H. Rept. 112-745 - 112th Congress (2011-2012)
January 02, 2013, As Reported by the Science, Space, and Technology Committee

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House Report 112-745 - FOURTH SEMIANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITIES OF THE COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES FOR THE ONE HUNDRED TWELFTH CONGRESS




[House Report 112-745]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]


                                                 Union Calendar No. 547

112th Congress, 2d Session - - - - - - - - - - - - -House Report 112-745

                 FOURTH SEMIANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITIES

                                 OF THE

              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY

                     U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                                FOR THE

                      ONE HUNDRED TWELFTH CONGRESS

                                    
<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>

                                    

                            January 2, 2013

January 2, 2013.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed


              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY

                    HON. RALPH M. HALL, Texas, Chair
F. JAMES SENSENBRENNER, JR.,         EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON, Texas*
    Wisconsin**                      JERRY F. COSTELLO, Illinois
LAMAR S. SMITH, Texas                LYNN C. WOOLSEY, California
DANA ROHRABACHER, California         ZOE LOFGREN, California
ROSCOE G. BARTLETT, Maryland         BRAD MILLER, North Carolina
FRANK D. LUCAS, Oklahoma             DANIEL LIPINSKI, Illinois
JUDY BIGGERT, Illinois               DONNA F. EDWARDS, Maryland
W. TODD AKIN, Missouri               BEN R. LUJAN, New Mexico
RANDY NEUGEBAUER, Texas              PAUL D. TONKO, New York
MICHAEL T. McCAUL, Texas             JERRY McNERNEY, California
PAUL C. BROUN, Georgia               TERRI A. SEWELL, Alabama
SANDY ADAMS, Florida                 FREDERICA S. WILSON, Florida
BENJAMIN QUAYLE, Arizona             HANSEN CLARKE, Michigan
CHARLES J. ``CHUCK'' FLEISCHMANN,    SUZANNE BONAMICI, Oregon
    Tennessee                        DAVID CURSON, Michigan
E. SCOTT RIGELL, Virginia            VACANCY
STEVEN M. PALAZZO, Mississippi       VACANCY
MO BROOKS, Alabama
ANDY HARRIS, Maryland
RANDY HULTGREN, Illinois
CHIP CRAVAACK, Minnesota
LARRY BUCSHON, Indiana
DAN BENISHEK, Michigan
VACANCY
                                 ------                                

                 Subcommittee on Energy and Environment

                   HON. ANDY HARRIS, Maryland, Chair
DANA ROHRABACHER, California**       BRAD MILLER, North Carolina*
ROSCOE G. BARTLETT, Maryland         LYNN C. WOOLSEY, California
FRANK D. LUCAS, Oklahoma             BEN R. LUJAN, New Mexico
JUDY BIGGERT, Illinois               PAUL D. TONKO, New York
W. TODD AKIN, Missouri               ZOE LOFGREN, California
RANDY NEUGEBAUER, Texas              JERRY McNERNEY, California
PAUL C. BROUN, Georgia                   
CHARLES J. ``CHUCK'' FLEISCHMANN,        
    Tennessee                            
+RALPH M. HALL, Texas                +EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON, Texas
              Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight

                   HON. PAUL C. BROUN, Georgia, Chair
F. JAMES SENSENBRENNER, JR.,         PAUL D. TONKO, New York*
    Wisconsin                        ZOE LOFGREN, California
SANDY ADAMS, Florida**               BRAD MILLER, North Carolina
RANDY HULTGREN, Illinois             JERRY McNERNEY, California
LARRY BUCSHON, Indiana                   
DAN BENISHEK, Michigan                   
VACANCY                                  
+RALPH M. HALL, Texas                +EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON, Texas
                                 ------                                

             Subcommittee on Research and Science Education

                     HON. MO BROOKS, Alabama, Chair
ROSCOE G. BARTLETT, Maryland**       DANIEL LIPINSKI, Illinois*
BENJAMIN QUAYLE, Arizona             HANSEN CLARKE, Michigan
STEVEN M. PALAZZO, Mississippi       PAUL D. TONKO, New York
ANDY HARRIS, Maryland                TERRI A. SEWELL, Alabama
RANDY HULTGREN, Illinois             SUZANNE BONAMICI, Oregon
LARRY BUCSHON, Indiana                   
DAN BENISHEK, Michigan                   
+RALPH M. HALL, Texas                +EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON, Texas
                                 ------                                

                 Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics

               HON. STEVEN M. PALAZZO, Mississippi, Chair
F. JAMES SENSENBRENNER JR.,          JERRY F. COSTELLO, Illinois*
    Wisconsin                        TERRI A. SEWELL, Alabama
LAMAR S. SMITH, Texas**              DONNA F. EDWARDS, Maryland
DANA ROHRABACHER, California         FREDERICA S. WILSON, Florida
FRANK D. LUCAS, Oklahoma             HANSEN CLARKE, Michigan
W. TODD AKIN, Missouri               VACANCY
MICHAEL T. McCAUL, Texas             VACANCY
SANDY ADAMS, Florida                     
E. SCOTT RIGELL, Virginia                
MO BROOKS, Alabama                       
+RALPH M. HALL, Texas                +EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON, Texas
               Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation

                  HON. BENJAMIN QUAYLE, Arizona, Chair
LAMAR S. SMITH, Texas                DONNA F. EDWARDS, Maryland*
JUDY BIGGERT, Illinois**             FREDERICA S. WILSON, Florida
RANDY NEUGEBAUER, Texas              DANIEL LIPINSKI, Illinois
MICHAEL T. McCAUL, Texas             BEN R. LUJAN, New Mexico
CHARLES J. ``CHUCK'' FLEISCHMANN,    SUZANNE BONAMICI, Oregon
    Tennessee                        VACANCY
E. SCOTT RIGELL, Virginia                
RANDY HULTGREN, Illinois                 
CHIP CRAVAACK, Minnesota                 
+RALPH M. HALL, Texas                +EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON, Texas

*  LRanking Minority Member
** LVice Chair appointments/Full Committee and Subcommittee.
+ LThe Chairman and Ranking Minority Member shall serve as Ex-
officio Members of all Subcommittees and shall have the right 
to vote and be counted as part of the quorum and ratios on all 
matters before the Subcommittees.


              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY
                     112th CONGRESS, SECOND SESSION

                                 ------                                

                          Full Committee Staff

                     JANET POPPLETON Chief of Staff
                    MARGARET CARAVELLI Chief Counsel
                   KATY CROOKS, Deputy Chief Counsel
                  ZACHARY KURZ Communications Director
                  KATIE COMER Administrative Director
             HARLAN WATSON Distinguished Professional Staff
                  SHANA DALE Principal Policy Advisor
               DEBORAH EMERSON SAMANTAR Legislative Clerk
                      ERIN HAVENER Press Assistant
                       LANA FROST Legal Assistant
           LARRY WHITTAKER Director of Information Technology
                    SANGINA WRIGHT Committee Printer
                 LESLIE COPPLER Financial Administrator

                            Democratic Staff

                      DICK OBERMANN Chief of Staff
                       JOHN PIAZZA Chief Counsel
                  RUSSELL NORMAN Deputy Chief Counsel
      KRISTIN KOPSHEVER Administrative and Communications Director
              BRYSTOL ENGLISH Research and Legal Assistant
         PAMITHA WEERASINGHE Administrative and Legal Assistant
                                 ------                                

              Subcommittee on Energy and Environment Staff

                 DAN BYERS Subcommittee Staff Director
      TARA ROTHSCHILD Republican Senior Professional Staff Member
             ANDY ZACH Republican Professional Staff Member
               CLINT WOODS Republican Professional Staff
            KYLE OLIVER Republican Professional Staff Member
                  ELLEN SCHOLL Republican Policy Staff
                TAYLOR JORDAN Republican Staff Assistant

           CHRIS KING Democratic Subcommittee Staff Director
                                 ------                                

              Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight

                TOM HAMMOND Subcommittee Staff Director
          RAJESH BHARWANI Republican Professional Staff Member
               JOE KEELEY Republican Subcommittee Counsel
                JOHN SERRANO Republican Staff Assistant

           DAN PEARSON Democratic Subcommittee Staff Director
       DOUGLAS S. PASTERNAK Democratic Professional Staff Member
             Subcommittee on Research and Science Education

               MELE WILLIAMS Subcommittee Staff Director
          KIRSTEN DUNCAN Republican Professional Staff Member
                AARICKA ALDRIDGE Republican Policy Staff
                MOLLY KEATON Republican Staff Assistant

         DAHLIA SOKOLOV Democratic Subcommittee Staff Director
           CHRIS O'LEARY Democratic Professional Staff Member
                                 ------                                

                 Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics

                ED FEDDEMAN Subcommittee Staff Director
         KEN MONROE Republican Senior Professional Staff Member
               ANNE CONNOR Republican Professional Staff
                       MIKE BEAVIN NOAA Detailee
                 BEN SCHELL Republican Staff Assistant

            PAM WHITNEY Democratic Professional Staff Member
             ALLEN LI Democratic Professional Staff Member
                                 ------                                

               Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation

                JULIA JESTER Subcommittee Staff Director
           NEIL CANFIELD Republican Professional Staff Member
            JAMIE BROWN Republican Professional Staff Member
              MELIA JONES Republican Subcommittee Counsel

           MARCY GALLO Democratic Subcommittee Staff Director
.................................................................
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                            C O N T E N T S

                 Fourth Semiannual Report of Activities
              Committee on Science, Space, and Technology
                          112th Congress, 2012

                                                                   Page
Letter of Transmittal............................................   VII

Overview.........................................................     1

                             Full Committee

    Legislative and Administrative Activities....................     4
    Other Legislative Activities.................................    21
    Oversight, Investigation, and Other Activities...............    40

                 Subcommittee on Energy and Environment

    Oversight Investigation, and Other Activities, Including 
      Selective Legislative Activities...........................    52

              Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight

    Oversight Activities.........................................    61

             Subcommittee on Research and Science Education

    Oversight, Investigation, and Other Activities, Including 
      Selective Legislative Activities...........................    71

                 Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics

    Oversight, Investigation, and Other Activities, Including 
      Selective Legislative Activities...........................    77

               Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation

    Oversight, Investigation, and Other Activities, Including 
      Selective Legislative Activities...........................    84

                  Oversight Plan Including Appendices

    Transmittal Letter...........................................    96
    Summary of Oversight Plan, Including Accomplishments To Date.    97
    Jurisdiction.................................................   114
    Hearings Held Pursuant to Rule XI Clauses 2(n), (o), and (p).   115
    Committee Oversight Correspondence...........................   123
    Summary of GAO High Risk Topics..............................   136
    GAO Request..................................................   139

                                Appendix

    Transmittal Letter for Views and Estimates for FY 2012.......   152
    Views and Estimates of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
      Technology for FY 2012.....................................   153
    Additional Views.............................................   167
    Minority Views and Estimates for FY 2012.....................   173
    Additional Minority Views....................................   179
    Transmittal Letter for Views and Estimates for FY 2013.......   183
    Views and Estimates of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
      Technology for FY 2013.....................................   184
    Additional Views.............................................   208
    Minority Views and Estimates for FY 2013.....................   215
    Additional Minority Views....................................   229
    History of Appointments, Committee on Science, Space, and 
      Technology.................................................   233
    Rules Governing Procedure, Committee on Science, Space, and 
      Technology for the 112th Congress..........................   236
    List of Publications of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
      Technology, 112th Congress, 1st Session & 2nd Session......   248
                                                 Union Calendar No. 547
112th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     112-745

======================================================================

 
 FOURTH SEMIANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITIES--COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, 
                             AND TECHNOLOGY

                               __________

January 2, 2013.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                               __________

    Mr. Hall, from the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology,

                        submitted the following



                              R E P O R T


                                Overview

    The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology met on 
February 10, 2011 for an organizational meeting and adoption of 
the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology Oversight Plan 
for the 112th Congress under the direction of Ralph M. Hall, 
Chair. The Committee Membership was 40 Members with 23 
Republicans (one vacancy) and 17 Democrats.
    The Committee established five subcommittees: Energy and 
Environment (Andy Harris, Chair); Investigations and Oversight 
(Paul Broun, Chair); Research and Science Education (Mo Brooks, 
Chair); Space and Aeronautics (Steven Palazzo, Chair); and 
Technology and Innovation (Benjamin Quayle, Chair). 
Representative F. James Sensenbrenner appointed Full Committee 
Vice Chair.
    The jurisdiction of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology, as prescribed by Clauses 1(p) and 3(k) of Rule X of 
the Rules of the House of Representatives is as follows:

                              HOUSE RULE X

                 LEGISLATIVE AND OVERSIGHT JURISDICTION

                  OF THE COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE,

                             AND TECHNOLOGY

    1. There shall be in the House the following standing 
committees, each of which shall have the jurisdiction and 
related functions assigned by this clause and clauses 2, 3, and 
4. All bills, resolutions, and other matters relating to 
subjects within the jurisdiction of the standing committees 
listed in this clause shall be referred to those committees, in 
accordance with clause 2 of rule XII, as follows:

                    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

    (p) Committee on Science, Space, and Technology.
      (1) All energy research, development, and demonstration, 
and projects therefor, and all federally owned or operated 
nonmilitary energy laboratories.
      (2) Astronautical research and development, including 
resources, personnel, equipment, and facilities.
      (3) Civil aviation research and development.
      (4) Environmental research and development.
      (5) Marine research.
      (6) Commercial application of energy technology.
      (7) National Institute of Standards and Technology, 
standardization of weights and measures, and the metric system.
      (8) National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
      (9) National Space Council.
      (10) National Science Foundation.
      (11) National Weather Service.
      (12) Outer space, including exploration and control 
thereof.
      (13) Science scholarships.
      (14) Scientific research, development, and demonstration, 
and projects therefor.

                    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

                      SPECIAL OVERSIGHT FUNCTIONS

      3(k) The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology 
shall review and study on a continuing basis laws, programs, 
and Government activities relating to nonmilitary research and 
development.

                           ACTIVITIES REPORT

                      COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE,

                        AND TECHNOLOGY STATISTICS

                 112th Congress, First & Second Session

                   January 3, 2011 -- January 2, 2013

                       Business Meetings Held - 3

                     Bills and Resolutions Referred

                         to the Committee - 164

                          Hearings Held - 110

             Witnesses Appeared Before the Committee - 473

                    Full Committee Markups Held - 7

                     Subcommittee Markups Held - 4

                           Reports Filed - 6

                   Legislation Passed the House - 27

                             FULL COMMITTEE

               LEGISLATIVE AND ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIVITIES

        FEBRUARY 10, 2011--FULL COMMITTEE ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING

    The Full Committee met to organize for the 112th Congress, 
established subcommittees, appointed subcommittee chairmen and 
ranking members, and adopted the Oversight Plan.

          MARCH 17, 2011--MARKUP HELD ON H.R. 970, THE FEDERAL

                   AVIATION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

                      REAUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2011

Background and Need
    The purpose of H.R. 970 is to reauthorize research and 
development activities at the Federal Aviation Administration 
for fiscal years 2011-2014 and to add specific direction to 
existing programs to enhance the research that is currently 
being performed. Additionally the bill requires an assessment 
of existing research and development activities in a number of 
programs to encourage coordination and streamlining of research 
to discourage duplication.
    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was created to 
develop the nation's air commerce system and promote aviation 
safety. As part of the Airport Development and Airway Trust 
Fund established by Congress in 1982, a comprehensive research 
and development program was put in place to maintain a safe and 
efficient air transportation system. In 2003, Congress passed 
Vision 100- Century of Aviation Reauthorization Act (P.L. 108-
176) that authorized funding for FAA's activities, including 
research and development, for fiscal years 2003-2007. P.L. 108-
176 also established the Next Generation Air Transportation 
System's Joint Planning and Development Office (JPDO) in Title 
VII, Aviation Research, to manage work related to planning, 
research, development and creation of a transition plan for the 
implementation of the Next Generation Air Transportation 
System.
    Since 2007 Congress has attempted without success to 
complete legislative work on a comprehensive FAA 
reauthorization, including these programs. As civil aviation is 
such a critical element of our economy, FAA's research and 
development program plays a crucial role ensuring that the 
agency's modernization and safety programs are properly focused 
and well planned. H.R. 970 reauthorizes appropriations for the 
Federal Aviation Administration's research and development 
programs for fiscal year 2011-2014.

Legislative History
    H.R. 970 was introduced by Representative Ralph Hall on 
March 9, 2011 and referred to the Committee on Science, Space, 
and Technology. On March 17, 2011, the Committee met to 
consider the bill. The Committee voted to report the bill, as 
amended, to the House by a vote of 17 yeas and 13 nays on March 
17, 2011.
    The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology reported 
H.R. 970, as amended, to the House on April 4, 2011 (H. Rept. 
112-52) and placed on the Union Calendar (Union Calendar No. 
26). No further legislative action was taken on H.R. 970. 
However, the substance of H.R. 970 passed the House as a 
component (Title X) of H.R. 658, the FAA Reauthorization and 
Reform Act of 2011, which became P.L. 112-95.

          MAY 4, 2011--MARKUP HELD ON H.R. 1425, THE CREATING

                 JOBS THROUGH SMALL BUSINESS INNOVATION

                              ACT OF 2011

Background and Need
    The purpose of H.R. 1425 is to reauthorize the Small 
Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business 
Technology Transfer (STTR) programs through Fiscal Year 2014, 
to increase SBIR and STTR award sizes to reflect changes in 
inflation, to allow small businesses with majority venture 
capital backing to compete for a limited percentage of awards, 
and to collect better data on the SBIR and STTR programs to 
evaluate the effectiveness of the programs and to prevent 
fraud, waste, and abuse.
    The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program was 
originally established when the Congress passed the Small 
Business Innovation Development Act in 1982 (P.L. 97-219).
    The original objectives of the SBIR program included:

        
 LStimulation of technological innovation in 
        the small business sector;

        
 LIncreased use of the small business sector to 
        meet the government's research and development (R&D) 
        needs;

        
 LAdditional involvement of minority and 
        disadvantaged individuals in the process; and

        
 LExpanded commercialization of the results of 
        federally funded R&D.

    The 1992 SBIR reauthorization (P.L. 102-564) placed greater 
emphasis on the objective of commercialization of SBIR 
projects.
    Current law requires that every federal department with an 
extramural R&D budget of $100 million or more establish and 
operate an SBIR program. Eleven federal departments have SBIR 
programs, including the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, 
Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland 
Security, and Transportation; the Environmental Protection 
Agency, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration 
(NASA); and the National Science Foundation (NSF). Under the 
program, each qualifying federal department is mandated to set 
aside 2.5 percent of its applicable extramural R&D for the SBIR 
program. Cumulatively, the SBIR program makes almost $2 billion 
in awards to small businesses annually.
    The Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program was 
created in 1992 to provide federal R&D funding for research 
proposals that are developed and executed cooperatively between 
a small firm and a scientist in a nonprofit research 
organization, and fall under the mission requirements of the 
federal funding agency. Federal departments with annual 
extramural research budgets over $1 billion must set aside 0.3 
percent for STTR programs.
    Currently, the Departments of Energy, Defense, and Health 
and Human Services, as well as NASA and NSF participate in the 
STTR program. Across the participating agencies, approximately 
$800 million in STTR awards are made annually.
    The SBIR and STTR programs have been operating under 
temporary extensions since their authorizations expired in 2008 
and 2009, respectively. This bill will increase the size 
guidelines for award amounts for Phase I and Phase II SBIR and 
STTR awards, will enable majority venture capital backed firms 
to compete for a limited percentage of SBIR awards, and will 
improve evaluation of the programs through greater data 
collection, sharing of best practices, and increased efforts to 
prevent fraud, waste, and abuse. H.R. 1425 will reauthorize the 
SBIR and the STTR programs through Fiscal Year 2014.

Legislative History
    On April 7, 2011, H.R. 1425, the Creating Jobs Through 
Small Business Innovation Act of 2011 was introduced by Rep. 
Renee Ellmers (R-NC 2). H.R. 1425 was referred to the Committee 
on Small Business and the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology and the Committee on Armed Services. On April 13, 
2011 the Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation met to 
consider H.R. 1425 and ordered it favorably reported to the 
Full Committee, as amended, by voice vote. On May 4, 2011 the 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology met in open markup 
session and ordered H.R. 1425, favorably reported to the House, 
as amended, by voice vote. On May 11, 2011 the Committee on 
Small Business met to consider the bill. The Committee voted to 
report the bill, as amended to the House by voice vote. The 
bill was reported to the House by Committee on Science, Space, 
and Technology on May 26, 2011 (H. Rept. 112-90, Part I). On 
July 1, 2011 the Committee on Small Business reported the bill 
to the House (H. Rept. 112-90, Part II) and the Committee on 
Armed Services discharged. H.R. 1425 was placed on the Union 
Calendar, Calendar No. 85. No further action was taken on H.R. 
1425
    On December 1, 2011 the Senate laid before it H.R. 1540, 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012, 
struck all after the enacting clause and substituted the 
language of S. 1867, the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2012, as amended. The Senate insisted on its 
amendment and asked for a conference, including in the Senate 
amendment, as passed, as Division E, the text of S. 493, the 
SBIR/STTR Reauthorization Act of 2011.
    On December 7, 2011 the House moved without objection to 
disagree to the Senate amendment and agree to a conference. The 
Speaker appointed conferees, naming Messrs. Hall, Quayle and 
Ms. Johnson, for the consideration of sections 911 and 1098 of 
the House bill, and sections 885, 911, 912, and Division E of 
the Senate amendment (SBIR/STTR) and modifications committed to 
conference.
    On December 12, 2011 the conference report (112-329), 
including conferenced language reauthorizing SBIR/STTR was 
filed. The House considered the conference report, subject to a 
rule (H. Res. 493) on December 15, 2011, and the report passed 
by: Y-283, N-136 (Roll Call No. 932). The Senate considered the 
conference report on December 15, 2011 and the conference 
report passed the Senate on December 15, 2011, by: Y-86, N-13 
(Record Vote No. 230). The bill was signed into law by the 
President on December 31, 2011, and became Public Law 112-81.

             JUNE 22, 2011--FULL COMMITTEE BUSINESS MEETING

    The Committee met to adopt the First Semiannual Report of 
Activities of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology 
for the 112th Congress. The Report was adopted and reported to 
the House by voice vote.

JULY 21, 2011--MARKUP HELD ON H.R. 2096, THE CYBERSECURITY ENHANCEMENT 
                              ACT OF 2011

Background and Need
    The purpose of H.R. 2096 is to improve cybersecurity in the 
Federal, private, and public sectors through: coordination and 
prioritization of federal cybersecurity research and 
development activities; strengthening of the cybersecurity 
workforce; coordination of Federal agency engagement in 
international cybersecurity technical standards development; 
and the reauthorization of cybersecurity related programs at 
the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).
    According to the Office of Management and Budget, Federal 
agencies spent $8.6 billion in FY 2010 on cybersecurity, and 
the Federal government has spent more than $600 billion on 
information technology in the last decade. In addition, the 
Federal government funds nearly $400 million in cybersecurity 
research and development each year.
    In January 2008, the Bush Administration established, 
through a series of classified executive directives, the 
Comprehensive National Cybersecurity Initiative (CNCI). The 
Obama Administration continued this initiative, with the goal 
of securing Federal systems and fostering public-private 
cooperation. In February 2009, the Obama Administration called 
for a 60-day review of the national cybersecurity strategy. The 
President's review required the development of a framework that 
would ensure that the CNCI was adequately funded, integrated, 
and coordinated among Federal agencies, the private sector, and 
state and local authorities.
    On May 29, 2009, the Obama Administration released its 
Cyberspace Policy Review. The Review recommended an increased 
level of interagency cooperation among all departments and 
agencies, highlighted the need for information sharing 
concerning attacks and vulnerabilities, and highlighted the 
need for an exchange of research and security strategies 
essential to the efficient and effective defense of Federal 
computer systems. Furthermore, it stressed the importance of 
advancing cybersecurity research and development, and the need 
for the Federal Government to partner with the private sector 
to guarantee a secure and reliable infrastructure. The Review 
also called for increased public awareness, improved education 
and expansion of the number of information technology 
professionals.
    In June 2009, GAO found that the Federal agencies 
responsible for protecting the U.S. Information Technology (IT) 
infrastructure were not satisfying their responsibilities, 
leaving the Nation's IT infrastructure vulnerable to attack. In 
an effort to strengthen the work of those Federal agencies, the 
U.S. House of Representatives passed the Cybersecurity 
Enhancement Act of 2010 (H.R. 4061) in the 111th Congress by a 
vote of 422-5.
    H.R. 4061 required increased coordination and 
prioritization of Federal cybersecurity research and 
development activities, and the development and advancement of 
cybersecurity technical standards. It also strengthened 
cybersecurity education and talent development and industry 
partnership initiatives. The Senate did not act on the 
legislation.
    The task of coordinating unclassified cybersecurity 
research and development (R&D) lies with the Networking and 
Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) 
program, which was originally authorized in statute by the 
High-Performance Computing Act of 1991 (P.L. 102-194). The 
NITRD program, which consists of 15 Federal agencies, 
coordinates a broad spectrum of R&D activities related to 
information technology. It also includes an interagency working 
group and program component area focused specifically on 
cybersecurity and information R&D. However, many expert panels, 
including the President's Council of Advisors on Science and 
Technology, have argued that the portfolio of Federal 
investments in cybersecurity R&D is not properly balanced and 
is focused on short-term reactive technologies at the expense 
of long-term, fundamental R&D.
    With a budget of $127 million for FY 2010, NSF is the 
principal agency supporting unclassified cybersecurity R&D and 
education. NSF's cybersecurity research activities are 
primarily funded through the Directorate for Computer & 
Information Science & Engineering (CISE). CISE supports 
cybersecurity R&D through a targeted program, Trustworthy 
Computing, as well as through a number of its core activities 
in Computer Systems Research, Computing Research 
Infrastructure, and Network and Science Engineering. In 
addition to its basic research activities, NSF's Directorate 
for Education & Human Resources (EHR) manages the Scholarship 
for Service program which provides funding to colleges and 
universities for the award of 2-year scholarships in 
information assurance and computer security fields.
    NIST is tasked with protecting the federal information 
technology network by developing and promulgating cybersecurity 
standards for federal non-classified network systems (Federal 
Information Processing Standards [FIPS]), identifying methods 
for assessing effectiveness of security requirements, 
conducting tests to validate security in information systems, 
and conducting outreach exercises. Experts have stated that 
NIST's technical standards and best practices are too highly 
technical for general public use, and making this information 
more usable to average computer users with less technical 
expertise will help raise the base level of cybersecurity 
knowledge among individuals, business, education, and 
government.
    Currently, the United States is represented on 
international bodies dealing with cybersecurity by an array of 
organizations, including the Department of State, Department of 
Commerce, Federal Communications Commission, and the United 
States Trade Representative without a coordinated and 
comprehensive strategy or plan. The Cyberspace Policy Review 
called for a comprehensive international cybersecurity strategy 
that defines what cybersecurity standards we need, where they 
are being developed, and ensures that the United States Federal 
government has agency representation for each. Recognizing that 
private sector standards development organizations also are 
engaged in international standards work, in some scenarios a 
nonfederal entity may be best equipped to represent United 
States interests, and coordination is necessary.
    In the 107th Congress, the Science and Technology Committee 
developed the Cyber Security Research and Development Act (P.L. 
107-305). The bill created new programs and expanded existing 
programs at NSF and NIST for computer and network security. The 
authorizations established under the Cyber Security Research 
and Development Act expired in fiscal year 2007.

Legislative History
    On June 2, 2011 Representative Michael T. McCaul (R-TX) for 
himself and Representative Daniel Lipinski (D-IL) introduced 
H.R. 2096, the Cybersecurity Enhancement Act of 2011. H.R. 2096 
was referred to the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology. On July 21, 2011, the Full Committee met in open 
markup session to consider the bill and ordered H.R. 2096 
favorably reported to the House, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology reported 
H.R. 2096, as amended, to the House on October 31, 2011 (H. 
Rept. 112-264) and it was placed on the Union Calendar (Union 
Calendar No. 177). On April 27, 2012 Mr. McCaul moved to 
suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended. The bill 
passed the House, by Y-395, N-10 (Roll Call No. 193). On May 7, 
2012, the bill as passed by the House was received in the 
Senate and read twice and referred to the Committee on 
Commerce, Science, and Transportation.

                JULY 28, 2011--MARKUP HELD ON H.R. 2484,

             THE HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS AND HYPOXIA RESEARCH

                   AND CONTROL AMENDMENTS ACT OF 2011

Background and Need
    The purpose of H.R. 2484 is to reauthorize the Harmful 
Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act of 1998 to 
include a comprehensive and integrated strategy to address 
harmful algal blooms and hypoxia; to provide for the 
development and implementation of a comprehensive research plan 
and action strategy to reduce harmful algal blooms and hypoxia.
    A harmful algal bloom (HAB) is a bloom, or rapid 
overproduction of algal cells, that produces toxins, which are 
detrimental to plants and animals. These outbreaks are commonly 
referred to as ``red'' or ``brown'' tides. Blooms can kill fish 
and other aquatic life by decreasing sunlight available to the 
water and by depleting the available oxygen in the water, 
causing hypoxia. The produced toxins accumulate in shellfish, 
fish, or through the accumulation of biomass that affect other 
organisms and alter food webs. In recent years, many of the 
nation's coastlines, near shore marine waters, and freshwaters 
have experienced an increase in the number, frequency, 
duration, and type of HABs.
    Harmful algal blooms are one of the most scientifically 
complex and economically significant coastal management issues 
facing the nation. In the past, only a few regions of the 
United States were affected by HABs, but now almost all states 
have reported blooms. In severe cases, these phenomena can have 
serious environmental, economic, and human health impacts.
    In 1998, Congress passed the Harmful Algal Bloom and 
Hypoxia Research and Control Act (HABHRCA, Public Law 105-83), 
which established an Interagency Task Force to develop a 
national HABs assessment and authorized funding for existing 
and new research programs on HABs. Funding supported the 
development of a national scientific research, development, 
demonstration, and technology transfer program at the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) that focused on 
HABs and included the Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal 
Blooms (ECOHAB) program and the Monitoring and Event Response 
for Harmful Algal Blooms (MERHAB) program. The program at NOAA 
involves federal, state, and academic partners and supports 
interdisciplinary extramural research studies to address the 
issues of HABs in an ecosystem context.
    In 2004, HABHRCA was reauthorized in Public Law 108-456. 
The reauthorized Act required assessments of HABs in different 
coastal regions and in the Great Lakes and included plans to 
expand research to address the impacts of HABs. The law also 
authorized research, education, and monitoring activities 
related to the prevention, reduction, and control of harmful 
algal blooms and hypoxia and reconstituted the Interagency Task 
Force on HABs and Hypoxia.
    The 2004 reauthorization also directed NOAA to produce 
several reports and assessments, which have since been 
completed, including:

        
 LThe Prediction and Response Report (September 
        2007) addressed both the state of research and methods 
        for HAB prediction and response, especially at the 
        federal level.

        
 LThe 2008 National Scientific Research, 
        Development, Demonstration, and Technology Transfer 
        Plan for Reducing Impacts from Harmful Algal Blooms 
        (RDDTT Plan) established research priorities to develop 
        and demonstrate prevention, control and mitigation 
        methods to advance current prediction and response 
        capabilities.

        
 LThe Scientific Assessment of Marine Harmful 
        Algal Blooms (December 2008) described the state of the 
        science with respect to: understanding HABs causes and 
        controls and developing predictive models; developing 
        detection methods for cells and toxins; characterizing 
        toxins and impacts; HAB impacts on food webs and 
        fisheries; and assessing public health, economic and 
        socio-cultural impacts.

        
 LThe 2008 Scientific Assessment of Freshwater 
        Harmful Algal Blooms released in 2008 described the 
        state of the knowledge of HABs in U.S inland and 
        freshwaters and presented a plan to advance research 
        and reduce the impacts on humans and the environment.

        
 LThe Scientific Assessment of Hypoxia in U.S. 
        Coastal Waters (September 2010) assessed the prevalence 
        of low-oxygen ``dead-zones'', or hypoxic zones, in U.S. 
        coastal waters and outlined a series of research steps 
        needed to address these occurrences.

    Additionally, the 2004 reauthorization directed NOAA, in 
coordination with the Task Force, to conduct local and regional 
scientific assessments if requested by state, tribal, or local 
governments or for affected areas identified by NOAA. Funding 
was also authorized for ongoing and new programs and activities 
such as: competitive, peer-reviewed research through the ECOHAB 
program; freshwater harmful algal bloom research added to the 
research priorities of ECOHAB; a competitive, peer-reviewed 
research program on management measures to prevent, reduce, 
control, and mitigate harmful algal blooms supported by the 
MERHAB program, and; activities related to research and 
monitoring of hypoxia supported by the Northern Gulf of Mexico 
program and Coastal Hypoxia Research Program.
    The 2004 HABHRCA authorized funds to conduct research and 
reduce HABs and hypoxia in U.S. marine waters, estuaries and 
the Great Lakes. In its role as a task force participant, the 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has signed Memorandums of 
Understanding to fund competitive research into the occurrence 
of HABs in these areas. However, since the completion of the 
freshwater report in 2008, EPA has ceased participation in 
HABHRCA for freshwater HAB research and mitigation activities. 
As a result, although EPA oversees a wide array of programs 
specifically designed to protect and preserve freshwater 
sources and the coastal and marine waters of the United States, 
including watershed protection programs and an array of 
regulatory programs, the agency currently has no research and 
development effort that directly addresses freshwater harmful 
algal blooms.
    EPA and NOAA work together to lead a Federal Workgroup of 
thirteen federal agencies committed to supporting the Gulf of 
Mexico Alliance, a partnership formed by the five Gulf State 
Governors. In addition, EPA is also the lead agency of the 
Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force.
    The 2004 HABHRCA reauthorization expired in 2008, however, 
the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-161) 
provided an authorization of appropriations through FY 2010. 
H.R. 2484 would reauthorize the Act with the primary goal of 
H.R. 2484 being advancing the body of knowledge of HABs and 
hypoxia to begin to enable development of solutions for 
communities affected by these events. By requiring greater 
Interagency Task Force involvement and a Comprehensive Research 
Plan and Action Strategy, H.R.2484 seeks to coordinate efforts 
across the Federal government. Although there have been long-
term strategies in place attempting to mitigate the occurrence 
of HABs, such strategies take years, even decades, to bear 
fruit. In the meantime, States and communities are dealing with 
increasing occurrences of HABs and hypoxia, indicating a 
greater need for near-term solutions.
    Accordingly, H.R.2484 shifts the focus of the current 
program to technological research, development, and 
demonstration, encouraging a move toward finding such near-term 
solutions through technological innovation.

Legislative History
    On July 11, 2011 Representative Andy Harris (R-MD) 
introduced, H.R. 2484, the Harmful Algal Blooms and Hypoxia 
Research and Control Amendments Act of 2011. H.R. 2484 was 
referred to the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology and 
in addition the Committee on Natural Resources. On July 14, 
2011 the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment met to consider 
H.R. 2484 and ordered it favorably forwarded to the Full 
Committee, as amended, by voice vote. On July 28, 2011 the 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology met in open markup 
session and ordered H.R. 2484, favorably reported to the House, 
as amended, by a record vote of 20 Yeas to 15 Nays. The bill 
was reported, as amended, to the House by Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology on December 16, 2011 (H. Rept. 112-333, 
Part I). On February 9, 2012, the Committee on Natural 
Resources discharged and the bill was placed on the Union 
Calendar (Calendar No. 271).

   DECEMBER 1, 2011--MARKUP HELD ON H.R. 3479, NATURAL HAZARDS RISK 
                         REDUCTION ACT OF 2011

Background and Need
    Congress created the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction 
Program (NEHRP) in 1977 with the passage of the Earthquake 
Hazards Reduction Act (P.L 95-124). Created largely in response 
to the 1964 Alaska Earthquake and the San Fernando Earthquake 
of 1971, the original program called on 10 federal agencies to 
coordinate research and development activities to implement an 
earthquake prediction system; develop design and construction 
methods for earthquake resilience; identify seismic hazards, 
and make model building code and land-use recommendations; 
increase the understanding of earthquake risks; and educate the 
public about earthquakes. The 1980 reauthorization of the 
program designated the Federal Emergency Management Agency 
(FEMA) as the lead agency.
    The 2004 reauthorization of NEHRP (P.L 108-360) changed the 
lead agency from FEMA to the National Institute of Standards 
and Technology (NIST). This change reflected concern that FEMA, 
newly located in the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), was 
focused on broader threats, rather than national hazard 
mitigation. In addition, the legislation established an 
Interagency Coordinating Committee composed of the directors of 
NIST, FEMA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), the United 
States Geological Survey (USGS), the Office of Science and 
Technology Policy (OSTP), and the Office of Management and 
Budget (OMB). To ensure coordination, the Interagency Committee 
was required to meet annually and to develop a strategic plan 
and coordinated inter-agency budget.
    Over the past 30 years, NEHRP activities have been 
instrumental in research and development to advance earthquake 
knowledge, establish seismic model building codes, and raise 
the awareness of officials and the general public about 
earthquake hazards.
    The National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program (NWIRP) was 
established in the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act of 
2004. The legislation directed the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), NIST, NSF, and FEMA to 
support activities to improve the understanding of windstorms 
and their impacts, and to develop and encourage the 
implementation of cost-effective mitigation measures to reduce 
these impacts. The program was authorized for three years 
through FY 2008.
    OSTP submitted a NWIRP implementation plan in April 2006, 
which assessed programs relevant to the goals of NWIRP across 
eight federal agencies and identified important areas of 
research that were not covered by current activities. The 
knowledge gaps identified in the implementation plan covered 
the three broad categories of research authorized in the 
original NWIRP Act: understanding windstorms; assessing the 
impacts of windstorms; and mitigating against the effects of 
windstorms. The implementation plan also recommended a 
continued role for an Interagency Working Group within the 
National Science and Technology Council's (NSTC) Committee on 
Environment and Natural Resources, Subcommittee on Disaster 
Reduction.
    The legislation defines NEHRP and NWIRP activities, 
including research and development to reduce the risk of 
hazards to the built environment; identifies the agencies that 
make up the programs; assigns responsibilities to the agencies; 
and authorizes funding for the programs from FY 2012 through FY 
2014.

Legislative History
    On November 18, 2011 Representative Judy Biggert (R-IL) 
introduced the Natural Hazards Risk Reduction Act of 2011. H.R. 
3479 was referred to the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology and in addition to the Committees on Transportation 
and Infrastructure and Natural Resources. H.R. 3479 contained 
the text of H.R. 3272, the National Windstorm Impact Reduction 
Act Reauthorization of 2011 as introduced by Representative 
Neugebauer (R-TX).
    On November 15, 2011 the Subcommittee on Technology and 
Innovation met to consider the Committee Print of the Natural 
Hazards Risk Reduction Act of 2011 and ordered it favorably 
forwarded to the Full Committee, as amended, by a record vote 
of 10 Yeas to 4 Nays. On November 18, 2011 Representative 
Biggert introduced the Committee Print, as amended, (becoming 
H.R. 3479). On December 1, 2011 the Full Committee met in open 
markup session and ordered H.R. 3479, favorably reported to the 
House, as amended, by a record vote of 21 Yeas to 12 Nays.
    On March 20, 2012 Chairman Hall of the House Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology, and Chairman Mica of the House 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure exchanged 
correspondence in which the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure waived further consideration of H.R. 3479.
    On September 12, 2012, the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology reported the bill, H.R. 3479, as amended, (H. Rept. 
112- 666, Part I). On September 12, 2012, both the Committee on 
Transportation and the Committee on Natural Resources 
discharged the legislation and it was placed on the Union 
Calendar (Calendar No. 480).

              FEBRUARY 7, 2012--MARKUP HELD ON H.R. 3834,

             ADVANCING AMERICA'S NETWORKING AND INFORMATION

            TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ACT OF 2012

Background and Need
    The purpose H.R. 3834 is to advance America's networking 
and information technology research and development by updating 
the High Performance Computing Act of 1991. H.R. 3834 requires 
the development and periodic update of a strategic plan for the 
federal government Networking and Information Technology 
Research and Development (NITRD) program and codifies work 
currently conducted by the National Coordination Office (NCO) 
of the NITRD program. The bill requires the NCO Director to 
convene a university/industry taskforce to explore mechanisms 
for carrying out collaborative research and development 
activities for cyber-physical systems. Additionally, the bill 
requires the NCO Director to convene an interagency working 
group to examine issues around cloud computing services.
    Federal support for research and development (R&D) in 
networking and information technology (NIT) originally stemmed 
from an interest in and the challenge of developing computers 
capable of addressing complex problems, primarily those focused 
on national security and global competition. Today, NIT 
encompasses a broad array of technologies from smart phones to 
digital libraries and cloud computing. Having changed the way 
we listen to music, drive our cars, and communicate with each 
other, this ever-growing field has led to the creation of many 
of the technologies and systems we rely on daily.
    The NITRD program is the main Federal R&D investment 
portfolio in networking, computing, software, cyber security, 
and related information technologies. NITRD coordinates this 
unclassified R&D across 14 contributing federal agencies. A 
number of additional agencies do not contribute funding, but 
also participate in NITRD planning activities.
    The Subcommittee on NITRD of the National Science and 
Technology Council (NSTC) is the internal deliberative 
organization for NITRD policy, program, and budget guidance. 
The NITRD Subcommittee includes representatives from each 
participating agency, as well as the Office of Management and 
Budget (OMB). The Subcommittee coordinates the planning, 
budgeting, implementation, and reviews of NIT R&D across the 
NITRD member agencies to help assure continued U.S. leadership, 
satisfy the needs of the federal government for advanced IT 
capabilities, and accelerate development and deployment of new 
technologies.
    The NITRD NCO provides staff support for the NITRD program. 
The NCO provides program and financial management services, 
technical and subject matter expertise in facilitation, 
strategic planning, technical writing, networking and 
information technology services, and administrative staff 
support for the NITRD Subcommittee and other NITRD subgroups. 
The National Science Foundation (NSF) serves as the host agency 
for the NCO.
    Congress originally authorized the Networking and 
Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) program 
in the High-Performance Computing Act of 1991 (P.L. 102-194), 
after recognizing that a number of federal agencies had ongoing 
high-performance computing programs without a coordinating 
body. The Act established that coordinating body to improve 
interagency coordination, cooperation, and planning among those 
agencies with high-performance computing programs. In addition, 
it authorized a multi-agency research effort, called the High-
Performance Computing and Communications program, to accelerate 
progress in the advancement of computing and networking 
technologies and to support leading edge computational research 
in a range of science and engineering fields. The statute 
established a set of mechanisms and procedures to provide for 
the interagency planning, coordination, and budgeting of the 
research and development activities carried out under the 
program. The Act has since been amended through the Next 
Generation Internet Research Act of 1998 and the America 
COMPETES Act of 2007.
    In December 2010, the President's Council of Advisors on 
Science and Technology (PCAST) completed a legislatively 
required report on NITRD. The report, Designing a Digital 
Future: Federally Funded Research and Development in Networking 
and Information Technology, found that ``NITRD is well 
coordinated and that the U.S. computing research community, 
coupled with a vibrant Networking and Information Technology 
(NIT) industry, has made seminal discoveries and advanced new 
technologies that are helping meet many societal challenges.''
    The 2010 report made several assessments about the role of 
the NIT field in answering the Nation's challenges and 
priorities:

        
 LAdvances in NIT are a key driver of economic 
        competitiveness. They create new markets and increase 
        productivity.

