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112th Congress                                            Rept. 112-701
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                      Part 1

======================================================================



 
                 FRANK BUCKLES WORLD WAR I MEMORIAL ACT

                                _______
                                

               December 12, 2012.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

 Mr. Hastings of Washington, from the Committee on Natural Resources, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                            DISSENTING VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 6364]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Natural Resources, to whom was referred 
the bill (H.R. 6364) to establish a commission to ensure a 
suitable observance of the centennial of World War I, to 
designate memorials to the service of members of the United 
States Armed Forces in World War I, including a National World 
War I Memorial on the National Mall in the District of 
Columbia, and for other purposes, having considered the same, 
report favorably thereon with amendments and recommend that the 
bill as amended do pass.
    The amendments are as follows:
  Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF CONTENTS.

  (a) Short Title.--This Act may be cited as the ``Frank Buckles World 
War I Memorial Act''.
  (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this Act is as 
follows:

Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents.
Sec. 2. Findings.
Sec. 3. Definitions.
Sec. 4. Establishment of World War I Centennial Commission.
Sec. 5. Duties of Centennial Commission.
Sec. 6. Powers of Centennial Commission.
Sec. 7. Centennial Commission personnel matters.
Sec. 8. Termination of Centennial Commission.
Sec. 9. Designation of National World War I Museum and Memorial in 
Kansas City, Missouri.
Sec. 10. Establishment of National World War I Memorial in the District 
of Columbia.
Sec. 11. Prohibition on obligation of Federal funds.

SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

  Congress makes the following findings:
          (1) From 2014 through 2018, the United States and nations 
        around the world will mark the centennial of World War I, 
        including the entry of the United States into the war in April 
        1917.
          (2) America's support of Great Britain, France, Belgium, and 
        its other allies in World War I marked the first time in United 
        States history that American soldiers went abroad in defense of 
        liberty against foreign aggression, and it marked the true 
        beginning of the ``American century''.
          (3) Although World War I was at the time called ``the war to 
        end all wars'', in fact the United States would commit its 
        troops to the defense of foreign lands 3 more times in the 20th 
        century.
          (4) More than 4,000,000 men and women from the United States 
        served in uniform during World War I, among them 2 future 
        presidents, Harry S. Truman and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Two 
        million individuals from the United States served overseas 
        during World War I, including 200,000 naval personnel who 
        served on the seas. The United States suffered 375,000 
        casualties during World War I, including 116,516 deaths.
          (5) The events of 1914 through 1918 shaped the world, the 
        United States, and the lives of millions of people.
          (6) The centennial of World War I offers an opportunity for 
        people in the United States to learn about and commemorate the 
        sacrifices of their predecessors.
          (7) Commemorative programs, activities, and sites allow 
        people in the United States to learn about the history of World 
        War I, the United States involvement in that war, and the war's 
        effects on the remainder of the 20th century, and to 
        commemorate and honor the participation of the United States 
        and its citizens in the war effort.
          (8) While the other great conflicts of the 20th century, 
        World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War, have 
        national memorials on the Mall in Washington, DC, there 
        currently exists no national memorial honoring the service of 
        the United States and its citizens in World War I.
          (9) In 1921, the people of Kansas City, Missouri, dedicated a 
        site in that city for a memorial to the service of Americans in 
        World War I, a ceremony attended by General John J. Pershing 
        and military leaders of Great Britain, France, Belgium, and 
        Italy. In 1924, the cornerstone of the 217-foot Liberty 
        Memorial Tower was laid. On Armistice Day 1926, President 
        Calvin Coolidge delivered the key note address at the 
        Memorial's dedication ceremony. The Memorial and surrounding 
        grounds were completed in 1938, with an inscription that reads 
        ``In Honor of Those Who Served in the World War in Defense of 
        Liberty and Our Country.''.
          (10) The 106th Congress recognized the Liberty Memorial as a 
        national symbol of World War I.
          (11) The 108th Congress designated the museum at the base of 
        the Liberty Memorial as ``America's National World War I 
        Museum''. The museum preserves the story of World War I, and 
        educates and enlightens people about this significant event.

SEC. 3. DEFINITIONS.

