S. Rept. 111-66 - 111th Congress (2009-2010)

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Senate Report 111-66 - DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, AND EDUCATION, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATION BILL, 2010

[Senate Report 111-66]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]


111th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 1st Session                                                     111-66
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     

                                                       Calendar No. 149

 
  DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, AND EDUCATION, AND 
               RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATION BILL, 2010

                               ----------                              

                              R E P O R T

                                 of the

                      COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS
                              U.S. SENATE

                                   on

                               H.R. 3293

                                     




                 August 4, 2009.--Ordered to be printed
  Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and 
         Related Agencies Appropriation Bill, 2010 (H.R. 3293)
                                                       Calendar No. 149
111th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 1st Session                                                     111-66

======================================================================




  DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, AND EDUCATION, AND 
               RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATION BILL, 2010
                                _______
                                

                 August 4, 2009.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

           Mr. Harkin, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                                 REPORT

                        [To accompany H.R. 3293]

    The Committee on Appropriations, to which was referred the 
bill (H.R. 3293) making appropriations for the Departments of 
Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education and related 
agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2010, and for 
other purposes, reports the same to the Senate with an 
amendment and recommends that the bill as amended do pass.

                       Amount of budget authority
Total of bill as reported to the Senate.............    $730,095,039,000
Amount of 2009 appropriations.......................  \1\804,561,222,000
Amount of 2010 budget estimate......................     728,547,509,000
Amount of 2010 House bill...........................     730,460,039,000
Bill as recommended to Senate compared to--
    2009 appropriations.............................     -74,466,183,000
    2010 budget estimate............................      +1,547,530,000
    2010 House bill.................................        -365,000,000

\1\Includes $133,045,703,000 in emergency appropriations provided in the
  American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and the Supplemental
  Appropriations Act, 2009.



                                CONTENTS

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page

Summary of Budget Estimates and Committee Recommendations........     4
Overview.........................................................     4
Highlights of the Bill...........................................     5
Initiatives......................................................     8
Title I: Department of Labor:
    Employment and Training Administration.......................    10
    Employee Benefits Security Administration....................    22
    Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation.........................    23
    Employment Standards Administration..........................    24
    Occupational Safety and Health Administration................    27
    Mine Safety and Health Administration........................    30
    Bureau of Labor Statistics...................................    32
    Office of Disability Employment Policy.......................    32
    Departmental Management......................................    33
    General Provisions...........................................    37
Title II: Department of Health and Human Services:
    Health Resources and Services Administration.................    38
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...................    64
    National Institutes of Health................................    87
    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration....   123
    Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality...................   132
    Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services...................   134
    Administration for Children and Families.....................   139
    Administration on Aging......................................   152
    Office of the Secretary......................................   156
    General Provisions...........................................   168
Title III: Department of Education:
    Education for the Disadvantaged..............................   170
    Impact Aid...................................................   176
    School Improvement Programs..................................   177
    Indian Education.............................................   182
    Innovation and Improvement...................................   183
    Safe Schools and Citizenship Education.......................   192
    English Language Acquisition.................................   195
    Special Education............................................   195
    Rehabilitation Services and Disability Research..............   198
    Special Institutions for Persons With Disabilities:
        American Printing House for the Blind....................   204
        National Technical Institute for the Deaf................   204
        Gallaudet University.....................................   205
    Career, Technical, and Adult Education.......................   205
    Student Financial Assistance.................................   208
    Student Aid Administration...................................   210
    Higher Education.............................................   210
    Howard University............................................   220
    College Housing and Academic Facilities Loans................   221
    Historically Black College and University Capital Financing 
      Program....................................................   221
    Institute of Education Sciences..............................   221
    Departmental Management:
        Program Administration...................................   224
        Office for Civil Rights..................................   224
        Office of the Inspector General..........................   225
    General Provisions...........................................   225
Title IV: Related Agencies:
    Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely 
      Dis- 
      abled......................................................   226
    Corporation for National and Community Service...............   226
    Corporation for Public Broadcasting..........................   230
    Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service...................   230
    Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission.............   231
    Institute of Museum and Library Services.....................   231
    Medicare Payment Advisory Commission.........................   232
    National Council on Disability...............................   232
    National Labor Relations Board...............................   233
    National Mediation Board.....................................   233
    Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.............   234
    Railroad Retirement Board....................................   234
    Social Security Administration...............................   235
Title V: General Provisions......................................   239
Compliance With Paragraph 7, Rule XVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Sen- 
  ate............................................................   240
Compliance With Paragraph 7(C), Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules 
  of the Senate..................................................   240
Compliance With Paragraph 12, Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   241
Budgetary Impact of Bill.........................................   245
Disclosure of Congressionally Directed Spending Items............   245
Comparative Statement of New Budget Authority....................   290

       SUMMARY OF BUDGET ESTIMATES AND COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    For fiscal year 2010, the Committee recommends total budget 
authority of $730,095,039,000 for the Departments of Labor, 
Health and Human Services [HHS], and Education, and Related 
Agencies. Of this amount, $163,100,000,000 is current year 
discretionary funding, including offsets.
    The bill provides program level funding (discretionary) of 
$13,253,000,000 for the Department of Labor, an increase of 
approximately $431,000,000 over the comparable 2009 level (not 
including funding in either the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act or the fiscal year 2009 supplemental bill). 
For the Department of Health and Human Services, the bill 
provides $72,520,000,000, an increase of approximately 
$729,000,000 over the comparable fiscal year 2009 level. And 
for the Department of Education, the bill provides 
$63,451,000,000, an increase of approximately $805,000,000 over 
the comparable fiscal year 2009 level. For Related Agencies, 
the bill provides $13,876,000,000, an increase of approximately 
$1,274,000,000.

                                OVERVIEW

    The Labor, HHS, and Education and related agencies bill 
constitutes the largest of the non-defense Federal 
appropriations bills being considered by Congress this year. It 
is the product of extensive deliberations, driven by the 
realization that no task before Congress is more important than 
safeguarding and improving the health and well-being of all 
Americans. This bill is made up of over 300 programs, spanning 
three Federal departments and numerous related agencies. But 
the bill is more than its component parts. Virtually every 
element of this bill reflects the traditional ideal of 
democracy: that every citizen deserves the right to a basic 
education and job skills training; protection from illness and 
want; and an equal opportunity to reach one's highest 
potential.
    This year, the Committee wrote the bill under unique 
circumstances created by the passage, in February, of the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act [ARRA] of 2009. That act 
appropriated a total of $125,143,703,000 for programs in this 
bill, including $98,238,000,000 in the Education Department and 
$10,380,703,000 for the National Institutes of Health. The vast 
majority of ARRA funding must be obligated by September 30, 
2010, and most will be obligated during fiscal year 2010, the 
same period covered by this Committee's appropriations bill.
    The unprecedented funding levels in ARRA created an unusual 
context for deliberations on this bill. Several programs that 
are historically among the highest priorities for this 
Committee--such as title I grants to local education agencies, 
Pell grants, special education, Head Start and the National 
Institutes of Health--also received large increases in ARRA. In 
some cases, the increases provided in ARRA were higher than had 
ever been awarded to these programs.
    With so much money flowing through these programs from ARRA 
in fiscal year 2010, the Committee adopted a general policy, 
which it considers a one-time adjustment, that it would not 
provide additional large increases to these programs in the 
regular fiscal year 2010 appropriations bill. Instead, the 
Committee emphasized several other programs that are also 
important but did not receive large increases in ARRA. Chief 
among them is school renovation, which the Committee has not 
funded on a national scale since fiscal year 2001. School 
renovation ended up with no dedicated funding in ARRA despite 
strong support in both the House and Senate versions of the act 
that would have provided at least $15,000,000,000 for this 
purpose. The Committee also provided higher-than-usual 
increases for programs designed to eliminate fraud, waste, and 
abuse.
    The Committee understands that fiscal year 2011 will be an 
even more difficult year, because several programs that were 
well-funded in ARRA will face the prospect of ``falling off a 
cliff.'' The Committee expects to restore a special emphasis on 
its traditional priority programs next year to help ease the 
transition to a post-ARRA budget.

                         HIGHLIGHTS OF THE BILL

    Job Training.--The Committee recommends $2,969,449,000 for 
State grants for job training, the same amount as the budget 
request. The Committee also recommends $1,711,089,000 for the 
Office of Job Corps, $9,700,000 more than the request. The bill 
also includes targeted investments in the Green Jobs Innovation 
Fund, which is funded at $40,000,000, the YouthBuild program, 
which is funded at $105,000,000, and a Transitional Jobs 
program funded at $40,000,000.
    Worker Protection, Safety and Rights.--The Committee bill 
provides $1,417,719,000 for key agencies that enforce rules 
protecting the health, safety, and rights of workers, including 
$561,620,000 for the Occupational Safety and Health 
Administration, $357,143,000 for the Mine Safety and Health 
Administration and $498,956,000 for the Employment Standards 
Administration. This total is $74,065,991 more than the fiscal 
year 2009 level, excluding $43,339,000 available in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.
    International Labor Affairs.--The Committee bill includes 
$93,919,000 for activities designed to end abusive child labor 
and forced labor, and monitor and more effectively support 
enforcement of labor issues in countries with which the United 
States has free trade agreements. This amount is $7,845,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 level.
    National Institutes of Health.--A total of $30,758,788,000 
is recommended to fund biomedical research at the 27 institutes 
and centers that comprise the NIH. This represents an increase 
of $441,764,000 over the level in the fiscal year 2009 health 
appropriations bill.
    Health Centers.--The recommendation includes $2,190,022,000 
for health centers, the same as the budget request.
    Nursing Education.--The Committee recommends $216,740,000 
for nursing education, $45,709,000 over the fiscal year 2009 
omnibus level and $3,509,000 over the level needed to sustain 
the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act investments. The 
Committee bill includes $5,209,000 for a new nurse education 
program focused on nursing home aides and home health aides.
    Autism.--The Committee bill includes $71,061,000 for 
prevention of and support for families affected by autism and 
other related developmental disorders. This is an increase of 
$7,661,000 over last year's appropriation.
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.--A total of 
$6,828,810,000 is provided in this bill for the Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention. This is an increase of 
$158,851,000 over the fiscal year 2009 level. This level does 
not include funding for the influenza pandemic, which is 
appropriated in the HHS Office of the Secretary.
    Cancer.--The Committee bill provides $380,234,000 for 
cancer prevention and control efforts at the Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention. This is an increase of 
approximately $40,000,000 over the fiscal year 2009 level.
    Nanotechnology.--The Committee bill includes $5,000,000 for 
the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health to 
begin research into the health effects of nanoparticles on the 
workers who manufacture and dispose of such material.
    Global Health.--The Committee bill includes $332,779,000 
for global health activities at the Centers for Disease Control 
and Prevention. This is an increase of $23,310,000 over the 
fiscal year 2009 level. Within the increase, funds are provided 
for an expanded vaccination campaign to prevent measles, a new 
chronic disease initiative and increased focus on developing 
the global health workforce.
    Substance Abuse and Mental Health.---The Committee bill 
provides $3,561,367,000 for substance abuse and mental health 
programs. Included in this amount is $2,269,897,000 for 
substance abuse treatment, $200,459,000 for substance abuse 
prevention and $988,269,000 for mental health programs.
    Pandemic Influenza.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$354,167,000 to prepare for and respond to an influenza 
pandemic. Funds are available for the development and purchase 
of vaccine, antivirals, necessary medical supplies, 
diagnostics, and other surveillance tools. The Committee 
provided $7,650,000,000 in the fiscal year 2009 Supplemental 
Appropriations Act to address the 2009 H1N1 influenza outbreak 
and to provide the funds necessary to vaccinate all Americans 
against that virus this fall if public health determines that 
such vaccinations are necessary.
    Head Start.--The Committee bill includes $7,234,783,000 for 
the Head Start Program. This represents an increase of 
$121,997,000 over the amount provided in the fiscal year 2009 
appropriation bill.
    Teen Pregnancy Prevention.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $104,455,000 for a new program to fund evidence-based 
efforts to reduce teen pregnancy.
    Title I (Education).--The Committee bill includes 
$13,792,401,000 for title I grants to local education agencies. 
This amount is $800,000,000 higher than the budget request.
    School Renovation.--The Committee bill includes 
$700,000,000 for a new program to improve the condition of 
school facilities.
    Literacy.--The Committee provides $262,920,000 for a 
revamped Striving Readers program, which will take a 
comprehensive approach to literacy, serve children from birth 
through grade 12, and subsume the mission of the Early Reading 
First program, which the Committee recommends eliminating. The 
combined fiscal year 2009 appropriation for Early Reading First 
and Striving Readers was $147,920,000.
    Teacher Incentive Fund [TIF].--The Committee recommends 
$300,000,000 for TIF. This amount is more than triple the 
$97,270,000 provided in the fiscal year 2009 education 
appropriations bill.
    Charter Schools.--The Committee provides $256,031,000, an 
increase of $40,000,000 over the fiscal year 2009 
appropriation, for the charter schools program.
    Student Financial Aid.--The Committee recommends 
$19,296,809,000 for student financial assistance. The maximum 
discretionary Pell Grant Program award level is maintained at 
$4,860. This funding, combined with mandatory funding provided 
in the College Cost Reduction and Access Act, would increase 
the maximum award to $5,550 for the 2010/2011 school year.
    Higher Education Initiatives.--The Committee bill provides 
$2,106,749,000 for initiatives to provide greater opportunities 
for higher education.
    Education for Individuals With Disabilities.--The Committee 
bill provides $12,587,856,000 to help ensure that all children 
have access to a free and appropriate education. This amount 
includes $11,505,211,000 for Part B grants to States, the same 
as the budget request.
    Rehabilitation Services.--The bill recommends 
$3,507,322,000 for rehabilitation services, $119,560,000 above 
the amount provided in the 2009 omnibus appropriations bill and 
$6,587,000 more than the budget request.
    Institute of Education Sciences.--The Committee bill 
includes $679,256,000 to support the Institute's activities 
related to education research, data collection and analysis, 
and assessment of student progress. This funding level is 
$62,081,000 more than the amount provided in the fiscal year 
2009 omnibus appropriations bill.
    Corporation for National and Community Service.--The 
Committee bill recommends $1,157,016,000 for the Corporation 
for National and Community Service. This level is $267,150,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 omnibus level and $66,150,000 above 
the level needed to sustain the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act investments. The recommendation is sufficient 
to increase the number of AmeriCorps members from 75,000 to 
over 83,000.
    Corporation for Public Broadcasting.--The Committee bill 
recommends an advance appropriation for fiscal year 2012 of 
$450,000,000 for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. In 
addition, the Committee bill includes $36,000,000 for 
conversion to digital broadcasting and $25,000,000 for the 
replacement project of the interconnection system in fiscal 
year 2010 funding. The Committee bill also includes $10,000,000 
for fiscal stabilization grants to public broadcasting stations 
hardest hit by the economic downturn.
    Social Security Administration.--The Committee bill 
includes $11,446,500,000 for the administrative expenses of the 
Social Security Administration. This funding level is 
$984,000,000 more than the comparable level in the fiscal year 
2009 omnibus appropriations bill.

                              INITIATIVES

Elimination of Fraud, Waste, and Abuse
    For fiscal year 2010, the Committee has increased funding 
for a variety of activities aimed at reducing fraud, waste, and 
abuse of taxpayer dollars. These program integrity initiatives 
have been shown to be a wise investment of Federal dollars 
resulting in billions of dollars of savings from Federal 
entitlement programs--unemployment insurance, Medicare and 
Medicaid, and Social Security.
    Unemployment Insurance Program Integrity.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $60,000,000, an increase of 
$10,000,000, to conduct eligibility reviews of claimants of 
Unemployment Insurance. This amount includes $50,000,000 in an 
adjustment to the discretionary spending cap. These funds will 
save an estimated $160,000,000 annually in inappropriate 
Unemployment Insurance payments.
    Social Security Program Integrity.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $758,000,000 for conducting continuing 
disability reviews [CDRs], redeterminations of eligibility, 
and, to the extent that it is as cost effective, asset 
verification pilot programs. This amount includes $485,000,000 
in an adjustment to the discretionary spending cap. CDRs save 
$10 in lifetime program savings for every $1 spent to conduct 
these activities, while redeterminations save $7 in program 
savings over 10 years for every $1 for doing this work.
    Health Care Program Integrity.--In fiscal year 2006, 
Medicare and Medicaid outlays accounted for nearly $1 out of 
every $5 of the total Federal outlays. Fraud committed against 
Federal health care programs puts Americans at increased risk 
and diverts critical resources from providing necessary health 
services to some of the Nation's most vulnerable populations.
    The Committee has included $311,000,000 for Health Care 
Fraud and Abuse Control [HCFAC] activities at the Center for 
Medicare and Medicaid Services. The Committee provided 
$198,000,000 in fiscal year 2009.
    Investment in healthcare program integrity more than pays 
for itself based on 10 years of documented recoveries to the 
Medicare Part A Trust Fund. The historical return on investment 
for the life of the Medicare Integrity program has been about 
13 to 1.

                  REPROGRAMMING AND TRANSFER AUTHORITY

    The Committee has included bill language delineating 
permissible transfer authority in general provisions for each 
of the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and 
Education, as well as specifying reprogramming authority in a 
general provision applying to all funds provided under this 
act, available for obligation from previous appropriations 
acts, or derived from fees collected.

                                TITLE I

                          DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

                 Employment and Training Administration

                    TRAINING AND EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................  $7,576,448,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   3,833,563,000
House allowance.........................................   3,802,961,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,798,536,000

\1\Includes $3,950,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommends $3,798,536,000 for this account, 
which provides funding primarily for activities under the 
Workforce Investment Act [WIA]. The fiscal year 2009 comparable 
amount is $7,576,448,000, including $3,950,000,000 available in 
the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, and the 
budget request provides $3,833,563,000 for this purpose.
    The training and employment services account is comprised 
of programs designed to enhance the employment and earnings of 
economically disadvantaged and dislocated workers, operated 
through a decentralized system of skill training and related 
services. Funds provided for fiscal year 2010 will support the 
program from July 1, 2010 through June 30, 2011. A portion of 
this account's funding, $1,772,000,000, is available on October 
1, 2010 for the 2010 program year.
    Pending reauthorization of the Workforce Investment Act, 
the Committee is acting on a current law basis. The Committee 
recommendation includes language in section 106 of the general 
provisions requiring that the Department take no action to 
amend, through regulatory or other administrative action, the 
definition established in 20 CFR 677.220 for functions and 
activities under title I of the Workforce Investment Act until 
such time as legislation reauthorizing the act is enacted. This 
language is continued from last year's bill.

Grants to States

    The Committee recommends $2,969,449,000 for Training and 
Employment Services Grants to States. The fiscal year 2009 
comparable amount is $5,919,449,000, including $2,950,000,000 
available in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009, and the budget request provides $2,969,449,000 for this 
purpose.
    The bill continues legislative language that allows a local 
workforce board to transfer up to 30 percent between the adult 
and dislocated worker assistance state grant programs, if such 
transfer is approved by the Governor. This language was 
proposed in the budget request. The bill also continues 
legislative language that allows a local workforce board to 
contract with eligible training providers to facilitate the 
training of multiple individuals in high-demand occupations, as 
long as it does not limit customer choice. This authority is 
continued from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and 
is intended to support local efforts to provide workers with 
the skills they need to find and sustain employment.
    Adult Employment and Training.--For Adult Employment and 
Training Activities, the Committee recommends $861,540,000. The 
fiscal year 2009 comparable amount is $1,361,540,000, including 
$500,000,000 available in the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act of 2009, and the budget request provides 
$861,540,000 for this purpose.
    This program is formula-funded to States and further 
distributed to local workforce investment boards. Three types 
of services for adults will be provided through the One-Stop 
system and most customers receiving a training service will use 
their individual training accounts to determine which programs 
and providers fit their needs. The act also authorizes core 
services, which will be available to all adults with no 
eligibility requirements, and intensive services, for 
unemployed individuals who are not able to find jobs through 
core services alone.
    Funds made available in this bill support program year 2010 
activities, which occur from July 1, 2010 through June 30, 
2011. The bill provides that $149,540,000 is available for 
obligation on July 1, 2010, and that $712,000,000 is available 
on October 1, 2010. Both categories of funding are available 
for obligation through June 30, 2011.
    Youth Training.--For Youth Training, the Committee 
recommends $924,069,000. The fiscal year 2009 comparable amount 
is $2,124,069,000, including $1,200,000,000 available in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, and the budget 
request provides $924,069,000 for this purpose.
    The purpose of Youth Training is to provide eligible youth 
with assistance in achieving academic and employment success 
through improving education and skill competencies and 
providing connections to employers. Other activities supported 
include mentoring, training, supportive services, and summer 
employment directly linked to academic and occupational 
learning, incentives for recognition and achievement, and 
activities related to leadership development, citizenship, and 
community service. Funds made available for youth training 
support program year 2010 activities, which occur from April 1, 
2010 through June 30, 2011.
    Dislocated Worker Assistance.--For Dislocated Worker 
Assistance, the Committee recommends $1,183,840,000, the same 
amount as the budget request. The fiscal year 2009 comparable 
amount is $2,433,840,000, including $1,250,000,000 available in 
the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. This 
program is a State-operated effort that provides core and 
intensive services, training, and support to help permanently 
separated workers return to productive, unsubsidized 
employment. In addition, States must use Statewide reserve 
funds for rapid response assistance to help workers affected by 
mass layoffs and plant closures. Also, States must use these 
funds to carry out additional statewide employment and training 
activities, such as providing technical assistance to certain 
low-performing local areas, evaluating State programs, and 
assisting with the operation of one-stop delivery systems, and 
may also use funds for implementing innovative incumbent and 
dislocated worker training programs.
    Funds made available in this bill support program year 2010 
activities, which occur from July 1, 2010 through June 30, 
2011. The bill provides that $321,731,000 is available for 
obligation on July 1, 2010, and that $862,109,000 is available 
on October 1, 2010. Both categories of funding are available 
for obligation through June 30, 2011.

Federally Administered Programs

    Dislocated Worker Assistance National Reserve.--The 
Committee recommends $229,160,000 for the Dislocated Worker 
National Reserve, which is available to the Secretary for 
activities such as responding to mass layoffs, plant and/or 
military base closings, and natural disasters across the 
country, which cannot be otherwise anticipated, as well as 
technical assistance and training and demonstration projects, 
including up to $30,000,000 for the Career Pathways Innovation 
Fund which is described later in this report.
    Funds made available in this bill support program year 2010 
activities, which occur from July 1, 2010 through June 30, 
2011. The bill provides that $31,269,000 is available for 
obligation on July 1, 2010, and that $197,891,000 is available 
on October 1, 2010. Both categories of funding are available 
for obligation through June 30, 2011.
    The Committee bill continues language authorizing the use 
of funds under the dislocated workers program for projects that 
provide assistance to new entrants in the workforce and 
incumbent workers, as well as to provide assistance where there 
have been dislocations across multiple sectors or local areas 
of a State.
    The Committee takes note of recent manufacturing job 
losses, and urges the Secretary of Labor to give favorable 
consideration to continued job training, workforce and economic 
development initiatives implemented and delivered by community 
colleges in partnership with the Department of Labor. The 
Committee recommends the Department give special attention to 
institutions located in counties with high unemployment that 
have lost a significant percentage of their job base, 
particularly in domestic automotive manufacturing, assembly 
facilities, and steel manufacturing.
    Career Pathways Innovation Fund.--Within the Committee 
recommendation for the Dislocated Worker Assistance National 
Reserve, up to $30,000,000 is available for the Career Pathways 
Innovation Fund. These resources, together with funding of 
$95,000,000 under National Activities, provide a program level 
of $125,000,000 for the Fund, which replaces a similar 
activity, the Community-Based Job Training Grants program 
[CBJT]. The CBJT was allocated $125,000,000 out of the National 
Reserve in last year's bill. Funds used for the Career Pathways 
Innovation Fund will be available for individual or consortia 
of community colleges that connect education and training 
programs with support services to enable individuals to secure 
employment within a specific industry or occupational sector, 
and to advance over time to successively higher levels of 
education and employment in that sector or industry.
    Native American Programs.--For Native American programs, 
the Committee recommends $52,758,000 the same as the comparable 
fiscal year 2009 level and the budget request. This program is 
designed to improve the economic well-being of Native Americans 
(Indians, Eskimos, Aleuts, and Native Hawaiians) through the 
provision of training, work experience, and other employment-
related services and opportunities that are intended to aid the 
participants in securing permanent, unsubsidized jobs.
    Migrant and Seasonal Farmworker Programs.--For Migrant and 
Seasonal Farmworkers, the Committee recommends $84,620,000. The 
comparable fiscal year 2009 level and budget request are 
$82,620,000 for this program. Authorized by the Workforce 
Investment Act, this program is designed to serve members of 
economically disadvantaged families whose principal livelihood 
is derived from migratory and other forms of seasonal farmwork, 
fishing, or logging activities. Enrollees and their families 
are provided with employment training and related services 
intended to prepare them for stable, year-round employment 
within and outside of the agriculture industry.
    The Committee recommendation provides that $78,310,000 be 
used for State service area grants. The Committee 
recommendation also includes bill language directing that 
$5,800,000 be used for migrant and seasonal farmworker housing 
grants, of which not less than 70 percent shall be for 
permanent housing. The principal purpose of these funds is to 
continue the network of local farmworker housing organizations 
working on permanent housing solutions for migrant and seasonal 
farmworkers. The Committee recommendation also includes 
$510,000 to be used for section 167 training, technical 
assistance and related activities, including funds for migrant 
rest center activities. Finally, the Committee wishes to advise 
the Department regarding the requirements of the Workforce 
Investment Act in selecting an eligible entity to receive a 
State service area grant under section 167. Such an entity must 
have already demonstrated a capacity to administer effectively 
a diversified program of workforce training and related 
assistance for eligible migrant and seasonal farmworkers.
    Women in Apprenticeship.--The Committee recommends 
$1,000,000 for program year 2010 activities as authorized under 
the Women in Apprenticeship and Non-Traditional Occupations Act 
of 1992, the same amount as the fiscal year 2009 level and the 
budget request. These funds provide for technical assistance to 
employers and unions to assist them in training, placing, and 
retraining women in nontraditional jobs and occupations.
    YouthBuild.--The Committee recommends $105,000,000 for the 
YouthBuild program. The fiscal year 2009 amount is 
$120,000,000, including $50,000,000 available in the American 
Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, and the budget request 
provides $114,476,000 for this purpose.
    The Committee recommendation is intended to build a stable 
and expanding system of community-based YouthBuild programs 
that attract large numbers of the most disadvantaged young 
people at risk of long term unemployment, and effectively 
connect them with basic, secondary, and post-secondary 
education; employment training and job placements; personal 
counseling; and significant community service experiences, all 
of which prepare the students for productive and contributing 
adulthood and provide a flow of candidates for high demand 
careers. The Committee encourages the Department to consider 
continued funding of well-performing local programs, while 
providing opportunities for program growth. The Committee is 
supportive of the rigorous evaluation of YouthBuild proposed in 
the budget as a means to build on the research base for this 
promising program and strengthen it for future YouthBuild 
participants.

National Activities

    Pilots, Demonstrations, and Research.--The Committee 
recommends $79,071,000 for pilots, demonstration and research 
authorized by section 171 of the Workforce Investment Act. The 
comparable fiscal year 2009 level is $48,781,000 and the budget 
request includes $57,500,000 for this purpose. These funds 
support grants or contracts to conduct research, pilots or 
demonstrations that foster promising practices for national 
policy application or launch pilot projects on a broader scale.
    Within the budget request, the Department proposes to use 
$50,000,000 to demonstrate and evaluate transitional job 
program models. The Committee bill provides that up to 
$40,000,000 of Pilots, Demonstrations, and Research funding may 
be used for Transitional Jobs projects. Transitional job models 
combine a comprehensive set of support services including pre-
job placement assessment, skills development, job readiness 
training, and case management for an individual in a subsidized 
transitional job which leads to placement and continued support 
in competitive employment. The Committee is aware that these 
models have shown great potential in studies that evaluated 
employment outcomes for individuals with multiple barriers to 
employment.
    The budget proposes bill language to authorize the transfer 
of some or all of the transitional jobs funds to the 
Departments of Health and Human Services or Justice. The 
Committee has provided the authority to use up to 10 percent of 
available funds for transfer to those Departments to assist 
with the effective implementation of transitional jobs 
projects, including support for leveraging resources under 
their control, and to enable the Department of Labor to 
evaluate such projects. Given that various Federal funding 
streams currently support transitional jobs programs around the 
United States, the Committee intends that the funds provided 
not simply replace existing resources for such programs, but 
leverage other resources to support program growth. The 
Committee requests advance notice of the solicitation for grant 
applications prior to its publication in the Federal Register.
    The Committee is greatly concerned about the low level of 
literacy and numeracy skills among adult workers, as one in 
seven adults do not have basic literacy skills to succeed in 
tomorrow's industries and jobs. The Committee encourages the 
Department to examine and publish successful strategies and 
best practices that can help the lowest literacy level adults 
improve their overall skills and employment opportunities.
    The Committee recommendation includes language providing 
funding for the following activities in the following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Project                              Funding
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Baltimore City Mayor's Office of Employment                     $575,000
 Development, Baltimore, MD, for YouthWorks...........
Beth Medrash Govoha, Lakewood, NJ, to expand the                 125,000
 career counseling and job training program...........
Blackhawk Technical College, Janesville, WI, to                1,000,000
 provide job training to the unemployed and incumbent
 workers..............................................
Brevard Workforce Development Board, Inc., Rockledge,            350,000
 FL, for retraining of aerospace industry work-  ers..
Capital Workforce Partners, Hartford, CT, for a career           200,000
 competency development program.......................
Capps Workforce Training Center, Stoneville, MS, for             500,000
 workforce training...................................
Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of            308,000
 Alaska, Juneau, AK, to expand vocational training
 including distance learning technologies.............
Chesapeake Bay Trust, Annapolis, MD for the clean                116,000
 water jobs training initiative.......................
City of Emeryville, CA, for the East Bay Green Jobs              200,000
 Initiative workforce development program.............
City of Los Angeles, CA, for the Los Angeles Youth               500,000
 Opportunity Movement workforce development program...
City of Oakland, CA, for the East Bay Green Jobs                 600,000
 Initiative workforce development program.............
College of Southern Idaho, Twin Falls, ID, for                   100,000
 renewable energy job training program................
Community Transportation Association of America,                 450,000
 Washington, DC, for the continuation of the Joblinks
 program..............................................
Covenant House New Jersey, Newark, NJ, for a job                 100,000
 training initiative..................................
Des Moines Area Community College, Ankeny, IA, for the           400,000
 Central Iowa Works Project Employment career
 opportunities education program......................
East Bay Regional Park District, Oakland, CA, for fire           600,000
 and conservation crews training programs.............
Finishing Trades Institute, Philadelphia, PA, for                100,000
 weatherization job training programs.................
Flathead Valley Community College, Kalispell, MT,                100,000
 Career Opportunities through Retraining and Education
Florida Manufacturing Extension Partnership,                     100,000
 Celebration, FL, for the Florida mobile outreach
 skills training program..............................
Fort Belknap Indian Community, Harlem, MT, Fort                  100,000
 Belknap 477 Employment and Training, Summer Youth
 Program..............................................
Fox Valley Technical College, Oshkosh, WI, to create             150,000
 an accelerated, 1 year welder training program.......
Friends of Children of Mississippi, Jackson, MS, for             200,000
 the TANF to Work and Ownership Project...............
Hartford Public Schools, Hartford, CT, for workforce             175,000
 readiness and job placement services through
 OPPortunity High School..............................
Haven for Hope of Bexar County, San Antonio, TX, for a           200,000
 homeless job training program........................
Hawkeye Community College, Waterloo, IA, for support             400,000
 of the Advance Manufacturing Training program,
 including equipment..................................
Hobbs Hispano Chamber of Commerce, Hobbs, NM, for                200,000
 workforce development................................
Impact Services Corporation, Philadelphia, PA, for a             100,000
 community job training and placement program.........
Instituto del Progresso Latino, Chicago, IL, for                 375,000
 employment and training programs in health care for
 limited English speaking individuals.................
Jobs for Maine's Graduates, Inc, Augusta, ME, for                200,000
 career development for at-risk youth.................
Jobs for Mississippi Graduates, Inc, Jackson, MS, for            200,000
 career development for at-risk youth.................
Liberty Resources, Inc, Philadelphia, PA, for job                100,000
 training programs for persons with disabilities......
Lincoln Land Community College, Springfield, IL, for             250,000
 workforce development programs.......................
Local Area 1 Workforce Investment Board, Caribou, ME,            500,000
 for workforce job opportunities......................
Maine Manufacturing Extension Partnership, Augusta,              500,000
 ME, for workforce job opportunities..................
Manchester Bidwell Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA, for              100,000
 job training programs at Bidwell Training Center.....
Massachusetts Manufacturing Extension Partnership,               250,000
 Worcester, MA, for expansion of a workforce skills
 training program.....................................
Maui Economic Development Board, Kihei, HI, Maui                 450,000
 Economic Development Board, Science, Technology,
 Engineering and Math training........................
Maui Economic Development Board, Kihei, HI, Rural                300,000
 Computer Utilization Training........................
Milton S Eisenhower Foundation, Washington, DC, for              400,000
 job training, job placement and GED acquisition
 programs in Iowa.....................................
Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College, Perkinston,            350,000
 MS, for workforce training...........................
Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS,             500,000
 for the Mississippi Integrated Workforce Performance
 System...............................................
Mississippi Technology Alliance, Ridgeland, MS, for              250,000
 workforce training...................................
Mississippi Valley State University, Itta Bena, MS,              500,000
 for training and development at the Automated
 Identification Technology/Automatic Data Collection
 Program..............................................
Montana State University, Billings, MT, for job                  100,000
 training.............................................
Northeast Iowa Ironworkers-Cedar Rapids Local 89,                250,000
 Cedar Rapids, IA, for workforce development..........
Opportunities Industrialization Center of Washington,            150,000
 Yakima, WA, to provide workforce and health and
 safety training to agricultural workers..............
Philadelphia Shipyard Development Corporation,                   100,000
 Philadelphia, PA, for job training programs..........
Project ARRIBA, El Paso, TX, for workforce development           100,000
 and economic opportunities in the West Texas region..
Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation,                   500,000
 Providence, RI, for support and delivery of job
 training services....................................
Sheppard Pratt Health System, Baltimore, MD, Work                725,000
 Force Initiative for the Mentally Ill................
Southern Utah University, Cedar City, UT, for a                  400,000
 renewable energy job training initiative.............
Spokane Area Workforce Development Council, Spokane,             250,000
 WA, to support comprehensive regional planning
 efforts to address the workforce challenges of the
 Spokane area.........................................
Team Taylor County, Campbellsville, KY, for job                  100,000
 training programs....................................
The Healing Place, Richmond, VA, for job training                150,000
 services.............................................
University of Hawaii--Maui, Kahului, HI, for the               2,300,000
 Remote Rural Hawaii Job Training Project.............
University of Hawaii--Maui, Kahului, HI, for Community         2,000,000
 College Training and Education Opportunities program.
Vermont Department of Public Safety, Waterbury, VT,              100,000
 for firefighting and emergency services training
 support..............................................
Vermont HITEC, Inc, Williston, VT, for the Vermont             2,000,000
 HITEC Job Training Initiative........................
Vermont Technical College, Randolph Center, VT, for              750,000
 the Vermont Green Jobs Workforce Development
 Initiative...........................................
Vocational Guidance Services, Cleveland, OH, for job             100,000
 training activities..................................
Washington State Board for Community and Technical               250,000
 Colleges, Federal Way, WA, for training, on-the-job
 support and career development services in the long-
 term care sector in Washington State.................
Washington State Labor Council AFL-CIO, Seattle, WA,             200,000
 to help support the creation of a pathway for young
 people to apprenticeship training programs in high
 demand industries across the State of Washington.....
Washington State Workforce Training and Education                850,000
 Coordinating Board, Olympia, WA, to support the
 development, expansion, delivery and testing of
 workplace-based education and training for low-income
 adult workers resulting in models for other States
 use..................................................
Waukesha Technical College, Pewaukee, WI, to provide             200,000
 job training to the unemployed and incumbent workers.
Workforce Opportunity Council, Concord, NH, for the              100,000
 Advanced Manufacturing Portable Classroom training
 program..............................................
Wrightco Educational Foundation, Ebensburg, PA, for              100,000
 security and communications technology job training
 programs.............................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Green Jobs Innovation Fund.--The Committee recommends 
$40,000,000 for the Green Jobs Innovation Fund, which is a new 
activity. The budget request includes $50,000,000 for the Fund. 
The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act included 
$500,000,000 for similar activities.
    Reintegration of Ex-offenders.--The Committee recommends 
$115,000,000 to continue funding for the Reintegration of Ex-
offenders program. The comparable fiscal year 2009 level is 
$108,493,000, while the budget request includes $115,000,000 
for this program. The Responsible Reintegration of Ex-offenders 
program targets critical funding to help prepare and assist ex-
offenders to return to their communities through pre-release 
services, mentoring, and case management. The program also 
provides support, opportunities, education and training to 
youth who are court-involved and on probation, in aftercare, on 
parole, or who would benefit from alternatives to incarceration 
or diversion from formal judicial proceedings. Programs are 
carried out directly through State and local governmental 
entities and community-based organizations, as well as 
indirectly through intermediary organizations.
    The Committee urges the Department to develop a competition 
that will award grants to organizations that will: (1) 
implement programs, practices, or strategies shown in well-
designed randomized controlled trials to have sizable, 
sustained effects on important workforce and reintegration 
outcomes; (2) adhere closely to the specific elements of the 
proven program, practice, or strategy; and (3) obtain sizable 
matching funds for their project from other Federal or non-
Federal sources, such as the Adult Training formula grant 
program authorized under the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, 
or State or local programs.
    Evaluation.--The Committee recommends $11,600,000, the same 
as the budget request, to provide for new and continuing 
rigorous evaluations of programs conducted under the Workforce 
Investment Act, as well as of federally funded employment-
related activities under other provisions of law. The 
comparable fiscal year 2009 level is $6,918,000 for this 
purpose.
    Career Pathways Innovation Fund.--The Committee recommends 
$125,000,000 for the Career Pathways Innovation Fund, which 
replaces the Community-Based Job Training Grants program. Of 
this amount, up to $30,000,000 is available from resources 
available in the Dislocated Worker Assistance National Reserve 
and $95,000,000 is a separate appropriation. A similar 
activity, the Community-Based Job Training Grants program, was 
allocated $125,000,000 out of the National Reserve in last 
year's bill. Funds used for the Career Pathways Innovation Fund 
should be provided to individual or consortia of community 
colleges that connect education and training programs and 
support services to enable individuals to secure employment 
within a specific industry or occupational sector, and to 
advance over time to successively higher levels of education 
and employment in that sector.
    Workforce Data Quality Initiative.--The Committee 
recommends $12,500,000 for the Workforce Data Quality 
Initiative, a new program proposed in this year's budget. The 
budget request includes $15,000,000 for this initiative. Funds 
will be used to assist States with incorporating comprehensive 
workforce information into longitudinal data systems being 
developed in part with the support of funding provided by the 
Department of Education. The initiative also will help improve 
the quality and accessibility of performance data being 
produced by training providers.
    The funds requested will be used for competitive grants to 
help workers access green training and green career pathways. 
Funds could be awarded for activities, including: enhanced pre-
apprenticeship and Registered Apprenticeship programs, and 
innovative partnerships that connect community-based 
organizations in underserved communities with the workforce 
investment system.
    Denali Commission.--The Committee recommends $3,378,000 for 
the Denali Commission to support job training in connection 
with the infrastructure building projects it funds in rural 
Alaska, the same as the comparable fiscal year 2009 level. The 
budget request does not include funding for the Denali 
Commission. Funding has enabled un- and under-employed rural 
Alaskans to train for better jobs in their villages.
    The Committee requests that the Denali Commission, within 
180 days of enactment of this act, shall transmit a report that 
details the employment outcomes of participants in the Denali 
job training program between fiscal years 2001-2007, including 
the changes in employment and earnings 1 year and 5 years after 
training. The Committee also requests that the Denali 
Commission submit a detailed list of projects undertaken in the 
past 3 fiscal years, the number of associated individuals 
trained, an accounting of any unexpended and unobligated 
balances for fiscal year 2009 and prior years, and a fiscal 
year 2010 work plan that details the spending plan for the 
training program funds.
    Job Training for Employment in High Growth Industries.--The 
Committee continues to have a strong interest in the 
initiatives funded from H-1B fees for job training services and 
related capacity-building activities. The Committee previously 
expressed concern that in recent years 90 percent of the funds 
made available under the High Growth Job Training Initiative 
have not been awarded on a competitive basis. The Committee 
recommendation continues language included in last year's bill 
which requires awards under the High Growth Job Training 
Initiative, Career Pathways Innovation Fund and Workforce 
Innovation in Regional Economic Development initiative to be 
made on a competitive basis.

            COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT FOR OLDER AMERICANS

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................    $691,925,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     575,425,000
House allowance.........................................     615,425,000
Committee recommendation................................     575,425,000

\1\Includes $120,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 funding (Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee recommends $575,425,000 for community service 
employment for older Americans, the same amount as requested in 
the budget. The comparable fiscal year 2009 level is 
$691,925,000, including $120,000,000 provided in the American 
Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.
    This program, authorized by title V of the Older Americans 
Act, provides part-time employment in community service 
activities for unemployed, low-income persons aged 55 and over. 
It is a forward-funded program, so the fiscal year 2010 
appropriation will support the program from July 1, 2010, 
through June 30, 2011.
    The program provides a direct, efficient, and quick means 
to assist economically disadvantaged older workers because it 
has a proven effective network in every State and in 
practically every county. Administrative costs for the program 
are low, and the vast majority of the money goes directly to 
low-income seniors as wages and fringe benefits.
    The program provides a wide range of vital community 
services that would not otherwise be available, particularly in 
low-income areas and in minority neighborhoods. Senior 
enrollees provide necessary and valuable services at Head Start 
centers, schools, hospitals, libraries, elderly nutrition 
sites, senior centers, and elsewhere in the community.
    A large proportion of senior enrollees use their work 
experience and training to obtain employment in the private 
sector. This not only increases our Nation's tax base, but it 
also enables more low-income seniors to participate in the 
program.
    Bill language is continued from last year to enable the 
Department to recapture and obligate unneeded program funds at 
the end of a program year for support of technical assistance, 
incentive grants or other purposes, as authorized by the Older 
Americans Act. The budget did not propose continuing this 
language.

              FEDERAL UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS AND ALLOWANCES

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $958,800,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   1,818,400,000
House allowance.........................................   1,818,400,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,818,400,000

    The Committee recommends $1,818,400,000 for Federal 
Unemployment Benefits and Allowances. The fiscal year 2009 
comparable amount is $958,800,000 and the budget request 
provides $1,818,400,000 for this purpose. Trade adjustment 
benefit payments are expected to increase from $238,000,000 in 
fiscal year 2009 to $1,067,000,000 in fiscal year 2010, while 
trade training expenditures in fiscal year 2010 are estimated 
to reach $686,400,000 for the expected certification of 213,000 
trade-affected workers.
    The Trade and Globalization Adjustment Assistance Act of 
2009 reauthorized the Trade Adjustment Assistance [TAA] 
programs. The reauthorization expanded TAA coverage to more 
workers and employers, including those in the service sector; 
and makes benefits available to workers whose jobs have been 
lost to any country, not just those countries involved in a 
trade agreement with the United States. The TAA program assists 
trade-impacted workers with services including: training, 
income support, employment and case management, and assistance 
with health insurance coverage. The program also includes a 
wage insurance option for certain workers at least 50 years 
old, available through Reemployment Trade Adjustment 
Assistance.

     STATE UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE AND EMPLOYMENT SERVICE OPERATIONS

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................  $4,094,865,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   4,101,556,000
House allowance.........................................   4,097,056,000
Committee recommendation................................   4,113,806,000

\1\Includes $400,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 funding (Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee recommends $4,113,806,000 for this account. 
The recommendation includes $4,027,403,000 authorized to be 
drawn from the Employment Security Administration account of 
the unemployment trust fund, including $50,000,000 in 
additional program integrity activities described later in this 
account, and $86,403,000 to be provided from the general fund 
of the Treasury.
    The funds in this account are used to provide 
administrative grants and assistance to State agencies which 
administer Federal and State unemployment compensation laws and 
operate the public employment service.
    The Committee bill continues language that allows States to 
pay the cost of penalty mail from funds allotted to them under 
the Wagner-Peyser Act; enables States to use funds appropriated 
under this account to assist other States if they are impacted 
by a major disaster declared by the President; at the request 
of one or more States, authorizes the Secretary to reallot 
funds for States to carry out activities that benefit the 
administration of unemployment compensation laws of a 
requesting State; and permits the Secretary to use funds to 
make payments on behalf of States for the use of the National 
Directory of New Hires.
    The Committee recommends a total of $3,256,955,000 for 
unemployment insurance activities.
    For unemployment insurance [UI] State operations, the 
Committee recommends $3,195,645,000. These funds are available 
for obligation by States through December 31, 2010. However, 
funds used for automation acquisitions are available for 
obligation by States through September 30, 2012.
    The recommendation includes $60,000,000 to conduct in-
person reemployment and eligibility assessments and 
unemployment insurance improper payment reviews, which includes 
$50,000,000 available for this purpose through a discretionary 
cap adjustment, as provided for in the fiscal year 2010 budget 
resolution and proposed in the budget request. The Committee 
notes the experience in several States that realized up to a 
$10 to $1 return on investment to State Trust Funds through 
expenditures for technology-based systems designed to prevent, 
detect, and collect overpayments. The Committee intends for the 
increase provided to be used for additional technology-based 
overpayment prevention, detection, and collection activities 
above the $9,000,000 to $10,000,000 supported in the 
Department's current Unemployment Insurance [UI] Supplemental 
Funding Opportunity for Automated Payment Integrity Related 
Systems. The increased funds may also be used to enhance in-
person re-employment and eligibility assessments.
    In addition, the Committee recommendation provides for a 
contingency reserve amount should the unemployment workload 
exceed an average weekly insured claims volume of 5,059,000, as 
proposed in the budget request. This contingency amount would 
fund the administrative costs of the unemployment insurance 
workload over the level of 5,059,000 insured unemployed persons 
per week at a rate of $28,600,000 per 100,000 insured 
unemployed persons, with a pro rata amount granted for amounts 
of less than 100,000 insured unemployed persons.
    For unemployment insurance national activities, the 
Committee recommends $11,310,000. These funds are directed to 
activities that benefit the State/Federal unemployment 
insurance program, including helping States adopt common 
technology-based solutions to improve efficiency and 
performance, supporting training and contracting for actuarial 
support for State trust fund management.
    For the Employment Service allotments to States, the 
Committee recommends $703,576,000, which includes $22,683,000 
in general funds together with an authorization to spend 
$680,893,000 from the Employment Security Administration 
account of the unemployment trust fund, which is the same as 
the budget request. The fiscal year 2009 comparable amount is 
$1,103,576,000, including $400,000,000 available in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. These funds are 
available for the program year of July 1, 2010 through June 30, 
2011.
    The Committee also recommends $21,119,000 for Employment 
Service national activities. The budget request and the 
comparable fiscal year 2009 amount both are $20,869,000. The 
administration of the work opportunity tax credit accounts for 
$18,520,000 of this amount, while the balance of funds is for 
technical assistance and training, and for the Federal share of 
State Workforce Agencies Retirement System payments. The 
Committee encourages the Department to focus a technical 
assistance program on services to individuals with disabilities 
available through State Employment Services and the One-Stop 
Career Center Network.
    For carrying out the Department's responsibilities related 
to foreign labor certification activities, the Committee 
recommends $68,436,000, the same amount proposed in the budget 
request. The fiscal year 2009 comparable amount is $67,950,000. 
In addition, $10,500,000 is estimated to be available from H-1B 
fees for processing H-1B alien labor certification 
applications.
    For One-Stop Career Centers and Labor Market Information, 
the Committee recommends $63,720,000. The budget request 
includes $51,720,000 for these activities, which is the same as 
the fiscal year 2009 amount. The Committee recommendation 
includes $12,000,000 for the Employment and Training 
Administration [ETA], in collaboration with the Office of 
Disability Employment Policy [ODEP], to develop and implement a 
plan for improving effective and meaningful participation of 
persons with disabilities in the workforce. The Committee 
expects that these funds, in combination with funding available 
to ODEP, will improve the accessibility and accountability of 
the public workforce development system for individuals with 
disabilities. The Committee further expects these funds to 
continue promising practices implemented by disability program 
navigators, including effective deployment of staff in selected 
States to: improve coordination and collaboration among 
employment and training and asset development programs carried 
out at a State and local level, including the Ticket to Work 
program and build effective community partnerships that 
leverage public and private resources to better serve 
individuals with disabilities and improve employment outcomes. 
The Committee requests that ETA and ODEP develop appropriate 
objectives and performance measures by which this initiative 
will be evaluated. The Committee requests that the joint plan 
described above be submitted to the Senate Committee on 
Appropriations no later than 30 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act.
    The Committee concurs in the budget request to eliminate 
funding for the Work Incentives Grants program. This program, 
which has helped persons with disabilities find and retain jobs 
through the One-Stop Career Center system mandated by the 
Workforce Investment Act, was funded at $17,295,000 in fiscal 
year 2009. The Committee has dedicated additional resources to 
existing programs within the Employment and Training 
Administration and the Office of Disability Employment Policy 
to help improve the labor force participation rates of and 
employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

        ADVANCES TO THE UNEMPLOYMENT TRUST FUND AND OTHER FUNDS

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $422,000,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     120,000,000
House allowance.........................................     120,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     120,000,000

    The Committee recommends $120,000,000 for this account, the 
same amount as the budget request. The fiscal year 2009 funding 
level is $422,000,000 for this purpose. The appropriation is 
available to provide advances to several accounts for purposes 
authorized under various Federal and State unemployment 
compensation laws and the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund, 
whenever balances in such accounts prove insufficient.
    The Committee bill includes language proposed in the budget 
request to allow the Department additional flexibility to 
access funds as needed for covered programs.

                         PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................    $141,213,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     147,906,000
House allowance.........................................     146,406,000
Committee recommendation................................     148,906,000

\1\Includes $10,750,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommends $98,766,000 in general funds for 
this account, as well as authority to expend $50,140,000 from 
the Employment Security Administration account of the 
unemployment trust fund, for a total of $148,906,000. The 
fiscal year 2009 comparable amount is $141,213,000, including 
$10,750,000 available in the American Recovery and Reinvestment 
Act of 2009, and the budget request provides $147,906,000 for 
this purpose.
    General funds in this account provide the Federal staff to 
administer employment and training programs under the Workforce 
Investment Act, the Older Americans Act, the Trade Act of 1974, 
the Women in Apprenticeship and Non-Traditional Occupations Act 
of 1992, and the National Apprenticeship Act. Trust funds 
provide for the Federal administration of employment security 
functions under title III of the Social Security Act.
    The Committee recommends funds above the budget request be 
used to ensure that the Employment and Training Administration 
[ETA] has sufficient capacity to improve the quality and 
accessibility of performance data reported by training 
providers, link workforce data systems and utilize performance 
information for better program outcomes. In addition, funds are 
available to strengthen ETA's leadership of and policy 
direction for improved labor market participation and 
employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities who are 
served within the public workforce development system.

               Employee Benefits Security Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................    $153,124,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     156,060,000
House allowance.........................................     154,060,000
Committee recommendation................................     155,662,000

\1\Includes $9,705,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 
funding (Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee recommends $155,662,000 for the Employee 
Benefits Security Administration [EBSA]. The comparable fiscal 
year 2009 amount is $153,124,000, which includes $9,705,000 in 
funds available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment 
Act of 2009 and the budget request includes $156,060,000.
    The EBSA is responsible for the enforcement of title I of 
the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 [ERISA] in 
both civil and criminal areas. EBSA is also responsible for 
enforcement of sections 8477 and 8478 of the Federal Employees' 
Retirement Security Act of 1986 [FERSA]. In accordance with the 
requirements of FERSA, the Secretary of Labor has promulgated 
regulations and prohibited transactions class exemptions under 
the fiduciary responsibility and fiduciary bonding provisions 
of the law governing the Thrift Savings Plan for Federal 
employees. In addition, the Secretary of Labor has, pursuant to 
the requirement of section 8477(g)(1) of FERSA, established a 
program to carry out audits to determine the level of 
compliance with the fiduciary responsibility provisions of 
FERSA that are applicable to Thrift Savings Plan fiduciaries. 
EBSA provides funding for the enforcement and compliance, 
policy, regulation, and public services, and program oversight 
activities.
    The Committee expects that additional funding provided will 
help EBSA better protect pension and health benefits for 
workers, retirees and their families. These funds will provide 
for increased enforcement capacity and continued investments in 
EBSA education and compliance assistance programs.

                  Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation

    The Corporation's estimated obligations for fiscal year 
2010 include single employer benefit payments of 
$5,823,000,000, multi-employer financial assistance of 
$101,000,000 and administrative expenses of $464,067,000. 
Administrative expenses are comprised of three activities: (1) 
Pension insurance activities, $86,412,000; (2) pension plan 
termination expenses, $234,005,000; and (3) operational 
support, $143,650,000. Such expenditures will be financed by 
permanent authority.
    The Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation is a wholly owned 
Government corporation established by the Employee Retirement 
Income Security Act of 1974. The law places it within the 
Department of Labor and makes the Secretary of Labor the chair 
of its board of directors. The corporation receives its income 
primarily from insurance premiums collected from covered 
pension plans, assets of terminated pension plans, collection 
of employer liabilities imposed by the act, and investment 
earnings. The primary purpose of the corporation is to 
guarantee the payment of pension plan benefits to participants 
if covered defined benefit plans fail or go out of existence.
    The President's budget proposes to continue from last 
year's bill a contingency fund for the PBGC that provides 
additional administrative resources when the number of 
participants in terminated plans exceeds 100,000. When the 
trigger is reached, an additional $9,200,000 becomes available 
for every 20,000 participants in terminated plans. A trigger 
also is included for additional investment management fees for 
plan terminations or asset growth. These additional funds are 
available for obligation through September 30, 2011. The 
Committee recommendation includes this language to ensure that 
the PBGC can take immediate, uninterrupted action to protect 
participants' pension benefits. The Committee expects to be 
notified immediately of the availability of any funds made 
available by this provision.
    The President's budget also continues language included in 
last year's bill that allows PBGC additional obligation 
authority for unforeseen and extraordinary pre-termination 
expenses, after approval by the Office of Management and Budget 
and notification of the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House of Representatives and Senate.
    The single-employer program protects about 33,800,000 
participants in approximately 28,000 defined benefit pension 
plans. The multi-employer insurance program protects about 10.1 
million participants in more than 1,500 plans.

                  Employment Standards Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................    $470,035,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     503,456,000
House allowance.........................................     486,756,000
Committee recommendation................................     498,956,000

\1\Includes $29,768,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 funding (Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee recommends $498,956,000 for this account. The 
comparable fiscal year 2009 amount is $470,035,000, which 
includes $29,768,000 in funds available through the American 
Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and the budget request 
includes $503,456,000. The bill contains authority to expend 
$2,124,000 from the special fund established by the Longshore 
and Harbor Workers' compensation Act; the remainder of 
$496,832,000 are general funds. In addition, an amount of 
$32,720,000 is available by transfer from the black lung 
disability trust fund. The Committee continues language that 
authorizes the employment standards agencies to assess and 
collect fees to defray the cost for processing applications for 
homeworker and special minimum wage certifications, and 
applications for registration under the Migrant and Seasonal 
Agricultural Worker Protection Act.
    Employment standards agencies are involved in the 
administration of numerous laws, including the Fair Labor 
Standards Act, the Immigration and Nationality Act, the Migrant 
and Seasonal Agricultural Workers' Protection Act, the Davis-
Bacon Act, the Family and Medical Leave Act, the Federal 
Employees' Compensation Act [FECA], the Longshore and Harbor 
Workers' Compensation Act, and the Federal Mine Safety and 
Health Act (black lung).
    This recommendation provides sufficient funding to offset 
the impact of inflation; ensure that Federal contractors comply 
with applicable nondescrimination and equal opportunity 
requirements; and to conduct inspections and investigations of 
industries with high concentrations of low-wage and other 
vulnerable workers, and industries with high levels of wage and 
hour violations, including overtime violations. The Committee 
is interested in the continued focus of the Wage and Hour 
Division on increased employer compliance with the special 
minimum wage program authorized under section 14(c) of the Fair 
Labor Standards Act.
    The Committee recommendation includes a rescission of 
$65,000,000 in unexpended balances from H-1B fee receipts. The 
budget proposes to rescind $30,000,000 of these balances.

                            SPECIAL BENEFITS

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $163,000,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     187,000,000
House allowance.........................................     187,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     187,000,000

    The Committee recommends $187,000,000 for this account, the 
same amount as the budget request. The comparable fiscal year 
2009 amount is $163,000,000. The appropriation primarily 
provides benefits under the Federal Employees' Compensation Act 
[FECA].
    The Committee recommends continuation of appropriation 
language to provide authority to require disclosure of Social 
Security account numbers by individuals filing claims under the 
Federal Employees' Compensation Act or the Longshore and Harbor 
Workers' Compensation Act and its extensions.
    The Committee recommends continuation of appropriation 
language that provides authority to use the FECA fund to 
reimburse a new employer for a portion of the salary of a newly 
re-employed injured Federal worker. The FECA funds will be used 
to reimburse new employers during the first 3 years of 
employment not to exceed 75 percent of salary in the worker's 
first year, declining thereafter.
    The Committee recommendation also continues language 
allowing carryover of unobligated balances from fiscal year 
2009 to be used in the following year.
    The Committee again includes appropriation language that 
retains the drawdown date of August 15. The drawdown authority 
enables the agency to meet any immediate shortage of funds 
without requesting supplemental appropriations. The August 15 
drawdown date allows flexibility for continuation of benefit 
payments without interruption.
    The Committee recommends continuation of appropriation 
language to provide authority to deposit into the special 
benefits account of the employees' compensation fund those 
funds that the Postal Service, the Tennessee Valley Authority, 
and other entities are required to pay to cover their fair 
share of the costs of administering the claims filed by their 
employees under FECA. The Committee concurs with bill language 
in the budget request to allow use of fair share collections to 
fund capital investment projects and specific initiatives to 
strengthen compensation fund control and oversight.

               SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR DISABLED COAL MINERS

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $188,130,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     169,180,000
House allowance.........................................     169,180,000
Committee recommendation................................     169,180,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $169,180,000 
in fiscal year 2010 for special benefits for disabled coal 
miners. This is in addition to the $56,000,000 appropriated 
last year as an advance for the first quarter of fiscal year 
2010. These funds are used to provide monthly benefits to coal 
miners disabled by black lung disease and to their widows and 
certain other dependents, as well as to pay related 
administrative costs.
    This account pays for the benefits and administrative costs 
of part B of the Black Lung Benefits Act. Part B benefits are 
based on black lung claims filed on or before December 31, 
1973. In fiscal year 2010, an estimated 27,250 beneficiaries 
will receive benefits.
    By law, increases in black lung benefit payments are tied 
directly to Federal pay increases. The year-to-year decrease in 
this account reflects a declining beneficiary population.
    The Committee recommends an advance appropriation of 
$45,000,000 for the first quarter of fiscal year 2011, the same 
as the budget request. These funds will ensure uninterrupted 
benefit payments to coal miners, their widows, and dependents.

    ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES, ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS 
                           COMPENSATION FUND

Appropriations, 2009....................................     $49,654,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................      51,197,000
House allowance.........................................      51,197,000
Committee recommendation................................      51,197,000

    The Committee recommends $51,197,000 for the Energy 
Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program [EEOICP], 
the same as the budget request. The comparable fiscal year 2009 
amount is $49,654,000.
    The objective of the EEOICP is to deliver benefits to 
eligible employees and former employees of the Department of 
Energy, its contractors and subcontractors or to certain 
survivors of such individuals, as provided in the Energy 
Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act. The 
mission also includes delivering benefits to certain 
beneficiaries of the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act.
    The Department of Labor's Office of Workers' Compensation 
Programs is responsible for adjudicating and administering 
claims filed by employees or former employees (or their 
survivors) under the act.
    In 2010, the volume of incoming claims under part B of the 
EEOICP is estimated at about 7,200 claims from Department of 
Energy [DOE] employees or survivors, and private companies 
under contract with DOE, who suffer from a radiation-related 
cancer, beryllium-related disease, or chronic silicosis as a 
result of their work in producing or testing nuclear weapons.
    Under part E, the Department is expected to receive 
approximately 7,500 new claims during fiscal year 2010. Under 
this authority, the Department provides benefits to eligible 
DOE contractor employees or their survivors who were found to 
have work-related occupational illnesses due to exposure to a 
toxic substance at a DOE facility.

                    BLACK LUNG DISABILITY TRUST FUND

Appropriations, 2009....................................  $2,822,683,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     300,099,000
House allowance.........................................     300,099,000
Committee recommendation................................     300,099,000

    The Committee recommends $300,099,000 for this account in 
2010, the same amount as the budget request. The comparable 
fiscal year 2009 amount is $2,822,683,000.
    The appropriation language continues to provide indefinite 
authority for the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund to provide 
for benefit payments. The recommendation assumes that 
$241,605,000 for benefit payments will be paid in fiscal year 
2010. In addition, the appropriation bill provides for 
transfers from the trust fund for administrative expenses for 
the following Department of Labor agencies: up to $32,720,000 
for the part C costs of the Division of Coal Mine Workers' 
Compensation, up to $25,091,000 for Departmental Management, 
Salaries and Expenses, and up to $327,000 for Departmental 
Management, Inspector General. The bill also allows a transfer 
of up to $356,000 for the Department of Treasury.
    The trust fund pays all black lung compensation/medical and 
survivor benefit expenses when no responsible mine operation 
can be assigned liability for such benefits, or when coal mine 
employment ceased prior to 1970, as well as all administrative 
costs which are incurred in administering the benefits program 
and operating the trust fund.
    It is estimated that 28,675 individuals will receive black 
lung benefits financed through the end of the fiscal year 2010.
    The basic financing for the trust fund comes from a coal 
excise tax for underground and surface-mined coal. Additional 
funds come from reimbursement from the Advances to the 
Unemployment Trust Fund and Other Funds as well as payments 
from mine operators for benefit payments made by the trust fund 
before the mine operator is found liable. The advances to the 
fund assure availability of necessary funds when liabilities 
may exceed other income. The Emergency Economic Stabilization 
Act of 2008 authorized the restructuring of the Black Lung 
Disability debt and extended the current tax structure until 
the end of 2018.

             Occupational Safety and Health Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................    $526,613,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     563,620,000
House allowance.........................................     554,620,000
Committee recommendation................................     561,620,000

\1\Includes $13,571,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommends $561,620,000 for this account. The 
comparable fiscal year 2009 amount is $526,613,000, which 
includes $13,571,000 available from the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act. The budget request includes $563,620,000 for 
authorized activities. This agency is responsible for enforcing 
the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 in the Nation's 
workplaces.
    In addition, the Committee has included language to allow 
OSHA to retain up to $200,000 per fiscal year of training 
institute course tuition fees to be utilized for occupational 
safety and health training and education grants in the private 
sector.
    The Committee retains language carried in last year's bill 
effectively exempting farms employing 10 or fewer people from 
the provisions of the act except those farms having a temporary 
labor camp. The Committee also retains language exempting small 
firms in industry classifications having a lost workday injury 
rate less than the national average from general schedule 
safety inspections. These provisions have been in the bill for 
many years.
    The Committee recommends $105,393,000 for grants to States 
under section 203(g) of the Occupational Safety and Health 
[OSH] Act. These funds are provided to States that have taken 
responsibility for administering their own occupational safety 
and health programs for the private sector and/or the public 
sector. State plans must be at least as effective as the 
Federal program and are monitored by OSHA. The Committee also 
has included language that allows OSHA to provide grants of up 
to 55 percent, instead of the current law 50 percent maximum, 
for the costs of State plans approved by the Occupational 
Safety and Health Administration [OSHA]. This flexibility is 
provided for OSHA if it determines that, due to fiscal and 
budgetary constraints, a State requires a higher Federal 
contribution for the State to meet its responsibilities under 
section 18 of the OSH Act.
    The Committee is concerned that OSHA's standard setting and 
enforcement capabilities have been diminished over the past 
several years, due in part to declining budgets. The number of 
employees covered by inspections has fallen from almost 2.1 
million in fiscal year 2000 to 1.4 million in fiscal year 2008, 
a decline of almost one-third. Meanwhile, the pace of 
occupational safety and health standards setting at OSHA has 
essentially drawn to a halt, despite planned timetables 
announced in its regulatory agendas. The Committee recommends 
funding above the 2009 level be used to begin rebuilding 
enforcement capacity and increase the pace of standard setting 
at OSHA in fiscal year 2010.
    In particular, the Committee is concerned about the 
inattention to comprehensive inspections of facilities at the 
greatest risk of catastrophic accidents. The Committee 
previously raised concerns about the U.S. Chemical Safety Board 
[CSB] report on its BP Texas City investigation that found over 
a 10-year period, Federal OSHA conducted planned, comprehensive 
process safety inspections of only 9 out of more than 2,800 
identified high-risk chemical facilities, and that OSHA has 
only a handful of technically qualified process safety 
inspectors with relevant industry expertise. The Committee is 
pleased to note that OSHA has finally implemented a National 
Emphasis Program on process safety management in petroleum 
industries, under which it will complete inspections of all 
refineries under its jurisdiction by the end of calendar year 
2009. Not later than 90 days after the enactment of this act, 
the Committee requests OSHA to report on major findings from 
inspections conducted to date, and current and planned actions 
for implementing the recommendations in the CSB's BP Texas City 
investigation.
    The Committee also notes the August 2008 explosion at the 
Bayer CropScience pesticide plant in Institute, West Virginia 
that fatally injured two employees and threatened a storage 
tank containing highly toxic methyl isocyanate, endangering the 
lives of area residents. A preliminary CSB investigation 
indicated the existence of longstanding process safety 
deficiencies at the plant. The Committee is aware that OSHA has 
a process management-based National Emphasis Program under 
development for chemical plants and urges OSHA to implement it 
as soon as possible. The Committee requests that OSHA report 
quarterly to the Senate Committee on Appropriations on the 
implementation of the program, including the number of planned 
comprehensive inspections, the number conducted, and the 
findings of those inspections.
    The Committee continues to be concerned that a significant 
proportion of work-related injuries and illnesses appear not to 
be captured on the OSHA Log of Work-related Injuries and 
Illnesses or in the annual Bureau of Labor Statistics [BLS] 
Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses. The Committee 
understands that several recent studies have found that the BLS 
survey may miss from 25 percent to 70 percent of all nonfatal 
injuries and illnesses, when compared to State workers' 
compensation information. While there is some explanation for 
why these data systems won't match completely, the Committee 
believes the apparent level of under-reporting raises serious 
questions, particularly when firms may have economic incentives 
to underreport and workers may fear retaliation for reporting 
injuries.
    Given that complete and accurate reporting of injuries and 
illnesses is part of the foundation of the OSHA program, the 
Committee continues to believe that OSHA needs to take steps to 
better understand the completeness of employer-provided data. 
Specifically, the Committee directs OSHA to continue oversight 
and enforcement of its recordkeeping standard to ensure 
complete and accurate recording and reporting by employers. 
Within the Committee recommendation, $1,000,000 is available to 
continue a recordkeeping enforcement initiative on injury and 
illness recording. This funding will support staff, training, 
and the continuation of a recordkeeping enforcement unit called 
for in the 2009 bill. The Committee intends for this effort to 
enable OSHA to review the completeness and accuracy of 
individual employers' injury and illness records and determine 
whether there are employer policies or practices in place that 
cause incomplete reporting of injuries and illnesses by 
employees. The Committee expects OSHA to keep it updated of its 
actions in this area.
    In addition to the general concern of underreporting of 
worker injury and illness data, the Committee is particularly 
interested in OSHA collecting better information on 
musculoskeletal disorders [MSDs], which constitute almost 30 
percent of all cases of lost workdays due to injury or illness. 
The Committee encourages OSHA to consider collecting 
information on MSDs in a separate column on its injury 
recordkeeping form. Only through the collection of complete and 
accurate data on the incidence of MSDs will OSHA be able to 
understand whether progress is being made on this important 
workplace safety and health issue.
    The Committee also believes that OSHA's worker safety and 
health training and education programs, including the grant 
program that supports such training, are a critical part of a 
comprehensive approach to worker protection. The Committee 
recommendation includes $11,000,000 for the OSHA Susan Harwood 
Training Grant Program to support worker safety and health 
training program, as proposed in the budget request. The 
Committee bill discontinues language included in last year's 
bill that directed $3,144,000 to the continuation of the 
existing Institutional Competency Building grants. However, the 
Committee believes that longer-term grants that build safety 
and health competency and train workers to recognize hazards 
and appropriate control measures, understand their rights and 
the requirements of OSHA regulations and standards should be 
the focus of OSHA's safety and health training program. The 
Committee expects OSHA to devote the majority of the 
$11,000,000 available for these types of training programs.

                 Mine Safety and Health Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $347,003,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     353,693,000
House allowance.........................................     353,193,000
Committee recommendation................................     357,143,000

    The Committee recommendation includes $357,143,000 for the 
Mine Safety and Health Administration [MSHA]. The comparable 
fiscal year 2009 amount is $347,003,000 and the budget request 
includes $353,693,000.
    The Committee bill continues language authorizing MSHA to 
use up to $2,000,000 for mine rescue and recovery activities. 
It also retains the provision allowing the Secretary of Labor 
to use any funds available to the Department to provide for the 
costs of mine rescue and survival operations in the event of a 
major disaster.
    This agency insures the safety and health of the Nation's 
miners by conducting inspections and special investigations of 
mine operations, promulgating mandatory safety and health 
standards, cooperating with the States in developing effective 
State programs, and improving training in conjunction with 
States and the mining industry.
    In addition, bill language is included to allow the 
National Mine Health and Safety Academy to collect not more 
than $750,000 for room, board, tuition, and the sale of 
training materials to be available for mine safety and health 
education and training activities. Bill language also allows 
MSHA to retain up to $1,000,000 from fees collected for the 
approval and certification of equipment, materials, and 
explosives for use in mines, and may utilize such sums for such 
activities.
    The Committee recommends $158,662,000 for coal enforcement. 
The budget request proposes $156,662,000, while the comparable 
fiscal year 2009 level is $154,491,000.
    The Committee continues to have concerns about the reported 
increases in respiratory illnesses in the coal miner 
population. The Committee has allocated an additional 
$2,000,000 over the budget request for MSHA to increase spot 
inspections in the active workings of coal mines for the 
purpose of obtaining compliance with section 202 of the Federal 
Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969. The Committee 
recommendation also includes sufficient funding within the 
standards and development activity for MSHA to update 
regulations regarding respirable dust under section 202 of such 
act. The Committee requests quarterly reports on enforcement of 
section 202 of such act, including findings from the spot 
inspection program.
    The Committee is aware that, like many Federal agencies, 
MSHA is not well-positioned to deal with its future workforce 
needs. A Government Accountability Office [GAO] implementation 
report issued in May 2007 identified continued concerns about 
MSHA's preparedness for dealing with its future workforce 
needs, which are expected to be significant given that more 
than 40 percent of underground coal mine inspectors are 
eligible to retire within the next 5 years. Many of these 
retirees are highly experienced, which adds to the impact of 
these losses. GAO has concluded that MSHA lacks a clear and 
well-thought-out plan to address the expected turnover in its 
experienced workforce. Therefore, the Committee directs MSHA to 
undertake a strategic planning process to identify goals and 
measures for monitoring and evaluating its progress on staying 
ahead of the retirement wave and meeting the needs of its 
enforcement workforce. The Committee requests a report, no 
later than December 31, 2009, that includes a 5-year succession 
plan and goals and measures related to MSHA's human capital 
needs.
    To help meet the demand for training of MSHA's workforce, 
the Committee recommendation includes $12,000,000 to operate 
the National Mine Safety and Health Academy and $2,000,000 to 
improve the infrastructure at the Academy. These funds are 
available under the educational policy and development [EPD] 
activity. Within funds available for the EPD activity, the 
Committee also encourages MSHA to consider a comprehensive 
review of safety and health training programs.
    The Committee also continues to express support of MSHA's 
Approval and Certification Center. While additional funding 
provided over the past 2 years has helped reduce the backlog of 
the Center's workload, the Committee believes more needs to be 
done to strengthen the ability of MSHA to review and certify 
equipment for use in mines. The Committee recommends 
$11,600,000 for operations, equipment and infrastructure 
improvement at the Approval and Certification Center to make 
more progress on reducing this backlog.
    The Committee recommendation also includes $1,450,000 for 
an award to the United Mine Workers of America to provide 
classroom and simulated rescue training for mine rescue teams 
at its Beckley, West Virginia and Washington, Pennsylvania 
career centers. The Committee notes that a GAO report issued in 
May 2007 found that 81 percent of mine operators considered the 
availability of special training facilities for mine rescue 
team training in simulated environments to be a challenge.
    The Committee understands the Office of Accountability was 
established to provide focus and oversight to ensure that MSHA 
policies, enforcement procedures, and guidance are being 
complied with consistently and that the agency is accomplishing 
its mission-critical activities. The Office conducts field 
audits, recommends and monitors corrective actions and analyzes 
mining data. The Committee requests that MSHA prepare and 
provide a report to the Committee, no later than March 31, 
2010, on staffing and budget resources expended or planned for 
fiscal years 2009 and 2010; findings and recommendations of 
audits conducted to date; and corrective actions implemented.

                       Bureau of Labor Statistics


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $597,182,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     611,623,000
House allowance.........................................     611,623,000
Committee recommendation................................     611,271,000

    The Committee recommends $611,271,000 for this account. The 
comparable fiscal year 2009 amount is $597,182,000 and the 
budget request includes $611,623,000 for this purpose. The 
recommendation includes $78,264,000 from the Employment 
Security Administration account of the unemployment trust fund, 
and $533,007,000 in Federal funds. Language pertaining to the 
Current Employment Survey is retained from prior year bills.
    The Bureau of Labor Statistics is the principal fact-
finding agency in the Federal Government in the broad field of 
labor economics.
    The Committee continue its concern about the significant 
discrepancies found in comparisons of BLS injury and illness 
survey data, which are based on employer-reported injury logs 
provided to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration 
[OSHA], and State worker compensation information. The research 
identified that the BLS data were only capturing as few as one-
third of injuries under certain State worker compensation 
systems. While there is some explanation for why data from 
State worker compensation systems won't match perfectly with 
the BLS survey data, the research conducted to date raises 
serious questions about the completeness of the national 
workplace injury surveillance system.
    Therefore, the Committee recommendation includes $1,300,000 
to continue BLS efforts to: strengthen the current BLS 
examination of the differences between workers' compensation 
information and BLS survey data; better understand employer 
injury and illnesses recording practices and conduct a pilot 
study of using multiple data sources to capture injury and 
illness data. The Committee expects to be kept apprised of BLS 
work in this area.
    The Committee recommendation also includes $1,500,000 to 
continue the Mass Layoff Statistics Program.

                 Office of Disability Employment Policy

Appropriations, 2009....................................     $26,679,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................      37,031,000
House allowance.........................................      37,031,000
Committee recommendation................................      39,031,000

    The Committee recommends $39,031,000 for this account in 
2010, the same amount as the budget request. The comparable 
fiscal year 2009 level is $26,679,000. The Committee intends 
that at least 80 percent of these funds shall be used to design 
and implement research and technical assistance grants and 
contracts to develop policy that reduces barriers to employment 
for youth and adults with disabilities.
    Congress created the Office of Disability Employment Policy 
[ODEP] in the Department of Labor's fiscal year 2001 
appropriation. The mission of the ODEP is to provide 
leadership, develop policy and initiatives, and award grants 
furthering the objective of eliminating physical and 
programmatic barriers to the training and employment of people 
with disabilities. The Committee strongly supports each of the 
components of ODEP's mission and, in particular, urges the 
Secretary to ensure that ODEP is properly supported in carrying 
out its leadership role with respect to Government-wide 
policies related to the training and employment of individuals 
with disabilities.
    The Committee recommendation includes $12,000,000 for the 
ODEP, in collaboration with the Employment and Training 
Administration [ETA], to develop and implement a plan for 
improving effective and meaningful participation of persons 
with disabilities in the workforce. The Committee expects that 
these funds, in combination with funding available to ETA, will 
improve the accessibility and accountability of the public 
workforce development system for individuals with disabilities. 
The Committee further expects these funds to continue promising 
practices implemented by disability program navigators, 
including effective deployment of staff in selected States to: 
improve coordination and collaboration among employment and 
training and asset development programs carried out at a State 
and local level, including the Ticket to Work program and build 
effective community partnerships that leverage public and 
private resources to better serve individuals with disabilities 
and improve employment outcomes. The Committee expects that ETA 
and ODEP will develop appropriate objectives and performance 
measures by which this initiative will be evaluated. The 
Committee requests that the joint plan described above be 
submitted to the Senate Committee on Appropriations no later 
than 30 days after the date of enactment of this act.

                        Departmental Management


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................    $330,404,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     355,154,000
House allowance.........................................     350,154,000
Committee recommendation................................     357,154,000

\1\Includes $16,206,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 funding (Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee recommendation includes $357,154,000 for this 
account. The comparable fiscal year 2009 amount is 
$330,404,000, which includes $16,206,000 available from the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, and the budget request 
includes $355,154,000 for this purpose. In addition, an amount 
of $327,000 is available by transfer from the black lung 
disability trust fund.
    The primary goal of the Department of Labor is to protect 
and to promote the interests of American workers. The 
departmental management appropriation finances staff 
responsible for formulating and overseeing the implementation 
of departmental policy and management activities in support of 
that goal. In addition, this appropriation includes a variety 
of operating programs and activities that are not involved in 
departmental management functions, but for which other salaries 
and expenses appropriations are not suitable. In fiscal year 
2010, employment standards agencies are expected to be 
reorganized and integrated with this account as part of a 
proposed reorganization.
    The Committee recommendation includes $93,919,000 for the 
Bureau of International Labor Affairs. Of this amount, the 
Committee directs $40,000,000 be used for the United States 
contribution to expand on the successful efforts of the ILO's 
International Program for the Elimination of Child Labor 
[IPEC].
    The Committee strongly supports the mandate of the Office 
of Child Labor, Forced Labor, and Human Trafficking [OCFT] 
which is part of the Department of Labor's ILAB. For the past 
decade, the OCFT has responded to requests from Congress to 
investigate and report on abusive child labor around the world. 
The OCFT played a key role in the drafting of ILO's Convention 
182, which became the world's definition of the worst forms of 
child labor and their expertise in combating international 
child labor, forced labor and human trafficking issues are 
vital to formulating U.S. Government policy.
    This Committee and Congress have provided OCFT with 
significant funding to implement activities, such as research 
and technical assistance related to international child labor, 
forced labor, and human trafficking. The Committee has provided 
funding to OCFT to implement and oversee over 130 cooperative 
agreements and contracts to organizations engaged in efforts to 
eliminate exploitive child labor in more than 70 countries 
around world. In 2005, the Trafficking Victim Protection 
Reauthorization Act mandated OCFT to monitor the use of forced 
labor and child labor in violation of international standards. 
Additionally, OCFT prepares an annual report to Congress on GSP 
countries' implementation of international commitments to 
eliminate the worst forms of child labor, as well as those 
countries that have negotiated free trade agreements with the 
United States.
    Also included is $20,000,000 to help ensure access to basic 
education for the growing number of children removed from the 
worst forms of child labor in impoverished nations where 
abusive and exploitative child labor is most acute. Funds may 
be used to support microcredit programs and other livelihood 
activities that contribute to a more comprehensive approach to 
addressing the root causes of labor exploitation, including 
child and forced labor. The Committee expects the Department of 
Labor to work with the governments of host countries to 
eliminate school fees that create a barrier to education.
    The Committee believes that the oversight committee created 
in 2006 to report publicly on the progress of the 
implementation of the Harkin-Engel protocol, a public private 
partnership to eliminate the worst forms of child labor and 
adult forced labor in the cocoa sector of West Africa, has been 
beneficial to all stakeholders. The Committee intends for ILAB 
to continue to support the implementation of the Harkin-Engel 
Protocol by providing assistance to countries in the collection 
of data regarding the worst forms of child labor in the cocoa 
sector.
    The Committee recommends continuation of the worker rights 
technical assistance projects initiated in last year's bill. 
These projects will support the implementation of model 
programs designed to address worker rights in countries with 
which the United States has trade preference programs.
    The Committee notes that ILAB is statutorily required to 
compile and report to the Congress annually on the extent to 
which each foreign country that has trade and investment 
agreements with the United States enforces internationally 
recognized worker rights. This report is required under 
multiple U.S. laws and promotes core labor standards as 
embodied in the ILO Declaration on Fundamental Principles and 
Rights at Work as adopted and reaffirmed in 1998. The Committee 
once again directs the Secretary to include in the 2009 report 
all former GSP recipients that have achieved a Free Trade 
Agreement with the United States over the preceding year.
    The Committee recommends $117,121,000 for the Office of the 
Solicitor. The Committee intends for the additional funds to 
provide adequate enforcement support to the Mine Safety and 
Health Administration.

                          OFFICE OF JOB CORPS

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................  $1,933,938,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   1,701,389,000
House allowance.........................................   1,705,320,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,711,089,000

\1\Includes $250,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    For Job Corps, the Committee recommends $1,711,089,000. The 
comparable fiscal year 2009 amount is $1,933,938,000, which 
includes $250,000,000 available in the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act. The budget request includes $1,701,389,000 
for Job Corps.
    The recommendation for operations of Job Corps centers is 
$1,571,899,000, comprised of $980,899,000 in fiscal year 2010 
funds and $591,000,000 in advance appropriations from last 
year's bill. For operations, the Committee also recommends 
advance funding of $591,000,000, which will become available on 
October 1, 2010.
    The Committee also recommends $10,000,000 in construction, 
renovation and acquisition funds, which are available from July 
1, 2010 to June 30, 2013. In addition, $100,000,000 in 
construction, rehabilitation and acquisition funds are provided 
in advance funding, which will make these funds available on 
October 1, 2010 through June 30, 2013.
    The budget request proposes to transfer the Office of Job 
Corps into the Employment and Training Administration prior to 
the start of the program year 2010. The Committee supports this 
action and has included bill language in section 108 of the 
general provisions that will enable the Department to take this 
action no earlier than 15 days after the date of submission to 
the Senate Committee on Appropriations a detailed plan on how 
this transfer will enhance program administration and 
oversight, including improved procurement and contracting.
    The Committee understands that there is an ongoing need for 
Job Corps to serve more youth, upgrade training and education, 
promote community revitalization, and improve overall job 
placements for at-risk young adults. The Committee encourages 
Job Corps to improve post-secondary education and credentialing 
certifications; expand rebuilding efforts in depressed 
neighborhoods; increase the capacity of participants to earn 
state high school diplomas; assist in training in green 
renovation; and increase local support and participation of 
business and industry. Further, the Committee would encourage 
Job Corps to explore forming partnerships with existing 
organizations with similar goals that can assist in such 
efforts.
    The Committee has previously requested the Department to be 
prepared to consider how to structure and announce a 
competition for additional Job Corps center sites, particularly 
focusing on unmet needs in rapidly growing metropolitan areas 
currently without a Job Corps center. Within the Committee 
recommendation, sufficient funds are available to initiate a 
competition for a new Job Corps Center site during fiscal year 
2010.

                    VETERANS EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $239,439,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     255,127,000
House allowance.........................................     257,127,000
Committee recommendation................................     255,127,000

    The Committee recommends $255,127,000 for this account, 
including $44,971,000 in general revenue funding and 
$210,156,000 to be expended from the Employment Security 
Administration account of the unemployment trust fund.
    For State grants, the bill provides $172,394,000, which 
includes funding for the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program and 
the Local Veterans Employment Representative Program.
    For Federal administration, the Committee recommends 
$35,313,000. The Committee supports the Transition Assistance 
Program administered jointly with the Department of Defense, 
which assists soon-to-be-discharged service members in 
transitioning into the civilian workforce, and includes funding 
to maintain this effective program.
    The Committee recommends $2,449,000 for the National 
Veterans Training Institute. This Institute provides training 
to the Federal and State staff involved in the direct delivery 
of employment and training related services to veterans.
    The Committee recommends $35,330,000 for the Homeless 
Veterans Program. The Committee also recommends $9,641,000 for 
the Veterans Workforce Investment Program, the same as the 
budget request.