        
 LAdvances in NIT are crucial to achieving our 
        major national and global priorities in energy and 
        transportation, education and life-long learning, 
        healthcare, and national and homeland security.

        
 LAdvances in NIT accelerate the pace of 
        discovery in nearly all other fields.

        
 LAdvances in NIT are essential to achieving 
        the goals of open government.

    Stressing the need that federal investments be in NIT basic 
research, since the private sector is heavily involved in the 
development side, the report suggests that an investment of at 
least $1 billion annually will be required for new, potentially 
transformative research. The report also recognizes that in the 
current economic uncertainty, repurposing and reprioritization 
of funding will be necessary, but does not rule out new funding 
and indicates a lower level of investment ``could seriously 
jeopardize America's national security and economic 
competitiveness.''
    The PCAST report includes recommendations for increased 
investments in long-term, multi-agency research initiatives in 
health, energy, transportation, and cybersecurity. It 
emphasizes, ``Where fundamental NIT advances are needed to 
support these initiatives, mission agencies should invest in 
fundamental research in NIT, either alone or in collaboration 
with NSF, and should not limit their programs to application-
specific research.''
    The report also calls for exercising leadership to bring 
about changes in K-12 STEM education; enhancing the 
effectiveness of government coordination of NIT research and 
development; and redefining NITRD budget categories to separate 
NIT infrastructure for R&D in other fields from NIT R&D.
    In February 2011, NITRD released its Supplement to the 
President's Budget request. The Supplement is a summary of the 
NITRD research activities planned and coordinated for Fiscal 
Year 2012 (FY12) for each of the participating agencies. The 
NITRD request totals $3.9 billion for FY12, a 1.9 percent 
increase from FY10 expenditures, and reflects many spending 
priorities recommended in the PCAST report.
    In February 2012, NITRD released its Supplement to the 
President's Budget request for FY13. The NITRD request totals 
$3.8 billion, a 1.8 percent increase from FY11 expenditures, 
and continues to reflect the spending priorities in the PCAST 
report.

Legislative History
    On January 27, 2012 Representative Ralph M. Hall (R-TX) 
introduced the Advancing America's Networking and Information 
Technology Research and Development Act of 2012 along with 
Representatives Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX), Mo Brooks (R-AL), 
Daniel Lipinski (D-IL), Judy Biggert (R-IL), and Ben Ray Lujan 
(D-NM). H.R. 3834 was referred to the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology.
    On February 7, 2012 the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology met in open markup session and adopted H.R. 3834, as 
amended by voice vote. Further, the Committee ordered H.R. 3834 
favorably reported to the House, as amended by voice vote. The 
Committee reported H.R. 3834, as amended, to the House on March 
22, 2012 (H. Rept. 112-420) and it was placed on the Union 
Calendar (Calendar No. 289). On April 27, 2012, the House 
suspended the rules and voted to pass H.R. 3834, as amended, by 
a voice vote. H.R. 3834 was received in the Senate on May 7, 
2012 and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation.

              FEBRUARY 7, 2012--MARKUP HELD ON H.R. 3199,

                TO PROVIDE A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT OF

                THE SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL RESEARCH ON

                THE IMPLICATIONS OF THE USE OF MID-LEVEL

                 ETHANOL BLENDS, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES

Background and Need
    In 1978, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved 
the use of ten percent ethanol blended gasoline (E10) under 
section 211(f) of the Clean Air Act (CAA).
    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (Pub. L. 
110-140, or EISA) created the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS 
II), an expansion on the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) 
established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Pub. L. 109-58, 
or EPAct05). This expansion mandated the use of 15 billion 
gallons of renewable fuel in 2012 and 36 billion gallons by 
2022. As the result of increased ethanol fuel consumption 
driven by these requirements and the limited use of E85, the 
U.S. has approached the so-called ``blend wall'' for ethanol. 
According to the United States Energy Information 
Administration, the ``national share of ethanol in gasoline 
reached ten percent in June 2011'' and ``the blend wall has 
been reached in most areas'' of the United States.
    Section 211(f) of the CAA requires that the Administrator 
of the EPA may not grant a waiver for any fuel or fuel additive 
that is ``not substantially similar'' to the existing 
certification fuel. The current certification fuel is E0 
(regular unleaded gasoline without ethanol added). However, in 
making this determination under Section 211(f), the 
Administrator may waive the substantially similar requirement 
in 211(f)(1) if the Administrator determines the fuel or fuel 
additive will ``not cause or contribute to a failure of any 
emission control device or system (over the useful life of the 
motor vehicle, motor vehicle engine, nonroad engine or nonroad 
vehicle in which such device or system is used).''
    In March of 2009 a coalition of ethanol supporters applied 
to EPA for a waiver to increase the maximum allowable amount of 
ethanol in gasoline from ten percent to 15 percent (E15). In 
October of 2010 and January of 2011, EPA partially approved two 
such waivers. The October partial waiver authorized the use of 
E15 gasoline in model year 2007 and newer light-duty motor 
vehicles (cars, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger 
vehicles), while the January partial waiver extended E15 use to 
model year 2001-2006 light-duty motor vehicles. These decisions 
relied primarily upon a test program conducted by the United 
States Department of Energy in 2010 and 2011. Vehicles older 
than model year 2001, as well as other gasoline-powered engines 
such as those for outdoor equipment and recreation vehicles, 
were not approved for E15 use.
    In February of 2012, the Agency announced that information 
submitted by the Renewable Fuels Association and Growth Energy 
would satisfy the emissions and health effects information 
requirements for any future E15 registration application. On 
April 2, 2012, EPA approved the first applications for 
registering E15. In late April, the Agency approved a required 
fuel survey funded by ethanol producers. Preliminary results 
from a comprehensive study conducted by the Coordinating 
Research Council, a nonprofit research organization that is 
sustained by the petroleum and automotive industries, indicated 
mechanical damage from the use of E15 in vehicles covered by 
the partial waiver. The final results of this study were 
released on May 16, 2012.
    EPA's actions resulted in two overarching technical and 
practical concerns: (1) the potential for E15 to damage onroad 
vehicle engines for all model years, as well as off-road 
engines; and (2) the potential of a newly bifurcated fueling 
system to result in widespread misfueling of engines (i.e. 
owners of model year 2000-and-older cars as well as nonroad 
vehicles and equipment, filling tanks with unapproved E15 
gasoline blends).
    The purpose of H.R. 3199 is to provide a comprehensive 
assessment of the scientific and technical research on the 
implications of the use of mid-level ethanol blends. The bill 
directs the EPA Administrator, acting through the Assistant 
Administrator of the Office of Research and Development, to 
enter into an agreement, not later than 45 days after 
enactment, with the National Academy of Sciences to provide 
this assessment prior to the implementation of any waiver, 
partial waiver, or decision pursuant to current law. The 
assessment is required to compare mid-level ethanol blends to 
gasoline blends containing both 10 and zero percent ethanol.

Legislative History
    On October 13, 2011, Rep. James Sensenbrenner introduced 
H.R. 3199. H.R. 3199 was referred to the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology.
    On February 7, 2012, the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology met in open markup session and adopted H.R. 3199, as 
amended, by a record vote of 19 yeas to 7 nays. Further, the 
Committee ordered H.R. 3199 favorably reported to the House, as 
amended, by voice vote.

             JUNE 28, 2012--FULL COMMITTEE BUSINESS MEETING

    The Committee met to adopt the Third Semiannual Report of 
Activities of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology 
for the 112th Congress. The Report was adopted and reported to 
the House by voice vote.

                     SEPTEMBER 19, 2012--H.R. 4158,

              TO CONFIRM FULL OWNERSHIP RIGHTS FOR CERTAIN

               UNITED STATES ASTRONAUTS TO ARTIFACTS FROM

                     THE ASTRONAUTS' SPACE MISSION

Background and Need
    Throughout the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo programs 
(including Skylab and the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project), NASA 
managers routinely allowed astronauts, at the conclusion of a 
mission, to keep mementos, pieces of hardware, and personal 
equipment (e.g., space suit emblems, food, hand controllers, 
and checklists) from the spacecraft. In some cases, these 
artifacts have been in the possession of an astronaut for 
almost forty years.
    Beginning in the mid-2000s, NASA began to challenge the 
ownership of these artifacts by Apollo-era astronauts in some 
cases. As a result of the actions by NASA, rightful ownership 
of artifacts still in the astronauts' possession--as well as 
those donated to colleges and museums, transferred to family 
members, or privately sold--has been brought into question, 
exposing astronauts to possible (and significant) damages if 
ownership is not clearly established.
    H.R. 4158 grants full ownership rights of the artifacts, 
mementos, and hardware from the Mercury, Gemini, Apollo and 
Apollo-Soyuz Test Project missions, received by the astronauts, 
and to those individuals to whom they gave, transferred, or 
sold the items. The bill specifically excludes lunar rocks and 
material from the definition of artifacts that astronauts would 
be entitled to keep.

Legislative History
    The legislation was introduced by Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology Chairman Ralph Hall and Ranking Member 
Eddie Bernice Johnson on March 7, 2012 and shares strong 
bipartisan support (33 bipartisan cosponsors, including 25 
Committee Members). CBO estimated that implementing H.R. 4158 
would have no significant impact on the federal budget.
    H.R. 4158 was considered under suspension of the rules on 
September 19, 2012 and was agreed to by voice vote. The 
legislation was received in the Senate on September 20, 2012. 
On September 22, 2012, H.R. 4158 passed the Senate without 
amendment by Unanimous Consent. The legislation was signed by 
the President on October 5, 2012 and became P. L. 112-185.

                     NOVEMBER 13, 2012--H.R. 6586,

                  TO EXTEND THE APPLICATION OF CERTAIN

             SPACE LAUNCH LIABILITY PROVISIONS THROUGH 2014

Background and Need
    The commercial space transportation risk-sharing and 
liability regime, which was established in the Commercial Space 
Launch Amendments Act of 1988 (PL 100-657), requires all 
commercial launch operators to purchase a fixed amount of 
insurance to cover any injuries or property damage to the 
uninvolved public, or ``third parties.'' As a part of this 
program, the government agrees to assume a portion of liability 
above the level of coverage purchased by the launch/reentry 
vehicle operator. If federal coverage were ever to be 
triggered, it would require the Administration to request 
federal indemnification, and a separate bill appropriating 
funding to be passed by Congress. The Office of Commercial 
Space Transportation has set a threshold of losses with a 
probability of occurrence of no less than one in ten million 
launches.
    Since establishing the risk-sharing and liability regime 
over 200 launches have been licensed without any claims for 
federal coverage for loss of life, serious injuries, or 
significant property damage to the general public. The ability 
of the government to assume some financial responsibility for 
losses to third parties allows a developing space launch 
industry to continue to grow.
    The authority of the government to provide payment of 
claims exceeding the maximum probable loss 
(``indemnification'') expires at the end of this year, Dec. 31, 
2012. The program has been extended five times, and H.R. 6586 
would extend the current regime for two years until Dec. 31, 
2014.

Legislative History
    The bipartisan bill was introduced by Representative Steven 
Palazzo, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics 
of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, as well as 
several Members of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology on November 9, 2012. CBO estimates that implementing 
H.R. 6586 would not impact direct spending or revenues.
    On November 13, 2012 H.R. 6586 was considered under 
suspension of the rules. A motion to suspend the rules and pass 
the bill was agreed to by voice vote on November 13, 2012. On 
November 14, 2012 H.R. 6586 was received in the Senate.
    On January 1, 2013, H.R. 6586 passed the Senate with an 
amendment by Unanimous Consent. The House concurred in the 
Senate amendment to H.R. 6586 by Unanimous Consent on January 
2, 2013.

                     DECEMBER 31, 2012--H.R. 6612,

                           TO REDESIGNATE THE

                     DRYDEN FLIGHT RESEARCH CENTER

            AS THE NEIL A. ARMSTRONG FLIGHT RESEARCH CENTER

                AND THE WESTERN AERONAUTICAL TEST RANGE

             AS THE HUGH L. DRYDEN AERONAUTICAL TEST RANGE

Background and Need
    The Dryden Flight Research Center is NASA and the Nation's 
premier flight research facility. Many of our country's most 
iconic high performance aircraft, notably including the X-15 
were flown from the Center. Neil Armstrong worked at the Center 
for seven years and during the course of his career flew the X-
15 seven times, including a flight that reached over 207,000 
feet in altitude. Neil Armstrong died on August 25, 2012. Hugh 
L. Dryden earned his undergraduate and Ph.D. degrees in physics 
from Johns Hopkins University and became Director of 
Aeronautical Research at the National Advisory Committee for 
Aeronautics, the predecessor of NASA. Dr. Dryden was appoint 
Deputy Administrator of NASA in 1958 and remained in that 
position until his death on December 2, 1965.
    H.R. 6612 renames NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center as 
the Neil Armstrong Flight Research Center and designates the 
Western Aeronautical Test Range, located at Dryden, as the Hugh 
L. Dryden Aeronautical Test Range.

Legislative History
    On November 29, 2012, Rep. Kevin McCarthy introduced H.R. 
6612. H.R. 6612 was referred to the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology. Cosponsors of the legislation included 
Rep. Adam Schiff, Rep. Buck McKeon, Rep. Ken Calvert, Rep. 
Steven Palazzo, Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, and Rep. Ralph Hall. On 
December 31, 2012, H.R. 6612 was considered under suspension of 
the rules. A motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill was 
agreed to on December 31, 2012 by a vote of Y-404, N-0 (Roll 
Call No. 653). On January 1, 2013, H.R. 6612 was received in 
the Senate.

              FULL COMMITTEE OTHER LEGISLATIVE ACTIVITIES

                 H.R. 658, THE FAA REAUTHORIZATION AND

                           REFORM ACT OF 2011

Background and Summary of Legislation
    The purpose of H.R. 658 is to authorize appropriations for 
the Federal Aviation Administration for fiscal years 2011 
through 2014, to streamline programs, create efficiencies, 
reduce waste, and improve aviation safety and capacity, and to 
provide stable funding for the national aviation system. 
Provisions within the jurisdiction of the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology include those in Title II, NextGen Air 
Transportation System and Air Traffic Control Modernization; 
Title III, Subtitle B, Unmanned Aircraft Systems; Title X, the 
Federal Aviation Research and Development Reauthorization Act 
of 2011, incorporating the text of H.R. 970, as reported by the 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology on March 17, 2011 
(H. Rept. 112-52); and Title XIII, Commercial Space, postponing 
for eight years after the first licensed commercial launch of a 
space flight participant the authority to propose, without 
regard to specified constraints, regulations governing the 
design or operation of a launch vehicle to protect the health 
and safety of crew and space flight participants, except in 
response to specific incidents of accident, injury, or death.

Legislative History
    H.R. 658 was introduced by Representative John Mica (R-FL) 
on February 11, 2011 and referred to the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure. On March 10, 2011 the bill 
was jointly and sequentially referred to the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology, and the Committee on the 
Judiciary. On March 23, 2011 the House Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology and the Committee on the Judiciary 
discharged the bill and it was placed on the Union Calendar, 
Calendar No. 19. On April 1, 2011 the House considered the 
measure and it was passed, as amended, by: Y-223; N-196 (Roll 
Call No. 220). It was received in the Senate on April 4, 2011. 
On April 7, 2011 the Senate struck all after the enacting 
clause, substituted the language of S. 223, as amended, and 
passed by unanimous consent. On April 7, 2011 the Senate 
insisted on its amendment, asked for a conference, and 
appointed conferees. On January 31, 2012, Mr. Cravaack asked 
unanimous consent that the House disagree to the Senate 
amendment, and agree to a conference, the motion was agreed to 
without objection. On January 31, 2012, the Speaker appointed 
conferees from the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure for consideration of the House bill and the 
Senate amendment, and modifications committed to conference; 
from the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology for 
consideration of sections 102, 105, 201, 202, 204, 208, 209, 
212, 220, 321, 324, 326, 812, title X and title XIII of the 
House bill and sections 102, 103, 106, 216, 301, 302, 309, 320, 
327, title VI, and sec. 732 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference; from the Committee on 
Ways and Means for consideration of title XI of the House bill 
and titles VIII and XI of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference.
    On February 1, 2012 conference report, H. Rept. 112-381 was 
filed. The Committee on Rules filed Committee Report 112-382 on 
H. Res. 533 on February 1, 2012. On February 3, 2012, Mr. Mica 
brought up conference report H. Rept. 112-381 for 
consideration. The conference report was agreed to by a vote of 
Y-248, N-169 (Roll no. 33). On February 6, 2012, the Conference 
report was considered in the Senate. The Senate agreed to the 
conference report by a recorded vote of Y-75, N-20 (Record Vote 
No. 15). The bill was signed into law by the President on 
February 14, 2012. It became Public Law No. 112-95.

      P.L. 112-10, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AND FULL-YEAR CONTINUING 
                        APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2011

Background and Summary
    P.L. 112-10 appropriated funds for the remainder of FY 2011 
to the Department of Defense and for continuing operations, 
projects, or activities which were conducted in 2010 and for 
which appropriations, funds or other authority were made 
available in the FY 2010 appropriations acts for the other 
various departments and agencies of the Federal government. The 
law appropriated resources to programs within the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology's jurisdiction, including the 
National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration (NASA), the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology (NIST), the Department of Energy 
(DOE), the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the 
Department of Transportation, (DOT), the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the Environmental 
Protection Agency (EPA).
    Key programs within the jurisdiction of the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology funded by P.L. 112-110 included, 
for example, at the DOE: Office of Science, APRA-E, Energy 
Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Nuclear Energy, Fossil Energy, 
Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, and the Title XVII 
Loan Guarantee Program. All of these programs received funding 
below FY 2010 levels. At the EPA and NOAA the overall funding 
levels for both, including programs in the Committee's 
jurisdiction were below FY 2010. At NIST several programs saw 
reductions from 2010 funding levels while the Hollings 
Manufacturing Extension Program Partnership received a slight 
increase over FY 2010 funding levels. The DHS' Science and 
Technology Directorate saw a reduction from FY 2010 levels, 
while the Fire Grants programs funding levels remained equal to 
the FY 2010 enacted levels.
    P.L. 112-10 also legislated on a select number of areas 
within the Committee's jurisdiction. In regard to NASA, the 
bill required the submission to Congress of an operating plan 
within 60 days of enactment (June 15, 2011), eliminated 
language preventing NASA from canceling any Constellation 
related contracts, specified funding levels for the Multi-
Purpose Crew Vehicle and Space Launch Systems, and banned NASA 
from funding collaboration with China.
    Additionally, language included in P.L. 112-10 prohibits 
funding provided to NOAA under the legislation to be used to 
implement, establish, or create a NOAA climate service.

Legislative History
    On April 11, 2011, Rep. Harold Rogers (R-KY), Chairman of 
the Committee on Appropriations, introduced H.R. 1473, which 
was referred to the Committees on Appropriations, Budget, and 
Ways and Means. On April 14, 2011, H.R. 1473 was considered by 
the House and passed by: Y-260, N-167 (Roll Call No. 268). H.R. 
1473 was received in the Senate on April 14, 2011. It was 
considered and, without amendment, passed by: 81-Y, N-19 
(Record Vote No. 61). It was signed into law by the President 
on April 15, 2010 and became Public Law No. 112-10.

 H.R. 1540, THE NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2012

Background and Summary of Legislation
    The purpose of H.R. 1540 is to authorize appropriations for 
the Department of Defense for fiscal year 2012. The Committee 
on Science, Space, and Technology has a jurisdictional interest 
in certain provisions of the bill dealing with the harmful 
interference of communication systems with Global Positioning 
Systems devices needed by the Department of Defense (Section 
911 of H.R. 1540 as reported), the integration of unmanned 
aerial vehicles into the national airspace system (Section 1098 
of H.R 1540 as reported), high performance computing, nuclear 
science, and the development of a national rocket propulsion 
strategy for the United States (Section 1096 of H.R. 1540 as 
reported). The Senate amendment to H.R. 1540 proposed a number 
of provisions that the Committee had jurisdiction over 
including: Extension and Expansion of Small Business Programs 
of the Department of Defense (Section 885 of the Senate 
amendment), Commercial Space Launch Cooperation (Section 911 of 
the Senate amendment), Authority to Designate Increments or 
Blocks of Space Vehicles As Major Subprograms Subject to 
Acquisition Reporting Requirements (Section 912 of the Senate 
amendment), and Reauthorization of SBIR and STTR programs 
(Division E of the Senate amendment).
    Section 911 of the House bill restricts the ability of the 
Federal Communications Commission to permit operations of a 
space-based or terrestrial based communications system that may 
interfere with the Global Positioning Systems devices needed by 
the Department of Defense. NASA works in conjunction with the 
Department of Defense to operate satellite systems and maintain 
its GPS capabilities. Section 1096 requires the President to 
prepare and transmit a national rocket propulsion strategy for 
the United States to address the effects of the end of the 
space shuttle program and the termination of the Constellation 
program on multiple departments and agencies that rely on the 
solid rocket motor and liquid rocket engine industrial base. 
Section 1098 provides for the development and testing of 
unmanned aircraft systems through an FAA program utilizing six 
test ranges to test the safe operations and develop detection 
techniques for unmanned flight operations in the national 
airspace system and develop certification standards and air 
traffic requirements for unmanned flight operations at those 
ranges. Section 885 and Division E of the Senate amendment 
would alter current law with regard to the Small Business 
Innovation Research program (SBIR) and the Small Business 
Technology Transfer (STTR) program. Section 911 of the Senate 
amendment allows the Secretary of Defense to assist the 
Secretary of Transportation in carrying out the 
responsibilities set forth in Titles 49 (Transportation) and 51 
(National and Commercial Space Programs) with respect to 
private sector involvement in commercial space activities and 
public-private partnerships pertaining to space transportation 
infrastructure. Section 912 amends the acquisition reporting 
under Title 10 with regard to the purchase of space vehicles.

Legislative History
    H.R. 1540 was introduced by Representative Buck McKeon (R-
CA) by request on April 14, 2011 and referred to the Committee 
on Armed Services. On May 17, 2011 the Committee on Armed 
Services reported as amended H.R. 1540, filed H. Rept. 112-78, 
and the bill was placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 39. 
On May 23, 2011 the Committee on Armed Services filed a 
supplemental report, H. Rept. 112-79, Part II. The Committee on 
Rules filed H. Rept. 112-86 on H. Res 269, providing for 
consideration of H.R. 1540. On May 26, 2011 the House passed 
H.R. 1540, as amended, by: Y-322, N-96 (Roll Call No. 375).
    H.R. 1540 was received in the Senate on June 6, 2011 and 
referred to the Committee on Armed Services. On December 1, 
2011 the Committee on Armed Services was discharged and a 
substitute amendment to H.R. 1540 was considered and passed in 
the Senate by unanimous consent. The Senate insisted on its 
amendment, asked for a conference, and appointed conferees.
    A message on Senate action was sent to the House on 
December 5, 2011. On December 7, 2011 Chairman McKeon moved 
that the House disagree to the Senate amendment to H.R. 1540 
and agree to a conference. The motion was agreed to without 
objection. From the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology, the Speaker appointed conferees, Chairman Ralph 
Hall, Technology and Innovation Subcommittee Chairman Ben 
Quayle, and Ranking Member Eddie Bernice Johnson, for 
consideration of sections 911 and 1098 of the House bill, and 
sections 885, 911, 912 and Division E of the Senate amendment, 
and modifications committed to conference.
    On December 12, 2011 the conference report (112-239) was 
filed. The House considered the conference report, subject to a 
rule (H. Res. 493) on December 14, 2011, and the report passed 
by: Y-283, N-136 (Roll Call No. 932). The Senate considered the 
conference report on December 15, 2011 and the conference 
report passed the Senate on December 15, 2011, by: Y-86, N-13 
(Record Vote No. 230) The bill was signed into law by the 
President on December 31, 2011, and became Public Law 112-81.

                  H.R. 672, TO TERMINATE THE ELECTION

                         ASSISTANCE COMMISSION

Background and Summary of Legislation
    The purpose of H.R. 672 is to terminate the Election 
Assistance Commission (EAC) as an agency and transfer certain 
key functions to other federal agencies to maintain those 
functions going forward. In particular, the adoption of 
voluntary voting standards and the certification 
responsibilities for voting systems is transferred from the EAC 
to the Federal Election Commission (FEC).
    The EAC was created by the Help America Vote Act of 2002 
(HAVA). During the 107th Congress, H.R. 3295, which became 
HAVA, was referred to the Committee on House Administration and 
the Committee on Science and Technology and incorporated 
multiple provisions of H.R. 2275, the Voting Technology 
Standards Act of 2001.
    These provisions included a process to ensure that proper 
technical standards would be developed to improve voting 
technology and that a reliable system would be set up to test 
equipment against those standards. These responsibilities have 
been assigned by HAVA to the National Institute of Standards 
and Technology (NIST). The Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology continues as the Committee of jurisdiction over the 
scientific and technological aspects of voting reform including 
research, development, and testing of voting machine standards.
    H.R. 672 would transfer the EAC's Office of Voting System 
Testing and Certification to the FEC while maintaining NIST's 
current role in the accreditation of laboratories to test 
voting equipment. The bill continues the formal mechanisms for 
input into the development of Voluntary Voting System 
Guidelines (VVSGs) by maintaining the current Technical 
Guidelines Development Committee (which NIST chairs) and 
replaces several committees with a streamlined 56-member 
Guidelines Review Board composed of state and local election 
officials and other key constituencies including federal 
representatives.

Legislative History
    H.R. 672 was introduced by Representative Gregg Harper (R-
MS) on February 11, 2011 and referred to the Committee on House 
Administration and in addition the Committee on Science, Space 
and Technology. On April 14 the Committee on House 
Administration held a legislative hearing, followed by a markup 
on May 25. On June 2, 2011 the Committee on House 
Administration reported H.R. 672, as amended, to the House (H. 
Rept. 112-100) and the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology discharged. H.R. 672 was placed on the Union 
Calendar, Calendar No. 55. On June 21, 2011, Chairman Lungren 
moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill, H.R. 672, and the 
motion failed by a vote of Y-235, N-187.

           H.R. 1309, THE FLOOD INSURANCE REFORM ACT OF 2011

Background and Summary
    H.R. 1309, the Flood Insurance Reform Act, reauthorizes the 
National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) through September 30, 
2016, and amends the National Flood Insurance Act to address 
fiscal and administrative issues of the NFIP. The bill includes 
provisions to ensure the continued viability of the NFIP 
through encouraging broader participation in the program, 
increasing financial accountability, eliminating unnecessary 
rate subsidies, and updating the program to meet current needs. 
The key provisions of the bill include: 1) a five year 
reauthorization of the NFIP; 2) a three-year delay in the 
mandatory purchase requirement for certain properties in newly 
designated Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHS); 3) a phase-in of 
full-risk, actuarial rates for areas newly designated as 
Special Flood Hazard; 4) a reinstatement of the Technical 
Mapping Advisory Council; and 5) an emphasis on greater private 
sector participation in providing flood insurance coverage.

Legislative History
    H.R. 1309 was introduced by Representative Judy Biggert (R-
IL) on April 1, 2011 and referred to the House Committee on 
Financial Services. The Committee on Financial Services met to 
consider the bill, H.R. 1309, on May 13, 2011 and ordered the 
bill favorably reported to the House, as amended, by a vote of 
Y-54, N-0.
    On June 2, 2011, Chairman Hall of the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology and Chairman Bachus of the Committee on 
Financial Services exchanged correspondence. Chairman Bachus 
acknowledged the jurisdictional interest of the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology in the bill, H.R. 1309, as 
amended and Chairman Hall agreed to waive a referral of the 
bill.
    On June 9, 2011, the bill was reported to the House, as 
amended, by the Committee on Financial Services (H. Rept. 112-
102). The House considered and passed H.R. 1309 on July 12, 
2011 by a vote of Y-406, N-22 (Roll Call No. 562). H.R. 1309 
was received in the Senate on July 27. Provisions of H.R. 1309 
to reform and modernize flood insurance were included in 
H.R.4348, ``MAP-21'', which became P. L. 112-141.

  P.L. 112-55, THE CONSOLIDATED AND FURTHER CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS 
                               ACT, 2012

Background and Summary
    P.L. 112-55 makes appropriations for Agriculture, Rural 
Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies 
programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2012. The law 
appropriated funds for certain Federal government agencies for 
fiscal year 2012, including agencies within the jurisdiction of 
the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. The law 
includes appropriations for fiscal year 2012 for the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Office of 
Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), the National Aeronautics 
and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science 
Foundation (NSF), the Department of Transportation (DOT), and 
made continuing appropriations for the Department of Homeland 
Security (DHS), the Department of Energy (DOE), and the 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).
    NASA activities are funded in the law at $17.8 billion, a 
slight decrease from FY 2011. Laboratory research activities at 
NIST receive a $60 million increase above the FY 2011 levels, 
but overall funding at NIST is only slightly increased. The 
overall budget for NOAA increased by $306 million, or seven 
percent above FY 2011 levels; most of this increase is 
allocated for the National Weather Service and the Joint Polar 
Satellite System weather satellite program. The NSF is funded 
at $7 billion, which represents a modest increase of $173 
million over FY 2011, with an emphasis on funding for basic 
research activities. The OSTP is funded at $4.5 million under 
the law.
    The law represents a prioritization of spending for 
programs within the jurisdiction of the Committee. While the 
law cut overall discretionary spending, it prioritizes basic 
research activities at NIST and NSF and minimized cuts to NASA. 
Additionally, the law specifically does not allocate spending 
for the establishment of a National Climate Service at NOAA as 
proposed by the Senate.

Legislative History
    On June 3, 2011, Representative Jack Kingston(R-GA) 
introduced H.R. 2112, which was reported by the Committee on 
Appropriations and included appropriations for Commerce, 
Justice, Science and Related Agencies.
    On June 14th, 15th, and 16th, the House of Representatives 
considered the bill, H.R. 2112. The bill passed the House of 
Representatives on June 16, 2011 by a vote of Y-217, N-203 
(Roll Call No. 459). H.R. 2112 was received in the Senate on 
June 16, 2011, and referred to the Senate Committee on 
Appropriations. The bill was considered and passed by the 
Senate with an amendment on November 1, 2011 by a vote of Y-69, 
N-30.
    On November 2, 2011 a message on Senate action was sent to 
the House of Representatives. On November 3, 2011 Chairman 
Rogers (R-KY) moved that the House disagree to the Senate 
amendments and request a conference, which was agreed to by 
unanimous consent. On November 14, 2011, the conferees agreed 
to file a conference report. The House of Representatives 
agreed to the conference report on November 17, 2011 by a vote 
of Y-298, N-121. The Senate agreed to the conference report on 
November 17, 2011 by a vote of Y-70, N-30. On November 18, 
2011, the President signed the bill, which became P.L. 112-55.

             H.R. 2693, THE ``BUDGET CONTROL ACT OF 2011''

Background and Summary of Legislation
    The bill would set discretionary spending limits for 
FY2012-FY2013, and makes it out of order for either house of 
Congress to consider any measure that would cause them to be 
exceeded. It also would establish the Joint Select Committee on 
Deficit Reduction to make recommendations that will 
significantly improve the short-term and long-term fiscal 
imbalance of the federal government, with the goal of reducing 
the federal deficit to 3% or less of Gross Domestic Product 
(GDP).
    Finally, it would increase the U.S. public debt ceiling 
from $14.294 trillion to $16.994 trillion.

Legislative History
    H.R. 2693 was introduced on July 28, 2011, and was referred 
to the Committee on Rules, and in addition to the Committees on 
the Budget, Energy and Commerce, Education and the Workforce, 
Ways and Means, and Science, Space, and Technology, for a 
period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each 
case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the 
jurisdiction of the committee concerned. On July 30, 2011, H.R. 
2693 was considered under suspension of the rules. A motion to 
suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended, failed by 
recorded vote (2/3 required), by Yeas-173, Nays-246 (Roll no. 
682).

             H.R. 3463, TO REDUCE FEDERAL SPENDING AND THE

               DEFICIT BY TERMINATING TAXPAYER FINANCING

              OF PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGNS AND PARTY

              CONVENTIONS AND BY TERMINATING THE ELECTION

                         ASSISTANCE COMMISSION

Background and Summary of Legislation
    The bill would eliminate the Presidential Election Campaign 
Fund (PECF), terminate public financing of presidential 
campaigns, and return PECF funds to the general treasury for 
deficit reduction. In addition, the bill would terminate the 
Election Assistance Commission (EAC) and transfer its remaining 
operations to the Office of Management and Budget and the 
Federal Election Commission. Eliminating the PECF would 
immediately return $199 million to the public treasury for 
deficit reduction and would save taxpayers $447 million over 
five years.

Legislative History
    On November 17, 2011, Representative Gregg Harper (R-MS) 
introduced H.R. 3463, which was referred to the Committee on 
House Administration, and in addition to the Committee on Ways 
and Means. H.R. 3463 was similar to H.R. 672, which was 
introduced earlier in the 112th Congress and failed to pass the 
House under a motion to suspend the rules. H.R. 672 was 
referred to the Committee on Science, Space and Technology 
Committee. In correspondence between Chairman Lungren of the 
Committee on House Administration and Chairman Hall of the 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, Chairman Lungren 
acknowledged the jurisdiction of the Committee over H.R. 3463 
and Chairman Hall agreed to waive referral of the bill.
    On December 1, 2011, H.R. 3463 was considered under a rule 
(H. Res. 477) allowing for one hour of general debate, equally 
divided and controlled. Mr. Bishop (GA) moved to recommit with 
instructions to House Administration, which failed by a vote of 
Y-190, N-236 (Roll Call No. 872). H.R. 3463 passed by a record 
vote: Y-235, N-190 (Roll Call No. 873). On December 5, 2011, 
the bill was received in the Senate and referred to the 
Committee on Rules and Administration.

              H.R. 2105, THE IRAN, NORTH KOREA, AND SYRIA

               NONPROLIFERATION REFORM AND MODERNIZATION

                              ACT OF 2011

Background and Summary of Legislation
    H.R. 2105 provides for the application of measures to 
foreign persons who transfer to Iran, North Korea, and Syria 
certain goods, services, or technology. The legislation is 
intended to address the growing threats and compel the Iranian, 
North Korean, and Syrian regimes into abandoning destructive 
policies.
    The legislation is aimed at expanding and strengthening 
existing sanctions on Iran and Syria and ensuring their full 
implementation and enforcement by the Executive Branch. H.R. 
2105 attempts to compel Iran, North Korea, and Syria to stop 
activities that threaten our security, our interests, and our 
allies.
    The legislation provides an integrated, cohesive strategy 
with the goal of preventing Iran, North Korea and Syria's 
development of nuclear and other non-conventional weapons and 
the missiles to deliver them and their sponsorship of terrorism 
and other activities that threaten Americans.

Legislative History
    H.R. 2105 was introduced on June 3, 2011, and referred to 
the Committee on Foreign Affairs, and in addition to the 
Committees on Oversight and Government Reform; Judiciary; Ways 
and Means; Science, Space, and Technology; Financial Services; 
and Transportation and Infrastructure.
    The Subcommittee on Terrorism, Nonproliferation, and Trade 
of the Committee on Foreign Affairs discharged the bill on 
November 2, 2011. The Full Committee on Foreign Affairs met to 
consider the bill on November 2, 2011 and ordered the bill 
favorably reported to the House, as amended, by voice vote.
    On November 10, 2011, Chairman Hall of the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology and Chairman Ros-Lehtinen of the 
Committee on Foreign Affairs exchanged correspondence.
    Chairman Ros-Lehtinen acknowledged the jurisdiction of the 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology over provisions of 
H.R.2105 and Chairman Hall waived further consideration of the 
bill. On December 14, 2011, the House suspended the rules and 
passed H.R. 2105 by a recorded vote of Y-418, N-2 (Roll no. 
928).
    On December 14, 2011, the bill was received in the Senate 
and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Foreign 
Relations.

H.R. 2845, THE PIPELINE SAFETY, REGULATORY CERTAINTY, AND JOB CREATION 
                              ACT OF 2011

Background and Summary of Legislation
    H.R. 2845 reauthorizes the federal pipeline safety programs 
administered by the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety 
Administration (PHMSA) of the U.S. Department of Transportation 
(USDOT) for fiscal years 2012 through 2015. H.R. 2845 provides 
for enhanced safety in pipeline transportation and provides for 
enhanced reliability in the transportation of the Nation's 
energy products by pipeline. The bill ensures regulatory 
certainty which will help create a positive environment for job 
development.
    The federal pipeline safety programs were last authorized 
under the Pipeline, Inspection, Protection, Enforcement, and 
Safety Act of 2006 (P.L. 109-468), a four year authorization 
for fiscal years 2007 through 2010. The federal pipeline safety 
programs expired on September 30, 2010.
    The bill increases the maximum amount of civil penalties 
the U.S. can seek from pipeline owners or operators who violate 
pipeline safety rules and regulations. H.R. 2845 requires 
states to eliminate most exemptions to their ``Call Before You 
Dig'' programs in order to receive federal grant funding. The 
bill allows the Secretary to issue a rulemaking requiring the 
installation of automatic and remote-controlled shutoff valves 
on newly constructed transmission pipelines but does not 
require operators to retrofit existing pipelines.
    H.R. 2845 requires the Secretary to study expanding 
pipeline integrity management requirements and leak detection 
systems, providing Congress the final say in whether or not the 
requirements should be expanded or the leak detection systems 
should be installed. Further, the bill requires USDOT and 
pipeline operators to provide information to first responders 
on the location of pipelines in their jurisdiction. USDOT is to 
review regulations regarding accident reporting requirements 
for pipeline operators.
    H.R. 2845 authorizes funding for several pipeline safety 
programs including pipeline safety research and development.
    The bill provides a continued roll for the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology in the development of 
ongoing research and development program plans as well as 
providing for a program-wide thirty percent non-Federal cost 
sharing requirement in the area of pipeline transportation 
research and development.

Legislative History
    On September 7, 2011 Representatives Bill Shuster (R-PA) 
and John Mica (R-FL) introduced H.R. 2845, the Pipeline Safety, 
Regulatory Certainty, and Job Creation Act of 2011. H.R. 2845 
was referred to the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure and in addition to the Committee on Energy and 
Commerce. On September 8, 2011 the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure met and favorably reported H.R. 2845, as 
amended, by voice vote to the House. In an exchange, 
Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chairman Mica 
acknowledged the jurisdictional interest of the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology in H.R. 2845. Chairman Hall 
agreed to waive a referral.
    On February 3, 2011 Senator Lautenberg (D-NJ) introduced S. 
275, the Pipeline Transportation Safety Improvement Act of 
2011. The bill was referred to the Senate Committee on 
Commerce, Science, and Transportation. On July 7, 2011, the 
Committee met and reported the bill with an amendment and it 
was placed on the Senate Calendar. On October 17, 2011 the 
Senate agreed to the Committee substitute by unanimous consent 
and sent a message to the House. On October 21, 2011 S. 275 was 
received in the House and held at the desk.
    On December 1, 2011 the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure reported H.R. 2845 (H. Rept. 112-297, Part I) 
and the Committee on Energy and Commerce discharged. H.R. 2845 
was placed on the Union Calendar (Calendar No. 197). On 
December 12, 2011 the House suspended the rules and passed H.R. 
2845, as amended, by a voice vote.
    On December 13, 2011, the bill was received in the Senate, 
read twice, considered, read a third time, and passed without 
amendment by Unanimous Consent. On January 3, 2012, the bill 
was signed into law by the President and became Public Law No. 
112-90.

      H.R. 4239, THE SURFACE TRANSPORTATION EXTENSION ACT OF 2012

Background and Summary of Legislation
    H.R. 4239 provides an extension of Federal-aid highway, 
highway safety, motor carrier safety, transit, and other 
programs funded out of the Highway Trust Fund pending enactment 
of a multiyear law reauthorizing such programs. The bill 
establishes funding levels for the portion of FY 2012 from 
October 1, 2011 through June 30, 2012 for surface 
transportation programs, thereby extending funding for the 
programs through June 30, 2012. The Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology has a jurisdictional interest in surface 
transportation research programs.

Legislative History
    H.R. 4239 was introduced on March 22, 2012 and referred to 
the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, and in 
addition to the Committees on Ways and Means, Natural 
Resources, Science, Space, and Technology, and Energy and 
Commerce, for a period to be subsequently determined by the 
Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as 
fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned. On 
March 27, 2012, Mr. Mica moved to suspend the rules and pass 
H.R. 4239, as amended. On March 29, 2012, the motion to suspend 
the rules and pass H.R. 4239, as amended, failed by a voice 
vote.

 H.R. 4257, THE ``FEDERAL INFORMATION SECURITY AMENDMENTS ACT OF 2012''

Background and Summary of Legislation
    The Federal Information Security Amendments Act of 2012 
(H.R. 4257) enhances the Federal Information Security 
Management Act (FISMA) of 2002 by improving the framework for 
securing federal information technology systems. H.R. 4257 
updates and amends the activities required to secure federal 
information systems. It establishes a mechanism for improved 
oversight of federal agency information security programs and 
systems through a focus on automated and continuous monitoring 
of agency information systems, when possible, and through 
conducting regular threat assessments. The Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology has a jurisdictional interest in 
H.R. 4257 due to the involvement of the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology (NIST) in developing and proposing 
both standards and guidelines for Federal government agencies 
to follow to ensure that the networks and information 
maintained by the Federal government agencies are secure. The 
language of H.R. 4257 seeks to amend the law in a number of 
different ways, all of which affect the role of NIST in the 
promulgation of standards and guidelines for information 
security within Federal agencies.

Legislative History
    On March 26, 2012, Representative Issa introduced H.R. 
4257. On April 18, 2012, the Committee on Oversight and 
Government Reform ordered H.R. 4257 to be reported, as amended, 
H.R. 4257, filed H. Rept. 112-455, and the bill was placed on 
the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 318. On April 26, 2012, 
Chairman Hall of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology and Chairman Issa of the Committee on Oversight and 
Government Reform exchanged correspondence. Chairman Issa 
acknowledged the jurisdictional interest of the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology in the bill, H.R. 4257, as 
amended, and Chairman Hall agreed to waive a referral of the 
bill. The exchange was included in the report on the bill, H. 
Rept. 112-455, as well as the Congressional Record on April 27, 
2012. On April 26, 2012, Mr. Issa moved to suspend the rules 
and pass H.R. 4257, as amended, which was agreed to by voice 
vote. The bill was received in the Senate on May 7, 2012.