  In this Act--
          (1) America's national world war i museum.--The term 
        ``America's National World War I Museum'' means the Liberty 
        Memorial Museum in Kansas City, Missouri, as recognized by 
        Congress in section 1031(b) of the Ronald W. Reagan National 
        Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (Public Law 108-
        375; 118 Stat. 2045).
          (2) Centennial commission.--The term ``Centennial 
        Commission'' means the World War I Centennial Commission 
        established by section 4(a).
          (3) Memorial foundation.--The term ``Memorial Foundation'' 
        means the World War I Memorial Foundation authorized to 
        establish the National World War I Memorial in the District of 
        Columbia under section 10.
          (4) Veterans service organization.--The term ``veterans 
        service organization'' means any organization recognized by the 
        Secretary of Veterans Affairs for the representation of 
        veterans under section 5902 of title 38, United States Code.

SEC. 4. ESTABLISHMENT OF WORLD WAR I CENTENNIAL COMMISSION.

  (a) Establishment.--There is established a commission to be known as 
the ``World War I Centennial Commission''.
  (b) Membership.--
          (1) Composition.--The Centennial Commission shall be composed 
        of 12 members as follows:
                  (A) Two members who shall be appointed by the Speaker 
                of the House of Representatives.
                  (B) One member who shall be appointed by the minority 
                leader of the House of Representatives.
                  (C) Two members who shall be appointed by the 
                majority leader of the Senate.
                  (D) One member who shall be appointed by the minority 
                leader of the Senate.
                  (E) Three members who shall be appointed by the 
                President from among persons who are broadly 
                representative of the people of the United States 
                (including members of the Armed Forces, veterans, and 
                representatives of veterans service organizations).
                  (F) One member who shall be appointed by the 
                executive director of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of 
                the United States.
                  (G) One member who shall be appointed by the 
                executive director of the American Legion.
                  (H) One member who shall be appointed by the 
                president of the Liberty Memorial Association.
          (2) Time for appointment.--The members of the Centennial 
        Commission shall be appointed not later than 60 days after the 
        date of the enactment of this Act.
          (3) Period of appointment.--Each member shall be appointed 
        for the life of the Centennial Commission.
          (4) Vacancies.--A vacancy in the Centennial Commission shall 
        be filled in the manner in which the original appointment was 
        made.
  (c) Meetings.--
          (1) Initial meeting.--
                  (A) In general.--Not later than 30 days after the 
                date on which all members of the Centennial Commission 
                have been appointed, the Centennial Commission shall 
                hold its first meeting.
                  (B) Location.--The location for the meeting held 
                under subparagraph (A) shall be the America's National 
                World War I Museum.
          (2) Subsequent meetings.--
                  (A) In general.--The Centennial Commission shall meet 
                at the call of the Chair.
                  (B) Frequency.--The Chair shall call a meeting of the 
                members of the Centennial Commission not less 
                frequently than once each year.
                  (C) Location.--Not less frequently than once each 
                year, the Centennial Commission shall meet at the 
                America's National World War I Museum.
          (3) Quorum.--Seven members of the Centennial Commission shall 
        constitute a quorum, but a lesser number may hold hearings.
  (d) Chair and Vice Chair.--The Centennial Commission shall select a 
Chair and Vice Chair from among its members.

SEC. 5. DUTIES OF CENTENNIAL COMMISSION.

  (a) In General.--The duties of the Centennial Commission are as 
follows:
          (1) To plan, develop, and execute programs, projects, and 
        activities to commemorate the centennial of World War I.
          (2) To encourage private organizations and State and local 
        governments to organize and participate in activities 
        commemorating the centennial of World War I.
          (3) To facilitate and coordinate activities throughout the 
        United States relating to the centennial of World War I.
          (4) To serve as a clearinghouse for the collection and 
        dissemination of information about events and plans for the 
        centennial of World War I.
          (5) To develop recommendations for Congress and the President 
        for commemorating the centennial of World War I.
  (b) Reports.--
          (1) Periodic report.--Not later than the last day of the 6-
        month period beginning on the date of the enactment of this 
        Act, and not later than the last day of each 3-month period 
        thereafter, the Centennial Commission shall submit to Congress 
        and the President a report on the activities and plans of the 
        Centennial Commission.
          (2) Recommendations.--Not later than 2 years after the date 
        of the enactment of this Act, the Centennial Commission shall 
        submit to Congress and the President a report containing 
        specific recommendations for commemorating the centennial of 
        World War I and coordinating related activities.