                    OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................     $88,141,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................      84,014,000
House allowance.........................................      84,014,000
Committee recommendation................................      84,014,000

\1\Includes $6,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 
funding (Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee recommends $84,014,000 for this account, the 
same amount as the budget request. The bill includes 
$78,093,000 in general funds and authority to transfer 
$5,921,000 from the Employment Security Administration account 
of the unemployment trust fund. In addition, an amount of 
$327,000 is available by transfer from the black lung 
disability trust fund. The comparable fiscal year 2009 amount 
is $88,141,000, which includes $6,000,000 available in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. This level provides 
sufficient resources to cover built-in cost increases, as well 
as augment program accountability activities and expand the 
labor racketeering program.
    The Office of the Inspector General [OIG] was created by 
law to protect the integrity of departmental programs as well 
as the welfare of beneficiaries served by those programs. 
Through a comprehensive program of audits, investigations, 
inspections, and program evaluations, the OIG attempts to 
reduce the incidence of fraud, waste, abuse, and mismanagement, 
and to promote economy, efficiency, and effectiveness.

                           General Provisions

    General provision bill language is included to:
    Limit the use of Job Corps funding for compensation of an 
individual that is not a Federal employee at a rate not to 
exceed Executive Level I (sec. 101).
    Provide for general transfer authority (sec. 102).
    Prohibit funding for the procurement of goods and services 
utilizing forced or indentured child labor in industries and 
host countries already identified by the Labor Department in 
accordance with Executive Order 13126 (sec. 103).
    Require that funds available under section 414(c) of the 
American Competitiveness and Workforce Improvement Act of 1998 
may only be used for training in occupations and industries for 
which employers are using H-1B visas to hire foreign workers 
(sec. 104).
    Require the Secretary to award competitively funds 
available for WIRED Grants, Career Pathways Innovation Fund, 
and grants for job training for employment in high growth 
industries (sec. 105).
    Prohibit the Secretary from taking any action to alter the 
procedure for redesignating local areas under subtitle B of 
title I of the Workforce Investment Act (sec. 106).
    Limit compensation from Federal funds to a rate not greater 
than Executive Level II for any recipient or subrecipient of 
funds under the heading, ``Employment and Training 
Administration'' (sec. 107).
    Allows the Secretary of Labor to transfer the 
administration and appropriated funds of the Job Corps program 
from the Office of the Secretary to the Employment and Training 
Administration 15 days after the submission of a plan for such 
transfer to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives and the Senate (sec. 108).

                                TITLE II

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

              Health Resources and Services Administration

                     HEALTH RESOURCES AND SERVICES

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................  $9,759,436,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   7,151,700,000
House allowance.........................................   7,331,817,000
Committee recommendation................................   7,263,799,000

\1\Includes $2,500,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 funding (Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee provides a program level of $7,263,799,000 
for the Health Resources and Services Administration [HRSA]. 
The Committee recommendation includes $7,238,799,000 in budget 
authority and an additional $25,000,000 via transfers available 
under section 241 of the Public Health Service Act. The fiscal 
year 2009 comparable program level was $9,759,436,000, 
including $2,500,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment 
Act funding. The budget request for fiscal year 2010 was 
$7,151,700,000.
    HRSA activities support programs to provide healthcare 
services for mothers and infants; the underserved, elderly, 
homeless; migrant farm workers; and disadvantaged minorities. 
This appropriation supports cooperative programs in community 
health, AIDS care, healthcare provider training, and healthcare 
delivery systems and facilities.

                     BUREAU OF PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

                        COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTERS

    The Committee provides $2,190,022,000 for the community 
health centers program. The fiscal year 2009 comparable program 
level was $4,190,022,000, including $2,000,000,000 in American 
Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The budget request for 
fiscal year 2009 was $2,190,022,000. This group of programs 
includes community health centers, migrant health centers, 
healthcare for the homeless, and public housing health service 
grants. The Committee continues to support strongly the ongoing 
effort to increase the number of people who have access to 
medical services at health centers.
    Within the amount provided, the Committee has provided 
$44,055,000 under the Federal Tort Claims Act [FTCA] for the 
Health Centers program. The Committee has included bill 
language making this funding available until expended and 
allowing costs associated with the health centers tort 
liability relief program to be paid from the fund. The 
Committee intends that the fund be used to pay judgments and 
settlements, occasional witness fees and expenses, and the 
administrative costs of the program, which include the cost of 
evaluating claims, defending claims, and conducting settlement 
activities.
    Child Maltreatment.--Parent training is a promising 
strategy for preventing child maltreatment that should be 
tested in primary care and other settings. The Committee 
encourages HRSA to collaborate with the Administration for 
Children and Families to ensure that community health centers 
are eligible grantees for any parent training grants or 
initiatives.
    FTCA Coverage Guidance.--The Committee is pleased that HRSA 
is drafting a policy manual for providers on the FTCA program. 
The Committee encourages HRSA to survey centers to determine 
the extent to which centers are purchasing private malpractice 
insurance to fill a perceived gap for contract employees and 
nonhealth center patients in nonhealth center settings where 
reciprocal coverage between the health center and other 
providers is customary. To the extent that this coverage is 
unnecessary, the Committee expects HRSA to work with health 
centers to understand the FTCA coverage and adjust their 
supplemental coverage accordingly.
    Mental Health.--Among the most prevalent health problems at 
federally qualified health centers are mental disorders and 
chronic illnesses. The Committee encourages HRSA to ensure that 
health centers are aware that psychologists are eligible to 
participate in the National Health Service Corps, which places 
health professionals in underserved areas including health 
centers.
    Scope of Project Changes.--The Committee expects that the 
Secretary will continue to approve community health centers' 
proposed scope of project changes when necessary to ensure 
access to needed specialty services or to meet the 
comprehensive needs of special populations who may require care 
in other types of healthcare settings.
    Specialty Care Services.--The Committee applauds HRSA for 
issuing a policy recognizing the importance of specialty care 
services in addressing the often complex and diverse needs of 
medically underserved populations and ensuring patient access 
to a comprehensive continuum of care based on the special or 
unique needs of the patient population.
    Technical Assistance.--The Committee strongly supports 
investments in health information technology at community 
health centers, including the rapid adoption of electronic 
health record. The Committee urges HRSA to coordinate with the 
Office of National Coordinator for Health IT to ensure that 
community health centers are fully integrated into community 
systems of care. The Committee feels strongly that technical 
assistance will be crucial to centers making this investment 
and encourages HRSA to provide additional technical assistance 
as new IT systems are implemented with Recovery Act 
investments.
    Workforce Recruitment.--The Committee recognizes that the 
National Health Service Corps is an essential tool for 
recruitment and retention of primary care health professionals 
at Community, Migrant, Homeless, and Public Housing Health 
Centers, especially given the recent expansion of the Health 
Centers program. Given the dramatically increased investment 
made in the National Health Service Corps in the Recovery Act, 
the Committee urges HRSA to work with health centers to qualify 
for additional NHSC slots to take maximum advantage of the 
opportunity.

Native Hawaiian Health Care

    The Committee again includes the legal citation in the bill 
for the Native Hawaiian Health Care Program. The Committee has 
included sufficient funding so that healthcare activities 
funded under the Native Hawaiian Health Care Program can be 
supported under the broader community health centers line. The 
Committee expects that not less than last year's level be 
provided for these activities in fiscal year 2010.

Free Clinics Medical Malpractice Coverage

    The Committee provides $40,000 in funding for payments of 
claims under the Federal Tort Claims Act to be made available 
for free clinic health professionals as authorized by U.S.C. 
title 42, section 233(o) of the Public Health Service Act. The 
fiscal year 2009 comparable level was $40,000 and the fiscal 
year 2010 budget request included $40,000 for this program. 
This appropriation continues to extend Federal Tort Claims Act 
coverage to medical volunteers in free clinics in order to 
expand access to healthcare services to low-income individuals 
in medically underserved areas.

National Hansen's Disease Program

    The Committee has included $16,109,000 for the National 
Hansen's Disease Program. The fiscal year 2009 comparable level 
was $16,109,000 and the budget request for fiscal year 2010 was 
$16,109,000. The program consists of inpatient, outpatient, 
long-term care, training, and research in Baton Rouge, 
Louisiana; a residential facility at Carville, Louisiana; and 
11 outpatient clinic sites in the continental United States and 
Puerto Rico.

National Hansen's Disease Program Buildings and Facilities

    The Committee provides $129,000 for buildings and 
facilities. The fiscal year 2009 comparable level was $129,000 
and the budget request for fiscal year 2010 was $129,000 for 
this program. This funding provides for the repair and 
maintenance of buildings at the Gillis W. Long Hansen's Disease 
Center.

Payment to Hawaii for Hansen's Disease Treatment

    The Committee provides $1,976,000 for Hansen's Disease 
services. The fiscal year 2009 comparable level was $1,976,000 
and the budget request for fiscal year 2010 was $1,976,000. 
Payments are made to the State of Hawaii for the medical care 
and treatment of persons with Hansen's Disease in hospital and 
clinic facilities at Kalaupapa, Molokai, and Honolulu. Expenses 
above the level of appropriated funds are borne by the State of 
Hawaii.

                      BUREAU OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS

National Health Service Corps: Field Placements

    The Committee provides $42,000,000 for field placement 
activities. The fiscal year 2009 comparable level was 
$99,736,000, including $60,000,000 in American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act funding. The budget request for fiscal year 
2010 was $46,412,000.
    The funds provided for this program are used to support the 
activities of the National Health Service Corps in the field, 
including travel and transportation costs of assignees, 
training and education, recruitment of volunteers, and 
retention activities. Salary costs of most new assignees are 
paid by the employing entity.

National Health Service Corps: Recruitment

    The Committee provides $100,000,000 for recruitment 
activities. The fiscal year 2009 comparable level was 
$335,230,000, including $240,000,000 in American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act funding. The budget request for fiscal year 
2010 was $122,588,000.
    This program provides major benefits to students (full-cost 
scholarships or sizable loan repayment) in exchange for an 
agreement to serve as a primary care provider in a high-
priority federally designated health professional shortage 
area. These funds should support multi-year, rather than 
single-year, commitments.

                           HEALTH PROFESSIONS

    The Committee provides $460,098,000 for HRSA health 
professions programs. The fiscal year 2009 comparable level was 
$591,226,000, including $198,500,000 in American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act funding. The budget request for fiscal year 
2010 was $528,098,000.

Training for Diversity

            Centers of Excellence
    The Committee provides $24,602,000 for the Centers of 
Excellence program, the same as the budget request for fiscal 
year 2010. The fiscal year 2009 comparable level was 
$24,602,000, including $4,000,000 in American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act funding.
    This program was established to fund institutions that 
train a significant portion of the Nation's minority health 
professionals. Funds are used for the recruitment and retention 
of students, faculty training, and the development of plans to 
achieve institutional improvements. The institutions that are 
designated as centers of excellence are private institutions 
whose mission is to train disadvantaged minority students for 
service in underserved areas. Located in poor communities and 
usually with little State funding, they serve the healthcare 
needs of their patients, often without payment.
            Health Careers Opportunity Program
    The Committee provides $22,133,000 for the Health Careers 
Opportunity Program, the same as the budget request. The fiscal 
year 2009 comparable level was $22,133,000, including 
$3,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding.
    This program provides funds to medical and other health 
professions schools for recruitment of disadvantaged students 
and pre-professional school preparations.
            Faculty Loan Repayment
    The Committee provides $1,266,000 for the Faculty Loan 
Repayment program, the same as the budget request. The fiscal 
year 2009 comparable level was $2,466,000, including $1,200,000 
in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding.
    This program provides for the repayment of education loans 
for individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds who are health 
professions students or graduates, and who have agreed to serve 
for not less than 2 years as a faculty member of a health 
professions school.
            Scholarships for Disadvantaged Students
    The Committee provides $45,842,000 for the Scholarships for 
Disadvantaged Students program, The fiscal year 2009 comparable 
level was $85,842,000, including $40,000,000 in American 
Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The budget request for 
fiscal year 2010 included $52,842,000 for this program.
    This program provides grants to health professions schools 
for student scholarships to individuals who are from 
disadvantaged backgrounds and are enrolled as full-time 
students in such schools.
            Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry
    The Committee provides $54,425,000 for Training in Primary 
Care Medicine and Dentistry programs. The fiscal year 2009 
comparable level is $96,025,000, including $47,600,000 in 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The budget for 
fiscal year 2010 included $56,425,000 for this program. The 
Committee has included bill language identifying no less than: 
$29,205,000 for Family Medicine programs; $7,575,000 for 
general dentistry programs; and $7,575,000 for pediatric 
dentistry programs. Bill language has also been included to 
clarify the terms of the dentistry loan repayment program.
    Pediatric dentistry residency programs provide both 
treatments for underprivileged children and training 
opportunities to address the national shortage of pediatric 
dentists. The Committee has included bill language allowing 
funds to be used for faculty loan repayment. The Committee 
encourages HRSA to communicate clearly to applicants that grant 
funds can be utilized for faculty development and curriculum 
enhancement, as well as program creation or expansion.
    The Committee is concerned with the state of our Nation's 
emergency medical system and the shortage of emergency 
physicians. With increased fragmentation and overcrowding at 
emergency departments nationwide, this shortage will have a 
dire effect on patient safety. To better understand the impact 
of this shortage on patient care, the Committee encourages HRSA 
to examine current and future supply, demand, need and 
requirements for residency-trained, board certified emergency 
physicians.
    The Committee continues to note the documented severe 
dental access crisis in rural and other underserved areas. The 
Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured notes that 
``the supply of dentists, especially pediatric dentists, is 
inadequate.'' In addition to the increased investment in dental 
health training made by the Committee in this and previous 
appropriation bills, the Committee is supportive of efforts by 
States to develop licensure and universities to develop 
curriculum for an advanced dental hygiene practitioner. The 
Committee urges the Secretary to develop a plan to evaluate the 
effectiveness of master's level advanced dental hygiene 
practitioner programs.

Interdisciplinary, Community-based Linkages

            Area Health Education Centers
    The Committee provides $32,540,000 for the Area Health 
Education Centers program, the same as the fiscal year 2009 
comparable level and the budget request for fiscal year 2010.
    This program links university health science centers with 
community health service delivery systems to provide training 
sites for students, faculty, and practitioners. The program 
supports three types of projects: core grants to plan and 
implement programs; special initiative funding for schools that 
have previously received Area Health Education Centers [AHEC] 
grants; and model programs to extend AHEC programs with 50 
percent Federal funding.
            Allied Health and Other Disciplines
    The Committee provides $15,890,000 for the Allied Health 
and Other Disciplines program. The fiscal year 2009 comparable 
level was $13,890,000 and the budget request for fiscal year 
2010 was $23,890,000.
    These programs seek to improve access, diversity, and 
distribution of allied health practitioners to areas of need. 
The program improves access to comprehensive and culturally 
competent health care services for underserved populations. The 
Committee recommendation is sufficient to continue the 
Chiropractic-Medical School Demonstration Grant, and the dental 
workforce programs authorized under section 340G of the Public 
Health Service Act at the same levels as in fiscal year 2009.
    The Committee has included additional funding for the 
Graduate Psychology training programs to increase the grant 
size, to reinstate the geropsychology component of the training 
program, and to expand training sites.
            Geriatric Education
    The Committee provides $30,997,000 for Geriatric Education 
programs, the same level as the fiscal year 2009 comparable 
level. The budget request for fiscal year 2010 included 
$41,997,000 for this program.
    Geriatric programs include: Geriatric Education Centers, 
the Geriatric Academic Career awards program, and the Geriatric 
Training program for Physicians, Dentists, and Behavioral/
Mental Health Professionals program. The Committee intends that 
all activities remain at last year's level.
    The Committee encourages the Department to collaborate with 
institutions of higher learning for the development of a dual 
Doctor of Pharmacy/Nurse Practitioner degree to address the 
growing need for specialty trained providers in the area of 
gerontological health.

Health Professions Workforce Information and Analysis

    The Committee is recommending $5,663,000 for health 
professions workforce information and analysis. This program 
was last funded in fiscal year 2005. The administration did not 
request funds for this program. The program provides grants and 
contracts to eligible entities to provide for the collection 
and analysis of targeted information, research on high-priority 
workforce questions, the development of analytic and research 
infrastructure, and the conduct of program evaluation and 
assessment.

Public Health, Preventive Medicine, and Dental Public Health Programs

    The Committee provides $10,000,000 for these programs. The 
fiscal year 2009 comparable level was $19,500,000, including 
$10,500,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. 
The budget request for fiscal year 2010 included $9,000,000 for 
this program. The Committee intends that the increase over the 
level in the fiscal year 2009 omnibus appropriations act 
(Public Law 111-8) be used to expand fellowships and training 
in the area of preventive medicine. The Committee urges HRSA to 
prioritize programs that seek to incorporate integrative 
medicine into residency training.
    This program supports awards to schools of medicine, 
osteopathic medicine, public health, and dentistry for support 
of residency training programs in preventive medicine and 
dental public health; and for financial assistance to trainees 
enrolled in such programs.

Nursing Workforce Development Programs

    The Committee provides $216,740,000 for the Nursing 
Workforce Development programs. The fiscal year 2009 comparable 
level was $213,231,000, including $42,200,000 in American 
Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The budget request for 
fiscal year 2010 was $263,403,000.
    The Committee recognizes that efforts to alleviate the 
Nation's shortage of Registered Nurses [RNs] must focus on 
addressing the nurse faculty shortage. According to the latest 
survey from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 
more than 50,000 qualified applicants were turned away from 
baccalaureate and graduate nursing programs in 2008 due 
primarily to a shortage of nurse faculty, including nearly 
7,000 applicants to master's and doctoral programs. Supporting 
programs that prepare more nurse educators is the key to 
stabilizing the nursing workforce and reversing the RN 
shortage.
    The Committee recommends funding for the following 
activities in the following amounts:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    Fiscal year     Fiscal year
                                                                       2009         2010 budget      Committee
                                                                    comparable        request     recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Advanced education nursing......................................          64,438          64,438          64,438
Nurse education, practice and retention.........................          37,291          37,291          42,500
Nursing workforce diversity.....................................          19,307          16,107          16,107
Loan repayment and scholarship program..........................          64,128         125,000          64,128
Comprehensive geriatric education...............................           4,567           4,567           4,567
Nursing faculty loan program....................................          23,500          16,000          25,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Within the allocation, the Committee encourages HRSA to 
allocate funding for nurse anesthetist education at no less 
than last year's level.
    The increase provided for ``nurse education, practice and 
retention'' is intended to establish a new initiative to train 
nursing home aides and home health aides. Grants may be made to 
colleges or community-based training programs for the 
development, testing, and demonstration of training programs 
on-campus, at alternative sites, and through telehealth 
methodologies. The Committee notes that these occupations have 
grown rapidly and are projected to continue that growth as 
America's baby boom generation continues to age. A position in 
either of these fields provides an entry level to the nursing 
career ladder and a skill that is transportable to any job 
market in the Nation. However, levels and types of training 
programs vary widely. The Committee encourages HRSA to create a 
plan for how best to improve the training in these fields and 
report to the Committee no later than March 15, 2010.

Children's Hospitals Graduate Medical Education Program

    The Committee has provided $315,000,000 for the Children's 
Hospitals Graduate Medical Education [GME] program. The fiscal 
year 2009 comparable level was $310,000,000 and the budget 
request for fiscal year 2010 was $310,000,000.
    The program provides support for health professions 
training in children's teaching hospitals that have a separate 
Medicare provider number (``free-standing'' children's 
hospitals). Children's hospitals are defined under Medicare as 
those whose inpatients are predominantly under the age of 18. 
The funds in this program are intended to make the level of 
Federal Graduate Medical Education support more consistent with 
other teaching hospitals, including children's hospitals that 
share provider numbers with other teaching hospitals. Payments 
are determined by formula, based on a national per-resident 
amount. Payments support training of resident physicians as 
defined by Medicare in both ambulatory and inpatient settings.

Patient Navigator

    The Committee recommendation includes $6,000,000 for the 
Patient Navigator Outreach and Chronic Disease Outreach 
program. The comparable funding level for fiscal year 2009 was 
$4,000,000 and the budget request for fiscal year 2010 was 
$4,000,000 for this program.
    The program provides demonstration grants to public or non-
profit health centers to help patients overcome barriers in the 
health care system to prompt screening, referral, diagnosis, 
and treatment services.

National Practitioner Data Bank

    The Committee provides $19,750,000 for the national 
practitioner data bank, the same as the fiscal year 2009 
comparable level and the budget request for fiscal year 2010. 
The Committee and the budget request assume that full funding 
will be provided entirely through the collection of user fees 
and will cover the full cost of operating the data bank. Bill 
language is included to ensure that user fees are collected to 
cover all costs of processing requests and providing such 
information to data bank users.

Health Care Integrity and Protection Data Bank

    The Committee provides $3,758,000 for the health care 
integrity and protection data bank, the same as the fiscal year 
2009 comparable level and the administration request for fiscal 
year 2010. The Committee assumes that full funding will be 
provided entirely through the collection of user fees and will 
cover the full cost of operating the data bank. The data bank 
is intended to collect, maintain, and report on certain actions 
taken against healthcare providers, suppliers, and 
practitioners.

                    MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH BUREAU

Maternal and Child Health Block Grant

    The Committee provides $662,121,000 for the maternal and 
child health [MCH] block grant, the same as the fiscal year 
2009 comparable level and the budget request for fiscal year 
2010.
    The Maternal and Child Health Block Grant program provides 
a flexible source of funding that allows States to target their 
most urgent maternal and child health needs through development 
of community-based networks of preventive and primary care that 
coordinate and integrate public and private sector resources 
and programs for pregnant women, mothers, infants, children, 
and adolescents. The program supports a broad range of 
activities including prenatal care, well child services and 
immunizations, reducing infant mortality, preventing injury and 
violence, expanding access to oral healthcare, addressing 
racial and ethnic disparities and providing comprehensive care 
for children, adolescents, and families through clinics, home 
visits and school-based health programs.
    Postpartum depression [PPD] is one of the most common and 
frequently undiagnosed conditions associated with childbirth. 
While postpartum depression is a widespread problem, there is 
not sufficient research on the causes and possible treatments 
for women suffering from this disorder. The Committee 
encourages HRSA to prioritize the issue of PPD by raising 
awareness, expanding research, and establishing grants for the 
operation and coordination of cost-effective services to 
afflicted women and their families.
    The Committee recognizes that 1 in 4 school-aged children 
has a vision problem significant enough to affect learning. The 
Committee understands that the MCHB requires States to report 
on a set of core performance measures and that these 
performance measures, when successfully addressed, can lead to 
better health outcomes. The Committee recommends that the MCHB 
develop and report on the nationwide implementation of a State 
title V core performance measure related to vision screening.
    The Committee has included bill language identifying 
$92,551,000 for the SPRANS set-aside. Within that total, the 
Committee recommendation includes sufficient funding to 
continue the set-asides for oral health, epilepsy, sickle cell, 
first-time motherhood, doula programs, and fetal alcohol 
syndrome at no less than last year's level.
    Doula Programs.--The Committee intends that Doula 
demonstration funding continue to be allocated evenly among 
urban and rural settings, with an emphasis on breastfeeding 
initiation and retention.
    Epilepsy.--The Committee has provided funding to continue 
outreach, technical assistance and State demonstration programs 
which develop and implement systems of care to improve access 
to comprehensive, coordinated healthcare and related services 
for children and youth with epilepsy living in medically 
underserved areas.
    Hemophilia.--The Committee supports the work of the network 
of hemophilia treatment centers through the Maternal and Child 
Health Block Grant SPRANS program and recognizes the critical 
role of the comprehensive disease management services provided 
by the centers.
    Oral Health.--The Committee has provided funding to 
continue and expand early childhood oral health interventions 
and prevention programs encompassing the medical/dental 
interface, topical fluorides, school and community-based 
sealant programs, and systems building with WIC, Head Start and 
others.

Sickle Cell Anemia Program

    The Committee provides $4,250,000 for the sickle cell 
anemia demonstration program, the same as the fiscal year 2009 
comparable level and the budget request for fiscal year 2010. 
The Sickle Cell Service Demonstration Program provides grants 
and contracts to help coordinate service delivery for 
individuals with sickle cell disease, including genetic 
counseling and testing; training of health professionals; and 
identifying and establishing other efforts related to the 
expansion and coordination of education, treatment, and 
continuity of care programs for individuals with sickle cell 
disease.

Traumatic Brain Injury Program

    The Committee provides $9,877,000 for the traumatic brain 
injury program, the same as the fiscal year 2009 comparable 
level and the budget request for fiscal year 2010. The program 
supports implementation and planning grants to States for 
coordination and improvement of services to individuals and 
families with traumatic brain injuries as well as protection 
and advocacy. Such services can include: pre-hospital care, 
emergency department care, hospital care, rehabilitation, 
transitional services, education, employment, and long-term 
support. The Committee includes no less than last year's 
funding level for protection and advocacy services, as 
authorized under section 1305 of Public Law 106-310.
    The Committee is concerned by the high percentage of 
traumatic brain injury funds being used for technical 
assistance for the State grant portion of the program. The 
Committee encourages HRSA to re-evaluate the proportion of 
funds being committed to technical assistance and to ensure 
that protection and advocacy programs receive the same quality 
technical assistance as the State grant program.

Autism and Other Developmental Disorders

    The Committee provides $48,000,000 for the autism and other 
developmental disorders initiative. The fiscal year 2009 
comparable level was $42,000,000 and the budget request for 
fiscal year 2010 was $48,000,000. The program supports 
surveillance, early detection, education and intervention 
activities on autism and other developmental disorders, as 
authorized in the Combating Autism Act of 2006.
    Within the funding provided for autism and other related 
developmental disorders, an increase of no less than $2,000,000 
is provided to continue and expand research on evidence-based 
practices for interventions for individuals with autism and 
other developmental disabilities, for development of guidelines 
for those interventions, and for information dissemination. In 
addition, an increase of no less than $2,000,000 is provided to 
continue and expand the Leadership Education in Neuro-
developmental and Related Disabilities program.

Newborn Screening for Heritable Disorders

    The Committee provides $10,013,000 for the newborn 
heritable disorders screening program, as described in section 
1109 of the Newborn Screening Saves Lives Act of 2008, the same 
as the fiscal year 2009 comparable level and the fiscal year 
2010 budget request.
    Newborn screening is an essential public health function 
provided to all newborns in the United States. The Committee is 
aware that the number of conditions and the quality of programs 
varies from State to State.

Congenital Disabilities Program

    The Committee has provided $1,000,000 for the congenital 
disabilities program, the same as the fiscal year 2009 
comparable level and the fiscal year 2010 budget request.
    The purpose of the program is to provide information and 
support services to families receiving a positive test 
diagnosis for down syndrome, spina bifida, dwarfism, or other 
prenatally and postnatally diagnosed conditions. Grants may be 
made to States, territories, localities, and nongovernmental 
organizations with expertise in prenatally and postnatally 
diagnosed conditions.
    Funding may be used to collect and disseminate current 
evidence-based information and to coordinate the provision of 
supportive services to parents who receive a positive diagnosis 
prenatally, at birth, or up to 1 year after the affected 
child's birth. These services may include the expansion and 
further development of national and local peer-support 
programs; the creation of a telephone hotline which would 
provide parents with information on the physical, 
developmental, educational, and psychosocial aspects of the 
condition; and awareness and education programs for the 
healthcare providers who provide, interpret, and inform parents 
of the results of positive test diagnoses for congenital 
disabilities.

Healthy Start

    The Committee provides $105,372,000 for the healthy start 
infant mortality initiative. The fiscal year 2009 comparable 
level was $102,372,000 and the same as the budget request.
    The healthy start initiative was developed to respond to 
persistently high rates of infant mortality in this Nation. The 
initiative was expanded in fiscal year 1994 by a special 
projects program, which supported an additional seven urban and 
rural communities to implement infant mortality reduction 
strategies and interventions. The Children's Health Act of 2000 
fully authorized this initiative as an independent program. The 
Committee urges HRSA to give preference to current and former 
grantees with expiring or recently expired project periods.

Universal Newborn Hearing Screening and Early Intervention

    The Committee provides $19,000,000 for universal newborn 
hearing screening and early intervention activities, the same 
as the fiscal year 2009 comparable level and the budget request 
for fiscal year 2010 for this program.
    The Committee expects HRSA to coordinate projects funded 
with this appropriation with projects related to early hearing 
detection and intervention by the National Center on Birth 
Defects and Developmental Disabilities, the National Institute 
on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, the National 
Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, and the 
Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services.

Emergency Medical Services for Children

    The Committee provides $22,000,000 for emergency medical 
services for children. The fiscal year 2009 comparable level 
and the budget request for fiscal year 2010 were $20,000,000. 
The program supports demonstration grants for the delivery of 
emergency medical services to acutely ill and seriously injured 
children.
    Now marking 25 years since its creation, the EMSC program 
makes funding available to every State EMS office to improve 
emergency care for children, as well as funding critical 
research and dissemination of best practices. The Committee 
commends the program's efforts to improve the evidence base for 
pediatric emergency care in the pre-hospital and emergency 
department settings and to drive the rapid translation of new 
science into professional practice.

                            HIV/AIDS BUREAU

                  ACQUIRED IMMUNE DEFICIENCY SYNDROME

Ryan White AIDS Programs

    The Committee provides $2,273,421,000 for Ryan White AIDS 
programs. The recommendation includes $25,000,000 in transfers 
available under section 241 of the Public Health Service Act. 
The fiscal year 2009 comparable level was $2,238,421,000 and 
the budget request for fiscal year 2010 was $2,292,414,000.
    Next to the Medicaid program, the Ryan White AIDS programs 
are the largest Federal investment in the care and treatment of 
people living with HIV/AIDS in the United States. These 
programs provide a wide range of community-based services, 
including primary and home healthcare, case management, 
substance abuse treatment, mental health services, and 
nutritional services.
    Within the total provided, the Committee intends that Ryan 
White AIDS activities that are targeted to address the growing 
HIV/AIDS epidemic and its disproportionate impact upon 
communities of color, including African-Americans, Latinos, 
Native Americans, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and 
Pacific Islanders continue with at least the level of funding 
provided in fiscal year 2009.

Emergency Assistance

    The Committee provides $663,082,000 for emergency 
assistance grants to eligible metropolitan areas 
disproportionately affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic, the same 
as the fiscal year 2009 comparable level. The budget request 
for fiscal year 2010 included $671,075,000.
    Grants are provided to metropolitan areas meeting certain 
criteria. Two-thirds of the funds are awarded by formula and 
the remainder is awarded through supplemental competitive 
grants.
    The Committee notes that the fiscal year 2009 comparable 
level included a provision directing funds to particular 
metropolitan areas facing dramatic cuts as a result of the 
changes to the Ryan White formula. The Committee has not 
continued this provision in fiscal year 2010.

Comprehensive Care Programs

    The Committee provides $1,253,791,000 for HIV healthcare 
and support services. The fiscal year 2009 comparable level was 
$1,223,791,000 and the budget request for fiscal year 2010 was 
$1,253,791,000. Funds are awarded to States to support HIV 
service delivery consortia, the provision of home and 
community-based care services for individuals with HIV disease, 
continuation of health insurance coverage for low-income 
persons with HIV disease and support for State AIDS drug 
assistance programs [ADAP].
    The Committee continues to be encouraged by the progress of 
anti-retroviral therapy in reducing the mortality rates 
associated with HIV infection and in enhancing the quality of 
life of patients on medication. The Committee includes bill 
language providing $835,000,000 for AIDS medications in the 
AIDS Drug Assistance Program [ADAP]. The fiscal year 2009 
comparable level was $815,000,000 and the budget request for 
fiscal year 2010 was $835,000,000.

Early Intervention Services

    The Committee provides $206,877,000 for early intervention 
grants. The fiscal year 2009 comparable level was $201,877,000 
and the budget request for fiscal year 2010 was $211,877,000.
    Funds are awarded competitively to primary healthcare 
providers to enhance healthcare services available to people at 
risk of HIV and AIDS. Funds are used for comprehensive primary 
care, including counseling, testing, diagnostic, and 
therapeutic services.

Children, Youth, Women, and Families

    The Committee provides $76,845,000 for grants for 
coordinated services and access to research for women, infants, 
children, and youth, the same as the fiscal year 2009 
comparable level and the budget request for 2010.
    Funds are awarded to community healthcenters, family 
planning agencies, comprehensive hemophilia diagnostic and 
treatment centers, federally qualified health centers under 
section 1905(1)(2)(B) of the Social Security Act, county and 
municipal health departments and other nonprofit community-
based programs that provide comprehensive primary healthcare 
services to populations with or at risk for HIV disease.

AIDS Dental Services

    The Committee provides $13,429,000 for AIDS Dental 
Services, the same as the fiscal year 2009 comparable level. 
The budget request for fiscal year 2010 was $15,429,000.
    This program provides grants to dental schools, dental 
hygiene schools, and postdoctoral dental education programs to 
assist with the cost of providing unreimbursed oral healthcare 
to patients with HIV disease.

AIDS Education and Training Centers

    The Committee provides $34,397,000 for the AIDS education 
and training centers [AETC's]. The fiscal year 2009 comparable 
level was $34,397,000 and the budget request for fiscal year 
2010 included $38,397,000.
    AIDS education and training centers train healthcare 
practitioners, faculty, and students who care for AIDS patients 
outside of the traditional health professions education venues, 
and support curriculum development on diagnosis and treatment 
of HIV infection for health professions schools and training 
organizations.
    The Committee encourages the AETCs to continue to 
prioritize interactive training that demonstrates effectiveness 
in changing clinician behavior. Funding may be used for 
existing regional and national centers to conduct clinical 
training and support workforce development to help meet the 
program's performance goal to maintain the proportion of 
racial/ethnic minority healthcare providers participating in 
the AETC intervention programs. In addition, the Committee 
recognizes the growing shortage of primary care health 
professionals trained in HIV care and treatment in the country.

                       HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS BUREAU

Organ Donation and Transplantation

    The Committee provides $26,049,000 for organ donation and 
transplantation activities. The fiscal year 2009 comparable 
level was $24,049,000 and the budget request for fiscal year 
2010 was $24,049,000.
    Funds support a scientific registry of organ transplant 
recipients and the National Organ Procurement and 
Transplantation Network to match donors and potential 
recipients of organs. A portion of the appropriated funds may 
be used for education of the public and health professionals 
about organ donations and transplants, and to support agency 
staff providing clearinghouse and technical assistance 
functions.
    The Committee commends HRSA and the United Network for 
Organ Sharing [UNOS] for working with the pulmonary 
hypertension [PH] community to address concerns regarding the 
allocation of lungs for transplantation in PH patients. The 
Committee encourages UNOS to continue its dialogue with the PH 
community to monitor concerns regarding the methodology used to 
determine transplantation eligibility for PH patients.
    The Committee is aware that the number of Americans 
awaiting organ transplants has recently climbed to more than 
100,000, the first time this threshold has been exceeded. After 
years of progress in reducing the organ transplant waiting 
lists, there is now an upward trend in the number of Americans 
waiting for an organ for transplant. The Committee therefore 
requests a report on additional initiatives and programs that 
would help the Division reach its stated goal of a 75 percent 
organ donation conversion rate. The Committee is particularly 
interested in best practices in the balancing of organ donation 
and advanced directives for palliative care. The Committee 
requests that HRSA complete this report no later than March 15, 
2010.

National Cord Blood Inventory

    The Committee has provided $11,983,000 for the National 
Cord Blood Inventory, which is the successor of the National 
Cord Blood Stem Cell Bank program. The fiscal year 2009 
comparable level was $11,983,000 and the budget request for 
fiscal year 2010 was $11,983,000. The purpose of this program 
is to provide funds to cord blood banks to build an inventory 
of the highest quality cord blood units for transplantation.

C.W. Bill Young Cell Transplantation Program

    The Committee provides $23,517,000 for the C.W. Bill Young 
Cell Transplantation Program, which is the successor of the 
National Bone Marrow Donor Registry. This is the same level as 
the fiscal year 2009 comparable level for the Registry and the 
budget request for fiscal year 2010.

Office of Pharmacy Affairs

    The Committee provides $2,970,000 for the Office of 
Pharmacy Affairs. The fiscal year 2009 comparable level for 
this program was $1,470,000 and the budget request for fiscal 
year 2010 was $2,970,000. The Office of Pharmacy Affairs 
promotes access to clinically and cost effective pharmacy 
services among safety-net clinics and hospitals that 
participate in the 340B Drug Pricing program. Section 340B of 
the Public Health Service Act requires drug manufacturers to 
provide discounts or rebates to a specified set of HHS assisted 
programs and hospitals that meet the criteria in the Social 
Security Act for serving a disproportionate share of low income 
patients. These funds will be used to help resolve deficiencies 
that could not be addressed within resources available for the 
normal operations of the office. Specifically, these 
deficiencies include non-compliance with the 340B pricing 
requirements and errors and omissions in the office's covered 
entity database.
    The Committee encourages HRSA to review carefully the 
proposed guidance for the 340B drug program, ``Regarding 
Section 602 of the Veterans Health Care Act of 1992 Definition 
of Patient'' published by the previous administration on 
January 12, 2007. The Committee is aware that safety net 
facilities will be dramatically affected by the 
administration's efforts to reform the health system and any 
changes to the drug program should be reviewed in light of the 
system that emerges from the health reform debate.

Poison Control Centers

    The Committee provides $30,314,000 for Poison Control 
Center activities. The fiscal year 2009 comparable level was 
$28,314,000, as was the budget request for fiscal year 2010. 
The Poison Control program currently supports a mix of 
grantees: most grantees serve entire States; a few grantees 
serve multi-State regions; and, in a handful of cases, more 
than one grantee serves a single State. In allocating funds, 
the Committee has provided sufficient resources to continue the 
current approach of allocating funding to all certified centers 
based on service population.

State Health Access Grants

    The Committee provides $75,000,000 for State Health Access 
Grants, the same as the fiscal year 2009 comparable level and 
the budget request for fiscal year 2010. This program gives 
grants to States to create plans and develop programs to expand 
access to healthcare coverage. The Committee encourages HRSA to 
work with States to ensure that State plans are not in conflict 
with any changes to the larger health system that may emerge 
from the current health reform debate.

                         RURAL HEALTH PROGRAMS

Rural Healthcare Services Outreach Grants

    The Committee provides $55,450,000 for rural health 
outreach grants. The fiscal year 2009 comparable level was 
$53,900,000, and the budget request for fiscal year 2010 was 
$55,450,000. This program supports projects that demonstrate 
new and innovative models of outreach in rural areas such as 
integration and coordination of health services. The Committee 
has included $800,000 for the Community Health Integration 
Models demonstration program authorized by section 123 of the 
Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act of 2008.

Rural Health Research

    The Committee provides $9,700,000 for the Rural Health 
Research program, the same as the fiscal year 2009 comparable 
level and the budget request for fiscal year 2010. The funds 
provide support for the Office of Rural Health Policy to be the 
focal point for the Department's efforts to improve the 
delivery of health services to rural communities and 
populations. Funds are used for rural health research centers, 
the National Advisory Committee on Rural Health, and a 
reference and information service.

Rural Hospital Flexibility Grants

    The Committee provides $41,200,000 for rural hospital 
flexibility grants. The fiscal year 2009 comparable level was 
$39,200,000, as was the budget request for fiscal year 2010.
    Under this program, HRSA works with the States to provide 
support and technical assistance to Critical Access Hospitals 
to focus on quality and performance improvement and to 
integrate emergency medical services. Of the amount provided, 
the Committee includes $39,200,000 to continue the Small Rural 
Hospital Improvement Grant Program, as authorized by section 
1820(g)(3) of the Social Security Act and Public Law 107-116 
and outlined in House Report 107-342. The program provides 
support for small rural hospitals and focuses on quality 
improvement and adoption of health information technology.
    The Committee is aware that the Department of Veterans 
Affairs, through its Rural Health Initiative, is committed to 
better serving veterans residing in remote and rural areas. 
This initiative gives the Secretary of the Department of 
Veterans Affairs the resources and latitude to collaborate with 
other Federal or community providers, including rural hospitals 
serving a large number of veterans. The Committee is strongly 
supportive of this collaboration and understands that one of 
the largest barriers to this effort is the lack of electronic 
medical records that are interoperable with the VISTA system. 
For that reason, the Committee has included $2,000,000 for 
grants authorized under section 1820(g)(6) of the Social 
Security Act to provide telehealth equipment and to develop 
electronic health records that are compatible with the VISTA 
system. The Committee encourages HRSA to coordinate with the 
Department of Veterans Affairs to ensure that this equipment 
furthers the goal of treating the illnesses and disabilities of 
our Nation's veterans. The Committee is particularly concerned 
with ensuring that veterans receive appropriate mental 
healthcare.

Delta Health Initiative

    The Committee has included $40,000,000 for the Delta Health 
Initiative as authorized in section 219 of division G of Public 
Law 110-161.

Rural and Community Access to Emergency Devices

    The Committee provides $1,751,000 for rural and community 
access to emergency devices, the same as the fiscal year 2009 
comparable level and the budget request for fiscal year 2010 
did not include funding for this program. This appropriation 
provides funding for both the rural program under section 413 
of the Public Health Service Act and the community access 
demonstration under section 313. The Committee expects that 
fiscal year 2010 funding be equally divided between urban and 
rural communities.
    Funding will be used to purchase automated external 
defibrillators, place them in public areas where cardiac 
arrests are likely to occur and train lay rescuers and first 
responders in their use.

State Offices of Rural Health

    The Committee provides $10,450,000 for the State Offices of 
Rural Health. The fiscal year 2009 comparable level was 
$9,201,000. The budget request for fiscal year 2010 was 
$9,450,000.
    The State Offices of Rural Health program helps the States 
strengthen rural healthcare delivery systems by allowing them 
to better coordinate care and improve support and outreach in 
rural areas.

Black Lung Clinics

    The Committee provides $7,200,000 for black lung clinics, 
the same as the fiscal year 2009 comparable level and the 
budget request for fiscal year 2010. This program funds clinics 
that treat respiratory and pulmonary diseases of active and 
retired coal miners, steel mill workers, agricultural workers, 
and others with occupationally related respiratory and 
pulmonary impairments. These clinics reduce the incidence of 
high-cost inpatient treatment for these conditions.

Radiation and Exposure Screening and Education Program

    The Committee provides $1,952,000 for activities authorized 
by the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act, the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 comparable level and the budget request for 
fiscal year 2010. This program provides grants for the 
education, prevention, and early detection of radiogenic 
cancers and diseases resulting from exposure to uranium during 
its mining and milling at nuclear test sites.

Native and Rural Alaskan Healthcare

    The Committee provides $10,000,000 for the Denali 
Commission. The fiscal year 2009 comparable level was 
$19,642,000 and the budget request for fiscal year 2010 did not 
include funding for this program. These funds support the 
construction and renovation of health clinics, hospitals and 
social service facilities in rural Alaska, as authorized by 
Public Law 106-113, to help remote communities in Alaska 
develop critically needed health and social service 
infrastructure for which no other funding sources are 
available, thereby providing health and social services to 
Alaskans in remote rural communities as they are in other 
communities throughout the country. The Committee expects the 
Denali Commission to allocate funds to a mix of rural hospital, 
clinic, long-term care and social service facilities, rather 
than focusing exclusively on clinic funding.

Family Planning

    The Committee provides $317,491,000 for the title X family 
planning program. The fiscal year 2009 comparable level was 
$307,491,000 and the budget request for fiscal year 2010 was 
$317,491,000.
    Title X grants support primary healthcare services at 
clinics nationwide. About 85 percent of family planning clients 
are women at or below 150 percent of poverty level. Title X of 
the Public Health Service Act, which established the family 
planning program, authorizes the provision of a broad range of 
acceptable and effective family planning methods and preventive 
health services to individuals, regardless of age or marital 
status. This includes FDA-approved methods of contraception.
    The Committee urges HRSA to use the increased funds to 
augment the awards for existing grantees to offset the rising 
cost of providing healthcare services. In addition, the 
Committee encourages HRSA to increase funding to the regional 
training centers.
    The Committee remains concerned that programs receiving 
title X funds ought to have access to these resources as 
quickly as possible. The Committee again instructs the 
Department to distribute to the regional offices all of the 
funds available for family planning services no later than 60 
days following enactment of this bill. The Committee intends 
that the regional offices should retain the authority for the 
review, award and administration of family planning funds, in 
the same manner and timeframe as in fiscal year 2006. The 
Committee intends that at least 90 percent of funds 
appropriated for title X activities be for clinical services 
authorized under section 1001 of the act. The Committee further 
expects the Office of Family Planning to spend any remaining 
year-end funds in section 1001 activities.

Healthcare-related Facilities and Activities

    The Committee provides $157,092,000 for the construction 
and renovation (including equipment) of healthcare-related 
facilities and other healthcare-related activities. In fiscal 
year 2009, $310,470,000 was provided and the budget request for 
fiscal year 2010 did not include funding for these activities.
    The Committee expects HRSA to use no more than 1 percent of 
the funds allocated for projects for agency administrative 
expenses. These funds are to be used for the following projects 
and in the following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Project                              Funding
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Adams State College, Alamosa, CO, for facilities and            $125,000
 equipment related to nurse training..................
Advocates for a Healthy Community, Springfield, MO,              500,000
 for facilities and equipment.........................
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK,         1,000,000
 for facilities and equipment.........................
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK,         2,000,000
 for training dental health care workers..............
Alivio Medical Center, Chicago, IL, for facilities and           500,000
 equipment............................................
Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA, for                  100,000
 equipment............................................
Allen Institute for Brain Science, Seattle, WA, for              300,000
 equipment............................................
Allied Services Foundation, Clarks Summit, PA, for               100,000
 rehabilitation equipment.............................
Altoona Regional Health System, Altoona, PA, for                 100,000
 equipment............................................
AMDEC Foundation, New York, NY, for facilities and               100,000
 equipment relating to medical research...............
American Optometric Association, Alexandria, VA, to              500,000
 expand vision screening programs.....................
American Optometric Association, Saint Louis, MO, to              90,000
 expand vision screening programs in Iowa.............
American Prosthodontic Society Foundation, Osceola               100,000
 Mills, PA, for scholarships and program costs related
 to training in prosthetic dentistry and clinical
 prosthodontics.......................................
American Red Cross, Columbus, OH, for purchase of                200,000
 vehicles to serve rural areas........................
American Red Cross Southeastern MI Blood Services                200,000
 Region, Detroit, MI, for blood donation programs.....
Anchorage Project Access, Anchorage, AK, for health              125,000
 care coordination and supplies.......................
Anna Jacques Hospital, Newburyport, MA, for health               200,000
 information technology...............................
Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, for                     100,000
 facilities and equipment related to rural health.....
Arkansas Department of Health, Little Rock, AR, for              240,000
 facilities and equipment at the Marshallese Health
 Clinic...............................................
Asher Community Health Center, Fossil, OR, for                   200,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Association for Utah Community Health, Salt Lake City,         1,350,000
 UT, for facilities and equipment.....................
Autism New Jersey, Ewing, NJ, for an autism patient              100,000
 navigator project....................................
Avis Goodwin Community Health Center, Dover, NH, for             125,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Baptist Health System, Jacksonville, FL, for equipment           100,000
Barnesville Hospital Association, Inc, Belmont, OH,              200,000
 for facilities and equipment related to the emergency
 department...........................................
Baton Rouge General Medical Center, Baton Rouge, LA,             200,000
 for facilities and equipment at a nursing facil-  ity
Bay Area Medical Center, Marinette, WI, for health               900,000
 information technology...............................
Beebe Medical Center, Lewes, DE, for facilities and              100,000
 equipment............................................
Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology, Boston, MA,           100,000
 for the development of health profession training
 programs.............................................
Bergen Regional Medical Center, Hackensack, NJ, for              300,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Big Springs Medical Association, Inc dba Missouri              1,000,000
 Highlands Health Care, Ellington, MO, for facilities
 and equipment........................................
Billings Clinic, Billings, MT, for facilities and                250,000
 equipment............................................
Bingham Memorial Hospital, Blackfoot, ID, for                    200,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
BioInnovation Institute of Akron, Akron, OH, for                 400,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Bi-State Primary Care Association, Montpelier, VT, for           125,000
 facilities, equipment and expansion of outreach and
 education programs...................................
Blackstone Valley Community Health Care Inc,                     500,000
 Pawtucket, RI, for facilities and equipment..........
Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, for facilities and            150,000
 equipment............................................
Boulder City Hospital, Boulder City, NV, for                   1,000,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Bridgeport Hospital, Bridgeport, CT, for facilities              310,000
 and equipment........................................
Broadlawns Medical Center, Des Moines, IA, for                   500,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Brown University, Providence, RI, for facilities and             116,000
 equipment relating to medical education..............
Butler Hospital, Providence, RI, for equipment                   200,000
 relating to Alzheimer's disease......................
CARD Clinic, Libby, MT, for facilities and equipment..           200,000
CarePartners Foundation, Asheville, NC, for health               300,000
 information systems including equipment..............
Caribou Memorial Hospital, Soda Springs, ID, for                 100,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Caring Health Center, Inc, Springfield, MA, for                  150,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Cassia Regional Medical Center, Burley, ID, for                  100,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Castleton State College, Castleton, VT, for a nursing            100,000
 program, including equipment.........................
Catholic Charities Free Health Care Center,                      100,000
 Pittsburgh, PA, for equipment........................
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, for                655,000
 equipment and supplies for the Institute for
 Irritable Bowel Syndrome Research....................
Centenary College of Louisiana, Shreveport, LA, for              400,000
 facilities and equipment in health sciences..........
Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital, Lincoln, NE, for                400,000
 facilities and equipment at the acute care hospital..
Central Piedmont Community College, Charlotte, NC, for           125,000
 facilities and equipment at the Health Sciences
 Simulation Lab.......................................
Central Washington Hospital, Wenatchee, WA, for                  100,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Charles A Dean Memorial Hospital and Nursing Home,               250,000
 Greenville, ME, for facilities and equipment.........
Charles Cole Memorial Hospital, Coudersport, PA, for             100,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Cherry Street Health Services, Grand Rapids, MI, for             400,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Children's Health Fund, New York, NY, for facilities             150,000
 and equipment at the South Bronx Health Center for
 Children and Families................................
Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA, for               200,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Children's Hospital of KidsPeace, Orefield, PA, for              100,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Children's Institute of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA,              100,000
 for facilities and equipment.........................
Children's Medical Center, Dallas, TX, for facilities            250,000
 and equipment........................................
Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital, Houston, TX, for           100,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL, for                   500,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Chippewa Valley Free Clinic, Eau Claire, WI, for                  50,000
 electronic health record equipment and implementa-
 tion.................................................
Chippewa Valley Hospital, Durand, WI, for electronic             400,000
 health record equipment and implementation...........
City of Anchorage, AK, for facilities and equipment              125,000
 relating to public health............................
City of Ketchikan, AK, for facilities and equipment at         1,000,000
 Ketchikan General Hospital...........................
City of New Orleans, LA, for facilities and equipment            750,000
 at a hospital in New Orleans East....................
City of Pendleton, OR, for facilities and equipment at           150,000
 the Women Veterans Trauma Rehabilitation Cen-  ter...
City of Philadelphia, PA, for equipment to develop an            125,000
 Electronic Parental Care Registry....................
City of West Wendover, NV, for equipment for the West            160,000
 Wendover Medical Clinic..............................
Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health, Las         1,300,000
 Vegas, NV, for equipment.............................
Codman Square Health Center, Dorchester, MA, for                 200,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Coeur d'Alene Tribe, Plummer, ID, for facilities and             100,000
 equipment............................................
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring, NY, for              500,000
 equipment............................................
College of Saint Scholastica, Duluth, MN, to implement           200,000
 an electronic health record system...................
Colorado State University--Pueblo, Pueblo, CO, for               100,000
 facilities and equipment related to nurse training...
Columbus Regional Hospital, Columbus, IN, for                    100,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Commonwealth Medical Education, Scranton, PA, for                250,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Community Health Center's Inc, Middletown, CT, for               225,000
 residency training for nurse practitioners...........
Community Health Centers of the Rutland Region,                  125,000
 Bomoseen, VT, for equipment..........................
Community Health Center's, Inc, Middletown, CT, for              100,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Community Health Integrated Partnership, Inc, Glen               150,000
 Burnie, MD, to implement an electronic health record
 system...............................................
Community Medical Center, Missoula, MT, for facilities           150,000
 and equipment........................................
Community Medical Center, Toms River, NJ, for                    150,000
 equipment............................................
Connecticut Children's Medical Center, Hartford, CT,             310,000
 for facilities and equipment.........................
Connecticut State University System, Hartford, CT, for           275,000
 a nursing education program..........................
Cook Children's Medical Center, Fort Worth, TX, for              100,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Cornerstone Care, Greensboro, PA, for outreach and               100,000
 supplies to expand dental care.......................
Corry Memorial Hospital Association, Corry, PA, for              100,000
 equipment............................................
Cove-Union-Powder Medical Association, Union, OR, for            100,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Curators of the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO,            750,000
 for facilities and equipment.........................
Cure Alzheimer's Fund, Wellesley Hills, MA, for                  150,000
 equipment............................................
Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, for                    200,000
 facilities and equipment at Center for Biomedical
 Imaging in Oncology..................................
Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH, for             200,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Delaware State University, Dover, DE, for facilities             100,000
 and equipment related to public health training......
Delta Dental of Iowa, Ames, IA, for the Rural Dental             150,000
 Health Initiative....................................
Delta State University, Cleveland, MS, for facilities            750,000
 and equipment........................................
DeSales University, Center Valley, PA, for medical               100,000
 education laboratory upgrades, including the purchase
 of equipment.........................................
Devereux Foundation, Rockledge, FL, for facilities and           100,000
 equipment............................................
Dillard University, New Orleans, LA, for facilities              150,000
 and equipment at the Gentilly Center for Health
 Disparities and Disease Prevention...................
Drake University, Des Moines, IA, for equipment and              400,000
 laboratory supplies for health sciences education....
Drew Memorial Hospital, Monticello, AR, for equipment.           100,000
East End Health Alliance, Greenport, NY, to implement            500,000
 an electronic health record system...................
Easter Seals, Chicago, IL, for facilities and                    250,000
 equipment at a center for autism research............
Eastern Washington University, Cheney, WA, for                   200,000
 equipment to establish an Advanced Dental Hygiene
 Practitioner program.................................
Elk Regional Health Center, St Marys, PA, for                    100,000
 equipment............................................
Ellwood City Hospital, Ellwood City, PA, for                     100,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Erie County Medical Center Corporation, Buffalo, NY,             300,000
 for facilities and equipment.........................
Excela Health Westmoreland Hospital, Latrobe, PA, to             100,000
 implement an electronic health record system.........
Family Health Centers of San Diego, San Diego, CA, for           100,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Ferrum College, Ferrum, VA, for facilities and                   200,000
 equipment at a rural community health center.........
Fletcher Allen Health Care, Burlington, VT, for the              750,000
 Hospital-National Guard Training Collaborative,
 including equipment..................................
Franciscan Hospital for Children, Boston, MA, for                150,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Free Clinics of Iowa, Des Moines, IA, for coordination           350,000
 of care..............................................
Friends of the Congressional Glaucoma Caucus                     100,000
 Foundation, Lake Success, NY, for a New Jersey mobile
 eye care screening initiative........................
Fulton County Medical Center, McConnellsburg, PA, for            100,000
 equipment............................................
Gateway Technical College, Kenosha, WI, for facilities           500,000
 and equipment at the Health Occupations Laboratory...
Geisinger Health System, Harrisburg, PA, for equipment           100,000
Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA, for                 100,000
 health professions training..........................
Goodall Hospital, Sanford, ME, for facilities and                250,000
 equipment............................................
Grady Health System, Atlanta, GA, for facilities and             200,000
 equipment............................................
Griffin Hospital, Derby, CT, for facilities and                  310,000
 equipment............................................
Gritman Medical Center, Moscow, ID, for facilities and           200,000
 equipment............................................
Hamot Medical Center, Erie, PA, for equipment.........           100,000
Harris County Hospital District, Houston, TX, for                150,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT, for facilities and              310,000
 equipment............................................
Hays Medical Center, Hays, KS, for facilities and                250,000
 equipment............................................
Healthy Connections Network, Akron, OH, for the Access           150,000
 to Care Initiative...................................
Helping Kids Clinic, Las Vegas, NV, for medical                  100,000
 supplies and supportive services.....................
Hidalgo County Judge's Office, Edinburg, TX, for a               150,000
 mobile health unit...................................
Holy Spirit Healthcare System, Camp Hill, PA, for                100,000
 equipment............................................
Hormel Institute, Austin, MN, for facilities and                 500,000
 equipment related to bioscience......................
Hospital Cooperative, Pocatello, ID, for electronic              200,000
 medical records......................................
Houston Community College, Houston, TX, for health               250,000
 professions training.................................
Howard Community College, Columbia, MD, for facilities         1,000,000
 and equipment related to healthcare workforce
 training.............................................
Hunter Health Clinic, Wichita, KS, for facilities and            300,000
 equipment............................................
Hurley Medical Center, Flint, MI, for facilities and             150,000
 equipment............................................
Huston-Tillotson University, Austin, TX, for                     100,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Intermountain Healthcare Foundation, Salt Lake City,             250,000
 UT, for facilities and equipment.....................
Iowa CareGivers Association, Des Moines, IA, for                 300,000
 training and support of certified nurse assistants...
Iowa Healthcare Collaborative, Des Moines, IA, to                500,000
 establish Lean healthcare services in collaboration
 with Pittsburgh Regional Health......................
Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, for the                 1,000,000
 Southern Institute for Mental Health Advocacy,
 Research, and Training...............................
Jellico Community Hospital, Jellico, TN, for                     500,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Jewish Healthcare Foundation, Pittsburgh, PA, to                 100,000
 expand web-based training programs...................
Johnson County Community College, Overland Park, KS,             400,000
 for facilities and equipment.........................
Kadlec Medical Center, Richland, WA, for facilities              500,000
 and equipment to expand the pediatric center.........
Kaweah Delta Hospital Foundation, Visalia, CA, for               500,000
 facilities and equipment for the Kaweah Delta Health
 Care District........................................
Kennesaw State University Foundation, Inc, Kennesaw,             200,000
 GA, for facilities and equipment.....................
Kent County Memorial Hospital, Warwick, RI, for                  200,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Kiddazzle Dental Network, Inc, Lake Oswego, OR, for              100,000
 equipment and supplies related to pediatric dental
 services.............................................
Kiowa County Hospital, Greensburg, KS, for facilities            400,000
 and equipment........................................
Laboure College, Dorchester, MA, to develop and expand           200,000
 nursing education programs...........................
Lahey Clinic Medical Center, Inc, Burlington, MA, for            300,000
 facilities and equipment relating to the emergency
 department...........................................
Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, Erie, PA,             100,000
 for equipment........................................
Lanai Community Health Center, Lanai City, HI, for               200,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Lane Community College, Eugene, OR, for equipment for            100,000
 nurse training.......................................
Lane Regional Medical Center, Baton Rouge, LA, for               300,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Le Moyne College, Syracuse, NY, for facilities and               500,000
 equipment relating to health professions training....
Lehigh Valley Hospital, Allentown, PA, for equipment..           100,000
Lewis and Clark County, Helena, MT, for facilities and           100,000
 equipment at the City-County Health Depart-  ment....
Lewis-Clark State College, Lewiston, ID, for health              100,000
 professions training.................................
Madison Area Technical College, Madison, WI, for                 300,000
 health training equipment............................
Maine State Board of Nursing, Augusta, ME, for nursing           150,000
 education and workforce data collection, analysis and
 planning.............................................
Manchester Community College, Manchester, CT, for                120,000
 medical diagnostic and treatment equipment...........
Maniilaq Association, Kotzebue, AK, for facilities and           500,000
 equipment............................................
Marcus Autism Center, Atlanta, GA, to expand services            300,000
 for children and adolescents with developmental
 disabilities.........................................
Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI, for a dental                800,000
 health outreach program, including supplies..........
Maui Economic Development Board, Kihei, HI, for health           100,000
 education at the Lanai'I Women's Initiative..........
Maui Medical Center, Wailuku, HI, for facilities and             100,000
 equipment at the Simulation Center...................
Meadville Medical Center, Meadville, PA, for equipment           100,000
Memorial Hospital at Gulfport, Gulfport, MS, for the             475,000
 Stroke Education and Prevention Community Net-  work.
Mena Regional Health System, Mena, AR, for facilities            300,000
 and equipment........................................
Mercer County Commission, Princeton, WV, for                   4,000,000
 facilities and equipment at the Health Department....
Mercy Medical Center, Des Moines, IA, for facilities             500,000
 and equipment........................................
Methodist Hospital System, Houston, TX, for a mobile             150,000
 medical unit.........................................
Methodist University, Fayetteville, NC, for facilities           400,000
 and equipment........................................
Metropolitan Community College, Omaha, NE, for                   300,000
 facilities and equipment relating to healthcare train-
   ing................................................
Metropolitan Family Health Network, Jersey City, NJ,             100,000
 for equipment........................................
Metropolitan State University, St Paul, MN, to expand            150,000
 nursing education....................................
Middlesex Community College, Lowell, MA, for                     150,000
 facilities and equipment at a dental hygiene clinic..
Milwaukee Health Services, Inc, Milwaukee, WI, for               350,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Milwaukee Public Schools, Milwaukee, WI, for outreach            200,000
 and supplies to expand dental care...................
Minot State University, Minot, ND, for its Great                 700,000
 Plains Autism Treatment Program to serve children
 with autism spectrum disorders.......................
Misericordia University, Dallas, PA, for facilities              100,000
 and equipment for the College of Health Sciences.....
Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Choctaw, MS, for            175,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Mississippi Blood Services, Jackson, MS, for                     300,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Mississippi Primary Health Care Association, Jackson,            700,000
 MS, for facilities and equipment.....................
Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS,             750,000
 for biomedical engineering facilities and equip-
 ment.................................................
Missouri Coalition for Primary Health Care, Jefferson            750,000
 City, MO, for facilities and equipment...............
Molokai Ohana Health Center, Kaunakakai, HI, for                 750,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Monmouth Medical Center, Long Branch, NJ, for                    200,000
 facilities and equipment at the emergency depart-
 ment.................................................
Montana Tech, Butte, MT, to expand health informatics            100,000
 training, including equipment........................
Morgan Hospital and Medical Center, Martinsville, IN,            100,000
 for facilities and equipment.........................
Mount Saint Mary College, Newburgh, NY, for nurse                100,000
 training equipment...................................
Murray State University, Breathitt Veterinary Center,            100,000
 Hopkinsville, KY, for facilities and equipment.......
Navos, Seattle, WA, for facilities and equipment at a            500,000
 mental health center.................................
Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV, for cancer               500,000
 education, outreach and support needs across the
 State of Nevada......................................
Nevada State College, Henderson, NV, to expand nursing           500,000
 education, including equipment.......................
New York University Langone Medical Center, New York,            750,000
 NY, for facilities and equipment.....................
Norman Regional Health System, Norman, OK, for                   200,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
North Carolina A&T State University, Greensboro, NC,             125,000
 for the development of nurse training programs.......
North Idaho College, Coeur d'Alene, ID, for health               100,000
 professions training.................................
NorthWest Arkansas Community College, Bentonville, AR,           460,000
 for expanding a nurse training program, including
 equipment............................................
Northwest Community Health Care, Pascoag, RI, for                200,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Northwest Hospital & Medical Center, Seattle, WA, for            250,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Northwest Mississippi Community College, Senatobia,              500,000
 MS, for facilities and equipment.....................
Northwest Nazarene University, Nampa, ID, for                    200,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL, for           100,000
 health information technology........................
Oglala Sioux Tribe, Pine Ridge, SD, for facilities and           800,000
 equipment relating to emergency medicine.............
Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center,               200,000
 Columbus, OH, for facilities and equipment...........
Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City,             200,000
 OK, for facilities and equipment.....................
Orange County Government, Orlando, FL, for facilities            200,000
 and equipment........................................
Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR, for             100,000
 equipment............................................
Pacific Northwest Diabetes Research Institute,                   150,000
 Seattle, WA, for equipment...........................
Palmer College, Davenport, IA, and the Myrna Brind               400,000
 Center of Integrative Medicine in Philadelphia, PA,
 to develop a model integrative health care program
 for the treatment of pain............................
Parkland Health and Hospital System, Dallas, TX, for             150,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Pen Bay Healthcare, Rockport, ME, for health                     500,000
 professions training.................................
Phoebe Putney Health System, Albany, GA, for health              100,000
 care services for students...........................
PinnacleHealth System, Harrisburg, PA, for equipment..           100,000
Pioneer Valley Life Science Institute, Springfield,              300,000
 MA, for medical research equipment and technology....
Pocono Medical Center, East Stroudsburg, PA, for                 100,000
 facilities and equipment relating to cancer..........
Preferred Health Care, Lancaster, PA, for health                 100,000
 information technology...............................
Primary Care Association of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, to           1,850,000
 provide service enhancements and outreach............
Providence St Mary Medical Center, Walla Walla, WA,              250,000
 for cancer treatment equipment.......................
Providence Community Health Centers, Providence, RI,             400,000
 for facilities and equipment.........................
Puget Sound Neighborhood Health Centers, Seattle, WA,            650,000
 for facilities and equipment.........................
Reading Hospital and Medical Center, Reading, PA, for            100,000
 equipment............................................
Renown Health, Reno, NV, for nursing programs,                   390,000
 including professional development...................
Resurrection Health Care, Chicago, IL, for equipment..           400,000
Rhode Island Free Clinic, Providence, RI, for                    100,000
 supportive services and supplies.....................
Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, for equipment..           100,000
Rice University, Houston, TX, for facilities and                 300,000
 equipment............................................
Riverside County Regional Medical Center, Moreno                 100,000
 Valley, CA, for a rural mobile health clinic.........
Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Rosebud, SD, for facilities and             600,000
 equipment relating to emergency medical ser-  vices..
Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown, PA, for equipment...           100,000
Saint Anselm College, Manchester, NH, for facilities             800,000
 and equipment........................................
Saint Barnabas Health Care System Foundation, West               300,000
 Orange, NJ, for health information technology........
Saint Francis Hospital Foundation, Wilmington, DE, for           175,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Saint Joseph College, West Hartford, CT, for equipment           175,000
 at the School of Pharmacy............................
Saint Luke's Health System, Boise, ID, for expansion             100,000
 of services for children.............................
Saint Luke's Hospital and Health Network, Bethlehem,             100,000
 PA, for equipment....................................
Saint Mary's Hospital, Waterbury, CT, for facilities             310,000
 and equipment........................................
Saint Patrick Hospital, Missoula, MT, to implement an            150,000
 electronic health record system......................
Saint Vincent Healthcare Foundation, Billings, MT, for           350,000
 facilities and equipment for the Montana Pediatric
 Project..............................................
Samuel U Rodgers Health Center Inc, Kansas City, MO,           1,500,000
 for facilities and equipment.........................
Schuylkill Health System, Pottsville, PA, for                    100,000
 equipment............................................
Seton Hill University, Greensburg, PA, for equipment             100,000
 relating to dental health education..................
Shands Healthcare, Gainesville, FL, for equipment.....           100,000
Sharon Regional Health System, Sharon, PA, for                   100,000
 equipment............................................
Shepherd Center, Atlanta, GA, for facilities and                 200,000
 equipment............................................
Sierra County, Truth or Consequences, NM, for                    125,000
 facilities and equipment at the Sierra Vista Hospital
Signature Healthcare, Brockton, MA, for equipment.....           100,000
Skagit Valley Hospital, Mount Vernon, WA, for                    350,000
 equipment............................................
South Shore Hospital, Weymouth, MA, for equipment.....           300,000
Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville, IL, for a            500,000
 nursing education program, including equipment.......
Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX, for                   300,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Southwest Tennessee Community College, Memphis, TN,              400,000
 for health professions training......................
Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System, Spartanburg,             500,000
 SC, for professional development.....................
SSM Cardinal Glennon Children's Hospital, Saint Louis,         1,000,000
 MO, for facilities and equipment.....................
Saint Bernard's Development Foundation, Jonesboro, AR,           300,000
 for equipment and supplies for the Flo and Phil Jones
 Hospice House........................................
Saint Claire Regional Medical Center, Morehead, KY,              100,000
 for facilities and equipment.........................
Saint Joseph Health System, Tawas City, MI, for                  100,000
 equipment............................................
Saint Joseph Hospital, Nashua, NH, for facilities and            400,000
 equipment............................................
Saint Joseph's Mercy Health Foundation, Hot Springs,             200,000
 AR, for equipment....................................
Saint Jude Children's Medical Center, Memphis, TN, for         3,111,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Saint Mary's Hospital, Passaic, NJ, for facilities and           550,000
 equipment............................................
Saint Vincent Charity and Saint John West Shore                  400,000
 Hospitals, Cleveland, OH, for facilities and equip-
 ment.................................................
State of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, for facilities,              2,000,000
 equipment and training related to medical surge
 capacity and mass casualty events....................
Staten Island University Hospital, Staten Island, NY,            200,000
 for facilities and equipment.........................
Stewart-Marchman-Act Foundation, Inc, Daytona Beach,             100,000
 FL, for facilities and equipment.....................
Straub Hospital Burn Center, Honolulu, HI, for                   150,000
 equipment............................................
Suffolk County Department of Health Services,                    200,000
 Hauppauge, NY, to implement an electronic health
 record system........................................
Susquehanna Health, Williamsport, PA, for equipment...           100,000
Temple University Health System, Philadelphia, PA, for           100,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Tennessee Department of Health, Nashville, TN, for               150,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Texas Health Institute, Austin, TX, for facilities and           150,000
 equipment............................................
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center at El               400,000
 Paso, TX, for facilities and equipment...............
Texas Tech University Paul L Foster School of                    100,000
 Medicine, El Paso, TX, for facilities and equipment..
Texas Woman's University, Denton, TX, for facilities             300,000
 and equipment........................................
The Manor, Jonesville, MI, for facilities and                    150,000
 equipment at the Treatment and Counseling Center.....
Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia,              100,000
 PA, for facilities and equipment.....................
Touro University Nevada, Henderson, NV, for facilities           750,000
 and equipment at the Gerontology Center..............
Town of Gilbert, Gilbert, WV, for facilities and               3,000,000
 equipment for a primary health care center...........
TriHealth, Cincinnati, OH, for facilities and                    100,000
 equipment............................................
Trinitas Health Foundation, Elizabeth, NJ, for                   400,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Tulsa Fire Department, Tulsa, OK, for equipment.......           100,000
Tyrone Hospital, Tyrone, PA, for facilities and                  100,000
 equipment............................................
UMass Memorial Health Care, Worcester, MA, for health            200,000
 information technology...............................
Union Hospital, Terre Haute, IN, for facilities and              100,000
 equipment............................................
University Medical Center at Brackenridge, Austin, TX,           150,000
 for facilities and equipment.........................
University Medical Center of Southern Nevada, Las              1,200,000
 Vegas, NV, for facilities and equipment for the
 Women's Care and Birth Center........................
University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, for facilities         10,250,000
 and equipment........................................
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little              300,000
 Rock, AR, for facilities and equipment at the
 Winthrop P Rockefeller Cancer Institute..............
University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA,              600,000
 for facilities and equipment at the School of Medi-
 cine.................................................
University of Colorado--Denver, Aurora, CO, to expand            100,000
 physician training in rural areas....................
University of Georgia, Athens, GA, for facilities and            100,000
 equipment............................................
University of Hawaii School of Medicine, Honolulu, HI,           200,000
 to expand medical education..........................
University of Hawaii School of Nursing-Manoa,                    200,000
 Honolulu, HI, for nursing education, including equip-
  ment................................................
University of HI at Hilo, HI, for a nurse training               350,000
 program..............................................
University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, for facilities and          1,000,000
 equipment at the College of Public Health............
University of Iowa, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa           2,000,000
 City, IA, for facilities and equipment for the
 Institute for Biomedical Discovery...................
University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, for facilities and           250,000
 equipment............................................
University of Kentucky Research Foundation, Lexington,         2,000,000
 KY, for data base design and equipment...............
University of Kentucky Research Foundation, Lexington,         1,300,000
 KY, for facilities and equipment.....................
University of Kentucky Research Foundation, Lexington,         2,000,000
 KY, to expand a heart disease prevention initiative
 in rural Kentucky....................................
University of Louisville Research Foundation,                  1,000,000
 Louisville, KY, for facilities and equipment.........
University of Louisville Research Foundation,                  1,000,000
 Louisville, KY, for facilities and equipment.........
University of Louisville Research Foundation,                  2,500,000
 Louisville, KY, for facilities and equipment.........
University of Louisville Research Foundation,                    800,000
 Louisville, KY, for health professions training and
 facilities and equipment.............................
University of Maine at Augusta, Augusta, ME, for                 350,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
University of Mississippi, University, MS, for                 1,500,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
University of Mississippi, University, MS, for the               600,000
 Center for Thermal Pharmaceutical Processing,
 including facilities and equipment...................
University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS,         8,000,000
 for facilities and equipment.........................
University of Nevada School of Medicine, Reno, NV, for           750,000
 facilities and equipment at the Center for Molecular
 Medicine.............................................
University of North Alabama, Florence, AL, for nursing           100,000
 education and equipment..............................
University of North Carolina at Greensboro,                      300,000
 Greensboro, NC, for telespeech initiative including
 purchase of equipment................................
University of North Texas, Denton, TX, for facilities            350,000
 and equipment........................................
University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, for                    100,000
 equipment relating to cancer diagnostics and
 treatment............................................
University of Scranton, Scranton, PA, for nursing and            100,000
 allied health programs, including the purchase of
 equipment............................................
University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL, for health              100,000
 information systems including equipment..............
University of Southern Maine, Portland, ME, for                  300,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS,             500,000
 for a relapse prevention program, including for
 facilities and equipment.............................
University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS,           2,750,000
 for facilities and equipment.........................
University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, TN,         1,000,000
 for health professions training......................
University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, TX, for                   350,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston,            150,000
 TX, for facilities and equipment.....................
University of Texas Health Science Center at San                 300,000
 Antonio, TX, for facilities and equipment............
University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler,              300,000
 TX, for facilities and equipment.....................
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center,                   500,000
 Houston, TX, for facilities and equipment............
University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, for health             1,500,000
 information technology...............................
Utah Department of Health, Salt Lake City, UT, for               500,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Utah Department of Health, Salt Lake City, UT, for               500,000
 facilities and equipment related to outbreak
 management...........................................
Utah Department of Health, Salt Lake City, UT, for               100,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Utah Department of Health, Salt Lake City, UT, to                600,000
 expand Monticello Health Education and Screening
 Initiative...........................................
Utah Personalized Health Care Institute at the                   100,000
 University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, to establish
 a personalized medicine infrastructure...............
Utah Valley University, Orem, UT, for health                     350,000
 professions development and equipment................
Van Wert County Hospital, Van Wert, OH, for facilities           100,000
 and equipment........................................
Vermont State Colleges, Randolph Center, VT, for                 700,000
 equipment to expand nursing programs.................
Virginia State University, Petersburg, VA, for                   100,000
 facilities and equipment to expand nursing programs..
Visiting Nurse Services, Indianapolis, IN, for                   100,000
 facilities and equipment and health professions
 training.............................................
Viterbo University, La Crosse, WI, for facilities and            300,000
 equipment for the nursing school.....................
Wake County, Raleigh, NC, for facilities and equipment           300,000
Wake Health Services, Inc, Raleigh, NC, for health               300,000
 information systems including equipment..............
Washington County, Plymouth, NC, for facilities and              300,000
 equipment............................................
Washington State University, Spokane, WA, for                    900,000
 facilities and equipment for the College of Nursing..
Wesley College, Dover, DE, for renovation and                    200,000
 equipping of the nursing school......................
West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission,              4,000,000
 Charleston, WV, for facilities and equipment relating
 to healthcare training...............................
West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, for                  1,500,000
 construction of a Multiple Sclerosis Center..........
West Virginia University Health Sciences, Morgantown,          1,000,000
 WV, for facilities and equipment.....................
Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, NY, for                    150,000
 equipment............................................
Wichita County Health Center, Leoti, KS, for                     150,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Windemere Rehabilitation Facility, Oak Bluffs, MA, for           250,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Woman's Hospital, Baton Rouge, LA, for facilities and            100,000
 equipment to expand the neonatal intensive care unit.
Wood River Health Services, Hope Valley, RI, for                 200,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital, Yakima, WA, for                 100,000
 facilities and equipment to expand the pediatric
 center...............................................
York College of Pennsylvania, York, PA, for nursing              100,000
 education programs, including the purchase of
 equipment............................................
Yukon-Kuskokwim Heath Corporation, Bethel, AK, for             1,000,000
 facilities and equipment.............................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Telehealth

    The Committee provides $8,200,000 for telehealth 
activities. The fiscal year 2009 comparable level was 
$9,050,000, including $1,500,000 in Recovery Act funding. The 
budget request for fiscal year 2010 was $8,200,000. The 
telehealth program funded through the Office for the 
Advancement of Telehealth promotes the effective use of 
technologies to improve access to health services for people 
who are isolated from healthcare and distance education for 
health professionals.
    The Committee has included additional funding to support 
telehealth network grants, telehealth demonstrations, and 
telehomecare pilot projects; and to facilitate cooperation 
between health licensing boards or various States to develop 
and implement policies that will reduce statutory and 
regulatory barriers to telehealth.
    The Committee requests a report by March 15, 2010 on the 
level of cooperation among health licensing boards, the best 
models for such cooperation and the barriers to cross-state 
licensing arrangements.

Program Management

    The Committee provides $147,052,000 for program management 
activities for fiscal year 2010. The fiscal year 2009 
comparable level was $142,024,000 and the budget request for 
fiscal year 2010 was $147,052,000.
    The Committee was pleased to learn that HRSA has named a 
Chief Dental Officer. The Committee has provided funding to 
establish the Office of Oral Health and provide leadership and 
oversight of HRSA dental programs.

           HEALTH EDUCATION ASSISTANCE LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2009....................................      $2,847,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................       2,847,000
House allowance.........................................       2,847,000
Committee recommendation................................       2,847,000

    The Committee provides $1,000,000 to liquidate obligations 
from loans guaranteed before 1992, the same level as the fiscal 
year 2009 comparable level and the budget request for fiscal 
year 2010. For administration of the HEAL program including the 
Office of Default Reduction, the Committee provides $2,847,000, 
the same level as the fiscal year 2009 comparable level and the 
budget request for fiscal year 2010.
    The HEAL program insures loans to students in the health 
professions. The Budget Enforcement Act of 1990, changed the 
accounting of the HEAL program. One account is used to pay 
obligations arising from loans guaranteed prior to 1992. A 
second account was created to pay obligations and collect 
premiums on loans guaranteed in 1992 and after. Administration 
of the HEAL program is separate from administration of other 
HRSA programs.

             VACCINE INJURY COMPENSATION PROGRAM TRUST FUND

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $118,519,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     122,410,000
House allowance.........................................     122,410,000
Committee recommendation................................     122,410,000

    The Committee provides that $122,410,000 be released from 
the vaccine injury compensation trust fund in fiscal year 2010, 
of which $6,502,000 is for administrative costs. The total 
fiscal year 2009 comparable level was $118,519,000 and the 
total budget request for fiscal year 2010 was $122,410,000.
    The National Vaccine Injury Compensation program provides 
compensation for individuals with vaccine-associated injuries 
or deaths. Funds are awarded to reimburse medical expenses, 
lost earnings, pain and suffering, legal expenses, and a death 
benefit. The vaccine injury compensation trust fund is funded 
by excise taxes on certain childhood vaccines.

                  COVERED COUNTERMEASURE PROCESS FUND

Appropriations, 2009....................................................
Budget estimate, 2010...................................      $5,000,000
House allowance.........................................       5,000,000
Committee recommendation................................       5,000,000

    The Committee provides $5,000,000 for the administration of 
the Covered Countermeasure Process fund and for costs under the 
Smallpox Emergency Personal Protection Act of 2003. The fiscal 
year 2010 budget request was $5,000,000.
    The Covered Countermeasure Process fund provides 
compensation for individuals injured from the manufacture, 
administration or use of countermeasures that the Secretary has 
declared necessary to respond to a public health threat. Funds 
are available until expended.

               Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


                DISEASE CONTROL, RESEARCH, AND TRAINING

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................  $6,969,959,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   6,698,818,000
House allowance.........................................   6,644,831,000
Committee recommendation................................   6,828,810,000

\1\Includes $300,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 funding (Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee provides a program level of $6,828,810,000 
for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC]. The 
Committee recommendation includes $6,733,377,000 in budget 
authority and an additional $40,075,000 via transfers available 
under section 241 of the Public Health Service Act. The fiscal 
year 2009 comparable program level is $6,969,959,000, including 
$300,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding 
and the program level budget request for fiscal year 2010 is 
$6,698,818,000.
    The activities of the CDC focus on several major 
priorities: provide core public health functions; respond to 
urgent health threats; monitor the Nation's health using sound 
scientific methods; build the Nation's health infrastructure to 
insure our national security against bioterrorist threats; 
assure the Nation's preparedness for emerging infectious 
diseases and potential pandemics; promote women's health; and 
provide leadership in the implementation of nationwide 
prevention strategies to encourage responsible behavior and 
adoption of lifestyles that are conducive to good health.

                          INFECTIOUS DISEASES

    The Committee recommends $1,978,204,000 for infectious 
disease related programs at the CDC. The fiscal year 2009 
comparable level was $2,247,827,000, including $300,000,000 in 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds. The budget 
request for fiscal year 2010 was $2,019,622,000. The Committee 
recommendation includes $8,905,000 in transfers available under 
section 241 of the Public Health Service Act.
    The Coordinating Center for Infectious Disease includes: 
zoonotic, vector borne, and enteric diseases; preparedness, 
detection and control of infectious diseases; HIV/AIDS, viral 
hepatitis, STD and TB prevention; and immunization and 
respiratory diseases.

Zoonotic, Vector Borne, and Enteric Diseases

    The Committee has included $67,638,000 for fiscal year 2010 
for this Center. The fiscal year 2009 level was $67,978,000 and 
the 2010 budget request was $73,122,000. This Center provides 
outbreak investigation, infection control and scientific 
evaluations of zoonotic, vector borne and enteric diseases; and 
conducts food-borne illness surveillance and investigation.
    The Committee directs the CDC to include in its annual 
budget justification an itemized expenditure of funds for each 
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome [CFS] research project or activity in 
the following five functional expense categories: surveillance 
and epidemiology; clinical assessment and evaluation; objective 
diagnosis and pathophysiology; treatment and intervention; and 
education, including the CFS marketing campaign and healthcare 
provider education. The justification should include a 
breakdown of intramural and extramural spending and should 
reflect funding mechanisms used for extramural support, such as 
contracts, cooperative agreements and grants.
    The Committee recognizes that the CDC has accumulated a 
vast amount of research data related to CFS. This data has 
great potential to facilitate continuing research. The 
Committee directs the CDC to report to the Committee by May 1, 
2010 on the possibility of and barriers to making this data 
public in a way that preserves the privacy of research 
participants. The Committee feels strongly that scientists 
working on CFS would benefit from access to the epidemiologic, 
clinical and laboratory data from studies conducted by the CFS 
research program.