    H.R. 4281, THE ``SURFACE TRANSPORTATION EXTENSION ACT OF 2012''

Background and Summary of Legislation
    H.R. 4281 provides an extension of Federal-aid highway, 
highway safety, motor carrier safety, transit, and other 
programs funded by the Highway Trust Fund pending enactment of 
a multiyear law reauthorizing such programs. The bill 
establishes funding levels for the portion of FY 2012 from 
October 1, 2011 through June 30, 2012 for surface 
transportation programs-resulting in an extension of funding 
for the programs through June 1, 2012. The Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology has a jurisdictional interest in 
surface transportation research programs.

Legislative History
    H.R. 4281 was introduced on March 28, 2012, and referred to 
the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, and in 
addition to the Committees on Ways and Means, Natural 
Resources, Science, Space, and Technology, and Energy and 
Commerce, for a period to be subsequently determined by the 
Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as 
fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned. The 
Committee on Rules filed H. Rept. 112-424 on H. Res 600, 
providing for consideration of H.R. 4281. On March 29, 2012 the 
House passed H.R. 4281, as amended, by: Y-266, N-158 (Roll Call 
No. 147). H.R. 4281 was received in the Senate and passed 
without amendment by Voice Vote on March 29, 2012. On March 30, 
2012, H.R. 4281 was signed by the President and became P. L. 
112-102.

 H.R. 4310, THE NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2013

Background and Summary of Legislation
    H.R. 4310 authorizes appropriations for fiscal year 2013 
for military activities of the Department of Defense and 
establishes military personnel strengths for fiscal year 2013. 
The Department of Defense programs were last authorized under 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 
(P.L. 112-81). The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology 
has a jurisdictional interest in certain provisions of the 
bill, including, but not limited to, those provisions dealing 
with prohibiting the use of funds to implement an international 
agreement on space activities without ratification by the 
Senate or authorization in statute (Section 913 of H.R. 4310 as 
reported), authorizing a report on counter space technology 
(Section 915 of H.R. 4310 as reported), establishing an 
interagency council on the strategic capability of the National 
Laboratories (Section 1062 of H.R. 4310 as reported), the 
interagency collaboration on unmanned aircraft systems (Section 
1074 of H.R 4310 as reported), an independent review and 
assessment of the technologies developed under the Small 
Business Innovation Research program (Section 1615 of H.R. 4310 
as reported), management of research laboratories and entities 
utilized for civilian and defense projects, nuclear science, 
and the development of and demonstration of domestic national-
security-related enrichment technologies.
    Section 913 of the House bill prohibits the Secretary of 
Defense or the Director of National Intelligence to limit the 
activities of the Department of Defense or the intelligence 
community in outer space pursuant to an international agreement 
unless such agreement has been ratified by the Senate or 
authorized in statute. Additionally, this section requires a 
report on the progress of negotiations on an international 
agreement concerning outer space activities to the 
``appropriate congressional committees,'' including the 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. Section 915 
requires a report describing key space technologies that could 
be used or are being sought by foreign countries with a counter 
space program. Section 1062 establishes an Interagency Council 
responsible for identifying and considering the science, 
technology, and engineering capabilities of the national labs 
that could be leveraged to support national security missions. 
Section 1074 provides interagency collaboration by DOD, the 
FAA, and NASA on research and solutions for the safe 
integration of unmanned aircraft systems into the National 
Airspace. Several provisions in H.R. 4310, as reported, would 
alter current law with regard to the Small Business Act; the 
Committee has jurisdiction over changes to the Small Business 
Act affecting the Small Business Innovation Research program 
(SBIR) and the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) 
program. Section 1615 requires an independent assessment of 
these programs related to the transition of technologies from 
these programs for use in DOD programs.
    In addition to the provisions included in H.R. 4310, as 
reported, several amendments of interest to the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology were adopted on the House Floor, 
including, among others, a provision to amend Title 51 
(National and Commercial Space Programs) to require the 
Secretary of Defense to take steps to maximize the use of the 
capacity of the space transportation infrastructure of the 
Department of Defense by the private sector in the United 
States, a provision to require the Secretary of Energy to 
establish a pilot program to accelerate technology transfer 
from the national labs to the marketplace, and a provision to 
remove satellites and related components and technology from 
the United States Munitions List.

Legislative History

    H.R. 4310 was introduced by Representative Buck McKeon (R-
CA) by request on March 29, 2012 and referred to the Committee 
on Armed Services. On May 9, 2012 the Committee on Armed 
Services reported, as amended, H.R. 4310, filed H. Rept. 112-
479, and the bill was placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar 
No. 335. On May 15, 2012 the Committee on Armed Services filed 
a supplemental report, H. Rept. 112-479, Part II. The Committee 
on Rules filed H. Rept. 112-481 on H. Res 656, providing for 
consideration of H.R. 4310. On May 18, 2012 the House passed 
H.R. 4310, as amended, by: Y-299, N-120 (Roll Call No. 291).
    On June 19, 2012, H.R. 4310 was received in the Senate and 
referred to the Committee on Armed Services. On June 4, 2012, 
the Senate Committee on Armed Services reported S. 3254, the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013. 
Cloture invoked on S. 3254 on December 3, 2012 by Y-93, N  0 
(Record Vote Number 218) and passed with amendments by Y-98, N-
0 (Record Vote Number 221). Senate incorporated S. 3254 into 
H.R. 4310 as an amendment. On December 7, 2012 H.R. 4310 as 
amended by the Senate received in the House and held at the 
desk. On December 13, 2012 Chairman McKeon moved that the House 
disagree to the Senate amendment to H.R. 4310, and agree to the 
requested conference and appoint conferees. From the Committee 
on Science, Space, and Technology, the Speaker appointed 
conferees, Chairman Ralph M. Hall, Congresswoman Judy Biggert, 
and Ranking Member Eddie Bernice Johnson, for consideration of 
sections 916, 1074, 1603, 1617, 1661, and 3158 of the House 
bill, and sections 271, 912, 1046, title XVIII, sections 3153, 
3159, and 3504 of the Senate amendment, and modifications 
committed to conference. Included in the final conference 
report were provisions reauthorizing the Assistance for 
Firefighting (AFG) and Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency 
Response (SAFER) grant programs, and the United States Fire 
Administration (USFA). The USFA reauthorization language was 
identical to H.R. 6229, introduced earlier in the session by 
Congresswoman Biggert. Also included in the final conference 
report was slightly modified language from S. 99, the American 
Medical Isotopes Production Act of 2011, which was passed in 
the Senate and referred to the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology on November 18, 2011.
    On December 18, 2012, the conference report to H.R. 4310, 
H. Rept. 112-705, was filed. On December 19, 2012, the 
Committee on Rules filed H. Rept. 112-707 on H. Res. 840 
providing for consideration of the conference report to H.R. 
4310. On December 20, 2012, Mr. McKeon brought up the 
conference report for consideration. The conference report was 
agreed to by Y-315, N-107 (Roll Call No. 645).

  H.R. 4348, THE ``SURFACE TRANSPORTATION EXTENSION ACT OF 2012, PART 
                                  II''

Background and Summary of Legislation
    H.R. 4348 provides an extension of Federal-aid highway, 
highway safety, motor carrier safety, transit, and other 
programs funded out of the Highway Trust.
    H.R. 4348 maintains funding pending enactment of a 
multiyear law reauthorizing such programs, includes provisions 
to require the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to issue a 
permit without additional conditions for the construction, 
operation, and maintenance of the Keystone oil pipeline, and 
requires a trust fund to be known as the ``Gulf Coast 
Restoration Trust Fund'' to be established in the Treasury of 
the United States. The legislation as introduced contained a 
number of provisions affecting surface transportation research 
programs in the jurisdiction of the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology.
    After the House passed the legislation, the Senate 
considered the legislation. The Senate struck all of the 
legislative text included by the House and replaced the 
language with language from S. 1813 and requested a conference. 
Because both H.R. 4348 and S. 1813 included numerous provisions 
in the jurisdiction of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology, conferees from the Committee were appointed by the 
Speaker. Provisions reauthorizing programs included in S. 1813 
had also been included in two pieces of legislation in the 
House, H.R. 7, the ``American Energy and Infrastructure Jobs 
Act of 2012,'' reported by the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure, and H.R. 3833, the ``Driving Research through 
Innovative Viable Economic Solutions Act of 2012'' introduced 
by Chairman Hall.
    The Committee was appointed conferees on numerous 
provisions affecting surface transportation research programs, 
environmental research programs, energy related research 
programs and various highway safety research programs. The 
Committee has jurisdiction over transportation-related 
research, development, and technology transfer programs at the 
Department of Transportation as well as the Bureau of 
Transportation Statistics. The Committee also has a 
jurisdictional interest in the establishment of a ``Gulf Coast 
Ecosystem Restoration Council'' that would conduct marine 
research and environmental research on effects on coastal 
wildlife and coastal ecosystems, and develop centers of 
excellence to focus on science, technology and monitoring of 
wildlife ecosystems, as well as research and technology to 
improve development of energy resources. Additional provisions 
of interest to the Committee in these bills include uranium 
enrichment research, research on transportation of hazardous 
materials, research to improve motor coach safety, and research 
to improve vehicle technology.

Legislative History
    H.R. 4348 was introduced by Representative Mica on April 
16, 2012 and referred to the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure, and in addition to the Committees on Ways and 
Means, Natural Resources, Science, Space, and Technology, and 
Energy and Commerce, for a period to be subsequently determined 
by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such 
provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee 
concerned. On April 17, 2012, the Committee on Rules filed H. 
Rept. 112-446 on H. Res. 619, providing for consideration of 
H.R. 4348. On April 18, 2012 the House passed H.R. 4348, as 
amended, by a vote of: Y-293, N-127 (Roll Call No. 170).
    On April 19, 2012, H.R. 4348 was received in the Senate. On 
April 24, 2012, the measure was laid before the Senate. The 
Senate struck all after the Enacting Clause and substituted the 
language of S. 1813. The Senate insisted on its amendment, 
asked for a conference, and appointed conferees. On April 25, 
2012, Mr. Mica asked unanimous consent that the House disagree 
to the Senate amendment, and agree to a conference. The motion 
was agreed to without objection. On April 25, 2012 the Speaker 
appointed Chairman Hall, Ranking Member Eddie Bernice Johnson, 
and Rep. Chip Cravaack as conferees from the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology for consideration of secs. 121, 
123, 136, and 137 of the House bill, and sec. 1534, subtitle F 
of title I of Division A, secs. 20013, 20014, 20029, 31101, 
31103, 31111, 31204, 31504, 32705, 33009, 34008, and Division E 
of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference.

    On May 8, 2012 the first meeting of the Conference on H.R. 
4348 was held.

    On June 28, 2012 the Conferees agreed to file the 
conference report and the House proceeded with one hour of 
debate on the conference report to accompany H.R. 4348 on June 
29, 2012. The House proceeded to consider the conference report 
H.Rept. 112-557 and agreed to the conference report by Y-373, 
N-52 (Roll Call no. 451). On June 29, 2012 the Senate agreed to 
the conference report by, Y-74, N-19. (Vote Number: 172). On 
July 6, 2012 H.R. 4348 was signed by the President and became 
P.L. 112-141.

           H.R. 5325, THE ``ENERGY AND WATER DEVELOPMENT AND

           RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT FOR FY 2013''

Background Information
    H.R. 5325 appropriates resources for FY 2013 to Department 
of Energy programs within the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology's jurisdiction. Key programs within the 
jurisdictional interest of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology funded by H.R. 5325 include: Office of Science, 
APRA-E, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Nuclear Energy, 
Fossil Energy, Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, and 
the Title XVII Loan Guarantee Program.

Legislative History
    H.R. 5325 was introduced by Representative Frelinghuysen on 
May 2, 2012 and referred to the Committee on Appropriations. On 
May 2, 2012, the Committee on Appropriations reported an 
original measure, H.R. 5325, filed H. Rept. 112-462, and the 
bill was placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 323. On May 
31, 2012 the Committee on Rules filed H. Rept. 112-504 on H. 
Res. 667, providing for consideration of H.R. 5325. On June 6, 
2012 the House passed H.R. 5325, as amended, by: Y-255, N-165 
(Roll Call No. 342).
    On June 11, 2012, H.R. 5325 was received in the Senate.

            H.R. 5326, THE ``COMMERCE, JUSTICE, SCIENCE, AND

           RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT FOR FY 2013''

Background and Summary of Legislation
    H.R. 5326 appropriated funds for FY 2013 to agencies and 
programs within the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology's jurisdiction, including the National Science 
Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration (NASA), the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology (NIST), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration (NOAA.
    H.R. 5326 also sought to authorize in areas within the 
Committee's jurisdiction. In regard to NASA, the bill struck a 
provision in current law that prohibited NASA from making any 
reductions in force prior to FY 2014. The bill also authorized 
NASA to transfer money from refunds to its working capital 
fund.

Legislative History
    H.R. 5326 was introduced by Representative Wolf on May 2, 
2012 and referred to the Committee on Appropriations. On May 2, 
2012, the Committee on Appropriations reported an original 
measure, H.R. 5326, filed H. Rept. 112-463, and the bill was 
placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 324. On May 7, 2012, 
the Committee on Rules filed H. Rept. 112-464 on H. Res. 643, 
providing for consideration of H.R. 5326. On May 10, 2012, the 
House passed H.R. 5326, as amended, by: Y-247, N-163 (Roll Call 
No. 249).
    On May 14, 2012, H.R. 5326 was received in the Senate.

            H.R. 5855, THE ``DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

                     APPROPRIATIONS ACT FOR 2013''

Background and Summary of Legislation
    H.R. 5855 appropriated funds for FY 2013 for programs at 
the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) within the Committee 
on Science, Space, and Technology's jurisdiction, including the 
Science and Technology Directorate, which administers research 
and development programs for the Department of Homeland 
Security.

Legislative History
    H.R. 5855 was introduced by Representative Aderholt on May 
23, 2012 and referred to the Committee on Appropriations. On 
May 23, 2012 the Committee on Appropriations reported an 
original measure, H.R. 5855, filed H. Rept. 112-492, and the 
bill was placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 345. On May 
31, 2012 the Committee on Rules filed H. Rept. 112-504 on H. 
Res. 667, providing for consideration of H.R. 5855. On June 6, 
2012, the bill H.R. 5855 was brought before the House for 
consideration. On June 7, 2012 the House passed H.R. 5855, as 
amended, by: Y-234, N-182 (Roll Call No. 370).
    On June 11, 2012, H.R. 5855 was received in the Senate.

 H.R. 6064, THE TEMPORARY SURFACE TRANSPORTATION EXTENSION ACT OF 2012

Background and Summary of Legislation
    H.R. 6064 directs the Secretary of Transportation (DOT) to 
reduce the amount apportioned for a surface transportation 
program, project, or activity for FY2012 by amounts apportioned 
or allocated under the Surface Transportation Extension Act of 
2012 for the period from October 1, 2011, through June 30, 
2012.
    It includes a special rule to provide that the amendments 
made by this Act shall cease to be effective upon enactment of 
the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21).
    Title I addresses funding for Federal-Aid Highways. Section 
101 amends the Surface Transportation Extension Act of 2011, 
Part II to continue through July 6, 2012, and authorizes 
appropriations through that date for, specified federal-aid 
highway programs. Funding for programs of interest to the 
jurisdiction of the Committee include: 1) the surface 
transportation research, development, and deployment program; 
2) training and education; 3) the Bureau of Transportation 
Statistics; 4) university transportation research; and 5) 
intelligent transportation systems (ITS) research. It also 
provides an extension of Federal-aid highway, highway safety, 
motor carrier safety, transit, and other programs funded out of 
the Highway Trust Fund pending enactment of a multiyear law 
reauthorizing such programs.
    Title II includes an extension of Highway Safety Programs. 
Section 201 amends SAFETEA-LU to extend, from October 1, 2011, 
through July 6, 2012, the authorization of appropriations for 
specified National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 
(NHTSA) safety programs, including programs of jurisdictional 
interest to the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. 
Programs extended in this Title include (1) highway safety 
research and development, (2) the occupant protection incentive 
grant program, (3) the safety belt performance grant program, 
(4) state traffic safety information system improvements, (5) 
the alcohol-impaired driving countermeasures incentive grant 
program, (6) the National Driver Register, (7) the high 
visibility enforcement program, (8) motorcyclist safety, (9) 
the child safety and child booster seat safety incentive grant 
program, and (10) NHTSA administrative expenses.
    Title III addresses the Public Transportation Programs. 
Section 301 extends from October 1, 2011, through July 6, 2012, 
the allocation of capital investment grant funds for federal 
transit programs, including the metropolitan planning program 
and the state planning and research program.
    Title IV included a Highway Trust Fund Extension. Section 
401 amends the Internal Revenue Code to extend through July 6, 
2012, authority for expenditures from the: (1) HTF Highway and 
Mass Transit accounts, (2) Sport Fish Restoration and Boating 
Trust Fund, and (3) Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust 
Fund.
    Title V authorized the Secretary of Education to delay the 
origination and disbursement of Direct Stafford loans to 
undergraduate students under the Higher Education Act of 1965 
until enactment of MAP-21, except that the Secretary may only 
delay the origination and disbursement until July 6, 2012.

Legislative History
    H.R. 6064 was introduced on June 29, 2012, and referred to 
the Committees on Ways and Means, Natural Resources, Energy and 
Commerce, Science, Space, and Technology, Education and the 
Workforce, and Transportation and Infrastructure, for a period 
to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for 
consideration of such provisions as fall within the 
jurisdiction of the committee concerned. On June 29, 2012, H.R. 
6064 was considered by unanimous consent by the House of 
Representatives and was passed without objection. The bill was 
received in the Senate and passed without amendment by 
unanimous consent on June 29, 2012. H.R. 6064 was signed by the 
President on June 29, 2012 and became P.L. 112-140.

                 H.R. 6213, THE NO MORE SOLYANDRAS ACT

Background and Summary of Legislation
    H.R. 6213 prohibits DOE from issuing any loan guarantees 
for applications submitted after December 31, 2011 and provides 
that loan guarantee applications submitted prior to December 
31, 2011, remain eligible to receive a DOE loan guarantee if 
certain conditions are satisfied.
    For any new guarantee issued, DOE must report to Congress 
on: (i)the review and decision-making process utilized by DOE 
in issuing the guarantee; (ii) the terms of the guarantee; 
(iii) the recipient; and (iv) the technology and project.
    The legislation prohibits DOE from restructuring the terms 
of any guarantee unless it first consults with Treasury and 
prohibits the subordination of U.S. taxpayer dollars to any 
other financing.
    Finally, H.R. 6213 subjects senior federal employees and 
federal appointees to remedial action, including suspension 
without pay and removal, for violations of any requirements of 
the Title XVII loan guarantee program.

Legislative History
    H.R. 6213 was introduced on July 26, 2012 and referred to 
the Committee on Energy and Commerce, and in addition to the 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, for a period to be 
subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for 
consideration of such provisions as fall within the 
jurisdiction of the committee concerned. On September 10, 2012, 
H.R. 6213 was reported as amended by the Committee on Energy 
and Commerce (H. Rept. 112-652, Part I). On September 10, 2012 
in an exchange, Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Upton 
acknowledged the jurisdiction of the Committee. Chairman Hall 
agreed to waive further consideration of H.R. 6213. The 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology discharged and the 
legislation was placed on the Union Calendar (Calendar No. 470) 
on September 10, 2012.
    On September 12, 2012 the Committee on Rules filed H. Rept. 
112-31 on H. Res. 779, providing for consideration of H.R. 
6213. On September 14, 2012 the bill H.R.6213 was brought 
before the House for consideration. The House passed H.R. 6213, 
as amended, by: Y-245 N-161 (Roll Call No. 584). On September 
19, 2012, H.R. 6213 was received in the Senate.

     FULL COMMITTEE OVERSIGHT, INVESTIGATION, AND OTHER ACTIVITIES

                  February 17, 2011_An Overview of The

                 Administration's Federal Research and

                Development Budget for Fiscal Year 2012

                       (Hearing Volume No. 112-2)

    On Thursday, February 17, 2011, the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology held an oversight hearing to examine the 
Administration's research and development budget proposal for 
fiscal year 2012. The Committee received testimony from Dr. 
John P. Holdren, Assistant to the President for Science and 
Technology and Director of the Office of Science, and 
Technology Policy.

            March 2, 2011_The National Aeronautics and Space

             Administration Fiscal Year 2012 Budget Request

                       (Hearing Volume No. 112-3)

    On March 2, 2011 the Committee held an oversight hearing on 
the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) 
fiscal year 2012 budget request. The hearing examined the 
Administration's proposed NASA budget and its prioritization of 
the Agency's investments in human space flight relative to the 
priorities outlined by Congress in the NASA Authorization Act 
of 2010 (P.L. 111-267). Over the next two years (FY2012-FY2013) 
the Administration's budget request underfunds development of 
the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle and Space Launch System/Heavy 
Lift Launch Vehicle by more than $2.4 billion, a 31 percent 
decline relative to the authorization levels in P.L. 111-267. 
Over the same two year period, the Administration's request 
seeks to increase spending by more than $700 million above 
authorized levels, a 70 percent increase, to pay for the 
creation of multiple Commercial Crew service providers to low 
Earth Orbit.
    The Committee received testimony from the NASA 
Administrator, Charles F. Bolden, Jr.

             March 3, 2011_The Department of Energy Fiscal

      Year 2012 Research And Development Budget Request (Hearing 
                           Volume No. 112-4)

    On March 3, 2011, the Committee held an oversight hearing 
on the Department of Energy's fiscal year 2012 research and 
development budget request. The hearing focused on the 
Department's proposed budget request for fiscal year 2012 
including policies and how budgetary priorities impact DOE R&D 
programs for fiscal year 2012. The Committee questioned the 
Secretary of Energy on a wide variety of topics, such as the 
implementation of a federal Clean Energy Standard, ongoing 
activities at the Nation's laboratories, and emerging energy 
technologies. The Committee received testimony from Secretary 
of Energy, Dr. Steven Chu.

           March 10, 2011_An Overview of The Fiscal Year 2012

              Research and Development Budget Proposals at

                  The National Oceanic And Atmospheric

    Administration and The Environmental Protection Agency (Hearing 
                           Volume No. 112-5)

    On March 10, 2011 the Committee held an oversight hearing 
on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 
and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) fiscal year 2012 
research and development budget requests. The hearing focused 
on NOAA and EPA's proposed budget requests for fiscal year 
2012. For NOAA the Committee focused on the proposed 
reorganization of NOAA and the satellite programs. The 
Committee honed in on the creation of a National Climate 
Service at NOAA included in the 2012 budget request, the 
Deepwater Horizon oil spill and the state of the Joint Polar 
Satellite System Program (JPSS). For EPA the Committee focused 
on the Office of Research and Development's fiscal year 2012 
budget priorities. The Committee questioned EPA Assistant 
Administrator for the Office of Research and Development (ORD) 
on the science used in development of the carbon dioxide 
endangerment finding, EPA's quality assurance and control 
processes for the use of science to inform policy, and nutrient 
loading in the Chesapeake Bay.
    The Committee received testimony from NOAA Administrator 
and Undersecretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere, Dr. 
Jane Lubchenco and EPA Assistant Administrator for the Office 
of Research and Development, Dr. Paul Anastas.

           March 11, 2011_An Overview of the Fiscal Year 2012

                Budget Proposals at the National Science

        Foundation and the National Institute of Standards and 
                 Technology (Hearing Volume No. 112-6)

    On Friday, March 11, 2011, the Committee held an oversight 
hearing to examine the Administration's proposed fiscal year 
2012 budget request for the National Science Foundation (NSF) 
and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). 
One witness panel provided testimony on NSF's budget, including 
testimony from the Chairman of the National Science Board, and 
one witness panel provided testimony on NIST's budget.
    The Committee received testimony from Dr. Subra Suresh the 
Director of the NSF and Dr. Ray Bowen, Chairman of the National 
Science Board. Dr. Patrick Gallagher testified on behalf of 
NIST as the Institute's Director and the Undersecretary of 
Commerce for Standards and Technology.

              March 31, 2011_Climate Change: Examining the

               Process Used to Create Science And Policy

                       (Hearing Volume No. 112-9)

    On Thursday, March 31, 2011 the Committee held a hearing to 
examine processes used to generate key climate change science 
and information used to inform policy development and decision 
making. The hearing focused on the integrity of the processes 
employed by scientists in generating climate-related scientific 
and technical information for use in public policy.
    The Committee received testimony from Dr. J. Scott 
Armstrong of the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Richard Muller 
of the University of California, Dr. John Christy of the 
University of Alabama, Mr. Peter Glaser of Troutman Sanders, 
LLP, Dr. Kerry Emanuel of the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, and independent economist, Dr. David Montgomery.

              May 11, 2011_Review of Hydraulic Fracturing

          Technology and Practices (Hearing Volume No. 112-17)

    On Wednesday, May 11, 2011 the Committee held a hearing to 
review the technology and practices of hydraulic fracturing for 
energy production. The hearing focused on the role of domestic 
shale gas in meeting growing energy demand and associated 
concerns related to managing potential risks to drinking water 
resources.
    The Committee received testimony from Elizabeth Ames Jones 
of the Texas Railroad Commission, Dr. Robert M. Summers of the 
Maryland Department of Environment, Mr. Harold Fitch of the 
Michigan Department of Environmental Quality and the Ground 
Water Protection Council, Dr. Cal Cooper of the Apache 
Corporation, and Dr. Michael Economides of the University of 
Houston. Paul Anastas, the Assistant Administrator for Research 
and Development at the Environmental Protection Agency also 
testified.

                June 16, 2011_STEM Education in Action:

                  Learning Today ... Leading Tomorrow

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-26)

    On Thursday, June 16, 2011, the Committee held a hearing to 
highlight Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) 
education activities across the Nation, their role in inspiring 
and educating future generations, and their contribution to our 
future's economic prosperity.
    The first hearing, STEM Education in Action: Learning Today 
... Leading Tomorrow, showcased the finalists, parents, 
teachers, and mentors of the ExploraVision Awards National 
Competition, sponsored by Toshiba and the National Science 
Teachers Association.
    The Committee received testimony from: Dr. Karen Lorenzo, 
parent to Pablo Lorenzo; Ms. Brenda Conwell-Dudley, parent and 
teacher mentor to Jack Dudley; Ms. Amy Attard, teacher and team 
mentor to Claudia Cooper; and Ms. Anne Manwell, teacher and 
mentor to Alison Reed.

          June 22, 2011_First Semiannual Report of Activities

     of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology (Business 
                     Meeting, House Report 112-112)

    On Wednesday, June 22, 2011 the Committee held a business 
meeting to approve the adoption of the first semiannual report 
of activities of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology. The Committee adopted the first semiannual report 
by voice vote and favorably reported it to the House for filing 
by the Chairman. The report filed on June 22, 2011 became House 
Report 112-112.

        June 22, 2011_Examining NOAA's Climate Service Proposal 
                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-27)

    On Wednesday, June 22, 2011 the Committee held a hearing to 
review the Administration's fiscal year 2012 budget request 
proposal to reorganize NOAA to create a climate service. The 
Administration's objective for this new line office is to bring 
together NOAA's existing climate capabilities under a single 
entity to more efficiently and effectively respond to demands 
for climate services.
    The Committee received testimony from Dr. Jane Lubchenco, 
Administrator, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 
and Dr. Robert Winokur, Deputy Oceanographer, Department of the 
Navy.

     July 12, 2011_A Review of NASA's Space Launch System (Hearing 
                           Volume No. 112-29)

    On Tuesday, July 12, 2011 the Committee held an oversight 
hearing to examine NASA's Space Launch System--the follow-on to 
the Space Shuttle--that was congressionally directed by the 
NASA Authorization Act of 2010 [P.L. 111-267]. NASA's Space 
Launch System decisions, due to Congress by January 9, 2011, 
have been repeatedly delayed but were expected by July 8, 2011. 
The hearing, originally intended to provide Members the 
opportunity to ask the Administration about the cost, schedule, 
capabilities, and justification for the final design, became, 
due to the Administration's continued delays, a forum for NASA 
to explain why it failed to reach a decision, what analyses 
still needed to be completed to reach a decision, and when the 
Administration would be forthcoming with the required 
decisions.
    The Committee received testimony from NASA Administrator, 
Charles F. Bolden, Jr.

           September 8, 2011_Impacts of LightSquared Network

                     on Federal Science Activities

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-33)

    On Thursday, September 8, 2011 the Committee held an 
oversight hearing to examine the concerns and issues associated 
with interference with the Global Positioning System (GPS) 
signal from the proposed LightSquared LLC terrestrial broadband 
network. The hearing was held in light of recent studies that 
indicated that the LightSquared network interference with GPS 
signals, and could potentially disrupt an array of Federal 
programs and scientific activities.
    Witnesses discussed LightSquared's business proposal, FCC's 
authorization of spectrum use, potential disruptions to 
industry and government, and costs of mitigating frequency 
interference.
    The Committee received testimony from: Mr. Anthony Russo, 
Director, National Coordination Office for Positioning, 
Navigation and Timing; Ms. Mary Glackin, Deputy Under 
Secretary, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Mr. 
Victor Sparrow, Director, spectrum Policy, Space Communications 
and Navigation, Space Operations Mission Directorate, National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration; The Honorable Peter 
Appel, Administrator, Research and Innovation Technology 
Administration, Department of Transportation; Dr. David 
Applegate, Associate Director, Natural Hazards, U.S. Geological 
Survey; Mr. Jeffrey Carlisle, Executive Vice President, 
Regulatory Affairs and Public Policy, LightSquared; Dr. Scott 
Pace, Director, Space Policy Institute, George Washington 
University.

            September 13, 2011_STEM in Action: Inspiring the

             Science and Engineering Workforce of Tomorrow

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-34)

    On Tuesday September 13, 2011, the Committee held a hearing 
to highlight Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) 
education activities across the Nation, their role in inspiring 
and educating future generations, and their contribution to our 
future's economic prosperity.
    The second hearing, STEM Education in Action: Inspiring the 
Science and Engineering Workforce of Tomorrow, showcased a 
variety of public/private partnerships and initiatives that are 
successfully inspiring the future STEM workforce.
    The Committee received testimony from: Mr. Tony Norman, VEX 
Robotics, Inc., Innovation First International, Inc.; Mrs. 
Nancy Conrad, Chairman, the Conrad Foundation; Mr. Michael 
Gallager, Entertainment Software Association.

                  September 15, 2011_Out of Thin Air:

                  EPA's Cross-State Air Pollution Rule

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-35)

    On Thursday, September 15, 2011 the Committee held a 
hearing to review the scientific, procedural, and technical 
basis of the Environmental Protection Agency's Cross-State Air 
Pollution Rule, including a discussion of the economic, 
employment, and electric reliability impacts. The Committee 
received testimony from Dr. Bryan Shaw, Chairman, Texas 
Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ); Mr. Gregory Stella, 
Senior Scientist, Alpine Geophysics, LLC; Mr. Barry Smitherman, 
Commissioner, Texas Railroad Commission; Mr. Wayne E. Penrod, 
Executive Manager, Environmental Policy, Sunflower Electric 
Corporation; Mr. Chip Merriam, Chief Legislative & Regulatory 
Compliance Officer, Orlando Utilities Commission; and The 
Honorable Gina McCarthy, Assistant Administrator, Office of Air 
and Radiation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

            September 22, 2011_NASA Human Spaceflight Past,

             Present, and Future: Where Do We Go From Here?

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-38)

    On Thursday, September 22, 2011 the Committee held a 
hearing to examine the strategic goals and priorities of 
America's human space exploration program, the importance of 
space access and demonstrated leadership among space-faring 
nations, the inspirational role of human and robotic space 
exploration, and the role of the Space Launch System and 
Multipurpose Crew Vehicle and a healthy industrial base in 
achieving those goals.
    The hearing drew upon our Nation's long history of space 
exploration to help frame the challenges confronting our 
present human spaceflight position and explore a path forward.
    The Committee received testimony from Mr. Neil Armstrong, 
Commander, Apollo 11; Captain Eugene A. Cernan USN (ret.), 
Commander Apollo 17; Dr. Maria Zuber, E.A. Griswold Professor 
of Geophysics and Head of the Department of Earth, Atmospheric 
and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; 
and Dr. Michael Griffin, Eminent Scholar and Professor, 
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Alabama, 
Huntsville.

              September 26, 2011_STEM Education in Action:

              Communities Preparing for Jobs of the Future

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-40)

    On Monday, September 26, 2011 the Committee held a field 
hearing in Texarkana, Texas the third in a series of hearings 
to highlight Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) 
education activities across the Nation, their role in inspiring 
and educating future generations, and their contribution to our 
future economic prosperity. The purpose of the hearing was to 
highlight the role of community colleges, specifically the 
importance of their partnerships and contributions to the local 
economy, workforce, and other aspects of the community.
    The Committee received testimony from: Dr. Cora Marrett, 
Deputy Director, National Science Foundation, Mr. James Henry 
Russell, President, Texarkana College, Dr. Brad Johnson, 
President, Northeast Texas Community College, Dr. C.B. 
Rathburn, President, Texas A&M University - Texarkana, Ms. Pam 
Kennedy, Vice President of Human Resources, CHRISTUS St. 
Michael Health System, Mr. Myron Barnett, Human Resource 
Manager, International Paper, and Mr. Denis Washington, 
Chairman, TexAmericas.

                October 26, 2011_NASA's Commercial Crew

     Development Program: Accomplishments and Challenges (Hearing 
                           Volume No. 112-46)

    On Wednesday, October 26, 2011, the Committee held an 
oversight hearing to examine NASA's Commercial Crew Program 
(CCP) office, focusing on accomplishments achieved by the 
agency and industry following two rounds of grant awards 
totaling $320 million (aggregate of FY10 & FY11), and the 
biggest programmatic and technical challenges remaining. 
Speaking about challenges ahead, industry witnesses and NASA 
officials highlighted the uncertainty of Congress' willingness 
to provide full funding for CCP over the next five years. Many 
Committee Members asked questions of the witnesses about the 
size of the commercial markets (i.e., spaceflight participants 
exclusive of NASA-sponsored astronauts, such as space tourists 
and/or astronauts from countries having no indigenous space 
industry).
    The Committee received testimony from Mr. John Elbon, Vice 
President and General Manager for Space Exploration, the Boeing 
Company; Mr. Steve Lindsey, Director of Space Exploration for 
the Sierra Nevada Corporation; Mr. Elon Musk, CEO and Chief 
Technology Officer, Space Exploration Technologies Corp. 
(SpaceX); Mr. Charlie Precourt, Vice President, ATK Launch 
Systems Group; Dr. George Sowers, Vice President, United Launch 
Alliance; the Honorable Paul Martin, Inspector General of NASA; 
and Mr. Bill Gerstenmaier, Associate Administrator, Human 
Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate, NASA.

              December 6, 2011_The Next Great Observatory:

                Assessing the James Webb Space Telescope

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-55)

    On Tuesday, December 6, 2011, the Committee held an 
oversight hearing to examine NASA's management and re-plan of 
the James Webb Space Telescope.
    In 2001, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) was ranked 
as the highest priority large space mission in astronomy by the 
National Academies of Science in their decadal survey Astronomy 
and Astrophysics in the New Millennium. Originally estimated by 
the decadal committee to cost $1 billion and to be launched in 
2007, JWST was dubbed as the next Great Observatory that will 
be three times more powerful than the Hubble Space Telescope in 
the infrared and eight times more powerful than the Spitzer 
Space Telescope. However, after high-level scrutiny arising 
from years of program cost and schedule overruns, NASA recently 
developed a revised plan for JWST that -- if fully funded -- 
would enable completion and launch by October, 2018. The 
revised budget life cycle costs now total just over $8.8 
billion.
    The Committee received testimony from Mr. Rick Howard, NASA 
Program Manager of the James Webb Space Telescope; Dr. Roger 
Blandford, Professor of Physics, Stanford University and Former 
Chair, Committee for the Decadal Survey of Astronomy and 
Astrophysics, National Research Council; Dr. Garth Illingworth, 
Professor & Astronomer, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of 
California, Santa Cruz; and Mr. Jeffrey D. Grant, Sector Vice 
President & General Manager, Space Systems Division, Northrop 
Grumman Aerospace Systems.

                              2nd Session

              February 8, 2012_Assessing America's Nuclear

            Future_A Review of the Blue Ribbon Commission's

                   Report to the Secretary of Energy

                        (Hearing Volume 112-60)

    On Wednesday, February 8, 2012, the Committee held a 
hearing to examine the recommendations contained in the Blue 
Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC) Report to 
the Secretary of Energy, as well as broader science and 
technology issues associated with spent nuclear fuel 
management.
    The Committee received testimony from Lieutenant General 
Brent Scowcroft (Ret.), Co-Chairman, Blue Ribbon Commission on 
America's Nuclear Future; The Honorable Richard Meserve, 
Commissioner, Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear 
Future; and The Honorable Pete Lyons, Assistant Secretary of 
Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy.

                  February 17, 2012_An Overview of the

                 Administration's Federal Research and

                Development Budget for Fiscal Year 2013

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-61)

    On Friday, February 17, 2012, the Committee held a hearing 
to examine President Obama's proposed fiscal year 2013 (FY13) 
budget request for research, development, demonstration, and 
commercial application programs.
    Dr. John P. Holdren, Assistant to the President for Science 
and Technology and Director of the Office of Science and 
Technology Policy (OSTP), reviewed the proposed budget in the 
context of the President's overall priorities in science, 
space, and technology and described the mechanisms the 
Administration uses to determine priorities across scientific 
disciplines and the mechanisms used to coordinate scientific 
research and technical development activities across federal 
agencies.
    The Committee received testimony from Dr. John P. Holdren, 
Assistant to the President for Science and Technology and 
Director, Office of Science and Technology Policy.

             March 1, 2012_An Overview of the Department of

               Energy Research and Development Budget for

              Fiscal Year 2013 (Hearing Volume No. 112-65)

    On Thursday, March 1, 2012, the Committee held a hearing to 
examine energy policy and budget priorities related to the 
President's Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 budget request, including 
activities within the DOE offices of Science, Energy Efficiency 
and Renewable Energy, Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy, 
Fossil Energy, Nuclear Energy, Electricity Delivery and Energy 
Reliability, and the Loan Guarantee Program Office.
    The Committee received testimony from Dr. Steven Chu, U.S. 
Secretary of Energy.

               March 7, 2012_An Overview of the National

                  Aeronautics and Space Administration

                      Budget for Fiscal Year 2013

                        (Hearing Volume 112-68)

    On Wednesday, March 7, 2012, the Committee held an 
oversight hearing to examine the Administration's FY 2013 
budget request for the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration. In addition to budgets, Members questioned the 
witness on the status of current programs, proposed 
programmatic changes, and the agency's priorities and 
challenges. Of particular concern to many Members was the 
progress being made on developing a successor to the Shuttle, 
and the reasoning behind NASA's proposal to impose significant 
reductions to its planetary sciences program.
    The Committee received testimony from the Honorable Charles 
F. Bolden, Jr., NASA Administrator.

               March 28, 2012_Securing the Promise of the

              International Space Station: Challenges and

               Opportunities (Hearing Volume No. 112-72)

    On Wednesday, March 28, 2012, the Committee held an 
oversight hearing to examine the current state of ISS 
utilization, research, access and maintenance of the 
International Space Station. NASA's focus is shifting from 
assembly and activation, to utilization and maintenance. The 
decision to extend the life of the ISS through at least 2020 
provides an unprecedented opportunity to perform promising 
scientific research. The hearing reviewed NASA's plans for 
conducting ISS research, and ensuring that essential spares, 
facilities, transportation and other resources are adequate to 
meet the research needs on the ISS through 2020, and on the 
formation of an organization for the management of the ISS 
National Laboratory.
    The Committee received testimony from Mr. William H. 
Gerstenmaier, Associate Administrator, Human Exploration and 
Operations Mission Directorate, National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration; Cristina Chaplain, Director, Acquisition and 
Sourcing Management, U.S. Government Accountability Office; and 
Lieutenant General Thomas P. Stafford, USAF (Ret.), Chairman, 
International Space Station Advisory Committee.

            April 17, 2012_Tapping America's Unconventional

             Oil Resources for Job Creation and Affordable

            Domestic Energy: Technology and Policy Pathways

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-75)

    On Tuesday, April 17, 2012, the Committee held a hearing to 
examine unconventional oil resources and identify technology 
and policy pathways to develop domestic energy resources.
    The Committee received testimony from Mr. Andrew Slaughter, 
Chair--Resource & Supply Task Group, National Petroleum Council 
Report ``Prudent Development''; Ms. Karen Harbert, President 
and Chief Executive Officer, Institute for 21st Century Energy, 
U.S. Chamber of Commerce; Dr. Michelle Michot Foss, Chief 
Energy Economist, Center for Energy Economics, Bureau of 
Economic Geology, University of Texas-Austin; Mr. James Brown, 
President and Chief Operating Officer, Whiting Petroleum 
Corporation; and Mr. Daniel Weiss, Senior Fellow and Director 
of Climate Strategy, Center for American Progress Action Fund.

                June 20, 2012_The Office of Science and

              Technology Policy: Examining Priorities and

    Effectiveness of the Nation's Science Policies (Hearing Volume 
                              No. 112-91)

    On Wednesday, June 20, 2012, the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology held a hearing to exercise the 
Committee's oversight authority of the Office of Science and 
Technology Policy (OSTP) by examining its roles, 
responsibilities, operations and management and its function in 
shaping our national science policy.
    The Committee received testimony from Dr. John P. Holdren, 
Assistant to the President for Science and Technology and 
Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy.

                 July 19, 2012_Keeping America Secure:

               The Science Supporting the Development of

                     Threat Detection Technologies

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-97)

    On Thursday, July 19, 2012, the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology held a hearing examining the federally-
funded research and development (R&D) of threat detection 
technologies. The hearing examined how R&D informs a layered, 
risk based system-approach to detecting threats, including 
advanced intelligence, screening technologies, and securing the 
environment.
    The Committee heard testimony from Dr. Richard Cavanagh, 
Director, Office of Special Programs, National Institute of 
Standards and Technology; Dr. Huban Gowadia, Acting Director, 
Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, Department of Homeland 
Security; Dr. Anthony Peurrung, Associate Laboratory Director, 
National Security Directorate, Pacific Northwest National 
Laboratory; and Dr. Thomas Peterson, Assistant Director, 
Directorate for Engineering, National Science Foundation.