SEC. 6. POWERS OF CENTENNIAL COMMISSION.

  (a) Hearings.--The Centennial Commission may hold such hearings, sit 
and act at such times and places, take such testimony, and receive such 
evidence as the Centennial Commission considers appropriate to carry 
out its duties under this Act.
  (b) Powers of Member and Agents.--If authorized by the Centennial 
Commission, any member or agent of the Centennial Commission may take 
any action which the Centennial Commission is authorized to take under 
this Act.
  (c) Information From Federal Agencies.--The Centennial Commission 
shall secure directly from any Federal department or agency such 
information as the Centennial Commission considers necessary to carry 
out the provisions of this Act. Upon the request of the Chair of the 
Centennial Commission, the head of such department or agency shall 
furnish such information to the Centennial Commission.
  (d) Administrative Support Services.--Upon the request of the 
Centennial Commission, the Administrator of the General Services 
Administration shall provide to the Centennial Commission, on a 
reimbursable basis, the administrative support services necessary for 
the Centennial Commission to carry out its responsibilities under this 
Act.
  (e) Contract Authority.--
          (1) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph (2), the 
        Centennial Commission is authorized--
                  (A) to procure supplies, services, and property; and
                  (B) to make or enter into contracts, leases, or other 
                legal agreements.
          (2) Limitation.--The Centennial Commission may not enter into 
        any contract, lease, or other legal agreement that extends 
        beyond the date of the termination of the Centennial Commission 
        under section 8(a).
  (f) Postal Services.--The Centennial Commission may use the United 
States mails in the same manner and under the same conditions as other 
departments and agencies of the Federal Government.
  (g) Gifts, Bequests, and Devises.--The Centennial Commission shall 
accept, use, and dispose of gifts, bequests, or devises of services or 
property, both real and personal, for the purpose of covering the costs 
incurred by the Centennial Commission to carry out its duties under 
this Act.

SEC. 7. CENTENNIAL COMMISSION PERSONNEL MATTERS.

  (a) Compensation of Members.--Members of the Centennial Commission 
shall serve without compensation for such service.
  (b) Travel Expenses.--Each member of the Centennial Commission shall 
be allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of subsistence, 
in accordance with the applicable provisions of title 5, United States 
Code.
  (c) Staff.--
          (1) In general.--The Chair of the Centennial Commission 
        shall, in consultation with the members of the Centennial 
        Commission, appoint an executive director and such other 
        additional personnel as may be necessary to enable the 
        Centennial Commission to perform its duties.
          (2) Compensation.--
                  (A) In general.--Subject to subparagraph (B), the 
                Chair of the Centennial Commission may fix the 
                compensation of the executive director and any other 
                personnel appointed under paragraph (1).
                  (B) Limitation.--The Chair of the Centennial 
                Commission may not fix the compensation of the 
                executive director or other personnel appointed under 
                paragraph (1) at a rate that exceeds the rate of 
                payable for level IV of the Executive Schedule under 
                section 5315 of title 5, United States Code.
                  (C) Work location.--If the city government for Kansas 
                City, Missouri, and the Liberty Memorial Association 
                make space available in the building in which the 
                America's National World War I Museum is located, the 
                executive director of the Centennial Commission and 
                other personnel appointed under paragraph (1) shall 
                work in such building to the extent practical.
  (d) Detail of Government Employees.--Upon request of the Centennial 
Commission, the head of any Federal department or agency may detail, on 
a reimbursable basis, any employee of that department or agency to the 
Centennial Commission to assist it in carrying out its duties under 
this Act.
  (e) Procurement of Temporary and Intermittent Services.--The Chair of 
the Centennial Commission may procure temporary and intermittent 
services under section 3109(b) of title 5, United States Code.
  (f) Source of Funds.--Gifts, bequests, and devises of services or 
property, both real and personal, received by the Centennial Commission 
under section 6(g) shall be the only source of funds to cover the costs 
incurred by the Centennial Commission under this section.