Preparedness, Detection and Control of Infectious Diseases

    The Committee has included $162,426,000 for fiscal year 
2010 for this Center. The comparable level for fiscal year 2009 
was $157,426,000 and the budget request for fiscal year 2010 
was $168,741,000. This Center builds epidemiology and 
laboratory capacity and provides technical assistance to 
identify and monitor infectious diseases.
    Antimicrobial Resistance.--The Committee remains concerned 
by the emergence of life-threatening antimicrobial resistant 
pathogens in hospital and community settings. The Committee is 
pleased that CDC has set up a surveillance network similar to a 
sentinel surveillance system and encourages CDC to continue 
making such systems easy to use and compatible with the 
emergence of health information technology.
    Lyme Disease.--The Committee encourages the CDC to expand 
its activities related to developing sensitive and more 
accurate diagnostic tools and tests for Lyme disease including 
the timely evaluation of emerging diagnostic methods and 
improving utilization of diagnostic testing to account for the 
multiple clinical manifestations of acute and chronic Lyme 
disease; to expand its epidemiological research activities on 
tick-borne diseases [TBDs] to include an objective to determine 
the long-term course of illness for Lyme disease; to improve 
surveillance and reporting of Lyme and other TBDs in order to 
produce more accurate data on the prevalence of the Lyme and 
other TBDs; to evaluate the feasibility of developing a 
national reporting system on Lyme including laboratory 
reporting; and to expand prevention of Lyme and TBDs through 
increased community-based public education and creating a 
physician education program that includes the full spectrum of 
scientific research on the diseases.
    Syringe Re-use.--The Committee remains concerned about the 
re-use of syringes and other infection control errors. The 
Committee is pleased that the CDC Healthcare Infection Control 
Practices Advisory Committee is at work developing additional 
infection control guidance specifically for outpatient settings 
and that the CDC is planning to convene meetings with academia 
and industry to explore the development of ``fail safe'' 
systems and products. In addition, the Committee continues to 
support the CDC's education and outreach campaign. The 
Committee requests that the CDC report to the Committee on the 
progress of those efforts by April 15, 2010.

HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention

    The Committee has included $1,028,680,000 for the 
activities at this Center in fiscal year 2010. The fiscal year 
2009 level was $1,006,375,000 and the 2010 budget request was 
$1,060,299,000. The Committee has included funding for the 
following activities at the following amounts:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    Fiscal year
                            Activity                                   2009         Fiscal year      Committee
                                                                    comparable      2010 budget   recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
HIV/AIDS........................................................         691,861         744,914         711,045
Viral Hepatitis.................................................          18,316          18,367          18,367
Tuberculosis....................................................         143,870         144,268         144,268
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Hepatitis Testing.--The Committee encourages the CDC to 
expand testing and continue to validate interventions focused 
on the mother-child transmission issue and other efforts 
targeted on the prevention of the hepatitis B virus in the 
Asian-American community where currently 1 in 10 individuals 
are infected with the hepatitis B virus.
    HIV/AIDS.--Within the amount made available for HIV/AIDS, 
increases over last year's level have been provided for the 
President's proposals on service integration, data collection 
and additional testing. All other activities, including the 
Early Diagnosis and Screening program have been included at the 
2009 level. The Committee again notes that the Early Diagnosis 
and Screening funds may be awarded to States newly eligible for 
the program in fiscal year 2010. No State may be eligible for 
more than $1,000,000. The Committee intends that the amounts 
that have not been awarded by May 31, 2010 shall be awarded for 
other HIV testing programs. The Committee commends the 
Department for the prioritization of the domestic HIV/AIDS 
testing among African-Americans. The Committee requests a 
comprehensive report on the progress of this initiative to date 
to be included in fiscal year 2011 budget justification. The 
Committee continues to be supportive of CDC's promotion of 
rapid HIV tests in its HIV/AIDS testing activities.
    Infertility Prevention Program.--The Committee has included 
additional funding for the Infertility Prevention program.
    Microbicides.--The Committee requests the CDC continue to 
include information in the fiscal year 2011 budget 
justification on the amount of anticipated and actual funding 
it allocates to activities related to research and development 
of microbicides for HIV prevention. The Committee urges CDC to 
work with NIH, USAID, and other appropriate agencies to develop 
processes for coordinated investment and prioritization for 
microbicide development, approval, and access.
    Prostatitis.--Up to 20 percent of chronic prostatitis may 
be due to sexually transmitted diseases [STDs] that go 
undiagnosed. The Committee encourages the CDC to consider 
updating the sexually transmitted disease guidelines with a new 
focus on the prostate as a reservoir for hidden infection. The 
Committee recommends that the National Center for Infectious 
Disease work with other centers in the CDC with special 
expertise to test for all microbial life and their relation to 
prostatic disease and to examine prostatic fluid, semen, and 
prostatic tissue pathology for other theories of causation.
    Viral Hepatitis.--The Committee expects the CDC to put 
forward a professional judgment budget for viral hepatitis no 
later than August 15, 2010.

Immunization and Respiratory Diseases

    The Committee has included a program level of $719,460,000 
for the activities of this Center in fiscal year 2010. The 
comparable level for fiscal year 2009 was $1,016,048,000 
including $300,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment 
Act funding. The budget request for fiscal year 2010 included 
$717,460,000 for this Center. The Committee recommendation 
includes $8,905,000 in transfers available under section 241 of 
the Public Health Service Act.
    The Committee recommendation includes funding for the 
following activities in the following amounts:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    Fiscal year
                            Activity                                   2009         Fiscal year      Committee
                                                                    comparable      2010 budget   recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Section 317 Immunization Program................................         795,901         496,847         496,847
Program Operations..............................................          61,458          61,621          63,621
    Vaccine Tracking............................................           4,738           4,747           4,747
    National Immunization Survey................................          12,794          12,864          12,864
Influenza.......................................................         158,689         158,992         158,992
    Pandemic Influenza..........................................         156,046         156,344         156,344
    Seasonal Influenza..........................................           2,643           2,648           2,648
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee is concerned by the lack of research on the 
impact of administering multiple vaccines within the first 2 
years of life. The Committee directs that no less than 
$2,000,000 of the funds appropriated for vaccine safety be used 
for research on the possible health effects of multiple 
vaccinations.
    The Committee is concerned that the number of doses of 
routinely recommended childhood vaccines in the pediatric 
vaccine stockpile of the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention has consistently remained well below the 6-month 
supply that is required under current law. The Committee 
understands that this target represents a significantly larger 
investment than is currently made under the Vaccines for 
Children program. The Committee is pleased that the CDC has 
formed a workgroup to review the stockpile target amounts to 
determine an appropriate supply target for each type of 
vaccine. The Committee requests that CDC include in that review 
a timetable for meeting the agreed-upon targets.
    The Committee continues to be pleased that CDC provides 
funding to States or local organizations that receive section 
317 immunization grant funds to develop community adolescent 
and adult immunization planning demonstrations to achieve 90 
percent immunization coverage for vaccines routinely 
recommended for adolescents and adults, and encourages CDC to 
continue to support these efforts. These models should include 
existing and new efforts planned within existing resources; new 
activities needed and estimates for those needs. The Committee 
expects a status report by February 1, 2010, on these 
demonstrations.
    The Committee is also pleased with the report on estimated 
funding needs of the section 317 immunization program that CDC 
provided, and requests that the report be updated and submitted 
next year by February 1, 2010, to reflect fiscal year 2011 cost 
estimates. The updated report also should include an estimate 
of optimum State and local operations funding as well as CDC 
operations funding needed relative to current levels to conduct 
and support childhood, adolescent and adult programs. This 
estimate should include the cost of vaccine administration; 
surveillance and assessment of changes in immunization rates; 
vaccine storage, handling and quality assurance; implementation 
of centralized vaccine distribution and other vaccine business 
improvement practices; needs to support provider and public 
outreach and education on new vaccines; identification of 
barriers to immunization and strategies to address such 
barriers; maintenance, utilization, and enhancement of 
Immunization Information Systems including integration with 
public health preparedness and other electronic medical record 
systems; innovative strategies to increase coverage rates in 
hard-to-reach populations and geographic pockets of need; 
vaccine safety and other non-vaccine resource needs of a 
comprehensive immunization program. While the Committee 
understands that the 317 program does not pay administration 
fees, it is nonetheless an authorized expenditure, and the 
Committee continues to request that this estimate be included 
in the report.
    Federal and State programs vary greatly on the 
reimbursement rates for vaccine administration for children, 
adolescents, and adults. The updated report should include 
information from the National Vaccine Advisory Financing 
Workgroup's Report on Vaccine Financing on what the most 
appropriate immunization administration reimbursement rate 
would be to optimize immunization rates, whether or not they 
are administered through the section 317 program. The report 
should include whether an antigen-based vaccine administration 
system would remove the financial disincentive for combination 
vaccines and increasing the use of combination vaccines. In 
addition, the Committee requests that the 317 report also 
include a discussion of specific strategies to reduce barriers 
and increase adult immunization rates in the United States.
    As CDC implements the $300,000,000 supplemental for the 
section 317 program that was included under the American 
Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the Committee requests an update 
in the fiscal year 2011 budget justification as to how the 
funds are being spent, what populations are being targeted in 
what venues, and what impact the increased funding is having on 
increasing immunization rates.

                            HEALTH PROMOTION

    The Coordinating Center for Health Promotion includes the 
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention, Health 
Promotion and Genomics and the National Center for Birth 
Defects and Developmental Disabilities.

       CHRONIC DISEASE PREVENTION, HEALTH PROMOTION, AND GENOMICS

    The Committee has recommended $946,348,000 for chronic 
disease prevention, health promotion and genomics. The 
comparable level for fiscal year 2009 was $881,686,000 and the 
budget request for 2010 was $896,239,000. Within the total 
provided, the following amounts are available for the following 
categories of funding:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    Fiscal year
                            Activity                                   2009         Fiscal year      Committee
                                                                    comparable      2010 budget   recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Heart Disease and Stroke........................................          54,096          54,221          56,221
    Delta Health Intervention...................................           3,000           3,007           5,000
Diabetes........................................................          65,847          65,998          65,998
Cancer Prevention and Control...................................         340,300         341,081         380,234
    Breast and Cervical Cancer..................................         205,853         206,326         220,000
        WISEWOMAN...............................................          19,528          19,573          21,000
    Cancer Registries...........................................          46,366          46,472          50,000
    Colorectal Cancer...........................................          38,974          39,063          50,000
    Comprehensive Cancer........................................          16,348          16,386          25,000
    Johanna's Law...............................................           6,791           6,807           6,807
    Ovarian Cancer..............................................           5,402           5,414           6,000
    Prostate Cancer.............................................          13,245          13,275          14,000
    Skin Cancer.................................................           1,876           1,880           2,500
    Geraldine Ferraro Cancer Education Program..................           4,666           4,677           4,677
    Cancer Survivorship Resource Center.........................             779             781           1,250
Arthritis and Other Chronic Diseases............................          25,245          25,303          26,294
    Arthritis...................................................          13,287          13,318          13,318
    Epilepsy....................................................           7,958           7,976           7,976
    National Lupus Patient Registry.............................           4,000           4,009           5,000
Tobacco.........................................................         106,164         106,408         115,000
Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity........................          44,300          44,402          44,991
Health Promotion................................................          28,541          27,103          30,408
    Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System..................           7,300           7,316           7,316
    Community Health Promotion..................................           6,453           6,468           6,468
        Sleep Disorders.........................................             859             861             861
    Mind-Body Institute.........................................           1,500  ..............           1,500
    Glaucoma....................................................           3,511           3,519           3,519
    Visual Screening Education..................................           3,222           3,229           3,229
    Alzheimer's Disease.........................................           1,688           1,692           2,000
    Inflammatory Bowel Disease..................................             684             686             686
    Interstitial Cystitis.......................................             658             660             660
    Excessive Alcohol Use.......................................           1,500           1,503           3,000
    Chronic Kidney Disease......................................           2,025           2,030           2,030
School Health...................................................          57,636          62,780          57,645
    Healthy Passages............................................           3,485           3,493           3,493
    Food Allergies..............................................             496             497             497
Safe Motherhood/Infant Health...................................          44,777          49,891          44,782
    Pre Term Birth..............................................           2,000           2,005           2,005
    Sudden Infant Death Syndrome................................             207             207             207
Oral Health.....................................................          13,044          13,074          15,000
Prevention Centers..............................................          31,132          31,203          35,000
Healthy Communities.............................................          22,771          22,823          22,823
Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health................          35,553          39,644          39,644
Genomics........................................................          12,280          12,308          12,308
    Primary Immune Deficiency Syndrome..........................           3,100           3,107           3,107
    Public Health Genomics......................................           9,180           9,201           9,201
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Alzheimer's Disease.--The Committee has included $2,000,000 
to expand community education demonstration projects to 
additional high-risk populations, including the Hispanic/Latino 
population; expand and enhance the population-based 
surveillance system for cognitive health; develop interventions 
that will improve the coordination of care for those with 
cognitive impairment and co-existing chronic disease; and 
develop and disseminate information to the general public and 
primary care physicians about early detection of Alzheimer's 
disease.
    Cancer.--Approximately 1.4 million people are expected to 
be diagnosed with cancer this year. However, cancer death rates 
in the United States have actually dropped each year since 
1990. The Committee is aware that there are almost 12 million 
Americans alive who have survived a cancer diagnosis. The 
Committee feels strongly that early detection is the best 
chance Americans have in fighting cancer. For that reason, the 
Committee has included a cancer initiative--an additional 
$40,000,000 meant to expand screening programs, outreach and 
education programs, resources for cancer survivors, and 
registries that help scientists search for better treatments. 
Within these funds, the Committee directs the CDC to look for 
ways to reduce disparities in cancer screening.
    The Committee is aware of the passage of the Conquer 
Childhood Cancer Act, which requires the CDC to track the 
epidemiology of pediatric cancer in a comprehensive nationwide 
registry. The Committee is aware that the current cancer 
registry program contains data on pediatric cancer. Therefore, 
the Committee requests that the CDC provide the subcommittee 
with a briefing on the options for developing a registry that 
can comply with the statute while taking advantage of the 
investments already made by the subcommittee. The briefing 
should include associated costs, barriers to its development, 
and how best to maximize the scientific benefit of a nationwide 
registry to researchers in the field of pediatric cancer.
    Chronic Kidney Disease.--The Committee supports continued 
planning for capacity and infrastructure at CDC for a kidney 
disease program and a CKD surveillance system. The Committee is 
pleased that CDC convened an expert panel on CKD, and 
encourages CDC to prioritize and begin implementation of the 
recommendations.
    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.--The Committee is 
pleased that the CDC has taken initial steps to collect COPD-
related data in the National Health and Nutrition Examination 
Survey and in the National Health Interview Survey.
    Coordination.--The Committee recognizes that many of CDC's 
chronic disease prevention programs include nutrition and 
physical activity interventions. The Committee encourages 
enhanced coordination among these programs and expects CDC to 
report within 90 days of enactment on its efforts to coordinate 
the goals of its chronic disease prevention and health 
promotion programs.
    Deep Vein Thrombosis.--The Committee is aware of the 
Surgeon General's Call to Action to Prevent Deep Vein 
Thrombosis [DVT] and Pulmonary Embolism [PE]. The Committee 
encourages the CDC to consider creating a coordinated plan to 
reduce the prevalence of DVT and PE nationwide.
    Diabetes.--The Committee urges that resources be put toward 
vital activities within the Division of Diabetes Translation, 
such as: public health surveillance; translating research 
findings into clinical and public health practice; developing 
and maintaining State-based diabetes prevention and control 
programs; and supporting outreach and education.
    Diabetes in Native Americans/Native Hawaiians.--The high 
incidence of diabetes among Native American, Native Alaskan, 
and Native Hawaiian populations persists. The Committee is 
pleased with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 
efforts to target this population, in particular, to assist the 
leadership of Native Hawaiian and Pacific Basin Islander 
communities. It is important to incorporate traditional healing 
concepts and to develop partnerships with community health 
centers. The Committee encourages CDC to build on all its 
historical efforts in this regard.
    Diabetes and Women's Health.--The Committee is concerned by 
the rising incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although the 
onset of type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed through 
prevention methods, obstetricians and other women's healthcare 
providers and their patients are often unaware of the woman's 
later risk and need for follow-up and preventive measures. Less 
than one-half of women with gestational diabetes receive 
recommended glucose testing at a postpartum visit. The 
Committee encourages the CDC to promote education and awareness 
among both patients and providers.
    Epilepsy.--The Committee encourages the CDC to develop 
national outcome measurement protocols to evaluate the impact 
public health programs have on employment, school, social life, 
and general well being. The findings of these measures will 
help families understand the relationships between medications 
and co-morbid conditions and epilepsy, and will help to build a 
platform for a national call to action for additional training 
for schools, employers, first responders and adult day care 
providers. In addition, the Committee encourages CDC to 
establish Regional Epilepsy Epidemiology Centers of Excellence 
to conduct greater surveillance of the causes and prevalence of 
epilepsy, particularly among pediatric, elderly and veteran 
populations and those suffering from related disorders such as 
autism, mental retardation, brain tumor, stroke, traumatic 
brain injury and a variety of genetic syndromes. The Committee 
encourages CDC to share data collected from this initiative 
with the National Institutes of Health and the Departments of 
Defense and Veterans Administration.
    Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Information.--The Committee is 
pleased by the report from the CDC outlining the status of the 
food allergy and anaphylaxis information center and requests 
that the report be updated in the fiscal year 2011 budget 
justification.
    Heart Disease and Stroke.--The Committee supports the CDC's 
effort to work collaboratively with States to establish a 
cardiovascular disease surveillance system to monitor and track 
these disorders at the National, State, and local levels.
    The Mississippi Delta Region experiences some of the 
Nation's highest rates of chronic diseases, such as diabetes, 
hypertension, obesity, heart disease, and stroke. The Committee 
recognizes CDC's expertise in implementing research and 
programs to prevent the leading causes of death and disability. 
The Committee has provided a total of $5,000,000 to expand 
CDC's background community assessment of health and related 
social and environmental conditions in the Delta.
    Inflammatory Bowel Disease.--The Committee continues to 
support CDC's inflammatory bowel disease epidemiology study and 
is pleased with the research done to date. The Committee 
encourages the CDC to consider the establishment of a pediatric 
patient registry.
    Interstitial Cystitis.--The Committee is pleased with CDC's 
education and awareness campaigns on interstitial cystitis. 
Funding is included to continue education outreach activities 
to healthcare providers.
    Lupus.--The Committee remains committed to the objective of 
developing reliable epidemiological data on the incidence and 
prevalence of all forms of lupus among various ethnic and 
racial groups. The Committee has included additional funding to 
continue to expand the CDC National Lupus Patient Registry and 
address the epidemiological gaps among Hispanics/Latinos, Asian 
Americans, and Native Americans.
    Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity.--Within the 
total provided, the Committee has included no less than 
$500,000 to continue a study by the Institute of Medicine [IOM] 
that will examine and provide recommendations regarding front-
of-package nutrition symbols. These should include, but not be 
limited to, a review of systems being used by manufacturers, 
supermarkets, health organizations, and governments in the 
United States and abroad and the overall merits of front-label 
nutrition icons, the advantages and disadvantages of various 
approaches, and the potential benefits of a single, 
standardized front-label food guidance system regulated by the 
Food and Drug Administration. Based upon its work, the IOM 
should recommend one or several of the systems, along with 
means of maximizing the use and effectiveness of front-label 
symbols, that it has identified as best able to promote 
consumers' health.
    National Youth Fitness and Health Study.--Prior to the 
NCYFS in the mid-1980s, the United States had conducted a 
decennial, national fitness studies in the mid-1950s, mid-
1960s, and mid-1970s. After a more than 20 year gap, the 
Committee believes that repeating and enhancing this survey is 
a critical investment that can make a difference in improving 
the health of our Nation's youth.
    Obesity.--The Committee recognizes the importance of the 
built environment to promoting healthy behaviors. The Committee 
encourages the CDC to work with the Secretary of 
Transportation, CDC grantees and local transit officials to 
coordinate the goals of population level prevention programs 
with transportation projects and infrastructure that support 
healthy lifestyles and enhanced physical activity.
    Office of Smoking and Health.--The Committee recognizes 
that efforts to reduce smoking and the health consequences of 
tobacco use are among the most effective and cost-effective 
investments in prevention that can be made. The Committee is 
pleased with the work underway to expand the Environmental 
Health Laboratory's effort to analyze tobacco products and 
cigarette smoke based on the increase provided in fiscal years 
2008 and 2009. The Committee expects the Office of Smoking and 
Health [OSH] to transfer no less than $4,000,000 above last 
year's transfer level to the Environmental Health Laboratory to 
support this work. The Committee notes that this transfer is to 
be provided by OSH to the lab in a manner that supplements and 
in no way replaces existing funding for tobacco-related 
activities. The Committee urges that the Office on Smoking and 
Health, as well as the Environmental Health Laboratory, provide 
assistance and coordinate with the new Center for Tobacco 
Products at the FDA.
    In addition, the Committee recognizes the effectiveness of 
State and national counter-marketing campaigns in reducing 
youth tobacco use and is aware of the diminishing resources at 
the State level for such efforts. The Committee has provided an 
increase for tobacco prevention activities to support expanded 
counter marketing programs.
    Oral Health.--The Committee has included funding to prevent 
oral diseases recognizes that to effectively reduce disparities 
in oral disease will require additional, sustained investments 
in proven strategies at the State and local levels. The 
Committee has provided funding for States to strengthen their 
capacities to assess the prevalence of oral diseases and the 
associated health burden, to target resources and interventions 
and prevention programs to the underserved, and to evaluate 
changes in policies and programs. The Committee encourages the 
CDC to advance efforts to reduce the health disparities and 
burden from oral diseases, including those that are linked to 
chronic diseases.
    Physical Fitness in Underserved Communities.--The Committee 
is particularly concerned by the disparity in obesity rates for 
African-American and Hispanic/Latino children. The Committee 
encourages CDC to promote school-based and after-school 
programs that combine physical fitness and nutrition education, 
and appeal to children in underserved communities.
    Preterm Birth.--The Committee encourages the CDC to expand 
epidemiological research on the causes and prevention of 
preterm birth and to establish systems for the collection of 
maternal-infant clinical and biomedical information to link 
with the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System in an 
effort to identify ways to prevent preterm birth and reduce 
racial disparities.
    Prevention Research Centers.--The Committee has included 
increased funding to support additional Comprehensive Centers.
    Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases.--The Committee remains 
strongly supportive of this program and believes it has 
demonstrated success in identifying--and moving into 
treatment--persons with undiagnosed diseases that pose a public 
health threat.
    Psoriasis.--The Committee is concerned that there is a lack 
of epidemiological and longitudinal data on individuals with 
psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, including children and 
adolescents. The Committee encourages CDC to undertake data 
collection efforts in order to better understand the co-
morbidities associated with psoriasis, examine the relationship 
of psoriasis to other public health concerns such as the high 
rate of smoking and obesity among those with the disease, and 
gain insight into the long-term impact and treatment of these 
two conditions. The Committee encourages the CDC to examine and 
develop options and recommendations for psoriasis and psoriatic 
arthritis data collection, including a registry.
    Scleroderma.--The Committee continues to encourage CDC to 
undertake steps to increase awareness in the public and larger 
healthcare community to allow for earlier diagnosis and 
treatment.
    Underage Drinking Risk Monitoring Program.--The Committee 
recognizes the importance of monitoring risk factors which 
science has demonstrated contribute to youth drinking, and 
therefore has included additional funding for the CDC to 
develop and continue its work to monitor and report on the 
level of risk faced by youth from exposure to alcohol 
advertising.
    Vision Screening and Education Program.--The Committee 
supports the development of eye disease surveillance and 
evaluation systems so that our Nation has much-needed 
epidemiological data to formulate and evaluate strategies to 
prevent and reduce vision loss and eye disease.

    BIRTH DEFECTS, DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES, DISABILITY AND HEALTH

    The Committee has included $144,850,000 for birth defects, 
developmental disabilities, disability and health in fiscal 
year 2010. The comparable level for 2009 was $138,022,000 and 
the 2010 budget request was $142,016,000.
    Within the total provided, the following amounts are 
provided for the following categories of funding:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    Fiscal year
                            Activity                                   2009         Fiscal year      Committee
                                                                    comparable      2010 budget   recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities....................          42,059          42,176          42,494
    Birth Defects...............................................          21,123          21,182          21,500
    Craniofacial Malformation...................................           1,750           1,755           2,000
    Fetal Death.................................................             844             846             846
    Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia................................             246             247             247
    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome......................................          10,112          10,140          10,140
    Folic Acid..................................................           2,818           2,826           2,826
    Infant Health...............................................           8,006           8,028           8,028
Human Development and Disability................................          76,106          79,928          82,444
    Disability and Health.......................................          13,572          13,611          13,611
    Charcot Marie Tooth Disorders...............................  ..............  ..............           1,000
    Limb Loss...................................................           2,898           2,906           2,906
    Tourette Syndrome...........................................           1,744           1,749           1,749
    Early Hearing Detection and Intervention....................          10,858          10,888          10,888
    Muscular Dystrophy..........................................           6,274           6,291           6,291
    Healthy Athletes............................................           5,519           5,534           5,534
    Paralysis Resource Center...................................           5,727           7,748           7,748
    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder....................           1,746           1,751           1,751
    Fragile X...................................................           1,900           1,905           1,905
    Spina Bifida................................................           5,468           5,483           7,000
    Autism......................................................          20,400          22,061          22,061
Blood Disorders.................................................          19,857          19,912          19,912
    Hemophilia..................................................          17,155          17,203          17,203
    Thallasemia.................................................           1,860           1,865           1,865
    Diamond Blackfan Anemia.....................................             516             517             517
    Hemachromatosis.............................................             326             327             327
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Attention-deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.--The Committee 
continues to support the AD/HD activities of the CDC, including 
support to maintain and expand education and outreach.
    Congenital Muscular Dystrophy.--The Committee is aware 
that, despite available genetic tests, congenital muscular 
dystrophy [CMD] is often misdiagnosed and medical care is 
variable. The Committee encourages the CDC to consider 
expanding on existing infrastructure such as the MD Star Net, 
to track diagnosis, care and prognosis in the CMDs.
    Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disorders.--The Committee has included 
funding to establish a national CMT resource center within the 
CDC.
    Craniofacial Malformation.--The Committee has included 
additional funding to support the continued analysis of data 
from the quality of life surveys of children with oral clefts 
completed in 2008. The Committee expects the increased funding 
to be used to further evaluate the health-related quality of 
life of children with oral clefts including the effect of 
residual impairment (speech, hearing, eating, facial 
appearance). Specifically, quality of life should include the 
behavioral and emotional health of the child, issues related to 
separation anxiety, and the impact of residual impairment on 
the family.
    Fragile X.--The Committee encourages the CDC to focus its 
efforts on identifying ongoing needs, effective treatments and 
positive outcomes for families by increasing epidemiological 
research, surveillance, screening efforts, and the introduction 
of early interventions and support for individuals living with 
Fragile X Syndrome and Associated Disorders. The Committee 
commends the CDC's current collaboration with NICHD and the 
newly formed Fragile X Clinical & Research Consortium. The 
Committee encourages the CDC to focus funds within the Fragile 
X program on the continued growth and development of 
initiatives that support health promotion activities and foster 
rapid, high-impact translational research practice for the 
successful treatment of Fragile X Syndrome and Associated 
Disorders, including ongoing collaborative activities with the 
Fragile X Clinical & Research Consortium. The Committee directs 
the CDC to provide to the Committee a progress report on all 
Fragile X activities in the fiscal year 2011 budget 
justification.
    Hemophilia.--The Committee recognizes the importance of the 
CDC hemophilia program. This program remains an essential part 
of CDC's blood disorders programs and needs to be maintained, 
in order to respond to increasing needs of men and women with 
bleeding and clotting disorders.
    Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia.--The Committee 
encourages the CDC to consider establishing a resource center 
to increase identification of people affected with HHT, and 
increase knowledge, education and outreach of this largely 
preventable condition. In addition, the Committee encourages 
the CDC to create a multi-center clinical database to collect 
and analyze data, support epidemiology studies, provide 
surveillance, train healthcare professionals and improve 
outcomes and quality of life for those with HHT.
    Infant Mortality.--The Committee is concerned that declines 
in infant mortality have stalled in the United States. Each 
year 12 percent of babies are born too early, and 8 percent are 
born with low birth-weight, putting them at higher risk for 
infant death and for developmental disabilities. The Committee 
notes that many experts believe that prenatal care, which 
usually begins during the first 3 months of a pregnancy, comes 
too late to prevent many serious maternal and child health 
problems. The Committee encourages CDC to study how best to 
communicate important health information with women who are 
contemplating starting or expanding their family.
    Marfan Syndrome.--The Committee encourages CDC to increase 
awareness of Marfan syndrome among the general public and 
healthcare providers.
    Paralysis.--The Committee has included additional funding 
to support the efforts to expand a paralysis resource center, 
quality of life program and access to activity-based 
rehabilitation.
    Spina Bifida.--The increase provided for the National Spina 
Bifida Program in fiscal year 2010 shall be used to support the 
implementation of the National Spina Bifida Patient Registry to 
improve the efficiency and quality of care in the Nation's 
spina bifida clinics.
    Thalassemia.--The Committee continues to support the 
thalassemia program, and encourages the CDC to work closely 
with the patient community to maximize the impact of this 
program.

                     HEALTH INFORMATION AND SERVICE

    The Coordinating Center for Health Information and Services 
includes the National Center for Health Statistics [NCHS], a 
National Center for Health Marketing, and a National Center for 
Public Health Informatics.
    The Committee recommends a program level of $291,784,000 
for Health Information and Service related activities at the 
CDC, the same as the 2010 budget request. The fiscal year 2009 
comparable program level was $279,356,000. The Committee 
intends that all activities be funded at the budget request 
level.

Health Statistics

    CDC's statistics give context and perspective on which to 
base important public health decisions. By aggregating the 
experience of individuals, CDC gains a collective understanding 
of health, collective experience with the health care system, 
and public health challenges. NCHS data are used to create a 
basis for comparisons between population groups or geographic 
areas, as well as an understanding of how trends in health can 
change and develop over time.
    The Committee commends the NCHS for fulfilling its mission 
as the Nation's premier health statistics agency and for 
ensuring the credibility and integrity of the data it produces. 
In particular, the Committee congratulates the agency for its 
timely release of critical data and encourages it to continue 
making information, including data from the National Health and 
Nutrition Examination Survey [NHANES] and the National Health 
Interview Study [HIS], accessible to the public as soon as 
possible.
    Integrity.--The Committee is concerned by cuts to sample 
sizes within the core surveys of the NCHS. The Committee 
expects NCHS to protect core surveys without comprising data 
quality or accessibility, particularly with regard to minority 
populations. Further cuts to the sample sizes of these surveys 
could compromise our ability to monitor health disparities.
    Nutritional Monitoring.--The Committee strongly supports 
national nutrition monitoring activities, continuously 
conducted jointly between the CDC and the Agricultural Research 
Service. This data collection supports management 
decisionmaking and research needed to address and improve the 
crisis of obesity, nutrition-related diseases, physical 
inactivity, food insecurity, and the poor nutritional quality 
of the American diet, as well as provide the data needed to 
protect the public against environmental pathogens and 
contaminants.
    Vital Statistics.--The Committee is supportive of the CDC's 
effort to assist health departments as they transition to 
electronic systems to collect data on vital statistics; however 
the Committee remains concerned about the integration of these 
systems into the larger transition to electronic health 
records. The Committee directs the CDC to submit a plan to the 
Committee by January 15, 2011 on the optimal design of a 
national vital statistics system and the steps needed to 
achieve that design. The report should include any barriers to 
integrating vital statistics collection into a patient's 
electronic record.

Public Health Informatics

    Information systems and information technology are critical 
to the practice of public health. CDC activities reflect 
ongoing efforts to build a national network of public health 
information systems that will enhance public health partner 
capabilities in detection and monitoring, surveillance, data 
analysis and interpretation, and other public health 
activities.
    The Committee believes that the widespread adoption of 
electronic health record systems provides a unique opportunity 
to integrate public health surveillance activities into the 
fabric of our medical system. The Committee looks to the public 
health informatics center to explore innovative approaches to 
integrate systems; build intelligent interfaces between 
clinical health systems and public health; work collaboratively 
with local, State, territorial, and other Federal agencies to 
build federated, integrated and shared solutions; and provide 
thought leadership and service within the CDC and throughout 
public health through innovative science and research to build 
greater healthcare informatics capacity for the Nation. The 
Committee strongly supports President Obama's call for 
innovation and openness in Government technology policy and 
expects the public health informatics center to evaluate and 
improve technology tools throughout the CDC according to that 
standard.

Health Marketing

    CDC links directly with the people whose health it is 
trying to improve. This activity uses commercial, nonprofit, 
and public service marketing practices to better understand 
people's health-related needs and preferences; to motivate 
changes in behaviors; and to enhance CDC's partnerships with 
public and private organizations to more effectively accomplish 
health protection and improvement.

               ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND INJURY PREVENTION

    The Coordinating Center for Environmental Health and Injury 
Prevention includes the National Center for Environmental 
Health, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, 
and the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control.
    The Committee recommends $338,786,000 for environmental 
health and injury prevention related activities at the CDC. The 
fiscal year 2009 comparable level was $330,657,000 and the 
budget request for fiscal year 2010 was $335,016,000.

Environmental Health

    Many of the public health successes that were achieved in 
the 20th century can be traced to innovations in environmental 
health practices. However, emerging pathogens and environmental 
toxins continue to pose risks to our health and significant 
challenges to public health. The task of protecting people's 
health from hazards in their environment requires a broad set 
of tools. First among these tools are surveillance and data 
collection to determine which substances in the environment are 
getting into people and to what degree. It also must be 
determined whether or not these substances are harmful to 
humans, and at what level of exposure. The Committee recommends 
$190,171,000 for Environmental Health in fiscal year 2010. The 
fiscal year 2009 comparable funding level was $185,415,000 and 
the budget request for fiscal year 2010 was $186,401,000. The 
Committee recommendation includes funding for the following 
activities:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    Fiscal year
                            Activity                                   2009         Fiscal year      Committee
                                                                    comparable      2010 budget   recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Environmental Health Laboratory.................................          42,735          42,962          42,962
    Newborn Screening Quality Assurance Program.................           6,878           6,915           6,915
    Newborn Screening for Severe Combined Immuno. Diseases......             983             988             988
Environmental Health Activities.................................          77,299          77,710          81,480
    Environmental Health........................................          15,075          15,153          16,367
    Arctic Health...............................................             292             294  ..............
    Safe Water..................................................           7,199           7,237           7,237
    Volcanic Emissions..........................................              98              99             500
    Environmental and Health Outcome Tracking Network...........          31,143          31,309          31,309
    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Registry......................           5,000           5,027           7,000
    Climate Change..............................................           7,500           7,540           7,540
    Polycythemia Vera (PV) Cluster..............................           5,000           5,027           5,027
    International Emergency & Refugee Health....................           5,992           6,024           6,500
Asthma..........................................................          30,760          30,924          30,924
Healthy Homes (formerly Childhood Lead Poisoning)...............          34,621          34,805          34,805
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Registry.--The Committee is 
pleased with CDC's work toward developing a nationwide ALS 
registry that will estimate the incidence and prevalence, 
promote a better understanding of the disease, and provide data 
that will be useful for research on improving disease 
management and developing standards of care. The Committee 
believes that a registry that includes other neurodegenerative 
disorders will provide a key resource for efforts to 
understanding the biology and epidemiology of ALS. The 
Committee intends that funds be used to design a registry that 
will be of use to biomedical researchers working in the field.
    Asthma.-- The Committee urges the CDC to work with States 
and the asthma community to implement evidence-based best 
practices for policy interventions, with specific emphasis on 
indoor and outdoor air pollution, which will reduce asthma 
morbidity and mortality.
    Biomonitoring.--The Committee is aware of the potential 
connection between environmental hazards and the incidence and 
distribution of chronic disease. Environmental hazards have 
been linked to birth defects and diseases such as asthma and 
cancer. The Committee applauds CDC's biomonitoring activities. 
Biomonitoring is a direct measure of people's exposure to toxic 
substances in the environment. Information obtained from 
biomonitoring helps public health officials determine which 
population groups are at high risk for exposure and adverse 
health effects, assess public health interventions, and monitor 
exposure trends over time.
    Built Environment.--The Committee recognizes the importance 
of the built environment to promoting healthy behaviors. The 
Committee encourages CDC to work with the Secretary of 
Transportation and encourages CDC grantees to work with local 
transit officials to coordinate the goals of population level 
prevention programs with transportation projects that support 
healthy lifestyles and enhanced physical activity.
    Childhood Lead Poisoning Screening.--The Committee commends 
CDC for supporting the development of point-of-care screening 
devices. The Committee continues to encourage CDC to develop 
and promote the use of these types of screening tools.
    Climate Change.--The Committee notes that the potential 
health effects of climate change include injuries and 
fatalities related to severe weather events and heat waves; 
changes in infectious disease patterns; changes in allergic 
symptoms; respiratory and cardiovascular disease; and 
nutritional and water shortages. The Committee has included no 
less than last year's level for the development of climate 
change mitigation and adaptation strategies.
    Health Impact Assessment.--The Committee strongly supports 
the adoption of health impact assessments and urges the CDC to 
develop a tool that would lend itself to widespread 
dissemination of this critical model.
    International Emergency and Refugee Health.--The Committee 
supports efforts to apply evidence-based public health 
strategies to mitigate the impact of conflict and other 
humanitarian emergencies on civilian populations around the 
world. Such populations are the most desperately in need of 
basic public health services, including water and sanitation, 
adequate nutrition, and protection from communicable diseases 
and war-related injuries. The Committee has included funding in 
the Environmental Health Activities line for CDC to expand 
these critical efforts in international emergency and refugee 
health. Particular emphasis for this program should be placed 
on supporting the utilization and further development of 
information systems and the public health data that 
decisionmakers need to improve program efficacy in humanitarian 
settings.
    National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network.--The 
Committee recognizes the important role of the Environmental 
and Health Outcome Tracking Network in understanding the 
relationship between environmental exposures and the incidence 
and distribution of disease, including potential health effects 
related to climate change. Health tracking, through the 
integration of environmental and health outcome data, enables 
public health officials to better target preventive services so 
that health care providers can offer better care, and the 
public will be able to develop a clear understanding of what is 
occurring in their communities and how overall health can be 
improved. The Committee is pleased that the National 
Environmental and Health Outcome Tracking Network is launching 
in 2009 and supports the continued development of the Network.
    Newborn Screening for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency 
Disease.--The Committee has been pleased that this program has 
supported pilot projects in the States and has led to the 
identification, treatment and cure of patients with this fatal 
disease.
    Volcanic Emissions.--The Committee has included additional 
funding to continue to study the impact of potentially toxic 
volcanic emissions. In particular, preexisting respiratory 
conditions such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, and emphysema 
seem to be particularly susceptible to the effects of sulfur 
dioxide. The acute and long-term impact that these emissions 
have on both the healthy and pre-disposed residents warrants 
further study. The increase provided in fiscal year 2010 is for 
the establishment of a research center that embraces a multi-
disciplinary approach in studying the short-and long-term 
health effects of the volcanic emissions.

Injury Prevention and Control

    CDC is the lead Federal agency for injury prevention and 
control. Programs are designed to prevent premature death and 
disability and reduce human suffering and medical costs caused 
by: fires and burns; poisoning; drowning; violence; lack of 
bicycle helmet use; lack of seatbelt and proper baby seat use; 
and other injuries. The national injury control program at CDC 
encompasses non-occupational injury and applied research in 
acute care and rehabilitation of the injured. Funds are 
utilized for both intramural and extramural research as well as 
assisting State and local health agencies in implementing 
injury prevention programs. The Committee recognizes the vital 
role CDC serves as a focal point for all Federal injury control 
activities.
    The Committee recommends $148,615,000 for injury prevention 
and control activities at the CDC. The comparable fiscal year 
2009 funding level was $145,242,000. The budget request for 
2010 was $148,615,000. The Committee recommendation includes 
funding for all activities at the level indicated in the 
President's budget request.
    Child Maltreatment.--Studies show the serious impact of 
adverse childhood experiences on lifelong physical and mental 
health. The Committee encourages the CDC to consider developing 
a network of researchers and research institutions to foster 
research, training, and dissemination of best practices on the 
prevention, detection, diagnosis, and treatment of child abuse 
and neglect.
    Injury Control Research Centers.--The Committee has 
included funding to support core operations, conduct the 
research necessary to fill gaps in the evidence base for 
developing and evaluating new injury control interventions and 
improve translation of effective interventions, conduct 
training of injury control professionals, and undertake other 
programmatic activities to reduce the burden of injury.
    National Violent Death Reporting System.--The Committee 
urges the CDC to continue to develop and implement this injury 
reporting system.
    Trauma Centers.--The Committee encourages the CDC to expand 
its capacity to collect and exchange information on trauma 
centers, including information on best practices to ensure 
long-term patient recovery and reintegration into work force, 
and information in inter and intrastate reimbursement of 
services at trauma centers.
    Violence Against Women.--The Committee encourages the CDC 
to increase research on the psychological sequelae of violence 
against women and expand research on special populations and 
their risk for violence, including adolescents, older women, 
ethnic and racial minorities, women with disabilities, 
immigrant women, and other affected populations.

                     OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH

    The Committee recommends a program level of $371,576,000 
for occupational safety and health programs. The fiscal year 
2009 program level was $360,059,000 and the budget request for 
fiscal year 2010 was $368,388,000. Sufficient funding has been 
provided to maintain staffing levels at the Morgantown facility 
and increase research funding at that facility.
    The CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and 
Health [NIOSH] is the only Federal agency responsible for 
conducting research and making recommendations for the 
prevention of work-related illness and injury. The NIOSH 
mission spans the spectrum of activities necessary for the 
prevention of work-related illness, injury, disability, and 
death by gathering information, conducting scientific 
biomedical research (both applied and basic), and translating 
the knowledge gained into products and services that impact 
workers in settings from corporate offices to construction 
sites to coal mines. The Committee recommendation includes 
funding for the following activities at the following amounts:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    Fiscal year
                            Activity                                   2009         Fiscal year      Committee
                                                                    comparable      2010 budget   recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Education and Research Centers..................................          23,497          23,740          25,000
Personal Protective Technology..................................          17,042          17,218          17,218
    Pan Flu Preparedness for Healthcare Workers.................           3,000           3,031           3,031
Healthier Workforce Centers.....................................           4,030           4,072           6,000
National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA)....................         111,644         117,406         117,406
World Trade Center Health.......................................          70,000          70,723          70,723
Mining Research.................................................          50,000          50,516          50,516
Other Occupational Safety and Health Research...................          83,846          84,713          84,713
    Miners Choice...............................................             641             648             648
    National Mesothelioma Registry and Tissue Bank..............           1,014           1,024           1,024
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee is concerned by recent reports that N95 
respirators do not provide an adequate level of protection 
against airborne viruses. The Committee is aware of reports 
that facemasks with an antimicrobial coating and that use 
antimicrobial technology are shown to have a greater efficacy 
rate. The Committee encourages the CDC to conduct a study 
regarding disposable NIOSH approved respirator facemasks, 
comparing the effectiveness against virus by facemasks with and 
without antimicrobial coating and antimicrobial technology. The 
report should also include recommendations as to whether U.S. 
stockpiles should include facemasks with antimicrobial coatings 
and at what level.

                             GLOBAL HEALTH

    The Committee recommends $332,779,000 for global health-
related activities at the CDC in fiscal year 2010. The fiscal 
year 2009 comparable level was $308,824,000 and the budget 
request for fiscal year 2010 was $319,134,000. The Office of 
Global Health leads and coordinates CDC's global programs to 
promote health and prevent disease in the United States and 
abroad, including ensuring rapid detection and response to 
emerging health threats. The Committee recommendation includes 
funding for the following activities in the following amounts:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    Fiscal year
                            Activity                                   2009         Fiscal year      Committee
                                                                    comparable      2010 budget   recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Global AIDS Program.............................................         118,863         118,979         118,979
Global Immunization Program.....................................         143,326         153,475         153,876
    Polio Eradication...........................................         101,500         101,599         102,000
    Global Immunization.........................................          41,826          51,876          51,876
Global Disease Detection........................................          33,723          33,756          37,000
Global Malaria Program..........................................           9,396           9,405           9,405
Other Global Health.............................................           3,516           3,519          13,519
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    AIDS and Malaria Programs.--The Committee commends the 
efforts of the CDC's Global AIDS and Global Malaria Programs in 
implementing the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief 
[PEPFAR] and the President's Malaria Initiative. The Committee 
encourages global AIDS and malaria program activities beyond 
PEPFAR and PMI countries.
    Global Disease Detection.--The Committee believes that the 
recent emergence and the ongoing evolution of H1N1 highlight 
the need for the Global Disease Detection Centers. For that 
reason, the Committee has included additional funding for new 
centers.
    Immunization Activities.--The bill provides not less than 
$102,000,000 for CDC's global polio eradication activities. In 
addition, the Committee included full funding of the 
President's initiative around global measles inoculation.
    Malaria.--The CDC plays a critical role in the fight 
against malaria by performing much of the ``downstream'' 
research that links basic science with the actual interventions 
tested and delivered to those in need, and CDC has been 
critical in developing and evaluating the tools being used 
today to combat malaria. As the threat of drug and pesticide 
resistance increases, the Committee urges the CDC to continue 
to perform malaria research leading to new drugs and tools that 
will be available to replace current interventions once they 
are no longer effective.
    Non-Communicable Diseases.--The Committee is concerned 
about the growing threat posed by non-communicable diseases to 
the health status of low-and middle-income countries. The 
Committee has included additional funding for CDC to expand its 
work in this area, with a particular focus on tobacco control 
and injury prevention. As the global tobacco burden begins to 
shift away from high-income countries, 7 out of 10 tobacco-
related deaths are expected to occur in the developing world by 
2030. The Committee urges CDC to work with low- and middle-
income countries to enhance research and surveillance 
activities through the Global Tobacco Surveillance System, 
improve design of national tobacco control programs, and 
strengthen related laboratory capacity. In addition, the 
Committee encourages CDC to expand research and programmatic 
efforts related to global injury and violence prevention to 
help reduce the 5 million annual deaths associated with injury 
and violence worldwide.
    Workforce.--The Committee is aware that workforce deficits 
threaten to undermine public health gains in many parts of the 
developing world today. The Committee strongly supports CDC's 
efforts to build sustainable public health workforce capacity 
in developing countries through programs like the Field 
Epidemiology (and Laboratory) Training Program and the 
Sustainable Management Development Program, which work in 
partnership with Ministries of Health to tailor applied 
epidemiology, laboratory and management programs to meet local 
needs. The Committee has provided increased funding to 
accelerate these efforts and to strengthen CDC workforce 
capacity to support other essential global health programs.

                               TERRORISM

    The Committee provides $1,550,858,000 for CDC terrorism 
preparedness activities. The comparable fiscal year 2009 level 
was $1,514,657,000 and the administration requested 
$1,546,809,000 for these activities in fiscal year 2010. The 
Committee recommendation includes funding for the following 
activities in the following amounts:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    Fiscal year
                            Activity                                   2009         Fiscal year      Committee
                                                                    comparable      2010 budget   recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Bioterrorism Cooperative Agreement..............................         700,465         714,949         714,949
Centers for Public Health Preparedness..........................          30,000          30,013          30,013
Advanced Practice Centers.......................................           5,261           5,263           5,263
All Other State and Local Capacity..............................          10,870          10,875          10,875
Upgrading CDC Capacity..........................................         120,744         120,795         120,744
Anthrax.........................................................           7,875  ..............           4,100
BioSense........................................................          34,389          34,404          34,404
Quarantine......................................................          26,507          26,518          26,518
Real-time Lab Reporting.........................................           8,239           8,243           8,243
Strategic National Stockpile....................................         570,307         595,749         595,749
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Anthrax.--The Committee has included $2,700,000 for the 
anthrax vaccine dose reduction study and $1,400,000 to continue 
the vaccine safety military medical records data mining 
activities.
    BioSense.--The Committee strongly supports the new 
direction being taken by the BioSense program, in particular 
the movement towards an open, distributed computing model. An 
open, distributed model encourages collaboration among 
geographically distributed organizations and provides a very 
efficient framework for creating mutually beneficial solutions. 
The Committee urges the CDC to ensure that biosurveillance 
systems interconnect with electronic medical record [EMR] 
systems effectively.
    State and Local Capacity.--The Committee continues to 
recognize that bioterrorism events and other public health 
emergencies will occur at the local level and will require 
local capacity, preparedness and initial response.
    State-by-State Preparedness Data.--The Committee commends 
CDC for releasing Public Health Preparedness: Strengthening 
CDC's Emergency Response. The Committee is pleased that the 
report provides an overview of public health preparedness 
activities and details accomplishments and challenges. The 
Committee expects the Department to collect and review State-
by-State data on benchmarks and performance measures developed 
pursuant to the provisions of the Pandemic and All-Hazards 
Preparedness Act (Public Law 109-417) and to detail how 
preparedness funding is spent in each State. The Committee 
further expects that as the Department collects and evaluates 
state pandemic response plans, the results of these evaluations 
will be made available to the Committee and to the public.
    Strategic National Stockpile.--The Committee urges the 
Department to prioritize updating and restocking on an ongoing 
basis, including replenishing material used during the ongoing 
H1N1 outbreak. The Committee supports stockpiling medical 
supplies, including syringes. The Committee requests a 
professional judgment recommendation as to the level of funding 
needed to acquire the necessary equipment, medicines and 
supplies.

                         PUBLIC HEALTH RESEARCH

    Public Health Research.--The Committee has provided 
$31,170,000 to fund the Public Health Research program. The 
fiscal year 2009 comparable level was $31,000,000 and 2010 
budget request was $31,170,000. The Committee is strongly 
supportive of public health and prevention research, which 
bridges the gap between medical research discoveries and 
behaviors that people adopt by identifying the best strategies 
for detecting new diseases, assessing the health status of 
populations, motivating healthy lifestyles, communicating 
effective health promotion messages, and acquiring and 
disseminating information in times of crisis.

                PUBLIC HEALTH IMPROVEMENT AND LEADERSHIP

    The Committee provides $204,101,000 for public health 
improvement and leadership activities at the CDC. The fiscal 
year 2009 comparable level was $209,136,000 and the budget 
request for fiscal year 2010 was $188,586,000.
    The Committee recommendation includes funding for the 
following activities in the following amounts:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    Fiscal year
                            Activity                                   2009         Fiscal year      Committee
                                                                    comparable      2010 budget   recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Leadership and Management.......................................         149,332         149,986         149,986
Director's Discretionary Fund...................................           2,948           2,948           5,000
Public Health Workforce Development.............................          34,859          35,652          40,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In addition, the Committee has included sufficient funding 
for the following projects in the following amounts for fiscal 
year 2010:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          Project                              Funding
------------------------------------------------------------------------
AIDS Community Resources, Inc., Syracuse, NY, for HIV/AIDS      $300,000
 education and prevention..................................
Center for International Rehabilitation, Washington, DC,         150,000
 for the disability rights monitor program.................
Community Health Centers in Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, for the        200,000
 Childhood Rural Asthma Project............................
County of Essex, Newark, NJ, for diabetes prevention and         125,000
 management program for severely mentally ill individuals..
East Carolina University, Chapel Hill, NC, for a racial          300,000
 disparities and cardiovascular disease initiative.........
Eastern Maine Health Systems, Brewer, ME, for emergency          640,000
 preparedness planning and equipment.......................
Healthy People Northeast Pennsylvania Initiative, Clarks         100,000
 Summit, PA, for obesity prevention and education programs.
Iowa State University of Science and Technology, Ames, IA,       750,000
 for facilities and equipment to support the Institute for
 Novel Vaccine and Anti-Microbial Design...................
Kalihi-Palama Health Center, Honolulu, HI, for outreach,         150,000
 screening and education related to renal disease..........
Kaweah Delta Hospital Foundation, Visalia, CA, for a             100,000
 comprehensive asthma management program...................
La Familia Medical Center, Santa Fe, NM, for diabetes            100,000
 education and outreach....................................
Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA, to expand      300,000
 early detection cancer screening..........................
Northeast Regional Cancer Institute, Scranton, PA, for a         100,000
 regional cancer registry..................................
Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL, for the             200,000
 development of a comprehensive diabetic program...........
Ohio University, Athens, OH, for diabetes outreach and           200,000
 education in rural areas..................................
PE4life Foundation, Kansas City, MO, for expansion and           300,000
 assessment of PE4life programs across Iowa................
Pednet Coalition, INC, Columbia, MO, for obesity prevention      500,000
 programs..................................................
Penn State University, Milton S Hershey Medical Center,          100,000
 Hershey, PA, for a stroke prevention program..............
South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, for research       150,000
 on health promotion.......................................
Spinal Muscular Atrophy Foundation, New York, NY, for            500,000
 outreach, patient education and registries................
State of Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene,     1,200,000
 Baltimore, MD, for the Unified Oral Health Education
 Message Campaign..........................................
University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, to             300,000
 develop an environmental health informatics data-  base...
University of Nevada School of Medicine, Reno, NV, to            800,000
 establish a diabetes management program...................
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI, to             850,000
 support and expand public health education and outreach
 programs..................................................
Waterloo Fire Rescue, Waterloo, IA, for FirePALS, a school-      150,000
 based injury prevention program...........................
Winston-Salem State University, Winston-Salem, NC, for           100,000
 blood pressure and obesity screening programs, including
 training of healthcare professionals......................
Yale New Haven Health Center, New Haven, CT, for the             150,000
 Connecticut Center for Public Health Preparedness.........
Youth & Family Services, Inc., Rapid City, SD, for a health      300,000
 promotion program for young men...........................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Disability.--The Committee encourages the CDC to create an 
Office of Disability and Health in the Director's office. The 
office would perform functions and carry out responsibilities 
akin to those currently undertaken by the Office of Minority 
Health and the Office of Women's Health.
    Leadership and Management Savings.--The Committee strongly 
believes that as large a portion as possible of CDC funding 
should go to programs and initiatives that improve the health 
and safety of Americans. To facilitate this goal, any savings 
in leadership and management may be reallocated to the 
Director's Discretionary Fund upon notification of the 
Committee.

           PREVENTIVE HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES BLOCK GRANT

    The Committee has provided $102,034,000, the same as the 
fiscal year 2010 budget request for the Preventive Health and 
Health Services Block grant. The fiscal year 2009 comparable 
level was $102,000,000.
    The block grant provides funding for primary prevention 
activities and health services that address urgent health 
problems in local communities. This flexible source of funding 
can be used to target concerns where other funds do not exist 
or where they are inadequate to address the extent of the 
health problem. The grants are made to the 50 States, the 
District of Columbia, 2 American Indian tribes, and 8 U.S. 
territories.

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES

    The Committee has provided $108,300,000 for the 
continuation of CDC's Buildings and Facilities Master Plan in 
Atlanta, Georgia. The fiscal year 2009 comparable level was 
$151,500,000 and the budget request for fiscal year 2010 was 
$30,000,000.
    The Committee has again provided bill language to allow CDC 
to enter into a single contract or related contracts for the 
full scope of development and construction of facilities and 
instructs CDC to utilize this authority, when necessary, in 
constructing the Atlanta facilities.
    The Committee intends that $30,000,000 be used for 
nationwide repairs and improvements; and $78,300,000 shall be 
for the planning and construction of buildings on the Chamblee 
campus.

                     BUSINESS SERVICES AND SUPPORT

    The Committee provides $372,662,000 for business services 
support functions at the CDC. The fiscal year 2009 comparable 
level was $359,877,000 and the administration requested 
$372,662,000 for fiscal year 2010. These funds will be used to 
support CDC-wide support functions.

                     National Institutes of Health

    The Committee recommends an overall funding level for the 
National Institutes of Health [NIH] of $30,758,788,000, the 
same as the budget request. This amount is $441,764,000 more 
than the regular fiscal year 2009 level, not including the 
$10,380,703,000 appropriated in the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act [ARRA].
    The Committee understands that the recommended fiscal year 
2010 funding level falls below the amount needed to keep up 
with biomedical inflation, and that the NIH could face severe 
financial pressures in fiscal year 2011. But the Committee 
notes that the record-high increase for the NIH in the ARRA 
greatly mitigates the need for more funding than the 
administration requested in fiscal year 2010. While additional 
funding for the NIH could help ease the budgetary pressures in 
fiscal year 2011, that alone is not a sufficient reason to go 
beyond the administration's budget request in fiscal year 2010, 
especially when many other important programs in this bill that 
did not receive increases in the ARRA face immediate pressures 
of their own.
    The Committee rejects the administration's proposals to 
earmark an increase of $268,000,000 for research on cancer and 
an increase of $19,000,000 for research on autism. The 
devastating effects of cancer and autism are well known, and 
additional federally supported research in these areas is 
certainly warranted. However, the President's plan would set a 
dangerous precedent. The Committee has long subscribed to the 
view that funding levels for individual diseases should be 
determined without political interference. If Congress were to 
earmark funds for cancer and autism, advocates for a multitude 
of other health problems would justifiably demand similar 
treatment. In the long run, no one's interest would be served 
if Members of Congress with no professional expertise in 
medical research were asked to make funding decisions about 
hundreds of diseases and health conditions.
    The Committee also notes that the proposed increases for 
cancer and autism research total $287,000,000 of the 
$441,764,000 overall proposed increase for NIH. It is hard to 
justify to those whose lives have been touched by heart 
disease, diabetes, COPD, Alzheimer's disease and stroke, to 
name a few other high-morbidity diseases, that research in just 
two areas deserves almost two-thirds of all the new funding in 
fiscal year 2010.
    The Committee recommends $549,066,000 for the Common Fund, 
the same amount as the budget request. The fiscal year 2009 
level was $541,133,000.

                       NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................  $6,225,490,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   5,150,170,000
House allowance.........................................   5,150,170,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,054,099,000

\1\Includes $1,256,517,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $5,054,099,000 
for the National Cancer Institute [NCI]. The budget request was 
$5,150,170,000. The fiscal year 2009 appropriation was 
$6,225,490,000, including $1,256,517,000 available in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.
    In general, the Committee urges the Institute to put a high 
priority on developing early detection tools and treatments for 
those cancers that remain most lethal; supporting behavioral, 
health services, and other research geared to better apply what 
is known about cancer prevention and early detection; 
addressing cancer-related health disparities; and promoting 
pain and symptom management, as well as other palliative and 
psychosocial care research aimed at improving quality of life 
for cancer patients, survivors, and their caregivers.
    Asian/Pacific Islanders.--The Committee notes that Asian 
and Pacific Islanders have a high incidence of stomach and 
liver cancers compared to Caucasians, and it urges the NCI to 
focus on the special needs of this population.
    Cancer Metabolism.--The Committee encourages the NCI to 
support more research on cancer metabolism, specifically how 
cancer cells become addicted to using more nutrients than 
normal cells to ensure their survival and growth. Research 
targeting these metabolic pathways could have a profound and 
broad effect on cancer cell survival and tumor growth, and 
ultimately cancer treatment.
    Gastrointestinal [GI] Cancer.--The Committee encourages the 
NCI to put a higher priority on GI cancers in people age 40 and 
under, giving emphasis particularly to late-stage cancers for 
which curative treatment options are unavailable. In addition, 
the Committee requests the NCI to consider developing an 
interconnected gastrointestinal cancer biorepository with 
consistent, interoperable systems for collection, storage, 
annotation, and information sharing.
    Hematology.--The Committee is aware of efforts being made 
by the Institute's Office of Latin American Cancer Program 
Development, in conjunction with the American Society of 
Hematology, to train physicians and scientists in the 
development of clinical trials and collaborative research 
networks focused on blood cancers. The Committee encourages 
international programs such as this, which will improve 
research mechanisms and access to novel treatments for cancer 
patients.
    Human Papillomavirus [HPV] Vaccine and Cervical Cancer.--
The Committee urges the NCI to fund research, including 
registry-based tools, that will allow for the identification of 
the most cost-effective management strategies for cervical 
cancer screening in communities where HPV vaccines are being 
implemented and to identify the circumstances where current 
screening protocols fail.
    Liver Cancer.--The Committee supports a stronger focus on 
liver cancer, which continues to be one of the fastest growing 
cancers in the Nation during a time when the overall incidence 
of cancer has stabilized. The Committee urges that new 
interventions and treatments, as well as new methods for early 
detection and prognosis, be aggressively pursued.
    Lung Cancer.--The Committee recognizes that lung cancer 
survival rates are too low, at 15 percent, and it urges the NCI 
to expand its research into improving lung cancer diagnosis and 
treatment.
    Melanoma.--The Committee encourages the NCI to work with 
advocates and researchers to fund the areas of research 
identified by the recently developed strategic research plan on 
melanoma and to use all available mechanisms to target research 
in those areas. The Committee is aware of recent successes in 
the therapy of rare forms of melanoma that were the result of 
basic research on the genetic signature of melanomas, and 
encourages NCI to include melanoma in The Cancer Genome Atlas 
consortium to establish a comprehensive map of genetic changes 
that will point to new therapies for the most common types of 
melanoma and help identify new markers for classification, 
detection and risk assessment. The Committee also urges the NCI 
to promote alliances between industry and academia in the field 
of melanoma research to foster laboratory and clinical trial 
consortia that will develop individualized therapies that 
target pathways or stimulate the patients' own defense system. 
The continuing increase in melanoma incidence should spur new 
efforts to prevent melanoma among high-risk individuals and 
reach populations at risk for early diagnosis when melanoma is 
still curable by surgery. Accordingly, the Committee encourages 
the NCI to explore the feasibility of a screening program for 
melanoma, including focused screening of high-risk individuals. 
The Committee requests the NCI to report to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
by July 1, 2010, on steps it has taken to implement these 
strategic investments in melanoma research.
    Neuroblastoma.--The Committee urges continued support for 
research on high-risk neuroblastoma, particularly as it relates 
to the development and clinical testing of new therapies for 
relapse patients.
    Pancreatic Cancer.--While there has been a continuing 
decline in mortality rates for many types of cancer, the number 
of Americans dying of cancer of the pancreas continues to rise. 
Despite its highly lethal nature, less than 2 percent of NCI's 
budget is devoted to what is now the fourth leading cause of 
cancer-related death. The Committee last year urged the NCI to 
launch a pancreatic cancer-specific research and training 
initiative. This will require a sustained and targeted effort 
designed to foster prioritized research immediately as well as 
build a cadre of researchers over the longer term. To further 
these efforts, the Committee strongly urges the NCI to develop 
an action plan for the use of fiscal year 2010 funds and to 
describe its progress in the fiscal year 2011 congressional 
budget justification.
    Pediatric Cancer.--The Committee urges the NCI to further 
expand and intensify pediatric cancer research, including 
laboratory research to identify and evaluate potential 
therapies, preclinical testing, and clinical trials through 
cooperative clinical trials groups. Such research should 
include research on the causes, prevention, diagnosis, 
recognition, treatment, and late effects of pediatric cancer.
    Reproductive Scientists Development Program.--The Committee 
urges the NCI to continue its partnership with the NICHD with 
regard to training the next generation of gynecologic cancer 
researchers.
    Social Psychology Research.--The Committee applauds the 
NCI's efforts to incorporate innovative social psychological 
theories into cancer prevention research, and it encourages 
additional work in this area.

               NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................  $3,778,273,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   3,050,356,000
House allowance.........................................   3,123,403,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,066,827,000

\1\Includes $762,584,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $3,066,827,000 for 
the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute [NHLBI]. The 
budget request was $3,050,356,000. The fiscal year 2009 
appropriation was $3,778,273,000, including $762,584,000 
available in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009.
    Atrial Fibrillation.--The Committee urges the NHLBI to 
convene a scientific workshop to identify evidence-based best 
practices for the identification and management of atrial 
fibrillation, and to disseminate the findings of the workshop 
to the patient and healthcare provider community.
    Cardiovascular Diseases.--The Committee believes that an 
increased investment in funding and resources to combat 
cardiovascular diseases is important to capitalize on progress 
when scientific discoveries are on the horizon and to help 
prepare for the increased prevalence of these diseases in aging 
populations. The Committee recommends that a significant 
portion of the additional funds provided for the NHLBI be 
devoted to cardiovascular research and to continue to implement 
priorities outlined in its Division of Cardiovascular Diseases 
Strategic Plan.
    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease [COPD].--The 
Committee continues to applaud the NHLBI's efforts to raise 
public awareness of COPD. The Committee notes that only 15 
States have developed COPD Action Plans, and it urges the NHLBI 
to continue to work with the remaining States to develop plans 
as appropriate.
    Diamond-Blackfan Anemia [DBA].--The Committee understands 
that DBA's recent identification as the first human disorder 
linked to a ribosomal protein deficiency has led to 
breakthrough discoveries indicating that decreased expression 
of ribosomal proteins can have pathogenic consequences within 
bone marrow and during development of other tissues. The 
Committee commends the NHBLI for its attention to this 
important area of disease research and encourages efforts to 
further investigate the role of ribosomal proteins in DBA and 
related marrow failure diseases.
    Heart Rhythm Disorders.--The Committee notes that more 
research is needed to understand the causes of heart rhythm 
disorders and to develop more effective treatments. The 
Committee urges the NHBLI to intensify its investments in basic 
research, clinical investigations and trials.
    Myelodysplastic Syndrome [MDS].--The Committee strongly 
urges the NHLBI, working with the NCI, NIDDK, and NIA, to 
develop a plan to implement the MDS research agenda that was 
developed in November 2008.
    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis [LAM].--The Committee supports 
both intramural and extramural means of expanding research on 
LAM and urges the NHLBI to use all available mechanisms as 
appropriate, including facilitating access to human tissues, to 
stimulate a broad range of clinical and basic LAM research. The 
Committee commends the NHLBI for supporting the multicenter 
international LAM efficacy of sirolimus [MILES] trial, and 
further encourages the support of intramural and extramural 
phase I and phase II clinical treatment trials to capitalize on 
the LAM patient populations that the NHLBI and the Rare Lung 
Disease Consortium have assembled. The Committee is also aware 
of the potential benefit of establishing regional LAM centers, 
and suggests the NHLBI consider supporting these activities.
    Marfan Syndrome.--The Committee encourages the Institute to 
continue its support for the Pediatric Heart Network study of 
the drug Losartan, and advance research on surgical outcomes 
for Marfan syndrome patients who undergo different procedures 
to repair compromised aortas and valves.
    Pulmonary Hypertension.--The Committee acknowledges the 
difficulties in establishing a pulmonary hypertension [PH] 
Clinical Research Network and encourages the NHLBI to 
prioritize support and renewal of the two PH clinical trials 
currently funded by the Institute.
    Sarcoidosis.--The Committee is concerned that little 
progress has been made in understanding the cause of 
sarcoidosis, for which there are no effective treatments 
options. The Committee strongly encourages the NHLBI to place a 
high priority on sarcoidosis by intensifying its investments in 
basic research, clinical investigations and trials.
    Severe Asthma.--Research funded by the NHLBI has led to 
dramatic improvements in the treatment of mild asthma, but 
severe asthma remains poorly understood. The European Union has 
undertaken a major initiative on severe asthma, and the 
Committee believes that the NHLBI should expand its focus on 
severe asthma as well, especially among women and African-
Americans. The Committee encourages the NHLBI to work with the 
National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities and 
the Office of Research on Women's Health to solicit 
investigator-initiated research on this topic and to pursue 
initiatives that will complement and encourage collaboration 
with the European Union consortium on severe asthma.
    Sickle Cell Disease.--The Committee supports NHLBI's 
request for information to identify sites with sufficient 
research infrastructure and patient population to undertake 
clinical studies in hemoglobinopathies with an emphasis on 
sickle cell disease and thalassemia. This research network, 
along with the surveillance system and disease registry under 
development with the CDC, will improve knowledge and lead to 
better treatments for sickle cell disease and other 
hemaglobinopathies. The Committee requests that NHLBI provide 
an update on the network in the fiscal year 2011 congressional 
budget justification.
    Sleep Disorders.--The Committee applauds the Institute's 
investment in sleep-related research through the National 
Center on Sleep Disorders Research. The Committee notes the 
growing understanding of the link between sleep and 
cardiovascular health, and it encourages further research to 
better understand and modify the link between sleep disorders 
and cardiovascular disease. The Committee is also aware that 
NHLBI research has demonstrated that adolescents who get too 
little sleep are at greater risk of high blood pressure. The 
NHLBI is encouraged to partner with other institutes to expand 
research on the benefits of sleep to learning and healthy 
development of young people.
    Specialized Centers of Clinically Oriented Research.--The 
Committee encourages the continued use of Specialized Centers 
of Clinically Oriented Research [SCCOR] as a mechanism to 
foster the translation of multidisciplinary basic research to 
improve clinical care.
    Thalassemia.--Thalassemia, or Cooley's anemia, is a fatal 
genetic blood disease. NHLBI has operated the Thalassemia 
Clinical Research Network for 9 years to advance the science of 
treating this disease. The Committee strongly encourages NHLBI 
to renew its focus on this disease, which has implications for 
other blood-related disorders and assure that research 
continues to advance treatments and find a cure.

         NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DENTAL AND CRANIOFACIAL RESEARCH

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................    $504,471,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     408,037,000
House allowance.........................................     417,032,000
Committee recommendation................................     409,241,000

\1\ Includes $101,819,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $409,241,000 for the 
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research [NIDCR]. 
The budget request was $408,037,000. The fiscal year 2009 
appropriation was $504,471,000, including $101,819,000 
available in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009.
    Future of Dental Science.--The Committee has learned that 
U.S. dental schools now receive less than half of the NIDCR 
extramural budget. The Committee encourages NIDCR to work 
closely with schools of dentistry to foster a more intensive 
research component to dental education, with the goal of 
cultivating and retaining dental students who have an interest 
in research.
    Oral Health Disparities.--The Committee commends NIDCR for 
continuing a progressive health disparities research portfolio.
    Saliva.--The Committee is pleased to see the progress that 
continues to be made in the field of salivary diagnostics, 
especially regarding the creation of an online data sharing 
network for saliva biomarkers.
    Temporomandibular Joint Disorder [TMJD].--The Committee 
appreciates that progress has been made in understanding some 
genetic and gender differences in sensitivity to pain, the role 
of hormones in modulating pain responses, and the unique 
anatomical and musculoskeletal characteristics of the 
temporomandibular joint. Similarly, the Committee looks forward 
to the results of the current prospective study exploring risk 
factors for the onset of TMJD. However, minimal progress has 
been made in understanding the causes of TMJD and mechanisms 
that might explain the presence of many co-morbid conditions 
with TMJD that are also associated with pain, such as chronic 
headache, vulvodynia, irritable bowel syndrome, interstitial 
cystitis, chronic fatigue and immune dysfunction syndrome, 
fibromyalgia and generalized pain syndromes. Resolution of TMJD 
problems is further hampered by inadequate diagnostics, 
ineffective and even harmful treatments, and the failure to 
develop effective medications to treat this and other chronic 
pain conditions. Therefore, the Committee requests the NIDCR to 
take the lead in developing a comprehensive 5-year TMJD 
research plan that articulates the strategies and goals 
necessary to resolve the issues that have plagued TMJD studies 
over the decades. The plan should include research to develop 
definitive diagnostic criteria; support an updated 
epidemiology, including a count of co-morbid conditions; 
examine genetic and other factors that increase risk for TMJD; 
and support endocrine, immune and nervous system research on 
pain mechanisms and treatments. The plan's research goals 
should incorporate the appropriate mix of basic, clinical and 
translational science, recruitment of scientists from the 
pertinent disciplines, and meaningful training programs to 
enlarge the pool of investigators and indicate what funding 
mechanisms should be employed.

    NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................  $2,206,731,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   1,781,494,000
House allowance.........................................   1,824,251,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,790,518,000

\1\Includes $445,393,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,790,518,000 for 
the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney 
Diseases [NIDDK]. The budget request was $1,781,494,000. The 
fiscal year 2009 appropriation was $2,206,731,000, including 
$445,393,000 available in the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act of 2009.
    Chronic Hepatitis B.--The Committee commends the NIDDK for 
establishing a Hepatitis B Clinical Research Network and 
conducting a consensus development conference on the management 
and treatment of hepatitis B. The Committee urges that the 
Hepatitis B Clinical Research Network increase the focus on 
pregnant women and pediatric cases of hepatitis B and further 
urges that a research plan be developed to address the research 
priorities identified by the consensus development conference, 
especially in understanding the nature of the different 
clinical categories of hepatitis B and of fibrosis and 
cirrhosis, and developing new medical interventions for the 
management of hepatitis B and the diseases with which it is 
associated, including fibrosis and cirrhosis.
    Chronic Hepatitis C.--The Committee urges a continuing 
focus on the development of new treatments for hepatitis C.
    Chronic Pediatric Kidney Disease.--The Committee 
appreciates NIDDK's support of two prospective multicenter 
pediatric nephrology studies, as requested by the Committee in 
fiscal year 2009. Beginning in fiscal year 2010, the Committee 
urges NIDDK to initiate two additional prospective multicenter 
pediatric nephrology translational studies or treatment trials 
over the next 2 years. These collaborative studies offer the 
best opportunity to systematically gain new knowledge about 
children being treated for kidney disease, and to use this 
knowledge to improve care and reduce future costs.
    Diabetes Prevention Program.--The Committee encourages the 
NIDDK's efforts to expand community research applications of 
the successful diet and exercise interventions of the Diabetes 
Prevention Program trial. The NIDDK is encouraged to partner 
with other institutes and centers to enhance similar community 
research networks.
    Digestive Diseases.--The Committee urges the NIDDK to 
prioritize and implement the recommendations of the National 
Commission on Digestive Diseases' recently completed Long-Range 
Research Plan for Digestive Diseases.
    Endoscopy and Obesity-Related Research.--While bariatric 
surgery is an important option for patients with medical 
complications from obesity, the Committee notes the emergence 
of less-invasive, endoscopic techniques to induce weight-loss 
without the risk of surgery. The Committee urges the NIDDK to 
fund studies comparing bariatric surgery with endoscopic 
interventions and support the development of novel endoscopic 
therapies for diabetes management through weight reduction.
    Fatty Liver Disease (Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis).--The 
Committee commends the NIDDK's recent efforts to address fatty 
liver disease and urges the Institute to convene a consensus 
development conference to confirm best practices and to 
identify additional research priorities.
    Fecal Incontinence.--The Committee is pleased with NIDDK's 
actions to establish a public and professional awareness 
campaign for fecal incontinence in collaboration with patient 
organizations.
    Glomerular Disease Research.--The Committee urges the NIDDK 
to collaborate with the NCMHD to support expanded research on 
glomerular disease and its effects on minorities and the 
specific implications of the link between the MYH9 gene and the 
high prevalence of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis among 
African Americans.
    Inflammatory Bowel Disease [IBD].--The Committee encourages 
support for the IBD research agenda detailed in the National 
Commission on Digestive Diseases report. The committee also 
encourages NIDDK to prioritize and expand research in the area 
of pediatric disease in collaboration with the IBD patient and 
professional community.
    Interstitial Cystitis [IC].--The Committee is concerned by 
the significant drop in overall funding for interstitial 
cystitis, with both the ending of the IC Clinical Trials 
Network [ICCRN] and the conclusion of an IC-specific basic 
science initiative. The Committee notes that this drop occurs 
at a time when a RAND epidemiology study of IC concluded that 
the prevalence of this disease is close to 4 million Americans, 
nearly fourfold the original estimates. Therefore, the 
Committee urges the NIDDK to resume the ICCRN as well as a 
dedicated IC-specific investment in basic science.
    Irritable Bowel Syndrome.--The Committee commends NIDDK for 
its expansion of the research portfolio on irritable bowel 
syndrome.
    Kidney Disease.--The Committee urges the NIDDK to 
prioritize research on: the relationship between kidney disease 
and its leading causes, particularly diabetes, hypertension, 
and obesity; methods for prevention; and appropriate and 
effective therapies that improve disheartening mortality 
statistics. In particular, the Committee urges the NIDDK to 
emphasize research support for acute kidney injury, diabetic 
nephropathy, glomerular disease, hypertension, transplantation, 
and kidney-related cardiovascular toxicity. Additional 
resources are needed to support the development of new disease 
biomarkers and imaging technologies, which are critical for the 
management of kidney diseases; implement the necessary 
infrastructure for disease-specific registries and clinical 
trials networks to better allow investigators to bridge the gap 
from the bench to the bedside; and track data on patient race 
and ethnicity to understand the overwhelming disparities 
related to morbidity and mortality of kidney disease among 
underrepresented minority patients. The Committee requests an 
update on these priorities in the fiscal year 2011 
congressional budget justification.
    Liver Disease.--The Committee urges the NIDDK to redouble 
its efforts to address the recommendations in the Action Plan 
on Liver Research developed in 2005.
    Pelvic Pain.--The Committee recognizes that there is a 
growing population of patients with chronic pelvic pain, 
chronic prostatitis and urogenital pain, and it urges the NIDDK 
to collaborate with the ORWH, NIAID, NIAMS, NINDS, and NICHD to 
establish a dedicated center for research and education on 
urologic/urogenital chronic pelvic pain and chronic prostatitis 
syndromes that will focus specifically on interstitial cystitis 
and vulvodynia, and related co-morbid disorders.
    Polycystic Kidney Disease [PKD].--The Committee urges the 
NIDDK to plan the future strategic direction of PKD research, 
expand the number of PKD researchers and strengthen current 
efforts, which include multiple clinical trials and the 
development of treatments. The Committee also encourages the 
NIDDK to look at the feasibility of establishing a core 
repository of laboratory animals for renal cystic diseases like 
PKD, which will help lower research costs and enhance 
scientific discoveries in this burgeoning area of translational 
research.
    Urological Diseases.--The Committee is disappointed that 
the NIDDK has not established a separate branch for urological 
diseases research. The Committee requests the Institute to 
provide an update in the fiscal year 2011 congressional budget 
justification on how it will move forward to strengthen 
urological diseases research, and to prepare a trans-NIH Action 
Plan for Urological Disease Research.

        NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS AND STROKE

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................  $1,996,256,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   1,612,745,000
House allowance.........................................   1,650,253,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,620,494,000

\1\Includes $402,912,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,620,494,000 for 
the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke 
[NINDS]. The budget request was $1,612,745,000. The fiscal year 
2009 appropriation was $1,996,256,000, including $402,912,000 
available in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009.
    Chiari.--The Committee notes that a research conference 
titled ``Chiari Malformation: State of the Research and New 
Directions'' was convened in November 2008 to identify the 
current state of knowledge and identify key areas of research. 
The Committee encourages aggressive measures toward 
implementing these recommendations, including but not limited 
to: using advanced engineering and imaging analysis to develop 
an objective diagnostic test for symptomatic chiari; 
understanding the genetic basis of chiari; and increasing focus 
on pediatric patients, including symptoms, optimal treatments, 
and quality of life issues.
    Dystonia.--The Committee is pleased with the Institute's 
support of additional dystonia research grants through its 
program announcement mechanism, particularly its collaboration 
with NICHD, NICDC, and NIEHS.
    Epilepsy.--The Committee applauds the work of the 
Interagency Epilepsy Working Group, led by the NINDS, and 
recommends that the membership be expanded to include 
representatives from the many other institutes and centers that 
fund epilepsy research, as well as representatives from the 
Department of Defense, Food and Drug Administration and patient 
advocacy organizations. The Committee also recommends that the 
Interagency Epilepsy Working Group use the 2007 NINDS Epilepsy 
Research Benchmarks to develop a strategic plan for 
multidisciplinary approaches to finding a cure for epilepsy. In 
particular, the Committee urges the NINDS to focus attention on 
epileptogenesis, co-morbidities, and sudden unexplained death 
in epilepsy.
    Frontotemporal Dementia [FTD].--Although FTD is a 
relatively common cause of dementia, particularly among younger 
individuals, a disproportionately small amount of research 
funding is devoted to it. The Committee requests the NINDS to 
help develop a minimum data set for FTD, including clinical, 
biomarker, genetic, and pathologic data, and a national 
repository for such data. The Committee further urges the NINDS 
to initiate funding for drug discovery efforts that focus on 
specific targets relevant to treating the mechanisms underlying 
brain degeneration due to frontotemporal dementia.
    Mucopolysaccharidosis [MPS].--The Committee commends the 
Institute's efforts to collaborate with the Lysosomal Storage 
Disease Network by participating in scientific conferences on 
lysosomal storage disorders, and it encourages continued 
collaborations with the goal of better understanding and 
treating MPS disorders.
    Stroke.--The Committee recommends that a significant 
portion of the additional funds provided for the NINDS will be 
devoted to expand current stroke studies, support promising and 
new stroke initiatives, and to implement priorities in its 
Stroke Progress Review Group Report.

         NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................  $5,815,860,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   4,760,295,000
House allowance.........................................   4,859,502,000
Committee recommendation................................   4,777,457,000

\1\Includes $1,113,288,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $4,777,457,000 for 
the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases 
[NIAID]. The budget request was $4,760,295,000. The fiscal year 
2009 appropriation was $5,815,860,000, including $1,113,288,000 
available in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009. Included in these funds is $300,000,000 to be transferred 
to the Global Fund to Fight HIV/AIDS, Malaria, and 
Tuberculosis. The fiscal year 2009 transfer amount was also 
$300,000,000.
    Antimicrobial Resistance.--The Committee is encouraged by 
NIAID's commitment to address antimicrobial resistance and 
related product (antibacterials, diagnostics, and vaccines) 
research through its clearance of council-approved concepts in 
May 2008 and September 2008. The Committee urges the NIAID to 
quickly translate these concepts into funding mechanisms.
    Chronic Hepatitis B.--The Committee understands that 
although there are now a number of medications approved for the 
treatment of hepatitis B, they are of limited therapeutic value 
since they mostly target the same virus functions. The 
Committee urges additional research on different courses of 
treatment as well as ways to support efforts to identify new 
cellular and viral antiviral targets and develop new strategies 
for intervention. In addition, special attention to the 
problems associated with co-infections of hepatitis B with 
hepatitis C and HIV is needed.
    Drug-resistant Tuberculosis [TB].--The Committee urges the 
NIAID to expand and intensify research into developing new 
diagnostics, drugs, and vaccines to halt the spread of drug-
resistant TB.
    Inflammatory Bowel Disease [IBD].--The Committee applauds 
NIAID for its continued leadership on IBD and encourages 
support for the IBD research agenda detailed in the NIH 
National Commission on Digestive Diseases report. The Committee 
also prioritizes expanded research in the area of pediatric 
disease in collaboration with the IBD community and NIDDK.
    Lyme Disease.--The Committee encourages the NIAID to 
sponsor a scientific conference on Lyme and other tick-borne 
diseases that would represent the broad spectrum of scientific 
views on Lyme disease and include input from individuals with 
Lyme disease. The Committee also encourages NIH to intensify 
research that will increase understanding of the full range of 
Lyme disease processes and the physiology of Borrelia 
burgdorferi, including the mechanisms of persistent infection, 
and research that may lead to the development of more sensitive 
and accurate diagnostic tests for Lyme disease capable of 
distinguishing between active and past infections.
    Malaria.--The Committee is aware that NIAID-funded 
scientists recently decoded the genome of Plasmodium vivax, the 
malaria-causing parasite most common in Asia and Latin America. 
This achievement is expected to significantly advance 
scientific understanding in several areas key to malaria 
control and prevention, including drug resistance. The 
Committee urges the NIAID to allocate additional resources to 
malaria research, and by doing so help ensure that new tools 
are available when current interventions begin to lose their 
effectiveness. In addition, the Committee encourages NIAID to 
expand its current support for public-private partnerships 
involved in the research and development of antimalarial drugs.
    Microbicides.--Encouraging results from a recent NIH 
Microbicide Trials Network safety and effectiveness study of 
the microbicide candidate PRO2000 showed that the product was 
30 percent more effective than any other arm of the study in 
preventing HIV. While data from this study are not definitive 
and results from additional trials are needed to confirm these 
findings, they support the concept that a microbicide could 
prevent HIV infection. The Committee urges the NIH to work with 
USAID, CDC, and other appropriate agencies to develop processes 
for coordinated investment and prioritization for microbicide 
development, approval, and access.
    Nontuberculous Mycobacteria [NTM].--The Committee commends 
the NIAID for its planning meetings regarding NTM, outreach to 
the NTM patient community, and leading NTM treatment center. 
The Committee recommends further collaboration with the NHLBI, 
CDC, the advocacy community and other Federal agencies to 
provide leadership that will enhance diagnostic and treatment 
options as well as medical and surgical outcomes through the 
stimulation of multi-center clinical trials and promotion of 
health care provider education.
    Pre-exposure Prophylaxis [PrEP].--The Committee is aware 
there are currently seven clinical trials testing the safety 
and effectiveness of PrEP, an experimental HIV prevention 
strategy using antiretroviral drugs in HIV negative people, and 
that PrEP is considered among the most promising of potential 
HIV prevention interventions now being studied. These clinical 
trials are expected to report results starting in 2010. The 
Committee urges the NIAID to begin developing a research plan 
to prepare for the range of possible outcomes.
    Scleroderma.--The Committee commends the NIAID for its 
support of scleroderma research through the Autoimmune Centers 
of Excellence program and the Stem Cell Transplantation for 
Autoimmune Diseases Consortium, and requests an update in the 
fiscal year 2011 congressional budget justification.

             NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................  $2,502,989,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   2,023,677,000
House allowance.........................................   2,069,156,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,031,886,000

\1\Includes $505,188,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $2,031,886,000 for 
the National Institute of General Medical Sciences [NIGMS]. The 
budget request was $2,023,677,000. The fiscal year 2009 
appropriation was $2,502,989,000, including $505,188,000 
available in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009.
    Basic Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Blueprint.--
The Committee is pleased that the NIGMS will co-chair with the 
NIA the development of a new blueprint to coordinate and 
augment research on basic behavioral and social science.
    Modeling Social Behavior.--The Committee is pleased that 
the NIGMS is supporting research on the modeling of social 
behavior, which will clarify the process by which individual 
interactions lead to collective group behaviors. However, the 
Committee remains concerned that the NIGMS is still not funding 
investigator-initiated research by behavioral scientists, as it 
is authorized to do so by way of its statute and multiple 
congressional requests.

  EUNICE KENNEDY SHRIVER NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN 
                              DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................  $1,622,337,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   1,313,674,000
House allowance.........................................   1,341,120,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,316,822,000

\1\Includes $327,443,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,316,822,000 for 
the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health 
and Human Development [NICHD]. The budget request was 
$1,313,674,000. The fiscal year 2009 appropriation was 
$1,622,337,000, including $327,443,000 available in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.
    Chromosome Abnormalities.--The Committee urges the NIH to 
convene a state of the science meeting on chromosome 
abnormalities involving multiple contiguous genes, for the 
purpose of creating a plan to collect data regarding dosage-
sensitive and dosage-insensitive genes, and to establish 
phenotyping and genotyping standards for data collection. The 
Committee also encourages the NIH to create funding mechanisms 
to support independent investigators whose work could provide 
pilot data or insight into future directions for the study of 
chromosome abnormalities, particularly those involving 
chromosome 18.
    Demographic Research.--The Committee urges the NICHD to 
continue its support of trans-NIH behavioral and social 
research initiatives on disasters and health outcomes to 
develop more data on the consequences of natural and man-made 
disasters for the health of children and vulnerable groups. 
Further, the Committee encourages the NICHD to continue its 
investment in large-scale data sets, such as the New Immigrant 
Study and National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, 
because of their value and accessibility to researchers 
worldwide. Finally, the Committee urges the Institute to 
continue research on (1) how the structure and characteristics 
of the work environment affect child and family health and 
well-being and (2) how health and well-being in the early years 
(including before birth) affect health and well-being later in 
life.
    Fetal Origins of Adult Disease.--The Committee urges the 
NIH to continue its research to pinpoint the connections and 
causations between maternal obesity, diabetes, and heart 
disease and low birthweight babies, as well as other likely 
causes of poor infant health.
    First Pregnancy Complications.--The Committee commends 
NICHD for identifying complications in nulliparous (first 
pregnancy) women as an important area requiring further 
research, and it urges the Institute to move forward with 
initiatives to identify predictors, especially with 
interventions, to improve the outcome for first pregnancies and 
to lower the risk of subsequent pregnancies.
    Hormonal Contraception in Obese Women.--The Committee urges 
continued and increased funding for research into the efficacy 
and safety of hormonal contraceptives among overweight and 
obese women.
    Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research 
Centers.--The Committee recognizes the contributions of the 
Eunice Kennedy Shriver Intellectual and Developmental 
Disabilities Research Centers [IDDRCs] toward understanding why 
child development goes awry, discovering ways to prevent 
developmental disabilities, and discovering treatments and 
interventions to improve the lives of people with developmental 
disabilities and their families. However, the Committee 
continues to be concerned that the IDDRC network does not have 
sufficient resources to sustain the progress made in these 
critical areas and is especially concerned with the cuts in 
support for recently funded centers. The Committee urges NICHD 
to restore these reductions and, to the extent possible, 
provide additional resources to the IDDRCs.
    Late Preterm Births.--The NICHD is encouraged to expand its 
research on the causes of late preterm births and to facilitate 
research into better management and identification of 
interventions for their prevention.
    Learning and School Readiness.--The Committee recognizes 
the importance of NICHD research in establishing the basic 
scientific foundation of the development of children's reading, 
math and science skills, and it encourages continued work in 
this area.
    Maternal Fetal Medicine Units Network.--The Committee notes 
that the NICHD Maternal Fetal Medicine Units [MFMU] Network has 
improved obstetrical practice by identifying new therapies and 
practices that are not useful. The Committee urges the NICHD to 
adequately fund the network so that therapies and preventive 
strategies that have significant impact on the health of 
mothers and their babies will not be delayed.
    Pediatric Research Acceleration.--There is a significant 
need to enhance the level of NIH support for biomedical 
research focused on diseases and conditions that affect the 
pediatric population. The Committee is aware of a promising 
proposal to leverage limited additional resources through 
multiple research consortia that would enhance the 
infrastructure needed to accelerate basic and translational 
pediatric research. The Committee encourages the NIH to support 
this networked consortia model.
    Preterm Birth.--The Committee encourages the NICHD to 
expand research on preterm birth as outlined in the research 
agenda produced at the 2008 Surgeon General's Conference on 
Preterm Birth.
    Rehabilitation Research.--The Committee encourages the 
Institute's National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research 
[NCMRR] to work with the Office of the Director to engage in 
greater collaboration with other relevant NIH institutes and 
centers in order to leverage the Federal investment in 
rehabilitation and disability research and enhance the 
translation of such research to clinical application. The 
Committee also commends the NCMRR for its focus on determining 
the most effective treatments for traumatic brain injury [TBI]. 
Given the comorbidity of TBI and behavioral problems, 
agitation, anger and memory loss, the NCMRR is encouraged to 
include behavioral interventions for TBI treatment in future 
trials as well.
    Vulvodynia.--The Committee remains concerned with the lack 
of progress in expanding research efforts on vulvodynia in 
recent years, and it strongly urges that the NICHD employ a 
full range of award mechanisms to substantially increase the 
number of awards for vulvodynia studies in fiscal year 2010. In 
addition, new research indicates that chronic vulvovaginal pain 
is also highly prevalent in the adolescent population and has 
been documented in children as young as 4 years of age; 
therefore, the Committee urges that consideration be given to 
collecting data on vulvodynia and related pain conditions in 
the National Children's Study. The Committee notes the lack of 
vulvodynia experts on peer-review panels and again encourages 
the Director to work with the Center for Scientific Review and 
other institutes and centers to ensure their adequate 
representation. The Committee also calls upon the Institute to 
continue efforts with the ORWH on the vulvodynia educational 
campaign. Finally, the Committee notes that vulvodynia coexists 
with other persistent pain conditions, including interstitial 
cystitis, fibromyalgia, temporomandibular joint and muscles 
disorders, irritable bowel syndrome, endometriosis, and chronic 
fatigue syndrome. The Committee calls upon the NICHD to 
collaborate with the Office of the Director on a trans-NIH 
research initiative that will support studies aimed at 
identifying common etiological pathways among these disorders, 
with the goal of developing therapeutic targets.

                         NATIONAL EYE INSTITUTE

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................    $862,577,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     695,789,000
House allowance.........................................     713,072,000
Committee recommendation................................     700,158,000

\1\Includes $174,097,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $700,158,000 for the 
National Eye Institute [NEI]. The budget request was 
$695,789,000. The fiscal year 2009 appropriation was 
$862,577,000, including $174,097,000 available in the American 
Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.
    Age-related Macular Degeneration [AMD].--The Committee 
commends NEI for its research into the cause, prevention, and 
treatment of AMD, including the identification of gene variants 
associated with an increased risk for the condition, initial 
safety trials of a protective version of the gene variant as a 
means to treat and even preempt the disease, and ongoing work 
in the second phase of its Age-related Eye Disease Study 
[AREDS]. The Committee also recognizes NEI research into the 
Robo4 protein pathway as another means to prevent and reverse 
AMD.
    Diabetic Eye Disease.--The Committee applauds the NEI for 
the collaborative efforts of the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical 
Research Network to test innovative treatments for diabetic eye 
disease. The Institute is encouraged to expand and extend the 
network by increasing the number of clinical trials with new 
drugs and therapeutics that can treat and prevent diabetic 
retinopathy.
    Genetic Basis of Eye Disease.--The Committee congratulates 
the NEI on its leadership in elucidating the basis of 
devastating eye diseases such as AMD, retinitis pigmentosa, and 
glaucoma, and recognizes the progress that has been made in 
understanding the underlying disease mechanisms and developing 
appropriate treatments. The Committee commends NEI's leadership 
on the human gene therapy clinical trial for neurodegenerative 
eye disease Leber Congenital Amaurosis, in which the initial 
safety study demonstrated vision improvement in young adults. 
The Committee also applauds NEI's initiation of its Human 
Genetics Collaboration [NEIGHBOR] study into the genetic basis 
of glaucoma.
    Neuro-ophthalmic Network.--The Committee recognizes NEI's 
initiation of its Neuro-Ophthalmology Research Disease 
Investigator Consortium [NORDIC] to initially study the impact 
of increased intracranial pressure on vision and the impact of 
thyroid eye disease. The Committee encourages the Institute to 
expand this network as appropriate. It also recognizes that the 
NEI has already begun coordinating with the Department of 
Defense's Vision Center of Excellence on the potential 
applicability of NORDIC findings for traumatic brain injury 
patients.

          NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................    $830,877,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     684,257,000
House allowance.........................................     695,497,000
Committee recommendation................................     683,149,000

\1\Includes $168,057,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $683,149,000 for the 
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences [NIEHS]. 
The budget request was $684,257,000. The fiscal year 2009 
appropriation was $830,877,000, including $168,057,000 
available in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009.
    The NIEHS receives a larger percentage increase in this 
bill than other institutes and centers because its allocation 
includes $9,000,000 to support a new initiative on 
nanotechnology safety research, as requested by the 
administration.
    Alternative Methods of Testing.--The Committee remains 
concerned by the slow pace at which Federal agencies have moved 
to adopt regulations that would replace, reduce, or refine the 
use of animals in testing. The Committee therefore urges the 
NTP Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative 
Toxicological Methods [NICEATM] and the Interagency 
Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods 
[ICCVAM] to hold workshops on the challenges of incorporating 
alternative methods and the difficulty of obtaining high-
quality data for validating alternative methods. NICEATM/ICCVAM 
are also urged to establish timetables for completion of all 
validation reviews that are currently under way.
    Translational Research.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance of translational research programs and applauds the 
NIEHS's investment in clinical research through the Disease 
Investigation Through Specialized Clinically Oriented Ventures 
in Environmental Research [DISCOVER].

                      NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................  $1,354,099,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   1,093,143,000
House allowance.........................................   1,119,404,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,099,409,000

\1\Includes $273,303,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,099,409,000 for 
the National Institute on Aging [NIA]. The budget request was 
$1,093,143,000. The fiscal year 2009 appropriation was 
$1,354,099,000, including $273,303,000 available in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.
    Alzheimer's Disease.--The Committee was disappointed to 
learn that the NIH is spending far less on Alzheimer's disease 
than was previously believed. Under the historical method of 
tracking NIH spending, the funding level was believed to be 
$645,000,000 in fiscal year 2007; the revised categorization 
method put the total for that year at $411,000,000. In light of 
the growing burden that Alzheimer's disease is placing on 
society, the Committee believes greater resources are clearly 
warranted. In particular, the Committee strongly urges the NIA 
to devote more funding to clinical studies, including studies 
of individuals who are genetically predisposed to develop 
early-onset Alzheimer's disease, and renewal of the Alzheimer 
Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, including biomarker 
development studies. The NIA is urged to work collaboratively 
with the NINDS and NIMH to speed the translation of research 
findings into more effective treatments and prevention 
strategies.
    Community Interventions.--The NIA is encouraged to 
strengthen its portfolio of community studies to identify and/
or evaluate promising interventions to reduce biological risk, 
chronic conditions, or improve outcomes relating to disability.
    Demographic and Economic Research.--The Committee is aware 
that in 2010 the NIA will be making 5-year awards as part of 
its Demography of Aging Centers and Roybal Centers for Research 
on Applied Gerontology programs. The Committee urges the NIA, 
with support from the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social 
Science Research and Office of AIDS Research, to fund at least 
the existing number of centers, and more if possible. In 
addition, the Committee encourages the NIA to substantially 
increase the minority sample size of the Health and Retirement 
Study to understand the impact of the economic downturn on pre-
retirees and retirees.
    Geroscience.--The Committee recognizes the importance of 
the emerging interdisciplinary research approach known as 
geroscience. Given the size of the aging baby boomer population 
and the incidence of chronic disease in an aging society, it is 
critical to devote increased resources to understanding the 
connection between aging and disease. The Committee also 
believes that more resources should be dedicated to studies on 
prevention (such as exercise and diet) as well as other 
interdisciplinary approaches to understanding extended health 
span and healthy aging interventions that delay and prevent 
chronic disease.
    Interdisciplinary Behavioral Research.--The Committee 
encourages the NIA to promote joint efforts with other 
institutes to explore the interface of behavior, neuroscience, 
and epidemiology in studies of normal aging. One such area is 
affective neuroscience, with particular emphasis on the ways in 
which basic psychological processes such as emotional 
regulation, motivation, and executive function contribute to 
health and functioning over the life span.
    Kidney Disease.--The Committee encourages the NIA to 
support research that studies the basic biology of the aging 
processes in the kidney, the science of how aging impacts 
kidney injury and repair, and how chronic kidney disease [CKD] 
differs in the elderly compared to a younger population. 
Additional research should consider how age impacts CKD 
progression in comparison to the impact of other risk factors 
and how cognitive impairment and frailty are impacted by CKD 
treatment, including dialysis.

 NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ARTHRITIS AND MUSCULOSKELETAL AND SKIN DISEASES

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................    $657,598,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     530,825,000
House allowance.........................................     543,621,000
Committee recommendation................................     533,831,000

\1\Includes $132,726,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $533,831,000 for the 
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin 
Diseases [NIAMS]. The budget request was $530,825,000. The 
fiscal year 2009 appropriation was $657,598,000, including 
$132,726,000 available in the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act of 2009.
    Marfan Syndrome.--The Committee encourages NIAMS to 
continue its support of collaborative, multi-investigator 
research related to Marfan syndrome and partner with the NHLBI 
in support of the Pediatric Heart Network's clinical trial on 
Marfan syndrome.
    Mucopolysaccharidosis [MPS].--The Committee commends NIAMS 
for taking the lead role in supporting the 1st Advances in Rare 
Bone Diseases Scientific Conference.
    Scleroderma.--The Committee commends NIAMS for its support 
of research on scleroderma through the National Family Registry 
for Scleroderma and the Center of Research Translation. The 
Committee requests an update on these activities as part of the 
Institute's fiscal year 2011 congressional budget 
justification.

    NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DEAFNESS AND OTHER COMMUNICATION DISORDERS

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................    $510,243,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     413,026,000
House allowance.........................................     422,308,000
Committee recommendation................................     414,755,000

\1\Includes $102,984,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $414,755,000 for the 
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication 
Disorders [NIDCD]. The budget request was $413,026,000. The 
fiscal year 2009 appropriation was $510,243,000, including 
$102,984,000 available in the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act of 2009.
    Brain Plasticity.--The Committee continues to support 
research on functional changes of synapses of the auditory 
pathways and cortex following hearing loss, and how these 
changes limit hearing capability, even with hearing aids or 
cochlear implants. Also recommended are investigations in 
animal models of neural mechanisms responsible for demonstrated 
auditory deficits following hearing loss.
    Cytomegolovirus.--The Committee supports more research into 
the pathogenesis and treatment of cytomegalovirus, a leading 
cause of congenital sensorineural hearing loss.
    Hair Cell Regeneration and Stem Cells.--The NIDCD should 
continue building on new approaches for regenerating lost hair 
cells, including developing technology for gene transfer and 
gene vector generation, and testing the viability of 
regenerated cells in animal models at the levels of nucleic 
acids and proteins. Comparative research on responses to hair 
cell damage in regenerating and nonregenerating species is also 
urged. The Committee encourages the NIDCD to expand and support 
stem cell research in the auditory system, with areas of focus 
to include the use of stem cells to replace lost hair cells and 
peripheral neurons via transplantation; integration of stem 
cells into sensory epithelium; and innervation/re-innervation 
of the partially deaf or deaf cochlea. The Committee continues 
to encourage further studies to correlate hair cell 
replenishment with improved hearing.
    Hereditary Hearing Loss.--The Committee applauds the 
NIDCD's efforts to identify and understand the structure, 
function and regulation of genes whose mutation results in 
deafness and other communication disorders. It recommends 
continuation of such studies, with increased emphasis on the 
genetics of complex hearing loss and Menieres disease.
    Noise and Environmentally Induced Hearing Loss.--Of 
particular concern to the Committee is the epidemic proportion 
of noise-induced hearing loss in the military, a situation that 
will increase as veterans age. The Committee encourages the 
NIDCD to support critical research into prevention of hearing 
loss from noise trauma in military environments, as well as 
studies of post-exposure treatment. The Committee commends the 
NIDCD for its efforts to raise public awareness of the 
omnipresent threats to the auditory system posed by 
environmental noise. It advocates continued dissemination of 
information emphasizing dangers to hearing from workplace 
noise, recreational activities and loud consumer products, and 
describing ways to protect hearing during exposure, through 
such means as the ``It's a Noisy Planet'' and ``Wise Ear'' 
campaigns, and the NIDCD website and publications. The 
Committee also understands the potentially deleterious effects 
of environmental pollutants in water and air on the inner ear, 
and urges the NIDCD to support studies of the impact of such 
chemicals as lead and mercury, and carbon monoxide, on hearing, 
especially during prenatal and early postnatal development. 
Finally, the Committee encourages the NIDCD to continue and 
enhance support of behavioral research on ways to prevent or 
lessen the cumulative damage to hearing caused by environmental 
noise.
    Presbycusis.--The Committee urges the NIDCD to continue its 
support of physiological and neurological studies of the 
peripheral and central mechanisms of presbycusis. Studies of 
inner ear development pointing the way for regenerating cells 
lost in presbycusis are also urged.
    Specific Language Impairment.--The Committee recommends 
that the NIDCD expand research on the pathophysiology of 
specific language impairment.
    Tinnitus.--The Committee recommends that the NIDCD expand 
its research into causal mechanisms underlying peripheral and 
central tinnitus and pursue research devoted to preventions, 
treatments, and cures of this prevalent disorder.
    Translational Research.--The Committee urges the 
continuation of research activities and clinical trials 
relative to prevention and treatments of hearing loss from 
noise, drugs, aging and genetic causes, and translation of 
these studies to therapies. Efforts should include studies of 
agents to treat acoustic trauma and exposure to ototoxicants, 
including animal and clinical trials of antioxidants, and 
studies of mechanisms to manipulate cellular pathways to 
protect against or prevent sensory cell and neuron loss. 
Clinical trials relevant to Meniere's disease, sudden deafness 
and autoimmune inner ear disease, including trials of newer 
rheumatic drugs delivered directly to the ear, are also 
encouraged.
    Vestibular Research.--The Committee recommends developing 
better intervention strategies and clinical trials to improve 
the diagnosis and treatment of vertigo and balance disorders. 
Research on vestibular compensation is encouraged.

                 NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NURSING RESEARCH

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................    $177,756,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     143,749,000
House allowance.........................................     146,945,000
Committee recommendation................................     144,262,000

\1\Includes $35,877,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $144,262,000 for the 
National Institute of Nursing Research [NINR]. The budget 
request was $143,749,000. The fiscal year 2009 appropriation 
was $177,756,000, including $35,877,000 available in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.
    Preparing Nurse Faculty.--The Committee recognizes that the 
NINR is integral to the future of the Nation's healthcare 
system and plays a vital role in educating the next generation 
of nurse researchers who will serve as nurse faculty in nursing 
schools.

           NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON ALCOHOL ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................    $564,081,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     455,149,000
House allowance.........................................     466,308,000
Committee recommendation................................     457,887,000

\1\Includes $113,851,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $457,887,000 for the 
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism [NIAAA]. The 
budget request was $455,149,000. The fiscal year 2009 
appropriation was $564,081,000, including $113,851,000 
available in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009.
    Behavior Change Research.--The Committee encourages the 
NIAAA to support interdisciplinary research that integrates 
biomedical, psychological, and social science perspectives on 
mechanisms of behavior change.
    Dissemination of Research Findings.--The Committee 
encourages NIAAA to continue its leadership role by 
disseminating science-based, user-friendly information on the 
health effects of alcohol use.

                    NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................  $1,293,915,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   1,045,384,000
House allowance.........................................   1,069,583,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,050,091,000

\1\Includes $261,156,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,050,091,000 for 
the National Institute on Drug Abuse [NIDA]. The budget request 
was $1,045,384,000. The fiscal year 2009 appropriation was 
$1,293,915,000, including $261,156,000 available in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.
    Adolescent Brain Development.--The Committee encourages 
NIDA to continue its emphasis on adolescent brain development 
to better understand how developmental processes and outcomes 
are affected by drug exposure, the environment, and genetics.
    Anti-drug Campaign Research.--The Committee urges NIDA to 
support behavioral research on message framing to help tailor 
the most effective anti-drug use media campaigns.
    Behavioral Research and Cognitive Development.--The 
Committee commends NIDA's continued support of behavioral 
research on the relationship between cognitive development and 
childhood experience, especially in children gestationally 
exposed to drugs, and encourages further research to better 
understand the complex relations among socioeconomic status, 
cognitive development and life experience.
    Blending Research and Practice.--The Committee applauds 
NIDA for its collaborative Blending Initiative with SAMHSA, an 
effort to translate research into practice and incorporate 
bidirectional feedback from multiple stakeholders to make the 
best drug abuse and addiction treatments available to those who 
need them.
    Effectiveness Research.--The Committee encourages NIDA to 
continue its investment in effectiveness research so that 
proven models of addiction treatment and prevention can be 
further refined.
    Prescription Drug Abuse.--The Committee continues to urge 
NIDA to support research aimed at reducing prescription drug 
abuse, especially among our Nation's youth, and at developing 
pain medications with reduced abuse liability.
    Pulmonary Hypertension.--The Committee encourages NIDA to 
support research aimed at assessing the growing frequency of 
pulmonary hypertension in patients who abuse methamphetamines.
    Raising Awareness of the Medical Community.--The Committee 
commends NIDA for raising the awareness of physicians of the 
potential impact of substance abuse on their patients' 
illnesses and outcomes. Specifically, NIDA has created the 
Centers of Excellence for Physician Information and developed a 
Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment 
initiative. The Committee understands that these projects will 
serve as national models to support the advancement of 
addiction awareness in primary care practices.
    State Substance Abuse Agency Infrastructure Grants.--The 
Committee continues to support NIDA's State substance abuse 
agency infrastructure grants, which help States conduct 
research to create, implement, expand, and/or sustain science-
based improvement in the publicly funded prevention and 
treatment system.
    Teens and Drug Abuse.--The Committee commends NIDA for its 
educational efforts to raise awareness among teens regarding 
the harmful health effects associated with drugs of abuse. 
Examples include the ``After the Party'' public service 
campaign and Chat Day, which enabled youth from across the 
country to ask questions of leading addiction science 
professionals. The Committee encourages NIDA to continue the 
expansion of these efforts.
    Tobacco Addiction.--The Committee recognizes that while 
significant declines in smoking have been achieved in recent 
decades, too many Americans, particularly youth, remain 
addicted to tobacco products. The Committee applauds the recent 
progress of NIDA-supported researchers toward identifying 
genetic factors that contribute to nicotine dependence and 
affect the efficacy of smoking cessation treatments, and it 
urges NIDA to continue developing much-needed evidence-based 
treatments, medications, and prevention strategies to combat 
nicotine addiction.

                  NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................  $1,817,280,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   1,474,676,000
House allowance.........................................   1,502,266,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,475,190,000

\1\Includes $366,789,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,475,190,000 for 
the National Institute of Mental Health [NIMH]. The budget 
request was $1,474,676,000. The fiscal year 2009 appropriation 
level was $1,817,280,000, including $366,789,000 available in 
the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.
    Children's Mental Health.--The Committee applauds the NIMH 
for its focus on identifying early risk factors and effective 
interventions for a variety of emotional and mental disorders 
among children.
    HIV/AIDS Behavioral Research.--The Committee supports 
additional research on how to change the behaviors that lead to 
HIV acquisition, transmission, and disease progression, and how 
to maintain protective behaviors once they are adopted, with a 
better understanding of the social and cultural factors that 
may impact different populations.
    Immigrant Health.--The Committee recognizes that immigrants 
experience unique stresses, prejudice and poverty, and can be 
considered at risk for health, emotional, and behavioral 
problems as well as, in the case of children, learning and 
academic difficulties. To address this, the Committee urges the 
NIMH to direct research on the adaptation, development, health, 
and mental health needs of diverse immigrant populations.

                NATIONAL HUMAN GENOME RESEARCH INSTITUTE

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................    $629,402,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     509,594,000
House allowance.........................................     520,311,000
Committee recommendation................................     511,007,000

\1\Includes $127,035,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $511,007,000 for the 
National Human Genome Research Institute [NHGRI]. The budget 
request was $509,594,000. The fiscal year 2009 appropriation 
was $629,402,000, including $127,035,000 available in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.
    Gene-environment Interactions.--The Committee encourages 
the NHGRI to continue its emphasis on the development of real-
time environmental monitoring technologies, and the advancement 
of tools to measure psychosocial stress and its influence on 
gene expression.

      NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF BIOMEDICAL IMAGING AND BIOENGINEERING

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................    $386,145,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     312,687,000
House allowance.........................................     319,217,000
Committee recommendation................................     313,496,000

\1\Includes $77,937,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $313,496,000 for the 
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering 
[NIBIB]. The budget request was $312,687,000. The fiscal year 
2009 appropriation was $386,145,000, including $77,937,000 
available in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009.

                 NATIONAL CENTER FOR RESEARCH RESOURCES

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................  $2,836,351,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   1,252,044,000
House allowance.........................................   1,280,031,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,256,926,000

\1\Includes $1,610,088,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,256,926,000 for 
the National Center for Research Resources [NCRR]. The budget 
request was $1,252,044,000. The fiscal year 2009 appropriation 
was $2,836,351,000, including $1,610,088,000 available in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.
    The NCRR receives a larger percentage increase under the 
Committee's recommendation than other institutes and centers 
because some of the costs of the Clinical and Translational 
Science Awards [CTSAs] program will shift to the NCRR from the 
Common Fund. The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$473,600,000 for the CTSAs in fiscal year 2010, divided as 
follows: $448,355,000 from the NCRR, compared with $430,642,000 
in fiscal year 2009; and $25,245,000 from the Common Fund, down 
from $53,224,000 in fiscal year 2009. The fiscal year 2009 
total for CTSAs was $483,866,000.
    Human Tissue Supply.--The Committee remains interested in 
matching the increased needs of NIH grantees and intramural and 
university-based researchers who rely upon human tissues and 
organs to study human diseases and search for cures. The 
Committee encourages the NCRR to increase support for nonprofit 
organizations that supply human tissue.
    Infrastructure Projects.--The Committee is concerned that 
schools of dentistry may not be receiving adequate 
infrastructure funding from the NCRR. The Committee encourages 
the NCRR to explore ways of ensuring an equitable distribution 
of infrastructure funding among various scientific programs.
    Institutional Development Awards [IDeA].--The Committee has 
provided $228,862,000, the same as the budget request, for the 
IDeA program authorized by section 402(g) of the Public Health 
Service Act. The fiscal year 2009 funding level was 
$224,043,000.
    Primate Research.--The Committee believes that nonhuman 
primates are extremely important models for conducting research 
to help understand and treat conditions such as heart disease, 
hypertension, cancer, diabetes, hepatitis, kidney disease, 
Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. In addition, 
nonhuman primate research is necessary for pursuing an HIV/AIDS 
vaccine and enhancing the Nation's emerging infectious disease 
and biodefense response capabilities. Therefore, the Committee 
appreciates the efforts of the National Primate Research Center 
[NPRC] directors to outline a 5-year initiative to address the 
upgrades and program expansions required to meet the demanding 
nonhuman primate research needs of the Nation, and encourages 
the NCRR to work with the NPRCs to ensure that they are 
provided with the resources necessary to contribute to the 
overall effectiveness of the Federal investment in biomedical 
research.
    Research Centers in Minority Institutions.--The Committee 
continues to recognize the critical role played by minority 
institutions at both the graduate and undergraduate level in 
addressing the health research and training needs of minority 
populations. The Research Centers in Minority Institutions 
[RCMI] program impacts significantly on these issues. The 
Committee encourages the NIH to strengthen the research 
environment at minority institutions so that they may fully 
engage in and build upon NIH initiatives. Specifically, the 
Committee recommends NCRR supplemental funds be directed to 
high-impact, high-risk research activities within the RCMI 
program such as creating an integrated translational research 
network to help reduce health disparities.

       NATIONAL CENTER FOR COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................    $157,199,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     127,241,000
House allowance.........................................     129,953,000
Committee recommendation................................     127,591,000

\1\Includes $31,728,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $127,591,000 for the 
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine 
[NCCAM]. The budget request was $127,241,000. The fiscal year 
2009 appropriation was $157,199,000, including $31,728,000 
available in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009.

       NATIONAL CENTER ON MINORITY HEALTH AND HEALTH DISPARITIES

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................    $258,040,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     208,844,000
House allowance.........................................     213,316,000
Committee recommendation................................     209,508,000

\1\Includes $52,081,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $209,508,000 for the 
National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities 
[NCMHD]. The budget request was $208,844,000. The fiscal year 
2009 appropriation was $258,040,000, including $52,081,000 
available in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009.
    The Committee commends the National Center on Minority 
Health and Health Disparities for its leadership in addressing 
the longstanding problem of health status disparities in 
minority and medically underserved populations. The Committee 
also commends NCMHD for its successful Project EXPORT 
initiative, which sponsors multidisciplinary and 
interdisciplinary research into some of the most prevalent and 
debilitating diseases affecting health disparity populations.
    Glomerular Disease Research.--The Committee notes the 
recently discovered link between the MYH9 gene and the high 
prevalence of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis among African 
Americans. The Committee urges the NCMHD to collaborate with 
the NIDDK to support expanded research on this condition's 
effect on minorities and the specific implications of this 
genealogical linkage.
    Severe Asthma.--The Committee encourages the NCMHD to work 
with the NHLBI to expand and strengthen research on severe 
asthma in minority populations.
    Urban Indians.--The Committee is aware of the need for 
greater focus on the health of urban Indians, a group known to 
experience serve health disparities in such areas as diabetes, 
alcohol-related deaths and sudden infant death syndrome. The 
Committee encourages the NCMHD to put a priority on addressing 
the needs of this population.

 JOHN E. FOGARTY INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR ADVANCED STUDY IN THE HEALTH 
                                SCIENCES

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................     $86,061,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................      69,227,000
House allowance.........................................      70,780,000
Committee recommendation................................      69,409,000

\1\Includes $17,370,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $69,409,000 for the 
Fogarty International Center [FIC]. The budget request was 
$69,227,000. The fiscal year 2009 appropriation was 
$86,061,000, including $17,370,000 available in the American 
Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.
    Depression.--The Committee urges the FIC to work with other 
institutes, particularly the NIMH, to combat the enormous 
worldwide incidence of depression.
    Global Health Research Training and Workforce Capacity.--
The Committee commends FIC for its continuing work to 
strengthen biomedical research capacity in the developing 
world, and by doing so advance the global efforts against 
malaria, neglected tropical diseases, and other health issues 
that disproportionately impact the developing world. The 
Committee appreciates that having a trained and expert local 
workforce as well as a research infrastructure for them to use 
has significant benefits for efforts to research and combat 
diseases of global priority. The Committee also recognizes that 
expanding in-country research capacity will complement 
associated U.S. efforts to improve global health.

                      NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................    $422,614,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     342,547,000
House allowance.........................................     350,785,000
Committee recommendation................................     344,617,000

\1\Includes $83,643,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $344,617,000 for the 
National Library of Medicine [NLM]. The budget request was 
$342,547,000. The fiscal year 2009 appropriation was 
$422,614,000, including $83,643,000 available in the American 
Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. These amounts include 
$8,200,000 made available from program evaluation funds. Of the 
funds provided, $4,000,000 is for improvement of information 
systems, to remain available until expended.
    Medline Plus Magazines.--The Committee is pleased that NLM 
has expanded the distribution of NIH MedlinePlus magazine and 
recently began testing a new bilingual version of the magazine, 
NIH MedlinePlus Salud, with good results. The Committee calls 
on NLM to increase the distribution of these important sources 
of consumer health information to reach all physician offices, 
federally qualified health centers, hospitals, libraries and 
free-standing health clinics.
    Native Hawaiian Resources.--The Committee urges the NLM to 
work with Native Hawaiian organizations to provide support in 
the areas of biomedicine and healthcare.

                         OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................  $2,583,701,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   1,182,777,000
House allowance.........................................   1,168,704,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,182,777,000

\1\Includes $1,336,837,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,182,777,000 for 
the Office of the Director [OD]; this amount is the same as the 
budget request. The fiscal year 2009 appropriation was 
$2,583,701,000, including $1,336,837,000 available in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.
    Conflicts of Interest.--The Committee remains deeply 
concerned about the lack of oversight and disclosure involving 
conflicts of interest among extramural investigators who are 
funded by the NIH. The Committee is aware that the comment 
period for the Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on this 
topic recently ended, but many steps remain in the process to 
ensure more transparency of funds, better systems for managing 
any conflicts, and stronger compliance by institutions. While 
it is important to craft the regulations thoughtfully, there is 
also no reason for undue delays, considering how long HHS has 
known that changes are needed. Therefore, the Committee 
includes bill language requiring that HHS publish the final 
regulations by May 1, 2010. The Committee also requests HHS, 
within 30 days of enactment of this act, to provide to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
and the Senate a schedule for meeting that deadline.
    National Children's Study.--Unlike the past 2 years, the 
Committee bill does not include a specific amount of funding 
for the National Children's Study [NCS]. The NIH informed the 
Committee for several years that the total cost of the NCS 
would be approximately $3,100,000,000. Later estimates 
conducted internally at the NIH put the total figure 
significantly higher, but the NIH did not provide the revised 
estimate to the Committee until recently, despite the 
Committee's strong interest in and support of the initiative. 
The Committee considers this withholding of information to be a 
serious breach of trust. The NIH now plans to extend the pilot 
phase of the NCS and postpone a final decision about whether to 
proceed with the full study until more is known about whether 
it is possible to achieve the original objectives of the NCS 
without drastically exceeding the budget that was initially 
presented to the Congress. The Committee welcomes that 
decision. However, given the lack of transparency involved with 
the study so far, the Committee believes it should have the 
most up-to-date information possible before settling on a 
specific funding level, if any, for the NCS, and thus will 
delay that decision until conference.
    Reprogrammings.--The Committee is aware that there has been 
some confusion surrounding the reprogramming limitation 
established in section 516 of this bill, especially regarding 
the term ``program, project or activity.'' The Committee wishes 
to clarify that ``program, project or activity'' applies to all 
sub-mechanisms and stand-alone activities in institute and 
center mechanism tables, with the exception of the research 
projects grants mechanism, in which case additional flexibility 
is warranted and the restriction shall apply at the subtotal 
level.

Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research [OBSSR]

    Systems Science Initiative.--The Committee acknowledges the 
collaborative work of OBSSR with other institutes and centers 
to encourage methodological advances in systems science and 
help cutting-edge areas of behavioral and social sciences 
research evolve and advance.

Office of Rare Diseases [ORD]

    Glomerular Disease.--The Committee is aware of 
opportunities to increase collaborative research efforts 
regarding the glomerular disease focal segmental 
glomerulosclerosis [FSGS], and encourages the ORD to consider 
FSGS for inclusion in its Rare Disease Clinical Research 
Consortia Program.
    Human Tissue Supply.--The Committee understands that 
obtaining human tissues for research for the more than 7,000 
rare diseases known today has been a major barrier to expand 
research aimed to treat and cure rare diseases. The Committee 
encourages the ORD to increase support for nonprofit 
organizations that supply human tissue to study rare diseases.
    Neurodegeneration With Brain Iron Accumulation [NBIA].--The 
Committee urges the ORD to put a higher priority on research 
involving NBIA, a disease for which there is no treatment or 
cure.
    Porphyria.--The Committee encourages the ORD to develop an 
agenda for basic and clinical research for the treatment of 
porphyria, to devote dedicated resources for this purpose, and 
to consult with patient stakeholder organizations when 
considering the development of the research agenda.

Office of Research on Women's Health [ORWH]

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome [CFS].--The Committee urges the 
ORWH to strengthen the network of investigators funded under 
the fiscal year 2007 CFS neuroimmune research initiative by 
stimulating new research initiatives and building multicenter 
collaborations. The Committee again urges the NIH to establish 
an intramural CFS research program with relevant areas of 
scientific expertise to study disease pathophysiology, identify 
biomarkers, objective diagnostic tools and better therapeutic 
approaches. The Committee urges the NIH to ensure that study 
sections responsible for reviewing grants on CFS include 
experts who are qualified in the appropriate disciplines.
    Irritable Bowel Syndrome [IBS].--The Committee is pleased 
with the ORWH's increased focus on IBS.
    Stroke in Women.--The Committee urges increased research 
into new therapies for stroke in women as well as ways to 
enhance vascular health of all Americans, including 
observational research on differences in the way men and women 
present with stroke symptoms; research addressing how stroke 
influences the likelihood and severity of cognitive impairment 
in women; a clinical trial of carotid endarterectomy and 
angioplasty/stenting in women; studies of differences in how 
men and women respond to antiplatelet agents for recurrent 
stroke prevention; basic science research to address unique 
brain cell death and repair mechanisms in females; and clinical 
and basic research on hormone physiology and its impact on 
women's vascular health.
    Vulvodynia.--The Committee calls upon the ORWH to allocate 
sufficient additional resources to the educational outreach 
campaign on vulvodynia, launched in 2007, to ensure that 
materials are more widely disseminated to the public, patient, 
and medical communities, as well as federally funded health 
centers and college health clinics. The Committee also notes 
that 5 years have passed since the last NIH vulvodynia 
conference, and requests that the ORWH convene, with the 
support of relevant institutes and centers, a research 
conference on vulvodynia in fiscal year 2010.

Multi-institute Research Initiatives

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis [ALS].--The Committee 
encourages NIH to continue to pursue collaborations and 
partnerships with voluntary health associations to advance 
basic, translational, and clinical research into ALS. Support 
for NIH translational research, the Office of Rare Diseases, 
SBIR grants and investment in cross-cutting, trans-NIH 
programs, including those that support high-risk, high-reward 
initiatives, are among the priorities through which NIH can 
create significant opportunities to advance ALS and other rare 
disease research. The success in advancing spinal muscular 
atrophy [SMA] research through NIH's translational programs, 
specifically the SMA Project, provides a model for what can be 
accomplished via these initiatives. The Committee encourages 
NIH to undertake similar efforts for ALS that can accelerate 
the development of therapeutic candidates for the treatment of 
the disease.
    Basic Behavioral Research.--The Committee is pleased that 
the NIH leadership has launched an initiative to develop a 
basic behavioral research blueprint modeled after the 
Neuroscience Blueprint to help ensure funding of the basic 
behavioral research necessary to advancing and improving health 
outcomes. The Committee notes that an April 2008 report from 
NIH indicated that basic behavioral research is funded in 13 of 
the 27 NIH institutes and centers. The Committee continues to 
be concerned, however, that the NIH, after many years of 
encouragement from this Committee, has not assigned scientific 
leadership for this research portfolio to an appropriate 
institute or center, such as the NIGMS. The Committee believes 
that a basic behavioral research portfolio spanning multiple 
institutes and centers will be strongly facilitated by 
establishing permanent scientific leadership in a lead 
institute.
    Bone Diseases.--The Committee urges the NIH to accelerate 
and expand research on osteoporosis and related bone diseases 
and related manifestations, such as cancer and bone loss 
leading to increased morbidity, mortality and disability. The 
Committee encourages more research on the pathophysiology of 
bone loss in diverse populations, with the goal of developing 
targeted therapies to improve bone density, quality and 
strength, assessment of microarchitecture and bone remodeling 
rates to more accurately determine fracture risk, as well as 
anabolic approaches to increase bone mass, novel molecular and 
cell-based therapies for bone and cartilage regeneration. 
Because the causes, symptoms and treatments of osteoporosis and 
related bone diseases cross scientific boundaries and impact 
various populations by age and gender, the Committee encourages 
continued collaboration among NIAMS, NCI, NIA, NICHHD, NIDCR, 
NIDDK, NINDS and NIBIB. The Committee also urges NIH to expand 
genetics and other research on diseases such as osteogenesis 
imperfecta and Paget's disease and other rare bone diseases 
such as fibrous dysplasia, osteoporosis, fibrodysplasia 
ossificans progressive, melhoreostosis, and X-linked 
hypophosphatemic rickets. Finally, the Committee encourages the 
NIA to conduct research aimed at translating basic and animal 
studies into novel therapeutic approaches to prevent age-
related bone loss.
    Career Development Awards.--The Committee supports the 
preservation of the K-12 and K-23 awards to ensure a diverse 
pool of highly trained clinical researchers. Both types of 
awards focus on patient-oriented clinical investigation.
    Class B Animal Dealers.--A recent study by the National 
Academies, ``Scientific and Humane Issues in the Use of Random 
Source Dogs and Cats in Research,'' found that while some 
random-source dogs and cats may be necessary and desirable for 
research that is funded by the NIH, Class B dealers are not 
necessary to supply such animals for NIH-funded research. The 
Committee therefore expects the NIH to phase out, as quickly as 
possible, the use of any of its funds for the purchase of, or 
research on, dogs or cats obtained from those USDA-licensed 
Class B dealers who acquire dogs or cats from third parties 
(i.e., individuals, dealers, breeders, and animal pounds) and 
resell them. Specifically, the NIH should not award any new 
grants or contracts that involve such animals and should 
immediately begin supporting alternative sources of random 
source animals from non-Class B dealers. The National Academies 
recommended, and the Committee agrees, that the NIH should use 
the request for proposal mechanism to acquire needed animals 
and form cooperative agreements with private research animal 
colonies. The Committee expects the NIH to address these 
concerns with a degree of urgency that has been sorely lacking 
in the 2 years since the Committee requested the National 
Academies study. The Committee requests the NIH to submit a 
report by April 1, 2010, to the Committee on Appropriations of 
the House of Representatives and the Senate describing its 
specific plans to follow these recommendations.
    Down Syndrome.--The Committee commends the NIH for creating 
the NIH Down Syndrome Working Group to develop the NIH Research 
Plan for Down syndrome. However, the Committee is concerned 
with the implementation of the plan since its release in 
January 2008. The Committee requests that the NIH report to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
and the Senate by September 30, 2010, on the quantity and 
dollar amount of Down syndrome research grants awarded since 
the release of the plan, including those awarded through funds 
made available by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, 
and how all such grants awarded meet the short- and long-term 
goals of the plan. In addition, the Committee urges the NIH to 
pursue public-private partnerships, when available, to help 
leverage the overall research spent on Down syndrome.
    Dystonia.--The intramural program at NIH continues to 
advance research activities in dystonia, and the Committee 
encourages continued support in this area of study.
    Fibromyalgia.--The evaluation and treatment of patients 
affected by fibromyalgia represent a disproportionate financial 
burden on the national health care system in large part because 
of a persistent lack of knowledge regarding the fundamental 
pathophysiology underlying its complex symptoms. The Committee 
urges the NIH, particularly the NIAMS and NINDS, to expand 
their emphasis on fibromyalgia research, including animal 
models of the disorder, basic science of the pathophysiology of 
the disorder in humans, and the development of appropriate 
clinical models of patient assessment and care. The Committee 
also continues to urge the NIH to establish a center dedicated 
to fibromyalgia and related disorders and to support the 
convening of an international symposium on fibromyalgia.
    Fragile X.--The Committee commends the NIH for developing 
the NIH Research Plan on Fragile X Syndrome and Associated 
Disorders. The Director is encouraged to dedicate sufficient 
resources to implement this plan with the guidance of the 
recently established Fragile X Research Coordinating Group, and 
in collaboration with the NICHD Fragile X Research Centers, as 
well as the Fragile X Clinical and Research Consortium. 
Priorities should include clinical trials of therapies for 
treatment of Fragile X syndrome and translational research that 
shows significant promise of a safe and effective treatment for 
Fragile X syndrome and associated disorders. The Committee 
congratulates the NIH and its private foundation partners for 
providing a Small Business Innovation Research grant to fund 
Fragile X drug development, and it encourages more efforts of 
this kind. Finally, the Committee urges the NIH, working with 
the Fragile X Clinical and Research Consortium, to convene a 
consensus conference on translational research opportunities in 
fiscal year 2010.
    Headache Disorders.--The Committee notes that NIH-funded 
research efforts on headache disorders have not been 
commensurate with their enormous disease burden. The Committee 
strongly urges the NINDS to solicit grant applications for 
fundamental and translational research on headache disorders 
and to recruit new investigators to the field. The Committee 
also urges the establishment of a screening program for 
therapies for headache disorders comparable in scope to the 
Anticonvulsant Screening Program [ASP]. The Center for 
Scientific Review is encouraged to provide fair peer review by 
ensuring that applications submitted in the area of headache 
research will be considered by study sections that include 
members who are principally headache research scientists. The 
Committee commends the NINDS for recently initiating a process 
towards defining headache disorders research benchmarks and 
requests an update on the progress of this program in the 
fiscal year 2011 congressional budget justification. The 
Committee also requests an update on the status of NIH 
intramural research programs related to headache disorders.
    Lymphatic Research and Lymphatic Disease.--Research on the 
lymphatic system is multidisciplinary and does not conform 
easily to the mission of any one institute or center. This 
situation has contributed to its relative neglect as an 
investigative focus. In an attempt to rectify this historical 
neglect, the Trans-NIH Working Group was convened in September 
2007 to provide recommendations to the participating institutes 
and centers for further direction in lymphatic research. The 
Committee is discouraged by the lack of progress made with 
respect to these recommendations and encourages aggressive 
measures to work toward their implementation, including but not 
limited to: the creation of centralized core facilities for 
experimental molecular and diagnostic lymphatic imaging, the 
development and standardization of research reagents, and the 
generation of virtual networks to facilitate basic, 
translational, and clinical research; the development of 
techniques for the quantitative and molecular imaging of 
lymphatic function, lymphatic malformations, and lymph nodes; 
the creation of interdisciplinary programs to train new 
investigators in lymphatic research; the creation of patient 
registries and a lymphatic disease tissue bank; the generation 
and characterization of animal models to foster and facilitate 
investigations in lymphatic biology; and the identification of 
suitable panels of biomarkers for lymphatic disease. The 
Committee again commends the NHLBI for taking a leadership role 
in the Trans-NIH Coordinating Committee and for engaging 
consultative expertise, and it encourages the continuation of 
these efforts in concert with the other relevant institutes and 
centers.
    Mitochondrial Disease.--The Committee is aware that the 
study of mitochondrial disease and dysfunction presents a 
number of unique research challenges and opportunities, and is 
by its nature a cross-cutting enterprise. Accordingly, the 
Committee applauds the Director for efforts to date to promote 
trans-NIH research on mitochondrial disease. The Committee 
expects that the Director will continue to treat mitochondrial 
disease research as a high priority area within the resources 
provided in the Common Fund, including through expanded efforts 
to advance fundamental understanding of mitochondrial function 
and variation, improved detection and analysis of mitochondrial 
proteins, and the accelerated application of systems biology 
and computational modeling approaches.
    Neurofibromatosis [NF].--NF is an important research area 
for multiple NIH institutes. Recognizing NF's connection to 
many of the most common forms of cancer, the Committee 
encourages the NCI to substantially increase its NF research 
portfolio in pre-clinical and clinical trials by applying newly 
developed and existing drugs. The Committee also encourages the 
NCI to support NF centers, virtual centers, SPORE programs, 
pre-clinical mouse consortiums, patient databases, and tissue 
banks, and to work together with other NIH institutes and 
Government agencies in doing so. The Committee also urges 
additional focus from the NHLBI, given NF's involvement with 
hypertension and congenital heart disease. The Committee 
encourages the NINDS to continue to aggressively explore NF's 
implications for conditions such as spinal cord injury, 
learning disabilities and memory loss. In addition, the 
Committee continues to encourage the NICHD to expand funding of 
clinical trials for NF patients in the area of learning 
disabilities, including the creation of NF centers involved 
with treating and curing these disabilities. NF2 accounts for 
approximately 5 percent of genetic forms of deafness; the 
Committee therefore encourages the NIDCD to expand its NF2 
research portfolio.
    NIH-DOE Collaborations.--The Committee applauds the 
successes that have been achieved when the NIH has collaborated 
with the Department of Energy's National Laboratories, 
including the Human Genome Project, advances in bioinformatics, 
and breakthroughs in atomic resolution structural biology. The 
Committee strongly encourages the NIH Director and directors of 
the institutes and centers to pursue additional opportunities 
for sustained collaboration in research and development.
    Obesity and Asthma/Allergy.--Studies have documented that 
the incidence of asthma is 50 percent more common among those 
who are overweight or obese. More recently, obesity has been 
linked to food allergies as well. The Committee is pleased that 
the NHLBI is collaborating with the NICHD in support of a 
consortium to evaluate methods to treat and prevent obesity. 
The Committee believes that the link between obesity and food 
allergy/asthma should be explored through this resource and 
that additional investigator-initiated research should be 
fostered through other institutes and centers, including the 
NIAID, NIEHS, NIDDK, NHGRI and NCMHD.
    Overlapping Chronic Disorders.--The Committee notes that 
millions of Americans suffer with one or more of the following 
chronic disorders: chronic fatigue syndrome, endometriosis, 
fibromyalgia, headache, interstitial cystitis, irritable bowel 
syndrome, temporomandibular joint and muscle disorders and 
vulvodynia. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that these 
conditions frequently co-exist or overlap, yet all are poorly 
understood. Progress in treating these prevalent, life-altering 
disorders has been hindered by their complex genetics and 
heterogeneous etiologies; however, studying related or 
clinically overlapping chronic conditions can yield unique 
biological insight into the mechanisms underlying common 
disease. The Committee calls upon the Director to coordinate, 
with all relevant institutes and centers, a trans-NIH research 
initiative in fiscal year 2010 that will support studies aimed 
at identifying common etiological pathways, with the goal of 
identifying potential therapeutic targets. The Committee also 
requests that the Director hold a conference in fiscal year 
2010 that will bring together a wide range of basic and 
clinical researchers from multiple specialties, as well as 
professional and patient advocacy organizations, to present and 
discuss the latest scientific discoveries and develop future 
research recommendations. The Committee requests an update on 
progress made in this area in the fiscal year 2011 
congressional budget justification.
    Pain Research.--The Committee is disappointed with the pace 
at which NIH is expanding and improving pain research in 
general, and in particular with the slow startup of the Pain 
Progress Review Group. The Committee urges the NIH to 
invigorate the NIH Pain Consortium and focus its efforts on 
identifying and filling important gaps in the pain research 
agenda, not simply showcasing the relatively small amount of 
work currently being done in this area. The Committee also 
urges the NIH to work with the Departments of Defense and 
Veterans Affairs to coordinate their respective research 
efforts on pain conditions afflicting troops returning from the 
current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.
    Psoriasis.--The Committee is encouraged by NIAMS' support 
of a CORT grant and of a strong follow-up study to the GAIN 
grant. The Committee recognizes that researchers are 
identifying genes that control immune pathways involved in 
psoriasis and giving promise to identifying and developing a 
permanent method of control for psoriasis and, eventually, a 
cure. The Committee recognizes that additional genetics, 
immunology and clinical research focused on understanding the 
mechanisms of psoriasis are needed, and it encourages NIAMS and 
NIAID to study the genetic susceptibility of psoriasis, develop 
animal models of psoriasis, identify and examine immune cells 
and inflammatory processes involved in psoriasis, and elucidate 
psoriatic arthritis specific genes and other biomarkers. The 
Committee also recognizes the mounting evidence of co-
morbidities associated with psoriasis and the 50 percent higher 
risk of mortality for people with severe psoriasis. The 
Committee urges the NHLBI to consider these factors in its 
research, specifically that individuals with severe psoriasis 
have an increased risk of heart attack, independent of other 
major risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes and obesity, 
and that for people in their 40's and 50's with severe 
psoriasis, the risk of heart attack is more pronounced. The 
Committee also urges the NIDDK to consider in its research that 
diabetes is more prevalent for patients with severe psoriasis 
than for those with mild disease. The Committee encourages the 
NIMH to conduct research to better understand why it is 
estimated that as many as 52 percent of psoriasis patients 
report clinically significant psychiatric symptoms and that 
individuals with psoriasis are twice as likely to have thoughts 
of suicide.
    Rehabilitation Research.--The Committee urges the Director 
to take administrative steps to work with the National Center 
for Medical Rehabilitation Research [NCMRR] and other relevant 
NIH institutes and centers to enhance and increase 
collaboration and support for medical rehabilitation and 
disability research across the NIH. The Committee believes that 
rehabilitation and disability research is well-suited for the 
type of cross-disciplinary, translational research that the OD 
has made a priority in recent years. Medical rehabilitation 
research on traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, stroke 
and amputation could all benefit from this approach.
    Sex Differences.--For many disorders, the sex of the 
patient influences disease etiology, natural history, diagnosis 
and treatment alternatives and outcomes. One of the fields 
where such differences are most pronounced is neuroscience. The 
Committee encourages each of the 15 institutes involved in the 
NIH Neuroscience Blueprint to analyze their blueprint research 
portfolios to ensure sex is included as a variable, when 
appropriate, and to require that all reported results include 
sex-specific analysis. The Committee requests an update on 
these efforts in the fiscal year 2011 congressional budget 
justification.
    Spina Bifida.--The Committee encourages the NIDDK, NICHD, 
and NINDS to study the causes and care of the neurogenic 
bladder in order to improve the quality of life of children and 
adults with spina bifida; to support research to address issues 
related to the treatment and management of spina bifida and 
associated secondary conditions, such as hydrocephalus; and to 
invest in understanding the myriad co-morbid conditions 
experienced by children with spina bifida, including those 
associated with paralysis and developmental delay.
    Spinal Muscular Atrophy [SMA].--Given the near-term 
scientific opportunity for an effective treatment, the 
Committee encourages the Director to establish a trans-NIH 
working group on SMA composed of NINDS, NICHD, and NIAMS, as 
well as other relevant institutes, to ensure ongoing support of 
SMA research and drug development, including vitally needed 
support for clinical research efforts in the field. In 
particular, the Committee encourages the NINDS to plan for each 
of the successive stages of SMA research, including preclinical 
testing of multiple compounds and the necessary clinical trials 
infrastructure that is needed on a national and coordinated 
level to ensure effective treatment studies; it encourages the 
NICHD to support large-scale pilot studies that support the 
development of a national newborn screening program for SMA; 
and it encourages NIAMS to take an active role in research that 
would provide a better understanding of the effects of SMA-
linked mutations on muscle as well as research that could 
provide therapeutic benefit through actions on muscle. On a 
related matter, the Committee is concerned by the lack of 
progress made towards the development of a pan-ethnic carrier 
screening program for SMA. The Committee strongly encourages 
the NHGRI, NICHD, and NINDS to work collaboratively to develop 
specific recommendations and guidelines for providers and 
patients on such a screening program, and it urges the 
institutes to partner with the relevant professional societies 
and the advocacy community in this effort. The Committee 
expects an update on these activities in the fiscal year 2011 
congressional budget justification.
    Stem Cell Research.--The Committee is pleased that stem 
cell research was included as a special emphasis area in the 
NIH Challenge Grant program, a special initiative supported by 
ARRA funds to focus on health and science problems amenable to 
significant progress within a 2-year timeframe. The Committee 
also welcomes the recent release of guidelines for the use of 
human embryonic stem cells [hESC] with NIH funds, but is 
concerned that implementing the guidelines will delay the 
funding of ARRA awards to support hESC and thus frustrate 
congressional intent to expedite this important area of 
research. Therefore, the Committee encourages the NIH to allow 
full 2-year funding of stem cell research awards with ARRA 
funds in fiscal year 2010.
    Tuberous Sclerosis Complex [TSC].--The Committee is 
encouraged by the potential of NIH-funded TSC research to 
reveal a better understanding not only of TSC, but more 
prevalent disorders such as autism, epilepsy and cancer. 
Because of the ``gateway'' potential of TSC research into these 
disorders, the Committee encourages a significant expansion of 
TSC research at all relevant institutes, and stronger 
coordination of this effort through the Trans-NIH TSC 
Coordinating Committee. In particular, the Committee encourages 
expanded research at the NICHD, NINDS, NIMH, and ORD targeted 
on the role of the TSC1/2 genes and the mTOR pathway in the 
mechanisms of epilepsy, autism and mental health issues. 
Furthermore, the NINDS, NIAMS, NICHD, NHLBI, NIDDK, NCI, ORD, 
and NHGRI are urged to collaborate on the mechanisms of tumor 
growth and drug target testing in preclinical models of TSC, 
TSC/polycystic kidney disease and lymphangioleiomyomatosis 
[LAM]. Finally, the Committee encourages all relevant NIH 
institutes to support clinical trials for the manifestations of 
TSC and LAM: epilepsy, autism, developmental delay, 
neurocognitive and mental health issues, and tumor growth in 
the kidneys, brain, skin, heart, liver and eyes.

                        OFFICE OF AIDS RESEARCH

    The Office of AIDS Research [OAR] coordinates the 
scientific, budgetary, legislative, and policy elements of the 
NIH AIDS research program. The Committee recommendation does 
not include a direct appropriation for the OAR. Instead, 
funding for AIDS research is included within the appropriation 
for each institute, center, and division of the NIH. The 
recommendation also includes a general provision which directs 
that the funding for AIDS research, as determined by the 
Director of the National Institutes of Health and the OAR, be 
allocated directly to the OAR for distribution to the 
institutes consistent with the AIDS research plan. The 
recommendation also includes a general provision permitting the 
Director of the NIH and the OAR to shift up to 3 percent of 
AIDS research funding among institutes and centers throughout 
the year if needs change or unanticipated opportunities arise.
    The Committee includes bill language permitting the OAR to 
use up to $8,000,000 for construction or renovation of National 
Primate Research Centers. This is the same as the fiscal year 
2009 level and the budget request.
    The Committee notes that the NCI has made numerous 
important breakthroughs in HIV/AIDS and supports the allocation 
of additional funding to the NCI for research into developing 
an HIV/AIDS vaccine.

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................    $625,581,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     125,581,000
House allowance.........................................     100,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     125,581,000

\1\Includes $500,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $125,581,000 for NIH 
buildings and facilities; this amount is the same as the budget 
request. The fiscal year 2009 appropriation was $625,581,000, 
including $500,000,000 available in the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act of 2009.

       Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Appropriations, 2009....................................  $3,466,491,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   3,525,467,000
House allowance.........................................   3,551,023,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,561,367,000

    The Committee recommends $3,561,367,000 for the Substance 
Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration [SAMHSA] for 
fiscal year 2010. The comparable fiscal year 2009 level is 
$3,466,491,000 and the administration request is 
$3,525,467,000. The recommendation includes $131,585,000 in 
transfers available under section 241 of the Public Health 
Service Act. SAMHSA is responsible for supporting mental health 
programs and alcohol and other drug abuse prevention and 
treatment services throughout the country, primarily through 
categorical grants and block grants to States.
    The Committee has provided funding for programs of regional 
and national significance under each of the three SAMHSA 
centers: mental health services, substance abuse treatment, and 
substance abuse prevention. Separate funding is available for 
the children's mental health services program, projects for 
assistance in transition from homelessness, the protection and 
advocacy program, data collection activities undertaken by the 
Office of Applied Studies and the two block grant programs: the 
community mental health services block grant and the substance 
abuse prevention and treatment block grant.

                   CENTER FOR MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $969,152,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     985,819,000
House allowance.........................................   1,008,182,000
Committee recommendation................................     988,269,000

    The Committee recommends $988,269,000 for mental health 
services. The comparable level for fiscal year 2009 is 
$969,152,000 and the administration request is $985,819,000. 
The recommendation includes $21,039,000 in transfers available 
under section 241 of the Public Health Service Act. Included in 
the recommendation is funding for programs of regional and 
national significance, the community mental health services 
block grant to the States, children's mental health services, 
projects for assistance in transition from homelessness, and 
protection and advocacy services for individuals with mental 
illnesses.

             PROGRAMS OF REGIONAL AND NATIONAL SIGNIFICANCE

    The Committee recommends $346,252,000 for programs of 
regional and national significance. The comparable level for 
fiscal year 2009 is $344,438,000 and the administration request 
is $335,802,000. Programs of regional and national significance 
[PRNS] address priority mental health needs through developing 
and applying best practices, offering training and technical 
assistance, providing targeted capacity expansion grants, and 
changing the delivery system through family, client-oriented 
and consumer-run activities.
    Within the total provided for CMHS programs of regional and 
national significance, the Committee recommendation includes 
funding for the following activities:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    Fiscal year
                         Budget activity                               2009         Fiscal year      Committee
                                                                    comparable     2010 request   recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CAPACITY:
    Co-Occurring State Incentive Grant..........................           3,173           3,611           3,173
    Seclusion & Restraint.......................................           2,449           2,449           2,449
    Youth Violence Prevention...................................          94,502          94,502          94,502
        Safe Schools/Healthy Students...........................          84,320          84,320          84,320
            College Emergency Preparedness......................           2,237           2,237           2,237
        School Violence.........................................          10,182          10,182          10,182
    National Child Traumatic Stress Network.....................          38,000          38,000          40,000
    Children and Family Programs................................           9,194           9,194           9,194
    Mental Health Transformation Activities.....................           5,912           5,912           5,912
    Consumer and Family Network Grants..........................           6,236           6,236           6,236
    Mental Health Transformation State Incentive Grants.........          26,012          26,012          26,012
    Project LAUNCH Wellness Initiative..........................          20,000          20,000          25,000
    Primary and Behavioral Health Care Integration..............           7,000           7,000           9,000
    Suicide Lifeline............................................           5,522           4,484           5,522
    Garrett Lee Smith--Youth Suicide State Grants...............          29,738          29,738          29,738
    Garrett Lee Smith--Youth Suicide Campus Grants..............           4,975           4,975           4,975
    American Indian/Native Suicide Prevention...................           2,944           2,944           2,944
    Homelessness Prevention Programs............................          32,250          32,250          32,250
    Older Adult Programs........................................           4,814           4,814           4,814
    Minority AIDS...............................................           9,283           9,283           9,283
    Criminal and Juvenile Justice Programs......................           6,684           6,684           6,684
                                                                 ===============================================
SCIENCE AND SERVICE:
    Garrett Lee Smith--Suicide Prevention Resource Center.......           4,957           4,957           4,957
    Mental Health Systems Transformation Activities.............           9,349           9,949           9,349
    National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices..             544             544             544
    SAMHSA Health Information Network...........................           1,920           1,920           1,920
    Consumer & Consumer Support Technical Assistance Centers....           1,927           1,927           1,927
    Minority Fellowship Program.................................           4,083           4,083           4,083
    Disaster Response...........................................           1,054           1,054           1,054
    Homelessness................................................           2,306           2,306           2,306
    HIV/AIDS Education..........................................             974             974             974
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Child Trauma.--The Committee reiterates its strong support 
for the National Child Traumatic Stress Initiative [NCTSI]. 
Within the total for PRNS, the Committee provides $40,000,000 
under section 582 of the Public Health Service Act to support 
grants to the National Center for Child Traumatic Stress 
[NCCTS] and academic, clinical, and community-based centers for 
the purposes of developing knowledge of best practices, 
offering trauma training to child-serving providers, and 
providing mental health services to children and families 
suffering from PTSD and other trauma-related disorders. The 
Committee directs that the $2,000,000 provided over the 
comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level be given directly to 
the NCCTS to strengthen its authority and capacity to 
coordinate the analysis and reporting of child-, family-, and 
center-level outcome and other data collected through the NCTSN 
core data set. These activities will support the efforts of the 
NCCTS to improve evidence-based practices, raise the standard 
of trauma care in all child-serving systems, and inform public 
health policies for all families affected by trauma.
    Foster Youth and Older Adopted Children.--The Committee is 
concerned that no funding in SAMHSA is specifically aimed at 
addressing the needs of foster youth and older children who are 
adopted. This is particularly alarming given that foster youth 
suffer depression, panic disorders, post-traumatic stress 
disorder, and substance abuse at disproportionately high rates. 
While the Committee recognizes that these populations are 
served to a limited degree by some existing programs with 
broader missions, SAMHSA should consider innovative ways of 
recognizing and addressing the unique needs of these youth.
    Homeless Services.--The Committee has provided funding at 
last year's level for grants to fund mental health, substance 
use, and other essential services in housing focused on ending 
homelessness. It is the Committee's intent that these grants 
provide services linked to permanent supportive housing for 
chronically homeless individuals and families, as well as other 
housing programs targeted to homeless families, youth, and 
individuals.
    Minority Fellowships.--The Committee notes that the 
demographics of our society are changing dramatically. 
Minorities represent 30 percent of the population and are 
projected to increase to 40 percent by 2025. Yet only 23 
percent of recent doctorates in psychology, social work and 
nursing were awarded to minorities. The Committee encourages 
SAMHSA to increase funding for the minority fellowship program 
in order to train an increasing number of culturally competent 
mental health professionals. Increased funding is also needed 
given the recent expansion of eligibility for this program to 
include additional professions.
    Persons with Disabilities.--The Committee urges SAMHSA to 
expand and improve its commitment to support services for 
persons with co-occurring or multiple disabilities. In 
addition, SAMHSA should enhance its monitoring of compliance 
with the Americans with Disabilities Act within agencies and 
departments served by its block grants in order to ensure 
meaningful access to services and treatments by all 
individuals, including persons with co-occurring or multiple 
disabilities.
    SSI/SSDI Outreach, Access and Recovery.--The Committee 
notes that the SSI/SSDI Outreach, Access and Recovery [SOAR] 
program has been successful in connecting people with 
disabilities experiencing homelessness with Federal disability 
benefits and appropriate supportive services, such as housing, 
medical benefits, and vocational training. SAMHSA is encouraged 
to continue funding the SOAR program within the programs of 
regional and national significance, to apply this approach 
nationally with adequate technical assistance and to share 
lessons learned to assist other disadvantaged populations.
    Trauma Services.--The Committee acknowledges the efforts of 
the Emergency Mental Health and Traumatic Stress Services 
Branch to provide trauma services and support for children, 
families, and providers through the outstanding and effective 
National Child Traumatic Stress Network [NCTSN]. The Committee 
supports NCTSN programs that promote the recovery of children, 
families and communities impacted by a wide range of trauma, 
including physical and sexual abuse, natural disasters, 
terrorism, accidental or violent death of a loved one, life-
threatening injury and illness, and refugee and war experience. 
SAMHSA, in collaboration with the NCTSN, to expand the national 
impact of this important program and increase attention to the 
needs of children and families affected by trauma, and those 
who are working to support their recovery.
    The Committee recommendation includes bill language 
providing funding for the following activities in the following 
amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          Project                              Funding
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Avera McKennan Hospital & University Health Center, Sioux       $300,000
 Falls, SD, for a program serving children with emotional
 and behavioral disorders..................................
Cheyenne River Sioux, Eagle Butte, SD, for youth suicide         100,000
 and substance abuse prevention programs...................
KidsPeace National Centers of New England, Ellsworth, ME,        150,000
 for the programmatic funding necessary to facilitate the
 expansion of the KidsPeace Graham Lake Autism Day
 Treatment Unit............................................
Oregon Partnership, Portland, OR, to provide suicide             300,000
 prevention services to soldiers and military families.....
Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Rosebud, SD, for suicide prevention         300,000
 programs..................................................
University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, for mental health        100,000
 services for disabled veterans............................
Volunteers of America, Wilkes-Barre, PA, for trauma              100,000
 recovery mental health services to children and famil-
 ies.......................................................
Youth Dynamics, Inc., Billings, MT, for a training program       100,000
 to help meet the mental health needs of those living in
 rural or frontier States..................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

              COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES BLOCK GRANT

    The Committee recommends $420,774,000 for the community 
mental health services block grant, which is the same as the 
comparable fiscal year 2009 level and the administration 
request. The recommendation includes $21,039,000 in transfers 
available under section 241 of the Public Health Service Act.
    The community mental health services block grant 
distributes funds to 59 eligible States and territories through 
a formula based upon specified economic and demographic 
factors. Grant applications must include an annual plan for 
providing comprehensive community mental health services to 
adults with a serious mental illness and children with a 
serious emotional disturbance.

                   CHILDREN'S MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

    The Committee recommends $120,316,000 for the children's 
mental health services program. The comparable fiscal year 2009 
level for this activity is $108,373,000 and the administration 
requested $125,316,000. This program provides grants and 
technical assistance to support a network of community-based 
services for children and adolescents with serious emotional, 
behavioral or mental disorders. Grantees must provide matching 
funds, and services must be coordinated with the educational, 
juvenile justice, child welfare and primary health care 
systems.

     PROJECTS FOR ASSISTANCE IN TRANSITION FROM HOMELESSNESS [PATH]

    The Committee recommends $65,047,000 for the PATH Program. 
The comparable fiscal year 2009 level is $59,687,000 and the 
administration request is $68,047,000. PATH provides outreach, 
mental health, case management and other community support 
services to individuals with serious mental illness who are 
homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. The PATH program 
makes a significant difference in the lives of homeless persons 
with mental illnesses. PATH services eliminate the revolving 
door of episodic inpatient and outpatient hospital care. 
Multidisciplinary teams address client needs within a continuum 
of services, providing needed stabilization so that mental 
illnesses and co-occurring substance abuse and medical issues 
can be addressed. Aid is provided to enhance access to housing, 
rehabilitation and training, and other needed supports, so that 
homeless people can return to secure and stable lives.

                        PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY

    The Committee recommends $35,880,000 for the protection and 
advocacy for individuals with mental illness [PAIMI] program. 
This amount is the same as the comparable fiscal year 2009 
level and the administration request. This program helps ensure 
that the rights of mentally ill individuals are protected while 
they are patients in all public and private facilities, or 
while they are living in the community, including their own 
homes. Funds are allocated to States according to a formula 
based on population and relative per capita incomes.

                  CENTER FOR SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT

Appropriations, 2009....................................  $2,192,933,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   2,238,647,000
House allowance.........................................   2,240,090,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,269,897,000

    The Committee recommends $2,269,897,000 for substance abuse 
treatment programs. The comparable fiscal year 2009 level is 
$2,192,933,000 and the administration request is 
$2,238,647,000. The recommendation includes $87,796,000 in 
transfers available under section 241 of the Public Health 
Service Act. This appropriation funds substance abuse treatment 
programs of regional and national significance and the 
substance abuse prevention and treatment block grant to the 
States.

Programs of Regional and National Significance

    The Committee recommends $451,306,000 for programs of 
regional and national significance [PRNS]. The comparable 
fiscal year 2009 level is $414,342,000 and the administration 
request is $460,056,000. The recommendation includes $8,596,000 
in transfers available under section 241 of the Public Health 
Service Act.
    Programs of regional and national significance include 
activities to increase capacity by implementing service 
improvements using proven evidence-based approaches as well as 
science to services activities, which promote the 
identification of practices thought to have potential for broad 
service improvement.
    Within the total provided for CSAT programs of regional and 
national significance, the Committee recommendation includes 
funding for the following activities:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    Fiscal year
                         Budget activity                               2009         Fiscal year      Committee
                                                                    comparable     2010 request   recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CAPACITY:
    Co-occurring State Incentive Grants.........................           4,263           4,263           4,263
    Opioid Treatment Programs/Regulatory Activities.............           8,903           8,903           8,903
    Screening, Brief Intervention, Referral & Treatment [SBIRT].          29,106          29,106          29,106
    Targeted Capacity Expansion--General........................          28,989          28,989          28,989
    Pregnant & Postpartum Women.................................          16,000          16,000          16,000
    Strengthening Treatment Access and Retention................           1,775           1,775           1,775
    Recovery Community Services Program.........................           5,236           5,236           5,236
    Access to Recovery..........................................          98,954          98,954          98,954
    Children and Families.......................................          20,678          20,678          30,678
    Treatment Systems for Homeless..............................          42,750          42,750          42,750
    Minority AIDS...............................................          65,988          65,988          65,988
    Criminal Justice Activities.................................          37,635          87,635          67,635
        Treatment Drug Courts...................................          23,882          58,882          43,882
            Families Affected by Meth Abuse.....................  ..............           5,000           5,000
        Ex-Offender Re-Entry....................................           8,200          23,200          18,200
    Services Accountability.....................................          20,816          20,816          20,816
    Prescription Drug Monitoring [NASPER].......................           2,000           2,000           2,000
                                                                 ===============================================
SCIENCE AND SERVICE:
    Addiction Technology Transfer Centers.......................           9,081           9,081           9,081
    Seclusion and Restraint.....................................              20              20              20
    Minority Fellowship Program.................................             547             547             547
    Special Initiatives/Outreach................................           2,400           2,400           2,400
    Information Dissemination...................................           4,553           4,553           4,553
    National Registry of Evidence-based Programs & Practices....             893             893             893
    SAMHSA Health Information Network...........................           4,255           4,255           4,255
    Program Coordination and Evaluation.........................           5,214           5,214           5,214
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Adolescent Treatment.--Within the total for Children and 
Families, the Committee has provided an increase of $10,000,000 
for evidence-based adolescent substance abuse treatment. The 
Committee is aware that effective and accessible treatment 
services for adolescents with substance use disorders are 
urgently needed. Only 9 percent of adolescents aged 12-17 years 
with an illicit drug problem receive treatment; similarly, only 
7 percent of adolescents with an alcohol problem receive 
treatment. Many of the treatment programs designed for adults 
do not address the unique cognitive or developmental needs 
faced by adolescents. The Committee finds the lack of treatment 
options for adolescents disturbing, since a number of 
approaches show promising results. The Committee intends that 
the increase provided be used for treatment approaches that 
have been shown in rigorous evaluations to be effective for 
adolescents, that are implemented with fidelity to the original 
model and that address geographic areas with unmet needs.
    HIV Testing.--The Committee understands that SAMHSA has 
established a goal of providing HIV tests to 80 percent of 
clients accessing the services of its HIV/AIDS grantees. The 
Committee requests that SAMHSA provide an update on its 
progress toward meeting this goal in its fiscal year 2011 
budget justification.
    Substance Abuse Testing.--The Committee commends SAMHSA for 
its effort to revise its drug testing policies and update its 
alternative testing matrix. Advances in science may offer an 
alternative to testers including sweat, hair and oral fluid 
testing. The Committee requests that SAMHSA provide an update 
on the status of these policy deliberations in its fiscal year 
2011 budget justification.
    Substance Use and Mental Disorders of Persons with HIV.--
According to the nationally representative HIV Cost and 
Services Utilization Study, almost half of persons with HIV/
AIDS screened positive for illicit drug use or a mental 
disorder, including depression and anxiety disorder. 
Unfortunately, health care providers fail to notice mental 
disorder and substance use problems in almost half of patients 
with HIV/AIDS, and mental health and substance use screening is 
not common practice in primary care settings. Several 
diagnostic mental health and substance use screening tools are 
currently available for use by non-mental health staff. The 
Committee encourages SAMHSA to collaborate with HRSA to train 
health care providers to screen HIV/AIDS patients for mental 
health and substance use problems.
    The Committee recommendation includes bill language 
providing funding for the following activities in the following 
amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          Project                              Funding
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Chesterfield County, VA, for a pretrial diversion program       $100,000
 for non-violent defendents with mental illness and
 substance abuse addiction.................................
City of Farmington, NM, to provide evidence-based substance      150,000
 abuse treatment to public inebriates......................
Mercy Recovery Center, Westbrook, ME, for residential          1,000,000
 treatment programs........................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant

    The Committee recommends $1,818,591,000 for the substance 
abuse prevention and treatment [SAPT] block grant. The 
comparable fiscal year 2009 level is $1,778,591,000, the same 
as the budget request. The recommendation includes $79,200,000 
in transfers available under section 241 of the Public Health 
Service Act. The block grant provides funds to States to 
support alcohol and drug abuse prevention, treatment, and 
rehabilitation services. Funds are allocated to the States 
according to formula. State plans must be submitted and 
approved annually.
    The Committee remains aware of the collaborative work by 
SAMHSA and State substance abuse directors to implement 
outcomes data collection and reporting through the National 
Outcome Measures [NOMs] initiative. The Committee is pleased 
that States continue to make progress in reporting NOMs data 
through the SAPT block grant. According to SAMHSA, all States 
voluntarily report substance abuse outcome data. State 
substance abuse agencies reported significant results in a 
number of areas--including abstinence from alcohol and illegal 
drug use; criminal justice involvement; employment; and stable 
housing. The Committee encourages SAMHSA to continue working 
with State substance abuse agencies in order to continue to 
help States address technical issues and promote State-to-State 
problem-solving solutions.

                 CENTER FOR SUBSTANCE ABUSE PREVENTION

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $201,003,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     198,259,000
House allowance.........................................     200,009,000
Committee recommendation................................     200,459,000

    The Committee recommends $200,459,000 for programs to 
prevent substance abuse. The comparable fiscal year 2009 level 
is $201,003,000 and the administration request is $198,259,000.

Programs of Regional and National Significance

    The Committee has provided $200,459,000 for programs of 
regional and national significance [PRNS]. The Center for 
Substance Abuse Prevention [CSAP] is the sole Federal 
organization with responsibility for improving accessibility 
and quality of substance abuse prevention services. Through the 
PRNS, CSAP supports: development of new practice knowledge on 
substance abuse prevention; identification of proven effective 
models; dissemination of science-based intervention 
information; State and community capacity building for 
implementation of proven, effective substance abuse prevention 
programs; and programs addressing new needs in the prevention 
system.
    Within the total provided for CSAP programs of regional and 
national significance, the Committee recommendation includes 
funding for the following activities:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    Fiscal year
                         Budget activity                               2009         Fiscal year      Committee
                                                                    comparable     2010 request   recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CAPACITY:
    Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentive Grant........         110,003         110,003         111,777
        Grants to States & Territories..........................         100,670          98,337         100,111
        State and Community Performance Initiative..............           9,333          11,666          11,666
    Mandatory Drug Testing......................................           5,206           5,206           5,206
    Minority AIDS...............................................          41,385          41,385          41,385
    Methamphetamine.............................................           1,774           1,774  ..............
    Program Coordination/Data Coordination and Consolidation Cen-          6,300           6,300           6,300
      ter.......................................................
    Sober Truth on Preventing Underage Drinking [STOP Act]......           7,000           7,000           7,000
        National Adult-Oriented Media Public Service Campaign...           1,000           1,000           1,000
        Community-Based Coalition Enhancement Grants............           5,000           5,000           5,000
        Intergovernmental Coordinating Committee on the                    1,000           1,000           1,000
         Prevention of Underage Drinking........................
SCIENCE AND SERVICE:
    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder.............................           9,821           9,821           9,821
    Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies.......           8,511           8,511           8,511
    Best Practices Program Coordination.........................           4,789           4,789           4,789
    National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices..             650             650             650
    SAMHSA Health Information Network...........................           2,749           2,749           2,749
    Minority Fellowship Program.................................              71              71              71
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee recognizes the importance of the 20 percent 
prevention set-aside within the SAPT block grant. The Committee 
urges SAMHSA to promote maximum flexibility in the use of 
prevention set-aside funds in order to allow each State to 
employ prevention strategies that match State and local 
circumstances.
    The Committee expects CSAP to focus its prevention efforts 
on stopping substance use before it starts, with a major focus 
on environmental and population-based strategies, due to the 
cost effectiveness of these approaches. The Committee also 
encourages CSAP to utilize the community coalition enhancement 
grant model, pioneered in the Sober Truth on Preventing 
Underage Drinking [STOP] Act, as a guide for its prevention 
programs. This model builds on the existing, effective and 
data-driven community-based coalition infrastructure. It is 
also a cost-effective way of investing Federal funds in efforts 
to deal with substance use prevention issues at the community 
level in order to get maximum results.
    Performance Enhancing Drugs.--The Committee is aware of the 
use and abuse of steroids and other performance enhancing drugs 
by young people. The Committee encourages CSAP to focus 
attention on this problem and highlight prevention programs 
that prevent the use of these drugs.
    Underage Drinking Prevention.--The Committee encourages 
SAMHSA, along with other members of the Federal Interagency 
Coordinating Committee on the Prevention of Underage Drinking 
to explore additional ways to combat underage alcohol use, as 
described in the Surgeon General's 2007 Call to Action to 
Prevent and Reduce Underage Drinking. Possibilities include the 
collection of data regarding the enforcement of underage 
drinking laws, as well as the development, testing and 
provision of incentives for States to adopt a uniform data 
system for reporting State enforcement data.
    The Committee recommendation includes bill language 
providing funding for the following activities in the following 
amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          Project                              Funding
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Bucks County Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence,         $100,000
 Inc., Doylestown, PA, to expand drug and alcohol
 prevention programs.......................................
Hamakua Health Center, Honokaa, HI, for a youth anti-drug        200,000
 program...................................................
Maryland Association of Youth Services Bureaus, Greenbelt,       100,000
 MD, for prevention and diversion services to youth and
 their families............................................
Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, for          100,000
 evidence-based prevention programs in schools and
 communities to reduce youth substance abuse...............
Waimanlo Health Center, Waimanalo, HI, for a youth anti-         200,000
 drug program..............................................
West Virginia Prevention Resource Center, South Charleston,    1,500,000
 WV, for drug abuse prevention.............................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                           PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

    The Committee recommends $101,947,000 for program 
management activities of the agency, the same as the 
administration request. The comparable level for fiscal year 
2009 is $100,131,000. The recommendation includes $22,750,000 
in transfers available under section 241 of the Public Health 
Service Act.
    The program management activity includes resources for 
coordinating, directing, and managing the agency's programs. 
Program management funds salaries, benefits, space, supplies, 
equipment, travel, and departmental overhead required to plan, 
supervise, and administer SAMHSA's programs.

                        ST. ELIZABETH'S HOSPITAL

    The Committee recommendation includes $795,000, the same as 
the administration request, to further remediate the West 
Campus of St. Elizabeth's Hospital. The comparable level for 
fiscal year 2009 is $772,000.

               Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Appropriations, 2009...................................\1\$1,072,053,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     372,053,000
House allowance.........................................     372,053,000
Committee recommendation................................     372,053,000

\1\ Includes $700,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 funding (Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee recommends $372,053,000 for the Agency for 
Healthcare Research and Quality [AHRQ], which is the same as 
the administration request. The comparable funding level for 
fiscal year 2009 is $1,072,053,000, which includes $700,000,000 
provided in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. 
The Committee recommendation is funded entirely from transfers 
available under section 241 of the Public Health Service Act.
    The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality was 
established in 1990 to enhance the quality, appropriateness, 
and effectiveness of health services, as well as access to such 
services. In order to fulfill this mission, AHRQ conducts, 
supports and disseminates scientific and policy-relevant 
research on topics such as reducing medical errors, eliminating 
health care disparities, the use of information technology, and 
the comparative effectiveness of drugs and medical procedures. 
AHRQ-supported research provides valuable information to 
researchers, policymakers, healthcare providers and patients on 
ways to improve our Nation's health system and make health care 
more affordable.