             July 25, 2012_Drought Forecasting, Monitoring,

                  and Decision-Making: A Review of the

    National Integrated Drought Information System (Hearing Volume 
                              No. 112-98)

    On Wednesday, July 25, 2012, the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology held a legislative hearing to examine the 
state of drought forecasting, monitoring, and decision-making 
and the role the National Integrated Drought Information System 
(NIDIS) serves in drought planning. Additionally, the Committee 
received comments on draft legislation entitled, ``The National 
Integrated Drought Information System Reauthorization Act of 
2012.''
    The Committee received testimony from Dr. Roger S. 
Pulwarty, Director, National Integrated Drought Information 
System, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); 
The Honorable Gregory A. Ballard, Mayor, City of Indianapolis; 
Mr. J.D. Strong, Executive Director, Oklahoma Water Resources 
Board; Dr. James S. Famiglietti, Professor and Director, Earth 
System Science, University of California, Irvine; and Ms. 
Patricia Langenfelder, President, Maryland Farm Bureau.

      September 14, 2012_Recent Developments in NASA's Commercial 
                       Crew Acquisition Strategy

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-104)

    On Friday, September 14, 2012, the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology held an oversight hearing to examine NASA 
commercial crew program. On August 3, 2012, NASA granted a 
total of $1.113 billion to three companies using Space Act 
Agreements (not Federal Acquisition Regulations) in the third 
phase of the commercial crew program to stimulate the 
development of multiple competing concepts for human 
spaceflight vehicles and systems. This award brought the total 
level of federal spending on the program to nearly $1.5 
billion. The hearing reviewed NASA's rationale for selecting 
the three companies; considered the cost and safety 
implications of the decisions; and, given the unique nature of 
Space Act Agreements, examined the level of NASA's insight and 
thus, its ability to evaluate technical and safety 
requirements.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. William H. 
Gerstenmaier, NASA's Associate Administrator of the Human 
Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate; and from VADM 
Joseph W. Dyer, USN (Ret.), Chairman, Aerospace Safety Advisory 
Panel.

             November 15, 2012_The U.S. Antarctic Program:

               Achieving Fiscal and Logistical Efficiency

                     While Supporting Sound Science

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-106)

    On Thursday, November 15, 2012, the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology held a hearing to review the future 
options and logistical recommendations of the U. S. Antarctic 
Program Blue Ribbon Panel Report, More and Better Science in 
Antarctica through Increased Logistical Effectiveness, and to 
examine the work and goals of the U.S. Antarctic Program.
    The Committee received testimony from: Mr. Norman R. 
Augustine, Chair of the U.S. Antarctic Program Blue Ribbon 
Panel; Dr. Subra Suresh, Director of the National Science 
Foundation; General Duncan J. McNabb (USAF-Retired), Member of 
the U.S. Antarctic Program Blue Ribbon Panel; and Dr. Warren 
Zapol, MD, Chair of the National Research Council's Committee 
on Future Science Opportunities in Antarctica and the Southern 
Ocean.

                 December 12, 2012_The Future of NASA:

                    Perspectives on Strategic Vision

                      for America's Space Program

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-110)

    On Wednesday, December 12, 2012, the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology held an oversight hearing with a panel of 
distinguished experts to hear their perspectives on NASA's 
strategic vision and the future of America's space program. The 
Committee reviewed the National Research Council report on 
NASA's Strategic Direction and the Need for a National 
Consensus. Overall NASA funding has been flat over the last 15 
years, and projected budget increases have varied greatly from 
year to year. As a result, planning for large, multi-year 
procurements has been difficult and inefficient. In certain 
programs, such as human spaceflight, there has been a recurring 
cycle in which the projected budget increases necessary to 
develop complex systems have not materialized. The subsequent 
flat budgets have contributed to increased costs and schedule 
delays of new systems. NASA is now facing budget declines 
coupled with increasingly expensive missions, large aging 
infrastructure, and lack of a strong compelling national 
strategy for human spaceflight.
    The Committee received testimony from The Honorable Robert 
Walker, Executive Chairman, Wexler & Walker; Maj. Gen. Ronald 
Sega, USAF (Ret), Vice Chair, National Research Council 
Committee on NASA's Strategic Direction; The Honorable Marion 
C. Blakey, President & CEO, Aerospace Industries Association; 
Dr. Thomas Zurbuchen Ph.D, Associate Professor for Space 
Science and Aerospace Engineering, Associate Dean for 
Entrepreneurial Programs, University of Michigan and; Dr. Scott 
Pace, Ph.D, Director, Space Policy Institute, The George 
Washington University.

           SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT ACTIVITIES

  Oversight, Investigation, and Other Activities, Including Selective 
                         Legislative Activities

                              1st Session

                 April 6, 2011_Offshore Drilling Safety

                       and Response Technologies

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-12)

    On April 6, 2011 the Energy and Environment Subcommittee 
held a hearing on offshore drilling safety and response 
technologies. The hearing focused on the Federal and industry 
efforts to identify and address safety and response technology 
challenges since the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 and 
how Federal programs in these areas can best be structured and 
prioritized.
    The Committee received testimony from Department of Energy, 
Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Dr. Victor Der; 
Mr. David Miller, Director of Standards for the American 
Petroleum Institute; Mr. Owen Kratz, President and Chief 
Executive Officer of Helix Energy Solutions Group; and Research 
Director and Senior Fellow, Dr. Molly Macauley of Resources for 
the Future.

              May 13, 2011_Nuclear Energy Risk Management

                      (Joint Subcommittee Hearing)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-18)

     On Friday, May 13, 2011 the Subcommittee on Energy and 
Environment and the Investigations and Oversight Subcommittee 
held a joint hearing to examine nuclear safety, risk 
assessment, public health protection, and associated scientific 
and technical policy issues in the United States. The 
subcommittees examined those issues in light of the earthquake 
and tsunami in Japan that resulted in the disaster at the 
Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
    The Subcommittees received testimony from Mr. Brian Sheron 
of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Mr. Lake Barrett of 
LBarrett Consulting LLC; Dr. John Boice of Vanderbilt 
University and the International Epidemiology Institute; and 
Mr. Dave Lochbaum of the Union of Concerned Scientists.

                   June 1, 2011_Harmful Algal Blooms:

                 Action Plans for Scientific Solutions

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-21)

    On Wednesday, June 1, 2011, the Subcommittee on Energy and 
Environment held a legislative hearing to examine harmful algal 
blooms (HABs) and hypoxia research and response needs to 
develop and implement action plans to monitor, prevent, 
mitigate, and control both marine and fresh water bloom and 
hypoxia events. The Subcommittee also asked witnesses to 
comment on draft legislation entitled ``the Harmful Algal 
Blooms and Hypoxia Research and Control Amendments Act of 
2011.''
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. Robert 
Magnien, Director of the Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean 
Research, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 
(NOAA); Dr. Richard Greene, Chief, Ecosystems Dynamics and 
Effects Branch, Gulf Ecology Division, Office of Research and 
Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); Dr. 
Donald Anderson, Senior Scientist and Director of the Coastal 
Ocean Institute, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Dr. 
Kevin Sellner, Executive Director, Chesapeake Research 
Consortium; Dr. Stephanie Smith, Chief Scientist, Algaeventure 
Systems; and Dr. Beth McGee, Senior Water Quality Scientist, 
Chesapeake Bay Foundation.

                    June 15, 2011_An Examination of

                    DOE's Clean Technology Programs

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-25)

    On Wednesday, June 15, 2011 the Subcommittee held a hearing 
to receive testimony on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Fiscal 
Year (FY) 2012 budget request for clean energy technologies and 
the relative prioritization therein. DOE manage a wide 
portfolio of activities related to the development of clean 
energy technologies. DOE's programs span the lifecycle of 
energy technology development, ranging from long-term basic 
research supported by the Basic Energy Sciences program at the 
Office of Science, through later-stage applied research, 
development, demonstration, and commercialization activities 
supported primarily by EERE, ARPA-E, and LPO.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. Arun Majumdar, 
Director, Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), 
U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); Dr. Henry Kelly, Acting 
Assistant Secretary, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable 
Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); and Mr. David Frantz, 
Director, Loan Guarantee Program Office, U.S. Department of 
Energy (DOE).

              July 7, 2011_Hitting the Ethanol Blend Wall:

                      Examining the Science on E15

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-28)

    On Thursday July 7, 2011 the Subcommittee held a hearing on 
the science and consequences of the use of E15. The hearing 
focused on examining the scientific and technical issues 
related to EPA's recent waiver decisions permitting mid-level 
ethanol blends of up to 15 percent ethanol in gasoline and 
receiving feedback on draft legislative language providing for 
a comprehensive assessment of the scientific and technical 
research on the implications of the use of mid-level ethanol 
blends.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Ms. Margo Oge, 
Director of the Office of Transportation and Air Quality, U.S. 
EPA, Mr Bob Greco, group director for Downstream and Industry 
Operations, American Petroleum Institute, Ms. Heather White, 
Chief of Staff and General Counsel for the Environmental 
Working Group, Mr. Jeff Wasil, Emissions Certification Engineer 
for Evinrude Outboard Motors, Mr. Mike Brown, President of the 
National Chicken Council, Mr. W. Steven Burke, President and 
CEO of Biofuels Center of North Carolina, and Dr. Ron Sahu, 
Technical Consultant for Outdoor Power Equipment Institute.

             July 14, 2011_Subcommittee Markup, H.R. 2484,

             The Harmful Algal Blooms and Hypoxia Research

                   and Control Amendments Act of 2011

    On Thursday, July 14, 2011 the Subcommittee met to consider 
H.R. 2484, the Harmful Algal Blooms and Hypoxia Research and 
Control Amendments Act of 2011. The Subcommittee favorably 
forwarded H.R. 2484 to the Full Committee as amended by voice 
vote.

                September 23, 2011_From NPOESS to JPSS:

                 An Update on the Nation's Restructured

                    Polar Weather Satellite Program.

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-39)

    On Friday, September 23, 2011 the Subcommittees on 
Investigations & Oversight and Energy & Environment met to 
examine the impact of the Administration's decision to 
restructure the National Polar-orbiting Operation Environmental 
Satellite System (NPOESS) and progress at NOAA and NASA in 
developing the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) program as 
the replacement system for polar-orbiting civilian weather 
satellites and climate services.
    Witnesses discussed the cost, schedule, and performance 
capabilities associated with the new polar-orbiting weather 
satellite program.
    The Committee received testimony from: The Honorable 
Kathryn Sullivan, Ph.D., Assisstant Secretary of Commerce for 
Environmental Observation and Prediction and Deputy 
Administrator, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; 
Mr. Christopher Scolese, Associate Administrator, National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration; Mr. David Powner, 
Director, Information Technology Management Issues, Government 
Accountability Office.

            October 4, 2011_Quality Science for Quality Air

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-41)

    On Tuesday, October 4, 2011 the Subcommittee held a hearing 
to examine the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) process 
for setting standards under the Clean Air Act including: the 
role of scientific advice from the Clean Air Scientific 
Advisory Committee (CASAC) and similar bodies; the economic 
underpinnings of EPA's Regulatory Impact Analyses (RIAs); and 
the assumptions, models, and data used in projecting 
compliance, technological standards necessary to achieve 
compliance and environmental benefits associated with proposed 
and finalized rules. With this examination the Subcommittee 
intended to gather preliminary information in preparation for 
reauthorizing the Environmental Research, Development, and 
Demonstration Act.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. Roger O. 
McClellan, Advisor, Toxicology and Human Health Risk Analysis; 
Dr. George Thurston, Professor, New York University School of 
Medicine; Dr. Michael Honeycutt, Chief Toxicologist, Texas 
Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ); Dr. Robert F. 
Phalen, Professor of Medicine and Co-Director, Air Pollution 
Effect Laboratory, University of California, Irvine; Dr. Anne 
E. Smith, Senior Vice President, NERA Economic Consulting; and 
Mr. J. Edward Cichanowicz, Consultant.

              October 13, 2011_Advancing Coal Research and

                 Development for a Secure Energy Future

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-45)

    On Thursday, October 13, 2011, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing on to examine current Department of Energy (DOE) coal 
research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) activities and 
identify future coal RD&D opportunities and priorities.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Scott Klara, 
Deputy Director, National Energy Technology Laboratory; Ms. 
Janet Gellici, Chief Executive Officer, American Coal Council; 
Mr. Nick Atkins, President, American Electric Power; Mr. David 
Foerter, Executive Director, Institute of Clean Air Companies; 
and Mr. Stu Dalton, Senior Government Representative, Electric 
Power Research Institute (EPRI).

               October 27, 2011_Review of the Blue Ribbon

                 Commission on America's Nuclear Future

                         Draft Recommendations

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-47)

    On Thursday, October 27, 2011, the Energy & Environment and 
Investigations & Oversight Subcommittees held a hearing to 
examine the recommendations contained in the Blue Ribbon 
Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC) Draft Report to 
the Secretary of Energy.
    Additionally, the Subcommittees considered science and 
technology issues associated with spent nuclear fuel 
management.
    The Subcommittees received testimony from Mr. Jack Spencer, 
Research Fellow, Nuclear Energy Policy, Heritage Foundation; 
Dr. Peter Swift, Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff, 
Sandia National Laboratory; Dr. Roger Kasperson, Professor and 
Distinguished Scientist, Clark University; Mr. Gary Hollis, 
Chairman, Nye County Board of County Commissioners; Mr. Rick 
McLeod, Executive Director, Savannah River Site Community Reuse 
Organization; and Dr. Mark Peters, Deputy Laboratory Director 
for Programs, Argonne National Laboratory.

               November 2, 2011_Conflicts and Unintended

                  Consequences of Motor Fuel Standards

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-49)

    On Wednesday, November 2, 2011, the Subcommittee on Energy 
and Environment held a hearing to examine motor fuel standards 
currently in place at the federal level and under consideration 
at the federal or state level; assess the scientific foundation 
for such standards; explore the inherent conflicts and 
unintended consequences of such standards; and question whether 
or not conflicts exist within the standards and the 
consequences of such effect the fungibility of, safe use of and 
affordability of the United States motor fuel supply.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Brendan 
Williams, Senior Director of Advocacy, National Petrochemical & 
Refiners Association; Dr. Ingrid Burke, Director, Haub School 
and Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources, 
University of Wyoming, and Co-Chair, National Research Council 
Committee on Economic and Environmental Impacts of Increasing 
Biofuels Production; Ms. Margo T. Oge, Director, Office of 
Transportation and Air Quality, U.S. Environmental Protection 
Agency; Dr. Jay Kesan, Professor and H. Ross & Helen Workman 
Research Scholar and Program leader of the Biofuel Law & 
Regulation Program, Energy Biosciences Institute, University of 
Illinois College of Law; Mr. Bob Greco, Group Director, 
Downstream and Industry Operations, American Petroleum 
Institute; Mr. David Hilbert, Thermodynamic Development 
Engineer, Mercury Marine; and Mr. Jack Huttner, Executive Vice 
President of Commercial and Public Affairs, Gevo, Inc.

              November 17, 2011_Fostering Quality Science

                at EPA: The Need for Common Sense Reform

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-52)

    On Thursday, November 17, 2011, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing to review research and development activities at the 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and how such activities 
support EPA program needs; explore the transition of science 
from the Office of Research and Development (ORD) to other 
program offices for use in developing and implementing 
regulations; examine the Science Advisory Board (SAB) process 
and how it contributes to the quality of science developed at 
ORD; and in preparation for the reauthorization of the 
Environmental Research, Development, and Demonstration Act 
(ERDDA) discuss any needed changes to the ERDDA which 
authorizes science activities at EPA.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. Paul Anastas, 
Assistant Administrator, Office of Research and Development, 
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Mr. Arthur Elkins, Jr., 
Inspector General, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; and 
Mr. David Trimble, Director, Natural Resources and Environment, 
U.S. Government Accountability Office.

              November 30, 2011_Fostering Quality Science

              at EPA: Perspectives on Common Sense Reform

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-54)

    On Wednesday, November 30, 2011, the Subcommittee on Energy 
and Environment held the first day of a hearing to provide 
external perspectives on the need to reauthorize and reform 
science, research and development activities at the 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); explore the intersection 
of Agency-supported science and its regulatory mission; and 
receive focused recommendations to raise the level, quality, 
usefulness, and objectivity of EPA science, including any 
necessary changes to the Environmental Research, Development 
and Demonstration Authorization Act (ERDDA).
    The subcommittee received testimony from Ms. Susan Dudley, 
Director, Regulatory Studies Center, and Research Professor of 
Public Policy & Public Administration, The George Washington 
University; Dr. Alan Moghissi, President, Institute for 
Regulatory Science; Dr. Kenneth Green, Resident Scholar, 
American Enterprise Institute; and Dr. Gary Marchant, Professor 
of Law and Executive Director, Center for Law, Science & 
Innovation, Arizona State University.

               December 7, 2011_Energy Critical Elements:

          Identifying Research Needs and Strategic Priorities

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-56)

    On Wednesday, December 7, 2011, the Subcommittee on Energy 
and Environment held a legislative hearing to examine research 
needs and priorities relating to Energy Critical Elements 
(ECE). The Subcommittee asked witnesses to comment on H.R. 
2090, ``The Energy Critical Elements Advancement Act of 2011'' 
introduced on June 2, 2011 by Representative Hultgren and 
cosponsored by Representatives Biggert and Lipinski.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from the Honorable 
David Sandalow, Assistant Secretary for Policy and 
International Affairs, U.S. Department of Energy; Dr. Derek 
Scissors, Research Fellow, the Heritage Foundation; Dr. Robert 
Jaffe, Jane and Otto Morningstar Professor of Physics, 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Dr. Karl Gschneidner, 
Jr. Senior Materials Scientist, Ames Laboratory; Mr. Luka 
Erceg, President and CEO, Simbol Materials.

                              2nd Session

              February 1, 2012_Fractured Science_Examining

    EPA's Approach to Ground Water Research: The Pavillion Analysis 
                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-58)

    On Wednesday, February 1, 2012, the Subcommittee on Energy 
and Environment held a hearing to review the EPA's approach to 
ground water research in Pavillion, Wyoming.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Jim Martin, 
Region 8 Administrator, Environmental Protection Agency; Mr. 
Tom Doll, State Oil & Gas Supervisor, Wyoming Oil & Gas 
Conservation Commission; Ms. Kathleen Sgamma, Vice President, 
Government & Public Affairs, Western Energy Alliance; and Dr. 
Bernard Goldstein, Professor and Dean Emeritus, Graduate School 
of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh.

           February 3, 2012_Fostering Quality Science at EPA:

               Perspectives on Common Sense Reform-Day II

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-59)

    On Friday, February 3, 2012, the Subcommittee on Energy and 
Environment held a second day of testimony to provide external 
perspectives on the need to reauthorize and reform science, 
research and development activities at the Environmental 
Protection Agency (EPA); explore the intersection of Agency-
supported science and its regulatory mission; and receive 
focused recommendations to raise the level, quality, 
usefulness, and objectivity of EPA science, including any 
necessary changes to the Environmental Research, Development 
and Demonstration Authorization Act.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Daniel 
Greenbaum, President and Chief Executive Officer, Health 
Effects Institute; Dr. Deborah Swackhamer, Professor, 
Environmental Health Sciences, University of Minnesota, and 
Chairwoman, EPA Science Advisory Board; Mr. Michael Walls, Vice 
President, Regulatory and Technical Affairs, American Chemistry 
Council; Dr. Richard Belzer, President, Regulatory Checkbook; 
Dr. Jerald Schnoor, Allen S. Henry Chair in Engineering, 
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University 
of Iowa; and Dr. S. Stanley Young, Assistant Director for 
Bioinformatics, National Institute of Statistical Sciences.

           March 6, 2012_An Overview of the National Oceanic

                 and Atmospheric Administration and the

              Environmental Protection Agency Budgets for

              Fiscal Year 2013 (Hearing Volume No. 112-67)

    On Tuesday, March 6, 2012, the Subcommittee on Energy and 
Environment held a hearing to examine the Administration's 
Fiscal Year 2013 budget requests for the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Environmental 
Protection Agency's (EPA) Science and Technology (S&T) 
Programs.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. Jane 
Lubchenco, Administrator, National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration, and Mr. Lek Kadeli, Acting Assistant 
Administrator, Office of Research and Development (ORD), U.S. 
Environmental Protection Agency.

            March 28, 2012_To Observe and Protect: How NOAA

                 Procures Data for Weather Forecasting

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-73)

    On Wednesday, March 28, 2012, the Subcommittee on Energy 
and Environment held a hearing to examine how the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) develops, 
evaluates, and executes plans to deliver the best and most cost 
effective data necessary to meet requirements for severe 
weather prediction and other observational needs.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Ms. Mary Kicza, 
Assistant Administrator, National Environmental Satellite, 
Data, and Information Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration (NOAA); Dr. Alexander MacDonald, Deputy 
Assistant Administrator for Research Laboratories and 
Cooperative Institutes, Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Research, NOAA; Mr. John Murphy, Chief, Programs and Plans 
Division, National Weather Service, NOAA; Mr. Eric Webster, 
Vice President and Director, Weather Systems, ITT Exelis; Dr. 
David Crain, Chief Executive Officer, GeoMetWatch; Mr. Bruce 
Lev, Vice Chairman, AirDat LLC; and Dr. Berrien Moore, Dean, 
University of Oklahoma College of Atmospheric and Geographic 
Sciences, and Director, National Weather Center.

             May 10, 2012_Supporting American Jobs and the

              Economy Through Expanded Energy Production:

             Challenges and Opportunities of Unconventional

            Resources Technology (Hearing Volume No. 112-84)

    On Thursday, May 10, 2012, the Subcommittee on Energy and 
the Environment held a hearing to examine challenges and 
opportunities associated with expanding development and use of 
unconventional oil and gas production technologies.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from The Honorable 
Charles McConnell, Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, U.S. 
Department of Energy; Ms. Anu Mittal, Director, Natural 
Resources and Environment, U.S. Government Accountability 
Office; Ms. Samantha Mary Julian, Director, Office of Energy 
Development, State of Utah; Mr. Jim Andersen, Chief Executive 
Officer and President, U.S. Seismic Systems, Inc; Mr. Cameron 
Todd, Chief Executive Officer, U.S. Oil Sands, Inc; and Mr. 
Tony Dammer, Member, Board of Directors, National Oil Shale 
Association.

              June 6, 2012_EPA's Impact on Jobs and Energy

            Affordability: Understanding the Real Costs and

                 Benefits of Environmental Regulations

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-88)

    On Wednesday, June 6, 2012, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
to examine the process used by the Office of Information and 
Regulatory Affairs and the Environmental Protection Agency in 
evaluating the costs and benefits of federal environmental 
regulations, including the recently announced Carbon Pollution 
Standard for New Power Plants.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. Michael 
Honeycutt, Chief Toxicologist, Texas Commission on 
Environmental Quality; Mr. Eugene Trisko, Attorney at Law, On 
behalf of the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity; 
Mr. Tom Wolf, Executive Director, Energy Council, Illinois 
Chamber of Commerce; Mr. David Hudgins, Director of Member and 
External Relations, Old Dominion Electric Cooperative; and Mr. 
Richard Trzupek, Principal Consultant, Trinity Consultants.

          June 21, 2012_Department of Energy User Facilities:

           Utilizing the Tools of Science to Drive Innovation

                      through Fundamental Research

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-92)

    On Thursday, June 21, 2012, the Subcommittee on Energy and 
the Environment held a hearing to examine the role the 
Department of Energy's (DOE) national scientific user 
facilities play in enabling basic research that drives 
innovation and economic growth. Additionally, the hearing 
examined challenges and opportunities associated with user 
facility planning and management.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. Antonio 
Lanzirotti, Chairman, National User Facility Organization; Dr. 
Persis Drell, Director, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; 
Dr. Stephen Wasserman, Senior Research Fellow, Translational 
Science & Technologies, Ely Lilly and Company; Ms. Suzy 
Tichenor, Director, Industrial Partnerships Program, Computing 
and Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory; and 
Dr. Ernest Hall, Chief Scientist, Chemistry and Chemical 
Engineering/Materials Characterization, GE Global Research.

            July 26, 2012_Review of DOE Vehicle Technologies

                   Program Management and Activities:

                        Assuring Appropriate and

                   Effective Use of Taxpayer Funding

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-99)

    On Thursday, July 26, 2012, the Subcommittee on Energy and 
the Environment held a hearing to examine the Department of 
Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP), and 
specifically management and oversight of DOE's alternative 
vehicle research, development, demonstration, and 
commercialization activities. The hearing also considered the 
prioritization of VTP activities, management of DOE's 
Transportation Electrification Initiative and implementation of 
President Obama's ``EV Everywhere Challenge.''
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. Kathleen 
Hogan, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency, U.S. 
Department of Energy; Mr. Rickey Hass, Deputy Inspector General 
for Audits and Inspections, U.S. Department of Energy; and Mr. 
Brian Wynne, President, Electric Drive Transportation 
Association.

               November 30, 2012_Tapping America's Energy

               Potential Through Research and Development

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-108)

    On Friday, November 30, 2012, the Subcommittee on Energy 
and the Environment of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology held a legislative hearing to receive testimony on 
research needs and priorities relating to unconventional oil 
and natural gas resources. The Subcommittee also received 
testimony on H.R. 6603, the ``Tapping America's Energy 
Potential Through Research and Development Act of 2012.''
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. Anthony 
Cugini, Director, National Energy Technology Laboratory, 
Department of Energy; Mr. David Martineau, Chairman, Texas 
Independent Producers and Royalty Owners Association; Dr. 
Daniel Hill, Interim Department Head, Professor and Holder of 
Noble Chair in Petroleum Engineering, Texas A&M University; and 
Mr. Michael Hagood, Director of Program Development, Energy and 
Environment Science and Technology, Idaho National Laboratory

        SUBCOMMITTEE ON INVESTIGATIONS AND OVERSIGHT ACTIVITIES

                              1st Session

             April 6, 2011_Behavioral Science and Security:

                     Evaluating TSA's SPOT Program

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-11)

    On Wednesday, April 6, 2011, the Subcommittee on 
Investigations and Oversight met to examine the Transportation 
Security Administration's (TSA) efforts to incorporate 
behavioral science into its transportation security 
architecture. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has 
been criticized for failing to scientifically validate the 
Screening of Passengers by Observational Techniques (SPOT) 
program before operational deployment. SPOT is a TSA program 
that employs Behavioral Detection Officers (BDO) at airport 
terminals for the purpose of detecting behavioral based 
indicators of threats to aviation security. Testimony focused 
on the validity of behavioral science and experience with SPOT 
and related programs.
    In May 2010, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) 
issued a report titled ``Efforts to Validate TSA's Passenger 
Screening Behavior Detection Program Underway, but 
Opportunities Exist to Strengthen Validation and Address 
Operational Challenges'' in response to a Congressional request 
to review the SPOT program. The report found a lack of 
scientific consensus on behavioral detection principles and a 
lack of justification for expanding the SPOT program. GAO also 
noted that TSA generally does not use all intelligence 
databases to identify or investigate persons referred through 
SPOT. In addition, TSA has no database for BDOs to record and 
analyze information on passengers identified under SPOT.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from the following 
witnesses: Mr. Stephen Lord, Director, Homeland Security and 
Justice Issues, Government Accountability Office (GAO); Mr. 
Larry Willis, Program Manager, Homeland Security Advanced 
Research Projects Agency, Science and Technology Directorate, 
Department of Homeland Security (DHS); Dr. Paul Ekman, 
Professor Emeritus of Psychology, University of California, San 
Francisco and President/Founder, Paul Ekman Group, LLC; Dr. 
Maria Hartwig, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, 
John Jay College of Criminal Justice; Dr. Phillip Rubin, Chief 
Executive Officer, Haskins Laboratories; and Lieutenant 
Detective Peter J. DiDomenica, Boston University Police.

                April 13, 2011_Green Jobs and Red Tape:

           Assessing Federal Efforts to Encourage Employment

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-14)

    On Wednesday, April 13, 2011, the Subcommittee met to 
examine the issue of green jobs and efforts to create them. The 
term ``green jobs'' generally refers to employment in the 
alternative energy and energy efficiency industries. One of the 
primary goals of the recent growth in federal incentives and 
funding for alternative energy sources and energy efficiency 
industries has been the creation of green jobs. The hearing 
examined international efforts to create green jobs, as well as 
historical efforts domestically, including the American 
Recovery and Reinvestment Act. In light of the Administration's 
recently announced ``Winning the Future'' initiative, the 
Subcommittee explored the effectiveness of loan guarantees, 
subsidies, tax incentives, regulations, mandates, research, and 
other federal efforts to create green jobs. The witnesses 
discussed their views on the levels of effectiveness of 
government programs to create green jobs and their experience 
with such efforts.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from: Dr. Kenneth P. 
Green, Resident Scholar, The American Enterprise Institute; Dr. 
David Kreutzer, Research Fellow in Energy, Economics, and 
Climate Change, The Heritage Foundation; Dr. Josh Bivens, 
Economist, Economic Policy Institute; Dr. David W. Montgomery, 
Vice President, NERA Economic Consulting; and Mr. William 
Kovacs, Director of Environment, Technology and Regulatory 
Affairs Division, U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

    May 13, 2011_Nuclear Energy Risk Management (Hearing Volume No. 
                                112-18)

    On Friday, May 13, 2011 the Investigations and Oversight 
Subcommittee and the Energy and Environment Subcommittee met in 
a joint hearing to examine nuclear energy safety, risk 
assessment, public health protection, and associated scientific 
and technical nuclear policy issues in the United States. The 
Subcommittees examined these issues in light of the earthquake 
and tsunami in Japan that resulted in the disaster at the 
Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
    The Subcommittees received testimony from: Dr. Brian 
Sheron, Director, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, 
Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Mr. Lake Barrett, Principal, 
LBarrett Consulting, LLC; Dr. John Boice, Scientific Director, 
International Epidemiology Institute; Mr. Dave Lochbaum, 
Director, Nuclear Safety Project, Union of Concerned 
Scientists.

               June 14, 2011_The Federal Perspective on a

                  National Critical Materials Strategy

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-24)

    On Tuesday, June 14, 2011 the Subcommittee on 
Investigations and Oversight met to examine the federal 
perspective on a national critical materials strategy, 
including rare earth elements and other critical materials. The 
hearing was held to examine Chinese dominance of the rare earth 
materials market and recent shortages in supply resulting from 
the Chinese government's decision to reduce production. The 
hearing also inspected ways to diversify the critical materials 
market and increase domestic production.
    Witnesses discussed beneficial steps the federal government 
could take such as expanding research into critical materials, 
improving access to market information, loan guarantees for 
domestic production, stockpiling of certain materials, and 
streamlining the permitting process for miners. The 
Subcommittee heard about the actions of the federal government 
through the interagency working group on critical and strategic 
mineral supply chains headed by the Office of Science and 
Technology Policy (OSTP), and examined the Department of 
Energy's ``Critical Materials Strategy'' report.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from: Dr. John Holdren, 
Director, Office of Science and Technology Policy; Mr. David 
Sandalow, Assistant Secretary for Policy and International 
Affairs, U.S. Department of Energy; Mr. Jeff Doebrich, Program 
Coordinator (Acting), Mineral Resources Program, U.S. 
Geological Survey.

                   July 14, 2011_EPA's IRIS Program:

               Evaluating the Science and Process Behind

                        Chemical Risk Assessment

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-30)

    On Thursday, July 14, 2011 the Subcommittee on 
Investigations and Oversight met to examine the process behind 
the development of EPA's IRIS assessments. The hearing was 
prompted in part by the National Academies' National Research 
Council report on EPA's formaldehyde assessment which 
reiterated several previous criticisms of EPA's IRIS process 
and provided recommendations for improvement. The goal of the 
hearing was to better understand the development of IRIS 
assessments, whether EPA plans on adopting the NAS' 
recommendations, and whether or not EPA assessments are based 
on the best available evidence and evaluated in accordance with 
established protocols.
    Witnesses discussed problems with IRIS and methods for 
improving the process and science behind IRIS assessments. The 
Committee also heard about regulatory impacts on industry and 
communities.
    The Committee received testimony from: The Honorable Paul 
Anastas, Assistant Administrator, Office of Research and 
Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Mr. Trimble, 
Director, Natural Resources and Environment, U.S. Government 
Accountability Office; Dr. Jonathan Samet, MD, MS, Professor 
and Flora L. Thorton Chair, Department of Preventive Medicine, 
Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, and 
Chair, Committee to Review EPA's Draft IRIS Assessment of 
Formaldehyde, National Research Council, the National 
Academies; The Honorable Calvin Dooley, President and CEO, 
American Chemistry Council; Ms. Rena Steinzor, Professor, 
University of Maryland School of Law, and President, Center for 
Progressive Reform; Dr. Gail Charnley, Principal, HealthRisk 
Strategies; The Honorable J. Christian Bollwage, Mayor, City of 
Elizabeth, New Jersey.

                September 23, 2011_From NPOESS to JPSS:

                 An Update on the Nation's Restructured

                    Polar Weather Satellite Program.

        (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING) (Hearing Volume No. 112-39)

    On Friday, September 23, 2011 the Subcommittees on 
Investigations & Oversight and Energy & Environment met to 
examine the impact of the Administration's decision to 
restructure the National Polar-orbiting Operation Environmental 
Satellite System (NPOESS) and progress at NOAA and NASA in 
developing the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) program as 
the replacement system for polar-orbiting civilian weather 
satellites and climate services.
    Witnesses discussed the cost, schedule, and performance 
capabilities associated with the new polar-orbiting weather 
satellite program.
    The Committee received testimony from: The Honorable 
Kathryn Sullivan, Ph.D., Assisstant Secretary of Commerce for 
Environmental Observation and Prediction and Deputy 
Administrator, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; 
Mr. Christopher Scolese, Associate Administrator, National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration; Mr. David Powner, 
Director, Information Technology Management Issues, Government 
Accountability Office.

              October 13, 2011_The Endangered Species Act:

               Reviewing the Nexus of Science and Policy

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-44)

    On Thursday, October 23, 2011 the Subcommittee on 
Investigations and Oversight met to examine the combination of 
science and policy decisions made under the Endangered Species 
Act (ESA). The hearing reviewed the influence of the growing 
number of judicial disputes over ESA-related actions and the 
importance of accurate scientific data for policy decisions.
    Witnesses discussed the process for designating species as 
endangered, delisting species from protection, the quality of 
science used in policy making decisions, impacts on local 
communities, benefits and problems associated with the ESA, and 
methods of improvement.
    The Committee received testimony from: Mr. Gary Frazer, 
Assistant Director, Endangered Species, U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service; The Honorable Craig Manson, General Counsel, Westlands 
Water District; Mr. Douglas Vincent-Lang, Senior Biologist, 
Alaska Department of Fish and Game; Dr. Neal Wilkins, Director, 
Texas A&M Institute of Renewable Natural Resources; Mr. 
Jonathan Adler, Professor, Case Western Reserve University 
School of Law; Dr. Francesca T. Grifo, Senior Scientist and 
Director, Scientific Integrity Program, Union of Concerned 
Scientists.

               October 27, 2011_Review of the Blue Ribbon

              Commission on America's Nuclear Future Draft

     Recommendations (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING) (Hearing Volume 
                              No. 112-47)

    On Thursday, October 27, 2011, the Energy & Environment and 
Investigations & Oversight Subcommittees held a hearing to 
examine the recommendations contained in the Blue Ribbon 
Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC) Draft Report to 
the Secretary of Energy.
    Additionally, the Subcommittees considered science and 
technology issues associated with spent nuclear fuel 
management.
    The Subcommittees received testimony from Mr. Jack Spencer, 
Research Fellow, Nuclear Energy Policy, Heritage Foundation; 
Dr. Peter Swift, Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff, 
Sandia National Laboratory; Dr. Roger Kasperson, Professor and 
Distinguished Scientist, Clark University; Mr. Gary Hollis, 
Chairman, Nye County Board of County Commissioners; Mr. Rick 
McLeod, Executive Director, Savannah River Site Community Reuse 
Organization; and Dr. Mark Peters, Deputy Laboratory Director 
for Programs, Argonne National Laboratory.

                 November 30, 2011_Stimulus Oversight:

               An Update on Accountability, Transparency,

              and Performance (Hearing Volume No. 112-53)

    On Wednesday, November 30, 2011 the Subcommittee on 
Investigations and Oversight met to receive an update on 
accountability, transparency, and performance issues associated 
with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The 
hearing focused on efforts by agency Inspector General Offices, 
the Government Accountability Office, and the Recovery, 
Accountability, and Transparency Board to monitor ARRA funding. 
The Subcommittee previously held hearings on ARRA funding on 
March 19, 2009, and May 5, 2009.
    Witnesses discussed lessons learned in managing ARRA funds, 
transparency in awarding funds, assessing risks associated with 
these investments, and methods for improving the management of 
taxpayer dollars.
    The Committee received testimony from: Mr. Frank Rusco, 
Director, Natural Resources and Environment Team, General 
Accountability Office; Mr. Michael Wood, Director, Recovery, 
Accountability, and Transparency Board; The Honorable Gregory 
Friedman, Inspector General, U.S. Department of Energy; The 
Honorable Todd Zinser, Inspector General, U.S. Department of 
Commerce; Ms. Allison Lerner, Inspector General, National 
Science Foundation; Ms. Gail Robinson, Deputy Inspector 
General, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

                              2nd Session

               January 24, 2012_A Review of the Advanced

                    Research Projects Agency-Energy

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-57)

    On Tuesday, January 24th, the Subcommittee on 
Investigations and Oversight met to receive an update on 
accountability, transparency, and performance issues associated 
with the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E). The 
hearing focused on recent reports from the Department of Energy 
Inspector General (DOE IG) report OAS-RA-11-11, ``Advanced 
Research Projects Agency-Energy'' and the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) report 12-112, ``Advanced Research 
Projects Agency Could Benefit from Information on Applicants' 
Prior Funding.''
    Witnesses discussed metrics used to evaluate the agency's 
performance, reviewed its statutory objectives to fund ``high-
risk, high reward'' research, technology transfer, and efforts 
to prevent duplicate research spending.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from: Dr. Arun 
Majumdar, Director, Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy, 
U.S. Department of Energy; The Honorable Gregory Friedman, 
Inspector General, U.S Department of Energy; Mr. Frank Rusco, 
Director, Energy and Science Issues, U.S. Government 
Accountability Office.

                 February 29, 2012_NASA Cybersecurity:

     An Examination of the Agency's Information Security (Hearing 
                           Volume No. 112-64)

    On Wednesday, February 29th, 2012, the Subcommittee on 
Investigations and Oversight met to examine the state of 
information security at the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration (NASA). The hearing focused on recent reports 
from the NASA Office of the Inspector General (IG) concerning 
information security, the steps NASA is taking to address the 
recommendations contained in those reports, and future 
challenges to the Agency's information security posture.
    Witnesses discussed the types and origins of cyber threats, 
recommendations from the IG reports, governance issues 
concerning the limited authority of the Chief Information 
Office (CIO), and internal agency cultural differences that 
compound the difficulties in protecting the agency's networks.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from: Ms. Linda 
Cureton, Chief Information Officer, NASA; and the Honorable 
Paul Martin, Inspector General, NASA.

               March 29, 2012_Federally Funded Research:

      Examining Public Access and Scholarly Publication Interests 
                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-74)

    On Thursday, March 29, 2012, the Subcommittee on 
Investigations and Oversight held an oversight hearing to 
examine various models for disseminating federally funded 
research and the corresponding effects on the scientific 
process. Federally funded research is accessed through an 
increasing variety of methods beyond the traditional scholarly 
journals maintained by a scientific society that is made 
available only through a paid subscription. Some of the push 
towards greater public access stems from increasing complaints 
about the widely varying subscription costs of journals.
    Witnesses discussed the impact of federal public access 
policies on scientific journals, publishers, and scientific 
societies, including the costs and revenue generated from 
publication and public access to taxpayer funded research.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from: Dr. H. Frederick 
Dylla, Executive Director and CEO, American Institute of 
Physics; Mr. Elliot Maxwell, Project Director for the Digital 
Connections Council, Committee on Economic Development; Dr. 
Crispin Taylor, Executive Director, American Society of Plant 
Biologists; Mr. Stuart Shieber, Director, Office for Scholarly 
Communications, Harvard University; and Mr. Scott Plutchak, 
Director, Lister Hill Library at University of Alabama at 
Birmingham.

              April 19, 2012_Impact of Tax Policies on the

               Commercial Application of Renewable Energy

      Technology (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING) (Hearing Volume No. 
                                112-78)

    On Thursday, April 19, 2012, the Subcommittees on 
Investigations & Oversight and Energy & Environment held a 
joint hearing to examine recently expired, current, and 
proposed renewable energy tax preferences, and their impact on 
the commercial application of renewable energy technologies.
    Witnesses discussed the costs of renewable energy tax 
preferences and of renewable energy technologies compared to 
traditional sources such as fossil fuels, renewable energy 
policies in various states and countries, and the impact of 
such policies on businesses and consumers.
    The Subcommittees received testimony from: Dr. Molly 
Sherlock, Specialist in Public Finance, Congressional Research 
Service; Mr. John Parcell, Acting Deputy Tax Legislative 
Counsel, U.S. Department of the Treasury; Dr. Michael Pacheco, 
Vice President, Deployment and Industrial Partnerships, 
National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Mr. Rhone Resch, 
President and CEO, Solar Energy Industries Association; Mr. 
Terry Royer, CEO, Winergy Drive Systems Corporation; Mr. Steven 
Erby, Vice President, Monolith Solar Associates, LLC; Dr. 
Benjamin Zycher, Visiting Scholar, American Enterprise 
Institute; Dr. Margo Thorning, Senior Vice President and Chief 
Economist, American Council for Capital Formation; and Ms. Lisa 
Linowes, Executive Director, Industrial Wind Action Group.

           April 25, 2012_How the Report on Carcinogens Uses

               Science to Meet its Statutory Obligations,

                 and its Impact on Small Business Jobs

                    (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING WITH

                      COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS,

      HEALTHCARE AND TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE) (Hearing Volume No. 
                                112-79)

    On Wednesday, April 25, 2012, the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology, Subcommittee on Investigations & 
Oversight, and the Committee on Small Business, Subcommittee on 
Healthcare and Technology, met to examine the Report on 
Carcinogens (RoC). The hearing provided the committees an 
opportunity to understand how the U.S. Department of Health and 
Human Services' (HHS) National Toxicology Program (NTP), an 
interagency program administered by the National Institute of 
Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), produces the RoC.
    Witnesses discussed the history of the RoC, how NTP uses 
science to meet its statutory obligations, and the RoC's impact 
on stakeholders, particularly small businesses.
    The committees received testimony from: Dr. Linda S. 
Birnbaum, Director, National Institute of Environmental Health 
Sciences & National Toxicology Program, U.S. Department of 
Health and Human Services; Mr. Charles A. Maresca, Director of 
Interagency Affairs, Office of Advocacy, U.S. Small Business 
Administration; Dr. James S. Bus, Director of External 
Technology, Toxicology and Environmental Research and 
Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company; Dr. L. Faye Grimsley, 
Associate Professor, Tulane School of Public Health and 
Tropical Medicine, Department of Global Environmental Health 
Sciences; Ms. Bonnie Webster, Vice President, Monroe 
Industries, Inc.; Ms. Ally LaTourelle, Esq., V.P. Government 
Affairs, Bioamber, Inc.; Mr. John E. Barker, Corporate Manager, 
Environmental Affairs, Safety and Loss Prevention, Strongwell 
Corporation; Dr. Richard B. Belzer, President, Regulatory 
Checkbook.