SEC. 8. TERMINATION OF CENTENNIAL COMMISSION.

  (a) In General.--The Centennial Commission shall terminate on the 
earlier of--
          (1) the date that is 30 days after the date the completion of 
        the activities under this Act honoring the centennial 
        observation of World War I; or
          (2) July 28, 2019.
  (b) Application of Federal Advisory Committee Act.--
          (1) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph (2), the 
        provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. 
        App.) shall apply to the activities of the Centennial 
        Commission under this Act.
          (2) Exception.--Section 14(a)(2) of such Act shall not apply 
        to the Centennial Commission.

SEC. 9. DESIGNATION OF NATIONAL WORLD WAR I MUSEUM AND MEMORIAL IN 
                    KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI.

  (a) In General.--The Liberty Memorial of Kansas City at America's 
National World War I Museum in Kansas City, Missouri, is hereby 
designated as the ``National World War I Museum and Memorial''.
  (b) Ceremonies.--The Centennial Commission may plan, develop, and 
execute ceremonies to recognize the designation of the Liberty Memorial 
of Kansas City as the National World War I Museum and Memorial.

SEC. 10. ESTABLISHMENT OF NATIONAL WORLD WAR I MEMORIAL IN THE DISTRICT 
                    OF COLUMBIA.

  (a) Authority to Establish Commemorative Work.--The World War I 
Memorial Foundation may establish a commemorative work on Federal land 
in the District of Columbia and its environs to consist of an 
appropriate sculptural or other commemorative elements to serve as the 
National World War I Memorial.
  (b) Limitation on Size of Memorial.--The National World War I 
Memorial may not exceed 0.5 acres in size.
  (c) Compliance With Standards for Commemorative Works.--
          (1) In general.--Chapter 89 of title 40, United States Code, 
        shall apply to the establishment of the National World War I 
        Memorial in the District of Columbia and its environs.
          (2) Exception from prohibition on additional commemorative 
        works in reserve.--Section 8908(c) of title 40, United States 
        Code, does not apply with respect to the selection of the site 
        for the National World War I Memorial.
          (3) No infringement upon existing memorial.--The site 
        selected for the National World War I Memorial may not infringe 
        upon or adversely impact the District of Columbia War Memorial.
  (d) Limitation on Total Cost.--The total cost to design and construct 
the National World War I Memorial may not exceed $10,000,000.
  (e) Deposit of Excess Funds.--The Memorial Foundation shall transmit 
to the Secretary of the Treasury for deposit in the account provided 
for in section 8906(b)(3) of title 40, United States Code--
          (1) any funds that remain after payment of all expenses 
        incurred in the establishment of the National World War I 
        Memorial (including payment of the amount for maintenance and 
        preservation required under section 8906(b) of that title); or
          (2) any funds that remain for the establishment of the 
        commemorative work on expiration of the authority for the 
        commemorative work under section 8903(e) of that title.
  (f) Ceremonies.--The Centennial Commission may plan, develop, and 
execute ceremonies to recognize the establishment of the National World 
War I Memorial.
  (g) Memorial Area Defined.--In this section, the term ``District of 
Columbia and its environs'' has the meaning given that term in section 
8902(a)(2) of title 40, United States Code.

SEC. 11. PROHIBITION ON OBLIGATION OF FEDERAL FUNDS.

  No Federal funds may be obligated to carry out this Act.

  Amend the title so as to read:

    A bill to establish a commission to ensure a suitable 
observance of the centennial of World War I, to provide for the 
designation of memorials to the service of members of the 
United States Armed Forces in World War I, and for other 
purposes.

                          PURPOSE OF THE BILL

    The purpose of H.R. 6364, as ordered reported, is to 
establish a commission to ensure a suitable observance of the 
centennial of World War I, and to provide for the designation 
of memorials to the service of members of the United States 
Armed Forces in World War I.