                  HEALTH COSTS, QUALITY, AND OUTCOMES

    The Committee provides $314,053,000 for research on health 
costs, quality and outcomes [HCQO]. The recommendation is the 
same as the administration request. The comparable funding 
level for fiscal year 2009 is $1,014,053,000, which includes 
$700,000,000 provided for comparative effectiveness research in 
the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The HCQO 
research activity is focused upon improving clinical practice, 
improving the health care system's capacity to deliver quality 
care, and tracking progress toward health goals through 
monitoring and evaluation.
    Of the amount provided for HCQO, the Committee recommends 
$27,645,000 for health information technology [IT]. The 
administration requested $44,820,000 for this activity. The 
Committee notes that $2,000,000,000 was provided in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to the Office of the 
National Coordinator for Health IT for accelerating the 
adoption of electronic health records and other technology.
    The Committee has redirected $17,175,000 from AHRQ's health 
IT portfolio in order to fund investigator-initiated research. 
The Committee values AHRQ for its unique role in research 
relating to comparative effectiveness, patient safety and the 
prevention of healthcare-associated infections. Yet the 
Committee notes that while funding for these specific 
priorities has increased in recent years, AHRQ's investigator-
initiated research activity has languished. New and original 
research on other topics in AHRQ's portfolio, such as research 
on health disparities, health care financing and organization, 
as well as access and coverage, could yield important 
contributions to health care reform. The Committee believes 
that in order to support innovative research that leads to 
improvements in health care delivery, AHRQ must prioritize 
investigator-initiated research. The Committee has provided 
$23,596,000 within HCQO for this purpose and urges AHRQ to use 
these funds to develop a more balanced research agenda, 
supporting all aspects of health care research outlined in its 
statutory mission.
    Building the Next Generation of Researchers.--The Committee 
is deeply concerned about declines in the number of, and 
funding for, training grants for the next generation of 
researchers. The Committee urges AHRQ to provide greater 
support to pre- and post-doctoral training grants and 
fellowships to ensure America stays competitive in the global 
research market.
    Comparative Effectiveness Research.--The Committee 
encourages AHRQ to expand the Evidence-based Practice Centers 
to focus on a broad range of interventions affecting health, 
including non-clinical programs and interventions, 
organizational and system characteristics, as well as policies 
and regulations.
    Diabetes.--The Committee notes that appropriate management 
of hemoglobin A1c can reduce the risk of complications of 
diabetes. Yet several quality measurement programs such as CMS' 
Physician Quality Reporting Initiative do not reward 
appropriate management of hemoglobin A1c due to the lack of 
consensus on a methodology for developing outcomes-focused 
measures. The Committee urges AHRQ to advance the development 
of an appropriate A1c management quality measure, possibly 
through support of organizations that have large A1c databases, 
such as the Veterans Administration system, or one of AHRQ's 
Accelerating Change and Transformation in Organizations and 
Networks [ACTION] partners.
    Lyme Disease.--The Committee encourages AHRQ to create a 
comprehensive clearinghouse of peer-reviewed tick-borne 
diseases literature that will include literature on persistent 
infection, appropriately organized for use by the scientific 
community, treating physicians, and the public.
    Moving Research Into Practice.--Health services research 
has great potential to improve health and health care when 
widely disseminated and used. The Committee supports AHRQ's 
research translation activities, including practice-based 
research centers and learning networks that are designed to 
better understand health care delivery and move the best 
available research and decisionmaking tools into health care 
practice. The Committee encourages AHRQ to expand these 
programs.
    Quality in Endoscopy.--Gastrointestinal [GI] endoscopic 
procedures, such as colonoscopy, and other outpatient 
procedural services represent a significant portion of 
healthcare spending, yet little attention has been focused on 
quality improvement. The Committee encourages AHRQ to validate 
already published quality measures for procedural services and 
to identify best practices that can improve patient outcomes. 
Collection of procedure and outcomes data from healthcare 
providers will be an important part of the effort to improve 
the quality of procedural services such as GI endoscopy.
    Restoring Innovation and Competitiveness.--The Committee is 
pleased that AHRQ is working to address the decline in 
investigator-initiated research opportunities through its 
Innovations Research Portfolio. The Committee provides funding 
for AHRQ to expand this grant making program to advance 
discovery and the free marketplace of ideas, and urges AHRQ to 
provide more opportunities for investigator-initiated research 
through its other core programs, including the Effective Health 
Care Program.
    Temporomandibular Joint and Muscle Disorders.--The 
Committee is aware that temporomandibular joint and muscle 
disorders [TMJDs] affect over 35 million people in the United 
States. Symptoms of this disorder range from mild discomfort to 
severe pain that causes limitations in speaking, chewing and 
swallowing. Health care practitioners have amassed over 50 
treatments for TMJDs with virtually no evidence of safety or 
efficacy based on randomized controlled clinical trials. The 
Committee urges AHRQ to conduct a study of the per-patient cost 
and efficacy/effectiveness of treatments for TMJDs, focusing on 
developments after a similar study was prepared in 2001.

                   MEDICAL EXPENDITURES PANEL SURVEYS

    The Committee provides $55,300,000 for medical expenditures 
panel surveys [MEPS], which is the same as the comparable 
funding level for fiscal year 2009 and the administration 
request. MEPS collects detailed information annually from 
families regarding health care use and expenditures, private 
and public health insurance coverage, and the availability, 
costs and scope of health insurance benefits. The data from 
MEPS is used in the development of economic models projecting 
the costs and savings of proposed changes in policy, as well as 
estimates of the impact of policy changes on payers, providers, 
and patients.

                            PROGRAM SUPPORT

    The Committee recommends $2,700,000 for program support. 
This amount is the same as the comparable funding level for 
fiscal year 2009 and the administration request. This activity 
supports the overall management of the agency.

               Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services


                     GRANTS TO STATES FOR MEDICAID

Appropriations, 2009

                                                        $189,855,034,000

Budget estimate, 2010

                                                         220,962,473,000

House allowance

                                                         220,962,473,000
Committee recommendation................................ 220,962,473,000

    The Committee recommends $220,962,473,000 for Grants to 
States for Medicaid, the same amount as the administration's 
request. This amount excludes $71,700,038,000 in fiscal year 
2009 advance appropriations for fiscal year 2010. In addition, 
$86,789,382,000 is provided for the first quarter of fiscal 
year 2011, as requested by the administration.
    The Medicaid program provides medical care for eligible 
low-income individuals and families. It is administered by each 
of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and 
the territories. Federal funds for medical assistance are made 
available to the States according to a formula, which 
determines the appropriate Federal matching rate for State 
program costs. This matching rate is based upon the State's 
average per capita income relative to the national average, and 
shall be no less than 50 percent and no more than 83 percent.
    The Committee notes that methadone is a highly addictive 
psychostimulant that is used to treat patients with substance 
abuse problems, including opiate addiction. In a number of 
States, methadone treatment is funded by Federal dollars under 
the Medicaid program. The Committee requests that CMS provide a 
report to the Committee detailing the total Federal Medicaid 
dollars spent in each State to fund methadone treatment. Such 
report should include a list of services and prescription drugs 
related to methadone treatment funded by Medicaid dollars in 
each State.

                  PAYMENTS TO HEALTH CARE TRUST FUNDS

Appropriations, 2009

                                                        $197,744,000,000

Budget estimate, 2010

                                                         207,231,070,000
House allowance......................................... 207,296,070,000
Committee recommendation................................ 207,231,070,000

    The Committee recommends $207,231,070,000 for Payments to 
Healthcare Trust Funds, the same amount as the administration's 
request. This entitlement account includes the general fund 
subsidy to the Federal Supplementary Medical Insurance Trust 
Fund for Medicare part B benefits and for Medicare part D drug 
benefits and administration, plus other reimbursements to the 
Federal Hospital Insurance Trust Fund for part A benefits and 
related administrative costs that have not been financed by 
payroll taxes or premium contributions. The Committee has 
provided $153,060,000,000 for the Federal payment to the 
Supplementary Medical Insurance Trust Fund. This payment 
provides matching funds for premiums paid by Medicare part B 
enrollees. The Committee further provides $53,180,000,000 for 
the general fund share of benefits paid under Public Law 108-
173, the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement and 
Modernization Act of 2003. The Committee includes bill language 
requested by the administration providing indefinite authority 
for paying the General Revenue portion of the part B premium 
match and provides resources for the part D drug benefit 
program in the event that the annual appropriation is 
insufficient. The recommendation also includes $414,000,000 for 
hospital insurance for the uninsured. The Committee also 
recommends $272,000,000 for Federal uninsured benefit payment. 
This payment reimburses the Hospital Insurance Trust Fund for 
the cost of benefits provided to Federal annuitants who are 
eligible for Medicare. The Committee recommendation includes 
$338,070,000 to be transferred to the Hospital Insurance Trust 
Fund as the general fund share of CMS Program Management 
administrative expenses. The Committee recommendation also 
includes $484,000,000 to be transferred to the Supplementary 
Insurance Trust Fund as the general fund share of part D 
administrative expenses. The Committee recommendation includes 
$311,000,000 in reimbursements to the Health Care Fraud and 
Abuse Control [HCFAC] fund.

                           PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

Appropriations, 2009....................................  $3,305,386,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   3,465,500,000
House allowance.........................................   3,463,362,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,431,500,000

    The Committee recommends $3,431,500,000 for CMS program 
management. The administration requested $3,465,500,000. The 
fiscal year 2009 comparable level was $3,305,386,000.

Research, Demonstrations, and Evaluations

    The Committee recommends $38,978,000 for research, 
demonstrations, and evaluation activities.
    CMS research and demonstration activities facilitate 
informed rational Medicare and Medicaid policy choices and 
decisionmaking. These studies and evaluations include projects 
to measure the impact of Medicare and Medicaid policy analysis 
and decisionmaking, projects to measure the impact of Medicare 
and Medicaid on healthcare costs, projects to measure patient 
outcomes in a variety of treatment settings, and projects to 
develop alternative strategies for reimbursement, coverage, and 
program management.
    The Committee notes the significant health care quality 
improvements and cost savings made possible by Medicare 
Demonstration Projects. In order to determine how 
demonstrations for beneficiaries with high cost conditions can 
be effective on a larger scale, the Committee suggests that 
funds for Research, Development and Evaluations be used for 
programs that have proven successful by meeting quality and 
savings targets.
    The Committee has included $2,500,000 for Real Choice 
Systems Change Grants for Community Living to States to fund 
initiatives that establish enduring and systemic improvements 
in long-term services and supports.
    The Committee recommendation also includes bill language 
requiring that funds be provided to the following organizations 
in the amounts specified:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          Project                              Funding
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Bi-State Primary Care, Concord, NH, for primary care            $650,000
 workforce recruitment.....................................
Bi-State Primary Care Association, Concord, NH, to support       600,000
 uncompensated care to treat uninsured and underinsured
 patients..................................................
Iowa Dental Association, Johnston, IA, for a children's          250,000
 dental home demonstration project in Scott County.........
University of Mississippi, University, MS, for the               500,000
 Medication Use and Outcomes Research Group................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Medicare Operations

    The Committee recommends $2,347,862,000 for Medicare 
operations. The administration requested $2,363,862,000; the 
comparable funding level for fiscal year 2009 was 
$2,265,715,000.
    The Medicare operations line item covers a broad range of 
activities including claims processing and program safeguard 
activities performed by Medicare contractors. These contractors 
also provide information, guidance, and technical support to 
both providers and beneficiaries. In addition, this line item 
includes a variety of projects that extend beyond the 
traditional fee-for-service arena.
    The Committee recommendation includes $65,600,000 for CMS 
Medicare contracting reform activities and includes bill 
language that extends the availability of those funds until 
September 30, 2011.
    The Committee recommendation includes $35,681,000 for 
contract costs for the Healthcare Integrated General Ledger 
Accounting System and includes bill language that extends the 
availability of those funds until September 30, 2011.

State Survey and Certification

    The Committee recommends $346,900,000 for Medicare State 
survey and certification activities, which is the same as the 
administration's request. The fiscal year 2009 funding level 
was $293,128,000.
    Survey and certification activities ensure that 
institutions and agencies providing care to Medicare and 
Medicaid beneficiaries meet Federal health, safety, and program 
standards. On-site surveys are conducted by State survey 
agencies, with a pool of Federal surveyors performing random 
monitoring surveys.
    The Committee has not included language, requested by the 
administration, which authorizes the Secretary to charge fees 
associated with the cost of conducting revisits of certain 
healthcare facilities.

Federal Administration

    The Committee recommends $697,760,000 for Federal 
administration costs, which is the same as the budget request. 
The fiscal year 2009 funding level was $641,351,000.
    The Committee continues to be concerned that many seniors 
do not have a good understanding of the benefits covered, and 
not covered, under the Medicare program. In particular, studies 
have indicated that a majority of adults who are 45 or older 
overestimate Medicare coverage for long-term care. The 
Committee commends CMS for its efforts in establishing the 
National Clearinghouse for Long-Term Care information.
    The Committee directs CMS to include in the next 
publication of ``Medicare & You'' information regarding the 
importance of writing and updating advance directives and 
living wills.
    The Committee applauds CMS for its leadership in clearly 
outlining the Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Program 
policies regarding routine HIV testing and HIV screening in its 
June 2009 letter to State health officials. The policies are 
consistent with HIV testing guidelines issued in 2006 by the 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
    The Committee commends CMS for collaborating with AHRQ to 
develop a transparent process to build consensus within the 
research community to support which appropriate outcomes 
measures or standards should be used in clinical trials to 
support research of rehabilitative treatments. The Committee 
believes that once these outcomes have been identified and good 
research, such as randomized controlled trials, are underway, 
patients can be admitted to proper rehabilitation settings 
without the concern of reimbursement issues.
    The Committee urges CMS to conduct a demonstration project 
to identify effective Medication Therapy Management Program 
models for low-income Medicare part D enrollees living with 
HIV/AIDS. The demonstration project should emphasize evidence-
based prescribing, prospective medication management, 
technological innovation and outcome reporting.
    The Committee has repeatedly requested that CMS develop 
objective admissibility criteria for long-term acute care 
hospitals [LTACHs]. In 2007 Congress passed legislation 
requiring HHS to make recommendations for such criteria by June 
2009 and placed a moratorium on certain regulations relating to 
LTACHs until 2010.
    With no admissibility criteria forthcoming, legislation has 
been introduced to extend the moratoria for another 2 years. 
The Committee urges CMS to adopt workable admissibility 
criteria as soon as possible. The Committee reaffirms its 
belief that long-term acute care hospitals are an important 
part of the Medicare continuum of care.
    In previous reports, the Committee has recognized the 
efficacy of using interactive video technology as a means of 
providing intensive behavioral health services to individuals 
with serious emotional and behavioral challenges, such as 
autism and other at-risk populations. Such demonstration 
projects supported by the Committee involved the use of 
interactive video technology as an in-home service delivery 
model that enabled live training, consultation, and support 
directly into the home when and where it was needed for 
children with autism and their families.
    One of the most serious obstacles to the integration of 
telemedicine, especially for intensive behavioral health 
services, is the absence of comprehensive reimbursement 
policies. The Committee urges CMS to analyze the efficacy of 
telehealth technology and recommend adequate and appropriate 
reimbursement policies under Medicaid and urges coordination 
with those entities that have successfully completed 
demonstration projects supported by the Committee. The 
Committee requests that CMS provide a report on this to the 
Committees on Appropriation no later than 180 days after 
enactment of this act.

                  HEALTH CARE FRAUD AND ABUSE CONTROL

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $198,000,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     311,000,000
House allowance.........................................     311,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     311,000,000

    The Committee recommends $311,000,000, to be transferred 
from the Medicare trust funds, for healthcare fraud and abuse 
control activities. This amount, in addition to the 
$1,483,683,000 in mandatory monies for these activities, will 
provide a total of $1,467,000,000 for healthcare fraud and 
abuse control activities in fiscal year 2010.
    The Committee encourages CMS to invest in efforts to apply 
data mining and warehousing methodologies to detect fraud, 
waste, and abuse. Data mining is increasingly being used to 
extract relevant information from large data bases, like those 
maintained by CMS. The Committee has included funds for CMS to 
expand its efforts, begun in 2006, to link Medicare claims and 
public records data and to initiate new demonstration projects 
using data mining technologies. The Committee requests that CMS 
make recommendations to the Committee on how linking CMS data 
might be used to enhance the Medicare and Medicaid Integrity 
Programs to reduce fraud and abuse and to better screen 
providers.
    Reducing fraud, waste, and abuse in Medicare and Medicaid 
continues to be a top priority of the Committee. The Committee 
has held a number of hearings on fraud and abuse issues over 
the past 10 years and expects to begin holding more hearings on 
this issue over the next 12 months.

                Administration for Children and Families


  PAYMENTS TO STATES FOR CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT AND FAMILY SUPPORT 
                                PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2009....................................  $3,316,699,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   3,571,509,000
House allowance.........................................   3,571,509,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,571,509,000

    The Committee recommends $3,571,509,000 be made available 
in fiscal year 2010 for payments to States for child support 
enforcement and family support programs. The Committee 
recommendation is the same as the budget request under current 
law. The Committee also has provided $1,100,000,000 in advance 
funding for the first quarter of fiscal year 2011 for the child 
support enforcement program, the same as the budget request.
    These payments support the States' efforts to promote the 
self-sufficiency and economic security of low-income families. 
These funds also support efforts to locate noncustodial 
parents, determine paternity when necessary, and establish and 
enforce orders of support.

               LOW INCOME HOME ENERGY ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

Appropriations, 2009...................................\1\$5,100,000,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   3,200,000,000
House allowance.........................................   5,100,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,100,000,000

\1\Provided in the Consolidated Security, Disaster Assistance, and 
Continuing Appropriations Act, 2009 (Public Law 110-329).

    The Committee recommends $5,100,000,000 for fiscal year 
2010 for the low income home energy assistance program 
[LIHEAP]. This is the same as the comparable funding level for 
fiscal year 2009, which was provided in the Consolidated 
Security, Disaster Assistance, and Continuing Appropriations 
Act of 2009. The administration requested $3,200,000,000 for 
this program. LIHEAP is made up of two components: the State 
grant program and a contingency fund.
    The Committee recommendation includes $4,509,672,000 for 
the State grant program, the same as the comparable funding 
level for fiscal year 2009. The administration requested 
$2,410,000,000 for this program. The Committee has continued 
the formula used in fiscal year 2009 to distribute funds to 
States. LIHEAP grants are awarded to States, territories, 
Indian tribes, and tribal organizations to assist low-income 
households in meeting the costs of home energy. States have 
great flexibility in determining payment levels and the types 
of payments provided, such as cash payments to individuals, 
payments to vendors and direct provision of fuel. Funds are 
distributed by formula based in part on each State's share of 
home energy expenditures by low-income households.
    The Committee recommends $590,328,000 for the contingency 
fund, the same as the comparable funding level for fiscal year 
2009. The administration request is $790,000,000. The 
contingency fund may be used to provide additional assistance 
to one or more States adversely affected by extreme heat or 
cold, significant price increases, or other causes of energy-
related emergencies.

                     REFUGEE AND ENTRANT ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2009.................................... \1\$715,442,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     740,657,000
House allowance.........................................     714,968,000
Committee recommendation................................     730,657,000

\1\Includes $82,000,000 in Supplemental Appropriation Act, 2009 funding 
(Public Law 111-32).

    The Committee recommends $730,657,000 for refugee and 
entrant assistance. The comparable funding level for fiscal 
year 2009 is $715,442,000, which includes $82,000,000 in 
funding from the Supplemental Appropriation Act, 2009. The 
budget request is $740,657,000.
    The refugee and entrant assistance program is designed to 
assist States in their efforts to assimilate refugees, asylees, 
Cuban and Haitian entrants, and adults and minors who are 
trafficking victims, into American society as quickly and 
effectively as possible. The program funds State-administered 
transitional and medical assistance, the voluntary agency 
matching grant program, programs for victims of trafficking and 
torture, employment and social services, targeted assistance, 
and preventive health. This appropriation enables States to 
provide 8 months of cash and medical assistance to eligible 
refugees and entrants, a variety of social and educational 
services, as well as foster care for refugee and entrant 
unaccompanied minors.
    The Committee recommends $353,332,000 for transitional and 
medical assistance, including State administration and the 
voluntary agency program. The Committee notes that the number 
of refugees is increasing, approaching for the first time since 
2001 the refugee ceiling of 80,000 set by the State Department. 
In addition, current economic conditions are making it more 
difficult for refugees and other entrants to find and maintain 
employment. As a result refugees are accessing cash and medical 
assistance for longer periods of time. The Committee is 
concerned that the administration request for transitional and 
medical assistance may not be adequate to provide the full 8 
months of benefits for which refugees are eligible. At the same 
time, the Committee understands that increased estimates of 
unaccompanied alien children [UAC] needing care and placement 
due to the implementation of the Wilberforce Trafficking 
Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008 [TVPRA] have 
thus far failed to materialize. Therefore the Committee has 
redirected $16,120,000 from the UAC activity to fund the 
increased costs of refugee cash and transitional medical 
assistance.
    The Committee recommendation also includes: $9,814,000 for 
victims of trafficking; $154,005,000 for social services; 
$4,748,000 for preventive health; and $48,590,000 for targeted 
assistance.
    For unaccompanied children, pursuant to section 462 of the 
Homeland Security Act of 2002, the Committee recommends 
$149,351,000. Funds provided are for the care and placement of 
unaccompanied alien children [UAC] who are apprehended in the 
United States by the Department of Homeland Security [DHS] or 
other law enforcement agencies. The Committee believes that the 
recommendation, together with funding provided in the 
Supplemental Appropriation Act, 2009 and available through 
fiscal year 2011, is sufficient for ORR to meet its increased 
roles and responsibilities relating to the care and custody of 
unaccompanied children as a result of the TVPRA.
    The Committee recommends $10,817,000 to treat and assist 
victims of torture. These funds provide medical and 
psychological treatment, social and legal services and 
rehabilitation for survivors of torture in their home countries 
as they attempt to rebuild their lives in the United States.
    The Committee is concerned that only international victims 
of trafficking are eligible for funds provided in ORR. 
Therefore the Committee urges the administration to include 
funds in its fiscal year 2011 budget request for section 202(d) 
and 203(g) of the Trafficking Victims Protection 
Reauthorization Act of 2005 to protect domestic victims of 
trafficking.

   PAYMENTS TO STATES FOR THE CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT

Appropriations, 2009...................................\1\$4,127,081,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   2,127,081,000
House allowance.........................................   2,127,081,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,127,081,000

\1\Includes $2,000,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 funding (Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee recommends $2,127,000,000 for the child care 
and development block grant, the same as the administration 
request. The comparable funding level for fiscal year 2009 is 
$4,127,081,000 which includes $2,000,000,000 provided in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.
    The child care and development block grant supports grants 
to States to provide low-income families with financial 
assistance for child care; for improving the quality and 
availability of child care; and for establishing or expanding 
child development programs.
    The Committee has continued specific set-asides in bill 
language that provide targeted resources to specific policy 
priorities: $18,960,000 for resource and referral programs, as 
well as school-aged child care activities; $9,910,000 for child 
care research and evaluation activities; and $271,401,000 for 
child care quality activities, including $99,534,000 
specifically for infant care quality. These quality funds are 
provided in addition to the 4 percent quality earmark 
established in the authorizing legislation. The Committee has 
included additional quality funds because of the considerable 
research showing the importance to child development and school 
readiness of serving children in high quality child care 
settings, which include adequately compensated, nurturing 
providers who are specially trained in child development.
    The Committee recommendation for resource and referral 
activities includes $1,000,000 to continue support for a 
national toll-free hotline that assists families in accessing 
local information on child care options and that provides 
consumer education materials.
    The Committee supports the emphasis on improving the 
quality of infant and toddler care through the child care and 
development block grant. As the Secretary develops strategies 
for improving the quality of infant and toddler care, 
particularly in family, friend and neighbor care settings, the 
Committee encourages the Secretary to invest in proven family 
support approaches that utilize uniquely designed materials for 
informal in-home care providers.

                      SOCIAL SERVICES BLOCK GRANT

Appropriations, 2009....................................  $1,700,000,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   1,700,000,000
House allowance.........................................   1,700,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,700,000,000

    The Committee recommends $1,700,000,000 for fiscal year 
2010 for the social services block grant [SSBG]. This is the 
same as the comparable fiscal year 2009 level and the 
administration request. The SSBG is a flexible source of 
funding that allows States to provide a diverse array of 
services to low-income children and families, the disabled and 
the elderly.
    The Committee regards SSBG as a critical source of funding 
for services that protect children from neglect and abuse, 
including providing foster and respite care, as well as related 
services for children and families, persons with disabilities, 
and older adults. The Committee recognizes the importance of 
this program, especially in providing mental health and 
counseling services to underserved populations, and recommends 
continued usage and flexibility of these funds for such 
purposes.

                CHILDREN AND FAMILIES SERVICES PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2009..................................\1\$12,451,111,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   9,459,559,000
House allowance.........................................   9,436,951,000
Committee recommendation................................   9,310,465,000

\1\Includes $3,150,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 funding (Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee recommends $9,310,465,000 for fiscal year 
2010 for children and families services programs. The 
comparable funding level for fiscal year 2009 is 
$12,451,111,000, which includes $3,150,000,000 provided in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 [ARRA]. The 
budget request is $9,459,559,000. The recommendation includes 
$5,762,000 in transfers available under section 241 of the 
Public Health Service Act.
    This appropriation provides funding for programs for 
children, youth, and families, the developmentally disabled, 
and Native Americans, as well as Federal administrative costs.

Head Start

    The Committee recommends $7,234,783,000 for Head Start, the 
same as the administration request. The comparable funding 
level for fiscal year 2009 is $9,212,786,000, which includes 
$2,100,000,000 in funding provided in ARRA.
    Head Start provides comprehensive development services for 
low-income children and families that emphasize cognitive and 
language development, socio-emotional development, physical and 
mental health, and parent involvement to enable each child to 
develop and function at his or her highest potential. At least 
10 percent of enrollment opportunities in each State are made 
available to children with disabilities.
    The Committee recommendation is sufficient to allow Head 
Start to serve approximately 978,000 children, including an 
increase of 69,000 children served as a result of the funding 
provided in ARRA. The Committee has included bill language 
requested by the administration that clarifies the calculation 
of the Head Start base grant for fiscal year 2010.
    The Head Start Bureau shall continue to provide the 
Committee with the number and cost of buses purchased, by 
region, with Head Start funds in the annual congressional 
budget justification.
    Family Treatment.--The Committee is aware of collaborative 
efforts between some Head Start grantees and family treatment 
centers. In these programs, Head Start and Early Head Start 
services are provided to children that reside with their 
mothers in residential treatment facilities serving women 
impacted by substance abuse as well as mental illness, 
homelessness and domestic violence. The Committee believes that 
locating Head Start services in such facilities could yield 
promising outcomes for at-risk families by improving mother-
child bonding and attachment, as well as focusing attention on 
the children's social-emotional and developmental growth. The 
Committee urges the Head Start Bureau to highlight these 
collaborative programs as promising models for other grantees 
to replicate.
    Vision Screening.--The Committee recognizes that vision 
disorders are the leading cause of impaired health in childhood 
and is concerned that, while Head Start currently requires 
children to be screened for vision problems, there are no 
procedures for training, tracking, or even conducting these 
screenings. This lack of a national uniform standard continues 
to cause many Head Start enrollees to fall through the cracks. 
The Committee supports the expansion of the efforts of the 
Office of Head Start to ensure that all Head Start enrollees 
receive vision screening services and other resources available 
to them in their community.

Consolidated Runaway and Homeless Youth Program

    The Committee recommends $97,234,000 for the consolidated 
runaway and homeless youth program. This is the same as the 
comparable funding level for fiscal year 2009 and the budget 
request. This program consists of the basic center program, 
which provides temporary shelter, counseling, and after-care 
services to runaway and homeless youth under age 18 and their 
families, and the transitional living program, which is 
targeted to older youth ages 16 to 21.
    Basic centers and transitional living programs provide 
services to help address the needs of some of the estimated 1.3 
million to 2.8 million runaway and homeless youth, many of whom 
are running away from unsafe or unhealthy living environments. 
These programs have been proven effective at lessening rates of 
family conflict and parental abuse, as well as increasing 
school participation and the employment rates of youth.

Runaway Youth Prevention Program

    The Committee recommends $17,721,000 for the runaway youth 
prevention program. This is the same as the comparable funding 
level for fiscal year 2009 and the budget request. This 
competitive grant program awards funds to private nonprofit 
agencies for the provision of services to runaway, homeless, 
and street youth. Funds may be used for street-based outreach 
and education, including treatment, counseling, provision of 
information, and referrals for these youths, many of whom have 
been subjected to, or are at risk of being subjected to, sexual 
abuse.

Child Abuse Programs

    The Committee recommends $109,294,000 for child abuse 
programs. The comparable level for fiscal year 2009 is 
$109,981,000 and the administration request is $107,569,000. 
The recommendation includes $26,535,000 for State grants, 
$41,070,000 for discretionary activities, and $41,689,000 for 
community-based child abuse prevention. These programs seek to 
improve and increase activities which identify, prevent, and 
treat child abuse and neglect through State grants, technical 
assistance, research, demonstration, and service improvement.
    The Committee recommendation includes $13,500,000 within 
child abuse discretionary activities for the third year of the 
home visitation initiative. This is the same as the comparable 
level for fiscal year 2009 and the administration request. This 
program provides competitive grants to States to encourage 
investment of existing funding streams into evidence-based home 
visitation models. The Committee continues to direct the 
Administration for Children and Families [ACF] to ensure that 
States use the funds to support models that have been shown, in 
well-designed randomized controlled trials, to produce sizable, 
sustained effects on important child outcomes such as abuse and 
neglect.
    The Committee recommendation includes bill language 
providing funding for the following activities in the following 
amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Project                              Funding
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Addison County Parent Child Center, Middlebury, VT, to          $100,000
 support and expand parental education activi-  ties..
County of Contra Costa, Martinez, CA, for an                     200,000
 initiative for children and adolescents exposed to
 domestic violence....................................
Klingberg Family Centers, Hartford, CT, for child                125,000
 abuse prevention and intervention services...........
Oregon Association of Relief Nurseries, Medford, OR,             100,000
 to provide early childhood development and education
 for children at risk of abuse and neglect............
Parents Anonymous, Inc., Claremont, CA, for a national           500,000
 parent helpline to prevent child abuse and neglect...
Prevent Child Abuse Vermont, Montpelier, VT, to expand           500,000
 the SAFE-T Prevention Program........................
Wynona's House, Newark, NJ, for a child sexual abuse             200,000
 intervention program.................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Abandoned Infants Assistance

    The Committee recommends $11,628,000 for abandoned infants 
assistance, which is the same as the comparable funding level 
for fiscal year 2009 and the budget request. This program 
provides grants to public and private community and faith-based 
organizations to develop, implement, and operate demonstration 
projects that prevent the abandonment of infants and young 
children impacted by substance abuse and HIV. Funds may be used 
to provide respite care for families and caregivers, allow 
abandoned infants and children to reside with their natural 
families or in foster care, and carry out residential care 
programs for abandoned infants and children who are unable to 
reside with their families or be placed in foster care.

Child Welfare Services

    The Committee recommends $281,744,000 for child welfare 
services. This is the same as the comparable funding level for 
fiscal year 2009 and the budget request. This program helps 
State and tribal public welfare agencies improve their child 
welfare services with the goal of keeping families together. 
States and tribes provide a continuum of services that: prevent 
child neglect, abuse, or exploitation; allow children to remain 
with their families, when appropriate; promote the safety and 
permanence of children in foster care and adoptive families; 
and provide training and professional development to the child 
welfare workforce.

Child Welfare Training

    The Committee recommends $27,207,000 for child welfare 
training, the same as the administration request. The 
comparable funding level for fiscal year 2009 is $7,207,000. 
These discretionary grants are awarded to institutions of 
higher learning and other nonprofit organizations for 
demonstration projects that encourage experimental and 
promising types of child welfare services, as well as projects 
that improve education and training programs for child welfare 
service providers.
    The Committee recommendation includes $20,000,000 as 
requested by the administration to fund innovative strategies 
that improve outcomes for children in long-term foster care. 
The Committee recognizes that achieving permanency for children 
in foster care is a systemic problem, and that children in care 
for extended periods of time can have significant behavioral, 
mental, and physical health problems. This funding will provide 
incentives to grantees to identify and implement evidence-based 
approaches that increase permanent placements for these 
children.

Adoption Opportunities

    The Committee recommends $26,379,000 for adoption 
opportunities, which is the same as the comparable funding 
level for fiscal year 2009 and the budget request. This program 
funds demonstration grants that eliminate barriers to adoption 
and help find permanent homes for children who would benefit by 
adoption, particularly children with special needs.

Adoption Incentives

    The Committee recommends $39,500,000 for adoption 
incentives, which is the same as the budget request. The 
comparable funding level for fiscal year 2009 is $36,500,000. 
This program provides incentive funds to States to encourage an 
increase in the number of adoptions of children from the foster 
care system. The recommendation will fully fund adoption 
incentives earned by States under current law.

Adoption Awareness

    The Committee recommends $12,953,000 for adoption 
awareness, which is the same as the comparable funding level 
for fiscal year 2009 and the budget request. This program 
consists of two activities: the infant adoption awareness 
program and the special needs adoption awareness program.
    The infant adoption awareness program provides grants for 
the training of health center staff to inform pregnant women 
about adoption and to make referrals on request to adoption 
agencies. Within the Committee recommendation, $10,058,000 is 
available for this purpose.
    The special needs adoption program provides for the 
planning, development, and operation of a national campaign to 
inform the public about the adoption of children with special 
needs. The Committee recommendation includes $2,895,000 for 
this activity.

Compassion Capital Fund

    The Committee recommendation does not include funding for 
the Compassion Capital Fund. The comparable funding level for 
fiscal year 2009 is $47,688,000. The administration proposed to 
eliminate funding for this program. The Committee has not 
provided funding for this program due to concerns that it lacks 
accountability and adequate performance measures.

Strengthening Communities Fund

    The Committee recommendation does not include funding for 
the Strengthening Communities Fund. The administration 
requested $50,000,000 for this activity. The Committee notes 
that $50,000,000 was provided for this new program in ARRA, and 
available until September 30, 2010, to help communities 
affected by the economic downturn.

Social Services Research

    The Committee recommends $9,637,000 for social services 
research, which includes $5,762,000 in transfers available 
under section 241 of the Public Health Service Act. The 
comparable funding level for fiscal year 2009 is $20,260,000 
and the budget request is $5,762,000. These funds support 
research and evaluation of programs that are cost-effective, 
that increase the stability and economic independence of 
American families, and that contribute to healthy development 
of children and youth.
    The Committee recommendation includes bill language 
providing funding for the following activities in the following 
amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                        Project                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
211 Maine, Inc., Portland, ME, to provide for                   $150,000
 telephone connections to community health and social
 services.............................................
AVANCE, Inc., San Antonio, TX, for a parent-child                200,000
 education program....................................
Campus Kitchens Project, Washington DC, for services              75,000
 to the homeless community............................
Connecticut Council of Family Service Agencies,                  200,000
 Wethersfield, CT, for a Family Development Network...
Connecting for Children and Families, Inc.,                      300,000
 Woonsocket, RI, to provide training and assistance to
 economically challenged families.....................
Erie Neighborhood House, Chicago, IL, for an                     250,000
 initiative addressing the needs of low-income
 children with emotional or behavioral difficulties...
Friends Association for Care and Protection of                   100,000
 Children, West Chester, PA, for emergency services
 for homeless families................................
Horizons for Homeless Children, Boston, MA, for                  100,000
 continued development of programs for homeless
 children.............................................
Michigan Association of United Ways, Lansing, MI, to             200,000
 provide work supports through a statewide 2-1-1
 system...............................................
Provo City, UT, for a mentoring program for at-risk              350,000
 families.............................................
SingleStop USA, New York, NY, to help low-income                 150,000
 families and individuals in New Jersey access
 available services...................................
TLC for Children and Families, Inc, Olathe, KS, for              200,000
 youth transitional living programs...................
United Methodist Children's Home of Alabama and West             100,000
 Florida, Selma, AL, for expansion and related
 expenses for children's services.....................
United Way, Anchorage, AK, for the Alaska 2-1-1                  100,000
 referral system......................................
United Way of Central Maryland, Baltimore, MD, to                800,000
 provide social services through the 2-1-1 Maryland
 Program..............................................
United Way of the Capital Area, Jackson, MS, for 2-1-1           400,000
 Mississippi..........................................
Washington Asset Building Coalition, Olympia, WA, to             100,000
 expand financial education and counseling services to
 low-income residents.................................
Washington Information Network, Renton, WA, to improve           100,000
 and expand 2-1-1 referral services...................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Developmental Disabilities

    The Committee recommends $187,855,000 for programs 
administered by the Administration on Developmental 
Disabilities [ADD]. The comparable funding level for fiscal 
year 2009 is $183,855,000, the same as the administration 
request.
    The Administration on Developmental Disabilities supports 
community-based delivery of services which promote the rights 
of persons of all ages with developmental disabilities. 
Developmental disability is defined as severe, chronic 
disability attributed to mental or physical impairments 
manifested before age 22, which causes substantial limitations 
in major life activities. The ADD also provides funding for 
election assistance for individuals with disabilities. This 
program is for individuals with any type of disability.
    Of the funds provided, the Committee recommends $75,816,000 
for State and Territorial Councils. These important entities 
work to develop, improve, and expand the system of services and 
supports for people with developmental disabilities. By 
engaging in activities such as training, public education, 
capacity-building and advocating for change in State policies, 
Councils on Developmental Disabilities support the inclusion 
and integration of individuals with developmental disabilities 
in all aspects of community life.
    The Committee recommends $41,024,000 for protection and 
advocacy grants. This formula grant program provides funds to 
States to establish protection and advocacy systems to protect 
the legal and human rights of persons with developmental 
disabilities who are receiving treatment, services, or 
rehabilitation.
    The Committee recommends $17,410,000 for disabled voter 
services. Of these funds, $12,154,000 is to promote disabled 
voter access and $5,256,000 is for disabled voters protection 
and advocacy systems. The election assistance for individuals 
with disabilities program was authorized in the Help America 
Vote Act of 2002. The program enables grantees to make polling 
places more accessible and increase participation in the voting 
process of individuals with disabilities.
    The Committee recommends $14,162,000 for projects of 
national significance to assist persons with developmental 
disabilities. This program funds grants and contracts that 
develop new technologies and demonstrate innovative methods to 
support the independence, productivity, and integration into 
the community of persons with developmental disabilities.
    The Committee recommends $39,443,000 for the University 
Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities [UCEDDs], 
a network of 67 university-based centers that provide 
interdisciplinary education, conduct research, and develop 
model services for children and adults with disabilities. The 
Centers serve as the major vehicle to translate disability-
related research into community practice and to train the next 
cohort of future professionals who will provide services and 
supports to an increasingly diverse population of people with 
disabilities. The Committee recommendation will support 
training initiatives for new and emerging needs, such as 
developing effective services for people with autism spectrum 
disorder, as well as partnerships with minority-serving 
institutions to focus research, training and services on 
minority populations with disabilities.
    The Committee is aware that individuals with autism, their 
families and other caregivers need a trusted source of 
information about evidence-based interventions, services, and 
protocols that can assist individuals with autism and other 
developmental disabilities. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary to establish a national autism family resource and 
information center, which could provide individuals living with 
autism and their families the information they need to access 
needed services.

Native American Programs

    The Committee recommends $49,023,000 for Native American 
programs. The comparable funding level for fiscal year 2009 is 
$47,023,000, the same as the budget request. The Administration 
for Native Americans [ANA] assists tribal and village 
governments, Native Indian institutions and organizations to 
support and develop stable, diversified local economies. In 
promoting social and economic self-sufficiency, ANA provides 
financial assistance through direct grants for individual 
projects, training and training, and research and demonstration 
programs.
    The Committee recommends that $12,000,000 of the total 
provided to ANA be available to fund activities authorized 
under section 803C(b)(7)(A)-(C) of the Native American Programs 
Act, as amended by the Esther Martinez Native American 
Languages Preservation Act of 2006. The Committee expects that 
no less than $4,000,000 of this funding be allocated to 
language immersion programs.

Community Services

    The Committee recommends $775,313,000 for community 
services programs. The comparable funding level for fiscal year 
2009 is $1,775,313,000, which includes $1,000,000,000 provided 
in ARRA. The administration requested $765,313,000 for this 
activity.
    Within the funds provided, the Committee recommends 
$700,000,000 for the community services block grant [CSBG], 
which is the same as the administration request. The comparable 
fiscal year 2009 funding level is $1,700,000,000, which 
includes $1,000,000,000 provided in ARRA. The CSBG is used to 
make formula grants to States and Indian tribes to provide a 
wide range of services and activities to alleviate causes of 
poverty in communities and to assist low-income individuals in 
becoming self-sufficient.
    Several other discretionary programs are funded from this 
account. Funding for these programs is recommended at the 
following levels for fiscal year 2010: community economic 
development, $36,000,000; individual development accounts, 
$24,025,000; job opportunities for low-income individuals, 
$5,288,000; and rural community facilities, $10,000,000. The 
administration proposed to eliminate funding for rural 
community facilities.
    In order to support the work of Community Development 
Corporations, the Committee encourages the Office of Community 
Services to implement technical assistance authority authorized 
under section 680 (a)(2))(E) of the Community Services Block 
Grant Act.

Domestic Violence Hotline

    The Committee recommends $3,209,000 for the national 
domestic violence hotline, which is the same as the comparable 
fiscal year 2009 level and the administration request. This 
activity funds the operation of a national, toll-free, 24-
hours-a-day telephone hotline to provide information and 
assistance to victims of domestic violence.

Family Violence Prevention and Services

    The Committee recommends $127,776,000 for the family 
violence prevention and services program, which includes 
battered women's shelters. This is the same as the comparable 
amount for fiscal year 2009 and the administration request. 
These funds support community-based projects which operate 
shelters and provide assistance for victims of domestic 
violence and their dependents. Grantees use funds to provide 
counseling, self-help, and referral services to victims and 
their children.

Mentoring Children of Prisoners

    The Committee recommends $49,314,000 for mentoring children 
of prisoners, which is the same as the comparable amount for 
fiscal year 2009 and the administration request. This program 
provides competitive grants to community organizations to 
create and sustain mentoring relationships between children of 
prisoners and adults in their community. Research indicates 
that mentoring programs can help children with incarcerated 
parents reduce their drug and alcohol use, improve their 
relationships and academic performance, and reduce the 
likelihood that they will initiate violence.

Independent Living Training Vouchers

    The Committee recommends $45,351,000 for independent living 
training vouchers, which is the same as the comparable fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the administration request. This 
program supports vouchers of up to $5,000 per year for post-
secondary educational and training for foster care youth up to 
21 years of age. This program increases the likelihood that 
individuals who age out of the foster care system will be 
better prepared to live independently and contribute 
productively to society.

Disaster Human Services Case Management

    The Committee recommendation includes $2,000,000, the same 
as the administration request, for a new program to provide 
disaster human case management services. This program will 
ensure that States have the capacity to meet social service 
needs during disasters such as Hurricane Katrina by helping 
disaster victims prepare recovery plans, referring them to 
service providers and FEMA contacts in order to identify needed 
assistance, and providing ongoing support and tracking through 
the recovery process.

Abstinence Education

    The Committee recommendation does not include funding for 
community-based abstinence education. The comparable level for 
fiscal year 2009 is $99,114,000. The administration did not 
request funding for this program. The Committee has redirected 
funding from this program to a new initiative in the Office of 
the Secretary that will fund a range of evidence-based programs 
that reduce teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, 
including HIV. The Committee notes that programs formerly 
receiving abstinence education funding are eligible for funding 
under this new initiative, provided they meet the evidence-
based criteria.

Teen Pregnancy Prevention

    The Committee recommendation does not include funding in 
ACF for the President's teen pregnancy prevention initiative. 
The administration requested $114,455,000 for this activity. 
The Committee applauds the administration for developing a new 
teen pregnancy proposal that focuses on evidence-based, 
effective interventions. The Committee has funded this 
initiative in the Office of the Secretary due to the public 
health expertise necessary to implement evidence-based 
approaches to reducing teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted 
infections, including HIV.

Faith-based Center

    The Committee recommends $1,376,000 for the operation of 
the Department's Center for Faith-Based and Community 
Initiatives. This amount is the same as the comparable funding 
level for fiscal year 2009 and the budget request.

Program Administration

    The Committee recommends $206,930,000 for program 
administration. The comparable funding level for fiscal year 
2009 is $196,930,000 and the administration request is 
$217,624,000.
    The Committee recommendation provides $1,000,000 to be 
transferred to the National Commission on Children and 
Disasters, which is preparing a report to the President and 
Congress on its recommendations to address the needs of 
children as they relate to preparation for, response to and 
recovery from emergencies and disasters.

                   PROMOTING SAFE AND STABLE FAMILIES

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $408,311,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     408,311,000
House allowance.........................................     408,311,000
Committee recommendation................................     408,311,000

    The Committee recommends $408,311,000 for promoting safe 
and stable families. This is the same as the comparable funding 
level for fiscal year 2009 and the administration request. The 
recommendation consists of $345,000,000 in mandatory funds 
authorized by the Social Security Act and $63,311,000 in 
discretionary appropriations.
    Funds available through the promoting safe and stable 
families [PSSF] program support activities that can prevent 
family crises from emerging which might require the temporary 
or permanent removal of a child from his or her own home. 
Grants allow States to operate coordinated programs of family 
preservation services, time-limited family reunification 
services, community-based family support services, and adoption 
promotion and support services.

                PAYMENTS FOR FOSTER CARE AND PERMANENCY

Appropriations, 2009....................................  $5,409,000,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   5,532,000,000
House allowance.........................................   5,532,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,532,000,000

    The Committee recommends $5,532,000,000 for payments for 
foster care and permanency, an appropriated entitlement which 
includes funding for the foster care, adoption assistance, 
guardianship assistance, and independent living programs. The 
comparable funding level for fiscal year 2009 is 
$5,409,000,000. In addition, the Committee recommendation 
provides $1,850,000,000 for an advance appropriation for the 
first quarter of fiscal year 2011. The Committee recommendation 
provides the full amount requested under current law.
    The foster care program, authorized under title IV-E of the 
Social Security Act, provides Federal reimbursement to States 
and tribes for maintenance payments to families and 
institutions caring for eligible foster children. Funds are 
matched at the Federal medical assistance percentage [FMAP] 
rate for each State. Funding is also provided for 
administrative costs for the management of the foster care 
program, as well as training costs for foster care workers and 
parents.
    The adoption assistance program provides funds to States 
for maintenance payments and the nonrecurring costs of adoption 
for children with special needs. The goal of this program is to 
facilitate the adoption of hard-to-place children in permanent 
homes, and thus prevent long, inappropriate stays in foster 
care. As in the foster care program, State administrative and 
training costs are eligible under this program for Federal 
reimbursement subject to a matching rate.
    Public Law 110-351, the Fostering Connections to Success 
and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008, created a new IV-E 
guardianship assistance program. This program gives States and 
tribes an option under their IV-E foster care programs to 
provide assistance payments to relatives taking legal 
guardianship of eligible children who have been in foster care.
    The independent living program provides services to foster 
children under 18 and foster youth ages 18-21 to help them make 
the transition to independent living by engaging in a variety 
of services including educational assistance, life skills 
training and health services. States are awarded grants based 
on their share of the number of children in foster care, 
subject to a matching requirement.

                        Administration on Aging


                        AGING SERVICES PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2009...................................\1\$1,593,843,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   1,493,843,000
House allowance.........................................   1,530,881,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,495,038,000

\1\Includes $100,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 funding (Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,495,038,000 
for the Administration on Aging [AoA]. The comparable fiscal 
year 2009 level is $1,593,843,000, which includes $100,000,000 
appropriated in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009. The administration requested $1,493,843,000 for this 
agency.

Supportive Services and Senior Centers

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $361,348,000 
for supportive services and senior centers. This amount is the 
same as the comparable fiscal year 2009 level and the 
administration request. The supportive services program 
provides formula grants to States and territories to fund 
activities that help seniors remain in their homes for as long 
as possible. This program funds a wide range of social services 
such as multipurpose senior centers, adult day care, 
transportation, and in-home assistance such as personal care 
and homemaker assistance. State agencies on aging award funds 
to designated area agencies on aging that, in turn, make awards 
to local services providers. All individuals age 60 and over 
are eligible for services, although, by law, priority is given 
to serving those who are in the greatest economic and social 
need, with particular attention to low-income minority older 
individuals, older individuals with limited English 
proficiency, and older individuals residing in rural areas.

Preventive Health Services

    The Committee recommends $21,026,000 for preventive health 
services, which is the same as the comparable fiscal year 2009 
level and the administration request. The preventive health 
services program funds activities that help seniors stay 
healthy and avoid chronic disease, thus reducing the need for 
more costly medical interventions. Services provided include 
health screenings, physical fitness, medication management, and 
information and outreach regarding healthy behaviors.

Protection of Vulnerable Older Americans

    The Committee recommends $22,383,000 for grants to States 
for protection of vulnerable older Americans. The comparable 
fiscal year 2009 level is $21,383,000, the same as the 
administration request. Within the Committee recommendation, 
$17,327,000 is for the ombudsman services program and 
$5,056,000 is for the prevention of elder abuse program. Both 
programs provide formula grants to States to prevent the abuse, 
neglect, and exploitation of older individuals. The ombudsman 
program focuses on the needs of residents of nursing homes and 
other long-term care facilities, while elder abuse prevention 
targets its message to the elderly community at large.

National Family Caregiver Support Program

    The Committee recommends $154,220,000 for the national 
family caregiver support program, which is the same as the 
comparable fiscal year 2009 level and the administration 
request. Funds appropriated for this activity establish a 
multifaceted support system in each State for family 
caregivers, allowing them to care for their loved ones at home 
for as long as possible. States may use funding to include the 
following five components into their program: information to 
caregivers about available services; assistance to caregivers 
in gaining access to services; caregiver counseling and 
training; respite care to enable caregivers to be temporarily 
relieved from their caregiving responsibilities; and limited 
supplemental services that fill remaining service gaps.

Native American Caregiver Support Program

    The Committee recommendation includes $6,389,000 to carry 
out the Native American caregiver support program. This amount 
is the same as the comparable fiscal year 2009 level and the 
administration request. The program assists tribes in providing 
multifaceted systems of support services for family caregivers 
and for grandparents or older individuals who are relative 
caregivers.

Congregate and Home-delivered Nutrition Services

    For congregate nutrition services, the Committee recommends 
an appropriation of $434,269,000, the same as the 
administration request. The comparable fiscal year 2009 level 
is $499,269,000, which includes $65,000,000 appropriated in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. For home-
delivered meals, the Committee recommends $214,459,000, the 
same as the administration request. The comparable fiscal year 
2009 level is $246,459,000, which includes $32,000,000 
appropriated in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009.
    These programs address the nutritional needs of older 
individuals. Projects funded must make home-delivered and 
congregate meals available at least once a day, 5 days a week, 
and each meal must meet a minimum of one-third of daily dietary 
requirements. While States receive separate allotments of funds 
for congregate meals, home-delivered meals and supportive 
services, they have flexibility to transfer funds between these 
programs.

Nutrition Services Incentives Program

    The Committee recommendation includes $161,015,000 for the 
nutrition services incentives program [NSIP]. This amount is 
the same as the comparable fiscal year 2009 level and the 
administration request. This program augments funding for 
congregate and home-delivered meals provided to older adults. 
Funds provided under this program are dedicated exclusively to 
the provision of meals. NSIP rewards effective performance by 
States and tribal organizations in the efficient delivery of 
nutritious meals to older individuals through the use of cash 
or commodities.

Aging Grants to Indian Tribes and Native Hawaiian Organizations

    The Committee recommends $27,208,000 for grants to Native 
Americans, the same as the administration request. The 
comparable fiscal year 2009 level is $30,208,000, which 
includes $3,000,000 appropriated in the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act of 2009. Under this program, awards are made 
to eligible organizations based on their share of Native 
American, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiians aged 60 and over. 
These tribal organizations assure that a broad range of 
supportive services, nutrition services, information, and 
assistance are available.

Program Innovations

    The Committee recommends $14,244,000 for program 
innovations. The comparable fiscal year 2009 level is 
$18,172,000 and the administration request is $13,049,000. 
These funds support activities that expand public understanding 
of aging and the aging process, apply social research and 
analysis to improve access to and delivery of services for 
older individuals, test innovative ideas and programs to serve 
older individuals, and provide technical assistance to agencies 
that administer the Older Americans Act.
    The Committee has provided $1,000,000 to continue support 
for a 24-hour call center that provides Alzheimer family 
caregivers with professional care consultation and crisis 
intervention.
    The Committee continues to support funding at no less than 
last year's level for national programs scheduled to be 
refunded in fiscal year 2010 that address a variety of issues, 
including elder abuse, Native American issues, and legal 
services.
    Civic Engagement.--The Committee strongly supports the 
multigenerational and civic engagement activities authorized 
under section 417 of the Older Americans Act. The Committee is 
aware of a program using older volunteers as tutors that has 
significantly improved the reading skills of students, as well 
as improved the mental and physical health of volunteers. The 
Committee encourages AoA to continue its work in advancing the 
field of civic engagement for older Americans by partnering 
with organizations with proven experience in creating 
innovative opportunities for older Americans to serve their 
communities.
    Older Adults and Mental Health.--The Committee recognizes 
that older adults are among the fastest growing subgroups of 
the U.S. population. Approximately 20 to 25 percent of older 
adults have a mental or behavioral health problem. Older white 
males (age 85 and over) currently have the highest rates of 
suicide of any group in the United States. The Committee 
acknowledges the importance of addressing the mental and 
behavioral health needs of older adults and encourages AoA to 
implement the provisions related to mental and behavioral 
health that were signed into law as part of the Older Americans 
Act Amendments of 2006.
    Transportation.--The Committee is aware of the rapidly 
growing need for transportation services for older Americans. 
In order to expand resources to meet this need, the Committee 
encourages AoA to fund section 416 of the Older Americans Act. 
Such funding could support successful, entrepreneurial models 
of economically sustainable transportation that supplement 
publicly funded services by accessing private resources and 
voluntary local community support, and that do not rely on 
Federal or other public financial assistance after 5 years.
    The Committee recommendation includes bill language 
providing funding for the following activities in the following 
amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Project                              Funding
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Gallagher Outreach Program Inc, Sunnyside, NY, for              $200,000
 outreach and social services to elderly Irish
 immigrants...........................................
Jewish Family Services of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT,              300,000
 for community-based caregiver services...............
Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta, Atlanta, GA, for           100,000
 services at a naturally occurring retirement
 community............................................
Lifespan of Greater Rochester, Inc., Rochester, NY,              100,000
 for activities to prevent elder abuse................
Mosaic, Garden City, KS, for the legacy senior                   300,000
 services initiative..................................
PACE Greater New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, to provide            100,000
 seniors with alternatives to institutionalized  care.
Washoe County Senior Services, Carson City, NV, for               95,000
 the RSVP Home Companion Senior Respite Care Program..
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Aging Network Support Activities

    The Committee recommends $44,283,000 for aging network 
support activities, the same as the administration request. The 
comparable fiscal year 2009 level is $41,694,000. The Committee 
recommendation includes funding at the administration request 
level for the Eldercare Locator, which is a toll-free, 
nationwide directory assistance service for older Americans and 
their caregivers. Established in 1991, the service links over 
100,000 callers annually to an extensive network of resources 
for aging Americans and their caregivers.
    The Committee recommendation includes $30,589,000 to 
continue national implementation of health and long-term care 
programs which seek to allow seniors to remain healthy and live 
independently in their own communities for as long as possible. 
These programs, formerly known as the Choices for Independence 
program, include nursing home diversion, aging and disability 
resource centers, and evidence-based disease prevention 
activities. Funds are also included, as requested by the 
administration, for an evaluation that will test the impacts 
and outcomes of these programs.

Alzheimer's Disease Demonstration Grants to States

    The Committee recommends a funding level of $11,464,000 for 
Alzheimer's disease demonstration grants to States, which is 
the same as the comparable fiscal year 2009 level and the 
administration request. This program provides competitively 
awarded matching grants to States to encourage program 
innovation and coordination of public and private services for 
individuals with Alzheimer's disease and their families. The 
Committee urges the AoA to continue this program with a focus 
on early intervention and chronic care management, particularly 
among underserved populations.

Lifespan Respite Care

    The Committee recommends $2,500,000 for the Lifespan 
Respite Care program, the same as the comparable fiscal year 
2009 level and the administration request. The Committee 
provides funding for this program in AoA, rather than the 
Office of the Secretary as requested by the administration, 
since administrative responsibility for the program has been 
tranferred to AoA. The Lifespan Respite Care program provides 
grants to States to expand respite care services to family 
caregivers, improve the local coordination of respite care 
resources, and improve access and quality of respite care 
services, thereby reducing family caregiver strain.
    The Committee recognizes the essential role of family 
caregivers who provide a significant proportion of our Nation's 
health and long-term care for the chronically ill and aging. 
Respite care can provide family caregivers with relief 
necessary to maintain their own health, bolster family 
stability and well-being, and avoid or delay more costly 
nursing home or foster care placements. The Committee urges AoA 
to ensure that State agencies and Aging and Disability Resource 
Centers use the funds to serve all age groups, chronic 
conditions and disability categories equitably and without 
preference.

Program Administration

    The Committee recommends $20,230,000 for program 
administration. The comparable fiscal year 2009 level is 
$18,696,000 and the administration request is $21,230,000. 
These funds support salaries and related expenses for program 
management and oversight activities.

                        Office of the Secretary


                    GENERAL DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $393,276,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     407,049,000
House allowance.........................................     402,452,000
Committee recommendation................................     483,779,000

    The Committee recommends $483,779,000 for general 
departmental management [GDM]. The comparable fiscal year 2009 
funding level was $393,276,000. The administration requested 
$407,049,000 for this activity. The Committee recommendation 
includes the transfer of $5,851,000 from Medicare trust funds, 
which is the same as the administration request. In addition, 
for research and evaluation activities the Committee recommends 
$64,211,000 in transfers available under section 241 of the 
Public Health Service Act.
    This appropriation supports those activities that are 
associated with the Secretary's role as policy officer and 
general manager of the Department. It supports certain health 
activities performed by the Office of Public Health and 
Science, including the Office of the Surgeon General. GDM funds 
also support the Department's centralized services carried out 
by several Office of the Secretary staff divisions, including 
personnel management, administrative and management services, 
information resources management, intergovernmental relations, 
legal services, planning and evaluation, finance and 
accounting, and external affairs.
    The Office of the Surgeon General, in addition to its other 
responsibilities, provides leadership and management oversight 
for the PHS Commissioned Corps, including the involvement of 
the Corps in departmental emergency preparedness and response 
activities.
    The Committee has included $14,813,000 for the 
transformation of the Commissioned Corps. This activity 
provides for the development of training and career development 
programs for officers, as well as policies and systems that 
ensure the rapid response of the Corps in public health and 
medical emergencies.
    The Committee recommendation includes $7,000,000 to 
continue the health diplomacy initiative. Funds will be used to 
invest in public health and diplomacy abroad by improving 
health systems, delivering direct patient care and training the 
health workforce in Latin America and the Caribbean.
    The Committee has again included $1,000,000 for the 
Secretary to implement section 399CC of the Public Health 
Service Act (as enacted in the Combating Autism Act, Public Law 
109-416) related to administration of the Interagency Autism 
Coordinating Committee. These funds are to be transferred to 
the National Institute of Mental Health. The Committee 
previously has supported demonstration projects using 
interactive video technology as a means of providing intensive 
behavioral health services to individuals with autism. Such 
demonstration projects involved the use of interactive video 
technology as an in-home service delivery model that enabled 
live training, consultation, and support directly into the home 
when and where it was needed for children with autism and their 
families. The Committee urges the coordinating committee to 
analyze the efficacy of telehealth technology to deliver 
services to children with autism.
    The Committee is extremely frustrated with the lack of 
cooperation and communication from the Department regarding the 
implementation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. 
The Committee provided the Secretary with maximum flexibility 
in ARRA, with the expectation that the Department would work 
collaboratively with the Committee as it developed spending 
plans for ARRA funding. This has not been the case. In 
addition, the Committee is disappointed that the Office of the 
Assistant Secretary for Legislation has failed to share 
information with the Committee in a timely manner. For these 
reasons, the Committee has not included requested staffing 
increases for departmental initiatives and has limited funding 
for the Assistant Secretary for Legislation.
    Adolescent Health.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$2,000,000 to establish and support the Office of Adolescent 
Health [OAH], as authorized under section 1708 of the Public 
Health Service Act. The Office did not receive funding in 
fiscal year 2009. The Office shall be responsible for 
coordinating activities of the Department with respect to 
adolescent health, including coordinating program design and 
support, trend monitoring and analysis, research projects, and 
the training of healthcare professionals. The Office is also 
charged with carrying out demonstration projects to improve 
adolescent health.
    The Committee expects that, in the context of national 
health reform and the renewed commitment to health promotion 
and disease prevention, the Secretary will place this office 
within the Office of Public Health and Science, as authorized. 
The Committee expects the Director of the Office to coordinate 
efforts among HRSA, CMS, CDC, and SAMHSA to reduce health risk 
exposure and behaviors among adolescents, particularly low-
income adolescents, and to better manage and treat their health 
conditions. The Committee has also tasked OAH with implementing 
a new initiative supporting evidence-based teen pregnancy 
prevention approaches.
    The Committee has provided funding to establish this office 
due to its concern about the historic lack of funding and focus 
at the highest level of the Department on the significant unmet 
and often interrelated health needs of adolescents. The 
Committee recognizes that health problems that emerge during 
adolescence have important consequences for adult morbidity and 
mortality. The Committee also notes that adverse experiences in 
childhood or adolescence, such as physical or emotional abuse, 
trauma or violence, have powerful impacts on the physical and 
mental health of adults. Research has shown that chronic stress 
experienced early in life has been associated with increased 
risk of heart disease, smoking, drug use, obesity, and 
autoimmune disorders.
    The Committee is especially troubled by the lack of 
priority given to the substance abuse and mental health needs 
of adolescents. Most mental, emotional, and behavioral 
disorders have their roots in childhood and adolescence: half 
of all lifetime cases of mental, emotional, and behavioral 
disorders start by age 14 and three-fourths start by age 24. 
The lack of attention paid to addressing these disorders is all 
the more disturbing since a number of interventions exist that 
have been shown in rigorous evaluations to impact risk and 
protective factors among young people. The Committee expects 
that OAH will coordinate with the administrator of SAMHSA on a 
strategy to implement the recommendations included in the 
Institute of Medicine report ``Preventing Mental, Emotional, 
and Behavioral Disorders Among Young People.'' Specifically, 
the Committee expects OAH to support the design and 
prioritization of evidence-based prevention and promotion 
programs that address mental, emotional, and behavioral 
disorders. The Office shall also support research and 
evaluations in areas where the evidence-base is lacking or 
needs improvement.
    Cleanup in Libby, Montana.--The Committee finds that the 
Department has not developed a clear process for identifying 
long-term health risks in Libby, Montana. Cleanup efforts to 
date have not adequately removed visible vermiculite and known 
public health risks. The Committee also recognizes that full 
community involvement in decisionmaking is critical to long-
term cleanup. The Committee directs the Secretary to coordinate 
with the Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] to identify the 
asbestos exposure risks associated with superfund cleanup in 
Libby and its impact on long-term healthcare needs in the 
community. The Department is requested to report back to the 
Committee on currently known health risks, the process for 
determining a baseline risk assessment in adults and children 
in the community and cleanup activities that will be conducted 
while a record of decision is being determined. The Committee 
encourages the Department to review previous decisions 
regarding the declaration of a public health emergency in 
Libby.
    Emergency Care.--The Committee is concerned that 
overcrowded emergency departments compromise patient safety and 
threaten access to emergency care. The Committee urges the 
Secretary to review the state of emergency care in the United 
States and to identify barriers contributing to delays in 
timely processing of hospital patients requiring admission as 
inpatients who initially sought care through the emergency 
department, as well as to examine available evidence of best 
practices to improve patient flow within hospitals.
    Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health.--The 
Committee notes that healthcare disparities affecting lesbian, 
gay, bisexual, and transgender [LGBT] persons have been 
recognized by various Federal agencies, including SAMHSA, HRSA, 
and NIH. The Committee encourages the Department to establish 
and fund an office focusing on LGBT health in order to 
strategically track and address health disparities experienced 
by LGBT individuals.
    Lyme Disease.--The Committee urges the Secretary to improve 
interagency coordination and communication and minimize overlap 
regarding efforts to address tick-borne diseases. The Secretary 
is encouraged to advise relevant Federal agencies on priorities 
related to Lyme and tick-borne diseases, identify future 
research needs, and involve CDC, NIH, FDA, and other agencies 
in the development of a more accurate system of diagnosing and 
reporting of Lyme disease.
    Sexualization of Girls.--The Committee recognizes that 
throughout U.S. culture, female children, adolescents, and 
adults are frequently depicted and treated in a sexualized 
manner that objectifies them. Research links sexualization with 
three of the most common mental health problems of female 
children, adolescents, and adults: eating disorders, depression 
or depressed mood, and low self-esteem. The Committee 
encourages the Department to fund media literacy and youth 
empowerment programs to prevent and counter the effects of the 
sexualization of female children, adolescents, and adults.
    The recommendation includes bill language providing funding 
for the following activities in the following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                        Project                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Community Transportation Association of America,                $950,000
 Washington, DC, for technical assistance to human
 services transportation providers on ADA requirements
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Teen Pregnancy Prevention

    The Committee recommendation includes $104,455,000 for an 
initiative to reduce teen pregnancy and improve adolescent 
reproductive health. The recommendation includes $4,455,000 in 
transfers available under section 241 of the Public Health 
Service Act. The administration requested $114,455,000 for this 
activity within the Administration for Children and Families 
[ACF].
    The Committee is alarmed that America's teen birth rate, 
already high compared to other developed nations, increased in 
2006 and 2007 following large declines from 1991 to 2005. Teen 
childbearing costs taxpayers at least $9,000,000,000 annually 
due to increased healthcare, child welfare and public 
assistance costs. According to a recent report by the Centers 
for Disease Control and Prevention, other negative health 
outcomes for adolescents, such as the rates of AIDS and 
syphilis cases, may also be increasing. For these reasons, the 
Committee believes that a new initiative focusing on improving 
the reproductive health and wellbeing of young people is 
urgently needed.
    The Committee recommendation includes $75,000,000 to fund 
programs that have been proven in rigorous evaluations to 
impact teen pregnancy or the behaviors associated with teen 
pregnancy prevention. It is the Committee's intent that a wide 
range of evidence-based programs should be eligible for funding 
under this initiative, including those that do not have teen 
pregnancy reduction as their original goal. As one example, the 
Committee notes that a foster care program for severely 
delinquent teens has been shown to produce a sizeable, 
statistically significant decrease in female youths' teen 
pregnancy rates. The Committee also provides $25,000,000 to 
expand the number of evidence-based programs by developing and 
testing models with promising outcomes. The recommendation also 
includes $4,455,000 for rigorous evaluations of teen pregnancy 
programs. The Committee intends that programs funded under this 
initiative will stress the value of abstinence and provide age-
appropriate information to youth that is scientifically and 
medically accurate.
    The Committee directs the newly established Office of 
Adolescent Health to administer this program in collaboration 
with ACF, CDC, and the Office of Population Affairs. The 
Committee has funded this program within the Office of the 
Secretary to highlight the urgent need to reduce teen 
pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections among 
adolescents. While ACF has valuable experience working with 
faith-based and community organizations, the Committee believes 
this program must also have a public health component. The 
Committee also believes that strong leadership by the Secretary 
should be an essential part of this important initiative. 
Placing this initiative within the Office of the Secretary will 
allow the Department to utilize the expertise of its operating 
divisions with responsibility for youth development, social 
service and public health, all of which are necessary for this 
initiative to succeed.

Adolescent Family Life

    The Committee has provided $16,658,000 for the Adolescent 
Family Life [AFL] program. The administration requested 
$29,778,000, the same as the comparable fiscal year 2009 level. 
The AFL program evaluates integrated approaches to the delivery 
of comprehensive services to pregnant and parenting teens. The 
Committee recommendation includes funding for AFL care 
demonstration grants. The Committee has not included funding 
for prevention demonstration grants, as well as bill language 
requested by the administration allowing the AFL program to 
fund teen pregnancy prevention programs. The Committee has 
provided funding for a teen pregnancy prevention initiative in 
the newly created Office of Adolescent Health. The Committee 
encourages the Office of Population Affairs to provide its 
public health expertise to OAH for the implementation of this 
new program.

Minority Health

    The Committee recommends $55,956,000 for the Office of 
Minority Health, the same as the administration request. The 
Office of Minority Health [OMH] focuses on strategies designed 
to decrease the disparities and to improve the health status of 
racial and ethnic minority populations in the United States. 
OMH establishes goals and coordinates all departmental activity 
related to improving health outcomes for disadvantaged and 
minority individuals. OMH supports several initiatives, 
including demonstration projects (the Minority Community Health 
Partnership HIV/AIDS, the Bilingual/Bicultural Service, and the 
Youth Empowerment Program) as well as the Center for Linguistic 
and Cultural Competency in Health Care, and the Family and 
Community Violence Prevention Program.
    The Committee has included $5,283,000 for programs focused 
on the improvement of geographic minority health and health 
disparities for rural disadvantaged minority populations. Funds 
are available to: increase awareness on healthcare issues 
impacting and effective interventions for these populations; 
increase access to quality healthcare; increase access to 
quality healthcare personnel available to provide services to 
these populations; improve healthcare outcomes; and develop a 
model that can be replicated to address national policies and 
programs to improve the health of these rural disadvantaged 
minority communities. This model should include research, 
health services, education/awareness, and health information 
components, with priority given to existing programs with prior 
funding, that are located in areas with the most need, and that 
can provide recommendations on projects that benefit the health 
of minority and rural populations.
    The Committee recommendation includes $1,000,000 to 
continue the national health provider education program on 
lupus. The Committee is pleased that OMH is working with the 
Surgeon General and the Office of Women's Health to implement 
this program, with the ultimate goal of improving diagnosis for 
those with lupus and reducing disparities in care.

Office of Women's Health

    The Committee recommends $33,746,000 for the Office of 
Women's Health. This amount is the same as the comparable 
fiscal year 2009 level and the administration request. The 
Office of Women's Health [OWH] develops, stimulates, and 
coordinates women's health research, healthcare services, and 
public and health professional education and training across 
HHS agencies. It advances important crosscutting initiatives 
and develops public-private partnerships, providing leadership 
and policy direction, and initiating and synthesizing program 
activities to redress the disparities in women's health. The 
Committee commends the work of OWH and its important leadership 
in advancing and coordinating a comprehensive women's health 
agenda throughout HHS.
    The Committee understands the importance of advancing the 
health of women by promoting health screening and prevention; 
improving access to care; and cultivating women's health 
research, professional development and education of new 
providers. From 1996 to 2006, the National Centers of 
Excellence in Women's Health served as a resource for clinical, 
educational and outreach programs, and achieved these goals in 
a cost-effective manner before the elimination of their funding 
in 2007. The Committee urges OWH to re-examine the benefits of 
the Centers of Excellence in Women's Health and their potential 
to reduce health disparities.

HIV/AIDS in Minority Communities

    To address high-priority HIV prevention and treatment needs 
of minority communities heavily impacted by HIV/AIDS, the 
Committee recommends $51,891,000. This is the same as the 
comparable fiscal year 2009 level and the administration 
request. These funds are available to key operating divisions 
of the Department with capability and expertise in HIV/AIDS 
services to assist minority communities with education, 
community linkages, and technical assistance.

Afghanistan

    The Committee recommendation includes $5,789,000 for the 
Afghanistan Health Initiative, the same as the comparable 
fiscal year 2009 level and the administration request. Funds 
will be used in partnership with the Department of Defense for 
medical training activities at the Rabia Balkhi Women's 
Hospital in Kabul, and for support of maternal and child health 
throughout Afghanistan.

Embryo Donation and Adoption

    The Committee has provided $4,200,000 for the Department's 
embryo donation and adoption awareness activities, which is the 
same as the comparable fiscal year 2009 level and the 
administration request. The Committee has again included bill 
language allowing funds appropriated for embryo donation and 
adoption activities to be available to pay medical and 
administrative costs deemed necessary to facilitate embryo 
donations and adoptions.

                OFFICE OF MEDICARE HEARINGS AND APPEALS

Appropriations, 2009....................................     $64,604,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................      71,147,000
House allowance.........................................      71,147,000
Committee recommendation................................      71,147,000

    The Committee provides $71,147,000 for the Office of 
Medicare Hearings and Appeals, the same as the administration 
request. The comparable fiscal year 2009 amount was 
$64,604,000.
    The Office of Medicare Hearings and Appeals is responsible 
for hearing Medicare appeals at the administrative law judge 
level, which is the third level of Medicare claims appeals. 
This office began to process Medicare appeals in 2005. Prior to 
that time, appeals had been processed by the Social Security 
Administration under an interagency agreement with the Centers 
for Medicare and Medicaid Services. This function was 
transferred to the Office of the Secretary by the Medicare 
Prescription Drug, Improvement and Modernization Act of 2003.

  OFFICE OF THE NATIONAL COORDINATOR FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Appropriations, 2009...................................\1\$2,061,231,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................      61,342,000
House allowance.........................................      61,342,000
Committee recommendation................................      61,342,000

\1\Includes $2,000,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee makes available $61,342,000 to the Office of 
the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology 
[ONCHIT], the same as the administration request. The fiscal 
year 2009 funding level was $2,061,231,000, including 
$2,000,000,000 available in the American Reinvestment and 
Recovery Act of 2009.
    The Office of the National Coordinator for Health 
Information Technology is responsible for promoting the use of 
electronic health records in clinical practice, coordinating 
Federal health information systems and collaborating with the 
private sector to develop standards for a nationwide 
interoperable health information technology infrastructure.
    The Committee applauds the work of ONCHIT in furthering 
interoperable Emergency Health Records [EHRs]. During 
emergencies, timely access to critical health information is 
essential for providing effective patient care. The Committee 
encourages ONCHIT to study the connectivity of emergency 
departments to community providers through EHRs.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2009....................................  \1\$62,279,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................      50,279,000
House allowance.........................................      50,279,000
Committee recommendation................................      50,279,000

\1\Includes $17,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $50,279,000 
for the Office of Inspector General [OIG], the same as the 
administration request. In addition to discretionary funds 
provided in this act, the Health Insurance Portability and 
Accountability Act of 1996 and the Deficit Reduction Act of 
2005 both contain permanent appropriations for the Office of 
Inspector General. The total funds provided to the OIG from 
this bill and other permanent appropriations are $252,484,000 
in fiscal year 2010.
    The Office of Inspector General conducts audits, 
investigations, and evaluations of the programs administered by 
the Department of Health and Human Services Operating and Staff 
Divisions, including the recipients of HHS's grant and contract 
funds. In doing so, the OIG addresses issues of waste, fraud, 
and abuse and makes re recommendations to improve the 
efficiency and effectiveness of HHS programs and operations.

                        OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS

Appropriations, 2009....................................     $40,099,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................      41,099,000
House allowance.........................................      41,099,000
Committee recommendation................................      41,099,000

    The Committee recommends $41,099,000 for the Office for 
Civil Rights [OCR], which is the same as the administration's 
request. The recommendation includes the transfer of $3,314,000 
from the Medicare trust funds.
    The Office for Civil Rights is responsible for enforcing 
civil rights-related statutes in healthcare and human services 
programs. To enforce these statutes, OCR investigates 
complaints of discrimination, conducts program reviews to 
correct discriminatory practices, and implements programs to 
generate voluntary compliance among providers and constituency 
groups of health and human services.

     RETIREMENT PAY AND MEDICAL BENEFITS FOR COMMISSIONED OFFICERS

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $434,694,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     474,557,000
House allowance.........................................     474,557,000
Committee recommendation................................     474,557,000

    The Committee provides an estimated $474,557,000 for 
retirement pay and medical benefits for commissioned officers 
of the U.S. Public Health Service, the same as the 
administration request.
    This account provides for retirement payments to U.S. 
Public Health Service officers who are retired for age, 
disability, or length of service; payments to survivors of 
deceased officers; medical care to active duty and retired 
members and dependents and beneficiaries.

            PUBLIC HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES EMERGENCY FUND

Appropriations, 2009...................................\1\$9,097,795,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   2,678,569,000
House allowance.........................................   2,100,649,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,621,154,000

\1\Includes $50,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding and $7,650,000 in Supplemental 
Appropriation Act, 2009 funding (Public Law 111-32).

    The Committee provides $2,621,154,000 to the Public Health 
and Social Services Emergency Fund. The Pandemic Preparedness 
and All-Hazards Preparedness Act, enacted into law in December 
2006, created the new position of the Assistant Secretary for 
Preparedness and Response. The administration requested 
$2,678,569,000. The comparable fiscal year 2009 amount was 
$9,097,795,000, including $7,650,000,000 available in the 
Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2009 and $50,000,000 available 
in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. As 
requested, the Committee bill includes a one-time transfer of 
all remaining balances in the Project BioShield Special Reserve 
Fund from the Department of Homeland Security to this account. 
The amount to be transferred is estimated to be $1,569,000,000.
    This appropriation supports the activities of the Office of 
the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response and other 
activities within the Office of the Secretary to prepare for 
the health consequences of bioterrorism and other public health 
emergencies, including pandemic influenza, and to support the 
Department's cyber-security efforts.

Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response [ASPR]

    The Committee recommendation includes $2,139,928,000 for 
activities administered by ASPR. The budget request is 
$2,154,928,000; the fiscal year 2009 comparable level is 
$788,191,000. These funds will support the Department's efforts 
to prepare for and respond to public health emergencies, 
including acts of terrorism.
    The Committee commends HHS for its efforts to enhance the 
Nation's capacity to respond to the threat of deliberate 
bioterrorism attacks as well as the threat of infectious 
diseases. Critical to responding to such threats is the 
availability of effective biologic drugs and vaccines. Because 
of the considerable capital necessary and the uncertainty of 
the commercial market for public health and biodefense 
biologics, implementing a public-private partnership to develop 
and manufacture such drugs and vaccines may provide that 
capacity in the most cost-effective manner. The Committee 
requests that the Secretary study the feasibility of such a 
plan and report back to the Committee with the results of that 
study before next year's budget hearings.
    Hospital Preparedness.--The Committee's recommendation 
includes $426,000,000 for hospital preparedness grants, the 
same as the budget request. The fiscal year 2009 comparable 
level is $393,585,000. The program provides funding to States 
and localities to enhance hospital preparedness to respond to 
public health emergencies. The recommendation is consistent 
with the fiscal year 2009 budget proposal to align Federal and 
State funding cycles.
    Advanced Research and Development.--The Committee has 
included bill language, proposed by the administration, to 
transfer $305,000,000 from the Project BioShield Special 
Reserve Fund advance appropriations provided in the Department 
of Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2004 to fund Advanced 
Research and Development. The fiscal year 2009 comparable 
amount was $275,000,000. The Committee encourages BARDA to 
invest greater amounts in promising clinical diagnostic 
technologies so that the Nation can limit the catastrophic 
effects of any pandemic by immediate and accurate triage of 
potentially sick individuals at ports, borders, schools, 
hospitals, clinics, and all other points of care and entry.
    Transfer of Project BioShield Funding.--The Committee has 
included bill language, proposed by the administration, to 
transfer all remaining balances from the Project BioShield 
Strategic Reserve Fund [SRF] from the Department of Homeland 
Security [DHS] to HHS. The Committee expects that HHS will 
continue to work with DHS to ensure a coordinated approach to 
the acquisition of medical countermeasures. The Department of 
Homeland Security Appropriations Act appropriated 
$5,592,000,000 to DHS in fiscal year 2004 for the Project 
BioShield SRF to procure and stockpile emergency medical 
countermeasures against a bioterrorism event. The funds are 
available thru fiscal year 2013.
    The Committee is concerned that development of promising 
medical countermeasures intended to protect first responders 
and the general population from the dangers of exposure to 
radiation following a nuclear or dirty bomb radiological event 
is being delayed because the private investor market fears the 
lack of a long-term and stable Government market. The Committee 
recognizes that both HHS and DOD have made significant 
investment in the development of these medical countermeasures, 
but little is being done to encourage private investment in 
these products. The Committee urges the Secretary to work with 
the private investor market so that they better understand the 
Department's plans for Project BioShield funding.
    Other Activities.--The Committee recommendation includes 
the following amounts for the following activities within the 
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and 
Response:
  --Operations/Preparedness and Emergency Operations--
        $43,412,000;
  --National Disaster Medical System--$56,037,000;
  --Bioshield Management--$22,364,000;
  --Medical Countermeasures Dispensing--$10,000,000. Funding 
        will support the development of a ``first strike'' 
        capability for direct residential delivery of medical 
        countermeasures using the U.S. Postal Service;
  --Global Medicine, Science, and Public Health--$8,748,000; 
        and
  --Policy, Strategic Planning and Communications--$4,367,000.

Office of the Assistant Secretary for Resources and Technology

    The Committee recommendation includes $40,000,000 for 
information technology cyber-security. The administration 
requested $50,000,000. These funds will build on work started 
in fiscal year 2009 with the $50,000,000 for IT security in HHS 
provided in the Recovery Act.

Office of Public Health and Science

    The Committee recommendation includes $12,581,000 for the 
medical reserve corps program, the same as the administration 
request.

Office of the Secretary

    Pandemic Influenza Preparedness.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $354,167,000 for pandemic influenza 
preparedness activities, the same as the administration 
request. Funds are available until expended for a variety of 
activities including purchase of pre-pandemic vaccine for 
stockpiling, vaccine development, the purchase of antivirals 
and the research and development of diagnostic tests. The 
Committee requests monthly reports updating the status of 
actions taken and funds obligated for these no-year funds.
    The Committee continues to strongly support efforts to 
strengthen the Federal Government's ability to respond to 
pandemic influenza. The Committee has not specified how these 
no-year funds are to be used, and is broadly supportive of 
plans for vaccine development and purchase, antiviral 
procurement, and research and development of diagnostics. 
However, the Committee encourages HHS to identify and support 
new technologies that might have the potential to enhance our 
response to a pandemic, and to be open to using the provided 
flexibility to make strategic investments in these potentially 
paradigm shifting technologies.
    The Committee again encourages HHS and CDC to continue to 
support public and professional education, media awareness, and 
outreach programs related to the annual flu vaccine. The 
Committee strongly encourages CDC and HHS to aggressively 
implement initiatives for increasing influenza vaccine demand 
to match the increased domestic vaccine production and supply 
resulting from pandemic preparedness funding. Developing a 
sustainable business model for vaccine production will go a 
long way toward making vaccine available when needed.
    The Committee notes that the Department has reached its 
goal of purchasing 50 million courses of antiviral drugs for 
the Federal portion of the antiviral stockpile. The Committee 
is concerned that States have only purchased 22 million 
courses, falling short of the goal of achieving State 
stockpiles of 31 million courses. The Committee also notes that 
some States have expressed concerns that the effectiveness of 
antiviral treatment may be compromised by the development of 
resistance by the pathogen. The Committee urges the Department 
to re-examine the concept of shared responsibility in light of 
State gaps in antiviral stockpiling and to reassess what is 
currently stockpiled in light of recent research on combination 
therapy.
    The Committee understands that reusable protective masks 
that kill, on contact, viruses such as H1N1, are available in 
both adult and children's sizes. The Committee further 
understands that masks presently in the stockpile must be 
changed four times a day whereas the reusable masks can be used 
up to 28 days. The Committee requests that HHS report back to 
the Committee within 60 days of enactment of this act on (1) 
the current number of masks in the stockpile and (2) whether 
the Department has investigated the value of stockpiling 
reusable masks.
    Parklawn Replacement.--The Committee has included 
$69,585,000 to support build-out costs for the Parklawn 
Building replacement and relocation expenses, as well as 
repositioning HHS within the Parklawn Building under a short-
term lease extension.
    Office of Security and Strategic Information.--The 
Committee has included $4,893,000 for the Office of Security 
and Strategic Information.