      May 8, 2012_The Science Behind Green Building Rating Systems

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-82)

    On Tuesday May 8, 2012, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to examine the scientific record that green building 
rating systems are based upon. The Subcommittee reviewed the 
General Services Administration (GSA) and the Department of 
Energy's investments in green buildings through federal 
research and development funding and construction choices.
    Witnesses discussed DOE and GSA's analysis of green 
building rating systems to be used by the federal government 
for the next five years, cost benefit analyses of green 
building standards, the impact of such standards on the public 
and private sector, and third party rating systems, including: 
Green Globes, the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design 
(LEED) system, and the American Society of Hearing, 
Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers 189.1 (ASHRAE).
    The Subcommittee received testimony from: Dr. Kathleen 
Hogan, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency, Office 
of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of 
Energy (DOE); Mr. Kevin Kampschroer, Director of the Office of 
High-Performance Green Buildings, GSA; Mr. Ward Hubbell, 
President, U.S. Green Building Initiative; Mr. Roger Platt, 
Senior Vice President, Global Policy and Law, U.S. Green 
Building Council; Professor John Scofield, Professor of 
Physics, Oberlin College; Mr. Victor Olgyay, Principal 
Architect, Built Environment Team, Rocky Mountain Institute; 
Mr. Tom Talbot, CEO, Glen Oak Lumber and Milling of Wisconsin.

            June 19, 2012_The Science of How Hunting Assists

                  Species Conservation and Management

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-90)

    On Tuesday, June 19, 2012, the Subcommittee on 
Investigations and Oversight held an oversight hearing to 
examine the science used to inform wildlife management 
decisions involving hunting. The federal government encourages 
hunting on some federal lands for numerous reasons, including 
wildlife management, recreation, and subsistence.
    Witnesses discussed the science behind hunting, including 
methods used to evaluate a species' population dynamics over 
time, providing valuable information for permit providers and 
conservation managers. Additionally, witnesses spoke on the use 
of hunting in managing overpopulation, invasive species, the 
use of hunting permits, and taxes on hunting equipment to 
provide monetary support for conservation efforts.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from: The Honorable 
Daniel Ashe, Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Dr. Al 
Maki, Conservation Committee Chairman, Safari Club 
International; Dr. Stuart Pimm, Nicholas School of the 
Environment, Duke University; and Mr. Nick Wiley, Executive 
Director, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

           June 27, 2012_Continuing Oversight of the Nation's

                      Weather Satellite Programs:

                      An Update on JPSS and GOES-R

        (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING) (Hearing Volume No. 112-94)

    On Wednesday, June 27, 2012, the Subcommittees on 
Investigations & Oversight and Energy & Environment held an 
oversight hearing to examine the recent Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) reports on both the Joint Polar 
Satellite System (JPSS) and Geostationary Operational 
Environmental Satellite-R Series (GOES-R) weather satellite 
programs. In light of present budgetary constraints, the 
Committee has provided strong oversight of NOAA's weather 
satellite programs, which the GAO has determined are at risk of 
exceeding cost and schedule targets.
    Witnesses discussed recent developments and management 
issues associated with JPSS and GOES-R, including cost, 
schedule, and performance capabilities. The Committee also 
received specifics regarding the two GAO reports released at 
the hearing, detailing the current and projected status of both 
satellite programs.
    The Subcommittees received testimony from: The Honorable 
Kathryn Sullivan, Ph.D., Assistant Secretary of Commerce for 
Environmental Observation and Prediction and Deputy 
Administrator, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; 
Mr. Marcus Watkins, Director, Joint Agency Satellite Division, 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration; and Mr. David A. 
Powner, Director, Information Technology Management Issues, 
Government Accountability Office.

            September 12, 2012_Mismanagement of Funds at the

             National Weather Service and the Impact on the

                     Future of Weather Forecasting

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-103)

    On Wednesday, September 12, 2012, the Subcommittee on 
Investigations and Oversight held an oversight hearing to 
understand the events that led to unauthorized reprogramming of 
funds within the National Weather Service. A 2011 National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) report and a 2012 
joint NOAA and Department of Commerce (DOC) investigative 
report provided the basis for memos detailing that NWS 
employees engaged in the transfer of potentially millions of 
NWS funds without Congressional authorization or notification. 
These actions raised concerns about the fidelity of budget 
requests, financial oversight, and possible Anti-Deficiency Act 
(ADA) violations.Witnesses discussed how NOAA, DOC, and the DOC 
Office of Inspector General (OIG) plan to prevent similar 
incidents in the future, as well as the breakdown in 
communication that led to earlier complaints being ignored. The 
Committee also heard about historical funding challenges at the 
NWS and the importance of science and technology investments to 
ensure the production of first class forecasting.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from: Dr. Kathryn D. 
Sullivan, Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Environmental 
Observation and Prediction and Deputy Administrator for the 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. 
Department of Commerce; Inspector General Todd J. Zinser, U.S. 
Department of Commerce, Office of Inspector General; Dr. 
William B. Gail, Chief Technology Officer, Global Weather 
Corporation, and Member, Committee on the Assessment of the 
National Weather Service's Modernization Program, National 
Research Council of the National Academies; and Mr. Richard 
Hirn, General Counsel and Legislative Director, National 
Weather Service Employees Organization. The Subcommittee also 
invited Ms. Maureen Wylie, Chief, Resource and Operations 
Management, and former Chief Financial Officer, National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of 
Commerce, but she refused to appear at the hearing.

              December 5, 2012_The Impact of International

                    Technology Transfer on American

                        Research and Development

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-109)

    On Wednesday December 5, 2012, the Subcommittee on 
Investigations and Oversight held an oversight hearing to 
examine the effect of international technology transfer on 
American competitiveness. Since U.S. taxpayers provide both 
direct and indirect support for private sector research and 
development, the Committee was interested in understanding the 
methods by which domestic technology and intellectual property 
are transferred to foreign countries and how it impacts the 
U.S. economy.
    Witnesses discussed how and where the benefits of American 
research, development, and innovation are realized and the 
importance to economic growth and international 
competitiveness. The Committee also heard about the ways 
specific countries design their industrial and science policies 
to direct the transfer of technology and intellectual property 
into their home markets and measures the U.S. government could 
implement to limit such activity. The Committee received 
testimony from: Dr. Robert D. Atkinson, President, Information 
Technology & Innovation Foundation; and The Honorable Dennis C. 
Shea, Chairman, United States China Economic and Security 
Review Commission

             SUBCOMMITTEE ON RESEARCH AND SCIENCE EDUCATION

            OVERSIGHT, INVESTIGATION, AND OTHER ACTIVITIES,

               INCLUDING SELECTIVE LEGISLATIVE ACTIVITIES

                              1st Session

            April 14, 2011_Nanotechnology: Oversight of the

           National Nanotechnology Initiative and Priorities

               for the Future (Hearing Volume No. 112-15)

    On Thursday, April 14, 2011, the Subcommittee on Research 
and Science Education held a hearing to review the Nation's 
multi-agency nanotechnology portfolio to ensure U.S. leadership 
and to discuss research and budget priorities for the future. 
The hearing provided an overview of the benefits of 
nanotechnology to society, and commenting on national priority 
areas, witnesses were asked to provide feedback on 
reauthorization language passed in the House during the 110th 
and 111th Congresses in anticipation of reauthorization during 
the 112th Congress.
    In the 111th Congress, H.R. 554, the National 
Nanotechnology Initiative Amendments Act of 2009, was 
introduced on January 15, 2009, referred to the Committee on 
Science and Technology, and passed the House under suspension 
of the rules on February 11, 2009. The same language was added 
to H.R. 5116, the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act, passed 
by the House but not included in the final version signed into 
law on January 4, 2011.
    The Committee received testimony from: Dr. Clayton Teague, 
Director, National Nanotechnology Coordination Office; Dr. 
Jeffrey Welser, Director, Nanoelectronics Research Initiative, 
Semiconductor Research Corporation and Semiconductor Industry 
Alliance; Dr. Seth Rudnick, Chairman, Board of Directors, 
Liquidia Technologies; Dr. James Tour, Professor of Chemistry, 
Computer Science, and Mechanical Engineering and Materials 
Science, Rice University; Mr. William Moffitt, President and 
Chief Executive Officer, Nanosphere, Inc.

           May 25, 2011_Protecting Information in the Digital

                Age: Federal Cybersecurity Research and

       Development Efforts (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING) (Hearing 
                           Volume No. 112-19)

    On Wednesday, May 25, 2011 the Subcommittee on Research and 
Science Education and the Subcommittee on Technology and 
Innovation held a joint legislative hearing to examine federal 
agency efforts to improve our national cybersecurity and 
prepare the future cybersecurity talent needed for national 
security, as it pertains to agencies within the Committee's 
jurisdiction and in the context of the Administration's overall 
priorities in science, space, and technology.
    In the 111th Congress, the House passed the Cybersecurity 
Enhancement Act of 2010 (H.R. 4061). The bill was referred to 
the Committee on Science and Technology and favorably reported 
on January 27, 2010. H.R. 4061 required increased coordination 
and prioritization of Federal cybersecurity research and 
development activities and the development of cybersecurity 
technical standards. It sought to strengthen cybersecurity 
education and talent development and partnership activities. 
Witnesses were asked to provide comments on the legislation in 
advance of reintroduction during the 112th Congress.
    The Subcommittees received testimony from: Dr. George O. 
Strawn, the Director of the National Coordination Office for 
Networking and Information Technology Research and Development 
Program; Dr. Farnam Jahanian, the Assistant Director of the 
Directorate for Computer and Information Science and 
Engineering at the National Science Foundation; Ms. Cita 
Furlani, Director of the Information Technology Laboratory at 
the National Institute of Standards and Technology; and Rear 
Admiral Michael Brown, the Director of Cybersecurity 
Coordination in the National Protection and Programs 
Directorate for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

             June 2, 2011_Social, Behavioral, and Economic

                Science Research: Oversight of the Need

      for Federal Investments and Priorities for Funding (Hearing 
                           Volume No. 112-22)

    On Thursday, June 2, 2011, the Subcommittee on Research and 
Science Education held an oversight hearing to examine the need 
for Federal investments in the social, behavioral, and economic 
sciences; to better understand the impact of this type of 
research; and to assess its value to the American taxpayer.
    The Committee received testimony from: Dr. Myron Gutmann, 
Assistant Director, Directorate for Social, Behavioral, and 
Economic Sciences, National Science Foundation; Dr. Hillary 
Anger Elfenbein, Associate Professor of Organizational 
Behavior, Olin Business School, Washington University in St. 
Louis; Dr. Peter Wood, President, National Association of 
Scholars; Ms. Diana Furchtgott-Roth, Senior Fellow, Hudson 
Institute.

                July 26, 2011_The Merit Review Process:

           Ensuring Limited Federal Resources are Invested in

              the Best Science (Hearing Volume No. 112-31)

    On Thursday, July 26, 2011 the Subcommittee held a hearing 
examining the merit review grant award process and its effect 
on federally funded scientific research, in an effort to 
understand the strengths and potential weaknesses of the 
process.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from: Dr. Cora Marrett, 
Deputy Director, National Science Foundation; Dr. Keith 
Yamamoto, Vice Chancellor for Research, University of 
California, San Francisco; Dr. Nancy Jackson, President, 
American Chemical Society; Dr. Jorge Jose, Vice President for 
Research, Indiana University.

           September 21, 2011_Oversight of the Networking and

            Information Technology Research and Development

                 Program and Priorities for the Future

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-37)

    On Wednesday, September 21, 2011, the Subcommittee on 
Research and Science Education held a hearing to review the 
networking and information technology research and development 
(NITRD) program to ensure U.S. leadership in networking and 
information technology and to discuss priorities for the future 
and potential reauthorization.
    The Committee received testimony from: Dr. George Strawn, 
Director, National Coordination Office, Networking and 
Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) 
Program, Dr. Edward Lazowska, Bill & Melinda Gates Chair in 
Computer Science & Engineering, University of Washington, Dr. 
Robert Sproull, Director of Oracle Labs, retired, and Dr. 
Robert Schnabel, Dean, School of Informatics, Indiana 
University.

            October 12, 2011_What Makes for Successful K-12

            STEM Education: A Closer Look at Effective STEM

            Education Approaches (Hearing Volume No. 112-42)

    On Wednesday, October 12, 2011, the Subcommittee on 
Research and Science Education held a hearing to review and 
examine the findings of the National Research Council Report, 
Successful K-12 STEM Education: Identifying Effective 
Approaches in Science, Technology, Engineering, and 
Mathematics, as requested by Congress in 2009 to identify 
highly successful K-12 schools and programs in STEM.
    The Committee received testimony from: Dr. Adam Gamoran, 
Director, Wisconsin Center for Education Research, University 
of Wisconsin, Mr. Mark Heffron, Director, Denver School for 
Science and Technology: Stapleton High School, Dr. Suzanne 
Wilson, Chair, Department of Teacher Education, Division of 
Science and Math, Education, Michigan State University, Dr. 
Elaine Allensworth, Senior Director and Chief Research Officer, 
Consortium on Chicago School Research, University of Chicago, 
and Dr. Barbara Means, Director, Center for Technology in 
Learning, SRI International.

             November 3, 2011_STEM In Action: Transferring

             Knowledge from the Workplace to the Classroom

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-50)

    On Thursday, November 3, 2011, the Subcommittee on Research 
and Science Education held the fourth in a series of hearings 
to highlight Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) 
education activities across the Nation, their role in inspiring 
and educating future generations, and their contribution to our 
future economic prosperity. The purpose of this hearing was to 
examine approaches and programs that encourage and assist STEM 
professionals looking to transition their knowledge and skills 
from industry to a second career in teaching or to give back to 
classroom education as a mentor.
    The Committee received testimony from: Dr. Michael Beeth, 
Professor, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, University 
of Wisconsin Oshkosh; Mrs. Christine Sutton, Secondary Math 
Teacher, Virgil I. Grissom High School, Huntsville City 
Schools, Alabama; Ms. Robin Willner, Vice President, Global 
Community Initiatives, Corporate Citizenship & Corporate 
Affairs, IBM Corporation; Mr. Jason Morrella, President, 
Robotics Education and Competition Foundation; and Dr. Jennifer 
Jones, Principal Clinical Scientist, Abbott Vascular.

                              2nd Session

             February 28, 2012_An Overview of the National

             Science Foundation Budget for Fiscal Year 2013

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-62)

    On Tuesday, February 28, 2012, the Subcommittee on Research 
and Science Education held a hearing that examined the 
Administration's proposed fiscal year 2013 (FY13) budget 
request for the National Science Foundation.
    The Committee received testimony from Dr. Subra Suresh, 
Director, National Science Foundation and Dr. Ray Bowen, 
Chairman, National Science Board.

             March 8, 2012_NSF Major Research Equipment and

                 Facilities Management: Ensuring Fiscal

                   Responsibility and Accountability

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-69)

    On Thursday, March 8, 2012, the Subcommittee on Research 
and Science Education held a hearing that examined the 
management and operations of Major Research Equipment and 
Facilities Construction (MREFC) projects at the National 
Science Foundation.
    The Committee received testimony from: Dr. Cora Marrett, 
Deputy Director, National Science Foundation, Dr. Jose-Marie 
Griffiths, Chairman, Subcommittee on Facilities, National 
Science Board; Vice President of Academic Affairs, Bryant 
University, Mr. James H. Yeck, IceCube Project Director, 
University of Wisconsin-Madison, Dr. Tony Beasley, COO/Project 
Manager, Neon, Inc., and Dr. Tim Cowles, Vice President and 
Director, Ocean Observing, Consortium for Ocean Leadership.

              April 18, 2012_NSF Major Multi-User Research

                 Facilities Management: Ensuring Fiscal

                   Responsibility and Accountability

                       (Hearing Volume No 112-76)

    On Wednesday, April 18, 2012, the Subcommittee on Research 
and Science Education held a hearing to examine the planning, 
management, operations, and stewardship of major multi-user 
research facilities funded through the National Science 
Foundation.
    The Committee received testimony from: Dr. Ethan J. 
Schreier, President, Associated Universities, Inc., Dr. William 
S. Smith, Jr., President, Association of Universities for 
Research in Astronomy, Dr. David Divins, Vice President and 
Director, Ocean Drilling Programs, Consortium for Ocean 
Leadership, Inc., Dr. Gregory S. Boebinger, Director, National 
High Magnetic Field Laboratory and Professor of Physics, 
Florida State University and University of Florida, Dr. Sol 
Michael Gruner, Director, Cornell High Energy Synchrotron 
Source and The John L. Wetherill Professor of Physics, Cornell 
University.

             April 30, 2012_STEM Education in Action: Local

            Schools, Non-Profits, and Businesses Doing Their

                    Part to Secure America's Future

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-81)

    On Monday, April 30, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. at Bob Jones High 
School, 650 Hughes Road, Madison, Alabama 35758, the 
Subcommittee on Research and Science Education held a hearing 
entitled STEM Education in Action: Local Schools, Non-Profits, 
and Businesses Doing Their Part to Secure America's Future. The 
purpose of the hearing was to highlight local science, 
technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education 
programs and partnerships and to examine their impact on the 
next generation of STEM professionals, local jobs, and the U.S. 
economy.
    The Committee received testimony from: Dr. Camille H. 
Wright, Director of Secondary Instruction, Madison City 
Schools, Dr. Robert A. Altenkirch, President, University of 
Alabama, Huntsville, Dr. Marilyn C. Beck, President, Calhoun 
Community College, Dr. Neil Lamb, Director of Educational 
Outreach, HudsonAlpha Institute of Biotechnology, and Mr. 
Andrew Partynski, Chief Technology Officer, Science 
Applications International Corporation (SAIC).

              May 9, 2012_Ensuring the Best Stewardship of

               American Taxpayer Dollars at the National

             Science Foundation (Hearing Volume No. 112-83)

    On Wednesday, May 9, 2012, at 2:00pm, the Subcommittee on 
Research and Science Education met to examine and receive 
testimony on various initiatives by and issues identified by 
the NSF Office of Inspector General.
    The witness discussed the work of the NSF Office of 
Inspector General to promote the efficiency and effectiveness 
of the Foundation and to safeguard the integrity of its 
programs and operations. The hearing addressed a number of 
potential waste, fraud, and abuse concerns, including issues 
with Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction 
funding for contingencies, problems with the Small Business 
Innovation Research program, and funding beyond expenses and 
per diem provided to merit review panel participants.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from: Ms. Allison C. 
Lerner, Inspector General, National Science Foundation.

           June 27, 2012_The Role of Research Universities in

                 Securing America's Future Prosperity:

                      Challenges and Expectations

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-93)

    On Wednesday, June 27, 2012, the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology Subcommittee on Research and Science 
Education held a hearing to examine the challenges faced by the 
Nation's research universities. The hearing provided an 
opportunity to discuss the future outlook for these 
universities and discussed the recently released National 
Academies study, Research Universities and the Future of 
America.
    The Committee received testimony from: Mr. Charles O. 
Holliday, Jr., Chair, Committee on Research Universities, 
National Academies; Dr. John M. Mason, Jr., Associate Provost 
and Vice President for Research, Auburn University; Dr. Jeffrey 
R. Seemann, Vice President for Research, Texas A&M University 
and Chief Research Officer, The Texas A&M University System; 
Dr. Leslie P. Tolbert, Senior Vice President for Research, The 
University of Arizona; and Dr. James N. Siedow, Vice Provost 
for Research, Duke University.

             July 16, 2012_Innovation Corps: A Review of a

               New National Science Foundation Program to

             Leverage Research Investments (FIELD HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-96)

    On Monday, July 16, 2012, the Subcommittee on Research and 
Science Education held a hearing at Northwestern University 
School of Law in Chicago, Illinois, to examine the new National 
Science Foundation Innovation Corps program and assess its 
value to the American taxpayer and its potential contribution 
to the Nation's future prosperity.
    The Committee received testimony from: Dr. Thomas Peterson, 
Assistant Director of the Directorate for Engineering, National 
Science Foundation; Mr. Steve Blank, Lecturer, Stanford 
University and the University of California at Berkeley; Mr. 
Neil Kane, President, Illinois Partners Executive Services, 
LLC; Dr. Gabriel Popescu, Assistant Professor in the Department 
of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois 
at Urbana-Champaign; and Dr. Andrew Mazar, Director of the 
Program for Developmental Therapeutics and Entrepreneur-in-
Residence, Innovation and New Ventures Office, Northwestern 
University.

     August 1, 2012_The Relationship Between Business and Research 
     Universities: Collaborations Fueling American Innovation and 
                              Job Creation

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-100)

    On Wednesday, August 1, 2012, the Subcommittee on Research 
and Science Education held a hearing to examine partnerships 
and collaborations between industry and research universities, 
as a follow-up to the June 27, 2012, hearing, The Role of 
Research Universities in Securing America's Future Prosperity: 
Challenges and Expectations. The hearing provided an 
opportunity to explore the necessary relationships between 
industry and research universities. It examined the challenges 
and opportunities they face in fueling the research necessary 
for American economic prosperity and ensuring that universities 
are adequately preparing the future workforce to meet the needs 
of industry.
    The Committee received testimony from: Mr. William D. 
Green, Executive Chairman, Accenture; Dr. Ray O. Johnson, 
Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, Lockheed 
Martin Corporation; Dr. John S. Hickman, Director, Global 
University Relations and Life Sciences, Deere and Company; Dr. 
Louis Graziano, Director, University R&D Strategy, Sustainable 
Technologies & Innovation Sourcing, The Dow Chemical Company; 
and Ms. Jilda Diehl Garton, Vice President for Research and 
General Manager, Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Georgia 
Institute of Technology.

                 SUBCOMMITTEE ON SPACE AND AERONAUTICS

            OVERSIGHT, INVESTIGATION, AND OTHER ACTIVITIES,

               INCLUDING SELECTED LEGISLATIVE ACTIVITIES

                              1st Session

           February 16, 2011_A Review of the Federal Aviation

               Administration's Research and Development

                  Programs (Hearing Volume No. 112-1)

    On Wednesday, February 16, 2011 the Space and Aeronautics 
Subcommittee held a hearing on the Federal Aviation 
Administration's (FAA) portfolio of research and development 
programs. Since 2007, Congress attempted to complete 
legislative work to reauthorize FAA including these programs. 
The Subcommittee examined the current suite of civil aviation 
research and development programs, including a focus on FAA's 
Next Generation Air Traffic System (NextGen) that is designed 
to modernize our nation's air traffic control system and is now 
in the early stages of deployment.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Ms. Victoria Cox, 
Vice President of FAA's Air Traffic Organization; the Honorable 
Calvin Scovel, Inspector General of the Department of 
Transportation; Dr. John Hansman, Professor of Aeronautics and 
Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and 
Chair of the FAA's advisory committee on research and 
development; and Mr. Peter Bunce, Chief Executive Officer of 
the General Aviation Manufacturers Association.

             March 30, 2011_A Review of NASA's Exploration

             Program in Transition: Issues For Congress and

                  Industry (Hearing Volume No. 112-8)

    On Wednesday, March 30, 2011 the Subcommittee held an 
oversight hearing to review the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration's (NASA's) Constellation program and examine the 
status of the transition to the Space Launch System (SLS) and 
Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV).
    Issues examined included the Administration's compliance 
with the FY 2011 Continuing Resolution and the Authorization 
Act's direction to extend and modify the Constellation 
contracts, and the status of NASA's transition report to 
Congress. The Subcommittee also examined key challenges and 
risks to the Nation's aerospace workforce and industrial base 
caused by delays or other disruptions in NASA's human 
spaceflight program.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Douglas Cooke, 
Associate Administrator, Exploration Systems Mission 
Directorate, NASA; Dr. Scott Pace, Director, Space Policy 
Institute, George Washington University; and Mr. James Maser, 
Chairman, Corporation Membership Committee, the American 
Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

                 May 5, 2011_Office of Commercial Space

            Transportation's Fiscal Year 2012 Budget Request

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-16)

    On Thursday, May 5, 2011, the Space and Aeronautics 
Subcommittee held a hearing to examine the FY 2012 budget 
request submitted by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), 
Office of Commercial Space Transportation. The Subcommittee 
also examined the new initiatives in the request to expand the 
Office's roles and responsibilities. The FY 2012 budget request 
seeks $26.625 million, a 74 percent increase over the FY 2010 
enacted level ($15.237 million) and a near 50 percent increase 
of the Office's workforce, asserting that NASA sponsored 
commercial cargo flights to the International Space Station, 
plus the expected start-up of commercial human sub-orbital 
flights, places new regulatory demands on their operations.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. George Nield, 
FAA Associate Administrator for Commercial Space 
Transportation; Dr. Gerald Dillingham, Director of Civil 
Aviation Issues at the U.S. Government Accountability Office; 
and Professor Henry Hertzfeld, Research Professor of Space 
Policy and International Affairs at the George Washington 
University.

            May 26, 2011_NASA's Commercial Cargo Providers:

           Are They Ready to Supply the Space Station in the

             Post-Shuttle Era? (Hearing Volume No. 112-20)

    On Thursday, May 26, 2011, the Subcommittee on Space and 
Aeronautics held an oversight hearing to examine NASA's 
commercial cargo programs. The Subcommittee reviewed the 
progress made by the commercial providers, as well as the 
budgetary and programmatic impacts of schedule delays. Through 
the COTS and cargo re-supply services program NASA has provided 
its contractors nearly $1.25 billion thus far and has yet to 
accomplish the goals established for the initial $500 million 
program, intended to demonstrate commercial cargo delivery 
capabilities to the International Space Station from two 
commercial partners, Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) 
and Orbital Science Corporation (Orbital).
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. William 
Gerstenmaier, Associate Administrator, Space Operations Mission 
Directorate, NASA; Ms. Cristina Chaplain, Director, Acquisition 
and Sourcing Management, Government Accountability Office; Ms. 
Gwynne Shotwell, President, Space Exploration Technologies; and 
Mr. Frank L. Culbertson, Jr., Senior Vice President and Deputy 
General Manager, Advanced Programs Group, Orbital Sciences 
Corporation.

           October 12, 2011_The International Space Station:

            Lessons from the Soyuz Rocket Failure and Return

                 to Flight (Hearing Volume No. 112-43)

    On Wednesday, October 12, 2011, the Subcommittee held an 
oversight hearing to examine the impacts of the Russian Soyuz 
launch vehicle failure on the safe operation and utilization of 
the International Space Station. The August 24th failure of a 
Soyuz-U launch vehicle carrying supplies to the International 
Space Station, coming about a month after the retirement of the 
Space Shuttle, underscores NASA's loss of the strategically 
important capability of U.S. human access to space. The hearing 
provided a current overview of the Russian Federal Space 
Agency's (Roscosmos) accident investigation, and NASA's 
involvement in the recertification and return-to-flight plans, 
as well as touching on the risks and implications of completely 
de-crewing the International Space Station. The Subcommittee 
also probed the basis and rationale for NASA's decision to 
resume the use of the Soyuz for transportation of its 
astronauts, including the advice received from independent 
external bodies.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. William 
Gerstenmaier, Associate Administrator, Human Exploration and 
Operations Mission Directorate, NASA; Lieutenant General Thomas 
P. Stafford, USAF (Ret.), Chairman, International Space Station 
Advisory Committee; and Vice Admiral Joseph W. Dyer, USN 
(Ret.), Chairman, Aerospace Advisory Panel.

              November 15, 2011_Exploring Mars and Beyond:

                   What's Next for Planetary Science?

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-51)

    On Tuesday, November 15, 2011, the Subcommittee held an 
oversight hearing on the prospects for future exploration of 
Mars and implications of the current fiscal crisis to the 
future of U.S. planetary science.
    On November 25, 2011, NASA launched the Mars Science 
Laboratory (MSL) to conduct a variety of experiments that will 
deepen our understanding of the history of the geological, 
atmospheric, and chemical composition of Mars and inform future 
missions, including human expeditions. Yet even as MSL begins 
its journey to Mars, the follow-on missions in 2016 and 2018--
planned jointly with the European Space Agency (ESA)--have been 
scaled back significantly and could be on the brink of 
cancellation altogether. Until the Administration delivers the 
fiscal year 2013 budget request, NASA is left without 
definitive answers for European partners. This uncertainty has 
left ESA to explore other opportunities--perhaps with Russia--
or to cancel part of the missions. The hearing provided a forum 
to discuss future plans for Mars exploration, the importance of 
collaborating on these missions with international partners and 
the importance of the U.S. maintaining global leadership and 
prestige by continuing to launch flagship missions in the 
future. The Subcommittee posed questions about the role OMB 
plays in making agency-level decisions on the types of mission 
NASA should pursue.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. Jim Green, 
Planetary Science Division Director, Science Mission 
Directorate, NASA; and Dr. Steve Squyres, Chair, Committee on 
the Planetary Science Decadal Survey, National Academies of 
Science. The Office of Management and Budget was invited to 
testify but chose not to participate.

                              2nd Session

               March 20, 2012_Office of Commercial Space

                 Transportation FY 2013 Budget Request

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-70)

    On Tuesday, March 20, 2012, the Subcommittee held an 
oversight hearing on the FAA Office of Commercial Space 
Transportation FY 2013 budget request. The hearing provided 
Members an opportunity to examine the office's roles and 
responsibilities as the commercial market is expected to 
achieve dramatic growth, as well as the role of a government-
sponsored indemnification program. AST's FY 2013 budget request 
seeks $16.700 million, a 2.6% increase over the FY 2012 enacted 
level ($16.271 million). Based on industry-provided launch 
manifests, FAA forecasts 40 commercial launch and reentry 
operations in 2012, compared with only one licensed launch in 
FY 2011.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. George Nield, 
Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation, 
Federal Aviation Administration, and Capt. Wilbur Trafton, 
Chairman, Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee.

           April 26, 2012_An Overview of the NASA Aeronautics

             Research Mission Directorate Budget for Fiscal

                   Year 2013 (Hearing Volume 112-80)

    On Thursday, April 26, 2012, the Subcommittee held an 
oversight hearing to examine (1) the FY 2013 budget request for 
NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate and (2) the 
agency's strategy for managing its aeronautics research 
portfolio. Additionally, the hearing discussed a report 
recently issued by the National Research Council, ``Recapturing 
NASA's Aeronautics Flight Research Capabilities,'' that looked 
into the efficacy and affordability of strengthening the 
agency's integrated flight research program.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. Jaiwon Shin, 
Associate Administrator for NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission 
Directorate; Ms. Marion Blakey, Chair of the Aeronautics 
Committee, NASA Advisory Council, and President of the 
Aerospace Industries Association; Dr. Wesley Harris, Chair of 
the Committee to Assess NASA's Aeronautics Flight Research 
Capabilities, National Research Council, and the Charles Stark 
Draper Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology; and Dr. John Tracy, Chair, National 
Research Council's Aeronautics Research and Technology 
Roundtable, and Chief Technology Officer and Senior Vice 
President of Engineering, Operations, and Technology, The 
Boeing Company.

      June 6, 2012_An Examination of FAA's Launch Indemnification 
                    Program (Hearing Volume 112-87)

    On Wednesday, June 6, 2012, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
on the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Office of 
Commercial Space Transportation (AST) which manages a 
federally-sponsored liability risk-sharing regime (commonly 
referred to as ``indemnification '') for third party loss 
(injury or property damage to the uninvolved public) during 
launch and reentry of a licensed commercial launch system. The 
current authorization for indemnification expires December 31, 
2012. The hearing reviewed FAA's management of the program, 
whether the program should be extended, and discussed if newly 
emerging commercial launch markets necessitated changes to 
current policy.
    Witnesses testifying at the hearing included: Dr. George 
Nield, Associate Administrator for the Office of Commercial 
Space Transportation, FAA; Ms. Alicia Cackley, Director of 
Financial Markets and Community Investment Team, Government 
Accountability Office (GAO); Mr. Frank Slazer, Vice President, 
Space Systems, Aerospace Industries Association; and Ms. Alison 
Alfers, Vice President, Defense and Intelligence, DigitalGlobe 
Inc.

      July 12, 2012_Spurring Economic Growth and Competitiveness 
                   Through NASA Derived Technologies

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-95)

    On Thursday, July 12, 2012 the Subcommittee on Space and 
Aeronautics held an oversight hearing examining the potential 
economic growth and global competitiveness that NASA-derived 
technologies make possible.
    NASA is often considered an incubator for technology 
development, and history has shown a vast array of technologies 
that owe their start to NASA programs. Despite decades of 
demonstrated success, federal investment in NASA remains 
essentially flat even as other R&D agencies are seeing 
increases. Investment in NASA's technology transfer activities 
has seen a drastic decline in recent years. The hearing 
provided an opportunity for NASA to highlight successful 
spinoff stories and was a platform for NASA's industry partners 
to demonstrate the direct economic and societal benefits 
derived from NASA's investments in technology.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. Mason Peck, 
NASA Chief Technologist; Mr. George Beck, Chief Clinical and 
Technology Officer, Impact Instrumentation, Inc.; Mr. Brian 
Russell, Chief Executive Officer, Zephyr Technology; Mr. John 
Vilja, Vice President for Strategy, Innovation and Growth, 
Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne; and Dr. Richard Aubrecht, Vice 
President, Moog, Inc.

      August 1, 2012_The Emerging Commercial Suborbital Reusable 
                         Launch Vehicle Market

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-101)

    On Wednesday, August 1, 2012, the Space and Aeronautics 
Subcommittee held a hearing on the emerging market for 
commercial suborbital reusable launch vehicles (SRVs). The 
hearing provided Members an opportunity to examine the recent 
development of new SRVs, the potential launch markets and 
applications for SRVs, the unique benefits that SRVs offer the 
scientific community for research, and the regulatory 
uncertainties that currently have the most impact on the 
emerging commercial SRV industry. Traditionally, sounding 
rockets have been used to conduct missile tests and scientific 
research for the government sector. The introduction of new 
commercial SRVs in the private sector has enabled the emergence 
of new markets and a number of these new companies are already 
testing their vehicles with plans to initiate commercial 
operations within a few years.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Ms. Carissa 
Christensen, Managing Partner, the Tauri Group; Dr. Alan Stern, 
Chairman, Suborbital Applications Researchers Group; Mr. George 
Whitesides, CEO and President, Virgin Galactic LLC; Mr. Bretton 
Alexander, Director, Business Development and Strategy, Blue 
Origin; Mr. Andrew Nelson, Chief Operating Officer, XCOR 
Aerospace; and Dr. Stephan R. McCandliss, Research Professor, 
the Johns Hopkins University.

     September 12, 2012_Examining NASA's Development of the Space 
                  Launch System and Orion Crew Capsule

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-102)

    On Wednesday, September 12, 2012, the Subcommittee on Space 
and Aeronautics held an oversight hearing to examine NASA's 
development of its next-generation heavy-lift launch vehicle: 
the Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion crew capsule. NASA is 
currently spending about $3 billion a year on these two 
programs, and under the agency's schedule they're expected to 
become operational in 2021. Members questioned the witnesses 
about progress designing, developing, and testing various 
components that will be incorporated in these vehicles, as well 
as technical and programmatic challenges. The final witness, 
Dr. Matt Mountain, testified on the types of science missions 
that would be enabled with SLS.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Dan Dumbacher, 
Deputy Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems 
Development, NASA; Mr. Cleon Lacefield, Vice President and 
Orion Program Manager, Lockheed Martin Corporation; Mr. Jim 
Chilton, Exploration Vice President, The Boeing Company; and 
Dr. Matt Mountain, Director, Space Telescope Science Institute.

          November 28, 2012_National Priorities for Solar and

       Space Physics Research and Applications for Space Weather 
                               Prediction

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-107)

    On Wednesday, November 28, 2012 the House Science, Space 
and Technology Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics held a 
hearing to discuss the recommendations from the recently 
released National Research Council's survey on Solar and Space 
Physics: A Science for a Technological Society. Specifically, 
this hearing examined the requirements for a robust space-based 
solar and space physics research program and discussed the 
application of this research to an operational space weather 
program.
    The study of solar and space physics helps us understand 
the interactions within the Earth-Sun system. Building our 
knowledge in this field is essential for maintaining our 
technological infrastructure and for the prospects of human 
exploration beyond the protection of Earth's atmosphere and 
magnetosphere. The hearing provided an opportunity to review 
the current state of the solar and space physics programs at 
the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and to 
discuss the prospects for the future given that budgets will 
remain essentially flat. The hearing also addressed the role of 
the Space Weather Prediction Center at the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration and the extent to which NOAA works 
with (and relies on) NASA to develop and disseminate space 
weather models and forecasts.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. Daniel Baker, 
Director, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics and 
Professor, Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of 
Colorado at Boulder and Chair, Decadal Survey in Solar and 
Space Physics, National Research Council; Mr. Charles J. Gay, 
Deputy Associate Administrator, Science Mission Directorate, 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration; and, Ms. Laura 
Furgione, Acting Assistant Administrator for Weather Services 
and Acting Director, National Weather Service, National Oceanic 
and Atmospheric Administration.

               SUBCOMMITTEE ON TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION

            OVERSIGHT, INVESTIGATION, AND OTHER ACTIVITIES,

               INCLUDING SELECTIVE LEGISLATIVE ACTIVITIES

                              1st Session

               March 15, 2011_An Overview of Science and

              Technology Research and Development Programs

    and Priorities at the Department of Homeland Security (Hearing 
                           Volume No. 112-7)

    On Tuesday, March 15, 2011, the Technology and Innovation 
Subcommittee held an oversight hearing to review activities at 
the Science and Technology Directorate of the Department of 
Homeland Security (DHS S&T) and the Domestic Nuclear Detection 
Office at the Department of Homeland Security (DNDO). The 
hearing focused on various elements of DHS S&T including the 
recent reorganization of the Directorate, the strategic 
planning process, stakeholder involvement in setting research 
priorities, and the role of research and development in the DHS 
S&T portfolio.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from two witness 
panels; the first panel included the Under Secretary of the DHS 
S&T and the Director of DNDO; the second panel represented 
stakeholders of the DHS enterprise including the Director of 
the Douglas and Sarah Allison Center for Foreign Policy Studies 
at the Heritage Foundation; the President and Chief Executive 
Officer of the Homeland Security and Defense Business Council; 
and the Director of the Homeland Security and Justice Team at 
the U.S. Government Accountability Office.

              March 31, 2011_The Role of Small Business in

                 Innovation and Job Creation: the SBIR

             and STTR Programs (Hearing Volume No. 112-10)

    On Thursday, March 31, 2011, the Subcommittee held a 
legislative hearing to examine the role of the Small Business 
Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology 
Transfer (STTR) Programs in promoting small business innovation 
and commercialization of federally funded research and 
development.
    These programs are due for reauthorization and the 
discussion draft of H.R. 1425, the ``Creating Jobs Through 
Small Business Innovation Act of 2011'', referred to the 
Committee, would reauthorize the programs through fiscal year 
2014. The legislation, as introduced, would increase the size 
guidelines for award amounts for Phase I and Phase II SBIR and 
STTR awards, enable majority venture capital backed firms to 
participate in the program, and expands evaluation of the 
programs through increased data collection and sharing of best 
practices. Witnesses before the Subcommittee discussed their 
experience with the SBIR and STTR Programs and provided input 
on areas of potential improvement as the Committee considers 
H.R. 1425 and the reauthorization of these programs.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from the following 
witnesses: Dr. Salley Rockey, Deputy Director for Extramural 
Research at the National Institutes of Health; Dr. Donald 
Siegel, Dean and Professor at the School of Business, 
University at Albany, State University of New York and a Member 
of the research team for the Committee for Capitalizing on 
Science, Technology, and Innovation, National Research Council 
of the National Academies; Mr. Mark Crowell, Executive Director 
and Associate Vice President for Innovation Partnerships and 
Commercialization at the University of Virginia; Mr. Doug 
Limbaugh, Chief Executive Officer of Kutta Technologies; and 
Ms. Laura McKinney, President and Chief Executive Officer of 
Galois, Inc.

                April 7, 2011_Are We Prepared? Assessing

             Earthquake Risk Reduction in the United States

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-13)

    On Thursday, April 7, 2011, the Subcommittee on Technology 
and Innovation held a hearing, in preparation for 
reauthorization during the 112th Congress, to examine 
earthquake risk in the United States and to review efforts 
supporting the development of earthquake hazard reduction 
measures, and the creation of disaster-resilient communities.
    The hearing examined various elements of the Nation's level 
of earthquake preparedness and resiliency including the U.S. 
capability to detect earthquakes and issue notifications and 
warnings, coordination between federal, state, and local 
stakeholders for earthquake emergency preparation, and research 
and development measures supported by the federal government 
designed to improve the scientific understanding of 
earthquakes.
    The Committee received testimony from the Director of the 
National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) at the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology; the Director of 
the Washington State Emergency Management Association; the 
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Degenkolb Engineers and 
the Chairman of the NEHRP Advisory Committee; and an Oregon 
State Geologist and the Director of the Oregon Department of 
Geology and Mineral Industries.

           April 13, 2011_Subcommittee Markup, H.R. 1425, the

            Creating Jobs through Small Business Innovation

               Act of 2011 (House Report 112-90, Part I)

    On Wednesday, April 13, 2011 the Subcommittee met to 
consider H.R. 1425, the Creating Jobs Through Small Business 
Innovation Act of 2011. The Subcommittee ordered H.R. 1425 
favorably forwarded to the Full Committee, as amended, by voice 
vote.