                  BACKGROUND AND NEED FOR LEGISLATION

    From 1914 to 1918, World War I (WWI) took 116,516 American 
lives. To commemorate those lives, the people of Kansas City, 
Missouri, created a memorial with a 217 foot tower in 1938. The 
106th Congress recognized the memorial as a national symbol of 
WWI.
    The District of Columbia War Memorial was dedicated in 1931 
in memory of the 499 D.C. residents who died in WWI. Although 
situated among the World War II Memorial, Korean War, and 
Vietnam Memorials, the D.C. War Memorial is not a national 
memorial.
    The legislation designates the Kansas City work as the 
``National World War I Museum and Memorial'' in an effort to 
raise its visibility as the centennial approaches.
    Rather than redesignating the D.C. WWI Memorial as a 
national memorial, H.R. 6364 authorizes the World War I 
Memorial Foundation to create a commemorative work, such as a 
sculpture, to be placed on federal lands in the District of 
Columbia. The legislation further authorizes that the new 
memorial may be placed on the ``reserve'' of the National Mall, 
an area that was placed off-limits to new construction by the 
108th Congress. However, the inclusion of the WWI work will 
complete the memorials to those who served in the great wars of 
the 20th century and will set a high standard beyond what the 
Committee foresees as attainable for other additions to the 
reserve. This narrow exemption does not reflect the Committee's 
intent to authorize commemorative works on the National Mall in 
the future.
    The legislation also creates a 12 member commission that 
would be charged with organizing activities to commemorate the 
100th anniversary of the war. The commissioners would serve 
without pay and federal funds are prohibited for any project 
authorized by the legislation.
    During Full Committee markup, an amendment offered by 
Congressman Rob Bishop (R-UT) was adopted to reduce the 
authorized footprint of the WWI Memorial from 1.5 acres to .5. 
While H.R. 6364 directed that the WWI Memorial be placed in the 
vicinity of Constitution Gardens on the National Mall, the 
amendment authorizes the Foundation to consider additional 
federal lands in the District of Columbia, and on the National 
Mall, including the reserve.

                            COMMITTEE ACTION

    H.R. 6364 was introduced on September 10, 2012, by 
Congressman Ted Poe (R-TX). The bill was referred to the 
Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, and in addition 
to the Committee on Natural Resources. Within the Resources 
Committee, the bill was referred to the Subcommittee on 
National Parks, Forests and Public Lands. On September 11, 
2012, the Subcommittee held a hearing on the bill. On December 
5, 2012, the Full Natural Resources Committee met to consider 
the bill. The Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and 
Public Lands was discharged by unanimous consent. Congressman 
Rob Bishop (R-UT) offered amendment designated .084 to the 
bill; the amendment was approved by unanimous consent. The 
bill, as amended, was then adopted and ordered favorably 
reported to the House of Representatives by unanimous consent.

            COMMITTEE OVERSIGHT FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    Regarding clause 2(b)(1) of rule X and clause 3(c)(1) of 
rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, the 
Committee on Natural Resources' oversight findings and 
recommendations are reflected in the body of this report.

                    COMPLIANCE WITH HOUSE RULE XIII

    1. Cost of Legislation. Clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives requires an estimate and 
a comparison by the Committee of the costs which would be 
incurred in carrying out this bill. However, clause 3(d)(2)(B) 
of that rule provides that this requirement does not apply when 
the Committee has included in its report a timely submitted 
cost estimate of the bill prepared by the Director of the 
Congressional Budget Office under section 402 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974. Under clause 3(c)(3) of rule 
XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives and section 
403 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the Committee has 
received the following cost estimate for this bill from the 
Director of the Congressional Budget Office:

H.R. 6364--Frank Buckles World War I Memorial Act

    H.R. 6364 would establish a commission to plan, develop, 
and execute programs, projects, and activities to commemorate 
the 100th anniversary of the First World War. The 12-member 
commission would be required to submit various reports to the 
Congress on its activities and recommendations for 
commemorating the event. The commission would terminate July 
28, 2019. All commission members would serve without pay but 
would be reimbursed for travel expenses. In addition, the 
commission could hire staff and use personnel detailed from 
other federal agencies to complete its work.
    In addition, the legislation would authorize the World War 
I Memorial Foundation to establish a National World War I 
Memorial in Washington, D.C., without federal funds, and it 
would designate the Liberty Memorial in Kansas City, Kansas, as 
the ``National World War I Museum and Memorial.''
    Based on the costs of similar commissions and commemorative 
projects, CBO estimates that H.R. 6364 would cost about $4 
million over the 2013-2017 period, subject to appropriation of 
the necessary amounts. Those funds would be used to plan, 
develop, and carry out activities and to prepare reports. 
Enacting H.R. 6364 would affect direct spending because it 
would authorize the commission to accept and spend monetary 
gifts, and the World War I Foundation would be required to 
provide funds to maintain the memorial authorized for 
Washington, D.C. Therefore, pay-as-you-go procedures apply. 
However, CBO estimates that the net effect on direct spending 
would be insignificant. Enacting H.R. 6364 would not affect 
revenues.
    H.R. 6364 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act and 
would not affect the budgets of state, local, or tribal 
governments.
    The CBO staff contact for this estimate is Matthew 
Pickford. The estimate was approved by Theresa Gullo, Deputy 
Assistant Director for Budget Analysis.
    2. Section 308(a) of Congressional Budget Act. As required 
by clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives and section 308(a) of the Congressional Budget 
Act of 1974, this bill does not contain any new budget 
authority, credit authority, or an increase or decrease in 
revenues or tax expenditures. Based on the costs of similar 
commissions and commemorative projects, CBO estimates that H.R. 
6364 would cost about $4 million over the 2013-2017 period, 
subject to appropriation of the necessary amounts. Those funds 
would be used to plan, develop, and carry out activities and to 
prepare reports. Enacting H.R. 6364 would affect direct 
spending because it would authorize the commission to accept 
and spend monetary gifts, and the World War I Foundation would 
be required to provide funds to maintain the memorial 
authorized for Washington, D.C. Therefore, pay-as-you-go 
procedures apply. However, CBO estimates that the net effect on 
direct spending would be insignificant.
    3. General Performance Goals and Objectives. As required by 
clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII, the general performance goal or 
objective of this bill, as ordered reported, is to establish a 
commission to ensure a suitable observance of the centennial of 
World War I, and to provide for the designation of memorials to 
the service of members of the United States Armed Forces in 
World War I.

                           EARMARK STATEMENT

    This bill does not contain any Congressional earmarks, 
limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as defined 
under clause 9(e), 9(f), and 9(g) of rule XXI of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives.

                    COMPLIANCE WITH PUBLIC LAW 104-4

    This bill contains no unfunded mandates.

                PREEMPTION OF STATE, LOCAL OR TRIBAL LAW

    This bill is not intended to preempt any State, local or 
tribal law.

                        CHANGES IN EXISTING LAW

    If enacted, this bill would make no changes in existing 
law.

                            DISSENTING VIEWS

    The Majority has taken an honorable idea, commemorating 
those who fought in America's First Great War, and needlessly 
complicated the memorialization process by overriding important 
protections for the National Mall embodied in the Commemorative 
Works Act.
    Section 8908 of the Commemorative Works Act prohibits 
development of new memorials within a reserved area generally 
represented by the cross-axis extending from the U.S. Capitol 
to the Lincoln Memorial and the White House to the Jefferson 
Memorial. Since 2003, it has been the view of both Republican 
and Democratic Congresses that the Reserve is a completed work 
of civic art within which no more development is to take place, 
including new memorials.
    H.R. 6364, as amended, requires the World War I Memorial 
Foundation to work with the National Park Service, Fine Arts 
Commission, and the National Capitol Planning Commission to 
find an acceptable site and design for a memorial honoring 
World War I veterans. However, H.R. 6364 allows, for the first 
time in a decade, the potential for the development of a new 
memorial within the Reserve. While we are confident that the 
artistic and architectural experts involved in the process will 
find a suitable location elsewhere, this is a troubling 
precedent that we oppose.
    We are not alone in our objections. The National Park 
Service expressed ``serious concerns about the placement of any 
new commemorative work in the Reserve.'' They further noted 
that an existing national memorial to World War I veterans 
already exists in Washington, D.C. in Pershing Park. This 
location, on Pennsylvania Avenue between 14th and 15th Streets, 
could be enhanced to recognize an important era in American 
history.
    Those who served and lost their lives in World War I should 
be honored. However, even the contemplation of additional 
development within the Reserve sends the wrong signals to 
proponents of this and other future memorials.
                                   Edward J. Markey.
                                   Raul M. Grijalva.