                           General Provisions

    The Committee recommendation continues a provision placing 
a $50,000 ceiling on official representation expenses (sec. 
201).
    The Committee recommendation continues a provision which 
limits the assignment of certain public health personnel (sec. 
202).
    The Committee recommendation continues a provision limiting 
the use of certain grant funds to pay individuals more than an 
annual rate of executive level I (sec. 203).
    The Committee recommendation continues a provision 
restricting the Secretary's use of taps for program evaluation 
activities unless a report is submitted to the Appropriations 
Committees of the House and Senate on the proposed use of funds 
(sec. 204).
    The Committee recommendation continues a provision 
authorizing the transfer of up to 2.4 percent of Public Health 
Service funds for evaluation activities (sec. 205).
    The Committee recommendation continues a provision 
restricting transfers of appropriated funds and requires a 15-
day notification to both the House and Senate Appropriations 
Committees (sec. 206).
    The Committee recommendation continues a provision 
permitting the transfer of up to 3 percent of AIDS funds among 
Institutes and Centers by the Director of NIH and the Director 
of the Office of AIDS Research at NIH (sec. 207).
    The Committee recommendation retains language which 
requires that the use of AIDS research funds be determined 
jointly by the Director of the National Institutes of Health 
and the Director of the Office of AIDS Research and that those 
funds be allocated directly to the Office of AIDS Research for 
distribution to the Institutes and Centers consistent with the 
AIDS research plan (sec. 208).
    The Committee recommendation continues a provision 
regarding requirements for family planning applicants (sec. 
209).
    The Committee recommendation retains language which states 
that no provider services under title X of the PHS Act may be 
exempt from State laws regarding child abuse (sec. 210).
    The Committee recommendation retains language which 
restricts the use of funds to carry out the Medicare Advantage 
Program if the Secretary denies participation to an otherwise 
eligible entity (sec. 211).
    The Committee recommendation retains language which 
prohibits the Secretary from withholding substance abuse 
treatment funds (sec. 212).
    The Committee recommendation modifies a provision which 
facilitates the expenditure of funds for international health 
activities (sec. 213).
    The Committee recommendation continues a provision 
authorizing the Director of the National Institutes of Health 
to enter into certain transactions to carry out research in 
support of the NIH Common Fund (sec. 214).
    The Committee continues a provision that permits the 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for 
Toxic Substances and Disease Registry to transfer funds that 
are available for Individual Learning Accounts to ``Disease 
Control, Research, and Training'' (sec. 215).
    The Committee recommendation includes bill language 
allowing use of funds to continue operating the Council on 
Graduate Medical Education (sec. 216).
    The Committee recommendation continues a provision 
permitting the National Institutes of Health to use up to 
$2,500,000 per project for improvements and repairs of 
facilities (sec. 217).
    The Committee recommendation includes a provision that 
transfers funds from NIH to HRSA and AHRQ, to be used for 
National Research Service Awards (sec. 218).
    The Committee recommendation modifies a provision 
concerning conflicts of interest among extramural investigators 
receiving grants from the National Institutes of Health (sec. 
219).

                               TITLE III

                        DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

                    Education for the Disadvantaged

Appropriations, 2009\1\................................. $28,760,086,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................  16,431,132,000
House allowance.........................................  15,938,215,000
Committee recommendation................................  15,891,132,000

\1\Includes $13,000,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$15,891,132,000 for education for the disadvantaged. The budget 
request was $16,431,132,000. The fiscal year 2009 appropriation 
was $28,760,086,000, including $13,000,000,000 available in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 [ARRA].
    The programs in the Education for the Disadvantaged account 
help ensure that poor and low-achieving children are not left 
behind in the Nation's effort to raise the academic performance 
of all children and youth. Funds appropriated in this account 
primarily support activities in the 2010-2011 school year.

Grants to Local Educational Agencies

    Title I grants to local educational agencies [LEAs] provide 
supplemental education funding, especially in high-poverty 
areas, for local programs that provide extra academic support 
to help raise the achievement of eligible students or, in the 
case of schoolwide programs, help all students in high-poverty 
schools meet challenging State academic standards.
    The Committee recommends $13,792,401,000 for this program. 
The budget request was $12,992,401,000, a cut of $1,500,000,000 
below the amount in the fiscal year 2009 education 
appropriations bill. Counting the $10,000,000,000 provided for 
title I grants to LEAs in the ARRA, the total fiscal year 2009 
appropriation was $24,492,401,000.
    The Committee is well aware of concerns that maintaining or 
exceeding the fiscal year 2009 level in fiscal year 2011 could 
be more difficult if funding drops in the fiscal year 2010 
appropriations bill. But the Committee notes that the record-
high increase for title I in the ARRA greatly mitigates the 
need for title I funding in fiscal year 2010. While additional 
funding in this bill could help ease the budgetary pressures in 
fiscal year 2011, that alone is not a sufficient reason to 
fully restore the administration's proposed cut, especially 
when districts face many other immediate needs besides title I, 
such as school building repairs.
    Restoring or exceeding the base amount for title I in the 
fiscal year 2009 education appropriations bill will be one of 
the Committee's highest priorities in fiscal year 2011.
    Title I grants are distributed through four formulas: 
basic, concentration, targeted, and education finance incentive 
grant [EFIG].
    For title I basic grants, including up to $4,000,000 
transferred to the Census Bureau for poverty updates, the 
Committee recommends an appropriation of $5,897,946,000. The 
budget request was $5,097,946,000, and the fiscal year 2009 
appropriation was $6,597,946,000.
    For concentration grants, the Committee recommends 
$1,365,031,000, the same as the budget request and the fiscal 
year 2009 level.
    The Committee recommends $3,264,712,000, the same as the 
budget request and the amount in the fiscal year 2009 education 
appropriations bill, for grants through the targeted formula. 
Including funds provided in the ARRA, the total fiscal year 
2009 appropriation was $8,264,712,000.
    The Committee recommends $3,264,712,000, the same as the 
budget request and the amount in the fiscal year 2009 education 
appropriations bill, for grants through the EFIG formula. 
Including funds provided in the ARRA, the total fiscal year 
2009 appropriation was $8,264,712,000.
    Of the funds available for title I grants to LEAs, up to 
$4,000,000 shall be available on October 1, 2009, not less than 
$2,947,225,000 will become available on July 1, 2010, and 
$10,841,176,000 will become available on October 1, 2010. The 
funds that become available on July 1, 2010, and October 1, 
2010, will remain available for obligation through September 
30, 2011.

William F. Goodling Even Start Family Literacy Program

    The Committee recommends no funding for the Even Start 
program, as did the budget request. The fiscal year 2009 
appropriation was $66,454,000.
    The Even Start program provides grants for family literacy 
programs that serve disadvantaged families with children under 
8 years of age and adults eligible for services under the Adult 
Education and Family Literacy Act.

School Improvement Grants

    The Committee recommendation includes $545,633,000 for the 
School Improvement Grants program. This is the same amount that 
was provided in the fiscal year 2009 education appropriations 
bill; counting the $3,000,000,000 provided in the ARRA, the 
total fiscal year 2009 appropriation was $3,545,633,000. The 
budget request was $1,515,633,000.
    The Committee requests that the Department assist States in 
encouraging LEAs to use their school improvement funds on those 
programs that are proven to be effective in rigorous research.
    The Committee includes bill language that makes two key 
changes to the program. First, the language specifies that 
States that receive School Improvement Grants funds must spend 
40 percent of their allocations on school improvement 
activities in middle and high schools in that State, unless the 
State educational agency determines that all middle and high 
schools can be served with a lesser amount.
    Second, the language expands the number of schools that may 
receive funds through the program. The program currently serves 
only those schools that receive assistance under part A of 
title I and that have not made adequate yearly progress for at 
least 2 years. The bill language allows schools to be eligible 
if they are title I-eligible and have not made adequate yearly 
progress for at least 2 years or are in the State's lowest 
quintile of performance based on proficiency rates.
    These changes apply to School Improvement Grants funds in 
both the fiscal year 2010 appropriations bill and the ARRA.

Early Childhood Grants

    The Committee recommends no funding for Early Childhood 
Grants, a new program proposed by the administration. The 
budget request was $500,000,000.
    This program would provide formula grants to States based 
on their proportional share of title I, part A funds received 
by their LEAs. States would then provide matching grants to 
LEAs that used the ARRA title I funds for early childhood 
programs.

Early Learning Challenge Fund

    The Committee recommends no funding for the Early Learning 
Challenge Fund, a new program proposed by the administration. 
The budget request was $300,000,000.
    This program would provide grants to States for the 
development of a statewide infrastructure of integrated early 
learning supports and services for children, from birth through 
age 5.
    The Committee is aware that the administration is seeking 
mandatory funding for this program through another legislative 
vehicle, and has therefore decided not to recommend funding for 
this purpose in this appropriations bill.

Gulf Coast Recovery Grants

    The Committee includes $30,000,000, the same as the budget 
request, for Gulf Coast Recovery Grants. This new program will 
provide competitive awards to LEAs located in counties (or 
parishes) in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas that were 
designated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency as 
counties eligible for individual assistance because of damage 
caused by Hurricanes Katrina, Ike, or Gustav. Funds will be 
used to improve education through such activities as replacing 
instructional materials and equipment; paying teacher 
incentives; constructing, modernizing, or renovating school 
buildings; beginning or expanding Advanced Placement or other 
rigorous instructional curricula; starting or expanding charter 
schools; and supporting after-school or extended learning time 
activities.

Early Reading First

    The Committee recommendation does not include any funds for 
the Early Reading First program. The budget request was 
$162,549,000 and the fiscal year 2009 appropriation was 
$112,549,000.
    Early Reading First provides competitive grants to school 
districts and nonprofit groups to support activities in 
existing preschool programs that are designed to enhance the 
verbal skills, phonological awareness, letter knowledge, pre-
reading skills, and early language development of children ages 
3 through 5.
    Rather than fund two separate literacy programs--one 
focusing on preschool and the other focusing on grades K-12--
the Committee believes it makes more sense to fund a single, 
comprehensive program that addresses the needs of children from 
birth through high school. Therefore, the Committee 
recommendation eliminates Early Reading First and shifts this 
funding to a revamped Striving Readers program, described 
below.

Striving Readers

    The Committee recommends $262,920,000 for a revamped 
Striving Readers initiative. The budget request was 
$370,371,000 and the fiscal year 2009 level was $35,371,000.
    This program currently supports grants to develop, 
implement, and evaluate reading interventions for middle or 
high school students reading significantly below grade level. 
The budget request proposed adding a new component to the 
program, Early Literacy Grants.
    The Committee has been highly aware of the need for a new 
approach to Federal literacy programs since the failure of 
Reading First, which was mismanaged in the early years of the 
program and produced disappointing results in an evaluation 
overseen by the Institute of Education Sciences. Therefore, the 
Committee includes bill language that authorizes a new 
comprehensive program to advance literacy skills, including 
language development, reading and writing. Instead of multiple, 
discrete programs that are targeted to children of different 
ages, this new program will serve all students, including 
English language learners and students with disabilities, from 
birth through grade 12.
    Of the total amount, $10,000,000 will be distributed by 
formula to States to create or support a State literacy team. 
After funds are set aside for schools funded by the Bureau of 
Indian Affairs and for the outlying areas, up to 5 percent of 
the remaining funds may be used for national activities, and 
the rest would be used for competitive grants to State 
educational agencies. States will be required to distribute not 
less than 95 percent of their funds as subgrants to LEAs, or in 
the case of early literacy, to LEAs or other entities providing 
early childhood care and education. State subgrants must be 
allocated as follows: at least 15 percent to serve children 
from birth through age 5, 40 percent to serve students in 
kindergarten through grade 5, and 40 percent to serve students 
in middle and high school, through grade 12.

Improving Literacy Through School Libraries

    The Committee recommends $19,145,000, the same as the 
budget request and the fiscal year 2009 appropriation, for the 
Improving Literacy Through School Libraries program.
    This program provides competitive awards to LEAs to acquire 
school library media resources, including books and advanced 
technology; facilitate resource-sharing networks among schools 
and school libraries; provide professional development for 
school library media specialists; and provide students with 
access to school libraries during nonschool hours.

Migrant Education Program

    The Committee recommends $394,771,000 for the migrant 
education program. This amount is the same as the budget 
request and the fiscal year 2009 appropriation.
    The title I migrant education program authorizes grants to 
State educational agencies for programs to meet the special 
educational needs of the children of migrant agricultural 
workers and fishermen. This appropriation also supports 
activities to improve interstate and intrastate coordination of 
migrant education programs, as well as identifying and 
improving services to the migrant student population.

Neglected and Delinquent

    The Committee recommends $50,427,000 for the title I 
neglected and delinquent program. This amount is the same as 
the budget request and the fiscal year 2009 appropriation.
    This program provides financial assistance to State 
educational agencies for education services to neglected and 
delinquent children and youth in State-run institutions and for 
juveniles in adult correctional institutions. States are 
authorized to set aside at least 15 percent, but not more than 
30 percent, of their neglected and delinquent funds to help 
students in State-operated institutions make the transition 
into locally operated programs and to support the successful 
re-entry of youth offenders, who are age 20 or younger and have 
received a secondary school diploma or its recognized 
equivalent.

Evaluation

    The Committee recommends $9,167,000, the same as the budget 
request and the fiscal year 2009 appropriation, for the 
evaluation of title I programs.
    Evaluation funds are used to support large-scale national 
surveys that examine how the title I program is contributing to 
student academic achievement. Funds also are used to evaluate 
State assessment and accountability systems and analyze the 
effectiveness of educational programs supported with title I 
funds.

High School Graduation Initiative

    The Committee recommends $50,000,000, the same as the 
budget request, for a High School Graduation Initiative under 
title I, part H of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.
    This program provides competitive grants to LEAs or State 
educational agencies to implement effective high school 
graduation and reentry strategies in schools and districts that 
serve students in grades 6 through 12 and have annual school 
dropout rates that are above their State's average.

Special Programs for Migrant Students

    These programs include the High School Equivalency Program 
[HEP] and College Assistance Migrant Program [CAMP], which were 
funded separately in the fiscal year 2009 appropriations bill 
at $18,682,000 and $15,486,000, respectively, for a total of 
$34,168,000. The Committee recommends $36,668,000, the same as 
the budget request, in fiscal year 2010.
    The Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008, which 
reauthorized these programs, added a new provision allowing the 
Department to reserve up to one-half of 1 percent of the funds 
appropriated between the two programs for outreach, technical 
assistance, and professional development activities. In 
addition, under the reauthorization, if the total amount 
appropriated is below $40,000,000, the remaining funds are to 
be distributed between the two programs in the same proportion 
as the amounts available for each program the previous year.
    HEP projects are 5-year grants to institutions of higher 
education and other nonprofit organizations to recruit migrant 
students ages 16 and over and provide the academic and support 
services needed to help them obtain a high school equivalency 
certificate and subsequently gain employment, win admission to 
a post-secondary institution or a job-training program, or join 
the military. Projects provide counseling, health services, 
stipends, and placement assistance.
    CAMP projects are 5-year grants to institutions of higher 
education and nonprofit organizations to provide tutoring, 
counseling, and financial assistance to migrant students during 
their first year of post-secondary education.

School Renovation

    The Committee includes $700,000,000 for school renovation, 
a new program, to be allocated under the terms and conditions 
of S. 1121, as introduced in the Senate on May 21, 2009. The 
budget request did not include any funds for this purpose.
    Safe, modern, healthy school buildings are essential to 
creating an environment where students can reach their academic 
potential. Yet too many students in the United States, 
particularly those most at risk of being left behind, attend 
school in facilities that are old, overcrowded and run-down. 
The National Center for Education Statistics reported in 2000 
that the Nation's elementary and secondary schools required 
approximately $127,000,000,000 to repair or upgrade their 
facilities. A 2008 analysis by the American Federation of 
Teachers found that the Nation's school infrastructure needs 
total an estimated $254,600,000,000.
    While the condition of public school buildings is primarily 
a State and local responsibility, the Federal Government can 
and should help, especially when it comes to closing 
disparities between affluent and disadvantaged school 
districts. This program will provide grants for the repair, 
renovation, and construction of elementary and secondary 
schools, including early learning facilities at elementary 
schools. Funding will be allocated by formula to the States, 
which will award the grants competitively. Districts that have 
higher percentages of poor children and/or plan to make use of 
``green'' practices will receive a priority.
    In addition to improving the learning environment for 
students, this program will provide a stimulus to the economy 
by creating jobs in every State for workers in the construction 
industry, as well as architects and engineers. It will also 
spur school districts to make their facilities more 
environmentally friendly and energy-efficient. According to the 
2006 report ``Greening America's Schools: Costs and Benefits,'' 
green schools use an average of 33 percent less energy than 
conventionally built schools, and generate financial savings of 
about $70 per square foot.
    Districts that receive Federal funding will be required to 
provide a local match; States may use a sliding scale for 
poorer communities. This approach has proven enormously 
successful in Iowa. Since 1998, the Iowa Demonstration 
Construction Grant Program has provided $121,000,000 in Federal 
assistance to over 300 school districts for school repair and 
construction. That Federal investment has leveraged more than 
$600,000,000 of additional local funding.

                               Impact Aid

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................  $1,365,718,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   1,265,718,000
House allowance.........................................   1,290,718,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,265,718,000

\1\Includes $100,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,265,718,000 for 
impact aid. This is the same amount as the budget request. The 
fiscal year 2009 appropriation was $1,365,718,000, including 
$100,000,000 available in the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act of 2009.
    Impact aid provides financial assistance to school 
districts for the costs of educating children when enrollments 
and the availability of revenues from local sources have been 
adversely affected by the presence of Federal activities. 
Children who reside on Federal or Indian lands generally 
constitute a financial burden on local school systems because 
these lands do not generate property taxes--a major revenue 
source for elementary and secondary education in most 
communities. In addition, realignments of U.S. military forces 
at bases across the country often lead to influxes of children 
into school districts without producing the new revenues 
required to maintain an appropriate level of education.
    The Committee bill retains language that provides for 
continued eligibility for students affected by the deployment 
or death of their military parent, as long as these children 
still attend the same school district.
    The Committee notes that for some years there have been 
long delays in processing payments in the impact aid program. 
For example, as of mid-July, the fiscal year 2006 payments for 
Federal property still had not yet been finalized. Delays are 
also routine in the construction and payments for children with 
disabilities programs. Such delays exacerbate the fiscal 
problems many federally affected districts already face because 
of budget shortfalls resulting from a decline in State and 
local revenues. The Committee requests an explanation for the 
delays and recommendations on how the payment process can be 
improved in the fiscal year 2011 congressional budget 
justification.
    Basic Support Payments.--The Committee recommends 
$1,128,535,000 for basic support payments. This is the same as 
the fiscal year 2009 level and the budget request. Under this 
statutory formula, payments are made on behalf of all 
categories of federally connected children, with a priority 
placed on making payments first to heavily impacted school 
districts and providing any remaining funds for regular basic 
support payments.
    Payments for Children with Disabilities.--The Committee 
bill includes $48,602,000, the same as the budget request and 
the fiscal year 2009 appropriation, for payments for children 
with disabilities. Under this program, additional payments are 
made for certain federally connected children eligible for 
services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.
    Facilities Maintenance.--The Committee recommends 
$4,864,000, the same as the fiscal year 2009 appropriation and 
the budget request, for facilities maintenance. This activity 
provides funding for emergency repairs and comprehensive 
capital improvements to certain school facilities owned by the 
Department of Education and used by local educational agencies 
to serve federally connected military dependent students. Funds 
appropriated for this purpose are available until expended.
    Construction.--The Committee recommends $17,509,000, the 
same as the budget request, for the construction program. The 
comparable level in fiscal year 2009 was $117,509,000, 
including $100,000,000 available in the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act of 2009. Formula and competitive grants are 
authorized to be awarded to eligible LEAs for emergency repairs 
and modernization of school facilities.
    The fiscal year 2008 and 2009 appropriations for this 
activity stipulated that funds were to be provided on a 
competitive basis only. For fiscal year 2010, the Committee 
recommendation includes bill language that would require all 
construction grants to be awarded on a formula basis.
    Payments for Federal Property.--The Committee recommends 
$66,208,000, the same as the budget request and the fiscal year 
2009 appropriation, for this activity. These payments 
compensate local educational agencies in part for revenue lost 
due to the removal of Federal property from local tax rolls.

                      School Improvement Programs

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................  $6,082,016,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   5,182,181,000
House allowance.........................................   5,244,644,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,197,316,000

\1\Includes $720,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $5,197,316,000 for 
school improvement programs. The budget request was 
$5,182,181,000. The fiscal year 2009 appropriation was 
$6,082,016,000, including $720,000,000 available in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.

State Grants for Improving Teacher Quality

    The Committee recommends $2,947,749,000, the same as the 
budget request and the fiscal year 2009 appropriation, for 
State grants for improving teacher quality.
    The appropriation for this program primarily supports 
activities associated with the 2010-2011 academic year. Of the 
funds provided, $1,266,308,000 will become available on July 1, 
2010, and $1,681,441,000 will become available on October 1, 
2010. These funds will remain available for obligation through 
September 30, 2011.
    States and LEAs may use the funds for a range of activities 
related to the certification, recruitment, professional 
development, and support of teachers and administrators. 
Activities may include reforming teacher certification and 
licensure requirements, addressing alternative routes to State 
certification of teachers, recruiting teachers and principals, 
and implementing teacher mentoring systems, teacher testing, 
merit pay, and merit-based performance systems. These funds may 
also be used by districts to hire teachers to reduce class 
sizes.

Mathematics and Science Partnerships

    The Committee recommends $178,978,000, the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 level and the budget request, for the 
mathematics and science partnerships program. These funds will 
be used to improve the performance of students in the areas of 
math and science by bringing math and science teachers in 
elementary and secondary schools together with scientists, 
mathematicians, and engineers to increase the teachers' 
subject-matter knowledge and improve their teaching skills. The 
Department awards grants to States by a formula based on the 
number of children aged 5 to 17 who are from families with 
incomes below the poverty line. States then are required to 
make grants competitively to eligible partnerships, which must 
include an engineering, math or science department of an 
institution of higher learning and a high-need LEA.

Educational Technology State Grants

    The Committee recommends $100,000,000, the same as the 
budget request, for educational technology State grants. The 
fiscal year 2009 appropriation was $919,872,000, including 
$650,000,000 available from the ARRA.
    The educational technology State grants program supports 
efforts to integrate technology into curricula to improve 
student learning. Funds flow by formula to States and may be 
used for the purchase of hardware and software, teacher 
training on integrating technology into the curriculum, and 
efforts to use technology to improve communication with 
parents, among other related purposes.
    Although the Committee's recommended level is substantially 
below the amount in the fiscal year 2009 education 
appropriations bill, the Committee notes that States are 
expected to have significant educational technology funds 
remaining from the ARRA allocations.
    The Committee bill retains language allowing States to 
award up to 100 percent of their funds competitively.

Supplemental Education Grants

    The Committee recommendation includes $17,687,000, the same 
as the budget request and the fiscal year 2009 appropriation, 
for supplemental education grants to the Republic of Marshall 
Islands and the Federated States of Micronesia. This grant 
program was authorized by the Compact of Free Association 
Amendments Act of 2003. These funds will be transferred from 
the Department of Education to the Secretary of the Interior 
for grants to these entities. The Committee bill includes 
language that allows up to 5 percent to be used by the FSM and 
RMI to purchase oversight and technical assistance, which may 
include reimbursement of the Departments of Labor, Health and 
Human Services, and Education for such services.

21st Century Community Learning Centers

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$1,131,166,000, the same as the budget request and the fiscal 
year 2009 level, for the 21st Century Community Learning 
Centers program.
    Funds are allocated to States by formula, which in turn, 
award at least 95 percent of their allocations to local 
educational agencies, community-based organizations and other 
public and private entities. Grantees use these resources to 
establish or expand community learning centers that provide 
activities offering significant extended learning 
opportunities, such as before- and after-school programs, 
recreational activities, drug and violence prevention, and 
family literacy programs for students and related services to 
their families. Centers must target their services on students 
who attend schools that are eligible to operate a schoolwide 
program under title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education 
Act or serve high percentages of students from low-income 
families.

State Assessments and Enhanced Assessment Instruments

    The Committee recommends $410,732,000 for State assessments 
and enhanced assessment instruments. This is the same amount as 
the fiscal year 2009 appropriation and the budget request.
    This program has two components. The first provides formula 
grants to States to pay the cost of developing standards and 
assessments required by the No Child Left Behind Act. The 
Committee provides $400,000,000, the same as the fiscal year 
2009 level and the budget request, for this purpose.
    Under the second component--grants for enhanced assessment 
instruments--appropriations in excess of the State assessment 
program are used for a competitive grant program designed to 
support efforts by States to improve the quality and fairness 
of their assessment systems. The Committee recommendation for 
the second component is $10,732,000, the same as the budget 
request and the fiscal year 2009 appropriation.
    The Committee urges the Department to continue to place a 
high priority on grant applications that aim to improve the 
quality of State assessments for students with disabilities and 
students with limited English proficiency, and to ensure the 
most accurate means of measuring their performance on these 
assessments.

Javits Gifted and Talented Education

    The Committee recommends $7,463,000, the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 appropriation, for the Javits Gifted and Talented 
Students Education Program. The budget request included no 
funds for this purpose. Funds are used for awards to State and 
local educational agencies, institutions of higher education, 
and other public and private agencies for research, 
demonstration, and training activities designed to enhance the 
capability of elementary and secondary schools to meet the 
special educational needs of gifted and talented students.

Foreign Language Assistance

    The Committee recommends $28,000,000 for the foreign 
language assistance program. The comparable funding level for 
fiscal year 2009 was $26,328,000, the same as the budget 
request.
    Funds from this program support competitive grants to 
increase the quality and quantity of foreign language 
instruction. At least 75 percent of the appropriation must be 
used to expand foreign language education in the elementary 
grades. The Committee has included bill language that prohibits 
foreign language assistance program funds from being used for 
the foreign language incentive program. The Committee also 
includes bill language that sets aside $9,729,000 for 5-year 
grants to LEAs, in partnership with institutions of higher 
education, for the establishment or expansion of articulated 
programs of study in critical-need languages. The amount set 
aside for this purpose in fiscal year 2009 was $7,360,000.
    The Committee is concerned that this program is unavailable 
to the poorest schools because grant recipients must provide a 
50 percent match from non-Federal sources. The Committee, 
therefore, strongly urges the Secretary to use his ability to 
waive the matching requirement for qualifying schools and to 
increase awareness of this accommodation among the affected 
school population.

Education for Homeless Children and Youth

    For carrying out education activities authorized by title 
VII, subtitle B of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance 
Act, the Committee recommends $65,427,000, the same as the 
budget request. The fiscal year 2009 appropriation was 
$135,427,000, including $70,000,000 provided in the ARRA.
    This program provides assistance to each State to support 
an office of the coordinator of education for homeless children 
and youth, to develop and implement State plans for educating 
homeless children, and to make subgrants to LEAs to support the 
education of those children. Grants are made to States based on 
the total that each State receives in title I grants to LEAs.
    Under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Children and Youths 
Program, State educational agencies must ensure that homeless 
children and youth have equal access to the same free public 
education, including a public preschool education, as is 
provided to other children and youth.

Training and Advisory Services

    For training and advisory services authorized by title IV 
of the Civil Rights Act, the Committee recommends $6,989,000, 
the same as the budget request. The fiscal year 2009 
appropriation was $9,489,000.
    The funds provided will support awards to operate the 10 
regional equity assistance centers [EACs]. Each EAC provides 
services to school districts upon request. Activities include 
disseminating information on successful practices and legal 
requirements related to nondiscrimination on the basis of race, 
color, sex, or national origin in education programs.

Education for Native Hawaiians

    For programs for the education of Native Hawaiians, the 
Committee recommends $34,315,000. The budget request was 
$33,315,000, the same amount as the fiscal year 2009 
appropriation. The Committee bill includes language requiring 
that at least $1,500,000 of the funds be used for construction 
and renovation of facilities at public schools serving a 
predominantly Native Hawaiian student body.
    The Committee bill includes language stipulating that 
$1,500,000 shall be used for a grant to the Center of 
Excellence at the University of Hawaii School of Law, for the 
Native Hawaiian Law School Center of Excellence. This 
repository houses a compilation of historical and cultural 
documents that facilitates preservation and examination of laws 
of great significance to Native Hawaiians.
    The Committee bill also includes language stipulating that 
$500,000 shall be used under title VIII, part Z of the Higher 
Education Act for the Henry K. Giugni Memorial Archives at the 
University of Hawaii.

Alaska Native Educational Equity

    The Committee recommends $33,315,000, the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 level and the budget request, for the Alaska 
Native educational equity assistance program.
    These funds address the severe educational handicaps of 
Alaska Native schoolchildren. Funds are used for the 
development of supplemental educational programs to benefit 
Alaska Natives. The Committee bill includes language that 
allows funding provided by this program to be used for 
construction. The Committee expects the Department to use some 
of these funds to address the construction needs of rural 
schools.

Rural Education

    The Committee recommends $178,382,000 for rural education 
programs. The budget request was $173,382,000, the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 appropriation.
    The Committee expects that rural education funding will be 
equally divided between the Small, Rural Schools Achievement 
Program, which provides funds to LEAs that serve a small number 
of students, and the Rural and Low-Income Schools Program, 
which provides funds to LEAs that serve concentrations of poor 
students, regardless of the number of students served.

Comprehensive Centers

    The Committee recommends $57,113,000, the same as the 
budget request and the fiscal year 2009 level, for the 
comprehensive centers program.
    These funds have provided support to a network of 21 
comprehensive centers that are operated by research 
organizations, agencies, institutions of higher education or 
partnerships thereof, and provide training and technical 
assistance on various issues to States, LEAs, and schools as 
identified through needs assessments undertaken in each region. 
The system also currently includes 16 regional centers, which 
are charged with providing intensive technical assistance to 
State educational agencies to increase their capacity to assist 
LEAs and schools with meeting the goals of No Child Left 
Behind, and 5 content centers, which are organized by topic 
area.

                            Indian Education

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $122,282,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     122,282,000
House allowance.........................................     132,282,000
Committee recommendation................................     122,282,000

    The Committee recommends $122,282,000, the same as the 
budget request and the fiscal year 2009 appropriation, for 
Indian Education programs.

Grants to Local Education Agencies

    For grants to local educational agencies, the Committee 
recommends $99,331,000, the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request.
    These funds provide financial support to elementary and 
secondary school programs that serve Indian students, including 
preschool children. Funds are awarded on a formula basis to 
local educational agencies, schools supported and operated by 
the Department of the Interior/Bureau of Indian Education, and 
in some cases directly to Indian tribes.

Special Programs for Indian Children

    The Committee recommends $19,060,000, the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request, for 
special programs for Indian children.
    Funds are used for demonstration grants to improve Indian 
student achievement through early childhood education and 
college preparation programs, and for professional development 
grants for training Indians who are preparing to begin careers 
in teaching and school administration.

National Activities

    The Committee recommends $3,891,000, the same as the budget 
request and the fiscal year 2009 appropriation, for national 
activities. Funds will be used to expand efforts to improve 
research, evaluation, and data collection on the status and 
effectiveness of Indian education programs.

                    State Fiscal Stabilization Fund

Appropriations, 2009\1\................................. $53,600,000,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     100,000,000
House allowance.........................................       3,000,000
Committee recommendation................................................

\1\Funds provided in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 
(Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee recommendation does not include any funds for 
the State Fiscal Stabilization Fund. The budget request was 
$100,000,000 and the fiscal year 2009 appropriation was 
$53,600,000,000, all of which was made available in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act [ARRA] of 2009.
    Funding in the budget request would be used to continue the 
What Works and Innovation Fund, which was created in the ARRA. 
This fund provides grants to LEAs, as well as partnerships 
between nonprofit organizations and LEAs or schools, to support 
extraordinary achievement, demonstrated success, and promising 
innovation, and to help the grantees expand their work and 
serve as models of best practices. The Committee believes that 
the $650,000,000 provided in the ARRA for this purpose makes 
additional funding in fiscal year 2010 unnecessary.

                       Innovation and Improvement

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................  $1,196,425,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   1,439,949,000
House allowance.........................................   1,347,363,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,234,787,000

\1\Includes $200,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (Public Law 111-5) funding.

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,234,787,000 for 
programs within the innovation and improvement account. The 
budget request was $1,439,949,000. The fiscal year 2009 
appropriation was $1,196,425,000, including $200,000,000 
available in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009.

Troops-to-Teachers

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $14,389,000, 
the same as the fiscal year 2009 appropriation and the budget 
request, to support the Defense Department's Troops-to-Teachers 
program.
    This program helps recruit and prepare retiring and former 
military personnel to become highly qualified teachers serving 
in high-poverty school districts. The Secretary of Education 
transfers program funds to the Department of Defense for the 
Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support to 
provide assistance, including stipends or bonuses, to eligible 
members of the armed forces so that they can obtain teacher 
certification or licensing. In addition, the program helps 
these individuals find employment in a school.

Transition to Teaching

    The Committee recommends $43,707,000, the same as the 
budget request and the fiscal year 2009 appropriation, for the 
Transition to Teaching program.
    This program provides grants to help support efforts to 
recruit, train, and place nontraditional teaching candidates 
into teaching positions and to support them during their first 
years in the classroom. In particular, this program is intended 
to attract mid-career professionals and recent college 
graduates. Program participants are placed in high-need schools 
in high-need LEAs.

National Writing Project

    The Committee recommends $27,000,000 for the National 
Writing Project. The budget request was $24,291,000, the same 
as the fiscal year 2009 level.
    These funds are awarded to the National Writing Project, a 
nonprofit organization that supports and promotes K-16 teacher 
training programs in the effective teaching of writing.

Teaching of Traditional American History

    The Committee recommends $118,952,000 for the teaching of 
traditional American history program. This is the same amount 
as the fiscal year 2009 level and the budget request.
    This program supports competitive grants to LEAs, and funds 
may be used only to undertake activities that are related to 
American history, and cannot be used for social studies 
coursework. Grant awards are designed to augment the quality of 
American history instruction and to provide professional 
development activities and teacher education in the area of 
American history. Grants are awarded for 3 years, with 2 
additional years allowed for grantees that are performing 
effectively.
    The Committee bill retains language that allows the 
Department to reserve up to 3 percent of funds appropriated for 
this program for national activities.

School Leadership

    The Committee recommends $29,220,000, the same as the 
budget request, for the school leadership program. The fiscal 
year 2009 level was $19,220,000. The program provides 
competitive grants to assist high-need LEAs to recruit and 
train principals and assistant principals through activities 
such as professional development and training programs. The 
Committee continues to recognize the critical role that 
principals and assistant principals play in creating an 
environment that fosters effective teaching and high academic 
achievement for students.

Advanced Credentialing

    The Committee recommends $10,649,000 for the advanced 
credentialing program. This is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
appropriation and the budget request.
    The Committee includes bill language directing all of the 
funding for this program to the National Board for Professional 
Teaching Standards. Funds available assist the board's work in 
providing financial support to States for teachers applying for 
certification, increasing the number of minority teachers 
seeking certification and developing outreach programs about 
the advanced certification program.

Teach for America

    The Committee recommends $20,000,000 for Teach for America 
[TFA], a nonprofit organization that recruits outstanding 
recent college graduates who commit to teach for 2 years in 
underserved communities. The budget request was $15,000,000. 
The fiscal year 2009 appropriation was $14,893,500, funded 
through the Fund for the Improvement of Education.
    In 2008, the Higher Education Opportunity Act amended the 
Higher Education Act of 1965 to include authority for the Teach 
for America program. The purpose of the program is to enable 
TFA to implement and expand its program for recruiting, 
selecting, training, and supporting new teachers. With these 
funds, the grantee is required to: (1) provide highly qualified 
teachers to serve in high-need local educational agencies in 
urban and rural communities; (2) pay the costs of recruiting, 
selecting, training, and supporting new teachers; and (3) serve 
a substantial number and percentage of underserved students.

Charter Schools

    The Committee recommends a total of $256,031,000 for the 
support of charter schools. The fiscal year 2009 appropriation 
was $216,031,000. The budget request was $268,031,000.
    The Committee allocates the recommended funding as follows: 
$232,949,000 for charter school grants, $14,782,000 for the 
State facilities program, and $8,300,000 for the credit 
enhancement for charter schools facilities program.
    The budget request includes $244,949,000 for charter school 
grants, and the same amount as the Committee recommendation for 
the latter two programs.
    The Charter Schools grants program supports the planning, 
development, and initial implementation of charter schools. 
State educational agencies that have the authority under State 
law to approve charter schools are eligible to compete for 
grants. If an eligible SEA does not participate, charter 
schools from the State may apply directly to the Secretary.
    Under the State facilities program, the Department awards 
5-year competitive grants to States that operate per-pupil 
facilities aid programs for charters schools. Federal funds are 
used to match State-funded programs in order to provide charter 
schools with additional resources for charter school facilities 
financing.
    The credit enhancement program provides assistance to help 
charter schools meet their facility needs. Funds are provided 
on a competitive basis to public and nonprofit entities, to 
leverage non-Federal funds that help charter schools obtain 
school facilities through purchase, lease, renovation, and 
construction.
    The Committee includes new bill language that allows the 
Secretary to reserve funds to make multiple awards to charter 
management organizations and other entities for the replication 
and expansion of successful charter school models.

Voluntary Public School Choice

    The Committee recommends $25,819,000, the same as the 
budget request and the fiscal year 2009 appropriation, for the 
voluntary public school choice program.
    This program supports efforts by States and school 
districts to establish or expand state- or district-wide public 
school choice programs, especially for parents whose children 
attend low-performing public schools.

Magnet Schools Assistance

    The Committee recommends $104,829,000, the same as the 
budget request and the fiscal year 2009 appropriation, for the 
magnet schools assistance program.
    This program supports grants to local educational agencies 
to establish and operate magnet schools that are part of a 
court-ordered or federally approved voluntary desegregation 
plan. Magnet schools are designed to attract substantial 
numbers of students from different social, economic, ethnic, 
and racial backgrounds. Grantees may use funds for planning and 
promotional materials, teacher salaries, and the purchase of 
computers and other educational materials and equipment.

Fund for the Improvement of Education

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $200,209,000 
for the Fund for the Improvement of Education [FIE]. The fiscal 
year 2009 appropriation was $250,370,000, and the budget 
request was $188,836,000.
    Within programs of national significance, the Committee 
includes bill language requiring that $1,000,000 be used for a 
clearinghouse that would provide information on planning, 
designing, financing, building, maintaining, and operating 
safe, healthy, high-performance educational facilities. The 
Committee also provides $6,000,000 for Reach Out and Read, a 
literacy program; $500,000 for the National History Day 
program; $5,000,000 for Communities in Schools, a dropout 
prevention program; $5,000,000 for full-service community 
schools demonstration grants; and additional funding for data 
quality and evaluation initiatives and peer review.
    The Committee also includes $5,000,000 for other activities 
that the Secretary may use at his discretion. The budget 
request included $5,000,000 for digital professional 
development grants, $37,000,000 for history, civics and 
government grants, and $5,000,000 for readiness readiness 
grants, while proposing to eliminate several related existing 
programs, such as Close Up, Civic Education, and Ready to 
Teach. Since the Committee rejected most of those proposed 
eliminations, it does not provide funding specifically for any 
of the three competitive grant programs described in this 
paragraph above. However, the $5,000,000 provided for other 
activities may be used for those purposes if the Secretary 
wishes.
    Within the total amount for FIE, the Committee 
recommendation also includes funding for several separately 
authorized programs.
    The Committee recommends $25,000,000 for the contract to 
Reading Is Fundamental Inc. [RIF] to provide reading-motivation 
activities. RIF, a private nonprofit organization, helps 
prepare young children and motivate older children to read, 
through activities including the distribution of books. The 
budget request was $24,803,000, the same as the fiscal year 
2009 appropriation.
    The Committee recommends $10,700,000, the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 appropriation, for the Ready to Teach program. 
The budget request did not include any funds for this program, 
but set aside $5,000,000 for digital professional development 
grants within FIE, as described above. Ready to Teach 
encompasses funding for competitive awards to one or more 
nonprofit entities, for the purpose of continuing to develop 
telecommunications-based programs to improve teacher quality in 
core areas. It also includes digital educational programming 
grants, which encourage community partnerships among local 
public television stations, State and local educational 
agencies, and other institutions to develop and distribute 
digital instructional content based on State and local 
standards.
    The Committee recommends $9,000,000 for the Education 
through Cultural and Historical Organizations [ECHO] Act of 
2001. The budget request was $8,754,000, the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 appropriation. Programs authorized under ECHO provide 
a broad range of educational, cultural, and job training 
opportunities for students from communities in Alaska, Hawaii, 
Massachusetts, and Mississippi.
    The Committee has included $40,000,000 for arts in 
education. The budget request was $38,166,000, the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 appropriation. The recommendation includes 
$9,200,000 for VSA arts, a national organization that supports 
the involvement of persons with disabilities in arts programs, 
and $6,838,000 for the John F. Kennedy Center for the 
Performing Arts. Additional funds are provided for professional 
development, model arts programs and evaluation activities.
    The Committee recommends $39,254,000, the same as the 
budget request and the fiscal year 2009 appropriation, for 
parental information and resource centers, which provide 
training, information, and support to parents, State and local 
education agencies, and other organizations that carry out 
parent education and family involvement programs.
    The Committee includes $2,423,000, the same as the budget 
request and the fiscal year 2009 appropriation, for the women's 
educational equity program. This program supports projects that 
assist in the local implementation of gender equity policies 
and practices.
    The Committee recommendation includes $1,447,000 for 
activities authorized by the Excellence in Economic Education 
Act. This is the same amount as the budget request and the 
fiscal year 2009 appropriation. These funds will support a 
grant to a nonprofit educational organization to promote 
economic and financial literacy among kindergarten through 12th 
grade students.
    In addition, the Committee recommends $6,913,000, the same 
as the budget request, for the mental health integration in 
schools program. The fiscal year 2009 appropriation was 
$5,913,000. This program supports grants to or contracts with 
State educational agencies, local educational agencies or 
Indian tribes to increase student access to mental healthcare 
by linking schools with their local mental health systems.
    The Committee recommendation includes bill language 
providing funding for the following activities in the following 
amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                        Project                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
3D School, Petal, MS, for a model dyslexia                      $250,000
 intervention program.................................
Adelphi University, Garden City, NY, to support the              200,000
 Adelphi University Institute for Math and Science
 Teachers.............................................
Army Heritage Center Foundation, Carlisle, PA, for               100,000
 history education programs...........................
Avant-Garde Learning Foundation, Anchorage, AK, for              500,000
 educational activities...............................
Big Brothers Big Sisters of Alaska, Anchorage, AK, for           100,000
 a mentoring demonstration project....................
Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Pittsburgh, Inc.,            100,000
 Pittsburgh, PA, for mentoring programs...............
Billings Public Schools, Billings, MT, for career                100,000
 training in construction technology, including the
 purchase of equipment................................
Boys and Girls Club of Truckee Meadows, Reno, NV, to             175,000
 develop an Internet safety program in schools........
Brehm Preparatory School, Carbondale, IL, to support             250,000
 the development of a national database for learning
 disabilities education and research at Brehm Prep
 School...............................................
Brockton Area Private Industry Council, Inc.,                    100,000
 Brockton, MA, for workforce development programs for
 at-risk youth........................................
Bushnell, Hartford, CT, for the PARTNERS Art Education           100,000
 Program..............................................
Caddo Parish School Board, Shreveport, LA, for                   100,000
 equipment and technology upgrades....................
Calcasieu Parish School Board, Lake Charles, LA, for             100,000
 equipment and technology upgrades....................
CentroNia, Takoma Park, MD, to expand pre-K services             500,000
 and train early education teachers...................
Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL, to provide                  300,000
 professional development to upper elementary and
 middle school science teachers.......................
Children's Home of Easton, PA, for tutoring and                  125,000
 mentoring at-risk youth during summer................
City of Los Angeles, CA, for the LA's BEST afterschool           900,000
 enrichment program...................................
City of Racine, WI, for an afterschool and summer                200,000
 program for children and their parents...............
City of San Jose, CA, for early childhood education              300,000
 improvement..........................................
City of Vernonia School District, Vernonia, OR, for              150,000
 technology and equipment.............................
City Year New Hampshire, Stratham, NH, to expand                 254,000
 education and youth development programs.............
City Year Rhode Island, Providence, RI, for a school-            100,000
 based initiative to improve the conditions that lead
 to student success and increase the graduation rate..
Clark County School District, Las Vegas, NV, to create           600,000
 a school for highly gifted students..................
Clark County School District, Las Vegas, NV, to expand           600,000
 instructional support for English-language learners..
Cleveland Municipal School District, Cleveland, OH, to           100,000
 improve math and language skills through music
 education............................................
Columbia Springs Environmental Education Center,                 100,000
 Vancouver, WA, to expand a summer school program that
 prepares high school students to pursue postsecondary
 education and green careers, including the purchase
 of equipment.........................................
County of Butte, Oroville, CA, for the Literacy is for           150,000
 Everyone family literacy program.....................
County of Monterey, Salinas, CA, for the Silver Star           1,000,000
 Gang Prevention and Intervention program.............
Creative Visions, Des Moines, IA, for a dropout                  200,000
 prevention program...................................
Dakota Boys and Girls Ranch, Minot, ND, for an                   475,000
 elementary school program that targets high-risk
 students.............................................
Darden School Foundation, Charlottesville, VA, to                150,000
 improve rural, chronically low-performing schools in
 southwest Virginia...................................
Davidson Academy of Nevada, Reno, NV, for math and               400,000
 science curriculum development.......................
Delaware Department of Education, Dover, DE, to train            100,000
 school leaders within the Vision 2015 network........
Delaware Department of Technology and Information,               100,000
 Dover, DE, to improve Internet access to Delaware
 schools, including the purchase of equipment.........
Delta Arts Alliance, Inc., Drew, MS, for arts                    100,000
 education and curriculum development.................
Delta State University, Cleveland, MS, for music                 300,000
 education in rural areas.............................
Des Moines Public Schools, Des Moines, IA, to expand             750,000
 pre-kindergarten programs............................
East Side Community Learning Center Foundation,                  100,000
 Wilmington, DE, to support supplemental education and
 enrichment programs for high-needs students..........
Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation, Evansville,           100,000
 IN, for education programs including equip-  ment....
Falcon School district 49, Falcon, CO, to support a              100,000
 science, technology, engineering and math [STEM]
 education program....................................
FAME, Inc., Wilmington, DE, to prepare minority                  125,000
 students for college and encourage them to pursue
 careers in science, engineering, and math............
Family, Inc., Council Bluffs, IA, to support a home              400,000
 visitation program for young children and their
 families.............................................
Golden Apple Foundation, Chicago, IL, to recruit and             350,000
 train math and science teachers through summer
 institutes across Illinois...........................
Grand County School District, Moab, UT, to career and            100,000
 technical education programs including the purchase
 of equipment.........................................
Harford County, Belair, MD, for a science, technology,           400,000
 engineering and math education program, including the
 purchase of equipment................................
Homeless Children's Education Fund, Pittsburgh, PA,              100,000
 for afterschool programs.............................
I Won't Cheat Foundation, Salt Lake City, UT, for an             250,000
 anti-steroid education program and awareness campaign
Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN, for                   100,000
 curriculum development and teacher training..........
Indianapolis Public Schools, Indianapolis, IN, for               100,000
 education programs including equipment...............
Inquiry Facilitators Inc., Bernalillo, NM, for                   200,000
 facilitating student and teacher involvement in a
 robotics competition.................................
Iowa Association of School Boards, Des Moines, IA, for         3,550,000
 continuation and expansion of the SKILLS Iowa program
Iowa Department of Education, Des Moines, IA, to               7,000,000
 continue the Harkin Grant program....................
Iowa State Education Association, Des Moines, IA, to             133,000
 educate teachers and students on international trade.
Ishpeming Public Schools, Ishpeming, MI, to provide              100,000
 wiring and technology upgrades.......................
Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, for education                100,000
 programs including the purchase of equipment.........
Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, for Mississippi           500,000
 Learning Institute to improve reading and literacy
 instruction..........................................
Jazz at Lincoln Center, New York, NY, for music                  400,000
 education programs...................................
JFYNetworks, Boston, MA, for the expansion of math,              150,000
 science, and language arts educational pro-  grams...
Jumpstart for Young Children, Inc., Boston, MA, for              100,000
 expanding the Jumpstart Connecticut mentoring pro-
 gram.................................................
Kauai Economic Development Board, Lihue, HI, for                 700,000
 science, technology, engineering and math educa-
 tion.................................................
Kanawha County Schools, Charleston, WV, for the                  500,000
 continuation and expansion of Skills West Virginia...
Lafourche Parish School Board, Thibodaux, LA, for                100,000
 equipment and tech upgrades..........................
LOOKBOTHWAYS, Port Townsend, WA, to create a                     300,000
 curriculum to teach children and youth Internet
 safety  skills.......................................
Los Alamos National Lab Foundation, Espanola, NM, for            100,000
 recruitment and training of math and science teachers
Los Angeles Universal Preschool, Los Angeles, CA, to             150,000
 expand a preschool and teacher training pro-  gram...
Lyon County School District, Yerington, NV, to expand            350,000
 distance education, including professional
 development and the purchase of equipment............
Massachusetts 2020, Boston, MA, for the continued                200,000
 development of an extended learning time initia-
 tive.................................................
Maui Economic Development Board, Kihei, HI, for                  800,000
 engaging girls and historically underrepresented
 students in science, technology, engineering, and
 math [STEM] education................................
Meeting Street, Providence, RI, for early childhood              300,000
 education for at-risk children.......................
Meskwaki Settlement School, Sac & Fox Tribe of the               500,000
 Mississippi in Iowa, Tama, IA, for a culturally based
 education curriculum.................................
Mississippi Building Blocks, Ridgeland, MS, for                  500,000
 establishment of a statewide early childhood literacy
 program..............................................
Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS,             200,000
 for economic education in K-12 settings..............
Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS,             100,000
 for enhancing K-12 science and mathematics
 preparation..........................................
Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS,             500,000
 for the development of an early childhood teacher
 education delivery system............................
Mississippi University for Women, Columbus, MS, for              200,000
 Science and Mathematics on the Tennessee-Tombigbee
 Waterway.............................................
Mississippi University for Women, Columbus, MS, for              550,000
 expansion of educational outreach for at-risk  youth.
Mississippi Writing/Thinking Institute, Mississippi              200,000
 State, MS, for program development for Mississippi
 Rural Voices.........................................
Montgomery/Cleveland Avenue YMCA, Montgomery, AL, for            100,000
 after-school and weekend programs....................
National Braille Press, Boston, MA, for the                      200,000
 development and deployment of portable Braille
 devices for blind school-aged children...............
National Council of La Raza, Washington, DC, to                  500,000
 improve the quality and availability of early
 childhood education..................................
New York Hall of Science, Queens, NY, for a teacher              500,000
 training program.....................................
North Carolina Mentoring Partnership, Raleigh, NC, for           100,000
 mentoring at-risk youth..............................
Nye County School District, Pahrump, NV, to improve              225,000
 science programs in rural middle schools, including
 the purchase of laboratory equipment.................
Ohio Appalachian Center for Higher Education,                    100,000
 Portsmouth, OH, to prepare students for careers and
 educational opportunities in science, technology,
 math, and engineering................................
Orchestra Iowa Music Education, Cedar Rapids, IA, to             400,000
 support a music education program....................
Orem City, UT, for curriculum expansion including the            100,000
 purchase of equipment................................
Pacific Islands Center for Educational Development,              500,000
 Pago Pago, America Samoa, for program development....
Piney Woods School, Piney Woods, MS, for science and             150,000
 technology curriculum development....................
Polynesian Voyaging Society, Honolulu, HI, for                   300,000
 educational programs.................................
Project HOME, Philadelphia, PA, for afterschool                  100,000
 programs.............................................
Save the Children, Albuquerque, NM, for a New Mexico             150,000
 rural literacy and afterschool program...............
Save the Children, Washington, DC, for afterschool               100,000
 programs in Mississippi..............................
Save the Children, Fernley, NV, to expand the Nevada             250,000
 Rural Literacy Program, including the purchase of
 equipment............................................
Seattle Science Foundation, Seattle, WA, to expand a             150,000
 hands-on medical science program for elementary
 school students......................................
Semos Unlimited, Santa Fe, NM, to develop and produce            100,000
 Hispanic learning materials..........................
South Salt Lake City, UT, to establish education                 100,000
 programs to expand ESL classes at the Villa Franche
 apartment complex....................................
Sunrise Children's Foundation, Las Vegas, NV, for                300,000
 early childhood education services...................
Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY, to expand an                  300,000
 afterschool program..................................
Terrebonne Parish School Board, Houma, LA, for                   100,000
 equipment and technology upgrades....................
University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, for the National              165,000
 Institute for Twice-Exceptionality...................
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA, for                750,000
 developing a center on early childhood education.....
University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS,             200,000
 for gifted education programs at the Frances Karnes
 Center for Gifted Studies............................
Urban Assembly New York Harbor High School, Brooklyn,            150,000
 NY, for a marine science and marine technology
 program..............................................
Utah Valley University, Orem, UT, to establish an                250,000
 entrepreneurship program for high school students....
Washoe County School District, Reno, NV, to support              500,000
 instructional coaches for K-12 teachers..............
Washoe County School District, Reno, NV, to expand a             500,000
 new teacher mentoring program........................
Weber State University, Ogden, UT, for teacher                   500,000
 education and curriculum development.................
West New York Board of Education, West New York, NJ,             150,000
 to launch an alternative fuel education program,
 including the purchase of equipment..................
West Valley City, UT, to expand an at-risk youth                 100,000
 afterschool program..................................
WhizKids Foundation, Inc., Cambridge, MA, to expand              100,000
 math, science, and engineering programs for primary
 school students......................................
YMCA Espanola Teen Center, Los Alamos, NM, to provide            125,000
 academic and enrichment support for at-risk  youth...
University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, for                  150,000
 supporting and developing charter and district-run
 public schools in New Orleans through teacher
 education, leadership preparation, applied research
 and policy, in cooperation with Tulane University....
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Teacher Incentive Fund

    The Committee recommendation includes $300,000,000 for the 
Teacher Incentive Fund [TIF] program. The budget request was 
$487,270,000, and the fiscal year 2009 appropriation was 
$297,270,000, including $200,000,000 provided in the ARRA.
    The goals of TIF are to improve student achievement by 
increasing teacher and principal effectiveness; reform 
compensation systems to reward gains in student achievement; 
increase the number of effective teachers teaching low-income, 
minority, and disadvantaged students, and students in hard-to-
staff subjects; and create sustainable performance-based 
compensation systems.
    The Committee includes bill language that will improve the 
program in several ways and help prevent some of the problems 
that have plagued earlier attempts to implement performance-
based pay systems. The Committee notes, for example, that 
performance-based compensation systems tend to work better when 
those people who are directly affected by the incentives are 
involved in the design of the systems; therefore, the bill adds 
a new provision requiring grantees to demonstrate that their 
compensation systems are developed with the input of teachers 
and school leaders. Likewise, the Committee adds new bill 
language requiring grantees to submit a plan for sustaining 
their programs financially once the grant period has expired, 
and allowing grantees to develop or improve systems and tools 
that would enhance the quality and success of the compensation 
system, such as high-quality teacher evaluations and tools to 
measure growth in student achievement. The Committee also 
includes new language requested by the administration that will 
allow grantees to use TIF funds to provide performance-based 
compensation to all staff in a school, rather than to teachers 
and principals only.
    The Committee urges the Department to award grants for 
short-term planning for the development of performance-based 
compensation systems as well as for implementation. Recognizing 
that such systems should be aligned with other educational 
improvement efforts, in awarding grants the Committee urges the 
Department to give priority to those applications that 
demonstrate a link between proposed projects and the 
instructional strategy or other key reforms undertaken by the 
relevant schools or LEAs.
    The ARRA required a portion of the funds provided for TIF 
in that act to be used for a rigorous national evaluation of 
ARRA-funded projects. The evaluation will be conducted by the 
Institute of Education Sciences [IES]. The Committee urges the 
IES to include grants awarded in this bill as well, and to 
examine school- and district-level factors that contribute to 
the results of funded projects as part of the evaluation. 
Finally, the Committee includes a general provision in this 
bill that prohibits the obligation of funds for new TIF awards 
prior to the submission of an impact evaluation plan to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
and the Senate.

National Teacher Recruitment Campaign

    The Committee recommendation does not include any funds for 
the National Teacher Recruitment Campaign. The budget request 
was $30,000,000. No funds for this program were provided in 
fiscal year 2009.
    The administration proposed that the Education Department, 
working with public and private, nonprofit partners, would use 
the proposed funds to reach out to potential candidates for 
teaching positions, provide information on routes they can take 
to enter the profession, and provide assistance in navigating 
those routes.

Ready-to-Learn Television

    The Committee recommendation includes $28,500,000 for the 
Ready-to-Learn Television program. The budget request was 
$25,416,000, the same as the fiscal year 2009 appropriation.
    Ready-to-Learn Television supports the development and 
distribution of educational television programming designed to 
improve the readiness of preschool children to enter 
kindergarten and elementary school. The program also supports 
the development, production, and dissemination of educational 
materials designed to help parents, children, and caregivers 
obtain the maximum advantage from educational programming. The 
Committee expects the increase over fiscal year 2009 to be used 
for Ready to Learn outreach programs by the Corporation for 
Public Broadcasting.

Close Up Fellowships

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,942,000, the same 
as the fiscal year 2009 appropriation, for Close Up 
Fellowships. The budget request did not include any funds for 
this purpose.
    These funds are provided to the Close Up Foundation of 
Washington, DC, which offers fellowships to students from low-
income families and their teachers to enable them to spend 1 
week in Washington attending seminars and meeting with 
representatives of the three branches of the Federal 
Government.

Advanced Placement

    The Committee recommends $43,540,000 for Advanced Placement 
[AP] programs. This is the same amount as the budget request 
and the fiscal year 2009 level.
    These funds support two programs, the Advanced Placement 
Test Fee program and the Advanced Placement Incentive [API] 
program, the purpose of both of which is to aid State and local 
efforts to increase access to Advanced Placement [AP] and 
International Baccalaureate [IB] classes and tests for low-
income students. Under the test fee program, the Department 
makes awards to State educational agencies to enable them to 
cover part or all of the cost of test fees of low-income 
students who are enrolled in an AP or IB class and plan to take 
an AP or IB test. Under the API program, the Department makes 
3-year competitive awards to State educational agencies, LEAs, 
or national nonprofit educational entities to expand access for 
low-income individuals to AP programs through activities 
including teacher training, development of pre-Advanced 
Placement courses, coordination and articulation between grade 
levels to prepare students for academic achievement in AP or IB 
courses, books and supplies, and participation in online AP or 
IB courses.
    Under statute, the Department must give priority to funding 
the test fee program. The budget request estimates that 
$15,374,000 will be needed to fund that program; the remaining 
funds will support continuations for API grants.

Promise Neighborhoods

    The Committee recommends $10,000,000, the same as the 
budget request, for the Promise Neighborhoods program. This is 
a new program.
    Competitive grants will be awarded to nonprofit, community-
based organizations for the development of comprehensive 
neighborhood programs designed to combat the effects of poverty 
and improve educational and life outcomes for children and 
youth, from birth through college. Each Promise Neighborhood 
grantee will serve a high-poverty urban neighborhood or rural 
community.

                 Safe Schools and Citizenship Education

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $690,370,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     413,608,000
House allowance.........................................     395,753,000
Committee recommendation................................     438,061,000

Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities

    The Committee recommends a total of $438,061,000 for 
activities to promote safe schools and citizenship education. 
The budget request was $413,608,000 and the fiscal year 2009 
appropriation was $690,370,000.
    State Grants.--The Committee recommends eliminating the 
Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities State grant program, 
as did the budget request. The fiscal year 2009 appropriation 
was $294,759,000. This formula-based State grant program 
provides resources to Governors, State educational agencies, 
and local educational agencies for developing and implementing 
activities that help create and maintain safe and drug-free 
learning environments in and around schools.
    The Committee agrees with the budget request that, in most 
States, the program spreads funding too thinly at the local 
level to support high-quality interventions in schools that 
need the most help. The Committee recommends reallocating much 
of this funding to national activities that can be better 
targeted.
    National Activities.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$224,978,000 for the national activities portion of the Safe 
and Drug-Free Schools and Communities program. The budget 
request was $250,896,000 and the fiscal year 2009 appropriation 
was $140,264,000.
    The Committee recommendation includes $81,000,000 for a new 
initiative proposed by the administration to support new 
approaches to assisting schools foster a safe, secure, and 
drug-free learning environment. The budget request for this 
program was $100,000,000.
    This program will award competitive grants in two areas: 
(1) reducing the number of suspensions and expulsions related 
to disruptive behavior and nonviolent offenses and to reducing 
the amount of time teachers spend on disciplining students for 
engaging in disruptive behavior and on other minor nonviolent 
offenses, and (2) reducing the amount of serious violent crime 
in schools (including on school grounds, as well as crimes 
affecting students on the way to and from school), and reducing 
the amount of serious violent crime among school-aged youth in 
the community.
    The Committee includes $7,000,000, the same as the budget 
request, for initiatives in emergency preparedness for 
institutions of higher education, such as: the dissemination of 
information about emergency management planning tailored to the 
needs of higher education; training, technical assistance, risk 
assessment and grant funding to IHEs to support emergency 
management and campus public safety agencies and programs on 
their campuses; the acquisition of software and hardware 
necessary to implement best practices in emergency planning and 
response; and other related activities.
    The Committee recommends no funds for Project SERV (School 
Emergency Response to Violence), which provides education-
related services to LEAs and institutions of higher education 
in which the learning environment has been disrupted due to a 
violent or traumatic crisis. Project SERV funds are available 
until expended. The budget request was $5,000,000. No funds 
were appropriated for this purpose in fiscal year 2009. The 
Committee believes that no additional funds are required in 
fiscal year 2010, given the amount of unobligated funds that 
have been carried over from previous years.
    The Committee recommendation includes $830,000, the same as 
the budget request, for a program to identify, and provide 
recognition of, promising and model alcohol and drug abuse 
prevention and education programs in higher education.
    The Committee recommendation also includes funds for school 
emergency preparedness, Safe Schools/Healthy Students, 
postsecondary education drug and violence prevention, and other 
activities.

Alcohol Abuse Reduction

    The Committee recommends $32,712,000, the same as the 
budget request and the fiscal year 2009 appropriation, for 
grants to LEAs to develop and implement programs to reduce 
underage drinking in secondary schools.

Mentoring

    The Committee recommends no funding for mentoring programs, 
as did the budget request. The fiscal year 2009 appropriation 
was $47,264,000. Funds have been used to support mentoring 
programs and activities for children who are at risk of failing 
academically, dropping out of school, getting involved in 
criminal or delinquent activities, or who lack strong positive 
role models.

Character Education

    The Committee recommendation includes $11,912,000 for the 
design and implementation of character education programs. This 
is the same amount as the fiscal year 2009 appropriation. The 
budget request did not include any funds for this program.

Elementary and Secondary School Counseling

    The Committee recommends $55,000,000 to establish or expand 
counseling programs in elementary and secondary schools. The 
fiscal year 2009 funding level was $52,000,000, the same as the 
budget request. As authorized, at least $40,000,000 must be 
used to support elementary school counseling programs.

Carol M. White Physical Education for Progress Program

    The Committee recommendation includes $80,000,000 to help 
LEAs and community-based organizations initiate, expand and 
improve physical education programs for students in grades K-
12. The budget request was $78,000,000, the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 appropriation. This funding will help schools and 
communities improve their structured physical education 
programs for students and help children develop healthy 
lifestyles to combat the national epidemic of obesity.

Civic Education

    The Committee recommends $33,459,000, the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 level, to improve the quality of civics and 
government education, to foster civic competence and 
responsibility, and to improve the quality of civic and 
economic education through exchange programs with emerging 
democracies. The budget request proposed to eliminate this 
program and instead provide competitive awards for history, 
civics, and government grants within the Fund for the 
Improvement of Education.
    The Committee recommends $20,076,000 for the We the People 
programs, including $2,957,000 to continue the comprehensive 
program to improve public knowledge, understanding, and support 
of American democratic institutions, which is a cooperative 
project among the Center for Civic Education, the Center on 
Congress at Indiana University, and the Trust for 
Representative Democracy at the National Conference of State 
Legislatures. The bill also includes $13,383,000 for the 
Cooperative Education Exchange program.

                      English Language Acquisition

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $730,000,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     730,000,000
House allowance.........................................     760,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     750,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $750,000,000 
for English language acquisition. The budget request was 
$730,000,000, the same as the fiscal year 2009 appropriation.
    The Department makes formula grants to States based on each 
State's share of the Nation's limited-English-proficient and 
recent immigrant student population. The program is designed to 
increase the capacity of States and school districts to address 
the needs of these students. The Committee includes bill 
language requiring that 6.5 percent of the appropriation be 
used to support national activities, which include professional 
development activities designed to increase the number of 
highly qualified teachers serving limited English proficient 
students; a National Clearinghouse for English Language 
Acquisition and Language Instructional Programs; and evaluation 
activities. National activities funds shall be available for 2 
years.
    The Committee bill also includes language requested by the 
administration that requires the Secretary to use the annual 3-
year estimates provided by the Census Bureau in order to 
determine the State allocations. Under the authorizing statute, 
the Department would use 1-year estimates, which are not as 
reliable and produce more volatility in the allocations from 
year to year. Fiscal year 2009 appropriations language directed 
the Secretary to use a 3-year average for those States that 
would otherwise receive greater than a 10 percent reduction 
from their previous year's allocation. Under the Committee 
bill, the same data set would be used for all States.

                           Special Education

Appropriations, 2009\1\................................. $24,779,677,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................  12,579,677,000
House allowance.........................................  12,579,677,000
Committee recommendation................................  12,587,856,000

\1\Includes $12,200,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 funding (Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee recommends $12,587,856,000 for special 
education programs authorized by the Individuals with 
Disabilities Education Act [IDEA] and the Special Olympics 
Sport and Empowerment Act of 2004. The fiscal year 2009 funding 
level is $24,779,677,000, which includes $12,200,000,000 
available in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The 
budget request includes $12,579,677,000 for such programs.

Grants to States

    The Committee recommends $11,505,211,000 for special 
education grants to States, as authorized under part B of the 
IDEA, which is the same amount as proposed in the budget 
request. The fiscal year 2009 funding level is $22,805,211,000, 
which includes $11,300,000,000 available in the American 
Recovery and Reinvestment Act.
    This program provides formula grants to assist States, 
outlying areas, and other entities in meeting the costs of 
providing special education and related services for children 
with disabilities. States pass along most of these funds to 
local educational agencies, but may reserve some for program 
monitoring, enforcement, technical assistance, and other 
activities.
    The appropriation for this program primarily supports 
activities associated with the 2010-2011 academic year. Of the 
funds available for this program, $2,912,828,000 will become 
available on July 1, 2010 and $8,592,383,000 will become 
available on October 1, 2010. These funds will remain available 
for obligation until September 30, 2011.
    The budget request proposes language capping the Department 
of the Interior set-aside at the prior year level, adjusted by 
the lower of the increase in inflation or the change in the 
appropriation for grants to States. This provision also would 
prevent a decrease in the amount to be transferred in case the 
funding for this program decreases or does not change. The 
Committee bill includes the requested language.

Preschool Grants

    The Committee recommends $374,099,000 for preschool grants, 
the same amount as the budget request. The fiscal year 2009 
funding level is $774,099,000, which includes $400,000,000 
available in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The 
preschool grants program provides formula grants to States to 
assist them in making available special education and related 
services for children with disabilities aged 3 through 5. 
States distribute the bulk of the funds to local educational 
agencies. States must serve all eligible children with 
disabilities aged 3 through 5 and have an approved application 
under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Grants for Infants and Families

    The Committee recommends $439,427,000 for the grants for 
infants and families program under part C of the IDEA, the same 
amount as proposed in the budget request. The fiscal year 2009 
funding level is $939,427,000, which includes $500,000,000 
available in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. This 
program provides formula grants to States, outlying areas and 
other entities to implement statewide systems of coordinated, 
comprehensive, multidisciplinary interagency programs to make 
available early intervention services to all children with 
disabilities, ages 2 and under, and their families.

State Personnel Development

    The Committee recommends $48,000,000 for the State 
personnel development program, which is the same amount as the 
comparable fiscal year 2009 and the budget request. This 
program focuses on the professional development needs in States 
by requiring that 90 percent of funds be used for professional 
development activities. The program supports grants to State 
educational agencies to help them reform and improve their 
personnel preparation and professional development related to 
early intervention, educational and transition services that 
improve outcomes for students with disabilities.

Technical Assistance and Dissemination

    The Committee recommends $50,228,000 for technical 
assistance and dissemination. The comparable fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request are $48,549,000 for these 
activities. This program supports awards for technical 
assistance, model demonstration projects, the dissemination of 
useful information and other activities. Funding supports 
activities that are designed to improve the services provided 
under IDEA. The Committee intends for the technical assistance 
for children who are both blind and deaf to be funded at 
$12,350,000, an increase of $1,000,000 over the budget request.
    The Committee appreciates the vital services, guidance, and 
critical information regarding disabilities in children and 
youth, educational best practices and IDEA provided to families 
and professionals through the information, referral, and 
dissemination center.

Personnel Preparation

    The Committee recommends $90,653,000 for the personnel 
preparation program, the same amount as the comparable fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the budget request. Funds support 
competitive awards to help address State-identified needs for 
personnel who are qualified to work with children with 
disabilities, including special education teachers and related 
services personnel. The program has requirements to fund 
several other broad areas including training for leadership 
personnel and personnel who work with children with low 
incidence disabilities, and providing enhanced support for 
beginning special educators.

Parent Information Centers

    The Committee recommends $28,028,000 for parent information 
centers. The comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request both are $27,028,000. This program makes awards 
to parent organizations to support parent training and 
information centers, including community parent resource 
centers. These centers provide training and information to meet 
the needs of parents of children with disabilities living in 
the areas served by the centers, particularly underserved 
parents, and parents of children who may be inappropriately 
identified.

Technology and Media Services

    The Committee recommends $44,115,000 for technology and 
media services. The comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and the budget request both are $38,615,000 for such 
activities. This program makes competitive awards to support 
the development, demonstration, and use of technology, and 
educational media activities of value to children with 
disabilities.
    The Committee recommendation includes $13,250,000 for 
Recording for the Blind and Dyslexic, Inc. [RFB&D]. These funds 
support the continued development, production, and circulation 
of accessible educational materials.
    The Committee also recommends $1,500,000 for support of the 
Reading Rockets program, administered by the Greater Washington 
Educational Television Association.

Special Olympics

    The Committee recommendation includes $8,095,000 for 
Special Olympics education activities, the same amount as the 
fiscal year 2009 level and budget request. Under the Special 
Olympics Sport and Empowerment Act of 2004, the Secretary is 
authorized to provide financial assistance to Special Olympics 
for activities that promote the expansion of Special Olympics 
and for the design and implementation of education activities 
that can be integrated into classroom instruction and are 
consistent with academic content standards.
    The Committee bill allows funds to be used to support 
Special Olympics National and Winter Games, as proposed in the 
budget request.

            Rehabilitation Services and Disability Research

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................  $4,067,762,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   3,500,735,000
House allowance.........................................   3,504,305,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,507,322,000

\1\Includes $680,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 funding (Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee recommends $3,507,322,000 for rehabilitation 
services and disability research. The fiscal year 2009 funding 
level is $4,067,762,000, which includes $680,000,000 available 
in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The budget 
request includes $3,500,735,000 for programs in this account.
    The authorizing statute for programs funded in this 
account, except for those authorized under the Assistive 
Technology Act, expired September 30, 2004. The program 
descriptions provided below assume the continuation of current 
law.

Vocational Rehabilitation State Grants

    The Committee recommends $3,084,696,000 for vocational 
rehabilitation grants to States, the same amount as proposed in 
the budget request. The Committee recommends the full amount 
authorized by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 for this mandatory 
funding stream. The fiscal year 2009 funding level is 
$3,514,635,000, which includes $540,000,000 available in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.
    Basic State grant funds assist States in providing a range 
of services to help persons with physical and mental 
disabilities prepare for and engage in meaningful employment. 
Authorizing legislation requires States to give priority to 
persons with the most significant disabilities. Funds are 
allotted to States based on a formula that takes into account 
population and per capita income. States must provide a 21.3 
percent match of Federal funds, except the State's share is 50 
percent for the cost of construction of a facility for 
community rehabilitation program purposes.
    The Rehabilitation Act requires that no less than 1 percent 
and not more than 1.5 percent of the appropriation in fiscal 
year 2009 for vocational rehabilitation State grants be set 
aside for grants for Indians. Service grants are awarded to 
Indian tribes on a competitive basis to help tribes develop the 
capacity to provide vocational rehabilitation services to 
American Indians with disabilities living on or near 
reservations.

Client Assistance State Grants

    The Committee recommends $13,000,000 for the client 
assistance State grants program. The comparable fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request both are $11,576,000 
for authorized activities.
    The client assistance program funds State formula grants to 
assist vocational rehabilitation clients or client applicants 
in understanding the benefits available to them and in their 
relationships with service providers. Funds are distributed to 
States according to a population-based formula, except that 
increases in minimum grants are guaranteed to each of the 50 
States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, and 
guaranteed to each of the outlying areas, by a percentage not 
to exceed the percentage increase in the appropriation. States 
must operate client assistance programs in order to receive 
vocational rehabilitation State grant funds.
    The Committee is particularly interested in the increase 
being utilized to assure that services provided under the 
Rehabilitation Act comply with all requirements related to 
integrated settings and competitive wages.

Training

    The Committee recommends $37,766,000 for training 
rehabilitation personnel, the same amount as the comparable 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request.
    The purpose of this program is to ensure that skilled 
personnel are available to serve the rehabilitation needs of 
individuals with disabilities. It supports training, 
traineeships, and related activities designed to increase the 
numbers of qualified personnel providing rehabilitation 
services. The program awards grants and contracts to States and 
public or nonprofit agencies and organizations, including 
institutions of higher education, to pay all or part of the 
cost of conducting training programs. Long-term, in-service, 
short-term, experimental and innovative, and continuing 
education programs are funded, as well as special training 
programs and programs to train interpreters for persons who are 
deaf, hard of hearing, and deaf-blind.

Demonstration and Training Programs

    The Committee bill includes $9,031,000 for demonstration 
and training programs for persons with disabilities. The 
comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level is $9,594,000 and the 
budget request includes $6,506,000 for authorized activities. 
This program awards grants to States and nonprofit agencies and 
organizations to develop innovative methods and comprehensive 
services to help individuals with disabilities achieve 
satisfactory vocational outcomes. Demonstration programs 
support projects for individuals with a wide array of 
disabilities.
    The Committee recommends continued support for parent 
training and information centers. The Committee expects the 
Rehabilitation Services Administration to coordinate with the 
Office of Special Education Programs in carrying out this 
activity.
    The Committee recommendation includes bill language 
providing funding for the following activities in the following 
amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                        Project                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
American Federation for the Blind Technology and              $1,000,000
 Employment Center, Huntington, WV, to expand the
 capacity of the AFB-TECH center for development of
 technology for the blind.............................
Camp High Hopes, Sioux City, IA, for a year-round camp           300,000
 for children with disabilities.......................
Deaf Blind Service Center, Seattle, WA, for training             200,000
 programs and materials for support service providers
 who assist deaf blind individuals with employment and
 independent living...................................
Elwyn, Inc., Aston, PA, for job training and education           100,000
 programs for individuals with disabilities...........
Enable America, Inc., Tampa, FL, for civic/citizenship           600,000
 demonstration project for disabled adults............
Intellectual Disabilities Education Association, Inc.,           225,000
 Bridgeport, CT, for IDEA Learning Center programming.
Supporting Autism and Families Everywhere, Wilkes-               100,000
 Barre, PA, for vocational services and program
 support..............................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers

    The Committee recommends $2,239,000 for migrant and 
seasonal farmworkers, the same amount as the comparable fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the budget request.
    This program provides grants for comprehensive 
rehabilitation services to migrant and seasonal farm workers 
with disabilities and their families. The size of the grants is 
limited to 90 percent of the costs of the projects. Projects 
also develop innovative methods for reaching and serving this 
population. The program emphasizes outreach, specialized 
bilingual rehabilitation counseling, and coordination of 
vocational rehabilitation services with services from other 
sources.

Recreational Programs

    The Committee provides $2,474,000 for recreational 
programs, the same amount as the comparable fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request.
    Recreational programs help finance activities such as 
sports, music, dancing, handicrafts, and art to aid in the 
employment, mobility, and socialization of individuals with 
disabilities. Grants are awarded to States, public agencies, 
and nonprofit private organizations, including institutions of 
higher education. Grants are awarded for a 3-year period with 
the Federal share at 100 percent for the first year, 75 percent 
for the second year, and 50 percent for the third year. 
Programs must maintain the same level of services over the 3-
year period.

Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights

    The Committee recommends $18,101,000 for protection and 
advocacy of individual rights. The comparable fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request both are $17,101,000 for 
this purpose.
    This program provides grants to agencies to protect and 
advocate for the legal and human rights of persons with 
disabilities who are not eligible for protection and advocacy 
services available through the Developmental Disabilities 
Assistance and Bill of Rights Act or the Protection and 
Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness Act.

Projects with Industry

    The Committee recommends $19,197,000 for projects with 
industry, the same amount as the comparable fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request.
    The projects with industry [PWI] program promotes greater 
participation of business and industry in the rehabilitation 
process. PWI provides training and experience in realistic work 
settings to prepare individuals with disabilities for 
employment in the competitive job market. Post-employment 
support services are also provided. The program supports grants 
to a variety of agencies and organizations, including 
corporations, community rehabilitation programs, labor and 
trade associations, and foundations.

Supported Employment State Grants

    The Committee recommends $29,181,000 for the supported 
employment State grant program, the same amount as the 
comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request.
    This program assists the most severely disabled individuals 
by providing the ongoing support needed to obtain competitive 
employment. Short-term vocational rehabilitation services are 
augmented with extended services provided by State and local 
organizations. Federal funds are distributed on the basis of 
population.

Independent Living State Grants

    The Committee recommends $23,450,000 for independent living 
State grants, the same amount as the budget request. The fiscal 
year 2009 funding level is $41,650,000, which includes 
$18,200,000 available from the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act.
    The independent living State formula grants program 
provides funding to improve independent living services, 
support the operation of centers for independent living, 
conduct studies and analysis, and provide training and 
outreach.

Independent Living Centers

    The Committee recommends $80,266,000 for independent living 
centers, the same amount as the budget request. The fiscal year 
2009 funding level is $164,766,000, which includes $87,500,000 
available from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.
    These funds support consumer-controlled, cross-disability, 
nonresidential, community-based centers that are designed and 
operated within local communities by individuals with 
disabilities. These centers provide an array of independent 
living services.

Independent Living Services for Older Blind Individuals

    The Committee provides $34,151,000 for independent living 
services to older blind individuals, the same amount as the 
budget request. The fiscal year 2009 funding level is 
$68,451,000, which includes $34,300,000 available from the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.
    Through this program, assistance is provided to persons 
aged 55 or older to adjust to their blindness, continue living 
independently and avoid societal costs associated with 
dependent care. Services may include the provision of 
eyeglasses and other visual aids, mobility training, Braille 
instruction and other communication services, community 
integration, and information and referral. These services help 
older individuals age with dignity, continue to live 
independently, and avoid significant societal costs associated 
with dependent care. The services most commonly provided by 
this program are daily living skills training, counseling, the 
provision of low-vision devices community integration, 
information and referral, communication devices, and low-vision 
screening.

Program Improvement Activities

    The Committee recommends $852,000 for program improvement 
activities, the same amount as the budget request. The fiscal 
year 2009 amount was $622,000. In fiscal year 2010, funds will 
continue to support technical assistance efforts to improve the 
efficiency and effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation 
program and improve accountability efforts.

Evaluation

    The Committee recommends $1,217,000 for evaluation 
activities, the same amount as the budget request. The 
comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level is $1,447,000 for 
such activities.
    These funds support evaluations of the impact and 
effectiveness of programs authorized by the Rehabilitation Act. 
The Department awards competitive contracts for studies to be 
conducted by persons not directly involved with the 
administration of Rehabilitation Act programs.

Helen Keller National Center

    The Committee recommends $10,000,000 for the Helen Keller 
National Center for Deaf-Blind Youth and Adults. The comparable 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request both are 
$8,362,000 for this purpose.
    The Helen Keller National Center consists of a national 
headquarters in Sands Point, New York, with a residential 
training and rehabilitation facility where deaf-blind persons 
receive intensive specialized services; a network of 10 
regional field offices that provide referral and counseling 
assistance to deaf-blind persons; and an affiliate network of 
agencies. The center serves approximately 120 persons with 
deaf-blindness at its headquarters facility and provides field 
services to approximately 2,000 individuals and families and 
approximately 1,000 organizations.

National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research

    The Committee recommends $110,741,000 for the National 
Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research [NIDRR], 
the same amount as the budget request. The comparable fiscal 
year 2009 funding level is $107,741,000 for authorized 
activities.
    NIDRR develops and implements a comprehensive and 
coordinated approach to the conduct of research, demonstration 
projects, and related activities that enable persons with 
disabilities to better function at work and in the community, 
including the training of persons who provide rehabilitation 
services or who conduct rehabilitation research. The Institute 
awards competitive grants to support research in federally 
designated priority areas, including rehabilitation research 
and training centers, rehabilitation engineering research 
centers, research and demonstration projects, and dissemination 
and utilization projects. NIDRR also supports field-initiated 
research projects, research training, and fellowships.
    The Committee strongly supports the mission of NIDRR, which 
includes research in the interrelated domains of health and 
function, employment, and participation and community living.
    The Committee believes the Interagency Committee on 
Disability Research, currently led by NIDRR, needs to more 
effectively carry out its mission, including assessing gaps in 
and coordinating existing or planned research, and meeting its 
required reporting requirements in a timely manner.
    The budget proposes $3,000,000 to support demonstration of 
promising models to serve students with intellectual 
disabilities. Instead, the Committee has provided $14,000,000 
for model comprehensive transition and postsecondary education 
programs for students with intellectual disabilities, as 
authorized in the Higher Education Opportunity Act, within the 
Higher Education account.
    The Committee notes that the Americans with Disabilities 
Act Amendments Act of 2008 and related regulations will require 
sustained training and technical resources from the disability 
and business technical assistance center program and requests 
that NIDRR consider ways to ensure that training and technical 
assistance services continue to be available during this period 
of change.
    The Committee encourages NIDRR to use a portion of the 
increase proposed in the budget to enhance support for the 
disability and business technical assistance center program. 
The Committee also strongly urges NIDRR to reconsider the 
current requirement for centers to dedicate limited direct 
service resources for research, which, given the modest 15 
percent requirement, may not add significantly to the research 
base, but does divert critical direct service resources away 
from needed training and technical assistance that will more 
effectively meet the goal of the Americans with Disabilities 
Act [ADA]. If NIDRR believes that supporting research on the 
ADA is a priority, the Committee encourages NIDRR to use a 
portion of its requested increase for research in this area.

Assistive Technology

    The Committee recommends $30,960,000 for assistive 
technology, the same amount as the comparable fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request.
    The Assistive Technology program is designed to improve 
occupational and educational opportunities and the quality of 
life for people of all ages with disabilities through increased 
access to assistive technology services and devices. The 
program supports various activities that help States to develop 
comprehensive, consumer-responsive statewide programs that 
increase access to, and the availability of, assistive 
technology devices and services.
    The Committee recommendation includes $25,660,000 for State 
grant activities authorized under section 4, $4,300,000 for 
protection and advocacy systems authorized by section 5, and 
$1,000,000 for technical assistance activities authorized under 
section 6.

           Special Institutions for Persons With Disabilities


                 AMERICAN PRINTING HOUSE FOR THE BLIND

Appropriations, 2009....................................     $22,599,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................      22,599,000
House allowance.........................................      22,599,000
Committee recommendation................................      24,600,000

    The Committee recommends $24,600,000 to help support the 
American Printing House for the Blind [APH]. The comparable 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and budget request both are 
$22,599,000 for this purpose.
    The American Printing House for the Blind provides 
educational materials to students who are legally blind and 
enrolled in programs below the college level. The Federal 
subsidy provides approximately 70 percent of APH's total sales 
income. Materials are distributed free of charge to schools and 
States through per capita allotments based on the total number 
of students who are blind. Materials provided include textbooks 
and other educational aids in braille, large type, and recorded 
form and computer applications. Appropriated funds may be used 
for staff salaries and expenses, as well as equipment purchases 
and other acquisitions consistent with the purpose of the Act 
to Promote the Education of the Blind.
    In addition to its ongoing activities, the Individuals with 
Disabilities Education Improvement Act assigned to the American 
Printing House for the Blind the responsibility of establishing 
and maintaining a National Instructional Materials Access 
Center.

               NATIONAL TECHNICAL INSTITUTE FOR THE DEAF

Appropriations, 2009....................................     $64,212,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................      68,437,000
House allowance.........................................      68,437,000
Committee recommendation................................      68,437,000

    The Committee recommends $68,437,000 for the National 
Technical Institute for the Deaf [NTID], the same amount as 
proposed in the budget request. The comparable fiscal year 2009 
funding level is $64,212,000. Within the Committee 
recommendation, $5,400,000 is available for improvements to the 
campus infrastructure of NTID.
    The Institute, located on the campus of the Rochester 
Institute of Technology, was created by Congress in 1965 to 
provide a residential facility for postsecondary technical 
training and education for persons who are deaf. NTID also 
provides support services for students who are deaf, trains 
professionals in the field of deafness, and conducts applied 
research. At the discretion of the Institute, funds may be used 
for the Endowment Grant program.