               May 25, 2011_Protecting Information in the

             Digital Age: Federal Cybesecurity Research and

                Development (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-19)

    On Wednesday, May 25, 2011 the Subcommittee on Technology 
and Innovation and the Subcommittee on Research and Science 
Education held a joint legislative hearing to examine federal 
agency efforts to improve our national cybersecurity and 
prepare the future cybersecurity talent needed for national 
security, as it pertains to agencies within the Committee's 
jurisdiction and in the context of the Administration's overall 
priorities in science, space, and technology.
    In the 111th Congress, the House passed the Cybersecurity 
Enhancement Act of 2010 (H.R. 4061). The bill was referred to 
the Committee on Science and Technology and favorably reported 
on January 27, 2010. On February 4, 2010 H.R. 4061 was passed 
by the House by recorded vote of 422-5 (Roll Call No. 43).
    H.R. 4061 required increased coordination and 
prioritization of Federal cybersecurity research and 
development activities and the development of cybersecurity 
technical standards. It sought to strengthen cybersecurity 
education and talent development and partnership activities. 
Witnesses were asked to provide comments on the legislation in 
advance of reintroduction during the 112th Congress.
    The Subcommittees received testimony from: Dr. George O. 
Strawn, the Director of the National Coordination Office for 
Networking and Information Technology Research and Development 
Program; Dr. Farnam Jahanian, the Assistant Director of the 
Directorate for Computer and Information Science and 
Engineering at the National Science Foundation; Ms. Cita 
Furlani, Director of the Information Technology Laboratory at 
the National Institute of Standards and Technology; and Rear 
Admiral Michael Brown, the Director of Cybersecurity 
Coordination in the National Protection and Programs 
Directorate for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

           June 14, 2011_Transportation Research Priorities:

              Maximizing Return on Investment of Taxpayer

                  Dollars (Hearing Volume No. 112-23)

    On Tuesday, June 14, 2011, the Subcommittee on Technology 
and Innovation held a hearing to review the research, 
development, and technology (RD&T) activities of the Department 
of Transportation. The hearing focused on issues related to the 
funding and prioritization of current research initiatives and 
how to maximize the efficiency of these activities. With the 
expiration of SAFETEA-LU in fiscal year 2009, the hearing also 
examined research issues to inform the current Federal surface 
transportation reauthorization effort.
    The Committee received testimony from: The Honorable Peter 
Appel, Administrator, Research and Innovative Technology 
Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation; Mr. John 
Halikowski, Director, Arizona Department of Transportation, and 
Chair, American Association of State Highway and Transportation 
Officials Standing Committee on Research; Mr. David Gehr, 
Senior Vice President, Highway Market, Parsons Brinckerhoff, 
and Chairman, American Society of Civil Engineers 
Transportation Policy Committee; Dr. Irwin Feller, Professor 
Emeritus of Economics, Pennsylvania State University, and 
Senior Visiting Fellow, American Association for the 
Advancement of Science; Ms. Lynn Peterson, Transportation 
Policy Advisor, Office of Governor John Kitzhaber (OR).

             July 13, 2011_Subcommittee Markup, H.R. 2463,

           Border Security Technology Innovation Act of 2011

    On Wednesday, July 13, 2011 the Subcommittee met to 
consider H.R. 2463, the Border Security Technology Innovation 
Act of 2011. The Subcommittee ordered H.R. 2463 favorably 
forwarded to the Full Committee, as amended, by voice vote.

               September 8, 2011_Empowering Consumers and

              Promoting Innovation through the Smart Grid

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-32)

    On Thursday, September 8, 2011 the Subcommittee on 
Technology and Innovation of the Committee on Science, Space, 
and Technology held a hearing to examine the status of efforts 
led by the National Institute of Standards and Technology to 
coordinate the development of a common framework as well as the 
open standards necessary to ensure a secure and interoperable 
nationwide smart grid. The hearing provided the Subcommittee 
with witness perspectives on the actions necessary to drive the 
development of innovative smart grid technologies while 
protecting consumer interests.
    The Committee received testimony from: Dr. George Arnold, 
National Coordinator for Smart Grid Interoperability, National 
Institute of Standards and Technology; The Honorable Donna 
Nelson, Chairman, Public Utility Commission of Texas; Mr. John 
Caskey, Assistant Vice President, Industry Operations, National 
Electrical Manufacturers Association; and Mr. Rik Drummond, 
Chief Executive Officer and Chief Scientist, The Drummond 
Group.

               September 21, 2011_The Next IT Revolution?

              Cloud Computing Opportunities and Challenges

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-36)

    On Wednesday, September 21, the Subcommittee on Technology 
and Innovation of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology held a hearing to examine the potential 
opportunities and challenges associated with cloud computing, 
and to assess the appropriate role of the Federal Government in 
the cloud computing enterprise. The hearing focused on 
innovation and efficiency opportunities associated with cloud 
computing, challenges restraining the widespread adoption of 
cloud computing, and federal cloud computing adoption 
initiatives.
    The Committee received testimony from: Mr. Michael 
Capellas, Chairman and CEO, Virtual Computing Environment 
Company; Dr. Dan Reed, Corporate Vice President, Technology 
Policy Group, Microsoft Corporation; Mr. Nick Combs, Federal 
Chief Technology Officer, EMC Corporation; Dr. David McClure, 
Associate Administrator, Office of Citizen Services and 
Innovative Technologies, General Services Administration.

                 November 2, 2011_Creating and Growing

                New Business: Fostering U.S. Innovation

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-48)

    On Wednesday, November 2, 2011, the Subcommittee on 
Technology and Innovation of the Committee on Science, Space, 
and Technology held a hearing to examine the current state of 
small, innovative startup companies, and their roles as engines 
of both transformative innovations and job creation. The 
hearing focused on the obstacles limiting individuals with the 
ideas and desire to either start a new company or take a 
fledgling company to a place of rapid growth.
    The Committee received testimony from: Mr. Brink Lindsey, 
Senior Scholar in Research and Policy, Ewing Marion Kauffman 
Foundation; Mr. Julian Mann, Co-Founder and Vice President, 
Product Development and Research, Skybox Imaging; Mr. Ray 
Rothrock, Partner, Venrock; Mr. Steve Dubin, Former CEO, Martek 
Biosciences, and Senior Advisor to DSM Nutritional Products.

                 November 15, 2011_Subcommittee Markup,

            Committee Print, Natural Hazards Risk Reduction

                              Act of 2011

    On Tuesday, November 15, 2011 the Subcommittee met to 
consider the Committee Print, the Natural Hazards Risk 
Reduction Act of 2011. The Subcommittee ordered the Committee 
Print favorably forwarded to the Full Committee, as amended, by 
a record vote of 10 yeas to 4 nays.

                              2nd Session

                February 29, 2012_Promoting Innovation,

            Competition, and Economic Growth: Principles for

      Effective Domestic and International Standards Development 
                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-63)

    On Wednesday, February 29, 2011, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing exploring the principles that support effective 
standards development processes, with respect to the effect of 
standards development on innovation, competition, and economic 
growth. The hearing analyzed the ways in which the Federal 
government, industry, and other organizations work to promote 
the application of principles in the international standards 
development arena. Additionally, the hearing examined the ways 
in which trading partners may use standards as technical 
barriers to trade and how the Federal government and other 
stakeholders seek to address these challenges in the global 
arena.
    The Subcommittee heard testimony from Ms. Mary H. Saunders, 
Director, Standards Coordination Office, National Institute of 
Standards and Technology; Mr. S. Joe Bhatia, President and CEO, 
American National Standards Institute; Mr. Philip Wennblom, 
Director of Standards, Intel Corporation; Mr. Mark Grimaldi, 
Owner, Equinox Chemicals; and Mr. James Seay, President, 
Premier Rides.

          March 6, 2012_An Overview of the National Institute

             of Standards and Technology Budget for Fiscal

                 Year 2013 (Hearing Volume No. 112-66)

    On Tuesday, March 6, 2012, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
to examine the Administration's proposed fiscal year 2013 
(FY13) budget request for the National Institute of Standards 
and Technology (NIST). NIST is a non-regulatory agency within 
the Department of Commerce. Originally founded in 1901 as the 
National Bureau of Standards, NIST's mission is to promote U.S. 
innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing 
measurement science, standards, and technology in ways that 
enhance economic security and improve our quality of life. By 
working closely alongside industry, NIST has become recognized 
as a provider of high-quality information utilized by the 
private sector.
    The Subcommittee heard testimony from Dr. Patrick 
Gallagher, Under Secretary of Commerce for Standards and 
Technology and Director, National Institute of Standards and 
Technology, who reviewed the proposed budget in the context of 
the Administration's overall priorities for NIST.
National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) Spending

(dollars in millions)

<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>


          March 27, 2012_Fostering the U.S. Competitive Edge:

              Examining the Effect of Federal Policies on

                Competition, Innovation, and Job Growth

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-71)

    On Tuesday, March 27, 2012, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
to better understand how Federal policies and regulations 
affect competition, innovation, and job growth, and to solicit 
input from leaders of innovative companies on ways to improve 
Federal economic and regulatory policy. The hearing focused on 
recommendations for policies Congress should enact to improve 
American competitiveness and to promote innovation; proposals 
for Federal policy-makers to help alleviate the burdens of 
current Federal policies that inhibit innovation; how 
regulatory uncertainty affects companies' ability to make 
business decisions; and how a country's economic policies 
influence companies' decisions to establish or expand business 
operations.
    The Subcommittee heard testimony from Dr. Ron Cohen, 
President and CEO, Acorda Therapeutics; Mr. Mick Truitt, Vice 
President, Ludlum Measurements, Inc.; Mr. Thomas M. Brandt, 
Jr., Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, 
TeleCommunication Systems, Inc.; and Mr. Richard A. Bendis, 
Interim CEO, BioHealth Innovation Inc., President and CEO, 
Innovation America.

              April 18, 2012_Avoiding the Spectrum Crunch:

    Growing the Wireless Economy through Innovation (Hearing Volume 
                              No. 112-77)

    On Wednesday, April 18, 2012, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing to review efforts supporting the flexible and 
innovative utilization of spectrum, while ensuring the 
continued growth of the wireless economy. Given continued 
growth projections and spectrum's finite nature, additional 
allocations of spectrum will only address the ``spectrum 
crunch'' for an indefinite period of time. Smartphone sales 
have eclipsed PC sales, and mobile broadband is being adopted 
faster than any computing platform in history.
    The Subcommittee heard testimony from Dr. James Olthoff, 
Deputy Director, Physical Measurement Laboratory, National 
Institute of Standards and Technology; Mr. Richard Bennett, 
Senior Research Fellow, Information Technology and Innovation 
Foundation; Mr. Christopher Guttman-McCabe, Vice President, 
Regulatory Affairs, CTIA-The Wireless Association; Ms. Mary 
Brown, Director, Technology and Spectrum Policy, Cisco Systems, 
Inc.; and Dr. Rangam Subramanian, Chief Wireless and Technology 
Strategist, Idaho National Laboratory.

             May 17, 2012_Working for a Fire Safe America:

    Examining United States Fire Administration Priorities (Hearing 
                             Volume 112-85)

    On Thursday, May 17, 2012, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
to examine the priorities of the fire service community for the 
future of the United States Fire Administration (USFA). The 
USFA is responsible for leadership, coordination, best 
practices, and support for the nation's fire prevention and 
control, fire training and education, and emergency medical 
services activities. It prepares first responders and health 
care leaders to react to all hazard and terrorism emergencies.
    Witnesses discussed the current effectiveness of the USFA; 
priorities for future research, development, and training 
activities; and the areas of greatest importance for the 
upcoming reauthorization.
    The Subcommittee heard testimony from Mr. Ernest Mitchell, 
Jr., Administrator, United States Fire Administration; Dr. John 
R. Hall, Jr., Division Director, Fire Analysis and Research, 
National Fire Protection Association; Chief Jim Critchley, 
Tucson Fire Department; President, Western Fire Chiefs 
Association; Mr. Kevin O'Connor, Assistant to the General 
President for Governmental Affairs, International Association 
of Fire Fighters.

                   May 31, 2012_Assembling the Facts:

       Examining the Proposed National Network for Manufacturing 
                 Innovation (Hearing Volume No. 112-86)

    On Thursday, May 31, 2012, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
to examine the proposed National Network for Manufacturing 
Innovation (NNMI). The Administration requested $1 billion in 
mandatory spending for the NNMI in the fiscal year 2013 budget 
request for the National Institute of Standards and Technology 
(NIST). The NNMI is designed to promote the development of 
manufacturing technologies with broad applications through 
collaboration between the Federal Government and public and 
private sector stakeholders. Since the NIST fiscal year 2013 
budget hearing in early March, the Administration has moved 
forward with establishing the pilot institute as well as the 
planning process for the greater NNMI. At the time of the 
hearing, Under Secretary Gallagher was unable to provide 
substantial details about the program. This hearing sought to 
follow up on the March 6, 2012 hearing, and specifically learn 
more about the proposed network and status of FY12 activities 
related to the pilot institute.
    The Subcommittee heard testimony from Dr. Patrick 
Gallagher, Under Secretary of Commerce for Standards and 
Technology and Director, National Institute of Standards and 
Technology.

              June 19, 2012_Best Practices in Transforming

                       Research into Innovation:

                Creative Approaches to the Bayh-Dole Act

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-89)

    On Tuesday, June 19, 2012, the Subcommittee on Technology 
and Innovation held a hearing to learn about different 
approaches universities and nonprofits are taking to transfer 
the results of federally-funded research. Because of the large 
amount of funding expended by the federal government on basic 
research, efforts to improve the transfer of federally-funded 
research are of interest to both the federal government and 
stakeholders across the nation. The Amendments to the Patent 
and Trademark Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-517), commonly known as the 
Bayh-Dole Act, were designed to improve collaboration between 
commercial concerns and nonprofit organizations, including 
universities, in addition to promoting the utilization of 
inventions arising from federally supported research and 
development. In order to encourage the two sectors to work 
together to generate new goods, processes, and services for the 
marketplace, the Act gave U.S. universities, small businesses, 
and nonprofits intellectual property control of their 
inventions and other intellectual property that resulted from 
such funding.
    Universities, nonprofits, and other interested stakeholders 
are attempting to improve the transfer of technology through a 
number of methods. Some of the areas of focus include: reducing 
the barriers to commercialization through activities such as 
reducing legal fees, minimizing licensing negotiations, 
restructuring organizational units, and building industry 
relationships; promoting entrepreneurship through cross-
discipline and cross-college programs; increasing collaboration 
between industry and innovator through federal agency research 
components, collaborative models, and commercialization 
potential in grant proposals; linking technology transfer to 
economic development through regional and local partnerships; 
and sharing of best practices between institutions with 
different levels of technology transfer capacity and 
experience.
    The Subcommittee heard testimony from Dr. Todd T. Sherer, 
President, The Association of University Technology Managers; 
Ms. Catherine Innes, Director, Office of Technology 
Development, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Mr. 
Ken Nisbet, Executive Director, University of Michigan 
Technology Transfer; and Mr. Robert Rosenbaum, President and 
Executive Director, Maryland Technology Development 
Corporation.

           November 14, 2012_Is ``Meaningful Use'' Delivering

                 Meaningful Results?: An Examination of

                Health Information Technology Standards

           and Interoperability (Hearing Volume No. 112-105)

    On Wednesday, November 14, 2012, the Subcommittee on 
Technology and Innovation held a hearing to examine progress on 
the development and implementation of interoperable technical 
standards and conformance testing procedures for health 
information technology (HIT). The Subcommittee reviewed the 
activities of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health 
Information Technology (ONC) and the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology (NIST) in promoting interoperability 
through the development of technical standards for HIT. 
Additionally, the Subcommittee examined the implementation of 
the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical 
Health (HITECH) Act, including the final rule for Stage 2 
meaningful use of HIT under the Act.
    The Subcommittee heard testimony from Dr. Farzad 
Mostashari, National Coordinator for Health Information 
Technology, The Office of the National Coordinator for Health 
Information Technology, U.S. Department of Health and Human 
Services; Dr. Charles H. Romine, Director, Information 
Technology Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and 
Technology; Mr. Marc Probst, Chief Information Officer and Vice 
President, Information Systems, Intermountain Healthcare; Ms. 
Rebecca Little, Senior Vice President, Medicity; and Dr. Willa 
Fields, DNSc, RN, FHIMSS, Professor, School of Nursing, San 
Diego State University.
                             Oversight Plan

                              ----------                              





<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>

                     U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY

                 OVERSIGHT PLAN FOR THE 112th CONGRESS

                    (INCLUDING ACCOMPLISHMENTS AS OF

                            JANUARY 2, 2013)

    House Rule X sets the Committee's legislative jurisdiction while 
also assigning broad general oversight responsibilities (Appendix A). 
Rule X also assigns the Committee special oversight responsibility for 
``reviewing and studying, on a continuing basis, all laws, programs, 
and Government activities dealing with or involving non-military 
research and development.'' The Committee appreciates the special 
function entrusted to it and will continue to tackle troubled programs 
and search for waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement, in non-military 
research and development programs regardless of where they may be 
found.
    Much of the oversight work of the Committee is carried out by and 
through the Investigations and Oversight Subcommittee. However, 
oversight is required for and necessarily built into every Subcommittee 
and the Full Committee. All elements of the Committee take their 
oversight charge seriously, and those elements have worked 
cooperatively in the past, as they will in the future, to meet our 
oversight responsibilities.
    The Committee also routinely works with the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) and the Inspectors General of our agencies 
to maintain detailed awareness of the work of those offices. The 
Committee currently has numerous outstanding requests with the GAO and 
more will be developed in the coming weeks and months. Many of these 
requests are bipartisan, having been signed by both the Chairmen and 
Ranking Members of our Committee and Subcommittees, or include multiple 
Committee Chairmen where there are shared interests. The Committee also 
works collaboratively with the National Academies of Science, the 
Congressional Research Service, the Office of Government Ethics, and 
the Office of Special Counsel, as well as various other independent 
investigative and oversight entities.
    Oversight is commonly driven by emerging events. The Committee will 
address burgeoning issues and topics as they transpire. Nevertheless, 
the Committee feels that the work contained in this plan reflects an 
accurate portrayal of its oversight intentions as of January, 2011.

                         Space and Aeronautics

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) human spaceflight

program

    The Committee will continue to provide oversight of NASA's human 
spaceflight program as it undergoes a period of uncertainty and 
transition following various Administration proposals. Specific 
attention will be paid to the feasibility of NASA's plans and 
priorities relative to their resources and requirements.

          Full Committee Hearing
          The National Aeronautics and Space Administration
          Fiscal Year 2012 Budget Request
          March 2, 2011

          Full Committee Hearing
          A Review of NASA's Space Launch Systems
          July 12, 2011

          Full Committee Hearing
          NASA Human Spaceflight Past, Present, and Future:
          Where Do We Go From Here?
          September 22, 2011

          Full Committee Hearing
          NASA's Commercial Crew Development Program:
          Accomplishments and Challenges
          October 26, 2011
          Full Committee Hearing
          An Overview of the National Aeronautics and Space 
        Administration
          Budget for Fiscal Year 2013
          March 7, 2012

          Full Committee Hearing
          The Future of NASA: Perspectives on Strategic Vision for 
        America's Space Program
          December 12, 2012

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Commercial Space Transportation

    FAA's Office of Commercial Space Transportation (OCST) regulates, 
including the licensing of commercial launch vehicles. An area of 
increasing interest is the emergence of a number of fledgling 
commercial human suborbital space flight ventures. In addition to its 
oversight of the FAA's OCST, the Committee will examine the progress of 
the emerging personal space flight industry, as well as the challenges 
it faces.

          Space & Aeronautics Subcommittee Hearing
          Office of Commercial Space Transportation's Fiscal Year 2012 
        Budget Request
          May 5, 2011

          Space & Aeronautics Subcommittee Hearing
          An Overview of the Office of Commercial Space Transportation 
        Budget for
          Fiscal Year 2013
          March 20, 2012

          Space & Aeronautics Subcommittee Hearing
          An Examination of FAA's Launch Indemnification Program
          June 6, 2012

NASA Earth and Space Science

    The Committee will monitor NASA's efforts to prioritize, plan, 
launch, and operate space and earth science missions with cost and 
schedule. Particular attention will be paid to programs that exceed 
cost estimates to ensure they do not adversely impact the development 
and launch of other missions. The Committee will also examine the 
impact of large increases in funding for the Earth Science Directorate 
relative to funding requested for other science disciplines.

          Space & Aeronautics Subcommittee Hearing
          Exploring Mars and Beyond: What's Next for U.S. Planetary 
        Science
          November 15, 2011

          Full Committee Hearing
          The Next Great Observatory: Assessing the James Webb Space 
        Telescope
          December 7, 2011

          Space & Aeronautics Subcommittee Hearing
          National Priorities for Solar and Space Physics Research and 
        Applications for Space Weather Prediction
          November 28, 2012

FAA Research and Development (R&D) activities

    The Committee will oversee the R&D activities at the FAA to ensure 
that they lead to improvements in FAA mission performance. The 
Committee has a particular interest in the performance of the Joint 
Planning and Development Office (JPDO), and FAA's management of its 
Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) program.

          Space & Aeronautics Subcommittee Hearing
          A Review of the Federal Aviation Administration's Research 
        and Development Programs
          February 16, 2011

Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS)

    The Committee will evaluate the ability, cost, safety, and 
reliability of commercial providers to meet NASA requirements to 
deliver cargo to the ISS. A similar hearing will be held later this 
Congress on the Agency's commercial crew program.

          Space & Aeronautics Subcommittee Hearing
          NASA's Commercial Cargo Providers: Are They Ready to Supply 
        the Space Station in the Post-Shuttle Era?
          May 26, 2011

          Space & Aeronautics Subcommittee Hearing
          The Emerging Commercial Suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicle 
        Market
          August 1, 2012

Space Shuttle transition

    As the Space Shuttle retires, the Committee will monitor the 
transition of its highly skilled workforce to other programs and 
projects, as there is potential for major workforce transition issues.

          Space & Aeronautics Subcommittee Hearing
          A Review of NASA's Exploration Program in Transition: Issues 
        for Congress and Industry
          March 30, 2011

International Space Station (ISS) utilization and operation

    Plans for operation and utilization of the ISS continue to draw the 
Committee's attention as NASA attempts to fully utilize the unique 
research opportunities that the facility offers, while exclusively 
relying on logistical services from commercial and foreign providers. 
Given the significant national investment to date in the facility, 
Congress has directed that NASA maintain a strong research and 
technology program to take advantage of ISS's unique capabilities.

          Space & Aeronautics Subcommittee Hearing
          The International Space Station: Lessons from the Soyuz 
        Rocket Failure and Return to Flight
          October 12, 2011

          Full Committee Hearing
          Securing the Promise of the International Space Station: 
        Challenges and Opportunities
          March 28, 2012

          Space & Aeronautics Subcommittee Hearing
          Examining NASA's Development of the Space Launch System and 
        Orion Crew Capsule
          September 12, 2012

Aeronautics Research

    An important area for oversight will be NASA's aeronautics research 
and development program. The Committee plans to examine NASA's ability 
to support the interagency effort to modernize the nation's air traffic 
management system, as well as its ability to undertake important long-
term R&D on aircraft safety, emissions, noise, and energy consumption--
R&D that will have a significant impact on the quality of life and U.S. 
competitiveness in aviation.

          Space & Aeronautics Subcommittee Hearing
          An Overview of the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission 
        Directorate
          Budget for Fiscal Year 2013
          April 26, 2012

NASA contract and financial management

    A perennial topic on GAO's high risk series, NASA financial 
management will continue to receive attention from the Committee. The 
Committee will also monitor NASA's contract management to ensure 
acquisitions are handled appropriately.

          Full Committee Hearing
          Recent Developments In NASA's Commercial Crew Acquisition 
        Strategy
          September 14, 2012

Near Earth Objects

    Congress provided guidance to NASA relating to Near Earth Objects 
in its last two authorization bills. The Committee will continue to 
monitor NASA's compliance with that direction, as well as determine 
whether additional oversight is necessary.

    Within the Space and Aeronautics Subcommittee's jurisdiction, 
activities warranting further review include costs associated with 
cancellation of the Constellation program, NASA's approach to develop 
and fund a successor to the Space Shuttle, and investment in NASA 
launch infrastructure. NASA has not clearly articulated what types of 
future human space flight missions it wishes to pursue, or their 
rationale.
                         Energy and Environment

          Full Committee Hearing
          The Department of Energy Fiscal Year 2012 Research and 
        Development Budget Request
          March 3, 2011

          Full Committee Hearing
          An Overview of the Fiscal Year 2012 Research and Development 
        Budget Proposals at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
        Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency
          March 10, 2011

          Full Committee Hearing
          An Overview of the Department of Energy Research and 
        Development Budget for Fiscal Year 2013
          March 1, 2012

          Subcommittee Hearing
          An Overview of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
        Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency Budgets 
        for Fiscal Year 2013
          March 6, 2012

          Subcommittee Hearing
          To Observe and Protect: How NOAA Procures Data for Weather 
        Forecasting
          March 28, 2012

Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science

    DOE plays a leading role in supporting basic research in the 
physical sciences and driving long-term innovation and economic growth. 
The Committee will conduct oversight of Office of Science programs to 
review prioritization across, and management within, its major program 
areas. Special attention will also be given to the cost, operation, and 
maintenance of DOE's existing and planned major facilities.

          Energy & Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          Energy Critical Elements: Identifying Research Needs and 
        Strategic Priorities
          December 7, 2011

          Subcommittee Hearing
          Department of Energy User Facilities: Utilizing the Tools of 
        Science to Drive Innovation through
          Fundamental Research
          June 21, 2012

National Laboratories

    The Committee will continue to oversee the Department's laboratory 
complex, which provides a wide range of important R&D capabilities. The 
management and upkeep of the national laboratories' aging facilities, 
particularly the clean-up of radioactive and hazardous material sites, 
remains a continuing concern for the Committee. Efforts will continue 
to assure that the government meets its responsibilities to control 
risks in and around these facilities.

DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    After recently receiving significant increases in funding, the 
Committee will provide close oversight to ensure that programs are 
managed efficiently, duplication is limited, and funding was allocated 
appropriately and effectively.

          Energy & Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          An Examination of DOE's Clean Technology Programs
          June 15, 2011

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Investigations & Oversight and Energy & Environment
          Impact of Tax Policies on the Commercial Application of 
        Renewable Energy Technology
          April 19, 2012

Fossil Energy R&D

    Fossil energy will remain a crucial aspect of our energy portfolio 
for the foreseeable future. In the 112th Congress, the Committee will 
continue to ensure that fossil fuel R&D programs are appropriately 
focused and managed efficiently. Expected areas of oversight include 
carbon capture and sequestration activities (including FutureGen) and 
oil and gas R&D efforts.

          Full Committee Hearing
          Review of Hydraulic Fracturing Technology and Practices
          May 11, 2011

          Energy & Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          Advancing Coal Research and Development for a Secure Energy 
        Future
          October 13, 2011

          Full Committee Hearing
          Tapping America's Unconventional Oil Resources for Job 
        Creation and Affordable Domestic Energy: Technology and Policy 
        Pathways
          April 17, 2012


          Subcommittee Hearing
          Supporting American Jobs and the Economy through Expanded 
        Energy Production: Challenges and Opportunities of 
        Unconventional Resources Technology
          May 10, 2012

          Subcommittee Hearing
          Tapping America's Potential Energy Through Research and 
        Development
          November 30, 2012

DOE loan guarantees

    Large increases in funding for DOE loan guarantees necessarily call 
for greater attention by the Committee. Ensuring the funding is 
appropriately prioritized and spent effectively will be a priority in 
the 112th Congress.

          Energy & Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          An Examination of DOE's Clean Technology Programs
          June 15, 2011

Fusion

    Technical challenges have hampered our ability to harness nuclear 
fusion as an energy source. The Committee will continue to monitor 
progress toward nuclear fusion, specifically international cooperation 
and progress in the International Thermonuclear Energy Reactor (ITER).

DOE Contract Management

    DOE programs have come under frequent scrutiny for contract 
management practices. GAO designated DOE's contract management as high-
risk in 1990 and continues to identify areas of potential waste, fraud, 
and abuse.

Nuclear R&D

    The Committee will provide oversight of the nation's nuclear R&D 
activities with the goal of unleashing the unlimited potential of 
emissions-free energy. DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the 
power industry hope to accelerate reactor construction as soon as 
possible. The Committee will examine how DOE R&D can best contribute to 
this goal through the advancement of various nuclear energy 
technologies.

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Investigations & Oversight and Energy & Environment
          Nuclear Energy Risk Management
          May 4, 2011

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Investigations & Oversight and Energy & Environment
          Review of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear 
        Future Draft Recommendations
          October 27, 2011

          Full Committee Hearing
          Assessing America's Nuclear Future-A Review of the Blue 
        Ribbon Commission's Report to the Secretary of Energy
          February 8, 2012

Science and R&D at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

    The Committee will continue to provide oversight of EPA's 
management of science, and its use of science in the decision making 
process, including the evaluation of quality assurance measures. In 
particular, the Committee will examine how to better integrate science 
into the Administration's regulatory decision-making process. EPA's 
decisions affect every state in the Union and we must demand that EPA's 
actions are supported by valid and complete science.

          Energy & Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          Hitting the Ethanol Blend Wall: Examining the Science on E15
          July 7, 2011

          Full Committee Hearing
          Out of Thin Air: EPA's Cross-State Air Pollution Rule
          September 15, 2011

          Energy & Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          Quality Science for Quality Air
          October 4, 2011

          Energy & Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          Conflicts and Unintended Consequences of Motor Fuel Standards
          November 2, 2011

          Energy & Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          Fostering Quality Science at EPA: The Need for Common Sense 
        Reform
          November 17, 2011

          Energy & Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          Fostering Quality Science at EPA: Perspectives on Common 
        Sense Reform
          November 30, 2011

          Subcommittee Hearing
          Fractured Science-Examining EPA's Approach to Ground Water 
        Research:
          The Pavillion Analysis
          February 1, 2012

          Subcommittee Hearing
          Fostering Quality Science at EPA: Perspectives on
          Common Sense Reform- Day II
          February 3, 2012

          Subcommittee Hearing
          EPA's Impact on Jobs and Energy Affordability:
          Understanding the Real Costs and Benefits of Environmental 
        Regulations
          June 6, 2012

EPA Laboratories and Libraries

    The Committee will evaluate the effectiveness and utility of EPA 
resources and infrastructure to ensure the Agency can fully meet its 
statutory requirements.

Oil Spill Response and Recovery

    The Committee will continue its oversight of the cause and impact 
of the oil spill, as well as the response and recovery efforts 
associated with the accident. Oversight efforts will build upon the 
various independent investigations including the President's National 
Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling 
Report, as well as reports from other entities such as the National 
Academies.

          Energy & Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          Offshore Drilling Safety and Response Technologies
          April 6, 2011

Federal Climate Research Activities

    The Committee will continue to monitor programs to address climate 
change issues across the Federal government to ensure that existing 
programs are necessary, appropriately focused, effectively coordinated, 
and properly organized to prevent duplication of efforts and waste 
taxpayer resources. We must also insist that decisions on climate 
activities are based on solid and thorough science.

          Full Committee Hearing
          Climate Change: Examining the Processes Used to Create 
        Science and Policy
          March 31, 2011

          Energy & Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          Examining NOAA's Climate Service Proposal
          June 22, 2011

Federal Ocean Research Activities

    The Committee will evaluate the President's National Policy for the 
Stewardship of the Ocean, Coasts, and Great Lakes, which adopted the 
Interagency Ocean Policy Task Force recommendations aimed at addressing 
the future of our oceans. The Committee will monitor the implementation 
of this plan, as well as Federal oceans R&D policy generally.

          Energy & Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          Harmful Algal Blooms: Action Plans for Scientific Solutions
          June 1, 2011

    Specific areas of interest within the Energy and Environment 
Subcommittee's portfolio warranting further review include major 
projects and facilities construction at the Department of Energy and 
accounts receiving significant recent increases, such as interagency 
climate science activities, EPA research programs, and DOE energy 
efficiency and renewable energy technology development programs.
                       Technology and Innovation

Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology

    The Committee will continue to monitor the maturation of DHS, 
particularly the reorganization of the Science and Technology 
Directorate, and the research and technology programs associated with 
the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office.

          Technology & Innovation Subcommittee Hearing
          An Overview of Science and Technology Research and 
        Development Programs 
        and Priorities at the Department of Homeland Security
          March 15, 2011

          Technology & Innovation Subcommittee Hearing
          Keeping America Secure: The Science Supporting the 
        Development of Threat Detection Technologies
          July 19, 2012

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) reorganization

    The Committee will conduct program oversight for NIST, and other 
programs in the Department of Commerce, paying special attention to the 
evaluation of their impact on the private sector. The Committee is 
aware that the nation's competitive position can be dramatically 
improved, or weakened, depending on how standards for different 
products and processes are developed. NIST is the only federal agency 
with long-term expertise working in this arena, and the Committee is 
concerned that the cooperation on standards development across agencies 
is less than optimal. It is the Committee's intention to review the 
government's role in standard setting with a focus on collaboration 
across Federal agencies.

          Full Committee Hearing
          An Overview of the Fiscal Year 2012 Budget Proposals at the 
        National Science Foundation and the National Institute of 
        Standards and Technology
          March 11, 2011

          Technology & Innovation Subcommittee Hearing
          An Overview of the National Institute of Standards and 
        Technology Budget for Fiscal Year 2013
          March 6, 2012

          Technology & Innovation Subcommittee Hearing
          Assembling the Facts: Examining the Proposed National Network 
        for Manufacturing Innovation
          May 31, 2012 

Department of Transportation (DOT) R&D programs

    The Committee will conduct oversight with regard to surface 
transportation R&D programs within the federal government, particularly 
focused on effectiveness and redundancy.

          Technology & Innovation Subcommittee Hearing
          Transportation Research Priorities: Maximizing Return on 
        Investment of Taxpayer Dollars
          June 14, 2011

American economic competitiveness

    The nation faces a challenge for economic and technological 
preeminence. The Committee will evaluate steps to reduce federal 
barriers to domestic and international competitiveness for U.S. 
companies.

          Technology & Innovation Subcommittee Hearing
          The Role of Small Business in Innovation and Job Creation: 
        The SBIR and STTR Programs
          March 31, 2011

          Technology & Innovation Subcommittee Hearing
          The Next IT Revolution? Cloud Computing Opportunities and 
        Challenges
          September 21, 2011

          Technology & Innovation Subcommittee Hearing
          Creating and Growing New Business: Fostering U.S. Innovation
          November 2, 2011

          Technology & Innovation Subcommittee Hearing
          Promoting Innovation, Competition, and Economic Growth: 
        Principles for Effective Domestic and International Standards 
        Development
          February 29, 2012

          Technology & Innovation Subcommittee Hearing
          Fostering the U.S. Competitive Edge: Examining the Effect of 
        Federal Policies on Competition, Innovation, and Job Growth
          March 27, 2012

          Technology & Innovation Subcommittee Hearing
          Avoiding the Spectrum Crunch: Growing the Wireless Economy 
        through Innovation
          April 18, 2012

Technology transfer

    The Committee will seek recommendations for continued improvements 
in the technology transfer incentives built into law by the Bayh-Dole 
and Stevenson-Wydler acts and the Small Business Innovation Research 
program.

          Technology & Innovation Subcommittee Hearing
          Best Practices in Transforming Research into Innovation: 
        Creative Approaches to the Bayh-Dole Act
          June 19, 2012

US Fire Administration

    The U.S. Fire Administration is responsible for the Assistance to 
Firefighters grant program, and the Committee has closely monitored the 
direction of this program as the organizational structure of the 
Department has coalesced. Continuing attention is important to assure 
first responders have the necessary support and training.

          Technology & Innovation Subcommittee Hearing
          Working for a Fire Safe America: Examining United States Fire 
        Administration Priorities
          May 17, 2012

Natural hazards monitoring and impact reduction

    The Committee has supported interagency research programs to 
identify improvements in building and infrastructure designs to protect 
and provide early warning for natural disasters. Evaluating further 
needs for these and other hazard types is ongoing.

          Technology & Innovation Subcommittee Hearing
          Are We Prepared? Assessing Earthquake Risk Reduction in the 
        United States
          April 7, 2011

Cybersecurity

    The Committee has continuously stressed the protection of the 
nation's cyber-infrastructure, underpinning economic and public 
services. The Committee will continue to provide oversight of how NIST 
and DHS address this important topic.

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Research & Science Education and Technology & Innovation
          Protecting Information in the Digital Age: Federal 
        Cybersecurity Research and Development Efforts
          May 25, 2011

Health information technology

    Real improvements in the cost and accuracy of health care can be 
achieved through enhanced integration of health data with IT systems. 
NIST has a critical role to play through setting standards that will 
protect patient privacy and minimize private sector waste. The 
Committee has been active in this area and will continue to work to 
ensure that the Nation realizes the gains in efficiency and safety 
implicit in an effective roll out of Health IT.

          Technology and Innovation Subcommittee Hearing
          Is ``Meaningful Use'' Delivering Meaningful Results?: An 
        Examination of the Health Information Technology Standards and 
        Interoperability
          November 14, 2012

    Within the Technology and Innovation's Subcommittee's jurisdiction, 
there are several activities supported by the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology (NIST) which would be better supported by the 
private sector. Among them is a grant program for building construction 
at universities and nonprofit organizations. There are also other 
programs administered by the Department of Commerce and Department of 
Transportation which could be streamlined and refined. The Committee 
will ensure that all funding for these programs is awarded 
competitively and only renewed after performance is assessed. In the 
area of economic competitiveness, the Committee must ensure that the 
Small Business Innovation Research Program is focused on innovations 
that industry finds too risky to invest in and to increase oversight of 
outcomes of program and consider reductions. Finally, there are 
substantial federal funds being provided for staffing local fire 
personnel that need to be examined as to whether this is a more 
appropriate role for local communities to support.
                     Research and Science Education

National Science Foundation (NSF)

    The Committee will continue to oversee the NSF. With the recent 
reauthorization of the America Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully 
Promote Excellence in Technology, Education, and Science (COMPETES) 
Act, special attention will be paid to the implementation, execution, 
and effectiveness of these new programs. While supportive of the 
overall goals of the legislation, there are concerns with several add-
ons, especially those that were added to the bill without the proper 
legislative process. Further, the Committee will look for ways to trim 
duplicative and unused programs in an effort to maximize available 
resources.

          Full Committee Hearing
          An Overview of the Fiscal Year 2012 Budget Proposals at the 
        National Science Foundation and the National Institute of 
        Standards and Technology
          March 11, 2011

          Research & Science Education Subcommittee Hearing
          Social, Behavioral, and Economic Science Research: Oversight 
        of the Need for Federal Investments and Priorities for Funding
          June 2, 2011

          Research & Science Education Subcommittee Hearing
          The Merit Review Process: Ensuring Limited Federal Resources 
        are Invested in the Best Science
          July 26, 2011


          Research & Science Education Subcommittee Hearing
          An Overview of the National Science Foundation Budget for FY 
        2013
          February 28, 2012

          Research & Science Education Subcommittee Hearing
          NSF Major Multi-User Research Facilities Management: Ensuring 
        Fiscal Responsibility and Accountability
          April 18, 2012

          Research & Science Education Subcommittee Hearing
          Ensuring the Best Stewardship of American Taxpayer Dollars at 
        the National Science Foundation
          May 9, 2012

Science, Technology, Education and Mathematics (STEM) K-12 oversight

    STEM education is a vital component in the evolving economy. 
Members of the Committee have expressed interests in improving STEM 
education activities from pre-K through graduate education and beyond, 
in order to cultivate a top-notch future scientific and technical 
workforce, including well-qualified teachers in STEM fields. 
Determining the appropriate forms of federal support to achieve these 
outcomes will be of great importance to the Committee.

          Full Committee Hearing
          STEM Education in Action: Learning Today.Leading Tomorrow
          June 16, 2011

          Full Committee Hearing
          STEM in Action: Inspiring the Science and Engineering 
        Workforce of Tomorrow
          September 13, 2011

          Full Committee Hearing--Field Hearing
          STEM in Education In Action: Communities Preparing for Jobs 
        of the Future
          September 26, 2011

          Research & Science Education Subcommittee Hearing
          What Makes for Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Closer Look 
        at Effective STEM Education Approaches
          October 12, 2011

          Research & Science Education Subcommittee Hearing
          STEM in Action: Transferring Knowledge from the Workplace to 
        the Classroom
          November 3, 2011
          Research & Science Education Subcommittee Hearing - Field 
        Hearing
          STEM Education in Action: Local Schools, Non-Profits, and 
        Businesses Doing Their Part to Secure America's Future
          April 30, 2012 

Academic/Industry Partnerships

    The Committee will review the effectiveness and consequences of 
academic/industry partnerships. Agencies and universities are again 
debating the level of scrutiny and control that should be applied to 
research in light of the possible use of new findings by adversaries. 
At the same time, industry questions the value of controls on 
technology sales and argues that such controls disproportionately limit 
American firms in competition for global sales. How to fairly balance 
these competing interests remains a perennial subject for Committee 
oversight.

          Research & Science Education Subcommittee Hearing
          The Role of Research Universities in Securing America's 
        Future Prosperity: Challenges and Expectations
          June 27, 2012

          Research & Science Education Subcommittee Hearing
          The Relationship Between Business and Research Universities: 
        Collaborations Fueling American Innovation and Job Creation
          August 1, 2012

U.S. Antarctic and Arctic Programs

    The U.S. has conducted operations on the Antarctic continent under 
the terms of the Antarctic Treaty System since 1959, and U.S. research 
activities in the Arctic predate that. The NSF serves as the steward 
for U.S. interests in Antarctica. Research in these extreme regions is 
a fundamental component to understanding the Earth and its systems. The 
future of the icebreaker fleet that provides vital logistical support 
for NSF activities in the harsh polar environments continues to be of 
concern.

          Research & Science Education Subcommittee Hearing
          The U.S. Antarctic Program: Achieving Fiscal and Logistical 
        Efficiency While Supporting Sound Science
          November 15, 2012

NSF Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction

(MREFC) program

    The Committee will continue to monitor and oversee NSF's MREFC 
program, including how priorities for projects are developed, long-term 
budgeting for such priorities, and decision-making with regards to 
ever-changing scientific community needs.

          Research & Science Education Subcommittee Hearing
          NSF Major Research Equipment and Facilities Management: 
        Ensuring Fiscal Responsibility and Accountability at NSF
          March 8, 2012

Government-wide R&D initiatives in emerging fields

    The Committee will continue to oversee the collaboration and 
interagency process associated with emerging fields such as networking 
and information technology, biotechnology, cybersecurity, and 
nanotechnology,

          Full Committee Hearing
          An Overview of the Administration's Federal Research and 
        Development Budget for Fiscal Year 2012
          February 17, 2011

          Research & Science Education Subcommittee Hearing
          Nanotechnology: Oversight of the National Nanotechnology 
        Initiative and Priorities for the Future
          April 14, 2011

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Research & Science Education and Technology & Innovation
          Protecting Information in the Digital Age: Federal 
        Cybersecurity Research and Development Efforts
          May 25, 2011

          Research & Science Education Subcommittee Hearing
          Oversight of the Networking and Information Technology 
        Research and Development Program and Priorities for the Future
          September 21, 2011

          Full Committee Hearing
          An Overview of the Administration's Federal Research and 
        Development Budget for Fiscal Year 2013
          February 17, 2012 

    The innovative work of the National Science Foundation is important 
to the economic prosperity and competitiveness of the United States. 
However, there are various activities within the Foundation that may go 
beyond the mission of the agency and require more scrutiny and 
potential cuts in order to ensure that federal investments in basic 
science remain primarily focused on actual research of benefit to the 
Nation. Likewise, while STEM education is critical to maintaining the 
scientific and technical workforce essential to our competitiveness, 
many duplicative, wasteful, or simply unused programs exist across a 
number of federal agencies and must be more closely examined and, where 
warranted, adjusted.
                      Investigations and Oversight

Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository closure decision

    The Committee will evaluate DOE's decision to close the Yucca 
Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository.