                          GALLAUDET UNIVERSITY

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $124,000,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     120,000,000
House allowance.........................................     120,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     126,000,000

    The Committee recommends $126,000,000 for Gallaudet 
University. The comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level is 
$124,000,000 and the budget request includes $120,000,000 for 
the university.
    Gallaudet University is a private, nonprofit institution 
offering undergraduate and continuing education programs for 
students who are deaf, as well as graduate programs in fields 
related to deafness for students who are hearing and deaf. The 
university conducts basic and applied research related to 
hearing impairments and provides public service programs for 
the deaf community.
    The Model Secondary School for the Deaf serves as a 
laboratory for educational experimentation and development, 
disseminates curricula, materials, and models of instruction 
for students who are deaf, and prepares adolescents who are 
deaf for postsecondary academic or vocational education or the 
workplace. The Kendall Demonstration Elementary School develops 
and provides instruction for children from infancy through age 
15.
    The budget request includes $2,000,000 earmarked in bill 
language for construction-related activities connected to soil 
instability and associated building damage on campus. The 
Committee recommendation includes $8,000,000 and requested bill 
language for these and related activities.

                 Career, Technical, and Adult Education

Appropriations, 2009....................................  $1,944,348,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   2,018,447,000
House allowance.........................................   2,016,447,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,018,447,000

    The Committee recommends a total of $2,018,447,000 for 
career, technical and adult education, the same amount as the 
budget request. The comparable funding level in fiscal year 
2009 is $1,944,348,000. The recommendation consists of 
$1,271,694,000 for career and technical education, $641,567,000 
for adult education and $105,186,000 for other activities.

Career and Technical Education

    The Committee recommends $1,271,694,000 for career and 
technical education, the same amount as the comparable fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the budget request.
    State Grants.--The Committee recommends $1,160,911,000 for 
State grants, the same amount as the comparable fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request. Funds provided under 
the State grant program assist States, localities, and outlying 
areas to expand and improve their programs of career and 
technical education and provide equal access to career and 
technical education for populations with special needs. Persons 
assisted range from secondary students in prevocational courses 
through adults who need retraining to adapt to changing 
technological and labor market conditions. Funds are 
distributed according to a formula based on State population 
and State per capita income, with special provisions for small 
States and a fiscal year 1998 base guarantee.
    Under the Indian and Hawaiian Natives programs, competitive 
grants are awarded to federally recognized Indian tribes or 
tribal organizations and to organizations primarily serving and 
representing Hawaiian Natives for services that are in addition 
to services such groups are eligible to receive under other 
provisions of the Perkins Act.
    Of the funds available for this program, $369,911,000 will 
become available on July 1, 2010 and $791,000,000 will become 
available on October 1, 2010. These funds will remain available 
for obligation until September 30, 2011.
    Tech-prep Education State Grants.--The Committee recommends 
$102,923,000 for tech-prep programs, the same amount as the 
comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request. This program is designed to link academic and career 
and technical education and to provide a structural link 
between secondary schools and postsecondary education 
institutions. Funds are distributed to the States through the 
same formula as the State grant program. States then make 
planning and demonstration grants to consortia of local 
educational agencies and postsecondary institutions to develop 
and operate model 4-year programs that begin in high school and 
provide students with the mathematical, science, communication, 
and technological skills needed to earn a 2-year associate 
degree or 2-year certificate in a given occupational field.
    National Programs.--The Committee recommends $7,860,000 for 
national research programs and other national activities, the 
same amount as the comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and the budget request.
    Funds will be used to support the national research center 
on career and technical education, as well as activities 
designed to improve the quality of performance data States 
collect and report to the Department.

                            ADULT EDUCATION

    The Committee recommends $641,567,000 for adult education, 
the same amount as the budget request. The comparable fiscal 
year 2009 funding is $567,468,000. The authorizing statute for 
adult education programs expired on September 30, 2004. 
Descriptions of these programs provided below assume the 
continuation of current law.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of the Adult 
Education and Family Literacy Act programs. To ensure that 
funding for these programs is benefiting as many students as 
possible, the Committee requests that the Department evaluate 
and report on whether the amount of funding for State grants 
that is allowed to be set aside for State leadership activities 
and State program administration is appropriate and how these 
set-asides impact the assistance reaching students. The 
Committee expects the Department to include the requested 
information in the fiscal year 2011 budget justification.
    Adult Education State Programs.--For adult education State 
programs, the Committee recommends $628,221,000, the same 
amount as the budget request. The comparable fiscal year 2009 
funding level is $554,122,000. These funds are used by States 
for programs to enable economically disadvantaged adults to 
acquire basic literacy skills, to enable those who so desire to 
complete a secondary education, and to make available to adults 
the means to become more employable, productive, and 
responsible citizens.
    The Committee recommendation continues the English literacy 
and civics education State grants set-aside within the adult 
education State grants appropriation. Within the total, 
$75,000,000 is available to help States or localities affected 
significantly by immigration and large limited-English 
populations to implement programs that help immigrants acquire 
English literacy skills, gain knowledge about the rights and 
responsibilities of citizenship, and develop skills that will 
enable them to navigate key institutions of American life.
    Within the Committee recommendation, up to $46,000,000 is 
available to be distributed to States that did not receive 
their full allocations in fiscal years 2003 through 2008 due to 
an administrative error. The Committee bill includes language 
authorizing the allocation of these funds on this basis, as 
well as providing the authority to the Secretary to hold 
harmless States that were overpaid over these years. This 
language was proposed in the budget request.
    National Leadership Activities.--The Committee recommends 
$13,346,000 for national leadership activities, the same amount 
as the budget request. The comparable funding level for fiscal 
year 2009 is $6,878,000.
    Under this program, the Department supports applied 
research, development, dissemination, evaluation, and program 
improvement activities to assist States in their efforts to 
improve the quality of adult education programs.
    The Committee supports the Department's review of 
activities supported by the National Institute for Literacy as 
a means to identify the professional development, technical 
assistance, and other services to adult learners and the adult 
education community that need to be continued. The Committee 
encourages the Department to take special note of the national 
discussion lists; Bridges to Practice/Learning to Achieve 
program; regional resource centers; and teacher, student and 
administrator databases among the various activities that 
should be supported. In addition, the Committee encourages the 
Office of Vocational and Adult Education to work with the 
Institute of Education Sciences to explore how best to support 
the research needs of the adult education field, including 
through possible dedicated funding for an adult education-
focused research grant competition and establishment of an 
adult education and literacy research and development center.
    National Institute for Literacy.--The Committee does not 
recommend continued funding for the National Institute for 
Literacy, as proposed in the budget request. The comparable 
fiscal year 2009 funding level is $6,468,000. The Institute 
provides national leadership on issues related to literacy, 
coordinates literary services and policy, and serves as a 
national resource for adult education and literacy programs. 
The center also engages in a variety of capacity-building 
activities that support the development of State, regional, and 
national literary services.

Smaller Learning Communities

    The Committee recommends $88,000,000 for this program, the 
same amount as proposed in the budget request and available in 
fiscal year 2009. This program supports competitive grants to 
local educational agencies to enable them to create smaller 
learning communities in large schools. Funds are available to 
study, research, develop and implement strategies for creating 
smaller learning communities, as well as professional 
development for staff. Two types of grants are made under this 
program: planning grants, which help LEAs plan smaller learning 
communities, and implementation grants, which help create or 
expand such learning environments.

State Grants for Incarcerated Youth Offenders

    The Committee recommends $17,186,000 for education and 
training for incarcerated individuals, the same amount as 
fiscal year 2009 and the budget request. This program provides 
grants to State correctional education agencies to assist and 
encourage incarcerated youth to acquire functional literacy, 
life and job skills, through the pursuit of a postsecondary 
education certificate or an associate of arts or bachelor's 
degree. Grants also assist correction agencies in providing 
employment counseling and other related services that start 
during incarceration and continue through prerelease and while 
on parole. Under current law, each student is eligible for a 
grant of not more than $3,000 annually for tuition, books, and 
essential materials, and not more than $300 annually for 
related services such as career development, substance abuse 
counseling, parenting skills training, and health education. In 
order to participate in a program, a student must be no more 
than 35 years of age and be eligible to be released from prison 
within 7 years. An individual may receive, for a period not to 
exceed 7 years, of which 2 years may be devoted to study in 
remedial or graduate education.

                      Student Financial Assistance

Appropriations, 2009\1\................................. $36,470,973,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................  19,296,809,000
House allowance.........................................  19,634,905,000
Committee recommendation................................  19,296,809,000

\1\Includes $17,314,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 funding (Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$19,296,809,000 for student financial assistance. The fiscal 
year 2009 comparable amount is $36,470,973,000, including 
$17,314,000,000 available in the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act of 2009 and the budget request provides 
$19,269,809,000 for this purpose. Program authorities and 
descriptions assume the continuation of current law.

Federal Pell Grant Program

    For Pell Grant awards in the 2010/2011 academic year, the 
Committee recommends $17,495,000,000 to increase the maximum 
discretionary Pell Grant award level to $4,860. Additional 
mandatory funding provided in the College Cost Reduction and 
Access Act would increase this maximum award by $690, to a 
total of $5,550.
    Pell Grants provide need-based financial assistance that 
helps low- and middle-income undergraduate students and their 
families defray a portion of the costs of post-secondary 
education and vocational training. Awards are determined 
according to a statutory need analysis formula that takes into 
account a student's family income and assets, household size, 
and the number of family members, excluding parents, attending 
post-secondary institutions. Pell Grants are considered the 
foundation of Federal post-secondary student aid.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants

    The Committee recommends $757,465,000 for Federal 
supplemental educational opportunity grants [SEOG], the same as 
the fiscal year 2009 level and the same as the budget request. 
This program provides funds to post-secondary institutions for 
need-based grants to undergraduate students. Institutions must 
contribute 25 percent toward SEOG awards, which are subject to 
a maximum grant level of $4,000. School financial aid officers 
have flexibility to determine student awards, though they must 
give priority to Pell Grant recipients with exceptional need.

Federal Work-study Programs

    The Committee bill provides $980,492,000 for the Federal 
work-study program, the same amount as the budget request. The 
comparable fiscal year 2009 level was $1,180,492,000, including 
$200,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding.
    This program provides grants to more than 3,300 
institutions to help an estimated 800,000 undergraduate, 
graduate, and professional students meet the costs of post-
secondary education through part-time employment. Work-study 
jobs must pay at least the Federal minimum wage and 
institutions must provide at least 25 percent of student 
earnings. Institutions also must use at least 7 percent of 
their grants for community service jobs.

Federal Perkins Loans

    The Federal Perkins loan program supports student loan 
revolving funds built up with capital contributions to nearly 
1,900 participating institutions. Institutions use these 
revolving funds, which also include Federal capital 
contributions [FCC], institutional contributions equal to one-
third of the FCC, and student repayments, to provide low-
interest (5 percent) loans that help financially needy students 
pay the costs of post-secondary education.
    The administration has proposed to restructure the Perkins 
Loan program as a mandatory credit program, with nearly 
$6,000,000,000 a year in new loan volume--six times the current 
Perkins volume.

Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership Program [LEAP]

    For the LEAP program, the Committee recommends $63,852,000, 
the same amount as the comparable funding level for fiscal year 
2009 and the budget request.
    The LEAP program provides a Federal match to States as an 
incentive for providing need-based grant and work-study 
assistance to eligible post-secondary students.

                       Student Aid Administration

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................    $813,402,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     870,402,000
House allowance.........................................     870,402,000
Committee recommendation................................     870,402,000

\1\Includes $60,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 funding (Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee recommends $870,402,000 for the Student Aid 
Administration account, for activities funded under this 
account, as reauthorized by the Higher Education Reconciliation 
Act of 2005, the same amount as the budget request. The fiscal 
year 2009 comparable amount is $813,402,000, including 
$60,000,000 available in the American Recovery and Reinvestment 
Act of 2009. These funds are available until expended. That act 
reclassified most of the administrative costs of the Student 
Aid Account that were classified as mandatory spending through 
fiscal year 2006.
    Funds appropriated for the Student Aid Administration 
account will support the Department's student aid management 
expenses. The Office of Federal Student Aid and Office of 
Postsecondary Education have primary responsibility for 
administering Federal student financial assistance programs.

                            Higher Education

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................  $2,200,150,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   2,050,191,000
House allowance.........................................   2,294,882,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,106,749,000

\1\Includes $100,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 funding (Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,106,749,000 
for higher education programs. The administration requested 
$2,050,191,000 and the fiscal year 2009 level was 
$2,200,150,000, including $100,000,000 available in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, for programs in this 
account.

Aid for Institutional Development

    The Committee recommends $542,943,000, the same as the 
administration's request. The fiscal year 2009 appropriation 
was $507,088,000.
    Strengthening Institutions.--The Committee bill recommends 
$84,000,000, the same as the administration's request. The part 
A program supports competitive, 1-year planning and 5-year 
development grants for institutions with a significant 
percentage of financially needy students and low educational 
and general expenditures per student in comparison with similar 
institutions. Applicants may use part A funds to develop 
faculty, strengthen academic programs, improve institutional 
management, and expand student services. Institutions awarded 
funding under this program are not eligible to receive grants 
under other sections of part A or part B.
    Hispanic-serving Institutions.--The Committee recommends 
$97,919,000, the same as the administration's request, for 
competitive grants to institutions at which Hispanic students 
make up at least 25 percent of enrollment. Institutions 
applying for title V funds must meet the regular part A 
requirements. Funds may be used for acquisition, rental or 
lease of scientific or laboratory equipment, renovation of 
instructional facilities, development of faculty, support for 
academic programs, institutional management, and purchase of 
educational materials. Title V recipients are not eligible for 
other awards provided under title III, parts A and B.
    Strengthening Historically Black Colleges and 
Universities.--The Committee recommends $250,000,000, the same 
as the administration's request, for part B grants. The part B 
strengthening historically black colleges and universities 
[HBCU] program makes formula grants to HBCUs that may be used 
to purchase equipment, construct and renovate facilities, 
develop faculty, support academic programs, strengthen 
institutional management, enhance fundraising activities, 
provide tutoring and counseling services to students, and 
conduct outreach to elementary and secondary school students. 
The minimum allotment is $500,000 for each eligible 
institution. Part B recipients are not eligible for awards 
under part A.
    Strengthening Historically Black Graduate Institutions.--
The Committee recommends $61,425,000, the same as the 
administration's request, for the part B, section 326 program. 
The section 326 program provides 5-year grants to strengthen 
historically black graduate institutions [HBGIs]. Grants may be 
used for any part B purpose and to establish an endowment.
    Strengthening Predominately Black Institutions [PBI].--The 
Committee recommends $7,875,000 for this part A program, the 
same amount as the budget request. This section 318 program 
provides 5-year grants to PBIs to plan and implement programs 
to enhance the institutions' capacity to serve more low- and 
middle-income Black American students. Funding is allocated 
among PBIs based on the number of Pell Grant recipients 
enrolled, the number of graduates, and the percentage of 
graduate who are attending a baccalaureate degree-granting 
institution or a graduate or professional school in degree 
programs in which Black American students are underrepresented.
    Strengthening Asian American and Native American Pacific 
Islander-serving Institutions [AANAPISI].--The Committee 
recommends $2,625,000 for this part A program, the same amount 
as the budget request. This section 320 program provides 
competitive grants to AANAPISIs that have an enrollment of 
undergraduate students that is at least 10 percent Asian 
American or Native American Pacific Islander students. Grants 
may be used to improve and their capacity to serve Asian 
American and Native American Pacific Islander students and low-
income individuals.
    Strengthening Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian-serving 
Institutions.--The Committee recommends $12,158,000, the same 
as the administration's request, for this program.
    The purpose of this program is to improve and expand the 
capacity of institutions serving Alaska Native and Native 
Hawaiian students. Funds may be used to plan, develop, and 
implement activities that encourage: faculty and curriculum 
development; better fund and administrative management; 
renovation and improvement of educational facilities; student 
services; and the purchase of library and other educational 
materials.
    Strengthening Native American Nontribal-Serving 
Institutions.--The Committee recommends $2,625,000 for the 
program, the same as the administration's request.
    Strengthening Tribally Controlled Colleges and 
Universities.--The Committee recommends $24,316,000 for this 
program. Tribal colleges and universities rely on a portion of 
the funds provided to address developmental needs, including 
faculty development, curriculum, and student services.

International Education and Foreign Language Studies

    The bill includes a total of $118,881,000 for international 
education and foreign language programs, which is the same as 
the administration request and the comparable fiscal year 2009 
level.
    The Committee bill includes language allowing funds to be 
used to support visits and study in foreign countries by 
individuals who plan to utilize their language skills in world 
areas vital to the United States national security in the 
fields of government, international development, and the 
professions. Bill language also allows up to 1 percent of the 
funds provided to be used for program evaluation, national 
outreach, and information dissemination activities. This 
language is continued from last year's bill and was proposed in 
the budget request.
    Domestic Programs.--The Committee recommends $102,335,000 
for domestic program activities related to international 
education and foreign language studies, including international 
business education, under title VI of the HEA. This is the same 
as the fiscal year 2009 level and the request. Domestic 
programs include national resource centers, undergraduate 
international studies and foreign language programs, 
international research and studies projects, international 
business education projects and centers, American overseas 
research centers, language resource centers, foreign language 
and area studies fellowships, and technological innovation and 
cooperation for foreign information access.
    Overseas Programs.--The bill includes $14,709,000 for 
overseas programs authorized under the Mutual Educational and 
Cultural Exchange Act of 1961, popularly known as the 
Fulbright-Hays Act, the same as the fiscal year 2009 level and 
the administration request. Under these overseas programs, 
grants are provided for group and faculty research projects 
abroad, doctoral dissertation research abroad, and special 
bilateral projects. Unlike other programs authorized by the 
Fulbright-Hays Act and administered by the Department of State, 
these Department of Education programs focus on training 
American instructors and students in order to improve foreign 
language and area studies education in the United States.
    Institute for International Public Policy.--The Committee 
bill recommends $1,837,000 for the Institute for International 
Public Policy, the same as the administration request. This 
program is designed to increase the number of minority 
individuals in foreign service and related careers by providing 
a grant to a consortium of institutions for undergraduate and 
graduate level foreign language and international studies. An 
institutional match of 50 percent is required.

Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education

    The Committee recommends $85,624,000 for the Fund for the 
Improvement of Postsecondary Education [FIPSE]. FIPSE 
stimulates improvements in education beyond high school by 
supporting exemplary, locally developed projects that have 
potential for addressing problems and recommending improvements 
in postsecondary education.
    Within the funds provided, the Committee has included 
sufficient funds to create a consortium of institutions of 
higher learning that offer interdisciplinary programs which 
focus on poverty. This activity was authorized in the recent 
reauthorization of the Higher Education Act.
    Erma Byrd Scholarships.--Within the total, the Committee 
recommendation includes $1,500,000 to continue the Erma Byrd 
Scholarships program.
    Training for Realtime Writers.--Within the total, the 
Committee recommendation includes $1,000,000 for the Training 
for Realtime Writers program authorized by section 872 of the 
Higher Education Act. This program provides grants to 
institutions of higher education to establish programs to train 
realtime writers. Eligible activities include curriculum 
development, student recruitment, distance learning, mentoring, 
and scholarships. The program places a priority on encouraging 
individuals with disabilities to pursue careers in realtime 
writing. More than 30 million Americans are considered deaf or 
hard of hearing and many require captioning services to 
participate in mainstream activities and gain access to 
emergency broadcasts. Federal law requires that all television 
broadcasts be closed captioned, yet the Committee has been 
informed that a shortage of trained captioners is creating a 
barrier to full quality captioning of realtime television 
programming such as news, weather and emergency messaging.
    Off-campus Community Service Program.--Within, the total, 
the Committee recommendation includes $1,000,000 for the off-
campus community service program authorized under section 447 
of the Higher Education Act.
    The Committee recommendation also includes bill language 
requiring that funds be provided to the following organizations 
in the amounts specified:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                        Project                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
AIB College of Business, Des Moines, IA, to continue            $400,000
 recruiting and training captioners and court
 reporters and to provide scholarships to students....
Alcorn State University, Alcorn, MS, for graduate                300,000
 level curriculum development.........................
Assumption College, Worcester, MA, for the acquisition           100,000
 of educational equipment and information technology..
Benedictine University, Lisle, IL, to design, create,            150,000
 and implement open source educational materials for
 use in introductory college courses..................
University of Illinois at Urbana--Champaign, Urbana,             150,000
 IL, to design, create, and implement open-source
 educational materials for use in introductory college
 courses..............................................
Blackburn College, Carlinville, IL, for science                  225,000
 education programs and laboratory upgrades, including
 the purchase of equipment............................
Blue Mountain College, Blue Mountain, MS, for the                100,000
 purchase of math and science equipment...............
Blue Mountain Community College, Pendleton, OR, to               100,000
 expand post-secondary education including college
 preparatory, advanced degree and continuing education
 programs.............................................
Brescia University, Owensboro, KY, for education                 500,000
 programs including the purchase of equipment.........
Buena Vista University, Storm Lake, IA, for support              200,000
 for students with disabilities.......................
Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, for                  100,000
 Internet-based foreign language programs.............
Cedar Crest College, Allentown, PA, for science                  100,000
 education programs, including the purchase of
 equipment............................................
Center for Empowered Living and Learning, Denver, CO,            300,000
 for an education program on terrorism................
Chestnut Hill College, Philadelphia, PA, for the                 100,000
 Center for Environmental Sciences and Sustainability.
Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH, for                   200,000
 supportive services to degree-seeking veterans.......
College Success Foundation, Washington, DC, for                  500,000
 mentoring and scholarships...........................
Colorado State University--Pueblo, Pueblo, CO, for               125,000
 STEM programs, including equipment...................
Command and General Staff College Foundation,                    250,000
 Leavenworth, KS, for curriculum and course
 development for a homeland security masters degree
 program..............................................
Community College of Allegheny County, Pittsburgh, PA,           100,000
 to support technical and career postsecondary
 education programs...................................
Community College of Rhode Island, Warwick, RI, for a            200,000
 transition to college program........................
Community College System of New Hampshire, Concord,              500,000
 NH, to purchase equipment and technology to modernize
 the teaching of nursing..............................
County of Greensville, Emporia, VA, for equipment and            400,000
 technology upgrades at the Southside Virginia
 Education Center.....................................
Delta State University, Cleveland, MS, for teacher               300,000
 training in science and curriculum development.......
Dickinson State University, Dickinson, ND, for its               600,000
 Theodore Roosevelt Center............................
Eastern New Mexico University, Portales, NM, for                 100,000
 educational equipment and technology infrastructure..
Edmonds Community College, Lynnwood, WA, for an                  100,000
 advanced materials and manufacturing training center,
 including educational equipment......................
Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the Senate, Boston,            1,000,000
 MA, for facilities, equipment, and program
 development, and may include support for an endowment
Emerson College, Boston, MA, for educational equipment           100,000
 and technology infrastructure........................
Emmanuel College, Boston, MA, for educational                    200,000
 equipment and technology infrastructure to support
 the Center for Science Education.....................
Endicott College, Beverly, MA, for educational                   150,000
 equipment and technology infrastructure..............
Evergreen State College, Olympia, WA, to expand                  325,000
 environmental and sustainability education
 opportunities to colleges and universities statewide.
Fulton-Montgomery Community College, Johnstown, NY, to           200,000
 establish a Center for Engineering and Technology....
Goodwin College, East Hartford, CT, for an                       175,000
 environmental studies program........................
Gordon College, Wenham, MA, for educational equipment            200,000
 and technology infrastructure........................
Harrisburg University of Science and Technology,                 100,000
 Harrisburg, PA, for curriculum development and for
 laboratory upgrades, including the purchase of
 equipment............................................
Hawaii Community College, Hilo, HI, for supportive               500,000
 services and classroom courses to prepare students
 unprepared for postsecondary education...............
Highline Community College, Des Moines, WA, to create            100,000
 a skilled supply chain management sector workforce by
 training education and workforce partners who work
 with students and other individuals about the
 opportunities available in this field................
Huntingdon College, Montgomery, AL, for teacher                  100,000
 training.............................................
Hutchinson Community College, Hutchinson, KS, for the            250,000
 purchase of equipment................................
Iowa Lakes Community College, Estherville, IA, for a             400,000
 training program in construction technology and wind
 turbine technology, including equipment..............
Iowa Valley Community College District, Marshalltown,            400,000
 IA, for a training program in agricultural and
 renewable energy technology, including the purchase
 of equipment.........................................
Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana, Northwest                 100,000
 Region, Indianapolis, IN, for education programs
 including equipment..................................
Jones County Junior College, Ellisville, MS, for                 200,000
 purchase of equipment and technology upgrades........
Junior College District of Metropolitan Kansas City,             500,000
 MO, for purchase of equipment and technology upgrades
 for the radiological technology laboratory...........
Kalamazoo Valley Community College, Kalamazoo, MI, for           200,000
 equipment relating to the Wind Turbine Technician
 Academy..............................................
Keene State College, Keene, NH, for curriculum                   100,000
 development and educational equipment for the
 Monadnock Biodiesel Collaborative....................
Lackawanna College, Scranton, PA, for laboratory                 100,000
 upgrades to a science center, including the purchase
 of equipment.........................................
Lake Area Technical Institute, Watertown, SD, for                150,000
 educational equipment related to fire training.......
Lake Area Technical Institute, Watertown, SD, for                500,000
 educational equipment for the Energy Technology
 Program..............................................
Lakes Region Community College, Concord, NH, for                 125,000
 curriculum development and educational equipment for
 the Energy Services and Technology program...........
Leeward Community College, Pearl City, HI, to provide            400,000
 college preparatory education for Filipino stu-
 dents................................................
Lesley University, Cambridge, MA, for development of             150,000
 the National Center for Teachers and School Leaders
 program..............................................
Lincoln University, Lincoln University, PA, for                  100,000
 college preparation programs.........................
Lorain County Community College, Elyria, OH, for                 200,000
 education programs including the purchase of
 equipment............................................
Loras College, Dubuque, IA, for science education                200,000
 equipment............................................
Loyola University New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, to               400,000
 establish The Center for Music and Arts
 Entrepreneurship & Music Industry Studies............
Lyndon State College, Lyndonville, VT, for a center              300,000
 for rural students...................................
Mercyhurst College, Erie, PA, for education programs             100,000
 and support services for individuals with
 disabilities.........................................
Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN,             750,000
 for professional development.........................
Midway College, Inc., Midway, KY, for facilities and             100,000
 equipment............................................
Miles Community College, Miles City, MT, for                     100,000
 curriculum development and educational equipment
 relating to bioenergy................................
Minnesota State Colleges and Universities, Office of             200,000
 the Chancellor, St. Paul, MN, for career and
 education services to veterans.......................
Minot State University, Minot, ND, to establish a                950,000
 Center for Community Research and Service............
Mississippi College, Clinton, MS, to support dyslexia            250,000
 education and training...............................
Missouri State University, Springfield, MO, for                1,000,000
 technology, equipment, and educational materials.....
Mott Community College, Flint, MI, for the Center for            200,000
 Advanced Manufacturing...............................
Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA, for a civic                   100,000
 engagement and service learning program..............
National Labor College, George Meany Center for Labor            400,000
 Studies, Silver Spring, MD, for the Adult Learning
 Program..............................................
Nazareth College, Rochester, NY, for educational                 300,000
 equipment and technology upgrades relating to math
 and science education................................
Northeast Iowa Community College, Calmar, IA, for a              300,000
 training program in renewable energy technology......
Northern Kentucky University, Highland Heights, KY,            2,400,000
 for the purchase of equipment........................
Pearl River Community College, Poplarville, MS, for              200,000
 instructional technology including the purchase of
 equipment............................................
Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA, for                   100,000
 educational equipment relating to science............
Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, KS, for                   400,000
 education programs...................................
Pulaski Technical College, North Little Rock, AR, for            100,000
 library improvements, including equipment, program
 costs and collections................................
Rhode Island College Foundation, Providence, RI, for             200,000
 educational equipment relating to science............
Rockford College, Rockford, IL, for technology                   300,000
 upgrades and educational equipment...................
Security on Campus, Inc., King of Prussia, PA, for a             100,000
 campus crime and emergency response training program.
Simpson College, Indianola, IA, for the creation of              500,000
 the John C. Culver Public Policy Center..............
Snow College, Ephraim, UT, for health professions                600,000
 education programs...................................
Southern Arkansas University Tech, Camden, AR, for               150,000
 curriculum development and educational equipment in
 the Aerospace Manufacturing program..................
St. Norbert College, De Pere, WI, for science                    800,000
 education, which may include equipment...............
Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, PA, for science             100,000
 education programs and laboratory upgrades, including
 the purchase of equipment............................
Tabor College, Hillsboro, KS, for rural nursing and              350,000
 education programs...................................
Truckee Meadows Community College, Reno, NV, to                  600,000
 establish an online degree program for nontraditional
 students.............................................
University of Massachusetts--Boston, Boston, MA, for             200,000
 educational equipment to support a developmental
 science research center..............................
University of Arkansas at Monticello, Monticello, AR,            250,000
 for educational equipment, technology and wiring
 relating to energy and environmental education.......
University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR, for                  100,000
 curriculum development and educational equipment
 relating to information technology...................
University of Dubuque, Dubuque, IA, for equipment and            400,000
 technology for its aviation degree program...........
University of Hawaii at Hilo Clinical Pharmacy                 1,500,000
 Training Program, Hilo, HI, for clinical pharmacy
 training program and applied rural science program...
University of Hawaii School of Law, Honolulu, HI, for            400,000
 the health policy center.............................
University of Massachusetts--Lowell, Lowell, MA, for a           200,000
 cooperative education program........................
University of Montana--Mike & Maureen Mansfield                  100,000
 Center, Missoula, MT, to establish the Institute for
 Leadership and Public Service to fulfill the purposes
 of the Mansfield Center, including the creation of an
 endowment............................................
University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD, to                   500,000
 identify and address the educational needs of
 veterans with disabilities...........................
University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS,             200,000
 for curriculum and professional development at
 University of Southern Mississippi--Gulf Coast campus
University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS,             100,000
 for teacher training at the Center for Economic
 Education............................................
University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS,             500,000
 for the development of a student retention initia-
 tive.................................................
University of Virginia Center for Politics,                      100,000
 Charlottesville, VA, to develop interactive civic
 lessons for high school students.....................
University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL, for                   200,000
 education programs for veterans......................
Urban College, Boston, MA, to support higher education           500,000
 programs serving low-income and minority students....
Utah State University, Logan, UT, to establish a land-           750,000
 grant education and research network.................
Valley City State University, Valley City, ND, for the           475,000
 Great Plains STEM Education Center...................
Voices of September 11th, New Canaan, CT, to continue            100,000
 the 9/11 Living Memorial Project.....................
Weber State University, Ogden, UT, for outreach web-             750,000
 based nursing program, including the purchase of
 equipment............................................
Weber State University, Ogden, UT, for curriculum                100,000
 development..........................................
Western Governors University, Salt Lake City, UT, for            600,000
 a nationally accredited online-competency based
 College of Health Professionals......................
Western Kentucky University Research Foundation,               2,000,000
 Bowling Green, KY, for equipment purchase............
Westminster College, Salt Lake City, UT, to expand               500,000
 distance learning technology including the purchase
 of equipment.........................................
Wheelock College, Boston, MA, to develop a higher                100,000
 education access program for early childhood
 educators............................................
Whitworth University, Spokane, WA, for science,                  100,000
 technology, engineering, and mathematics equipment...
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Model Comprehensive Transition and Postsecondary Programs for Students 
        with Intellectual Disabilities

    The Committee recommendation includes $14,000,000 for the 
Comprehensive Transition and Postsecondary Education Model 
Demonstration Grants as authorized by section 769 of the Higher 
Education Act. These funds will be used to award competitive 
grants to postsecondary institutions to establish model 
programs to help students with intellectual disabilities 
transition to and complete college. The programs will focus on 
academic enrichment; socialization; independent living; and 
integrated work experiences and career skills that lead to 
gainful employment for individuals with intellectual 
disabilities. The Committee recommends that the grants awarded 
under this competition be a minimum of $1,000,000 for each year 
of the award period.

Legal Assistance Loan Repayment Program

    The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for the Legal 
Assistance Loan Repayment Program, as authorized by section 
428L of the Higher Education Act, which authorizes student loan 
repayment assistance for civil legal assistance lawyers. The 
Legal Assistance Loan Repayment Program addresses the serious 
problem facing legal services across the country in recruitment 
and retention of qualified attorneys who provide invaluable 
legal assistance to our Nation's neediest citizens, including 
the elderly, persons with disabilities, persons impacted by 
natural disaster victims and victims of domestic violence.

Minority Science and Engineering Improvement

    The Committee recommends $9,006,000 for the Minority 
Science and Engineering Improvement program [MSEIP], the same 
as the administration request. The comparable fiscal year 2009 
level is $8,577,000. Funds are used to provide discretionary 
grants to institutions with minority enrollments greater than 
50 percent to purchase equipment, develop curricula, and 
support advanced faculty training. Grants are intended to 
improve science and engineering education programs and increase 
the number of minority students in the fields of science, 
mathematics, and engineering.

Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Career and Technical Institutions

    The Committee recommends $7,773,000 for tribally controlled 
postsecondary vocational institutions, the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 level and the administration's request. This program 
provides grants for the operation and improvement of two 
tribally controlled postsecondary vocational institutions to 
ensure continued and expanding opportunities for Indian 
students.

Federal TRIO Programs

    The Committee recommends $848,089,000 for Federal TRIO 
Programs, the same as the fiscal year 2009 level and the 
administration's request.
    TRIO programs provide a variety of services to improve 
postsecondary education opportunities for low-income 
individuals and first-generation college students: Upward Bound 
offers disadvantaged high school students academic services to 
develop the skills and motivation needed to continue their 
education; Student Support Services provides remedial 
instruction, counseling, summer programs and grant aid to 
disadvantaged college students to help them complete their 
postsecondary education; Talent Search identifies and counsels 
individuals between ages 11 and 27 regarding opportunities for 
completing high school and enrolling in postsecondary 
education; Educational Opportunity Centers provide information 
and counseling on available financial and academic assistance 
to low-income adults who are first-generation college students; 
and the Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program 
supports research internships, seminars, tutoring, and other 
activities to encourage disadvantaged college students to 
enroll in graduate programs.
    The Committee recognizes that supportive services aimed at 
increasing retention and graduation of low-income students in 
college are an important complement to student financial aid--
particularly the Pell Grant program. Many such retention 
services are supported by the Federal TRIO Program's Student 
Support Services effort. The Committee intends that the funds 
provided will maintain the number of Student Support Services 
programs.

Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs 
        [GEARUP]

    The Committee recommends $313,212,000 for GEARUP, the same 
as the fiscal year 2009 level and the administration's request.
    Under this program funds are used by States and 
partnerships of colleges, middle and high schools, and 
community organizations to assist middle and high schools 
serving a high percentage of low-income students. Services 
provided help students prepare for and pursue a postsecondary 
education.

Byrd Honors Scholarships

    The Committee recommends $42,000,000 for the Byrd Honors 
scholarship program. The fiscal year 2009 comparable amount and 
the budget request is $40,642,000.
    The Byrd Honors scholarship program is designed to promote 
student excellence and achievement and to recognize 
exceptionally able students who show promise of continued 
excellence. Funds are allocated to State education agencies 
based on each State's school-aged population. The State 
education agencies select the recipients of the scholarships in 
consultation with school administrators, teachers, counselors, 
and parents. The funds provided will support a new cohort of 
first-year students in 2010, and continue support for the 2007, 
2008, and 2009 cohorts of students in their fourth, third and 
second years of study, respectively.

Javits Fellowships

    The Committee recommends $9,687,000 for the Javits 
Fellowships program, the same as the fiscal year 2009 level and 
the budget request.
    The Javits Fellowships program provides fellowships of up 
to 4 years to students of superior ability who are pursuing 
doctoral degrees in the arts, humanities, and social sciences 
at any institution of their choice. Each fellowship consists of 
a student stipend to cover living costs, and an institutional 
payment to cover each fellow's tuition and other expenses. The 
Committee bill includes language proposed in the budget that 
stipulates that funds provided in the fiscal year 2010 
appropriation support fellowships for the 2011-2012 academic 
year.

Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need

    The Committee recommends $31,030,000 for graduate 
assistance in areas of national need, the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 level and the budget request. This program awards 
competitive grants to graduate academic departments and 
programs for fellowship support in areas of national need as 
determined by the Secretary. The Secretary designated the 
following areas of national need: biology, chemistry, computer 
and information sciences, engineering, mathematics, physics, 
and nursing. Recipients must demonstrate financial need and 
academic excellence, and seek the highest degree in their 
fields.

Teacher Quality Partnership Program

    The Committee recommends $48,000,000 for the teacher 
quality partnership program. The fiscal year 2009 comparable 
amount is $150,000,000, including $100,000,000 available in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The budget request 
proposed $50,000,000 within the Innovation and Improvement 
account.

Child Care Access Means Parents in Schools

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $16,034,000 
for the Child Care Access Means Parents in School [CCAMPIS] 
program, the same as the fiscal year 2009 level and the 
administration request. CCAMPIS was established in the Higher 
Education Amendments of 1998 to support the efforts of a 
growing number of nontraditional students who are struggling to 
complete their college degrees at the same time that they take 
care of their children. Discretionary grants of up to 4 years 
are made to institutions of higher education to support or 
establish a campus-based childcare program primarily serving 
the needs of low-income students enrolled at the institution.

Demonstration Projects To Ensure Quality Higher Education for Students 
        With Disabilities

    The Committee recommends $6,755,000 for this program, the 
same amount as the comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and the budget request. This program's purpose is to ensure 
that students with disabilities receive a high-quality 
postsecondary education. Grants are made to support model 
demonstration projects that provide technical assistance and 
professional development activities for faculty and 
administrators in institutions of higher education.

Underground Railroad Program

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,945,000 for the 
Underground Railroad Program, the same as the fiscal year 2009 
level and the budget request. The administration did not 
request funding for this program. The program was authorized by 
the Higher Education Amendments of 1998 and was funded for the 
first time in fiscal year 1999. Grants are provided to 
research, display, interpret, and collect artifacts relating to 
the history of the underground railroad. Educational 
organizations receiving funds must demonstrate substantial 
private support through a public-private partnership, create an 
endowment fund that provides for ongoing operation of the 
facility, and establish a network of satellite centers 
throughout the United States to share information and teach 
people about the significance of the Underground Railroad in 
American history.

GPRA/Higher Education Act Program Evaluation

    The Committee recommends $609,000 for data collection 
associated with the Government Performance and Results Act data 
collection and to evaluate programs authorized by the Higher 
Education Act, the same as the fiscal year 2009 level and the 
budget request. These funds are used to comply with the 
Government Performance and Results Act, which requires the 
collection of data and evaluation of Higher Education programs 
and the performance of recipients of Higher Education funds.

B.J. Stupak Olympic Scholarships

    The Committee recommendation includes $977,000 for B.J. 
Stupak Scholarships, the same as the fiscal year 2009 level and 
the budget request.

Thurgood Marshall Legal Educational Opportunity Program

    The Committee recommendation includes $3,000,000 for the 
Thurgood Marshall Educational Opportunity Program, the same as 
the fiscal year 2009 level and the budget request.
    Under this program, funds help low-income, minority, or 
disadvantaged college students with the information, 
preparation, and financial assistance to enter and complete law 
school study. The Higher Education Act stipulates that the 
Secretary make an award to or contract with the Council on 
Legal Education Opportunity to carry out authorized activities.

BA Degrees in STEM and Critical Foreign Languages

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,092,000 for this 
activity, the same as the fiscal year 2009 level and the budget 
request.
    Under this program grants are awarded on a competitive 
basis, to eligible recipients to implement teacher education 
programs that promote effective teaching skills and lead to a 
baccalaureate degree in science, technology, engineering, 
mathematics, or a critical foreign language with concurrent 
teacher certification.

MA Degrees in STEM and Critical Foreign Languages

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,092,000 for this 
activity, the same as the fiscal year 2009 level and the budget 
request.
    Under this program grants are awarded, on a competitive 
basis, to eligible recipients to develop and implement part-
time master's degree programs in science, technology, 
engineering, mathematics, or critical foreign language 
education for teachers in order to enhance the teacher's 
content knowledge and teaching skill.

                           Howard University

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $234,977,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     234,977,000
House allowance.........................................     234,977,000
Committee recommendation................................     234,977,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $234,977,000 
for Howard University, the same amount as the comparable fiscal 
year 2009 funding and the budget request. Howard University is 
located in the District of Columbia and offers undergraduate, 
graduate, and professional degrees through 12 schools and 
colleges. The university also administers the Howard University 
Hospital, which provides both inpatient and outpatient care, as 
well as training in the health professions. Federal funds from 
this account support approximately 50 percent of the 
university's projected educational and general expenditures, 
excluding the hospital. The Committee recommends, within the 
funds provided, not less than $3,600,000 shall be for the 
endowment program.
    Howard University Hospital.--Within the funds provided, the 
Committee recommends $28,946,000 for the Howard University 
Hospital, the same amount as the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and the budget request. The hospital serves as a major acute 
and ambulatory care center for the District of Columbia and 
functions as a major teaching facility attached to the 
university. The Federal appropriation provides partial funding 
for the hospital's operations.

             College Housing and Academic Facilities Loans

Appropriations, 2009....................................        $461,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................         461,000
House allowance.........................................         461,000
Committee recommendation................................         461,000

    Federal Administration.--The Committee bill includes 
$461,000 for Federal administration of the CHAFL program, the 
same amount as the comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and the budget request.
    These funds will be used to reimburse the Department for 
expenses incurred in managing the existing CHAFL loan portfolio 
during fiscal year 2010. These expenses include salaries and 
benefits, travel, printing, contracts (including contracted 
loan servicing activities), and other expenses directly related 
to the administration of the CHAFL program.

  Historically Black College and University Capital Financing Program 
                                Account

Appropriations, 2009....................................     $10,354,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................      20,582,000
House allowance.........................................      20,582,000
Committee recommendation................................      10,354,000

    The Committee recommends $10,354,000 for the Historically 
Black College and University [HBCU] Capital Financing Program. 
The fiscal year 2009 funding level is $10,354,000 and the 
budget request includes $20,582,000 for this activity.
    The budget proposes $20,582,000 to pay for the subsidy 
costs of up to $178,221,000 in guaranteed loan authority under 
this program. The Committee has provided $10,000,000 for loan 
subsidy costs and slightly modified bill language.
    The HBCU Capital Financing Program makes capital available 
to HBCUs for construction, renovation, and repair of academic 
facilities by providing a Federal guarantee for private sector 
construction bonds. Construction loans will be made from the 
proceeds of the sale of the bonds.

                    Institute of Education Sciences

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................    $867,175,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     689,256,000
House allowance.........................................     664,256,000
Committee recommendation................................     679,256,000

\1\Includes $250,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 funding (Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee recommends $679,256,000 for the Institute of 
Education Sciences. The comparable fiscal year 2009 funding 
level is $867,175,000, which includes $250,000,000 available in 
the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The budget request 
includes $689,256,000 for authorized activities. This account 
supports education research, data collection and analysis 
activities, and the assessment of student progress.

                RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND DISSEMINATION

    The Committee recommends $211,196,000 for education 
research, development and national dissemination activities. 
The comparable fiscal year 2009 amount is $167,196,000 and the 
budget request includes $224,196,000 for these activities. 
Funds are available for obligation for 2 fiscal years. These 
funds support research, development, and dissemination 
activities that are aimed at expanding fundamental knowledge of 
education and promoting the use of research and development 
findings in the design of efforts to improve education.

                               STATISTICS

    The Committee recommends $108,521,000 for data gathering 
and statistical analysis activities of the National Center for 
Education Statistics [NCES], the same amount as the budget 
request. The comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level is 
$98,521,000.
    The NCES collects, analyzes, and reports statistics on 
education in the United States. Activities are carried out 
directly and through grants and contracts. The Center collects 
data on educational institutions at all levels, longitudinal 
data on student progress, and data relevant to public policy. 
The NCES also provides technical assistance to State and local 
education agencies and postsecondary institutions.

                   REGIONAL EDUCATIONAL LABORATORIES

    The Committee recommends $70,650,000 to continue support 
for the regional educational laboratories, the same amount as 
the budget request. The comparable fiscal year 2009 funding 
level is $67,569,000. Program funds support a network of 10 
laboratories that are responsible for promoting the use of 
broad-based systemic strategies to improve student achievement. 
The Committee recommends additional funds for the laboratories 
to increase their capacity to provide timely responses to 
requests for assistance on issues of urgent regional need.
    The Committee is pleased that the research, development, 
dissemination, and technical assistance activities carried out 
by the regional educational laboratories will be consistent 
with the standards for scientifically based research prescribed 
in the Education Sciences Reform Act of 2002. The Committee 
continues to believe that the laboratories, working 
collaboratively with the comprehensive centers and Department-
supported technical assistance providers, have an important 
role to play in helping parents, States, and school districts 
improve student achievement as called for in No Child Left 
Behind. In particular, the Committee intends for the 
laboratories and their technical assistance provider partners 
to provide products and services that will help States and 
school districts utilize the school improvement funds available 
in the Education for the Disadvantaged account to support 
school improvement activities that are supported by 
scientifically based research.

              RESEARCH AND INNOVATION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION

    The Committee recommends $73,585,000 for research and 
innovation in special education. The fiscal year 2009 level and 
the budget request both are $70,585,000. The National Center 
for Special Education Research addresses gaps in scientific 
knowledge in order to improve special education and early 
intervention services and outcomes for infants, toddlers, and 
children with disabilities. Funds provided to the center are 
available for obligation for 2 fiscal years.

               SPECIAL EDUCATION STUDIES AND EVALUATIONS

    The Committee recommends $11,460,000 for special education 
studies and evaluations, the same amount as the budget request. 
The comparable fiscal year 2009 level is $9,460,000.
    This program supports competitive grants, contracts, and 
cooperative agreements to assess the implementation of the 
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Funds also will be 
used to evaluate the effectiveness of State and local efforts 
to deliver special education services and early intervention 
programs. Funds are available for obligation for 2 fiscal 
years.

                         STATEWIDE DATA SYSTEMS

    The Committee recommendation includes $65,000,000 for 
statewide data systems, the same amount as the budget request. 
The fiscal year 2009 level is $315,000,000, which includes 
$250,000,000 available in the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act.
    This program supports competitive grants to State 
educational agencies to enable such agencies to design, 
develop, and implement statewide, longitudinal data systems to 
manage, analyze, disaggregate, and use individual student data. 
These systems may incorporate workforce and postsecondary 
education information. Funds are available for obligation for 2 
fiscal years.
    The Committee bill allows $10,000,000 to be used for 
statewide data coordinators, and other activities to improve 
the State's capability to use, report and maintain high-quality 
data in their systems. The bill also allows the Department to 
use funds to coordinate data collection and reporting with 
private sector initiatives, in order to help reduce the 
reporting burden on States and schools, while improving data 
accuracy and maintaining access to the data for research 
purposes. In addition, the budget proposes, and the bill 
includes, language to allow Statewide data systems to include 
information on children of all ages.

                               ASSESSMENT

    The Committee recommends $138,844,000 for assessment, the 
same amount as the comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and the budget request.
    These funds provide support for the National Assessment of 
Educational Progress [NAEP], a congressionally mandated 
assessment created to measure the educational achievement of 
American students. The primary goal of NAEP is to determine and 
report the status and trends over time in educational 
achievement, subject by subject. In 2002, the Department began 
paying for State participation in biennial reading and 
mathematics assessments in grades 4 and 8.
    Within the funds appropriated, the Committee recommends 
$8,723,000 for the National Assessment Governing Board [NAGB], 
the same amount as the comparable fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and budget request. The NAGB is responsible for 
formulating policy for NAEP.

                        Departmental Management


                         PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $433,482,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     456,500,000
House allowance.........................................     452,200,000
Committee recommendation................................     452,200,000

    The Committee recommends $452,200,000 for program 
administration. The comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level 
is $433,482,000 and the budget request includes $456,500,000 
for this purpose.
    Funds support personnel compensation and benefits, travel, 
rent, communications, utilities, printing, equipment and 
supplies, automated data processing, and other services 
required to award, administer, and monitor approximately 180 
Federal education programs. Support for program evaluation and 
studies and advisory councils is also provided under this 
activity.
    The budget request includes $8,200,000 for building 
renovations of the Mary E. Switzer building. The Committee 
recommends $8,200,000 for this purpose and makes the funds 
available until expended, as proposed in the budget request.

                        OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS

Appropriations, 2009....................................     $96,826,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     103,024,000
House allowance.........................................     103,024,000
Committee recommendation................................     103,024,000

    The Committee recommends $103,024,000 for the Office for 
Civil Rights [OCR], the same amount as the budget request. The 
comparable fiscal year 2009 amount is $96,826,000.
    The Office for Civil Rights is responsible for the 
enforcement of laws that prohibit discrimination on the basis 
of race, color, national origin, sex, disability, and age in 
all programs and institutions funded by the Department of 
Education. To carry out this responsibility, OCR investigates 
and resolves discrimination complaints, monitors desegregation 
and equal educational opportunity plans, reviews possible 
discriminatory practices by recipients of Federal education 
funds, and provides technical assistance to recipients of funds 
to help them meet civil rights requirements.

                    OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................     $68,539,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................      60,053,000
House allowance.........................................      60,053,000
Committee recommendation................................      60,053,000

\1\Includes $14,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 funding (Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee recommends $60,053,000 for the Office of the 
Inspector General, the same amount as the budget request. The 
fiscal year 2009 amount is $68,539,000, which includes 
$14,000,000 available in the American Recovery and Reinvestment 
Act.
    The Office of the Inspector General has the authority to 
investigate all departmental programs and administrative 
activities, including those under contract or grant, to prevent 
and detect fraud and abuse, and to ensure the quality and 
integrity of those programs. The Office investigates alleged 
misuse of Federal funds, and conducts audits to determine 
compliance with laws and regulations, efficiency of operations, 
and effectiveness in achieving program goals.

                           General Provisions

    The Committee bill contains language which has been 
included in the bill since 1974, prohibiting the use of funds 
for the transportation of students or teachers in order to 
overcome racial imbalance (sec. 301).
    The Committee bill contains language included in the bill 
since 1977, prohibiting the involuntary transportation of 
students other than to the school nearest to the student's home 
(sec. 302).
    The Committee bill contains language which has been 
included in the bill since 1980, prohibiting the use of funds 
to prevent the implementation of programs of voluntary prayer 
and meditation in public schools (sec. 303).
    The Committee bill includes a provision giving the 
Secretary of Education authority to transfer up to 1 percent of 
any discretionary funds between appropriations (sec. 304).
    The Committee continues a provision that allows the 
outlying areas to consolidate funds under title V of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act (sec. 305).
    The Committee includes a new provision that prohibits the 
obligation of funds in this act for new awards under the 
Teacher Incentive Fund prior to the submission of an impact 
evaluation plan to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House of Representatives and the Senate (sec. 306).
    The Committee bill includes a new provision that makes 
technical changes to the Innovation Fund within the State 
Fiscal Stabilization Fund established in section 14007 of the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (sec. 307).
    The Committee bill includes a new provision concerning 
school libraries that amends the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act of 1965, as added by this bill by reference to S. 
1121 (sec. 308).
    The Committee bill includes a new provision that extends 
for 2 years an impact aid provision concerning the North 
Chicago school district (sec. 309).

                                TITLE IV

                            RELATED AGENCIES

 Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2009....................................      $5,094,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................       5,396,000
House allowance.........................................       5,396,000
Committee recommendation................................       5,396,000

    The Committee recommends $5,396,000 for fiscal year 2010 
for the Committee for Purchase from People Who Are Blind or 
Severely Disabled, the same as the fiscal year 2010 budget 
request. The fiscal year 2009 comparable level is $5,094,000.
    The Committee for Purchase from People Who Are Blind or 
Severely Disabled was established by the Javits-Wagner-O'Day 
Act of 1938 as amended. Its primary objective is to increase 
the employment opportunities for people who are blind or have 
other severe disabilities and, whenever possible, to prepare 
them to engage in competitive employment.

             Corporation for National and Community Service

Appropriations, 2009....................................  $1,090,866,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................   1,149,016,000
House allowance.........................................   1,059,016,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,157,016,000

    The Committee recommends $1,157,016,000 for the Corporation 
for National and Community Service in fiscal year 2010. The 
fiscal year 2009 comparable level was $1,090,866,000, including 
$201,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. 
The budget for fiscal year 2010 included $1,149,016,000.
    The Corporation for National and Community Service, a 
Corporation owned by the Federal Government, was established by 
the National and Community Service Trust Act of 1993 to enhance 
opportunities for national and community service and provide 
national service education awards. The Corporation makes grants 
to States, institutions of higher education, public and private 
nonprofit organizations, and others to create service 
opportunities for students, out-of-school youth, and adults.

                  DOMESTIC VOLUNTEER SERVICE PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $321,269,000 for fiscal year 2010 
for the domestic volunteer service programs of the Corporation 
for National and Community Service. The comparable level for 
fiscal year 2009 was $374,835,000, including $65,000,000 in 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The 
administration request for fiscal year 2010 was $318,832,000. 
The Corporation administers programs authorized under the 
Domestic Volunteer Service Act including: the Volunteers in 
Service to America Program [VISTA]; the Foster Grandparent 
Program [FGP]; the Senior Companion Program [SCP]; and the 
Retired and Senior Volunteer Program [RSVP].

VISTA

    The Committee recommends $100,000,000 for the Volunteers in 
Service to America [VISTA] Program. The comparable funding 
level for fiscal year 2009 was $161,050,000, including 
$65,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. 
The budget request for fiscal year 2010 was $97,932,000.
    VISTA, created in 1964 under the Economic Opportunity Act, 
provides capacity building for small community-based 
organizations. VISTA volunteers raise resources for local 
projects, recruit and organize volunteers, and establish and 
expand local community-based programs in housing, employment, 
health, and economic development activities.

National Senior Volunteer Corps

    The Committee recommends $221,269,000 for the National 
Senior Volunteer Corps programs. The comparable level in fiscal 
year 2009 was $213,785,000. The fiscal year 2010 budget request 
was $220,900,000.
    The Committee has included the following activities in the 
following amounts:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       Fiscal year--
                                                           ------------------------------------     Committee
                         Programs                                             2010 President's   recommendation
                                                             2009 comparable       request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Retired Senior Volunteer Program..........................           $58,642           $63,000           $63,000
Foster Grandparent........................................           108,999           110,900           111,269
Senior Companion..........................................            46,144            47,000            47,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The maximum total dollars which may be used in fiscal year 
2010 for Grants.gov/eGrants support, Training and Technical 
Assistance, and Recruitment and Retention activities shall not 
exceed the amount enacted for these activities in fiscal year 
2009.
    The CNCS shall comply with the directive that use of funds 
appropriated for FGP, RSVP, SCP, and VISTA shall not be used to 
fund demonstration activities. The Committee has not included 
funding for senior demonstration activities.
    The Committee directs that any assignments made under 
section 1708 of the Serve America Act relating to programs 
authorized under the Domestic Volunteer Service Act shall be 
published in the Federal Register and following normal 
procedure allow for a 90-day comment period. Furthermore, the 
Committee directs the Corporation to detail any such 
assignments in its annual budget justification.

                NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $543,047,000 for the programs 
authorized under the National Community Service Act of 1990. 
The comparable level for fiscal year 2009 was $459,729,000, 
including $89,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act 
funding. The administration request for fiscal year 2010 was 
$538,847,000. The Committee recommendation includes the 
following activities at the following amounts:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       Fiscal year--
                                                           ------------------------------------     Committee
                         Programs                                                2010 budget     recommendation
                                                             2009 comparable       request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AmeriCorps State and National.............................          $360,196          $372,547          $372,547
AmeriCorps NCCC...........................................            27,500            26,300            29,000
Learn and Serve America...................................            37,459            39,500            40,000
State Commission Grants...................................            11,790            16,000            17,000
Innovation, Demonstration and Assistance..................            18,893            65,500            65,500
Training and Technical Assistance.........................  ................             8,000             8,000
Disability Grants.........................................             4,913             5,000             5,000
Evaluation................................................             3,891             6,000             6,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Americorps State and National

    The Committee is strongly supportive of the President's 
goal to support 100,000 AmeriCorps members and has included 
funding to increase the number of members from 75,000 non-
Recovery Act members in fiscal year 2009 to over 85,000 in 
fiscal year 2010.
    The Committee directs the Corporation to include a 5-year 
detail of member service in the annual congressional budget 
justification. The detail should include the number of members, 
grant cost, and Trust cost broken out by both program [VISTA, 
NCCC, State, and National, et cetera) and by level of service 
(full time, part time, quarter time, et cetera).
    The Committee notes that by 2020, the number of Americans 
over 55 will increase to more than 95 million, a jump of 64 
percent in two decades. Baby boomers, Americans born between 
1946 and 1964, are ready to tackle some of America's most 
pressing challenges, including school drop-out, elder care, 
community improvement, and environmental conservation. The 
Committee requests that the Corporation for National and 
Community Service study the participation of Americans 55 and 
older under subtitle C and to catalog barriers to recruiting 
more seniors.

Innovation, Demonstration, and Assistance Activities

    Within the funds provided for the Innovation account, the 
Committee has included $50,000,000 for the Social Innovation 
fund authorized under section 1807 of the SERVE America Act. 
The Committee recommendation also includes $2,000,000 for the 
nonprofit capacity building program authorized under section 
1809 of the SERVE America Act.
    In addition, $8,000,000 is included for the Volunteer 
Generation Fund authorized under section 198P of the SERVE 
America Act. The Committee intends that funds allocated to 
competitive grants authorized under subsection (d)(1)(b) of 
such section be made available to State Commissions or 
organizations working in partnership with State or local 
governments for identifying and enrolling eligible individuals 
and families into already existing Federal, State, and local 
benefit programs or to direct individuals to other existing 
programs, for example, housing, legal, and/or financial 
counseling.
    All other activities are included at the President's 
request level.

National Civilian Community Corps

    The Committee recommendation has sufficient funding to 
increase the Corps size at the Nation's NCCC centers. The Corps 
has proved invaluable in responding to natural disasters 
including Hurricane Katrina and the floods in the Midwest, yet 
the Corps is currently operating at only 80 percent of its 
capacity.

                         NATIONAL SERVICE TRUST

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $197,000,000 
for the National Service Trust. The comparable level for fiscal 
year 2009 was $171,075,000, including $40,000,000 in American 
Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds. The administration request 
for fiscal year 2010 was $195,637,000.
    The Committee notes that the funding level recommended is 
sufficient to support more than 85,000 members in fiscal year 
2010, an increase of more than 13,000 members from the non-
Recovery Act members in fiscal year 2009. The Committee intends 
that, effective October 1, 2009, the Segal Education Award will 
increase from $4,725 to $5,350 to align it with the maximum 
level of Pell Grants during the 2009-2010 award year.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $88,000,000 
for the Corporation's salaries and expenses. The comparable 
level for fiscal year 2009 was $77,715,000, including 
$6,000,000 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds. The 
administration request for fiscal year 2010 was $88,000,000. 
The Committee directs that the Corporation must fund all 
staffing needs from the salaries and expenses account.
    The salaries and expenses appropriation provides funds for 
staff salaries, benefits, travel, training, rent, advisory and 
assistance services, communications and utilities expenses, 
supplies, equipment, and other operating expenses necessary for 
management of the Corporation's activities under the National 
and Community Service Act of 1990 and the Domestic Volunteer 
Service Act of 1973.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $7,700,000 for 
the Office of Inspector General [OIG]. The comparable level for 
fiscal year 2009 was $7,512,000 and the administration request 
for fiscal year 2010 was $7,700,000.
    The goals of the Office of Inspector General are to 
increase organizational efficiency and effectiveness and to 
prevent fraud, waste, and abuse.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    The Committee has included two administrative provisions: 
language requiring the Corporation to notify the Committee 15 
days prior to any significant changes to program requirements 
or policy (sec. 401) and language requiring that donations 
supplement and not supplant operations (sec. 402).

                  Corporation for Public Broadcasting

Appropriations, 2010....................................    $420,000,000
Appropriations, 2011....................................     430,000,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................     440,000,000
House allowance.........................................     440,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     450,000,000

    The Committee recommends $450,000,000 be made available for 
the Corporation for Public Broadcasting [CPB], as an advance 
appropriation for fiscal year 2012. The comparable funding 
level provided last year was $430,000,000 for fiscal year 2011. 
The budget request includes $440,000,000 in advance funds for 
fiscal year 2012.
    In addition, the Committee recommends $36,000,000 be made 
available in fiscal year 2010 for the conversion to digital 
broadcasting, $1,409,000 more than the comparable funding level 
for fiscal year 2009 and the same as the budget request.
    The Committee is concerned by the effect of the economic 
downturn on the donations that support public broadcasting 
stations nationwide. The Committee supports the aggressive 
transition to digital broadcasting, however, the Committee 
understands that capital projects are not the highest priority 
when basic operations are threatened. The Committee has 
included $10,000,000 for emergency operations support at the 
discretion of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. The 
Committee urges the Corporation to prioritize the stations with 
the highest need.
    Further, the Committee recommendation includes $25,000,000 
in fiscal year 2010 for the final installment of the radio 
interconnection system replacement project, $1,642,000 less 
than the comparable level in fiscal year 2009 and equal to the 
budget request.

               Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2009....................................     $45,476,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................      46,303,000
House allowance.........................................      47,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      46,303,000

    The Committee recommends $46,303,000 for fiscal year 2010 
for the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service [FMCS]. The 
comparable funding level for fiscal year 2009 was $45,476,000 
and the budget request for fiscal year 2010 includes 
$46,303,000 for this program.
    The FMCS was established by Congress in 1947 to provide 
mediation, conciliation, and arbitration services to labor and 
management. FMCS is authorized to provide dispute resolution 
consultation and training to all Federal agencies.

            Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2009....................................      $8,653,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................       9,858,000
House allowance.........................................       9,858,000
Committee recommendation................................      10,858,000

    The Committee recommends $10,858,000 for fiscal year 2010 
for the Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission. The 
comparable funding level for fiscal year 2009 was $8,653,000 
and the fiscal year 2010 budget request includes $9,858,000.
    The Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission 
provides administrative trial and appellate review of legal 
disputes under the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. 
The five-member Commission provides review of the Commission's 
administrative law judge decisions.
    The Committee is concerned that the backlog of cases in the 
Commission's Office of Administrative Law Judges has increased 
by greater than 400 percent over historical levels. The 
Committee understands that this backlog is largely due to the 
fact that the rate of contested citations has more than 
quadrupled since passage of the MINER Act of 2006. The 
Committee has included additional funding to reduce the backlog 
by engaging additional judges and support staff, and continuing 
the transition to an electronic case management system. The 
Committee directs that the fiscal year 2011 budget 
justification include data on the number of new cases 
submitted, the number of cases decided and the current number 
of cases pending.

                Institute of Museum and Library Services


       OFFICE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARIES: GRANTS AND ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $274,840,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     265,556,000
House allowance.........................................     275,688,000
Committee recommendation................................     275,056,000

    The Committee recommends $275,056,000 for fiscal year 2010 
for the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The 
comparable funding level for fiscal year 2009 is $274,840,000 
and the administration request for fiscal year 2010 is 
$265,556,000.
    The Committee recommendation includes $172,000,000 for the 
Library Services Grants to States; $4,000,000 for Native 
American Libraries; $975,000 for Native American and Native 
Hawaiian Museums; and $17,134,000 for administration. All other 
activities are included at no less than last year's level.
    The Committee recommendation includes bill language 
providing funding for the following activities in the following 
amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                        Project                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI, for assessments and                $200,000
 educational programming..............................
Cape Cod Maritime Museum, Cape Cod, MA, for the                  100,000
 continued development of exhibits and educational
 programs.............................................
Cedar Rapids Public Library, Cedar Rapids, IA, for               500,000
 library services, including RFID upgrade.............
City of Hagerstown, MD, to restore and display the               150,000
 Doleman collection...................................
Czech & Slovak Museum & Library, Cedar Rapids, IA, for           500,000
 exhibits.............................................
Eagle Mountain City, UT, for the purchase of equipment           100,000
Great Lakes Science Center, Cleveland, OH, for                   200,000
 education, outreach, and exhibits....................
Holyoke Public Library, Holyoke, MA, for educational             100,000
 equipment and technology infrastructure..............
Iowa Radio Reading Information Service for the Blind             100,000
 and Print Handicapped, Inc., Des Moines, IA, for the
 upgrade of tuner receivers and the purchase of
 equipment............................................
Louisiana Children's Museum, New Orleans, LA, to                 250,000
 establish an early childhood and parenting pro-  gram
McLean County Fiscal Court, Calhoun, KY, for equipment           100,000
 and technology at Livermore Library..................
Mississippi Children's Museum, Jackson, MS, for                  300,000
 installation, exhibits, and educational programming..
Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College, Perkinston,            100,000
 MS, for archive of newspaper and digital me-  dia....
Mississippi Museum of Natural Science Foundation,                100,000
 Jackson, MS, for science education exhibits and
 outreach programs....................................
National Mississippi River Museum and Aquarium,                  500,000
 Dubuque, IA, for exhibits relating to the Mississippi
 River................................................
Robert Russa Moton Museum, Farmville, VA, to develop             100,000
 and install exhibitions on civil rights..............
Saint Xavier University, Chicago, IL, for technology             250,000
 and equipment........................................
Sewall-Belmont House and Museum, Washington, DC, for           1,000,000
 exhibitions..........................................
University of Mississippi, University, MS, for                   450,000
 preserving and digitizing recordings in the modern
 political library archives...........................
University of Mississippi, University, MS, for the               300,000
 American Music Archives..............................
Washington National Opera, Washington, DC, for set               200,000
 design, installation, and performing arts at
 libraries and schools................................
Witte Museum, San Antonio, TX, for the South Texas               150,000
 Heritage Center equipment and program development....
World Food Prize, Des Moines, IA, for exhibits........           750,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                  Medicare Payment Advisory Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2009....................................     $11,403,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................      11,800,000
House allowance.........................................      11,800,000
Committee recommendation................................      11,800,000

    The Committee recommends $11,800,000 for fiscal year 2010 
for the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission [MedPAC]. The 
comparable funding level for fiscal year 2009 is $11,403,000 
and the administration request for fiscal year 2010 is 
$11,800,000.
    The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission was established by 
Congress as part of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (Public Law 
105-933). Congress merged the Physician Payment Review 
Commission with the Prospective Payment Assessment Commission 
to create MedPAC.

                     National Council on Disability


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2009....................................      $3,206,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................       3,271,000
House allowance.........................................       3,271,000
Committee recommendation................................       3,271,000

    The Committee recommends $3,271,000 for fiscal year 2010 
for the National Council on Disability. The comparable funding 
level for fiscal year 2009 is $3,206,000 and the administration 
request for fiscal year 2010 is $3,271,000.
    The Council is mandated to make recommendations to the 
President, the Congress, the Rehabilitation Services 
Administration, and the National Institute on Disability and 
Rehabilitation Research on the public issues of concern to 
individuals with disabilities. The Council gathers information 
on the implementation, effectiveness, and impact of the 
Americans with Disabilities Act and looks at emerging policy 
issues as they affect persons with disabilities and their 
ability to enter or re-enter the Nation's work force and to 
live independently.

                     National Labor Relations Board


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $262,595,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     283,400,000
House allowance.........................................     283,400,000
Committee recommendation................................     283,400,000

    The Committee recommends $283,400,000 for fiscal year 2010 
for the National Labor Relations Board [NLRB]. The comparable 
funding level for fiscal year 2009 is $262,595,000 and the 
administration request for fiscal year 2010 is $283,400,000.
    The NLRB is a law enforcement agency that adjudicates 
disputes under the National Labor Relations Act. The mission of 
the NLRB is to carry out the statutory responsibilities of the 
National Labor Relations Act as efficiently as possible and in 
a manner that gives full effect to the rights afforded to 
employees, unions, and employers under the act.

                        National Mediation Board


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2009....................................     $12,992,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................      13,434,000
House allowance.........................................      12,992,000
Committee recommendation................................      13,934,000

    The Committee recommends $13,934,000 for fiscal year 2010 
for the National Mediation Board [NMB]. The comparable funding 
level for fiscal year 2009 is $12,992,000 and the 
administration request for fiscal year 2010 is $13,434,000.
    The National Mediation Board protects interstate commerce 
as it mediates labor-management relations in the railroad and 
airline industries under the Railway Labor Act. The Board 
mediates collective bargaining disputes, determines the choice 
of employee bargaining representatives through elections, and 
administers arbitration of employee grievances.
    The Committee remains concerned by the backlog of 
arbitration cases and urges the administration to work 
aggressively to eliminate this backlog. The Committee intends 
the additional funding over the administration's budget to be 
used to increase the number of arbitration cases heard and 
closed.

            Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2009....................................     $11,186,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................      11,712,000
House allowance.........................................      11,712,000
Committee recommendation................................      11,712,000

    The Committee recommends $11,712,000 for fiscal year 2010 
for the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. The 
comparable funding level for fiscal year 2009 is $11,186,000 
and the administration request for fiscal year 2010 is 
$11,712,000.
    The Commission serves as a court to justly and 
expeditiously resolve disputes between the Occupational Safety 
and Health Administration [OSHA] and employers charged with 
violations of health and safety standards enforced by OSHA.

                       Railroad Retirement Board


                     DUAL BENEFITS PAYMENTS ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2009....................................     $72,000,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................      64,000,000
House allowance.........................................      64,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      64,000,000

    The Committee recommends $64,000,000 for fiscal year 2010 
for the Dual Benefits Payments Account. Of these funds, 
$3,000,000 is from income taxes on vested dual benefits. The 
comparable funding level for fiscal year 2009 is $72,000,000 
and the administration request for fiscal year 2010 is 
$64,000,000.
    This appropriation provides for vested dual benefit 
payments authorized by the Railroad Retirement Act of 1974, as 
amended by the Omnibus Reconciliation Act of 1981. This 
separate account, established for the payment of dual benefits, 
is funded by general fund appropriations and income tax 
receipts of vested dual benefits.

          FEDERAL PAYMENTS TO THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2009....................................        $150,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................         150,000
House allowance.........................................         150,000
Committee recommendation................................         150,000

    The Committee recommends $150,000 for fiscal year 2010 for 
interest earned on nonnegotiated checks, the same as the 
comparable funding level for fiscal year 2009 and the 
administration request.

                      LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2009....................................    $105,463,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     109,073,000
House allowance.........................................     109,073,000
Committee recommendation................................     109,073,000

    The Committee recommends $109,073,000 for fiscal year 2010 
for the administration of railroad retirement/survivor benefit 
programs. The comparable funding level for fiscal year 2009 is 
$105,463,000 and the administration request for fiscal year 
2010 is $109,073,000.
    The Board administers comprehensive retirement-survivor and 
unemployment-sickness insurance benefit programs for the 
Nation's railroad workers and their families. This account 
limits the amount of funds in the railroad retirement and 
railroad unemployment insurance trust funds that may be used by 
the Board for administrative expenses.
    The Committee has included language to prohibit funds from 
the railroad retirement trust fund from being spent on any 
charges over and above the actual cost of administering the 
trust fund, including commercial rental rates.

           LIMITATION ON THE OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2009....................................      $7,806,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................       8,186,000
House allowance.........................................       8,186,000
Committee recommendation................................       8,186,000

    The Committee recommends $8,186,000 for fiscal year 2010 
for the Office of the Inspector General. The comparable funding 
level for fiscal year 2009 is $7,806,000 and the administration 
request for fiscal year 2010 is $8,186,000.
    The Committee has deleted language prohibiting funds from 
being transferred from the Railroad Retirement Board to the 
Office of the Inspector General. The Committee expects the 
relationship between the Board and the Inspector General to be 
guided by the laws governing each.

                     Social Security Administration


                PAYMENTS TO SOCIAL SECURITY TRUST FUNDS

Appropriations, 2009....................................     $20,406,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................      20,404,000
House allowance.........................................      20,404,000
Committee recommendation................................      20,404,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $20,404,000 
for payments to Social Security trust funds, the same amount as 
the budget request. The comparable fiscal year 2009 funding 
level is $20,406,000. This amount reimburses the old age and 
survivors and disability insurance trust funds for special 
payments to certain uninsured persons, costs incurred 
administering pension reform activities, and the value of the 
interest for benefit checks issued but not negotiated. This 
appropriation restores the trust funds to the same financial 
position they would have been in had they not borne these costs 
and were properly charged to the general funds.

                  SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME PROGRAM

Appropriations, 2009\1\................................. $31,471,537,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................  34,742,000,000
House allowance.........................................  34,742,000,000
Committee recommendation................................  34,742,000,000

\1\Includes $1,000,000,000 in administrative funding available in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$34,742,000,000 for supplemental security income, the same 
amount as the budget request. This is in addition to the 
$15,400,000,000 appropriated last year as an advance for the 
first quarter of fiscal year 2010. The fiscal year 2009 funding 
level is $31,471,537,000, which includes $1,000,000,000 in 
administrative funding provided in the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act. The Committee also recommends an advance 
appropriation of $16,000,000,000 for the first quarter of 
fiscal year 2011 to ensure uninterrupted benefits payments. The 
program level supported by the Committee recommendation is 
$50,142,000,000, the same amount proposed in the budget 
request.
    These funds are used to pay benefits under the SSI Program, 
which was established to ensure a Federal minimum monthly 
benefit for aged, blind, and disabled individuals, enabling 
them to meet basic needs. It is estimated that more than 7 
million persons will receive SSI benefits each month during 
fiscal year 2010. In many cases, SSI benefits supplement income 
from other sources, including Social Security benefits. The 
funds are also used to reimburse the Social Security trust 
funds for the administrative costs for the program with a final 
settlement by the end of the subsequent fiscal year as required 
by law, to reimburse vocational rehabilitation agencies for 
costs incurred in successfully rehabilitating SSI recipients 
and for research and demonstration projects.

Beneficiary Services

    The Committee recommends $49,000,000 for beneficiary 
services, as proposed in the budget request. The comparable 
fiscal year 2009 funding level is $3,000,000. This amount is 
available for payments to Employment Networks for successful 
outcomes or milestone payments under the Ticket to Work program 
and for reimbursement of State vocational rehabilitation 
agencies and alternate public or private providers.

Research and Demonstration Projects

    The Committee recommendation includes $49,000,000 for 
research and demonstration projects conducted under sections 
1110, 1115 and 1144 of the Social Security Act, the same amount 
as proposed in the budget request. The comparable fiscal year 
2009 funding level is $35,000,000.
    This amount will support SSA's efforts to strengthen its 
policy evaluation capability and implement outreach activities 
to certain low-income individuals who may be eligible for 
assistance with medical expenses. These funds also will enable 
SSA to focus on: retirement and disability policy research, 
effective return-to-work strategies for disabled beneficiaries 
and activities that maintain and strengthen the capacity of SSA 
to analyze data and respond to information requests from the 
Congress.

Administration

    The Committee recommendation includes $3,442,000,000 for 
payment to the Social Security trust funds for the SSI 
Program's share of SSA's base administrative expenses, the same 
amount as proposed in the budget request. The fiscal year 2009 
amount is $4,206,537,000, which includes $1,000,000,000 
available in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

                 LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2009\1\................................. $11,453,500,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................  11,446,500,000
House allowance.........................................  11,446,500,000
Committee recommendation................................  11,446,500,000

\1\Includes $1,000,000,000 in funds available in the American Recovery 
and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee recommends a program funding level of 
$11,446,500,000 for the limitation on administrative expenses, 
the same amount as proposed in the budget request. The fiscal 
year 2009 funding level is $11,453,500,000, which includes 
$1,000,000,000 in funds available in the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act.
    This account provides resources from the Social Security 
trust funds to administer the Social Security retirement and 
survivors and disability insurance programs, and certain Social 
Security health insurance functions. As authorized by law, it 
also provides resources from the trust funds for certain 
nontrust fund administrative costs, which are reimbursed from 
the general funds. These include administration of the 
supplemental security income program for the aged, blind, and 
disabled; work associated with the Pension Reform Act of 1984; 
and the portion of the annual wage reporting work done by the 
Social Security Administration for the benefit of the Internal 
Revenue Service. The dollars provided also support automated 
data processing activities and fund the State disability 
determination services which make initial and continuing 
disability determinations on behalf of the Social Security 
Administration. Additionally, the limitation provides funding 
for computer support, and other administrative costs.
    The Committee recommendation includes $10,800,500,000 for 
routine operating expenses of the agency, as well as the 
resources related to program integrity activities and those 
derived from the user fees discussed below.
    The budget request includes bill language earmarking not 
less than $273,000,000 of funds available within this account 
for continuing disability reviews and redeterminations of 
eligibility under Social Security's disability programs. An 
additional $485,000,000 earmark for continuing disability 
reviews, redeterminations of eligibility and asset verification 
activities also was proposed in the budget request. The 
Committee recommendation includes the requested resources and 
earmarking language.

Social Security Advisory Board

    The Committee has included not less than $2,300,000 within 
the limitation on administrative expenses account for the 
Social Security Advisory Board for fiscal year 2010.

User Fees

    In addition to other amounts provided, the Committee 
recommends $161,000,000 for administrative activities funded 
from user fees. Of this amount, $160,000,000 is derived from 
fees paid to SSA by States that request SSA to administer State 
SSI supplementary payments. The remaining $1,000,000 will be 
generated from a fee payment process for non-attorney 
representatives of claimants.

                    OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2009\1\.................................    $100,127,000
Budget estimate, 2010...................................     102,682,000
House allowance.........................................     102,682,000
Committee recommendation................................     102,682,000

\1\Includes $2,000,000 available in the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-5).

    The Committee recommends $102,682,000 for activities for 
the Office of the Inspector General, the same amount as the 
budget request. The fiscal year 2009 funding level is 
$100,127,000, which includes $2,000,000 available in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The recommendation 
includes a general fund appropriation of $29,000,000 together 
with an obligation limitation of $73,682,000 from the Federal 
old-age and survivors insurance trust fund and the Federal 
disability insurance trust fund.

                      TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    The Committee recommendation includes provisions which: 
authorize transfers of unexpended balances (sec. 501); limit 
funding to 1 year availability unless otherwise specified (sec. 
502); limit lobbying and related activities (sec. 503); limit 
official representation expenses (sec. 504); prohibit funding 
of any program to carry out distribution of sterile needles for 
the hypodermic injection of any illegal drug (sec. 505); 
clarify Federal funding as a component of State and local grant 
funds (sec. 506); limit use of funds for abortion (sec. 507 and 
sec. 508); restrict human embryo research (sec. 509); limit the 
use of funds for promotion of legalization of controlled 
substances (sec. 510); prohibits the use of funds to promulgate 
regulations regarding the individual health identifier (sec. 
511); limits use of funds to enter into or review contracts 
with entities subject to the requirement in section 4212(d) of 
title 38, United States Code, if the report required by that 
section has not been submitted (sec. 512); prohibits transfer 
of funds made available in this act to any department, agency, 
or instrumentality of the U.S. Government, except as otherwise 
provided by this or any other act (sec. 513); prohibits Federal 
funding in this act for libraries and elementary and secondary 
schools unless they are in compliance with the Children's 
Internet Protection Act (sec. 514 and sec. 515); maintains a 
procedure for reprogramming of funds (sec. 516); prohibits 
candidates for scientific advisory committees from having to 
disclose their political activities (sec. 517); requires the 
Secretaries of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education 
to submit a report on the number and amounts of contracts, 
grants, and cooperative agreements awarded by the Departments 
on a noncompetitive basis (sec. 518); continues a provision 
prohibiting the use of funds for a grant or contract exceeding 
$5,000,000 unless the prospective contractor or grantee, makes 
certain certifications regarding Federal tax liability (sec. 
519); and delays by several months scheduled minimum wage 
increases in American Samoa and the Commonwealth of the 
Northern Mariana Islands (sec. 520).

  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI, OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 7 of rule XVI requires that Committee report on 
general appropriations bills identify each Committee amendment 
to the House bill ``which proposes an item of appropriation 
which is not made to carry out the provisions of an existing 
law, a treaty stipulation, or an act or resolution previously 
passed by the Senate during that session.''
    The Committee recommends funding for the following programs 
and activities which currently lack authorization: No Child 
Left Behind Act; Workforce Investment Act; Homeless Veterans 
Reintegration Program; Title VII of the Public Health Service 
Act; Universal Newborn Hearing Screening; Ryan White AIDS 
programs; Organ Transplantation; Denali Commission; Family 
Planning; Rural Health programs; Nurse Reinvestment Act; Public 
Health Improvement Act; Traumatic Brain Injury Program; 
Emergency Medical Services for Children; Black Lung Program; 
Healthy Start; Telehealth; Health Professions Education 
Partnership Act; Children's Health Act; Women's Health Research 
and Prevention Amendments of 1998; Bioterrorism; Birth Defects 
Prevention, Preventive Health Amendments of 1993; Substance 
Abuse and Mental Health Services Programs, except for Stop Act 
programs; Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; Low 
Income Home Energy Assistance Program; Refugee and Entrant 
Assistance programs; Child Abuse Prevention; Adoption 
Opportunities; Adoption Awareness; Child Care and Development 
Block Grant; Family violence programs; Developmental 
Disabilities programs; Voting Access for Individuals with 
Disabilities; Native American Programs; Community Services 
Block Grant; Rural Facilities; Individual Development Accounts; 
Community Economic Development; Alzheimer's Disease 
Demonstration Grants; Title V of the Public Health Services 
Act; Adolescent Family Life; Office of Minority Health; Office 
of Disease Prevention Services; Rehabilitation Services and 
Disability Research, except sections 4, 5, and 6 of the 
Assistive Technology Program; Institute of Education Sciences; 
Corporation for Public Broadcasting; and National Council on 
Disability.

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(c), RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, on July 30, 2009, 
the Committee ordered reported H.R. 3293, making appropriations 
for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and 
Education, and related agencies for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 2010, and for other purposes, with an amendment 
in the nature of a substitute, with the bill subject to further 
amendment and consistent with the budget allocation, by a 
recorded vote of 29-1, a quorum being present. The vote was as 
follows:
        Yeas                          Nays
Chairman Inouye                     Mr. Brownback
Mr. Byrd
Mr. Leahy
Mr. Harkin
Ms. Mikulski
Mr. Kohl
Mrs. Murray
Mr. Dorgan
Mrs. Feinstein
Mr. Durbin
Mr. Johnson
Ms. Landrieu
Mr. Reed
Mr. Lautenberg
Mr. Nelson
Mr. Pryor
Mr. Tester
Mr. Specter
Mr. Cochran
Mr. Bond
Mr. McConnell
Mr. Shelby
Mr. Gregg
Mr. Bennett
Mrs. Hutchison
Mr. Alexander
Ms. Collins
Mr. Voinovich
Ms. Murkowski

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of rule XXVI requires that Committee reports 
on a bill or a joint resolution repealing or amending any 
statute include ``(a) the text of the statute or part thereof 
which is proposed to be repealed; and (b) a comparative print 
of that part of the bill or joint resolution making the 
amendment and of the statute or part thereof proposed to be 
amended, showing by stricken through type and italics, parallel 
columns, or other appropriate typographical devices the 
omissions and insertions which would be made by the bill or 
joint resolution if enacted in the form recommended by the 
committee.''

   U.S. TROOP READINESS, VETERANS' CARE, KATRINA RECOVERY, AND IRAQ 
       ACCOUNTABILITY APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2007, PUBLIC LAW 110-28


              TITLE VIII--FAIR MINIMUM WAGE AND TAX RELIEF

                     Subtitle A--Fair Minimum Wage

SEC. 8101. SHORT TITLE.

  This subtitle may be cited as the ``Fair Minimum Wage Act of 
2007''.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 8103. APPLICABILITY OF MINIMUM WAGE TO AMERICAN SAMOA AND THE 
                    COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS.

    (a) * * *
    (b) * * *
            (1) * * *
                    (A) * * *
                    (B) increased by $0.50 an hour (or such 
                lesser amount as may be necessary to equal the 
                minimum wage under section 6(a)(1) of such 
                Act), beginning 1 year after the date of 
                enactment of this Act and each year thereafter 
                until the minimum wage applicable to the 
                Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands 
                under this paragraph is equal to the minimum 
                wage set forth in such section, except that, 
                beginning in 2010 and each year thereafter, 
                such increase shall occur on September 30; and
            (2) * * *
                    (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                    (C) increased by $0.50 an hour (or such 
                lesser amount as may be necessary to equal the 
                minimum wage under section 6(a)(1) of such 
                Act), beginning 1 year after the date of 
                enactment of this Act and each year thereafter 
                until the minimum wage applicable to American 
                Samoa under this paragraph is equal to the 
                minimum wage set forth in such section, except 
                that, beginning in 2010 and each year 
                thereafter, such increase shall occur on 
                September 30.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


    AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT OF 2009, PUBLIC LAW 111-5


               TITLE XIV--STATE FISCAL STABILIZATION FUND

                        DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


                     GENERAL PROVISIONS--THIS TITLE


SEC. 14007. INNOVATION FUND.

    (a) * * *
            (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            [(3) Basis for awards.--The Secretary shall make 
        awards to eligible entities [that have made significant 
        gains in closing the achievement gap as described in 
        subsection (b)(1)--
                    [(A) to allow such eligible entities to 
                expand their work and serve as models for best 
                practices;
                    [(B) to allow such eligible entities to 
                work in partnership with the private sector and 
                the philanthropic community; and
                    [(C) to identify and document best 
                practices that canbe shared, and taken to scale 
                based on demonstrated success.]
            (3) Purpose of awards.--The Secretary shall make 
        awards to eligible entities in order to identify, 
        document, and bring to scale innovative best practices 
        based on demonstrated success, to allow such eligible 
        entities to--
                    (A) expand their work and serve as models 
                for best practices; and
                    (B) work in partnership with the private 
                sector and the philanthropic community.
    (b) Eligibility.--To be eligible for such an award, an 
eligible entity shall--
            [(1)](1)(A) have significantly closed the 
        achievement gaps between groups of students described 
        in section 1111(b)(2) of the ESEA (20 U.S.C. 
        6311(b)(2)); or
            [(2) have exceeded the State's annual measurable 
        objectives consistent with such section 1111(b)(2) for 
        2 or more consecutive years or have demonstrated 
        success in significantly increasing student academic 
        achievement for all groups of students described in 
        such section through another measure, such as measures 
        described in section 1111(c)(2) of the ESEA;]
            (B) have demonstrated success in significantly 
        increasing student academic achievement for all groups 
        of students described in such section;
            [(3)] (2) have made significant improvement in 
        other areas, such as graduation rates or increased 
        recruitment and placement of high-quality teachers and 
        school leaders, as demonstrated with meaningful data; 
        and
            [(4)] (3) demonstrate that [they have established 
        partnerships] it has established one or more 
        partnerships with the private sector, which may include 
        philanthropic organizations, and that the private 
        sector will provide matching funds in order to help 
        bring results to scale.
    (c) Special Rule.--In the case of an eligible entity that 
includes a nonprofit organization, the eligible entity shall be 
considered to have met the eligibility requirements of 
[paragraphs (1), (2), (3) of subsection (b) if such nonprofit 
organization has a record of meeting such requirements] 
paragraphs (1)(A) or (1)(B) and (2) of subsection (b) if the 
nonprofit organization has a record of significantly improving 
student achievement, attainment, or retention and shall be 
considered to have met the requirements of subsection (b)(3) if 
it demonstrates that it will meet the requirement relating to 
private-sector matching.
    (d) Subgrants.--In the case of an eligible entity that is a 
partnership described in subsection (a)(1)(B), the partner 
serving as the fiscal agent may make subgrants to one or more 
of the other entities in the partnership.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


       CONSOLIDATED APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2008, PUBLIC LAW 110-161


   DIVISION G--DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, AND 
        EDUCATION, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2008


                               TITLE III


                        DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


                           General Provisions

    Sec. 307. (a) Notwithstanding section 8013(9)(B) of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, North Chicago 
Community Unit School District 187, North Shore District 112, 
and Township High School District 113 in Lake County, Illinois, 
and Glenview Public School District 34 and Glenbrook High 
School District 225 in Cook County, Illinois, shall be 
considered local educational agencies as such term is used in 
and for purposes of title VIII of such Act for fiscal years 
2008 [and 2009] through 2011.
    (b) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, federally 
connected children (as determined under section 8003(a) of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965) who are in 
attendance in the North Shore District 112, Township High 
School District 113, Glenview Public School District 34, and 
Glenbrook High School District 225 described in subsection (a), 
shall be considered to be in attendance in the North Chicago 
Community Unit School District 187 described in subsection (a) 
for purposes of computing the amount that the North Chicago 
Community Unit School District 187 is eligible to receive under 
subsection (b) or (d) of such section for fiscal years 2008 and 
[and 2009] through 2011 if--

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                        BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL


  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS
                                                     AMENDED
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  Budget authority               Outlays
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                                                               Committee    Amount  of   Committee    Amount  of
                                                               allocation      bill      allocation      bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with Committee allocations
 to its subcommittees of amounts in the budget resolution
 for 2010: Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services,
 Education, and related agencies:
    Mandatory...............................................      554,596      554,596      554,813   \1\554,813
    Discretionary...........................................      160,354      163,100      217,248   \1\218,842
Projection of outlays associated with the recommendation:
    2010....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........   \2\626,332
    2011....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........       64,117
    2012....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........       15,112
    2013....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        3,554
    2014 and future years...................................  ...........  ...........  ...........          670
Financial assistance to State and local governments for                NA      362,307           NA      319,488
 2010.......................................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\2\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

NA: Not applicable.

Consistent with the funding recommended in the bill for continuing disability reviews and Supplemental Security
  Income [SSI] redeterminations, control of healthcare fraud and abuse, reviews of improper unemployment
  insurance payments, and low income home energy assistance, and in accordance with subparagraphs A, C, and D of
  section 401(c)(2) and section 401(c)(3) of Senate Concurrent Resolution 13 (111th Congress), the Committee
  anticipates that the Budget Committee will file a revised section 302(a) allocation for the Committee on
  Appropriations reflecting an upward adjustment of $2,746,000,000 in budget authority plus associated outlays.

         DISCLOSURE OF CONGRESSIONALLY DIRECTED SPENDING ITEMS

    The Constitution vests in the Congress the power of the 
purse. The Committee believes strongly that Congress should 
make the decisions on how to allocate the people's money.
    As defined in Rule XLIV of the Standing Rules of the 
Senate, the term ``congressional directed spending item'' means 
a provision or report language included primarily at the 
request of a Senator, providing, authorizing, or recommending a 
specific amount of discretionary budget authority, credit 
authority, or other spending authority for a contract, loan, 
loan guarantee, grant, loan authority, or other expenditure 
with or to an entity, or targeted to a specific State, locality 
or congressional district, other than through a statutory or 
administrative, formula-driven, or competitive award process.
    For each item, a Member is required to provide a 
certification that neither the Member nor the Senator's 
immediate family has a pecuniary interest in such 
congressionally directed spending item. Such certifications are 
available to the public on the website of the Senate Committee 
on Appropriations (www.appropriations.senate.gov/senators.cfm).
    Following is a list of congressionally directed spending 
items included in the Senate recommendation discussed in this 
report, along with the name of each Senator who submitted a 
request to the Committee of jurisdiction for each item so 
identified. Neither the Committee recommendation nor this 
report contains any limited tax benefits or limited tariff 
benefits as defined in rule XLIV.

                                                                             CONGRESSIONALLY DIRECTED SPENDING ITEMS
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
               Agency                                  Account                                               Project                                  Funding            Requesting member
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  3D School, Petal, MS, for a model dyslexia intervention                 $250,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                                                                  program.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Adelphi University, Garden City, NY, to support the Adelphi             $200,000  Schumer
                                                                                  University Institute for Math and Science Teachers.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Army Heritage Center Foundation, Carlisle, PA, for history              $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  education programs.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Avant-Garde Learning Foundation, Anchorage, AK, for                     $500,000  Murkowski, Begich
                                                                                  educational activities.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Big Brothers Big Sisters of Alaska, Anchorage, AK, for a                $100,000  Murkowski
                                                                                  mentoring demonstration project.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Pittsburgh, Inc.,                   $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  Pittsburgh, PA, for mentoring programs.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Billings Public Schools, Billings, MT, for career training in           $100,000  Tester
                                                                                  construction technology, including the purchase of equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Boys and Girls Club of Truckee Meadows, Reno, NV, to develop            $175,000  Reid
                                                                                  an Internet safety program in schools.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Brehm Preparatory School, Carbondale, IL, to support the                $250,000  Durbin
                                                                                  development of a national database for learning disabilities
                                                                                  education and research at Brehm Prep School.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Brockton Area Private Industry Council, Inc., Brockton, MA,             $100,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  for workforce development programs for at-risk youth.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Bushnell, Hartford, CT, for the PARTNERS art education program          $100,000  Dodd, Lieberman
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Caddo Parish School Board, Shreveport, LA, for equipment and            $100,000  Vitter
                                                                                  technology upgrades.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Calcasieu Parish School Board, Lake Charles, LA, for equipment          $100,000  Vitter
                                                                                  and technology upgrades.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  CentroNia, Takoma Park, MD, to expand pre-K services and train          $500,000  Mikulski, Cardin
                                                                                  early education teachers.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL, to provide professional            $300,000  Durbin
                                                                                  development to upper elementary and middle school science
                                                                                  teachers.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Children's Home of Easton, PA, for tutoring and mentoring at-           $125,000  Specter, Casey
                                                                                  risk youth during summer.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  City of Los Angeles, CA, for the LA's BEST afterschool                  $900,000  Feinstein
                                                                                  enrichment program.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  City of Racine, WI, for an afterschool and summer program for           $200,000  Kohl
                                                                                  children and their parents.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  City of San Jose, CA, for early childhood education                     $300,000  Feinstein
                                                                                  improvement.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  City of Vernonia School District, Vernonia, OR, for technology          $150,000  Wyden, Merkley
                                                                                  and equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  City Year New Hampshire, Stratham, NH, to expand education and          $254,000  Gregg
                                                                                  youth development programs.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  City Year Rhode Island, Providence, RI, for a school-based              $100,000  Whitehouse, Reed
                                                                                  initiative to improve the conditions that lead to student
                                                                                  success and increase the graduation rate.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Clark County School District, Las Vegas, NV, to create a                $600,000  Reid
                                                                                  school for highly gifted students.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Clark County School District, Las Vegas, NV, to expand                  $600,000  Reid
                                                                                  instructional support for English-language learners.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Cleveland Municipal School District, Cleveland, OH, to improve          $100,000  Voinovich
                                                                                  math and language skills through music education.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Columbia Springs Environmental Education Center, Vancouver,             $100,000  Murray
                                                                                  WA, to expand a summer school program that prepares high
                                                                                  school students to pursue postsecondary education and green
                                                                                  careers, including the purchase of equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  County of Butte, Oroville, CA, for the Literacy is for                  $150,000  Boxer
                                                                                  Everyone family literacy program.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  County of Monterey, Salinas, CA, for the Silver Star Gang             $1,000,000  Feinstein
                                                                                  Prevention and Intervention program.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Creative Visions, Des Moines, IA, for a dropout prevention pro-         $200,000  Harkin
                                                                                    gram.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Dakota Boys and Girls Ranch, Minot, ND, for an elementary               $475,000  Conrad, Dorgan
                                                                                  school program that targets high-risk students.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Darden School Foundation, Charlottesville, VA, to improve               $150,000  Warner, Webb
                                                                                  rural, chronically low-performing schools in southwest
                                                                                  Virginia.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Davidson Academy of Nevada, Reno, NV, for math and science              $400,000  Ensign
                                                                                  curriculum development.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Delaware Department of Education, Dover, DE, to train school            $100,000  Carper, Kaufman
                                                                                  leaders within the Vision 2015 network.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Delaware Department of Technology and Information, Dover, DE,           $100,000  Kaufman, Carper
                                                                                  to improve Internet access to Delaware schools, including the
                                                                                  purchase of equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Delta Arts Alliance, Inc., Drew, MS, for arts education and             $100,000  Cochran
                                                                                  curriculum development.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Delta State University, Cleveland, MS, for music education in           $300,000  Cochran
                                                                                  rural areas.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Des Moines Public Schools, Des Moines, IA, to expand pre-               $750,000  Harkin
                                                                                  kindergarten programs.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  East Side Community Learning Center Foundation, Wilmington,             $100,000  Carper, Kaufman
                                                                                  DE, to support supplemental education and enrichment programs
                                                                                  for high-needs students.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation, Evansville, IN, for          $100,000  Lugar
                                                                                  education programs including equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Falcon School district 49, Falcon, CO, to support a science,            $100,000  Mark Udall, Bennet
                                                                                  technology, engineering and math [STEM] education program.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  FAME, Inc., Wilmington, DE, to prepare minority students for            $125,000  Kaufman, Carper
                                                                                  college and encourage them to pursue careers in science,
                                                                                  engineering, and math.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Family, Inc., Council Bluffs, IA, to support a home visitation          $400,000  Harkin, Grassley
                                                                                  program for young children and their families.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Golden Apple Foundation, Chicago, IL, to recruit and train              $350,000  Durbin, Burris
                                                                                  math and science teachers through summer institutes across
                                                                                  Illinois.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Grand County School District, Moab, UT, to career and                   $100,000  Bennett
                                                                                  technical education programs including the purchase of
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Harford County, Belair, MD, for a science, technology,                  $400,000  Mikulski
                                                                                  engineering and math education program, including the
                                                                                  purchase of equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Homeless Children's Education Fund, Pittsburgh, PA, for                 $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  afterschool programs.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  I Won't Cheat Foundation, Salt Lake City, UT, for an anti-              $250,000  Bennett
                                                                                  steroid education program and awareness campaign.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN, for curriculum               $100,000  Lugar
                                                                                  development and teacher training.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Indinanapolis Public Schools, Indianapolis, IN, for education           $100,000  Lugar
                                                                                  programs including equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Inquiry Facilitators Inc., Bernalillo, NM, for facilitating             $200,000  Bingaman, Tom Udall
                                                                                  student and teacher involvement in a robotics competition.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Iowa Association of School Boards, Des Moines, IA, for                $3,550,000  Harkin
                                                                                  continuation and expansion of the SKILLS Iowa program.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Iowa Department of Education, Des Moines, IA, to continue the         $7,000,000  Harkin
                                                                                  Harkin grant program.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Iowa State Education Association, Des Moines, IA, to educate            $133,000  Grassley, Harkin
                                                                                  teachers and students on international trade.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Ishpeming Public Schools, Ishpeming, MI, to provide wiring and          $100,000  Levin, Stabenow
                                                                                  technology upgrades.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, for education programs              $100,000  Collins, Snowe
                                                                                  including the purchase of equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, for Mississippi                  $500,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                                                                  Learning Institute to improve reading and literacy
                                                                                  instruction.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Jazz at Lincoln Center, New York, NY, for music education               $400,000  Harkin
                                                                                  programs.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  JFYNetworks, Boston, MA, for the expansion of math, science,            $150,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  and language arts educational programs.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Jumpstart for Young Children, Inc., Boston, MA, for expanding           $100,000  Dodd
                                                                                  the Jumpstart Connecticut mentoring program.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Kanawha County Schools, Charleston, WV, for the continuation            $500,000  Byrd
                                                                                  and expansion of Skills West Virginia.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Kauai Economic Development Board, Lihue, HI, for science,               $700,000  Inouye, Akaka
                                                                                  technology, engineering, and math education.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Lafourche Parish School Board, Thibodaux, LA, for equipment             $100,000  Vitter
                                                                                  and tech upgrades.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  LOOKBOTHWAYS, Port Townsend, WA, to create a curriculum to              $300,000  Murray
                                                                                  teach children and youth Internet safety skills.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Los Alamos National Lab Foundation, Espanola, NM, for                   $100,000  Tom Udall, Bingaman
                                                                                  recruitment and training of math and science teachers.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Los Angeles Universal Preschool, Los Angeles, CA, to expand a           $150,000  Boxer
                                                                                  preschool and teacher training program.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Lyon County School District, Yerington, NV, to expand distance          $350,000  Reid
                                                                                  education, including professional development and the
                                                                                  purchase of equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Massachusetts 2020, Boston, MA, for the continued development           $200,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  of an extended learning time initiative.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Maui Economic Development Board, Kihei, HI, for engaging girls          $800,000  Inouye, Akaka
                                                                                  and historically underrepresented students in science,
                                                                                  technology, engineering and math [STEM] education.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Meeting Street, Providence, RI, for early childhood education           $300,000  Reed, Whitehouse
                                                                                  for at-risk children.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Meskwaki Settlement School, Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi          $500,000  Harkin, Grassley
                                                                                  in Iowa, Tama, IA, for a culturally based education
                                                                                  curriculum.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Mississippi Building Blocks, Ridgeland, MS, for establishment           $500,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                                                                  of a state-wide early childhood literacy program.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, for                $200,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                                                                  economic education in K-12 settings.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, for                $100,000  Cochran
                                                                                  enhancing K-12 science and mathematics preparation.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, for the            $500,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                                                                  development of an early childhood teacher education delivery
                                                                                  system.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Mississippi University for Women, Columbus, MS, for expansion           $550,000  Wicker, Cochran
                                                                                  of educational outreach for at-risk youth.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Mississippi University for Women, Columbus, MS, for Science             $200,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                                                                  and Mathematics on the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Mississippi Writing/Thinking Institute, Mississippi State, MS,          $200,000  Cochran
                                                                                  for program development for Mississippi Rural Voices.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Montgomery/Cleveland Avenue YMCA, Montgomery, AL, for after-            $100,000  Sessions
                                                                                  school and weekend programs.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  National Braille Press, Boston, MA, for the development and             $200,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  deployment of portable Braille devices for blind school-aged
                                                                                  children.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  National Council of La Raza, Washington, DC, to improve the             $500,000  Menendez
                                                                                  quality and availability of early childhood education.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  New York Hall of Science, Queens, NY, for a teacher training            $500,000  Gillibrand
                                                                                  program.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  North Carolina Mentoring Partnership, Raleigh, NC, for                  $100,000  Hagan
                                                                                  mentoring at-risk youth.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Nye County School District, Pahrump, NV, to improve science             $225,000  Reid
                                                                                  programs in rural middle schools, including the purchase of
                                                                                  laboratory equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Ohio Appalachian Center for Higher Education, Portsmouth, OH,           $100,000  Brown
                                                                                  to prepare students for careers and educational opportunities
                                                                                  in science, technology, math and engineering.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Orchestra Iowa Music Education, Cedar Rapids, IA, to support a          $400,000  Harkin
                                                                                  music education program.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Orem City, UT, for curriculum expansion including the purchase          $100,000  Bennett, Hatch
                                                                                  of equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Pacific Islands Center for Educational Development, Pago Pago,          $500,000  Inouye, Akaka
                                                                                  America Samoa, for program development.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Piney Woods School, Piney Woods, MS, for science and                    $150,000  Cochran
                                                                                  technology curriculum development.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Polynesian Voyaging Society, Honolulu, HI, for educational              $300,000  Inouye, Akaka
                                                                                  programs.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Project HOME, Philadelphia, PA, for afterschool programs......          $100,000  Specter
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Save the Children, Albuquerque, NM, for a New Mexico rural              $150,000  Bingaman, Tom Udall
                                                                                  literacy and afterschool program.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Save the Children, Fernley, NV, to expand the Nevada Rural              $250,000  Reid
                                                                                  Literacy Program, including the purchase of equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Save the Children, Washington, DC, for afterschool programs in          $100,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                                                                  Mississippi.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Seattle Science Foundation, Seattle, WA, to expand a hands-on           $150,000  Murray
                                                                                  medical science program for elementary school students.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Semos Unlimited, Santa Fe, NM, to develop and produce Hispanic          $100,000  Tom Udall, Bingaman
                                                                                  learning materials.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  South Salt Lake City, UT, to establish education programs to            $100,000  Bennett, Hatch
                                                                                  expand ESL classes at the Villa Franche apartment complex.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Sunrise Children's Foundation, Las Vegas, NV, for early                 $300,000  Reid
                                                                                  childhood education services.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY, to expand an afterschool             $300,000  Schumer, Gillibrand
                                                                                  program.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Terrebonne Parish School Board, Houma, LA, for equipment and            $100,000  Vitter
                                                                                  technology upgrades.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, for the National Institute           $165,000  Grassley, Harkin
                                                                                  for Twice-Exceptionality.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, for supporting and          $150,000  Landrieu
                                                                                  developing charter and district-run public schools in New
                                                                                  Orleans through teacher education, leadership preparation,
                                                                                  applied research and policy, in cooperation with Tulane
                                                                                  University.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA, for developing a          $750,000  Harkin, Grassley
                                                                                  center on early childhood education.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, for                $200,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                                                                  gifted education programs at the Frances Karnes Center for
                                                                                  Gifted Studies.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Urban Assembly New York Harbor High School, Brooklyn, NY, for           $150,000  Gillibrand
                                                                                  a marine science and marine technology program.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Utah Valley University, Orem, UT, to establish an                       $250,000  Bennett, Hatch
                                                                                  entrepreneurship program for high school students.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Washoe County School District, Reno, NV, to expand a new                $500,000  Reid
                                                                                  teacher mentoring program.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Washoe County School District, Reno, NV, to support                     $500,000  Reid
                                                                                  instructional coaches for K-12 teachers.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  Weber State University, Ogden, UT, for teacher education and            $500,000  Bennett, Hatch
                                                                                  curriculum development.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  West New York Board of Education, West New York, NJ, to launch          $150,000  Lautenberg, Menendez
                                                                                  an alternative fuel education program, including the purchase
                                                                                  of equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  West Valley City, UT, to expand an at-risk youth afterschool            $100,000  Bennett, Hatch
                                                                                  program.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  WhizKids Foundation, Inc., Cambridge, MA, to expand math,               $100,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  science, and engineering programs for primary school students.
Dept. of Education.................  Elementary & Secondary Education..........  YMCA Espanola Teen Center, Los Alamos, NM, to provide academic          $125,000  Tom Udall, Bingaman
                                                                                  and enrichment support for at-risk youth.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  AIB College of Business, Des Moines, IA, to continue                    $400,000  Harkin
                                                                                  recruiting and training captioners and court reporters and to
                                                                                  provide scholarships to students.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Alcorn State University, Alcorn, MS, for graduate level                 $300,000  Cochran
                                                                                  curriculum development.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Assumption College, Worcester, MA, for the acquisition of               $100,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  educational equipment and information technology.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Benedictine University, Lisle, IL, to design, create, and               $150,000  Durbin
                                                                                  implement open-source educational materials for use in
                                                                                  introductory college courses.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Blackburn College, Carlinville, IL, for science education               $225,000  Durbin, Burris
                                                                                  programs and laboratory upgrades, including the purchase of
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Blue Mountain College, Blue Mountain, MS, for the purchase of           $100,000  Cochran
                                                                                  math and science equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Blue Mountain Community College, Pendleton, OR, to expand post-         $100,000  Wyden, Merkley
                                                                                  secondary education including college preparatory, advanced
                                                                                  degree, and continuing education programs.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Brescia University, Owensboro, KY, for education programs               $500,000  Bunning
                                                                                  including the purchase of equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Buena Vista University, Storm Lake, IA, for support for                 $200,000  Harkin
                                                                                  students with disabilities.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, for Internet-based          $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  foreign language programs.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Cedar Crest College, Allentown, PA, for science education               $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  programs, including the purchase of equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Center for Empowered Living and Learning, Denver, CO, for an            $300,000  Bennet
                                                                                  education program on terrorism.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Chestnut Hill College, Philadelphia, PA, for the Center for             $100,000  Specter, Casey
                                                                                  Environmental Sciences and Sustainability.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH, for supportive               $200,000  Brown
                                                                                  services to degree-seeking veterans.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  College Success Foundation, Washington, DC, for mentoring and           $500,000  Harkin
                                                                                  scholarships.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Colorado State University--Pueblo, Pueblo, CO, for STEM                 $125,000  Mark Udall, Bennet
                                                                                  programs, including equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Command and General Staff College Foundation, Leavenworth, KS,          $250,000  Roberts, Brownback
                                                                                  for curriculum and course development for a homeland security
                                                                                  masters degree program.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Community College of Allegheny County, Pittsburgh, PA, to               $100,000  Specter, Casey
                                                                                  support technical and career postsecondary education programs.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Community College of Rhode Island, Warwick, RI, for a                   $200,000  Reed
                                                                                  transition to college program.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Community College System of New Hampshire, Concord, NH, to              $500,000  Gregg, Shaheen
                                                                                  purchase equipment and technology to modernize the teaching
                                                                                  of nursing.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  County of Greensville, Emporia, VA, for equipment and                   $400,000  Webb, Warner
                                                                                  technology upgrades at the Southside Virginia Education
                                                                                  Center.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Delta State University, Cleveland, MS, for teacher training in          $300,000  Cochran
                                                                                  science and curriculum development.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Dickinson State University, Dickinson, ND, for its Theodore             $600,000  Conrad, Dorgan
                                                                                  Roosevelt Center.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Eastern New Mexico University, Portales, NM, for educational            $100,000  Tom Udall, Bingaman
                                                                                  equipment and technology infrastructure.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Edmonds Community College, Lynnwood, WA, for an advanced                $100,000  Cantwell, Murray
                                                                                  materials and manufacturing training center, including
                                                                                  educational equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the Senate, Boston, MA, for           $1,000,000  Kerry
                                                                                  facilities, equipment, and program development, and may
                                                                                  include support for an endowment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Emerson College, Boston, MA, for educational equipment and              $100,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  technology infrastructure.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Emmanuel College, Boston, MA, for educational equipment and             $200,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  technology infrastructure to support the Center for Science
                                                                                  Education.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Endicott College, Beverly, MA, for educational equipment and            $150,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  technology infrastructure.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Evergreen State College, Olympia, WA, to expand environmental           $325,000  Murray
                                                                                  and sustainability education opportunities to colleges and
                                                                                  universities statewide.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Fulton-Montgomery Community College, Johnstown, NY, to                  $200,000  Schumer
                                                                                  establish a Center for Engineering and Technology.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Goodwin College, East Hartford, CT, for an environmental                $175,000  Dodd, Lieberman
                                                                                  studies program.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Gordon College, Wenham, MA, for educational equipment and               $200,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  technology infrastructure.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Harrisburg University of Science and Technology, Harrisburg,            $100,000  Specter, Casey
                                                                                  PA, for curriculum development and for laboratory upgrades,
                                                                                  including the purchase of equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Hawaii Community College, Hilo, HI, for supportive services             $500,000  Inouye, Akaka
                                                                                  and classroom courses to prepare students unprepared for
                                                                                  postsecondary education.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Highline Community College, Des Moines, WA, to create a                 $100,000  Murray
                                                                                  skilled supply chain management sector workforce by training
                                                                                  education and workforce partners who work with students and
                                                                                  other individuals about the opportunities available in this
                                                                                  field.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Huntingdon College, Montgomery, AL, for teacher training......          $100,000  Sessions
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Hutchinson Community College, Hutchinson, KS, for the purchase          $250,000  Brownback
                                                                                  of equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Iowa Lakes Community College, Estherville, IA, for a training           $400,000  Harkin
                                                                                  program in construction technology and wind turbine
                                                                                  technology, including equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Iowa Valley Community College District, Marshalltown, IA, for           $400,000  Harkin
                                                                                  a training program in agricultural and renewable energy
                                                                                  technology, including the purchase of equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana, Northwest Region,                $100,000  Lugar
                                                                                  Indianapolis, IN, for education programs including equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Jones County Junior College, Ellisville, MS, for purchase of            $200,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                                                                  equipment and technology upgrades.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Junior College District of Metropolitan Kansas City, MO, for            $500,000  Bond
                                                                                  purchase of equipment and technology upgrades for the
                                                                                  radiological technology laboratory.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Kalamazoo Valley Community College, Kalamazoo, MI, for                  $200,000  Stabenow, Levin
                                                                                  equipment relating to the Wind Turbine Technician Academy.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Keene State College, Keene, NH, for curriculum development and          $100,000  Shaheen
                                                                                  educational equipment for the Monadnock Biodiesel
                                                                                  Collaborative.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Lackawanna College, Scranton, PA, for laboratory upgrades to a          $100,000  Specter, Casey
                                                                                  science center, including the purchase of equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Lake Area Technical Institute, Watertown, SD, for educational           $500,000  Johnson, Thune
                                                                                  equipment for the Energy Technology Program.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Lake Area Technical Institute, Watertown, SD, for educational           $150,000  Johnson
                                                                                  equipment related to fire training.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Lakes Region Community College, Concord, NH, for curriculum             $125,000  Shaheen
                                                                                  development and educational equipment for the Energy Services
                                                                                  and Technology program.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Leeward Community College, Pearl City, HI, to provide college           $400,000  Inouye, Akaka
                                                                                  preparatory education for Filipino students.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Lesley University, Cambridge, MA, for development of the                $150,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  National Center for Teachers and School Leaders program.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Lincoln University, Lincoln University, PA, for college                 $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  preparation programs.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Lorain County Community College, Elyria, OH, for education              $200,000  Voinovich
                                                                                  programs including the purchase of equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Loras College, Dubuque, IA, for science education equipment...          $200,000  Harkin, Grassley
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Loyola University New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, to establish            $400,000  Landrieu
                                                                                  the Center for Music and Arts Entrepreneurship & Music
                                                                                  Industry Studies.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Lyndon State College, Lyndonville, VT, for a center for rural           $300,000  Leahy
                                                                                  students.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Mercyhurst College, Erie, PA, for education programs and                $100,000  Specter, Casey
                                                                                  support services for individuals with disabilities.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN, for                $750,000  Alexander
                                                                                  professional development.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Midway College, Inc., Midway, KY, for facilities and equip-             $100,000  Bunning
                                                                                  ment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Miles Community College, Miles City, MT, for curriculum                 $100,000  Tester, Baucus
                                                                                  development and educational equipment relating to bioenergy.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Minnesota State Colleges and Universities, Office of the                $200,000  Klobuchar
                                                                                  Chancellor, St. Paul, MN, for career and education services
                                                                                  to veterans.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Minot State University, Minot, ND, to establish a Center for            $950,000  Conrad, Dorgan
                                                                                  Community Research and Service.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Mississippi College, Clinton, MS, to support dyslexia                   $250,000  Wicker, Cochran
                                                                                  education and training.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Missouri State University, Springfield, MO, for technology,           $1,000,000  Bond
                                                                                  equipment, and educational materials.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Mott Community College, Flint, MI, for the Center for Advanced          $200,000  Levin, Stabenow
                                                                                  Manufacturing.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA, for a civic engagement and           $100,000  Specter, Casey
                                                                                  service learning program.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  National Labor College, George Meany Center for Labor Studies,          $400,000  Harkin
                                                                                  Silver Spring, MD, for the Adult Learning program.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Nazareth College, Rochester, NY, for educational equipment and          $300,000  Schumer
                                                                                  technology upgrades relating to math and science education.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Northeast Iowa Community College, Calmar, IA, for a training            $300,000  Harkin, Grassley
                                                                                  program in renewable energy technology.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Northern Kentucky University, Highland Heights, KY, for the           $2,400,000  McConnell
                                                                                  purchase of equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Pearl River Community College, Poplarville, MS, for                     $200,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                                                                  instructional technology including the purchase of equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA, for educational              $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  equipment relating to science.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, KS, for education                $400,000  Brownback
                                                                                  programs.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Pulaski Technical College, North Little Rock, AR, for library           $100,000  Lincoln, Pryor
                                                                                  improvements, including equipment, program costs, and
                                                                                  collections.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Rhode Island College Foundation, Providence, RI, for                    $200,000  Reed, Whitehouse
                                                                                  educational equipment relating to science.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Rockford College, Rockford, IL, for technology upgrades and             $300,000  Durbin
                                                                                  educational equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Security on Campus, Inc., King of Prussia, PA, for a campus             $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  crime and emergency response training program.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Simpson College, Indianola, IA, for the creation of the John            $500,000  Kennedy, Kerry, Harkin
                                                                                  C. Culver Public Policy Center.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Snow College, Ephraim, UT, for health professions education             $600,000  Bennett, Hatch
                                                                                  programs.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Southern Arkansas University Tech, Camden, AR, for curriculum           $150,000  Lincoln, Pryor
                                                                                  development and educational equipment in the Aerospace
                                                                                  Manufacturing program.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  St. Norbert College, De Pere, WI, for science education, which          $800,000  Kohl
                                                                                  may include equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, PA, for science education          $100,000  Specter, Casey
                                                                                  programs and laboratory upgrades, including the purchase of
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Tabor College, Hillsboro, KS, for rural nursing and education           $350,000  Brownback
                                                                                  programs.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Truckee Meadows Community College, Reno, NV, to establish an            $600,000  Reid
                                                                                  online degree program for nontraditional students.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  University of Arkansas at Monticello, Monticello, AR, for               $250,000  Lincoln, Pryor
                                                                                  educational equipment, technology and wiring relating to
                                                                                  energy and environmental education.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR, for curriculum              $100,000  Lincoln, Pryor
                                                                                  development and educational equipment relating to information
                                                                                  technology.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  University of Dubuque, Dubuque, IA, for equipment and                   $400,000  Harkin, Grassley
                                                                                  technology for its aviation degree program.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  University of Hawaii at Hilo Clinical Pharmacy Training               $1,500,000  Inouye, Akaka
                                                                                  Program, Hilo, HI, for clinical pharmacy training program and
                                                                                  applied rural science program.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  University of Hawaii School of Law, Honolulu, HI, for the               $400,000  Inouye, Akaka
                                                                                  health policy center.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  University of Illinois at Urbana--Champaign, Urbana, IL, to             $150,000  Durbin
                                                                                  design, create, and implement open-source educational
                                                                                  materials for use in introductory college courses.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  University of Massachusetts--Boston, Boston, MA, for                    $200,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  educational equipment to support a developmental science
                                                                                  research center.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  University of Massachusetts--Lowell, Lowell, MA, for a                  $200,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  cooperative education program.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  University of Montana--Mike & Maureen Mansfield Center,                 $100,000  Tester
                                                                                  Missoula, MT, to establish the Institute for Leadership and
                                                                                  Public Service to fulfill the purposes of the Mansfield
                                                                                  Center, including the creation of an endowment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD, to identify and             $500,000  Johnson, Thune
                                                                                  address the educational needs of veterans with disabilities.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, for                $200,000  Cochran
                                                                                  curriculum and professional development at University of
                                                                                  Southern Mississippi--Gulf Coast campus.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, for                $100,000  Cochran
                                                                                  teacher training at the Center for Economic Education.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, for the            $500,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                                                                  development of a student retention initiative.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  University of Virginia Center for Politics, Charlottesville,            $100,000  Warner
                                                                                  VA, to develop interactive civic lessons for high school
                                                                                  students.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL, for education                $200,000  Martinez
                                                                                  programs for veterans.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Urban College, Boston, MA, to support higher education                  $500,000  Kennedy
                                                                                  programs serving low-income and minority students.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Utah State University, Logan, UT, to establish a land-grant             $750,000  Bennett
                                                                                  education and research network.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Valley City State University, Valley City, ND, for the Great            $475,000  Conrad, Dorgan
                                                                                  Plains STEM Education Center.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Voices of September 11th, New Canaan, CT, to continue the 9/11          $100,000  Dodd, Lautenberg, Menendez,
                                                                                  Living Memorial Project.                                                          Lieberman
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Weber State University, Ogden, UT, for curriculum development.          $100,000  Hatch, Bennett
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Weber State University, Ogden, UT, for outreach web-based               $750,000  Bennett, Hatch
                                                                                  nursing program, including the purchase of equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Western Governors University, Salt Lake City, UT, for a                 $600,000  Bennett, Hatch
                                                                                  nationally accredited online competency-based College of
                                                                                  Health Professionals.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Western Kentucky University Research Foundation, Bowling              $2,000,000  McConnell
                                                                                  Green, KY, for equipment purchase.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Westminster College, Salt Lake City, UT, to expand distance             $500,000  Bennett, Hatch
                                                                                  learning technology including the purchase of equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Wheelock College, Boston, MA, to develop a higher education             $100,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  access program for early childhood educators.
Dept. of Education.................  Higher Education..........................  Whitworth University, Spokane, WA, for science, technology,             $100,000  Cantwell
                                                                                  engineering, and mathematics equipment.
Dept. of Education.................  Rehabilitation Services...................  American Federation for the Blind Technology and Employment           $1,000,000  Byrd
                                                                                  Center, Huntington, WV, to expand the capacity of the AFB-
                                                                                  TECH center for development of technology for the blind.
Dept. of Education.................  Rehabilitation Services...................  Camp High Hopes, Sioux City, IA, for a year-round camp for              $300,000  Harkin
                                                                                  children with disabilities.
Dept. of Education.................  Rehabilitation Services...................  Deaf Blind Service Center, Seattle, WA, for training programs           $200,000  Murray
                                                                                  and materials for support service providers who assist deaf/
                                                                                  blind individuals with employment and independent living.
Dept. of Education.................  Rehabilitation Services...................  Elwyn, Inc., Aston, PA, for job training and education                  $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  programs for individuals with disabilities.
Dept. of Education.................  Rehabilitation Services...................  Enable America, Inc., Tampa, FL, for civic/citizenship                  $600,000  Harkin
                                                                                  demonstration project for disabled adults.
Dept. of Education.................  Rehabilitation Services...................  Intellectual Disabilities Education Association, Inc.,                  $225,000  Dodd
                                                                                  Bridgeport, CT, for IDEA Learning Center programming.
Dept. of Education.................  Rehabilitation Services...................  Supporting Autism and Families Everywhere, Wilkes-Barre, PA,            $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  for vocational services and program support.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Administration on Aging...................  Gallagher Outreach Program Inc., Sunnyside, NY, for outreach            $200,000  Schumer
                                                                                  and social services to elderly Irish immigrants.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Administration on Aging...................  Jewish Family Services of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, for                 $300,000  Bennett, Hatch
                                                                                  community-based caregiver services.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Administration on Aging...................  Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta, Atlanta, GA, for                  $100,000  Chambliss
                                                                                  services at a naturally occurring retirement community.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Administration on Aging...................  Lifespan of Greater Rochester, Inc., Rochester, NY, for                 $100,000  Schumer
                                                                                  activities to prevent elder abuse.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Administration on Aging...................  Mosaic, Garden City, KS, for the legacy senior services                 $300,000  Brownback, Roberts
                                                                                  initiative.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Administration on Aging...................  PACE Greater New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, to provide seniors           $100,000  Landrieu, Vitter
                                                                                  with alternatives to institutionalized care.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Administration on Aging...................  Washoe County Senior Services, Carson City, NV, for the RSVP             $95,000  Reid
                                                                                  Home Companion Senior Respite Care Program.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Center for Mental Health Services.........  Avera McKennan Hospital & University Health Center, Sioux               $300,000  Johnson
                                                                                  Falls, SD, for a program serving children with emotional and
                                                                                  behavioral disorders.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Center for Mental Health Services.........  Cheyenne River Sioux, Eagle Butte, SD, for youth suicide and            $100,000  Johnson
                                                                                  substance abuse prevention programs.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Center for Mental Health Services.........  KidsPeace National Centers of New England, Ellsworth, ME, for           $150,000  Snowe
                                                                                  the programmatic funding necessary to facilitate the
                                                                                  expansion of the KidsPeace Graham Lake Autism Day Treatment
                                                                                  Unit.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Center for Mental Health Services.........  Oregon Partnership, Portland, OR, to provide suicide                    $300,000  Wyden, Merkley
                                                                                  prevention services to soldiers and military families.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Center for Mental Health Services.........  Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Rosebud, SD, for suicide prevention pro-           $300,000  Thune, Johnson
                                                                                  grams.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Center for Mental Health Services.........  University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, for mental health               $100,000  Martinez
                                                                                  services for disabled veterans.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Center for Mental Health Services.........  Volunteers of America, Wilkes-Barre, PA, for trauma recovery            $100,000  Specter, Casey
                                                                                  mental health services to children and families.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Center for Mental Health Services.........  Youth Dynamics, Inc., Billings, MT, for a training program to           $100,000  Tester, Baucus
                                                                                  help meet the mental health needs of those living in rural or
                                                                                  frontier States.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.....  Bucks County Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc.,           $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  Doylestown, PA, to expand drug and alcohol prevention
                                                                                  programs.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.....  Hamakua Health Center, Honokaa, HI, for a youth anti-drug               $200,000  Inouye, Akaka
                                                                                  program.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.....  Maryland Association of Youth Services Bureaus, Greenbelt, MD,          $100,000  Cardin, Mikulski
                                                                                  for prevention and diversion services to youth and their
                                                                                  families.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.....  Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, for                 $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  evidence-based prevention programs in schools and communities
                                                                                  to reduce youth substance abuse.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.....  Waimanlo Health Center, Waimanalo, HI, for a youth anti-drug            $200,000  Inouye, Akaka
                                                                                  program.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.....  West Virginia Prevention Resource Center, South Charleston,           $1,500,000  Byrd
                                                                                  WV, for drug abuse prevention.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Center for Substance Abuse Treatment......  Chesterfield County, VA, for a pretrial diversion program for           $100,000  Webb
                                                                                  non-violent defendants with mental illness and substance
                                                                                  abuse addiction.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Center for Substance Abuse Treatment......  City of Farmington, NM, to provide evidence-based substance             $150,000  Bingaman, Tom Udall
                                                                                  abuse treatment to public inebriates.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Center for Substance Abuse Treatment......  Mercy Recovery Center, Westbrook, ME, for residential                 $1,000,000  Collins, Snowe
                                                                                  treatment programs.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services..  Bi-State Primary Care Association, Concord, NH, to support              $600,000  Gregg, Shaheen
                                                                                  uncompensated care to treat uninsured and underinsured
                                                                                  patients.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services..  Bi-State Primary Care, Concord, NH, for primary care workforce          $650,000  Gregg, Shaheen
                                                                                  recruitment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services..  Iowa Dental Association, Johnston, IA, for a children's dental          $250,000  Harkin
                                                                                  home demonstration project in Scott County.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services..  University of Mississippi, University, MS, for the Medication           $500,000  Cochran
                                                                                  Use and Outcomes Research Group.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Child Abuse...............................  Addison County Parent Child Center, Middlebury, VT, to support          $100,000  Sanders
                                                                                  and expand parental education activities.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Child Abuse...............................  County of Contra Costa, Martinez, CA, for an initiative for             $200,000  Boxer
                                                                                  children and adolescents exposed to domestic violence.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Child Abuse...............................  Klingberg Family Centers, Hartford, CT, for child abuse                 $125,000  Dodd, Lieberman
                                                                                  prevention and intervention services.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Child Abuse...............................  Oregon Association of Relief Nurseries, Medford, OR, to                 $100,000  Merkley, Wyden
                                                                                  provide early childhood development and education for
                                                                                  children at risk of abuse and neglect.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Child Abuse...............................  Parents Anonymous, Inc., Claremont, CA, for a national parent           $500,000  Gillibrand, Boxer,
                                                                                  helpline to prevent child abuse and neglect.                                      Lautenberg, Lincoln,
                                                                                                                                                                    Menendez, Wyden, and Levin
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Child Abuse...............................  Prevent Child Abuse Vermont, Montpelier, VT, to expand the              $500,000  Leahy
                                                                                  SAFE-T Prevention Program.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Child Abuse...............................  Wynona's House, Newark, NJ, for a child sexual abuse                    $200,000  Lautenberg, Menendez
                                                                                  intervention program.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  AIDS Community Resources, Inc., Syracuse, NY, for HIV/AIDS              $300,000  Schumer
                                                                                  education and prevention.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  Center for International Rehabilitation, Washington, DC, for            $150,000  Harkin
                                                                                  the disability rights monitor program.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  Community Health Centers in Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, for the               $200,000  Inouye, Akaka
                                                                                  Childhood Rural Asthma Project.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  County of Essex, Newark, NJ, for diabetes prevention and                $125,000  Menendez, Lautenberg
                                                                                  management program for severely mentally ill individuals.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  East Carolina University, Chapel Hill, NC, for a racial                 $300,000  Burr, Hagan
                                                                                  disparities and cardiovascular disease initiative.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  Eastern Maine Health Systems, Brewer, ME, for emergency                 $640,000  Collins, Snowe
                                                                                  preparedness planning and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  Healthy People Northeast Pennsylvania Initiative, Clarks                $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  Summit, PA, for obesity prevention and education programs.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  Iowa State University of Science and Technology, Ames, IA, for          $750,000  Harkin, Grassley
                                                                                  facilities and equipment to support the Institute for Novel
                                                                                  Vaccine and Anti-Microbial Design.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  Kalihi-Palama Health Center, Honolulu, HI, for outreach,                $150,000  Inouye, Akaka
                                                                                  screening and education related to renal disease.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  Kaweah Delta Hospital Foundation, Visalia, CA, for a                    $100,000  Boxer
                                                                                  comprehensive asthma management program.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  La Familia Medical Center, Santa Fe, NM, for diabetes                   $100,000  Bingaman, Tom Udall
                                                                                  education and outreach.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA, to expand             $300,000  Vitter, Landrieu
                                                                                  early detection cancer screening.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  Northeast Regional Cancer Institute, Scranton, PA, for a                $100,000  Specter, Casey
                                                                                  regional cancer registry.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL, for the                    $200,000  Durbin, Burris
                                                                                  development of a comprehensive diabetic program.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  Ohio University, Athens, OH, for diabetes outreach and                  $200,000  Voinovich, Brown
                                                                                  education in rural areas.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  PE4life Foundation, Kansas City, MO, for expansion and                  $300,000  Harkin
                                                                                  assessment of PE4life programs across Iowa.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  Pednet Coalition, Inc., Columbia, MO, for obesity prevention            $500,000  Bond
                                                                                  programs.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  Penn State University, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center,                $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  Hershey, PA, for a stroke prevention program.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, for research on           $150,000  Johnson, Thune
                                                                                  health promotion.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  Spinal Muscular Atrophy Foundation, New York, NY, for                   $500,000  Harkin, Schumer
                                                                                  outreach, patient education and registries.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  State of Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene,            $1,200,000  Mikulski, Cardin
                                                                                  Baltimore, MD, for the Unified Oral Health Education Message
                                                                                  Campaign.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, to develop            $300,000  Ben Nelson
                                                                                  an environmental health informatics database.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  University of Nevada School of Medicine, Reno, NV, to                   $800,000  Reid
                                                                                  establish a diabetes management program.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI, to support           $850,000  Kohl
                                                                                  and expand public health education and outreach programs.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  Waterloo Fire Rescue, Waterloo, IA, for FirePALS, a school-             $150,000  Harkin
                                                                                  based injury prevention program.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  Winston-Salem State University, Winston-Salem, NC, for blood            $100,000  Hagan
                                                                                  pressure and obesity screening programs, including training
                                                                                  of healthcare professionals.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  Yale New Haven Health Center, New Haven, CT, for the                    $150,000  Dodd, Lieberman
                                                                                  Connecticut Center for Public Health Preparedness.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Disease Control, Research and Training....  Youth & Family Services, Inc., Rapid City, SD, for a health             $300,000  Johnson, Thune
                                                                                  promotion program for young men.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  General Departmental Management...........  Community Transportation Association of America, Washington,            $950,000  Harkin
                                                                                  DC, for technical assistance to human services transportation
                                                                                  providers on ADA requirements.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Adams State College, Alamosa, CO, for facilities and equipment          $125,000  Mark Udall, Bennet
                                                                                  related to nurse training.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Advocates for a Healthy Community, Springfield, MO, for                 $500,000  Bond
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK, for            $1,000,000  Murkowski, Begich
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK, for            $2,000,000  Murkowski, Begich
                                                                                  training dental healthcare workers.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Alivio Medical Center, Chicago, IL, for facilities and                  $500,000  Durbin
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA, for equipment.....          $100,000  Specter
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Allen Institute for Brain Science, Seattle, WA, for equipment.          $300,000  Murray, Cantwell
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Allied Services Foundation, Clarks Summit, PA, for                      $100,000  Specter, Casey
                                                                                  rehabilitation equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Altoona Regional Health System, Altoona, PA, for equipment....          $100,000  Specter, Casey
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  AMDEC Foundation, New York, NY, for facilities and equipment            $100,000  Gillibrand
                                                                                  relating to medical research.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  American Optometric Association, Alexandria, VA, to expand              $500,000  Byrd
                                                                                  vision screening programs.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  American Optometric Association, St. Louis, MO, to expand                $90,000  Harkin
                                                                                  vision screening programs in Iowa.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  American Prosthodontic Society Foundation, Osceola Mills, PA,           $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  for scholarships and program costs related to training in
                                                                                  prosthetic dentistry and clinical prosthodontics.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  American Red Cross Southeastern MI Blood Services Region,               $200,000  Levin, Stabenow
                                                                                  Detroit, MI, for blood donation programs.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  American Red Cross, Columbus, OH, for purchase of vehicles to           $200,000  Brown
                                                                                  serve rural areas.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Anchorage Project Access, Anchorage, AK, for healthcare                 $125,000  Begich, Murkowski
                                                                                  coordination and supplies.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Anna Jacques Hospital, Newburyport, MA, for health information          $200,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  technology.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, for facilities and             $100,000  Hagan
                                                                                  equipment related to rural health.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Arkansas Department of Health, Little Rock, AR, for facilities          $240,000  Lincoln, Pryor
                                                                                  and equipment at the Marshallese Health Clinic.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Asher Community Health Center, Fossil, OR, for facilities and           $200,000  Wyden, Merkley
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Association for Utah Community Health, Salt Lake City, UT, for        $1,350,000  Bennett, Hatch
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Autism New Jersey, Ewing, NJ, for an autism patient navigator           $100,000  Menendez, Lautenberg
                                                                                  project.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Avis Goodwin Community Health Center, Dover, NH, for                    $125,000  Shaheen
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Baptist Health System, Jacksonville, FL, for equipment........          $100,000  Bill Nelson
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Barnesville Hospital Association, Inc., Belmont, OH, for                $200,000  Brown
                                                                                  facilities and equipment related to the emergency department.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Baton Rouge General Medical Center, Baton Rouge, LA, for                $200,000  Landrieu, Vitter
                                                                                  facilities and equipment at a nursing facility.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Bay Area Medical Center, Marinette, WI, for health information          $900,000  Kohl
                                                                                  technology.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Beebe Medical Center, Lewes, DE, for facilities and equipment.          $100,000  Carper, Kaufman
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology, Boston, MA, for the          $100,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  development of health profession training programs.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Bergen Regional Medical Center, Hackensack, NJ, for facilities          $300,000  Lautenberg, Menendez
                                                                                  and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Big Springs Medical Association, Inc dba Missouri Highlands           $1,000,000  Bond
                                                                                  Health Care, Ellington, MO, for facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Billings Clinic, Billings, MT, for facilities and equipment...          $250,000  Baucus, Tester
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Bingham Memorial Hospital, Blackfoot, ID, for facilities and            $200,000  Crapo, Risch
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  BioInnovation Institute of Akron, Akron, OH, for facilities             $400,000  Voinovich, Brown
                                                                                  and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Bi-State Primary Care Association, Montpelier, VT, for                  $125,000  Sanders
                                                                                  facilities, equipment and expansion of outreach and education
                                                                                  programs.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Blackstone Valley Community Health Care Inc., Pawtucket, RI,            $500,000  Reed, Whitehouse
                                                                                  for facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, for facilities and                   $150,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Boulder City Hospital, Boulder City, NV, for facilities and           $1,000,000  Reid
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Bridgeport Hospital, Bridgeport, CT, for facilities and                 $310,000  Dodd, Lieberman
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Broadlawns Medical Center, Des Moines, IA, for facilities and           $500,000  Harkin, Grassley
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Brown University, Providence, RI, for facilities and equipment          $116,000  Whitehouse, Reed
                                                                                  relating to medical education.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Butler Hospital, Providence, RI, for equipment relating to              $200,000  Reed, Whitehouse
                                                                                  Alzheimer's disease.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  CARD Clinic, Libby, MT, for facilities and equipment..........          $200,000  Baucus, Tester
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  CarePartners Foundation, Asheville, NC, for health information          $300,000  Burr
                                                                                  systems including equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Caribou Memorial Hospital, Soda Springs, ID, for facilities             $100,000  Crapo, Risch
                                                                                  and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Caring Health Center, Inc., Springfield, MA, for facilities             $150,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Cassia Regional Medical Center, Burley, ID, for facilities and          $100,000  Crapo, Risch
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Castleton State College, Castleton, VT, for a nursing program,          $100,000  Sanders
                                                                                  including equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Catholic Charities Free Health Care Center, Pittsburgh, PA,             $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  for equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, for equipment             $655,000  Feinstein
                                                                                  and supplies for the Institute for Irritable Bowel Syndrome
                                                                                  Research.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Centenary College of Louisiana, Shreveport, LA, for facilities          $400,000  Landrieu, Vitter
                                                                                  and equipment in health sciences.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Central Piedmont Community College, Charlotte, NC, for                  $125,000  Hagan
                                                                                  facilities and equipment at the Health Sciences Simulation
                                                                                  Lab.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Central Washington Hospital, Wenatchee, WA, for facilities and          $100,000  Cantwell, Murray
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Charles A. Dean Memorial Hospital and Nursing Home,                     $250,000  Collins, Snowe
                                                                                  Greenville, ME, for facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Charles Cole Memorial Hospital, Coudersport, PA, for                    $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Cherry Street Health Services, Grand Rapids, MI, for                    $400,000  Stabenow, Levin
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Children's Health Fund, New York, NY, for facilities and                $150,000  Gillibrand
                                                                                  equipment at the South Bronx Health Center for Children and
                                                                                  Families.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA, for facilities           $200,000  Isakson, Chambliss
                                                                                  and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Children's Hospital of KidsPeace, Orefield, PA, for facilities          $100,000  Specter, Casey
                                                                                  and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Children's Institute of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, for                 $100,000  Specter, Casey
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Children's Medical Center, Dallas, TX, for facilities and               $250,000  Hutchison
                                                                                  equip-  ment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital, Houston, TX, for                  $100,000  Hutchison
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL, for facilities and           $500,000  Durbin
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Chippewa Valley Free Clinic, Eau Claire, WI, for electronic              $50,000  Kohl
                                                                                  health record equipment and implementation.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Chippewa Valley Hospital, Durand, WI, for electronic health             $400,000  Kohl
                                                                                  record equipment and implementation.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  City of Anchorage, AK, for facilities and equipment relating            $125,000  Begich
                                                                                  to public health.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  City of Ketchikan, AK, for facilities and equipment at                $1,000,000  Murkowski, Begich
                                                                                  Ketchikan General Hospital.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  City of New Orleans, LA, for facilities and equipment at a              $750,000  Landrieu, Vitter
                                                                                  hospital in New Orleans East.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  City of Pendleton, OR, for facilities and equipment at the              $150,000  Merkley, Wyden
                                                                                  Women Veterans Trauma Rehabilitation Center.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  City of Philadelphia, PA, for equipment to develop an                   $125,000  Specter, Casey
                                                                                  Electronic Parental Care Registry.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  City of West Wendover, NV, for equipment for the West Wendover          $160,000  Reid
                                                                                  Medical Clinic.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health, Las Vegas,         $1,300,000  Reid, Ensign
                                                                                  NV, for equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Codman Square Health Center, Dorchester, MA, for facilities             $200,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Coeur d'Alene Tribe, Plummer, ID, for facilities and equipment          $100,000  Crapo, Risch
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring, NY, for equipment.          $500,000  Gillibrand, Schumer
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  College of Saint Scholastica, Duluth, MN, to implement an               $200,000  Klobuchar
                                                                                  electronic health record system.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Colorado State University--Pueblo, Pueblo, CO, for facilities           $100,000  Mark Udall
                                                                                  and equipment related to nurse training.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Columbus Regional Hospital, Columbus, IN, for facilities and            $100,000  Lugar
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Commonwealth Medical Education, Scranton, PA, for facilities            $250,000  Casey, Specter
                                                                                  and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Community Health Center's Inc., Middletown, CT, for residency           $225,000  Dodd, Lieberman
                                                                                  training for nurse practitioners.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Community Health Centers of the Rutland Region, Bomoseen, VT,           $125,000  Sanders
                                                                                  for equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Community Health Center's, Inc., Middletown, CT, for                    $100,000  Dodd, Lieberman
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Community Health Integrated Partnership, Inc., Glen Burnie,             $150,000  Cardin
                                                                                  MD, to implement an electronic health record system.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Community Medical Center, Missoula, MT, for facilities and              $150,000  Baucus, Tester
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Community Medical Center, Toms River, NJ, for equipment.......          $150,000  Lautenberg, Menendez
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Connecticut Children's Medical Center, Hartford, CT, for                $310,000  Dodd
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Connecticut State University System, Hartford, CT, for a                $275,000  Dodd
                                                                                  nursing education program.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Cook Children's Medical Center, Fort Worth, TX, for facilities          $100,000  Hutchison
                                                                                  and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Cornerstone Care, Greensboro, PA, for outreach and supplies to          $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  expand dental care.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Corry Memorial Hospital Association, Corry, PA, for equipment.          $100,000  Specter, Casey
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Cove-Union-Powder Medical Association, Union, OR, for                   $100,000  Merkley, Wyden
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Curators of the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, for               $750,000  Bond
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Cure Alzheimer's Fund, Wellesley Hills, MA, for equipment.....          $150,000  Kennedy, Kerry
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, for facilities and            $200,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  equipment at Center for Biomedical Imaging in Oncology.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH, for                    $200,000  Gregg
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Delaware State University, Dover, DE, for facilities and                $100,000  Kaufman, Carper
                                                                                  equipment related to public health training.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Delta Dental of Iowa, Ames, IA, for the Rural Dental Health             $150,000  Harkin, Grassley
                                                                                  Initiative.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Delta State University, Cleveland, MS, for facilities and               $750,000  Cochran
                                                                                  equip-  ment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  DeSales University, Center Valley, PA, for medical education            $100,000  Specter, Casey
                                                                                  laboratory upgrades, including the purchase of equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Devereux Foundation, Rockledge, FL, for facilities and                  $100,000  Bill Nelson
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Dillard University, New Orleans, LA, for facilities and                 $150,000  Landrieu, Vitter
                                                                                  equipment at the Gentilly Center for Health Disparities and
                                                                                  Disease Prevention.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Drake University, Des Moines, IA, for equipment and laboratory          $400,000  Harkin, Grassley
                                                                                  supplies for health sciences education.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Drew Memorial Hospital, Monticello, AR, for equipment.........          $100,000  Lincoln, Pryor
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  East End Health Alliance, Greenport, NY, to implement an                $500,000  Schumer, Gillibrand
                                                                                  electronic health record system.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Easter Seals, Chicago, IL, for facilities and equipment at a            $250,000  Durbin
                                                                                  center for autism research.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Eastern Washington University, Cheney, WA, for equipment to             $200,000  Murray
                                                                                  establish an Advanced Dental Hygiene Practitioner program.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Elk Regional Health Center, St. Marys, PA, for equipment......          $100,000  Specter, Casey
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Ellwood City Hospital, Ellwood City, PA, for facilities and             $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Erie County Medical Center Corporation, Buffalo, NY, for                $300,000  Schumer, Gillibrand
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Excela Health Westmoreland Hospital, Latrobe, PA, to implement          $100,000  Specter, Casey
                                                                                  an electronic health record system.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Family Health Centers of San Diego, San Diego, CA, for                  $100,000  Boxer
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Ferrum College, Ferrum, VA, for facilities and equipment at a           $200,000  Webb, Warner
                                                                                  rural community health center.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Fletcher Allen Health Care, Burlington, VT, for the Hospital-           $750,000  Leahy
                                                                                  National Guard Training Collaborative, including equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Franciscan Hospital for Children, Boston, MA, for facilities            $150,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Free Clinics of Iowa, Des Moines, IA, for coordination of care          $350,000  Harkin
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Friends of the Congressional Glaucoma Caucus Foundation, Lake           $100,000  Menendez, Lautenberg
                                                                                  Success, NY, for a New Jersey mobile eye care screening
                                                                                  initiative.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Fulton County Medical Center, McConnellsburg, PA, for equip-            $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  ment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Gateway Technical College, Kenosha, WI, for facilities and              $500,000  Kohl
                                                                                  equipment at the Health Occupations Laboratory.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Geisinger Health System, Harrisburg, PA, for equipment........          $100,000  Specter, Casey
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA, for health                 $100,000  Chambliss
                                                                                  professions training.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Goodall Hospital, Sanford, ME, for facilities and equipment...          $250,000  Collins, Snowe
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Grady Health System, Atlanta, GA, for facilities and equipment          $200,000  Isakson, Chambliss
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Griffin Hospital, Derby, CT, for facilities and equipment.....          $310,000  Dodd, Lieberman
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Gritman Medical Center, Moscow, ID, for facilities and equip-           $200,000  Crapo, Risch
                                                                                  ment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Hamot Medical Center, Erie, PA, for equipment.................          $100,000  Specter, Casey
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Harris County Hospital District, Houston, TX, for facilities            $150,000  Hutchison
                                                                                  and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT, for facilities and equipment.          $310,000  Dodd, Lieberman
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Hays Medical Center, Hays, KS, for facilities and equipment...          $250,000  Brownback
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Healthy Connections Network, Akron, OH, for the Access to Care          $150,000  Brown
                                                                                  Initiative.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Helping Kids Clinic, Las Vegas, NV, for medical supplies and            $100,000  Reid
                                                                                  supportive services.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Hidalgo County Judge's Office, Edinburg, TX, for a mobile               $150,000  Cornyn
                                                                                  health unit.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Holy Spirit Healthcare System, Camp Hill, PA, for equipment...          $100,000  Specter, Casey
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Hormel Institute, Austin, MN, for facilities and equipment              $500,000  Klobuchar
                                                                                  related to bioscience.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Hospital Cooperative, Pocatello, ID, for electronic medical             $200,000  Crapo, Risch
                                                                                  records.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Houston Community College, Houston, TX, for health professions          $250,000  Hutchison
                                                                                  training.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Howard Community College, Columbia, MD, for facilities and            $1,000,000  Mikulski, Cardin
                                                                                  equipment related to healthcare workforce training.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Hunter Health Clinic, Wichita, KS, for facilities and                   $300,000  Brownback
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Hurley Medical Center, Flint, MI, for facilities and equipment          $150,000  Stabenow, Levin
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Huston-Tillotson University, Austin, TX, for facilities and             $100,000  Cornyn
                                                                                  equip-  ment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Intermountain Healthcare Foundation, Salt Lake City, UT, for            $250,000  Bennett, Hatch
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Iowa CareGivers Association, Des Moines, IA, for training and           $300,000  Harkin
                                                                                  support of certified nurse assistants.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Iowa Healthcare Collaborative, Des Moines, IA, to establish             $500,000  Harkin
                                                                                  Lean healthcare services in collaboration with Pittsburgh
                                                                                  Regional Health.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, for the Southern               $1,000,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                                                                  Institute for Mental Health Advocacy, Research, and Training.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Jellico Community Hospital, Jellico, TN, for facilities and             $500,000  Corker, Alexander
                                                                                  equip-  ment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Jewish Healthcare Foundation, Pittsburgh, PA, to expand web-            $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  based training programs.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Johnson County Community College, Overland Park, KS, for                $400,000  Brownback
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Kadlec Medical Center, Richland, WA, for facilities and                 $500,000  Murray, Cantwell
                                                                                  equipment to expand the pediatric center.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Kaweah Delta Hospital Foundation, Visalia, CA, for facilities           $500,000  Feinstein
                                                                                  and equipment for the Kaweah Delta Health Care District.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Kennesaw State University Foundation, Inc., Kennesaw, GA, for           $200,000  Isakson
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Kent County Memorial Hospital, Warwick, RI, for facilities and          $200,000  Whitehouse
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Kiddazzle Dental Network, Inc., Lake Oswego, OR, for equipment          $100,000  Wyden, Merkley
                                                                                  and supplies related to pediatric dental services.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Kiowa County Hospital, Greensburg, KS, for facilities and               $400,000  Brownback
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Laboure College, Dorchester, MA, to develop and expand nursing          $200,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  education programs.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Lahey Clinic Medical Center, Inc., Burlington, MA, for                  $300,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  facilities and equipment relating to the emergency department.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, Erie, PA, for equip-         $100,000  Specter
                                                                                    ment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Lanai Community Health Center, Lanai City, HI, for facilities           $200,000  Inouye, Akaka
                                                                                  and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Lane Community College, Eugene, OR, for equipment for nurse             $100,000  Merkley, Wyden
                                                                                  training.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Lane Regional Medical Center, Baton Rouge, LA, for facilities           $300,000  Vitter, Landrieu
                                                                                  and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Le Moyne College, Syracuse, NY, for facilities and equipment            $500,000  Schumer
                                                                                  relating to health professions training.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Lehigh Valley Hospital, Allentown, PA, for equipment..........          $100,000  Specter, Casey
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Lewis and Clark County, Helena, MT, for facilities and                  $100,000  Tester, Baucus
                                                                                  equipment at the City-County Health Department.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Lewis-Clark State College, Lewiston, ID, for health                     $100,000  Crapo, Risch
                                                                                  professions training.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Madison Area Technical College, Madison, WI, for health                 $300,000  Kohl
                                                                                  training equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital, Lincoln, NE, for facilities            $400,000  Ben Nelson
                                                                                  and equipment at the acute care hospital.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Maine State Board of Nursing, Augusta, ME, for nursing                  $150,000  Collins
                                                                                  education and workforce data collection, analysis, and
                                                                                  planning.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Manchester Community College, Manchester, CT, for medical               $120,000  Dodd, Lieberman
                                                                                  diagnostic and treatment equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Maniilaq Association, Kotzebue, AK, for facilities and equip-           $500,000  Murkowski, Begich
                                                                                  ment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Marcus Autism Center, Atlanta, GA, to expand services for               $300,000  Isakson, Chambliss
                                                                                  children and adolescents with developmental disabilities.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI, for a dental health                $800,000  Kohl
                                                                                  outreach program, including supplies.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Maui Economic Development Board, Kihei, HI, for health                  $100,000  Inouye, Akaka
                                                                                  education at the Lanai'I Women's Initiative.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Maui Medical Center, Wailuku, HI, for facilities and equipment          $100,000  Inouye, Akaka
                                                                                  at the Simulation Center.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Meadville Medical Center, Meadville, PA, for equipment........          $100,000  Specter
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Memorial Hospital at Gulfport, Gulfport, MS, for the Stroke             $475,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                                                                  Education and Prevention Community Network.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Mena Regional Health System, Mena, AR, for facilities and               $300,000  Lincoln, Pryor
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Mercer County Commission, Princeton, WV, for facilities and           $4,000,000  Byrd
                                                                                  equipment at the Health Department.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Mercy Medical Center, Des Moines, IA, for facilities and equip-         $500,000  Harkin, Grassley
                                                                                    ment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Methodist Hospital System, Houston, TX, for a mobile medical            $150,000  Cornyn
                                                                                  unit.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Methodist University, Fayetteville, NC, for facilities and              $400,000  Burr
                                                                                  equip-  ment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Metropolitan Community College, Omaha, NE, for facilities and           $300,000  Ben Nelson
                                                                                  equipment relating to healthcare training.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Metropolitan Family Health Network, Jersey City, NJ, for equip-         $100,000  Menendez, Lautenberg
                                                                                    ment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Metropolitan State University, St. Paul, MN, to expand nursing          $150,000  Klobuchar
                                                                                  education.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Middlesex Community College, Lowell, MA, for facilities and             $150,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  equipment at a dental hygiene clinic.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Milwaukee Health Services, Inc., Milwaukee, WI, for facilities          $350,000  Kohl
                                                                                  and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Milwaukee Public Schools, Milwaukee, WI, for outreach and               $200,000  Kohl
                                                                                  supplies to expand dental care.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Minot State University, Minot, ND, for its Great Plains Autism          $700,000  Conrad, Dorgan
                                                                                  Treatment Program to serve children with autism spectrum
                                                                                  disorders.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Misericordia University, Dallas, PA, for facilities and                 $100,000  Specter, Casey
                                                                                  equipment for the College of Health Sciences.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Choctaw, MS, for                   $175,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Mississippi Blood Services, Jackson, MS, for facilities and             $300,000  Cochran
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Mississippi Primary Health Care Association, Jackson, MS, for           $700,000  Cochran
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, for                $750,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                                                                  biomedical engineering facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Missouri Coalition for Primary Health Care, Jefferson City,             $750,000  Bond
                                                                                  MO, for facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Molokai Ohana Health Center, Kaunakakai, HI, for facilities             $750,000  Inouye, Akaka
                                                                                  and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Monmouth Medical Center, Long Branch, NJ, for facilities and            $200,000  Lautenberg, Menendez
                                                                                  equipment at the emergency department.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Montana Tech, Butte, MT, to expand health informatics                   $100,000  Tester, Baucus
                                                                                  training, including equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Morgan Hospital and Medical Center, Martinsville, IN, for               $100,000  Lugar
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Mount Saint Mary College, Newburgh, NY, for nurse training              $100,000  Schumer
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Murray State University, Breathitt Veterinary Center,                   $100,000  Bunning
                                                                                  Hopkinsville, KY, for facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Navos, Seattle, WA, for facilities and equipment at a mental            $500,000  Murray, Cantwell
                                                                                  health center.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV, for cancer education,           $500,000  Reid
                                                                                  outreach and support needs across the State of Nevada.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Nevada State College, Henderson, NV, to expand nursing                  $500,000  Reid
                                                                                  education, including equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, for           $750,000  Schumer
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Norman Regional Health System, Norman, OK, for facilities and           $200,000  Inhofe
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  North Carolina A&T State University, Greensboro, NC, for the            $125,000  Hagan
                                                                                  development of nurse training programs.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  North Idaho College, Coeur d'Alene, ID, for health professions          $100,000  Crapo, Risch
                                                                                  training.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  NorthWest Arkansas Community College, Bentonville, AR, for              $460,000  Lincoln, Pryor
                                                                                  expanding a nurse training program, including equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Northwest Community Health Care, Pascoag, RI, for facilities            $200,000  Reed, Whitehouse
                                                                                  and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Northwest Hospital & Medical Center, Seattle, WA, for                   $250,000  Murray
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Northwest Mississippi Community College, Senatobia, MS, for             $500,000  Cochran
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Northwest Nazarene University, Nampa, ID, for facilities and            $200,000  Crapo, Risch
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL, for health           $100,000  Bill Nelson
                                                                                  information technology.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Oglala Sioux Tribe, Pine Ridge, SD, for facilities and                  $800,000  Johnson
                                                                                  equipment relating to emergency medicine.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus,            $200,000  Voinovich
                                                                                  OH, for facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK, for            $200,000  Inhofe
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Orange County Government, Orlando, FL, for facilities and               $200,000  Martinez
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR, for equipment          $100,000  Merkley, Wyden
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Pacific Northwest Diabetes Research Institute, Seattle, WA,             $150,000  Murray
                                                                                  for equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Palmer College, Davenport, IA, and the Myrna Brind Center of            $400,000  Harkin
                                                                                  Integrative Medicine in Philadelphia, PA, to develop a model
                                                                                  integrative healthcare program for the treatment of pain.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Parkland Health and Hospital System, Dallas, TX, for                    $150,000  Hutchison
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Pen Bay Healthcare, Rockport, ME, for health professions train-         $500,000  Collins, Snowe
                                                                                    ing.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Phoebe Putney Health System, Albany, GA, for healthcare                 $100,000  Chambliss
                                                                                  services for students.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  PinnacleHealth System, Harrisburg, PA, for equipment..........          $100,000  Specter, Casey
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Pioneer Valley Life Science Institute, Springfield, MA, for             $300,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  medical research equipment and technology.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Pocono Medical Center, East Stroudsburg, PA, for facilities             $100,000  Specter, Casey
                                                                                  and equipment relating to cancer.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Preferred Health Care, Lancaster, PA, for health information            $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  technology.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Primary Care Association of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, to provide          $1,850,000  Inouye, Akaka
                                                                                  service enhancements and outreach.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Providence Community Health Centers, Providence, RI, for                $400,000  Reed, Whitehouse
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Providence St. Mary Medical Center, Walla Walla, WA, for                $250,000  Murray
                                                                                  cancer treatment equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Puget Sound Neighborhood Health Centers, Seattle, WA, for               $650,000  Murray, Cantwell
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Reading Hospital and Medical Center, Reading, PA, for equip-            $100,000  Specter, Casey
                                                                                  ment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Renown Health, Reno, NV, for nursing programs, including                $390,000  Reid
                                                                                  professional development.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Resurrection Health Care, Chicago, IL, for equipment..........          $400,000  Durbin, Burris
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Rhode Island Free Clinic, Providence, RI, for supportive                $100,000  Whitehouse
                                                                                  services and supplies.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, for equipment..........          $100,000  Whitehouse, Reed
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Rice University, Houston, TX, for facilities and equipment....          $300,000  Hutchison
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Riverside County Regional Medical Center, Moreno Valley, CA,            $100,000  Boxer
                                                                                  for a rural mobile health clinic.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Rosebud, SD, for facilities and equipment          $600,000  Johnson, Thune
                                                                                  relating to emergency medical services.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown, PA, for equipment...........          $100,000  Specter, Casey
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Saint Anselm College, Manchester, NH, for facilities and equip-         $800,000  Gregg
                                                                                    ment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Saint Barnabas Health Care System Foundation, West Orange, NJ,          $300,000  Lautenberg, Menendez
                                                                                  for health information technology.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Saint Bernard's Development Foundation, Jonesboro, AR, for              $300,000  Lincoln, Pryor
                                                                                  equipment and supplies for the Flo and Phil Jones Hospice
                                                                                  House.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Saint Claire Regional Medical Center, Morehead, KY, for                 $100,000  Bunning
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Saint Francis Hospital Foundation, Wilmington, DE, for                  $175,000  Carper, Kaufman
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Saint Joseph Health System, Tawas City, MI, for equipment.....          $100,000  Stabenow, Levin
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Saint Joseph Hospital, Nashua, NH, for facilities and                   $400,000  Gregg, Shaheen
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Saint Joseph College, West Hartford, CT, for equipment at the           $175,000  Dodd, Lieberman
                                                                                  School of Pharmacy.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Saint Joseph's Mercy Health Foundation, Hot Springs, AR, for            $200,000  Lincoln, Pryor
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Saint Jude Children's Medical Center, Memphis, TN, for                $3,111,000  Alexander
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Saint Luke's Health System, Boise, ID, for expansion of                 $100,000  Crapo, Risch
                                                                                  services for children.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Saint Luke's Hospital and Health Network, Bethlehem, PA, for            $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Saint Mary's Hospital, Passaic, NJ, for facilities and                  $550,000  Lautenberg, Menendez
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Saint Mary's Hospital, Waterbury, CT, for facilities and equip-         $310,000  Dodd
                                                                                    ment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Saint Patrick Hospital, Missoula, MT, to implement an                   $150,000  Baucus, Tester
                                                                                  electronic health record system.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Saint Vincent Charity and Saint John West Shore Hospitals,              $400,000  Voinovich
                                                                                  Cleveland, OH, for facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Saint Vincent Healthcare Foundation, Billings, MT, for                  $350,000  Baucus, Tester
                                                                                  facilities and equipment for the Montana Pediatric Project.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Samuel U. Rodgers Health Center Inc., Kansas City, MO, for            $1,500,000  Bond
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Schuylkill Health System, Pottsville, PA, for equipment.......          $100,000  Specter
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Seton Hill University, Greensburg, PA, for equipment relating           $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  to dental health education.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Shands Healthcare, Gainesville, FL, for equipment.............          $100,000  Bill Nelson
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Sharon Regional Health System, Sharon, PA, for equipment......          $100,000  Specter
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Shepherd Center, Atlanta, GA, for facilities and equipment....          $200,000  Isakson
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Sierra County, Truth or Consequences, NM, for facilities and            $125,000  Tom Udall, Bingaman
                                                                                  equipment at the Sierra Vista Hospital.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Signature Healthcare, Brockton, MA, for equipment.............          $100,000  Kennedy, Kerry
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Skagit Valley Hospital, Mount Vernon, WA, for equipment.......          $350,000  Murray, Cantwell
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  South Shore Hospital, Weymouth, MA, for equipment.............          $300,000  Kennedy, Kerry
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville, IL, for a nursing           $500,000  Durbin
                                                                                  education program, including equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX, for facilities and           $300,000  Hutchison
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Southwest Tennessee Community College, Memphis, TN, for health          $400,000  Alexander
                                                                                  professions training.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System, Spartanburg, SC, for            $500,000  Graham
                                                                                  professional development.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  SSM Cardinal Glennon Children's Hospital, Saint Louis, MO, for        $1,000,000  Bond
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  State of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, for facilities, equipment           $2,000,000  Mikulski
                                                                                  and training related to medical surge capacity and mass
                                                                                  casualty events.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Staten Island University Hospital, Staten Island, NY, for               $200,000  Gillibrand
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Stewart-Marchman-Act Foundation, Inc., Daytona Beach, FL, for           $100,000  Bill Nelson
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Straub Hospital Burn Center, Honolulu, HI, for equipment......          $150,000  Inouye, Akaka
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Suffolk County Department of Health Services, Hauppauge, NY,            $200,000  Gillibrand
                                                                                  to implement an electronic health record system.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Susquehanna Health, Williamsport, PA, for equipment...........          $100,000  Specter
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Temple University Health System, Philadelphia, PA, for                  $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Tennessee Department of Health, Nashville, TN, for facilities           $150,000  Alexander
                                                                                  and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Texas Health Institute, Austin, TX, for facilities and                  $150,000  Hutchison
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center at El Paso, TX,            $400,000  Hutchison
                                                                                  for facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Texas Tech University Paul L. Foster School of Medicine, El             $100,000  Cornyn
                                                                                  Paso, TX, for facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Texas Woman's University, Denton, TX, for facilities and equip-         $300,000  Hutchison
                                                                                    ment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  The Manor, Jonesville, MI, for facilities and equipment at the          $150,000  Levin, Stabenow
                                                                                  Treatment and Counseling Center.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, for             $100,000  Specter, Casey
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Touro University Nevada, Henderson, NV, for facilities and              $750,000  Reid
                                                                                  equipment at the Gerontology Center.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Town of Gilbert, Gilbert, WV, for facilities and equipment for        $3,000,000  Byrd
                                                                                  a primary healthcare center.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  TriHealth, Cincinnati, OH, for facilities and equipment.......          $100,000  Voinovich
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Trinitas Health Foundation, Elizabeth, NJ, for facilities and           $400,000  Lautenberg, Menendez
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Tulsa Fire Department, Tulsa, OK, for equipment...............          $100,000  Inhofe
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Tyrone Hospital, Tyrone, PA, for facilities and equipment.....          $100,000  Specter
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  UMass Memorial Health Care, Worcester, MA, for health                   $200,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                                                                  information technology.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Union Hospital, Terre Haute, IN, for facilities and equipment.          $100,000  Lugar
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University Medical Center at Brackenridge, Austin, TX, for              $150,000  Hutchison
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University Medical Center of Southern Nevada, Las Vegas, NV,          $1,200,000  Reid
                                                                                  for facilities and equipment for the Women's Care and Birth
                                                                                  Center.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, for facilities and            $10,250,000  Shelby
                                                                                  equip-  ment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR,           $300,000  Lincoln, Pryor
                                                                                  for facilities and equipment at the Winthrop P Rockefeller
                                                                                  Cancer Institute.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA, for                 $600,000  Feinstein
                                                                                  facilities and equipment at the School of Medicine.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Colorado--Denver, Aurora, CO, to expand                   $100,000  Mark Udall
                                                                                  physician training in rural areas.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Georgia, Athens, GA, for facilities and                   $100,000  Chambliss
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Hawaii School of Medicine, Honolulu, HI, to               $200,000  Inouye, Akaka
                                                                                  expand medical education.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Hawaii School of Nursing--Manoa, Honolulu, HI,            $200,000  Inouye, Akaka
                                                                                  for nursing education, including equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Hawaii at Hilo, HI, for a nurse training program          $350,000  Inouye, Akaka
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Iowa, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA,        $2,000,000  Harkin, Grassley
                                                                                  for facilities and equipment for the Institute for Biomedical
                                                                                  Discovery.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, for facilities and                 $1,000,000  Harkin, Grassley
                                                                                  equipment at the College of Public Health.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, for facilities and                  $250,000  Roberts
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Kentucky Research Foundation, Lexington, KY, for        $2,000,000  McConnell
                                                                                  data base design and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Kentucky Research Foundation, Lexington, KY, for        $1,300,000  McConnell
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Kentucky Research Foundation, Lexington, KY, to         $2,000,000  McConnell
                                                                                  expand a heart disease prevention initiative in rural
                                                                                  Kentucky.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Louisville Research Foundation, Louisville, KY,         $1,000,000  McConnell
                                                                                  for facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Louisville Research Foundation, Louisville, KY,         $1,000,000  McConnell
                                                                                  for facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Louisville Research Foundation, Louisville, KY,         $2,500,000  McConnell
                                                                                  for facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Louisville Research Foundation, Louisville, KY,           $800,000  McConnell
                                                                                  for health professions training and facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Maine at Augusta, Augusta, ME, for facilities             $350,000  Collins
                                                                                  and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, for            $8,000,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Mississippi, University, MS, for facilities and         $1,500,000  Cochran
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Mississippi, University, MS, for the Center for           $600,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                                                                  Thermal Pharmaceutical Processing, including facilities and
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Nevada School of Medicine, Reno, NV, for                  $750,000  Reid, Ensign
                                                                                  facilities and equipment at the Center for Molecular Medicine.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of North Alabama, Florence, AL, for nursing                  $100,000  Sessions
                                                                                  education and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC,             $300,000  Burr, Hagan
                                                                                  for telespeech initiative including purchase of equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of North Texas, Denton, TX, for facilities and               $350,000  Hutchison
                                                                                  equip-  ment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, for equipment                 $100,000  Specter
                                                                                  relating to cancer diagnostics and treatment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Scranton, Scranton, PA, for nursing and allied            $100,000  Specter, Casey
                                                                                  health programs, including the purchase of equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL, for health                     $100,000  Sessions
                                                                                  information systems including equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Southern Maine, Portland, ME, for facilities and          $300,000  Snowe, Collins
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, for a              $500,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                                                                  relapse prevention program, including for facilities and
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, for              $2,750,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, TN, for            $1,000,000  Alexander, Corker
                                                                                  health professions training.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, TX, for facilities and           $350,000  Hutchison
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, TX, for           $150,000  Hutchison
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, TX,           $300,000  Hutchison
                                                                                  for facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, TX, for             $300,000  Hutchison
                                                                                  facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX,             $500,000  Hutchison
                                                                                  for facilities and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, for health information        $1,500,000  Bennett, Hatch
                                                                                  technology.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Utah Department of Health, Salt Lake City, UT, for facilities           $500,000  Bennett
                                                                                  and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Utah Department of Health, Salt Lake City, UT, for facilities           $100,000  Hatch, Bennett
                                                                                  and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Utah Department of Health, Salt Lake City, UT, for facilities           $500,000  Bennett, Hatch
                                                                                  and equipment related to outbreak management.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Utah Department of Health, Salt Lake City, UT, to expand                $600,000  Hatch, Bennett
                                                                                  Monticello Health Education and Screening Initiative.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Utah Personalized Health Care Institute at the University of            $100,000  Hatch
                                                                                  Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, to establish a personalized
                                                                                  medicine infrastructure.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Utah Valley University, Orem, UT, for health professions                $350,000  Bennett, Hatch
                                                                                  development and equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Van Wert County Hospital, Van Wert, OH, for facilities and              $100,000  Voinovich
                                                                                  equipment.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Vermont State Colleges, Randolph Center, VT, for equipment to           $700,000  Leahy
                                                                                  expand nursing programs.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Virginia State University, Petersburg, VA, for facilities and           $100,000  Warner, Webb
                                                                                  equipment to expand nursing programs.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Visiting Nurse Services, Indianapolis, IN, for facilities and           $100,000  Lugar
                                                                                  equipment and health professions training.
Dept. of Health and Human Services.  Health Resources and Services.............  Viterbo University, La