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Investigations & Oversight and Energy & Environment
          Review of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear 
        Future Draft Recommendations
          October 27, 2011

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Investigations & Oversight and Energy & Environment 
        Subcommittee Hearing
          Nuclear Energy Risk Management
          May 4, 2011

NOAA satellite modernization

    The Committee will continue its close monitoring of satellite 
modernization at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 
(NOAA). The restructuring of the National Polar-orbiting Environmental 
Satellite System (NPOESS), and the creation of the Joint Polar 
Satellite System (JPSS) will continue to draw the Committee's 
attention, as well as the Geostationary Operational Environmental 
Satellites, and the broader issues of research-to-operations planning 
and data continuity.

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Investigations & Oversight and Energy & Environment
          From NPOESS to JPSS: An Update on the Nation's Restructured 
        Polar Weather Satellite Program
          September 23, 2011

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Investigations & Oversight and Energy & Environment
          Continuing Oversight of the Nation's Weather Satellite 
        Programs: An Update on JPSS and GOES-R
          June 27, 2012

Critical minerals, materials, and isotopes

    The Committee will provide oversight of materials, minerals, and 
isotopes that are critical to U.S. national interests. Recent shortages 
and supply concerns associated with helium-3, rare earth elements, 
californium-251, and plutonium-238 highlight the need to be ever 
vigilant in our monitoring of critical materials, mineral, and 
isotopes.

          Investigations & Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          The Federal Perspective on a National Critical Materials 
        Strategy
          June 14, 2011

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) oversight

    The Committee will provide oversight of funding associated with 
ARRA to ensure that waste, fraud, abuse and mismanagement is minimized, 
and to evaluate whether funding was aligned to achieve agency mission 
objectives through measurable outcomes.

          Investigations & Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          Stimulus Oversight: An Update on Accountability, 
        Transparency, and Performance
          November 30, 2011

Risk assessment

    As the number and complexity of regulations increases throughout 
federal and state governments, the risk assessments that inform those 
decisions are garnering more attention. The Committee will continue to 
oversee how risk assessments are developed and how they are used in the 
regulatory process to ensure that policies are based on the best 
science available.

          Investigations & Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          EPA's IRIS Program: Evaluating the Science and Process Behind 
        Chemical Risk Assessment
          July 14, 2011

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Investigations & Oversight and Committee on Small Business, 
        Subcommittee on Health & Technology
          How the Report on Carcinogens Uses Science to Meet its 
        Statutory Obligations, and its Impact on Small Business Jobs
          April 25, 2012

Scientific integrity

    The Committee will continue to collect and examine allegations of 
intimidation of science specialists in federal agencies, suppression or 
revisions of scientific finding, and mischaracterization of scientific 
findings because of political or other pressures. The Committee's 
oversight will also involve the development and implementation of 
scientific integrity principles within the executive branch.

          Full Committee Hearing
          Impacts of the LightSquared Network on Federal Science 
        Activities
          September 8, 2011

Additional Science Activities

    Pursuant to House Rule X, the Committee will review and study on a 
continuing basis laws, programs, and Government activities relating to 
non-military research and development. This will include agencies both 
in, and out, of the Committee's legislative jurisdiction.

          Investigations & Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          The Endangered Species Act: Reviewing the Nexus of Science 
        and Policy
          October 13, 2011

          Investigations & Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          Federally Funded Research: Examining Public Access and 
        Scholarly Publication Interests
          March 29, 2012

          Investigations & Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          The Science of How Hunting Assists Species Conservation and 
        Management
          June 19, 2012

Agency compliance with Congressional directives and requests

    The Committee will be ever vigilant in its oversight to ensure that 
recent authorization acts, appropriation acts, and other congressional 
directions are complied with appropriately.

          Investigations & Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          A Review of the Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy
          January 24, 2012

          Investigations & Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          Mismanagement of Funds at the National Weather Service and 
        the Impact on the Future of Weather Forecasting
          September 12, 2012

Emerging Issues

    Additional matters as the need arises and as provided for under 
House Rule X, clause 3(k).

          Investigations & Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          Behavioral Science and Security: Evaluating TSA's SPOT 
        Program
          April 6, 2011

          Investigations & Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          Green Jobs and Red Tape: Assessing Federal Efforts to 
        Encourage Employment
          April 13, 2011

          Investigations & Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          NASA Cybersecurity: An Examination of the Agency's 
        Information Security
          February 29, 2012

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Investigations & Oversight and Energy & Environment 
        Subcommittee Hearing
          Impact of Tax Policies on the Commercial Application of 
        Renewable Energy Technology
          April 19, 2012

          Investigations & Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          The Science Behind Green Building Rating Systems
          May 8, 2012

          Investigations & Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          The Impact of International Technology Transfer on American 
        Research and Development
          December 5, 2012

                             Collaboration
    The Committee maintains a rich relationship with its Inspectors 
General, the Government Accountability Office (GAO), the National 
Academies of Science, the Congressional Research Service, the Office of 
Government Ethics, and the Office of Special Counsel, as well as 
various other independent investigative and oversight entities. The 
Committee will continue to work with those offices, relying on them to 
identify major mismanagement issues, using their reports in hearings, 
and working with the High Risk Series published by GAO to guide 
hearings and inquiries. The Committee already has several outstanding 
requests, many of which are bipartisan or cross-Committee, which 
reflects the collaborative nature of much of the Committee's oversight 
work.
    The Committee also welcomes input from the public and 
whistleblowers. The Committee has developed many relationships with 
whistleblowers in agencies. The Committee has taken positive steps to 
try to protect them from retaliation and has been reasonably successful 
in that role. Most of the whistleblowers who come to the Committee 
remain anonymous--sometimes even from the Committee.
    The Committee will retain its open-door policy regarding 
whistleblowers, whether they are contractors or government employees, 
and they should rest assured that we will never betray a confidence. 
Even if the information offered turns out not to be useful, as 
sometimes happens, the Committee will remain a haven for such figures 
and we understand the absolute necessity for citizens to feel safe in 
their communications with Congress.

                               Appendix A

                              HOUSE RULE X

                       GOVERNING JURISDICTION OF

              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY

                     U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                  FOR THE ONE HUNDRED TWELFTH CONGRESS

COMMITTEES AND THEIR LEGISLATIVE JURISDICTIONS

    1. There shall be in the House the following standing committees, 
each of which shall have the jurisdiction and related functions 
assigned by this clause and clauses 2, 3, and 4. All bills, 
resolutions, and other matters relating to subjects within the 
jurisdiction of the standing committees listed in this clause shall be 
referred to those committees, in accordance with clause 2 of rule XII, 
as follows:

    (p) Committee on Science, Space, and Technology.

    (1) All energy research, development, and demonstration, and 
projects therefor, and all federally owned or operated nonmilitary 
energy laboratories.

    (2) Astronautical research and development, including resources, 
personnel, equipment, and facilities.

    (3) Civil aviation research and development.

    (4) Environmental research and development.

    (5) Marine research.

    (6) Commercial application of energy technology.

    (7) National Institute of Standards and Technology, standardization 
of weights and measures, and the metric system.

    (8) National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

    (9) National Space Council.

    (10) National Science Foundation.

    (11) National Weather Service.

    (12) Outer space, including exploration and control thereof.

    (13) Science scholarships.

    (14) Scientific research, development, and demonstration, and 
projects therefor.

SPECIAL OVERSIGHT FUNCTIONS

    3(k) The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology shall review 
and study on a continuing basis laws, programs, and Government 
activities relating to nonmilitary research and development.

                               Appendix B

     HEARINGS HELD PURSUANT TO CLAUSES 2(n), (o), OR (p) OF RULE XI

    2(n) Each standing committee, or a subcommittee thereof, shall hold 
at least one hearing during each 120 day period following the 
establishment of the committee on the topic of waste, fraud, abuse, or 
mismanagement in Government programs which that Committee may 
authorize. The hearing shall focus on the most egregious instances of 
waste, fraud, abuse or mismanagement as documented by any report the 
Committee has received from a Federal Office of the Inspector General 
or the Comptroller General of the United States.

          Investigations & Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          Mismanagement of Funds at the National Weather Service and 
        the Impact on the Future of Weather Forecasting
          September 12, 2012

    On Wednesday, September 12, 2012, the Subcommittee on 
Investigations and Oversight held an oversight hearing to understand 
the events that led to unauthorized reprogramming of funds within the 
National Weather Service. A 2011 National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration (NOAA) report and a 2012 joint NOAA and Department of 
Commerce (DOC) investigative report provided the basis for memos 
detailing that NWS employees engaged in the transfer of potentially 
millions of NWS funds without Congressional authorization or 
notification. These actions raised concerns about the fidelity of 
budget requests, financial oversight, and possible Anti-Deficiency Act 
(ADA) violations.
    Witnesses discussed how NOAA, DOC, and the DOC Office of Inspector 
General (OIG) plan to prevent similar incidents in the future, as well 
as the breakdown in communication that led to earlier complaints being 
ignored. The Committee also heard about historical funding challenges 
at the NWS and the importance of science and technology investments to 
ensure the production of first class forecasting.
    The Committee received testimony from: Dr. Kathryn D. Sullivan, 
Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Environmental Observation and 
Prediction and Deputy Administrator for the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce; Inspector 
General Todd J. Zinser, U.S. Department of Commerce, Office of 
Inspector General; Dr. William B. Gail, Chief Technology Officer, 
Global Weather Corporation, and Member, Committee on the Assessment of 
the National Weather Service's Modernization Program, National Research 
Council of the National Academies; Mr. Richard Hirn, General Counsel 
and Legislative Director, National Weather Service Employees 
Organization. The Committee also invited Ms. Maureen Wylie, Chief, 
Resource and Operations Management, and former Chief Financial Officer, 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of 
Commerce, but she refused to appear at the hearing.

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Investigations & Oversight and Energy & Environment
          Continuing Oversight of the Nation's Weather Satellite 
        Programs: An Update on JPSS and GOES-R
          June 27, 2012

    On Wednesday, June 27, 2012, the Subcommittees on Investigations & 
Oversight and Energy & Environment held an oversight hearing to examine 
the recent Government Accountability Office (GAO) reports on both the 
Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) and Geostationary Operational 
Environmental Satellite - R Series (GOES-R) weather satellite programs. 
In light of present budgetary constraints, the Committee has provided 
strong oversight of NOAA's weather satellite programs, which the GAO 
has determined are at risk of exceeding cost and schedule targets
    Witnesses discussed recent developments and management issues 
associated with JPSS and GOES-R, including cost, schedule, and 
performance capabilities. The Committee also received specifics 
regarding the two GAO reports released at the hearing, detailing the 
current and projected status of both satellite programs.
    The committee received testimony from: The Honorable Kathryn 
Sullivan, Ph.D., Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Environmental 
Observation and Prediction and Deputy Administrator, National Oceanic 
and Atmospheric Administration; Mr. Marcus Watkins, Director, Joint 
Agency Satellite Division, National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration; Mr. David A. Powner, Director, Information Technology 
Management Issues, Government Accountability Office

          Investigations & Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          NASA Cybersecurity: An Examination of the Agency's 
        Information Security
          February 29, 2012

    The Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight met on Wednesday, 
February 29, 2012 to examine the state of information security at the 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The hearing 
focused on recent reports from the NASA Office of the Inspector General 
(IG) concerning information security, the steps NASA is taking to 
address the recommendations contained in those reports, and future 
challenges to the Agency's information security posture.
    Witnesses discussed the types and origins of cyber threats, 
recommendations from the IG reports, governance issues concerning the 
limited authority of the Chief Information Officer (CIO), and internal 
agency cultural differences that compound the difficulties in 
protecting the agency's networks.
    The committee received testimony from: Ms. Linda Cureton, Chief 
Information Officer, NASA; The Honorable Paul Martin, Inspector 
General, NASA.

          Investigations & Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          A Review of the Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy
          January 24, 2012
    On Tuesday, January 24, 2012 at 2:00pm the Subcommittee on 
Investigations and Oversight met to receive an update on 
accountability, transparency, and performance issues associated with 
the Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E). The hearing 
focused on recent reports from the Department of Energy Inspector 
General (DOE IG) report OAS-RA-11-11, ``Advanced Research Projects 
Agency - Energy'' and the Government Accountability Office (GAO) report 
12-112, ``Advanced Research Projects Agency Could Benefit from 
Information on Applicants' Prior Funding.''

    Witnesses discussed metrics used to evaluate the agency's 
performance, reviewed its statutory objectives to fund ``high-risk, 
high reward" research, technology transfer, and efforts to duplicate 
research spending.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from: Dr. Arun Majumdar, 
Director Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy, U.S. Department of 
Energy; The Honorable Gregory Friedman, Inspector General, U.S. 
Department of Energy; and Mr. Frank Rusco, Director, Energy and Science 
Issues, U.S. Government Accountability Office.

          Research & Science Education Subcommittee Hearing
          Ensuring the Best Stewardship of American Taxpayer Dollars
          at the National Science Foundation
          May 9, 2012

    On Wednesday, May 9, 2012, at 2:00pm, the Subcommittee on Research 
and Science Education met to examine and receive testimony on various 
initiatives by and issues identified by the NSF Office of Inspector 
General.
    The witness discussed the work of the NSF Office of Inspector 
General to promote the efficiency and effectiveness of the Foundation 
and to safeguard the integrity of its programs and operations. The 
hearing addressed a number of potential waste, fraud, and abuse 
concerns, including issues with Major Research Equipment and Facilities 
Construction funding for contingencies, problems with the Small 
Business Innovation Research program, and funding beyond expenses and 
per diem provided to merit review panel participants.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from: Ms. Allison C. Lerner, 
Inspector General, National Science Foundation.

          Investigations & Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          Stimulus Oversight: An Update on Accountability, 
        Transparency,
          and Performance
          November 30, 2011

    On Wednesday, November 30, 2011 at 10:00am, the Subcommittee on 
Investigations and Oversight met to receive an update on 
accountability, transparency, and performance issues associated with 
the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The hearing focused 
on efforts by agency Inspector General Offices, the Government 
Accountability Office, and the Recovery, Accountability, and 
Transparency Board to monitor ARRA funding. The Subcommittee previously 
held hearings on ARRA funding on March 19, 2009, and May 5, 2009.
    Witnesses discussed lessons learned in managing ARRA funds, 
transparency in awarding funds, assessing risks associated with these 
investments, and methods for improving the management of taxpayer 
dollars.
    The Committee received testimony from: Mr. Frank Rusco, Director, 
Natural Resources and Environment Team, General Accountability Office; 
Mr. Michael Wood, Director, Recovery, Accountability, and Transparency 
Board; The Honorable Gregory Friedman, Inspector General, U.S. 
Department of Energy; The Honorable Todd Zinser, Inspector General, 
U.S. Department of Commerce; Ms. Allison Lerner, Inspector General, 
National Science Foundation; and Ms. Gail Robinson, Deputy Inspector 
General, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

          Investigations & Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          EPA's IRIS Program: Evaluating the Science and Process Behind 
        Chemical Risk Assessment
          July 14, 2011

    On Thursday, July 14, 2011 at 10:00am, the Subcommittee on 
Investigations and Oversight met to examine the process behind the 
development of EPA's IRIS assessments. The hearing was prompted in part 
by the National Academies' National Research Council report on EPA's 
formaldehyde assessment which reiterated several previous criticisms of 
EPA's IRIS process and provided recommendations for improvement. The 
goal of the hearing was to better understand the development of IRIS 
assessments, whether EPA plans on adopting the NAS' recommendations, 
and whether or not EPA assessments are based on the best available 
evidence and evaluated in accordance with established protocols.
    Witnesses discussed problems with IRIS and methods for improving 
the process and science behind IRIS assessments. The Committee also 
heard about regulatory impacts on industry and communities.
    The committee received testimony from: The Honorable Paul Anastas, 
Assistant Administrator, Office of Research and Development, U.S. 
Environmental Protection Agency; Mr. Trimble, Director, Natural 
Resources and Environment, U.S. Government Accountability Office; Dr. 
Jonathan Samet, MD, MS, Professor and Flora L. Thorton Chair, 
Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University 
of Southern California, and Chair, Committee to Review EPA's Draft IRIS 
Assessment of Formaldehyde, National Research Council, the National 
Academies; The Honorable Calvin Dooley, President and CEO, American 
Chemistry Council; Ms. Rena Steinzor, Professor, University of Maryland 
School of Law, and President, Center for Progressive Reform; Dr. Gail 
Charnley, Principal, HealthRisk Strategies; The Honorable J. Christian 
Bollwage, Mayor, City of Elizabeth, New Jersey.

          Investigations & Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          Behavioral Science and Security: Evaluating TSA's SPOT 
        Program
          April 6, 2011 

    On Wednesday, April 6, the Subcommittee on Investigations and 
Oversight of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology met to 
examine the Transportation Security Administration's (TSA) efforts to 
incorporate behavioral science into its transportation security 
architecture. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has been 
criticized for failing to scientifically validate the Screening of 
Passengers by Observational Techniques (SPOT) program before 
operationally deploying it. SPOT is a TSA program that employs 
Behavioral Detection Officers (BDO) at airport terminals for the 
purpose of detecting behavioral based indicators of threats to aviation 
security.
    In May 2010, GAO issued a report titled ``Efforts to Validate TSA's 
Passenger Screening Behavior Detection Program Underway, but 
Opportunities Exist to Strengthen Validation and Address Operational 
Challenges'' in response to a Congressional request to review the SPOT 
program. The report found a lack of scientific consensus on behavioral 
detection principles and a lack of justification for expanding the SPOT 
program. GAO also noted that TSA generally does not use all 
intelligence databases to identify or investigate persons referred 
through SPOT. In addition, TSA has no database for BDOs to record and 
analyze information on passengers identified under SPOT.
    Witnesses discussed their views on the validity of behavioral 
science and their experience with SPOT and related programs.
    The Committee received testimony from: Mr. Stephen Lord, Director, 
Homeland Security and Justice Issues, Government Accountability Office; 
Mr. Larry Willis, Program Manager, Homeland Security Advanced Research 
Projects Agency, Science and Technology Directorate, Department of 
Homeland Security; Dr. Paul Ekman, Professor Emeritus of Psychology, 
University of California, San Francisco, and President and Founder, 
Paul Ekman Group, LLC; Dr. Maria Hartwig, Associate Professor, 
Department of Psychology, John Jay College of Criminal Justice; Dr. 
Philip Rubin, Chief Executive Officer, Haskins Laboratories; and 
Lieutenant Detective Peter J. DiDomenica, Boston University Police.
    2(o) Each committee or a subcommittee thereof shall hold at least 
one hearing in any session in which the committee has received 
disclaimers of agency financial statements from auditors of any Federal 
agency that the committee may authorize to hear testimony on such 
disclaimers from representatives of such agency.

          Investigations & Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          Mismanagement of Funds at the National Weather Service and 
        the Impact on the Future of Weather Forecasting
          September 12, 2012

    On Wednesday, September 12, 2012, the Subcommittee on 
Investigations and Oversight held an oversight hearing to understand 
the events that led to unauthorized reprogramming of funds within the 
National Weather Service. A 2011 National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration (NOAA) report and a 2012 joint NOAA and Department of 
Commerce (DOC) investigative report provided the basis for memos 
detailing that NWS employees engaged in the transfer of potentially 
millions of NWS funds without Congressional authorization or 
notification. These actions raised concerns about the fidelity of 
budget requests, financial oversight, and possible Anti-Deficiency Act 
(ADA) violations.
    Witnesses discussed how NOAA, DOC, and the DOC Office of Inspector 
General (OIG) plan to prevent similar incidents in the future, as well 
as the breakdown in communication that led to earlier complaints being 
ignored. The Committee also heard about historical funding challenges 
at the NWS and the importance of science and technology investments to 
ensure the production of first class forecasting.
    The Committee received testimony from: Dr. Kathryn D. Sullivan, 
Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Environmental Observation and 
Prediction and Deputy Administrator for the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce; Inspector 
General Todd J. Zinser, U.S. Department of Commerce, Office of 
Inspector General; Dr. William B. Gail, Chief Technology Officer, 
Global Weather Corporation, and Member, Committee on the Assessment of 
the National Weather Service's Modernization Program, National Research 
Council of the National Academies; Mr. Richard Hirn, General Counsel 
and Legislative Director, National Weather Service Employees 
Organization. The Committee also invited Ms. Maureen Wylie, Chief, 
Resource and Operations Management, and former Chief Financial Officer, 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of 
Commerce, but she refused to appear at the hearing.
    2(p) Each standing committee or subcommittee thereof shall hold at 
least one hearing on issues raised by reports issued by the Comptroller 
General of the United States indicating that federal programs or 
operations that the Committee may authorize are at high risk for waste, 
fraud, and mismanagement, known as the ``high risk list'' or the ``high 
risk series.''

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Investigations & Oversight and Energy & Environment
          Continuing Oversight of the Nation's Weather Satellite 
        Programs: An Update on JPSS and GOES-R
          June 27, 2012

    On Wednesday, June 27, 2012, the Subcommittees on Investigations & 
Oversight and Energy & Environment held an oversight hearing to examine 
the recent Government Accountability Office (GAO) reports on both the 
Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) and Geostationary Operational 
Environmental Satellite - R Series (GOES-R) weather satellite programs. 
In light of present budgetary constraints, the Committee has provided 
strong oversight of NOAA's weather satellite programs, which the GAO 
has determined are at risk of exceeding cost and schedule targets
    Witnesses discussed recent developments and management issues 
associated with JPSS and GOES-R, including cost, schedule, and 
performance capabilities. The Committee also received specifics 
regarding the two GAO reports released at the hearing, detailing the 
current and projected status of both satellite programs.
    The committee received testimony from: The Honorable Kathryn 
Sullivan, Ph.D., Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Environmental 
Observation and Prediction and Deputy Administrator, National Oceanic 
and Atmospheric Administration; Mr. Marcus Watkins, Director, Joint 
Agency Satellite Division, National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration; Mr. David A. Powner, Director, Information Technology 
Management Issues, Government Accountability Office.

          Investigations & Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          NASA Cybersecurity: An Examination of the Agency's 
        Information Security
          February 29, 2012

    On Wednesday, February 29, 2012, the Subcommittee on Investigations 
and Oversight met to examine the state of information security at the 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The hearing 
focused on recent reports from NASA Office of the Inspector General 
(IG) concerning information security, the steps NASA is taking to 
address the recommendations contained in those reports, and future 
challenges to the Agency's information security posture.
    Witnesses discussed the types and orgins of cyber threats, 
recommendations from the IG reports, governance issues concerning the 
limited authority of the Chief Information Officer (CIO), and internal 
agency cultural differences that compound the difficulties in 
protecting the agency's networks.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from: Ms. Linda Cureton, Chief 
Information Officer, NASA; and the Honorable Paul Martin, Inspector 
General, NASA.

          Investigations & Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          EPA's IRIS Program: Evaluating the Science and Process Behind 
        Chemical Risk Assessment
          July 14, 2011

    On Thursday, July 14, 2011 at 10:00am, the Subcommittee on 
Investigations and Oversight met to examine the process behind the 
development of EPA's IRIS assessments. The hearing was prompted in part 
by the National Academies' National Research Council report on EPA's 
formaldehyde assessment which reiterated several previous criticisms of 
EPA's IRIS process and provided recommendations for improvement. The 
goal of the hearing was to better understand the development of IRIS 
assessments, whether EPA plans on adopting the NAS' recommendations, 
and whether or not EPA assessments are based on the best available 
evidence and evaluated in accordance with established protocols.
    Witnesses discussed problems with IRIS and methods for improving 
the process and science behind IRIS assessments. The Committee also 
heard about regulatory impacts on industry and communities.
    The Committee received testimony from: The Honorable Paul Anastas, 
Assistant Administrator, Office of Research and Development, U.S. 
Environmental Protection Agency; Mr. Trimble, Director, Natural 
Resources and Environment, U.S. Government Accountability Office; Dr. 
Jonathan Samet, MD, MS, Professor and Flora L. Thorton Chair, 
Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University 
of Southern California, and Chair, Committee to Review EPA's Draft IRIS 
Assessment of Formaldehyde, National Research Council, the National 
Academies; The Honorable Calvin Dooley, President and CEO, American 
Chemistry Council; Ms. Rena Steinzor, Professor, University of Maryland 
School of Law, and President, Center for Progressive Reform; Dr. Gail 
Charnley, Principal, HealthRisk Strategies; and The Honorable J. 
Christian Bollwage, Mayor, City of Elizabeth, New Jersey.

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Investigations & Oversight and Energy & Environment
          From NPOESS to JPSS: An Update on the Nation's Restructured 
        Polar Weather Satellite Program
          September 23, 2011

    On September 23, 2011 at 10:00am, the Subcommittee on 
Investigations and Oversight met to examine the impact of the 
Administration's decision to restructure the National Polar-orbiting 
Operation Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) and progress at NOAA 
and NASA in developing the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) program 
as the replacement system for polar-orbiting civilian weather 
satellites and climate services.
    Witnesses discussed the cost, schedule, and performance 
capabilities associated with the new polar-orbiting weather satellite 
program.
    The Committee received testimony from: The Honorable Kathryn 
Sullivan, Ph.D., Assisstant Secretary of Commerce for Environmental 
Observation and Prediction and Deputy Administrator, National Oceanic 
and Atmospheric Administration; Mr. Christopher Scolese, Associate 
Administrator, National Aeronautics and Space Administration; and Mr. 
David Powner, Director, Information Technology Management Issues, 
Government Accountability Office.

          Full Committee Hearing
          NASA's Commercial Crew Development Program: Accomplishments
          and Challenges
          October 26, 2011

    On Wednesday, October 26, 2011, the Committee held an oversight 
hearing to examine NASA's Commercial Crew Program (CCP) office, 
focusing on accomplishments achieved by the agency and industry 
following two rounds of grant awards totaling $320 million (aggregate 
of FY10 & FY11), and the biggest programmatic and technical challenges 
remaining. Speaking about challenges ahead, industry witnesses and NASA 
officials highlighted the uncertainty of Congress' willingness to 
provide full funding for CCP over the next five years. Many Committee 
Members asked questions of the witnesses about the size of the 
commercial markets (i.e., spaceflight participants exclusive of NASA-
sponsored astronauts, such as space tourists and/or astronauts from 
countries having no indigenous space industry).
    The Committee received testimony from: Mr. John Elbon, Vice 
President and General Manager for Space Exploration, the Boeing 
Company; Mr. Steve Lindsey, Director of Space Exploration for the 
Sierra Nevada Corporation; Mr. Elon Musk, CEO and Chief Technology 
Officer, Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX); Mr. Charlie 
Precourt, Vice President, ATK Launch Systems Group; Dr. George Sowers, 
Vice President, United Launch Alliance; the Honorable Paul Martin, 
Inspector General of NASA; and Mr. Bill Gerstenmaier, Associate 
Administrator, Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate, 
NASA.

          Full Committee Hearing
          The Next Great Observatory: Assessing the James Webb Space 
        Telescope
          December 6, 2011

    On Tuesday, December 6, 2011, the Committee held an oversight 
hearing to examine NASA's management and re-plan of the James Webb 
Space Telescope. In 2001, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) was 
ranked as the highest priority large space mission in astronomy by the 
National Academies of Science in their decadal survey Astronomy and 
Astrophysics in the New Millennium. Originally estimated by the decadal 
committee to cost $1 billion and to be launched in 2007, JWST was 
dubbed as the next Great Observatory that will be three times more 
powerful than the Hubble Space Telescope in the infrared and eight 
times more powerful than the Spitzer Space Telescope. However, after 
high-level scrutiny arising from years of program cost and schedule 
overruns, NASA recently developed a revised plan for JWST that--if 
fully funded--would enable completion and launch by October, 2018. The 
revised budget life cycle costs now total just over $8.8 billion.
    The Committee received testimony from: Mr. Rick Howard, NASA 
Program Manager of the James Webb Space Telescope; Dr. Roger Blandford, 
Professor of Physics, Stanford University and Former Chair, Committee 
for the Decadal Survey of Astronomy and Astrophysics, National Research 
Council; Dr. Garth Illingworth, Professor & Astronomer, UCO/Lick 
Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz; and Mr. Jeffrey D. 
Grant, Sector Vice President and General Manager, Space Systems 
Division, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems.

          Space & Aeronautics Subcommittee Hearing
          NASA's Commercial Cargo Providers: Are They Ready to
          Supply the Space Station in the Post-Shuttle Era?
          May 26, 2011

    On Thursday, May 26, 2011, the Subcommittee on Space and 
Aeronautics of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology held an 
oversight hearing to examine NASA's commercial cargo programs. The 
subcommittee reviewed the progress made by the commercial providers, as 
well as the budgetary and programmatic impacts of schedule delays. NASA 
has spent nearly $1.25 billion thus far and has yet to accomplish the 
goals established for the initial $500 million program, intended to 
demonstrate commercial cargo delivery capabilities to the International 
Space Station from two commercial partners, Space Exploration 
Technologies (SpaceX) and Orbital Science Corporation (Orbital).
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. William H. 
Gerstenmaier, Associate Administrator, Space Operations Mission 
Directorate, National Aeronautics and Space Administration; Ms. 
Cristina Chaplain, Director, Acquisition and Sourcing Management, 
Government Accountability Office; Ms. Gwynne Shotwell, President, Space 
Exploration Technologies; and Mr. Frank L. Culbertson, Jr., Senior Vice 
President and Deputy General Manager, Advanced Programs Group, Orbital 
Sciences Corporation.

          Space & Aeronautics Subcommittee Hearing
          An Overview of the Office of Commercial Space Transportation 
        Budget Request for Fiscal Year 2013
          March 20, 2012

    On Tuesday, March 20, 2012, the Subcommittee on Space and 
Aeronautics held an oversight hearing to examine the FY 2013 budget 
request submitted by the FAA Office of Commercial Space Transportation. 
The hearing examined the office's roles and responsibilities, as the 
commercial market is expected to achieve dramatic growth, as well as 
the role of a government-sponsored indemnification program. The FY 2013 
budget request seeks $16.700 million, a 2.6% increase over FY 2012 
enacted level ($16.271 million). Based on industry-provided launch 
manifests, FAA forecasts 40 commercial launch an reentry operations in 
2012, compared with only onne licensed launch in 2011.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. George Nield, FAA 
Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation and Capt. 
Wilbur Trafton, Chairman, Commercial Space Transportation Advisory 
Committee.

          Space & Aeronautics Subcommittee Hearing
          Office of Commercial Space Transportation's Fiscal Year 2012 
        Budget Request
          May 5, 2011

    On Thursday, May 5, 2011, the Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics 
of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology held an oversight 
hearing to examine the FY 2012 budget request submitted by the FAA 
Office of Commercial Space Transportation and new initiatives in the 
request to expand the office's roles and responsibilities. The FY 2012 
budget request seeks $26.625 million, a 74% increase over the FY 2010 
enacted level ($15.237 million) and a near 50% increase of the Office's 
workforce, asserting that NASA-sponsored commercial cargo flights to 
the International Space Station, plus the expected start-up of 
commercial human sub-orbital flights, places new regulatory demands on 
their operations.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. George Nield, FAA 
Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation, Dr. Gerald 
Dillingham, Director of Civil Aviation Issues at the U.S. Government 
Accountability Office, and Prof. Henry Hertzfeld, Research Professor of 
Space Policy and International Affairs at the George Washington 
University.

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Research & Science Education and Technology & Innovation
          Protecting Information in the Digital Age: Federal 
        Cybersecurity
          Research and Development Efforts
          May 25, 2011

    On Wednesday, May 25, 2011 the Subcommittee on Research and Science 
Education and the Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation held a 
joint legislative hearing to examine federal agency efforts to improve 
our national cybersecurity and prepare the future cybersecurity talent 
needed for national security, as it pertains to agencies within the 
Committee's jurisdiction and in the context of the Administration's 
overall priorities in science, space, and technology.
    In the 111th Congress, the House passed the Cybersecurity 
Enhancement Act of 2010 (H.R. 4061). The bill was referred to the 
Committee on Science and Technology and favorably reported on January 
27, 2010. H.R. 4061 required increased coordination and prioritization 
of Federal cybersecurity research and development activities and the 
development of cybersecurity technical standards. It sought to 
strengthen cybersecurity education and talent development and 
partnership activities. Witnesses were asked to provide comments on the 
legislation in advance of reintroduction during the 112th Congress.
    The Subcommittees received testimony from: Dr. George O. Strawn, 
the Director of the National Coordination Office for Networking and 
Information Technology Research and Development Program; Dr. Farnam 
Jahanian, the Assistant Director of the Directorate for Computer and 
Information Science and Engineering at the National Science Foundation; 
Ms. Cita Furlani, Director of the Information Technology Laboratory at 
the National Institute of Standards and Technology; and Rear Admiral 
Michael Brown, the Director of Cybersecurity Coordination in the 
National Protection and Programs Directorate for the U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security.

          Space & Aeronautics Subcommittee Hearing
          A Review of NASA's Exploration Program In Transition:
          Issues For Congress and Industry
          March 30, 2011

    On Wednesday, March 30, 2011 the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to review the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's 
(NASA's) Constellation program and examine the status of the transition 
to the Space Launch System (SLS) and Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV).
    Issues examined included the Administration's compliance with the 
FY 2011 Continuing Resolution and the Authorization Act's direction to 
extend and modify the Constellation contracts, and the status of NASA's 
transition report to Congress. The Subcommittee also examined key 
challenges and risks to the Nation's aerospace workforce and industrial 
base caused by delays or other disruptions in NASA's human spaceflight 
program.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Douglas Cooke, 
Associate Administrator, Exploration Systems Mission Directorate, NASA; 
Dr. Scott Pace, Director, Space Policy Institute, George Washington 
University; and Mr. James Maser, Chairman, Corporation Membership 
Committee, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

          Technology & Innovation Subcommittee Hearing
          An Overview of Science and Technology Research and 
        Development Programs
          and Priorities at the Department of Homeland Security
          March 15, 2011

    On Tuesday, March 15, 2011 the Subcommittee on Technology and 
Innovation of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology held an 
oversight hearing to review activities at the Science and Technology 
Directorate of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS S&T) and the 
Domestic Nuclear Detection Office at the Department of Homeland 
Security (DNDO). The hearing focused on various elements of DHS S&T 
including the recent reorganization of the Directorate, the strategic 
planning process, stakeholder involvement in setting research 
priorities, and the role of research and development in the DHS S&T 
portfolio.
    The Committee received testimony from two panels; the first panel 
included the Under Secretary of DHS S&T and the Director of DNDO; the 
second panel represented stakeholders of the DHS enterprise including 
the Director of the Douglas and Sarah Allison Center for Foreign Policy 
Studies at the Heritage Foundation; the President and Chief Executive 
Officer of the Homeland Security and Defense Business Council; and the 
Director of the Homeland Security and Justice Team at the U.S. 
Government Accountability Office.

                               Appendix C

                    OVERSIGHT CORRESPONDENCE THROUGH

                             DECEMBER 2012
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                               Appendix D
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                               Appendix E
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                                Appendix

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                          VIEWS AND ESTIMATES
              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY
                            FISCAL YEAR 2012
    President Obama transmitted his budget request for Fiscal Year 2012 
(FY12) to Congress on February 14, 2011. The President proposes $38.9 
billion in FY12 for all non-defense and non-health specific research 
and development, a 10.8 percent increase over the FY10 enacted level. 
This amount includes basic and applied research, development, and 
facilities and equipment.
    The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology supports funding 
research and development activities and believes that wise investments, 
coupled with favorable tax cuts and reduced regulations, can lead to 
economic growth and innovation. However, we are mindful that in order 
to realize gains on investment, the nation needs to be on a sound 
economic footing. Our nation is currently in a challenging economic 
environment. The Congressional Budget Office estimates that Federal 
spending will rise to $3.7 trillion or 25 percent of GDP this year. We 
are running a deficit of $1.5 trillion and our gross Federal debt now 
exceeds $14 trillion. These levels are truly unsustainable. We need to 
begin to address this challenge by reducing spending and finding ways 
to cut unnecessary, duplicative, and wasteful programs so that we 
deliver the most efficient and effective programs for the country.
    The following are the views of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology on the budget for programs within the Committee's 
jurisdiction.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

    The National Aeronautics and Space administration (NASA) is the 
Nation's primary civilian space and aeronautics research and 
development agency, carrying out a diverse set of missions and projects 
designed to expand our understanding of Earth, the Solar System, and 
the universe. NASA operates the Space Shuttle fleet, the International 
Space Station, and a number of satellites in orbit around Earth and 
throughout the solar system. It also undertakes activities in 
technology development and transfer, education, outreach, and 
participates in a number of interagency initiatives such as 
nanotechnology, information technology, climate change research, and 
the Next Generation Air Transportation (NextGen) program.
    The Committee supports NASA's FY12 budget request of $18.7 billion, 
the same amount appropriated by Congress for FY 1O and continued thus 
far in FY11.
    NASA's budget requests also display budget assumptions for the 
succeeding four out-years, giving Congress an indication of near-term 
spending plans for programs, projects and activities. The FY12 budget 
request assumes a flat spending profile through FY16, while last year's 
budget (and associated out-years) assumed annual increases such that by 
FY16, NASA would be receiving over $20 billion annually. The potential 
savings indicated in the FY12 budget request would, in the aggregate, 
save $3.8 billion for FY12-FY14, compared to last year's budget 
request.
    NASA's FY12 request qualified their out-year assumptions as 
``notional.'' However, NASA's ``notional'' assumptions are 
significantly higher than the corresponding numbers used in OMB's FY12 
U.S. Budget request (OMB's Blue Books) by an aggregate of $2.3 billion. 
NASA officials advised the Committee that they are using their higher 
out-year assumptions for planning purposes. Requested funding levels 
for NASA's space science program are relatively flat, going up an. 
additional $11 million between the FY11 and FY12 requests, amounting to 
a 0.2% increase. Within the Science Mission Directorate (SMD), the 
James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has run into serious cost and 
schedule challenges. NASA is intent on finding resources within the SMD 
account to remedy the problem, a solution we endorse.
    With respect to Earth Science, which is a program within SMD, in 
the FY11 budget request (including the out years) Committee Republicans 
took exception to significant increases in its funding profile. We were 
concerned that the balance of funding within the SMD was getting out of 
balance to the detriment of the other SMD programs. This year's request 
(including the out years) for Earth Science is substantially reduced. 
To stay within this profile, NASA is delaying start of two Earth 
Science missions (CLARREO and DESDynI). We support this change.
    The most troubling aspect of this year's request lies within the 
agency's human space flight program (Exploration Systems Directorate 
and the Space Operations Mission Directorate). Last year Congress 
passed, and the President signed, the NASA Authorization Act of 2010 
(P.L. 111-267). The bill directed NASA to give priority to development 
of a Space Launch System (SLS) and Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) to 
replace the retiring Shuttle. The bill also authorized NASA to continue 
activities related to development of a commercial crew launch system. 
NASA's FY12 request flips the relative priority, seeking an amount 
higher than authorized for commercial crew ($850 million versus $500 
million authorization); and underfunding development of the SLS and 
MPCV ($2.8 billion versus $4 billion authorization). By doing so, NASA 
will be delaying development of a government-owned assured access 
system to the IS'S, perhaps until the end of this decade. Coupled with 
this is the likelihood that the yet-to-be-developed commercial crew 
system may fail to materialize, leaving our government with only one 
option: to continue buying seats from the Russians. We find this 
unacceptable and firmly believe NASA should give highest priority to 
the SLS and MPCV programs.
    Finally, we note that the FY12 budget includes a new program first 
proposed last year: Space Technology. The FY12 request seeks $1.02 
billion to manage and develop a portfolio of technologies needed to 
ensure the success of future missions, as well as enabling the spinoff 
of NASA technologies to the private sector. We support this endeavor 
generally, but believe these tough budgetary times argue for a smaller 
initial start.

National Science Foundation (NSF)

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) provides approximately 20 
percent of Federal support for all basic research at U.S. colleges and 
universities and is second only to National Institutes of Health (NIH) 
in support for all academic research. It is the primary source of 
federal funding for non-medical basic research, providing approximately 
40 percent of all federal support, and serves as a catalyst for 
science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education 
improvement at all levels of education. It supports the fundamental 
investigations that ultimately serve as the foundation for progress in 
nationally significant areas such as national security, technology-
driven economic growth, energy independence, health care, 
nanotechnology, and networking and information technology.
    The FY12 budget request for NSF is $7.7 billion, an increase of 13 
percent, or $894.5 million over the FY10 enacted level (not including 
any carryover from the $3 billion NSF received from ARRA funding). The 
Committee recognizes the importance of making appropriate investments 
in science, space, and technology research, development, and STEM 
education in order for the United States to remain a world leader in 
competitiveness and innovation. While supporting a robust budget 
request for NSF, the Committee is concerned that the levels requested 
exceed what is fiscally responsible in the current economic climate. 
Further, new and expanded Administration priorities continue to 
excessively divert precious research and development (R&D) funds from 
other worthy endeavors.
    The Committee applauds the Administration's decision to eliminate 
or reduce funding for six specific programs, but regrets that it did 
not go further in identifying areas for significant savings to the 
American taxpayer. This additional savings could go a long way in 
helping to protect the integrity of the Nation's essential basic R&D 
portfolio.

    Research and Related Activities (RRA)

    The FY12 budget request includes $6.3 billion for Research and 
Related Activities (RRA), an increase. of $690 million or 12.4 percent 
over FY10 enacted. New programs established as part of the increased 
research funding request for FY12 include $35 million for a 
nanotechnology manufacturing initiative, $40 million in next-generation 
robotics technologies, and $96 million for an interdisciplinary program 
to eventually replace computer chip technologies. In addition, $87 
million is requested for advanced manufacturing activities including 
expanded university- industry research partnerships and regional 
innovation ecosystems and clean energy manufacturing research. Another 
$117 million is requested for ``cyber-infrastructure'' activities to 
accelerate the pace of discovery and $12 million for a ``new program 
that will fund a suite of activities that promote greater 
interdisciplinary research.'' Much of the funding increases are focused 
on manufacturing technologies and regional innovation centers. The 
Committee is concerned that the increased emphasis in these areas moves 
the Foundation from its core mission of supporting basic R&D to 
significantly more support for applied areas of R&D, which are best 
left to market forces or agencies with specific applied R&D goals to 
advance their mission.
    As part of the Science, Engineering and Education for 
Sustainability (SEES) program that crosses all NSF directorates and has 
a goal of advancing ``climate and energy science, engineering, and 
education to inform the societal actions needed for environment and 
economic sustainability and sustainable human well-being,'' the FY12 
budget request is $998.1 million, an increase of $337.5 million or 51 
percent. The Committee recognizes the broad interdisciplinary 
activities within the SEES program, but is greatly concerned that 13 
percent of the entire Foundation's budget request is being devoted to 
this issue, particularly given the strong emphasis on these programs 
across all relevant federal agencies. Further, the Committee is 
strongly opposed to the 144.5 percent budget request increase for the 
NSF contribution to the Climate Change Technology Program (CCTP) and 
recommends elimination of the $10 million Climate Change Education 
program, as worthy climate change education proposals are certainly 
eligible for other education funding at the Foundation.
    In addition, the FY12 budget request also includes a plan to invest 
broadband spectrum receipts in a variety of areas, including $150 
million to NSF in FY12 and $1 billion total over a five-year period for 
targeted research on experimental wireless technology test beds, more 
flexible and efficient use of the radio spectrum, and cyber-physical 
systems such as wireless sensor networks for smart buildings, roads, 
and bridges. NSF's participation is a piece of the $3 billion WIN fund.

    Education and Human Resources (EHR)

    The FY12 budget request for Education and Human Resources (EHR) is 
$911 million, a $38.4 million or 4.4 percent increase over FY10. The 
Administration continues to offer a mixed message regarding the 
treatment of EHR relative to the healthy increase for RRA. While 
calling for an investment of $3.4 billion in STEM education activities 
across the federal government, a number of proven NSF initiatives are 
being eliminated, reduced, or reprogrammed to make way for new or 
expanded programs. Like last year's request, the FY12 budget request 
continues to shift a greater responsibility for STEM education to the 
Department of Education while maintaining NSF primarily as a research 
agency. The Committee agrees that NSF is primarily a research agency, 
but also strongly believes that an essential element of NSF's mission 
is support for STEM education; from pre-K through graduate school and 
beyond. Therefore, the Committee is concerned with this shift. We 
recognize that the Department of Education is better equipped to 
disseminate and replicate STEM programming, but the STEM-related 
research and expertise that NSF can and does provide is world-class and 
needs to be included in any appropriate larger, overarching STEM 
education activities carried out by the Federal government.
    New funding in the FY12 budget request includes an additional $20 
million for a Transforming Broadening Participation through STEM (TBPS) 
pilot program to seek innovative solutions for broadening participation 
in STEM at the undergraduate level This is part of an overarching 
realigned program called Broadening Participation at the Core (BP AC), 
which also houses several underrepresented population programs. The 
BPAC program total request is $156 million, a $21 million or 23.3 
percent increase over FY10. Research programs focused on gender and 
persons with disabilities have been moved from this Division to the 
Division of Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings and 
funding under the request is cut by 8.7 percent to $17 million. The 
Committee does not believe that a new $20 million pilot program is 
warranted at this time, given the budgetary constraints our country is 
facing. Further, the Committee is concerned that funding for the Human 
Resources Division has increased by more than 15 percent while the 
focus of the Division does not include all underrepresented 
populations.
    Additionally, the FY12 budget request includes $40 million in 
funding for a new teacher-training research and development program, 
split evenly between K-12 teachers and undergraduate teachers. At the 
same time, the budget request for Noyce Scholarships is $45 million, a 
decrease of $10 million or 18.2 percent and the Math and Science 
Partnership is $48.2 million, also a decrease of $10 million or 17.2 
percent. Likewise, the Administration's budget request places a high 
priority on Graduate Research Fellowships (GRF) by increasing the 
funding to $134.6 million, a 31.2 percent increase over FY10, while 
essentially flat lining the Integrative Graduate Education and Research 
Traineeship Program (IGERT) at $30.17 million and greatly diminishing 
the Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-I2) to $27 million, a 
45 percent cut. The Committee understands the need to make cuts, but 
believes that Noyce Scholarships and MSP are proven and worthy programs 
and are not appropriate areas to be cut in order to fund a new and 
unproven program. Increasing the number of GRFs is a laudable goal in a 
better economic environment, but increasing the funding level by over 
31 percent, particularly while essentially ignoring other graduate 
programs, is not fiscally responsible.

Department of Energy (DOE)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) funds a wide range of research, 
development, demonstration and commercial application activities. The 
overall FY I2 budget request for DOE is $29.5 billion, which represents 
a $3.1 billion or 11.8 percent increase of FY10 levels. Approximately 
one third of this amount is directed to research and development 
programs.
    President Obama made clean energy technology development a 
centerpiece proposal of his State of the Union. The proposal includes 
an 80 percent clean energy standard (CES), a $2 billion increase in 
``clean energy'' research, and a Better Buildings Initiative. The 
Committee recognizes the importance of energy technology development to 
America's economic future, but has serious concerns with the overall 
spending and relative prioritization within the President's budget 
request.

    Office of Science (SC)

    The DOE Office of Science (SC) is the Federal government's primary 
supporter of long-term basic research in the physical sciences, as well 
as design, construction, and operation of major scientific user 
facilities. Office of Science activities are organized into the 
following six major programs: Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Advanced 
Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), Biological and Environmental 
Research (BER), Fusion Energy Sciences (FES), High Energy Physics 
(HEP), and Nuclear Physics (NP). The FY12 budget request for SC is $5.4 
billion, a 9.1 percent increase over FY10 levels.
    The Committee recognizes the unique role of the Office of Science 
in supporting world-class scientific research and facilities and notes 
its continued strong support for SC activities as a key driver of 
innovation and long-term economic growth. We also recognize SC's strong 
record in managing construction and operation of major scientific 
facilities that are delivering cutting-edge research breakthroughs in 
areas such as materials science and chemistry. Accordingly, we believe 
the Office of Science should be the top funding priority among DOE R&D 
programs. However, in light of budget circumstances, we intend to 
continue to work to identify areas within the SC budget warranting 
consideration for cuts. Of particular interest in this regard are SC 
Biological and Environmental Research activities, which fund 
significant research in areas ancillary to DOE's primary mission and/or 
potentially duplicative of research funded elsewhere in the government 
(such as climate change). Specifically, the Committee is concerned that 
the Atmospheric System Research and the Climate and Earth Systems 
Modeling programs are duplicative of research programs at the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the National Science 
Foundation. Additionally, the Fusion Energy Sciences program is an area 
of concern due to high-risk program management and international 
funding and cooperation challenges associated with the ITER project, 
and the value of SC spending on science education and workforce 
development also warrants further review.

    Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E)

    Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) was created in 
2007 with a charge to fund high-risk, high-reward research that 
industry itself is not likely to undertake.'' The Administration 
requests $650 million for ARPA-E in FY12. Of this amount, $550 million 
would be provided through discretionary funding. ARPA-E would also 
administer an additional $100 million ``Wireless Innovation Fund'' 
aimed at developing wireless communications technologies and paid for 
through a proposed transfer of wireless spectrum auction revenues. 
Initially provided with $400 million in the 2009 Recovery Act, ARPA-E 
did not receive a direct appropriation in FY10, though it was the 
beneficiary of a $15 million transfer from the Office of Science.
    The Committee remains concerned with ARPA-E. In 2007, many members 
opposed the creation of ARPA-E because they feared the program would 
emphasize late-stage technology development more appropriately 
performed by the private sector, and that it would funded at the 
expense of priority basic research programs within the Office of 
Science.
    These concerns appear to be validated by ARPA-E's initial 
activities, which suggest several instances of awards being made for 
activities already being pursued by the private sector. While the 
Committee remains open to identifying an acceptable manner in which to 
support truly high-risk and unsupported transformational research 
activities such as those described in the original ARPA-E vision, we do 
not believe the program should receive funding above existing levels 
necessary to oversee ongoing projects until an evaluation of the 
projects being funded takes place.

    Nuclear Energy (NE)

    The Administration request for Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) R&D 
programs is $447.4 million, a 8.1 percent decrease ($39.6 million) from 
the FY10 enacted level and ten percent decrease from the FY11 
President's budget request. Approximately 74 percent of that request is 
dedicated to the Fuel Cycle R&D and Reactor Concepts RD&D programs.
    The Committee strongly supports advancement of nuclear energy and 
associated research in NE. This support does not preclude Committee 
concern for misdirected and lower priority R&D within NE. For example, 
NE should focus on technology development for reactors with realistic 
potential for deployment, rather than continuing university research on 
well-studied technologies unlikely to move beyond the academic realm.
    The Committee is encouraged by the proposal for two new programs, 
the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program and the Light 
Water Reactor (LWR) Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Licensing Technical 
Support program. The NEET program may provide an avenue for reactor 
development with crosscutting technologies which are not easily 
categorized specifically as fuel cycle or reactor concepts technology.
    SMRs are well-researched and near demonstration. SMRs hold promise; 
however, still lack approval and licensing from the Nuclear Regulatory 
Commission (NRC). The proposed LWR SMR program intends to overcome the 
existing regulatory challenges. DOE must work closely with NRC to 
complete the SMR licensing process, at which point the LWR SMR 
Licensing. Technical Support program should be terminated.

    Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) funds a 
wide array of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. The 
Administration's budget request of $3.2 billion for EERE represents a 
44.4 percent ($958 million) increase from the FY10 enacted level and a 
36 percent increase ($845 million) over the President's FY11 budget 
request. This reflects President Obama's call in his State of the Union 
speech for increased spending on clean energy technologies. Most EERE 
programs receive significant funding increases relative to the FY10 
enacted level. Of note, Industrial Technologies receives a $225 million 
increase (239 percent), which includes the creation of an Energy 
Innovation Hub on critical materials. Geothermal Technology would see 
an increase of $58 million (125 percent) to expand the enhanced 
geothermal subprogram and Solar Energy would receive an additional $213 
million (87.8 percent) to fund the ``Sunshot'' and ``dollar-a-watt'' 
initiatives.
    The Committee objects to the requested $958 million (44 percent) 
increase in EERE's budget. This concern is based on (1) EERE's focus on 
incremental, low-impact technological advances through technology 
development, demonstration, commercialization, and deployment 
activities; and (2) its significant budget increases, which include 32 
percent growth since FY 2008 and 93 percent growth since FY 2006. 
Additionally, EERE has spent only 31 percent of its appropriated $16.5 
billion in Stimulus funding. Outside of specific programmatic concerns, 
the ability of the office to responsibly manage and effectively oversee 
such massive budgetary increases is questionable.
    Additionally, we believe many activities conducted by EERE are 
unnecessary and represent an inappropriate government involvement in 
the marketplace, resulting in the government ``picking winners and 
losers'' among competing companies and technologies. EERE's budget 
increase includes a number of programs explicitly designed to assist 
with technology-specific demonstration, deployment and 
commercialization activities. Fundamentally, the act of providing 
individual firms with government money for the purpose of 
commercializing profitable technology is an inappropriate intervention 
in the market that may crowd out or discourage a greater amount of 
private investment.
    We also generally question the appropriateness and value of several 
other newly proposed and expanded activities within EERE. The Vehicle 
Technologies Program (VTP) requests a $204 million increase in vehicle 
technology deployment to disburse grants to cities for upgrade 
infrastructure to accommodate electric vehicles. Also, VTP plans to 
raise public awareness of vehicle technologies with ``high visibility 
demonstration projects at national parks.'' The Building Technologies 
Program (BTP) requests a $186 million increase from FY10 levels to 
support a ``Race to the Green'' competitive grant program. The grant 
program would implement policies such as adopting more stringent 
building codes, benchmarking and disclosing building energy use, and 
establishing public energy-savings targets. The Race to the Green 
program is a component of the Administration's Better Buildings 
Initiative. The Committee questions the relative value of a significant 
increase in Federal government spending for the purpose of providing 
grants to select localities.
    EERE conducts a multitude of outreach and education'' programs 
encompassing projects from developing K-12 curriculums to providing 
energy resource assessments for governments' scattered throughout Latin 
American and the Caribbean. These projects call into question the merit 
of existing spending and demand a methodical reevaluation of budget 
priorities before an increase of any size should even be considered.
    These areas of concern are not exhaustive but rather represent 
examples of areas the Committee intends to further scrutinize. Rigorous 
examination and Committee oversight of EERE is necessary and the 
Committee believes EERE warrants significant and well-justified cuts to 
meet necessary spending reductions.

    Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE)

    The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DE) 
oversees the modernization of the electric grid, the reliability of 
energy infrastructure, and conducts research and development for energy 
delivery-related technologies. Research and Development within OE would 
be funded at $193 million in the President's FY12 budget request. This 
would reflect an increase of $71.4 million (58.8 percent) from enacted 
FY10 levels and a $48.5 million increase (33.6 percent) from the 
President's FY11 budget request. Additionally, the President requests 
$20 million for the creation of a Smart Grid Technology and Systems Hub 
to be administered by OE.
    This Committee asserts OE's FY12 budget request is misguided given 
current budgetary restraints. OE seeks an increase of $43.4 million for 
the Energy Storage program; however, we are concerned about potential 
overlap with similar programs in the Office of Science, EERE's Vehicle 
Technologies Program, and ARPA-E's ``GRIDS'' program.
    The Committee supports targeted OE R&D in Cyber Security for Energy 
Delivery Systems, which provide basic value and is a wise and necessary 
investment for the Federal government. In spite of the value provided 
by a rigorous cyber security program, the budget request reduces cyber 
security funding by $9 million.

    Fossil Energy (FE)

    The DOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE) supports research and 
development focused on coal (including ``clean coal'' technologies), 
gas, petroleum, and also supports the Federal Government's Strategic 
Petroleum Reserve. The President's total budget request for the Office 
of Fossil Energy (FE) is $520 million. FE's research and development 
budget is reduced to $453 million, a decrease of $207 million, or 31 
percent, from FY10 enacted levels. This correlates to a 23 percent 
decrease ($134 million) from the President's FY11 budget request.
    The FY12 budget request proposes to terminate the Natural Gas 
Technologies and Unconventional Fossil Energy Technologies programs. 
Coal R&D is funded at $291 million, the bulk of which is focused on 
advancing carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) efforts. The Hydrogen 
from Coal, Coal to Coal Biomass to Liquids, and Solid Oxide Fuel Cells 
subprograms would all be eliminated.
    The Committee continues to be supportive of an ``all-of-the-above'' 
approach to addressing energy supply and demand issues, and recognizes 
the potential of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies to 
contribute to this effort We are concerned about the budget's hostile 
approach to supply side factors associated with energy independence--
primarily, expanding traditional sources of domestic energy--is 
disturbing. For example, we are deeply disappointed that the 
President's budget summary proposes to eliminate the Ultra-Deepwater 
and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Research Program 
established in Section 999 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (P.L. 109-
58). Section 999H(a) sets the funding for this program at a level of 
$50-million-per-year provided from Federal lease royalties, rents, and 
bonuses paid by oil and gas companies--not taxpayers. It should be 
clear that the overall program was initiated and carried out to reach 
energy known to exist in the areas targeted--energy that was impossible 
to produce without new technology--and that the required technology 
would be eventually be paid for from the energy captured. Further, the 
Section 999 program is the only R&D program in the Federal government 
capable of addressing drilling safety and accident prevention-related 
technology needs in a timely and effective manner.
    The Committee believes the United States must develop domestic 
energy resources to improve America's energy security. This entails 
fossil fuel development, which are the backbone of energy usage today 
and, according to the Energy Information Administration, for the 
foreseeable future. Accordingly, the Administration's proposal to 
eliminate a number of traditional Fossil Energy R&D programs, while 
placing nearly exclusive emphasis on carbon capture and sequestration 
(CCS) technology, is misguided. The Committee recommends restoring 
DOE's Fossil Energy program to its prior focus on fundamental R&D to 
advance oil and gas exploration and production technologies and enable 
near-term environmental improvements, such as increasing power plant 
efficiency and research on non-greenhouse gas related pollution 
abatement technology.

    Loan Guarantee Program Office (LPO)

    The President's FY12 budget request for DOE's Loan Guarantee 
Program Office (LPO) is $200 million. This funding would be used as a 
credit subsidy for loans authorized under Section 1703 of the Energy 
Policy Act of 2005. The LPO did not receive an appropriation for credit 
subsidies in FY10. The credit subsidy funding would support an 
estimated $1 to $2 billion in loan guarantees to support energy 
efficiency and renewable energy activities.
    The Committee does not support the budget request for $200 million 
to cover credit subsidies for renewable energy loan guarantees. The 
loan guarantee program offers businesses the ability to secure below 
market financing rates. Private financial institutions have a record of 
supporting economically feasible and valuable projects. Highly-
developed financial markets have the necessary tools to evaluate the 
relative worth of an energy project and provide the appropriate level 
of financing. We should avoid picking ``winning and losing'' projects 
through this program and return to a privately funded model of energy 
innovation.
    In addition to the Title 17 loan guarantees, the President is 
requesting $105 million to for the creation of a ``Better Building 
Pilot Loan Guarantee Initiative for Universities, Schools, and 
Hospitals.'' This program would fund loan guarantees help retrofit 
commercial buildings and would be available to subsidize up to $2 
billion in total loan principal.
    The Committee believes the creation of the Better Buildings 
Initiative is not warranted. The Administration provides nominal 
details for the initiative, such as what entities would qualify the 
criteria by which terms and conditions would be decided, and why such a 
program is needed.
    The associated costs, outside of the $100 million for credit 
subsidies, reveal the potentially wasteful nature of the program. For 
example, the detailed justification requests $1.65 million for salaries 
and benefits often full-time equivalent employees, or an average 
package of $165,000 per employee.

    Energy Innovation Hubs

    The FY12 budget request proposes funding of $146 million to support 
six Energy Innovation Hubs, which are supported through the SC, EERE, 
and NE accounts. This would support the three existing Hubs as well as 
the creation of three new Hubs, which the President highlighted in his 
recent State of the Union address. According to the Administration, 
Hubs are intended to ``advance highly promising areas of energy science 
and engineering from the early stage of research to the point where the 
technology can be handed off to the private sector.''
    The Administration's proposal to double the number of Hubs is not 
warranted under current fiscal strains. The newly proposed hubs all 
replicate ongoing research in multiple DOE programs. For example, the 
request includes $34 million for a Batteries and Energy Storage Hub, in 
addition to $136 million ($60 million increase) for battery and energy 
storage R&D in EERE's Vehicle Technologies Program, thermal energy 
storage research conducted by the Solar Technologies Program, and two 
BES subprograms.
    Rather than merge and consolidate programs to improve program 
direction and research efficiency, the request advances the complete 
opposite approach with new research programs in associated across-the-
board increases for all programs.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

    Within the jurisdiction of the Committee, the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is one of the smaller operational and 
research agencies. NOAA's mission of science, service, and stewardship 
is manifested through improvement of the understanding of oceans and 
atmosphere and how their interactions affect human life, property and 
ecosystem health. NOAA provides critical weather and climate data 
necessary to protect lives and to enhance commerce through the National 
Weather Service (NWS) and the National Environmental Satellite Service 
(NESS)\1\. NOAA is responsible for mapping and charting coastal areas 
and other navigation support services through the National Ocean 
Service (NOS). NOAA also manages fisheries and conducts research on 
marine ecosystems and marine mammals through the National Marine 
Fisheries Service (NMFS). Finally, NOAA conducts world-leading 
atmospheric and oceanic research through its Office of Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Research (OAR).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\ This line office was previously termed the National 
Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS). 
However, with the movement of the data centers into the new Climate 
Service, the name was changed to reflect the office's narrower focus.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    NOAA's FY12 budget request is 5.5 billion, an increase of $749 
million or 15.8 percent above the FY10 enacted level. As part of the 
request, the Administration has proposed the largest reorganization of 
NOAA since its inception in 1970.

    Climate Service (CS)

    The budget request includes $346.2 million for a new line office, 
the Climate Service (CS), which would include assets consolidated from 
OAR, NWS, and NESS. The Committee does not approve this reorganization 
or the creation of this Climate Service. The Committee has serious 
concerns regarding the implications of transitioning climate-related 
research into an operational office. Such a movement makes research 
funding vulnerable to cuts during tight budgetary times in order to 
ensure the continued operational functionality of the service. The 
Committee is concerned that existing science-driven research activities 
would be supplanted by service-driven and mission-directed research, 
compromising the integrity and objectivity of NOAA research. The 
Committee remains open to identifying organizational changes to improve 
information flow between NOAA's research, service, and operational 
activities, but such an effort would require close review and 
consideration through hearings and possibly legislative action. The 
Committee expects that NOAA will continue operating in its current 
organizational structure unless explicitly authorized otherwise by 
Congress.

    National Environmental Satellite Service (NESS)

    The FY12 budget request for the NESS is $2 billion, a $698.2 
million increase over FY 2010 enacted levels. This 58.2 percent 
increase is by far the largest increase in NOAA's total budget request. 
The bulk of the increase is for the Joint Polar Satellite System 
(JPSS)\2\. JPSS will provide polar-orbiting satellites scheduled to 
launch starting in 2016, which will replace currently operational 
satellites and provide key data used in weather forecasting and 
environmental observations. The Committee strongly supports this 
request and believes it should receive funding priority, even if it 
must come at the expense of other programs at NOAA. Due to the previous 
delays of its predecessor program, JPSS is well behind schedule. 
Further significant budgetary shortfalls are very likely to result in a 
satellite data continuity gap, degrading the efficacy of timely weather 
forecasts (particularly with respect to development storms and severe 
weather), and potentially harming NOAA's ability to fulfill its mission 
to protect life arid property. However, the Committee is concerned 
that, since the recent reorganization of this program, JPSS has not 
undergone a budget re-baseline process as required under P.L. 110-161 
and P.L. 109-155. The Committee believes that a base lining process 
should be completed before funding for FY12 is appropriated, and will 
continue to work to identify cost-savings within the JPSS program that 
do not jeopardize operational needs.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \2\ This program was previously the National Polar-orbiting 
Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS), a tri-agency 
program with the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) 
and the Department of Defense (DoD). As part of the FY 2011 budget 
request, the Administration split NPOESS into two programs. NOAA and 
NASA have responsibility for the JPSS program to cover the afternoon 
satellite orbit. DoD will have a separate polar weather satellite 
program for the early morning orbit.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Committee has reservations about NOAA's request of $47 million 
for the refurbishment of the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) 
satellite. Although supportive of funding a replacement satellite for 
the existing Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite that 
provides space weather information, NOAA's choice of replacement 
warrants further scrutiny. The DSCOVR satellite has been in storage for 
a decade. The Committee realizes that NASA has already spent money 
refurbishing DSCOVR for a research mission, we are concerned about 
using such an old satellite for a replacement of ACE, a vital resource 
for forecasting space weather events that have direct impacts on global 
positioning satellites, communication networks and the electric grid. 
Furthermore, we are concerned about combining an operational mission 
from NOAA with a research mission from NASA. Typically, specifications 
for research satellites differ from specifications and standards for 
operational satellites. The Committee will closely monitor the 
development of the ACE replacement and will also ensure that the Office 
of Science and Technology Policy follows through on the requirement 
laid out in P.L. 111-267 to submit a report to Congress detailing 
options for an ACE replacement.

    Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR)

    The Committee has grave concerns regarding the impact of the 
proposed Climate Service on OAR. More than half the resources of OAR 
will move into the new line office, decimating the resources of this 
research agency and harming the synergistic and strategic approach of 
the entire NOAA science enterprise. This transfer of assets is 
inconsistent with what was suggested and proposed by NOAA's Science 
Advisory Board only six years ago. The Committee will be reviewing the 
effects of such a transfer, and in the meantime, has insisted to the 
Administrator that the existing structure is maintained.
    The Committee does not agree with the proposed budget reduction of 
the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) program. After several successful 
test runs this program is prime for additional research to truly make 
it operational. The UAS technology appears likely to be capable of 
delivering improved weather and environmental data for reduced cost, 
alleviating operational budgets for the National Weather Service and 
other NOAA activities. The Committee recommends that this budget stay 
at the FY 2010 enacted levels of $6 million. We believe that such an 
investment will result in future cost savings.
    The Committee supports the $10 million OAR request for R&D on 
Multi-function Phased Array Radar (MPAR). This next generation radar 
has the potential to reduce the U.S. system by 180 radars, resulting in 
$1.9 billion in acquisition savings and $3 billion in operational cost 
reductions over 30 years. MP AR would be four to five times faster than 
today's system, greatly enhancing public safety by allowing warnings of 
over one-hour versus the current 15 minute lead time.

    National Weather Service (NWS)

    The Committee is generally supportive of the overall National 
Weather Service (NWS) FY12, budget request of $988.0 million which is a 
1.2 percent decrease from the FY10 enacted level. However, there are 
some concerns with the prioritization of the request. During some of 
the major storms in 2010, the NWS website went down. This is a vital 
resource used by emergency responders, State and local decision makers 
and the general public in order to deal with extreme weather events. 
The Committee is concerned about the requested decrease of $3.2 million 
for the telecommunications program at NWS; specifically, how it will 
affect the ability of NWS to ensure that critical information flow to 
the public is not hampered. With increasing concerns about the quality 
of the surface temperature data used for climate monitoring and 
prediction, the Committee is hesitant about the zeroing out of funding 
for the National Mesonet Network. The Mesonet Network was established 
in response to the National Academies of Science expressing concern 
about the lack of integration of distributed monitoring and 
observational networks. While we have confidence that NWS will be able 
to achieve quality forecasts using existing networks, we are concerned 
with the quality of the data generated by outside entities and the 
ability of NWS to properly integrate it into its own databases. 
Therefore, the Committee would support a reduction but not elimination 
of funding for the Mesonet Network, provided this would not increase 
the total proposed budgetary request. Finally, the Committee supports 
the NWS request of an increase of $11 million for weather and climate 
supercomputing. However, given the amount of funding NOAA has received 
for climate computing capability in the last few years, including 
stimulus funding, the Committee would recommend that this increase be 
granted only in accordance with an equal or larger decrease in the 
climate-related computing budget.

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is a non-
regulatory laboratory of the federal government tasked with innovation 
and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement science, 
standards and technology in ways that enhance economic security and 
improve our quality of life.
    In FY12, the Administration has requested a funding level of $1 
billion or a 16.9 percent increase from FY10 enacted funding for NIST. 
The budget request would provide $678.9 million for NIST's Scientific 
and Technical Research and Services (STRS); $84.6 million for 
Construction of Research Facilities (CRF); $142.6 million for the 
Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) program; and $75.0 million 
for the Technology Innovation Program (TIP).

    Laboratories and Construction

    The Committee recognizes that NIST's laboratories and internal 
maintenance and construction of those laboratories closely support our 
nation's innovation by working closely with industry to develop 
consensus-based voluntary standards. As a trusted arbiter regarded for 
its high-quality work, maintaining strong support for the laboratories 
is vital to our economic security. Nevertheless, the $164 million or 32 
percent increase over FY10 requested for the laboratories needs to be 
scrutinized to ensure that these additional funds are necessary.
    While state-of-the-art facilities are essential to the capabilities 
of NIST's intramural laboratories, the Committee supports the 
Administration for requesting no funds for the extramural construction 
grant program. The grants awarded to external entities do not directly 
support NIST's mission and were not an authorized activity. Members 
believe NIST should remain focused on its primary mission and concur 
with the Administration that this program should not be funded in FY12.

    Industrial Technology Services

    The Committee is concerned about the proposed expansion of the 
industrial technology services programs requested by the 
Administration. In particular, the Technology Innovation Program (TIP) 
is requested to receive a $5 million increase. Though the three-year 
old program has had limited time to prove itself, the Committee wants 
to ensure that this program is successfully supporting the development 
of technologies to meet critical national needs. The Committee also 
notes that this program was not reauthorized in the 2010 America 
COMPETES Act
    The Committee is pleased with the Administration's reduced request 
for the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program (BPEP). While the 
program plays an important role in recognizing and perpetuating high 
quality practices across industry, it is an appropriate time in the 
program's maturity to explore other sustainable mechanisms of running 
the program.
    The Committee questions the creation of the new Advanced 
Manufacturing Technology Consortia (AMTech) Program, with a $12.3 
million request in FY12. The program would fund facilities, equipment, 
and research at universities and government laboratories to address 
long-term research needs of the manufacturing industry. A thorough 
review of the plans for this program is necessary.

    Public Safety Innovation Fund (WIN)

    The FY12 budget request includes a plan to invest broadband 
spectrum receipts in a variety of areas, including $100 million 
annually provided to NIST for 2012-2016 for research supporting the 
development and promotion of wireless technologies to advance public 
safety, Smart Grid'' and other broadband capabilities. The Committee 
commends the Administration for recognizing NIST's history of working 
closely with industry on interoperability standards.

Department of Homeland Security (DHS)

    The Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology 
Directorate (DHS S&T) funds research, development, testing and 
evaluation to improve homeland security. The Domestic Nuclear Detection 
Office (DNDO), whose transformative research program is transferred to 
DHS S&T in 'the FY12 request, is dedicated to both the development and 
enhancement of the global nuclear detection architecture, the 
coordination of nuclear detection research and development, and the 
establishment of procedures and training for end users of nuclear 
detection equipment.
    The FY12 budget request for DHS S&T is $1.2 billion, an increase of 
16.9 percent, or $170 million over the FY10 enacted level. Most of this 
increase reflects the transfer of R&D' , programs from the DNDO to DHS 
S&T; Within DNDO, the FY12 budget drops by $51.3 million or 13.4 
percent.
    The Committee is concerned that if the DNDO transfer and proposed 
funding for the construction of the National Bio and Agro-Defense 
Facility is removed, the DHS S&T budget request represents a net 11 
percent decrease from FY10 funding levels. The Committee recognizes 
that robust research and development is necessary to support DHS's 
mission, and wants to ensure that the S&T Directorate has the resources 
it needs to keep our nation safe and, borders secure.
    Finally, the Committee recognizes the value of both Assistance to 
Firefighter Grants (AFG) and Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency 
Response (SAFER) grants to our Nation's fire departments. However, the 
Committee remains concerned that SAFER grant program continues to 
expand while the FY12 request for AFG reflects a 36 percent decrease 
below FY10 funding.

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

    The Science and Technology (S&T) account in the Environmental 
Protection Agency (EPA) covers research and development activities in 
several line offices. The activities at the Office of Research and 
Development (ORD) represent about 70 percent of the S&T budget. The 
FY12 budget request for S&T is $825.6 million, a 2.6 percent reduction 
from FY10 enacted levels. The budget request for ORD is $584.1 million, 
a 2.1 percent decrease from FY10 levels.
    Due to EPA's disturbing pattern of regulating based on insufficient 
or faulty scientific evidence, the Committee feels that it is 
unnecessary to continue to fund EPA's research at existing levels until 
reforms are undertaken. For example, the Air, Climate and Energy (ACE) 
research programs at ORD include activities to develop tools to assess 
behavioral responses to mitigation or adaption policies. This type of 
research does not further EPA's mission of protecting human health and 
the environment. Instead, these activities seem to be more driven by 
policy advocacy, which is not an appropriate use of research dollars.
    The Committee does not support the 56 percent increase in STAR 
fellowships. Although fellowships are important for the training and 
education of the next generation of scientists, the Committee feels 
that the budgetary constraints we are currently operating under do not 
afford this type of expenditure.
    The Committee has reservations about $0.5 million requested 
decrease in the Human Health Risk Assessment research program. This 
program supports the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS), a risk-
based database used by industry and government regulators alike. IRIS 
has been notoriously late on assessments; and with the decreased 
transparency that is now embedded into the new assessment process, the 
Committee has grave concerns about the quality of the assessments 
produced. Furthermore, the Committee has serious reservations about how 
this system is being used for ulterior purposes. EPA decision makers 
for IRIS are focusing on chemicals that a very small percentage of the 
overall population is exposed to. Given the backlog of chemicals IRIS 
is assessing, the Committee feels it would make more sense to assess 
chemicals that potentially affect a much greater percentage of the 
population. Finally, the Committee does not support the use of poor 
quality data, reports or information in these IRIS assessments. It has 
come to our attention that such data is used to make determinations 
that will have substantial economic and policy implications.

Department of Transportation

    Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)--Research, Development and 
Technology

    The FY12 budget request provides $394.4 million for FAA research 
and development activities, plus an additional $28.4 million for 
related facilities, adding to a total request of $422.8 million, a 
$22.2 million increase (5.5%) above the FY11 request. Agency R&D is 
spread among four accounts:

        1.  Office of Commercial Space Transportation (OCST) -Safety. 
        The FY12 budget request is $566,000 for OCST Safety, a $401,000 
        or 243 percent increase over FY11. Among other activities, the 
        additional funds would be used for research and development of 
        the, technical expertise needed to certify human space flight 
        launch systems and capsules now, under development that would 
        be used to carry non-government passengers (astronauts) to 
        orbit.

        2.  The Research, Engineering and Development account (Aviation 
        Trust Fund), with a FY12 request of $190 million, is $500,000 
        less than the amount requested in FY11. RE&D conducts research 
        to support a safe, efficient and environmentally acceptable 
        aviation system in five key areas: air traffic services, 
        airport technology, aircraft safety, human factors and the 
        environment.

        3.  A portion of the Facilities and Equipment account (Aviation 
        Trust Fund) dedicated to engineering, development, test and 
        evaluation, with an FY12 request of $177.5 million, a $22.3 
        million or 14 percent increase over the FY11 request.

        4.  A portion of the Airport Improvement Program account 
        (Aviation Trust Fund) with an FY12 request of $44.3 million, an 
        increase of $2.1 million over five percent over FY11.

    At a programmatic level we support the FAA's budget request for 
development and implementation of NextGen, to modernize our nation's 
air traffic control system. NextGen technologies will ensure that our 
national airspace system can readily accommodate future growth while 
maintaining the highest levels of safety. Whether speaking about 
NextGen R&D, or NextGen generally, it is essential these efforts be 
supported.

    Office of Commercial Space Transportation (OCST)

    The FY12 budget request for OCST (operations) is $26.6 million, an 
increase of $10.9 million or 70 percent over the FY11 request. OCST is 
responsible for licensing and regulating commercial space launches and 
reentries to ensure compliance with standards designed to protect 
public safety. For FYI2, OCST proposes to hire 32 additional FTE staff 
to develop and implement additional safety processes and requirements 
specifically for commercial human spaceflight and space traffic 
management. Our Committee intends to hold hearings prior to 
reauthorizing OCST later this year.

    Research and Innovative Technology Administration (RITA)

    The FY12 Administration research request for RITA is $17.6 million, 
or $4.6 million above the FY10 enacted. RITA is tasked with 
coordinating and reviewing all of DOT's research and development 
programs, representing more than $1 billion across the Department.
    The proposed funding levels for research and development for the 
Federal Highway Administration is $661 million and for the Federal 
Transit Administration is $30 million. Both of these accounts support 
portions of the research and development conducted by University 
Transportation Centers across the country.
    The Committee is concerned about long-term, rigorous transportation 
research and development remaining a high priority, and believes that 
we must provide realistic and sustainable funding for these programs 
'in the future. Furthermore, the Committee is concerned that the 
Administration's goals for some transportation research programs, such 
as Livable Communities or green construction, may stray from the 
fundamental transportation needs of most taxpayers including road 
safety and congestion mitigation.
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List of Signatures

1. Representative Ralph M. Hall

2. Representative Charles lFleischmann

3. Representative Steven M. Palazzo

4. Representative Judy Biggert

5. Representative Scott E. Rigell

6. Representative Benjamin Quayle

7. Representative Randy Neugebauer

8. Representative Randy Hultgren

9. Representative Paul C. Broun

10. Representative Larry Buschon

11. Representative Frank D. Lucas

12. Representative James F. Sensenbrenner

13. Representative Mo Brooks

14. Representative Lamar Smith

15. Representative Michael T. McCaul

16. Representative Roscoe G. Bartlett

17. Representative Andy Harris

18. Representative W. Todd Akin

19. Representative Dan Benishek

20. Representative Chip Cravaack

21. Representative Sandy Adams 
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             MINORITY VIEWS OF THE DEMOCRATIC CAUCUS OF THE
              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY
                     ON THE FY 2012 BUDGET REQUEST
    The nation's research and development agencies have a long history 
of investing in research and education programs that return very 
significant economic payoffs to the American people. The President's FY 
2012 budget request continues the commitment to investing in our future 
while at the same time acknowledging the difficult fiscal environment 
in which we find ourselves. While we can disagree with some of the 
specific choices and priorities contained in the Administration's FY 
2012 budget request, we share the President's goals of maintaining a 
strong science and technology enterprise and ensuring that our young 
people are prepared for the technical careers of the future.
    The choice before us as a nation is stark: we can focus on the need 
to create jobs now and in the coming years by making sure that we are 
taking the necessary steps to ensure that we remain economically strong 
and competitive in a challenging international marketplace, or we can 
engage in short-sighted cutting of our capabilities for innovation and 
education to meet arbitrary budgetary targets. If the past is any 
guide, it is clear that investments in science, technology and STEM 
education must be a cornerstone of any serious long-term strategy to 
keep America competitive.
    The budget resolution that these Views and Estimates are intended 
to inform is being developed even while the FY 2011 budget remains in 
play. The House consideration of the FY 2011 budget has been marked by 
severe cuts to important research and development (R&D) initiatives in 
order to meet arbitrary fiscal goals. The end result of those cuts, if 
enacted into law, would be thousands of layoffs and furloughs among the 
best and brightest of our scientists and engineers; curtailment of 
critical research activities to protect the public from environmental 
hazards; fewer innovative technologies to enable the industries of the 
future; and serious damage to our core scientific and technological 
capabilities.
    The President's FY 2012 budget request, on the other hand, 
recognizes that even in these challenging economic times, we need not--
and should not--sacrifice our future for the sake of crippling cuts to 
a small fraction of the total federal budget. With vision and 
perseverance, we can be both fiscally responsible and make the 
necessary investments to keep the American economy competitive in the 
coming decades while keeping our people and our environment healthy.
    Thus, while there are findings in the Majority's Views and 
Estimates with which we can agree, it is clear that the overall thrust 
of those Views and Estimates is in the direction of advocating 
substantial cuts to important research and development programs and 
initiatives. While there are undoubtedly areas of savings that could be 
found by careful examination of programs and projects, the broad-brush 
notion that whole areas of science and technology are not needed to 
prepare for an uncertain future does not have a credible basis in 
either fact or analysis. Thus, vague and unsupported claims that 
agencies like the Environmental Protection Agency are regulating 
``based on insufficient or faulty science''--and thus should have their 
funding cut--do little to advance the debate over appropriate R&D 
funding priorities nor do they provide thoughtful guidance to the 
Budget Committee as it attempts to construct an overall federal budget 
blueprint.
    That is not to say that there is nothing of value that can be said 
about the choices before us as a nation. For example, one need only 
look at the cuts that were adopted in H.R. 1 to realize that the path 
advocated in that legislation and in the Majority's Views and Estimates 
would lead thousands of the most promising scientists and engineers in 
the nation to lose their jobs and abandon their research. After years 
of bipartisan calls for young people to come into science and math and 
engineering, the outcome of enacting H.R. 1 or the policies in the 
Majority's Views and Estimates would be the same as posting a big 
``Help Not Needed'' sign on every National Laboratory and university 
throughout the country. That would be a tragedy--and one that the 
President's FY 2012 budget request seeks to avoid.
    Every family understands that there are consumption expenditures 
and investment expenditures. We sacrifice to make sure our children 
have shoes, medical care, and a good education. When money is tight, we 
cut back on restaurant dinners, new clothes for ourselves, and vacation 
trips--those things that might be nice to have, but are not necessary 
to keep a roof over our heads today or build a better life for our 
family tomorrow. Even when times are tough, however, we are willing to 
take (out loans or take on a second job to help cover the costs of 
college. People understand that shortchanging our children's education 
will leave them less prepared for what will come. In our private lives 
we understand that the investments we make today, even when times are 
hard, will pay dividends in the future. This same logic applies to 
meeting our public responsibilities.
    In short, Democratic members of the Committee on Science, Space, 
and Technology believe that if we do not invest in education, in new 
ideas, and in new processes, we will deny our children the capacity to 
deal effectively with the crises that their generation will have to 
tackle. It is irresponsible not to invest in the future, whether you 
are talking about your own children or speaking of the legacy we as a 
society leave the generations that will succeed us.
    The Democratic Members of the Committee thus endorse the 
President's budget request for FY 2012 in the area of research and 
development. While we might make slightly different recommendations 
across specific program areas, taken as a whole, the Administration has 
worked hard to find savings to balance their continuing commitment to 
investing in our nation's future. We endorse the Administration's 
approach of guarding from cuts those investments in innovation, 
education and infrastructure that contribute to the conditions that 
allow Americans to continue to do what we have done time and again 
since the founding of the Republic:

        
  invest to keep America economically competitive and 
        strong and to create good jobs now and in the future;

        
  build opportunities for every citizen to unleash 
        their potential to be creative, productive and actively 
        contribute to this great democracy; and

        
  leave for our children a world that is better than 
        the one we inherited.

    We should add that these investments will build not just a better 
society, but also make this country a better place to do business and 
develop a workforce with the skills to excel, the ambition to create, 
and the means to succeed.
                         Programmatic Guidance
    While programmatic guidance is of limited utility to the Budget 
Committee, what follows are specific observations, agency-by-agency, 
where the agreement or disagreement with the Majority Views and 
Estimates is significant enough to justify comment.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

    While supportive of the President, Democratic members are 
disappointed with the NASA request, especially in light of the work 
that Congress undertook last year to forge a constructive path forward 
for the nation's space program. The compromise that was enacted into 
law is not reflected in the proposed NASA budget request. The request 
cuts NASA's overall budget plan and its human exploration budget even 
further than before, delays the development of the next generation 
vehicle, and eliminates any concrete destinations or milestones beyond 
the International Space Station that can inform decisions on needed 
investments in space technology. We agree with the Majority's view that 
NASA's FY 2012 request is not reflective of the priorities established 
in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010 as the Administration has placed 
a relative higher priority on commercial crew and underfunded 
development of the Space Launch Vehicle (SLV) and Multiple Purpose Crew 
Vehicle (MPCV).
    Contrary to the Majority's position on Earth Science, Democratic 
members have been supportive of the higher funding accorded this area 
in last year's request. NASA has indicated that reduced out-year 
funding for Earth Sciences will necessitate delaying the start of two 
missions, CLARREO and DESDynI. While this is unfortunate, Democratic 
members acknowledge the budgetary challenges facing NASA's Science 
program. However, we are concerned that delays in initiating these 
missions could lead to higher development costs and also delay the 
collection of data. This data would provide significant utility in 
observing, understanding, and addressing key environmental challenges 
including complete EI Nino/ La Nina cycles, reflected solar radiation 
and Earth thermal radiation, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, 
landslides as well as new observational information for monitoring 
forests, agricultural resources, and mountain glaciers.

National Science Foundation (NSF)

    Democratic Members strongly support fully funding NSF at the levels 
requested by the President. There is no record to support the 
Republican views that `` . . . new and expanded Administration 
priorities continue to excessively divert precious research and 
development funds from other worthy endeavors.'' Innovation in science 
and the creation of cross-disciplinary science initiatives that tie 
basic research to technology innovation, at agencies that fund research 
and development both reflect and help drive creativity across the 
nation's colleges and universities.

Department of Energy (DOE)

    Democratic Members strongly reject the Republican preferences for 
cuts to programs at the DOE. The cuts outlined in the FY 2011 
Continuing Resolution would lead to job losses in the thousands spread 
across the National Labs in California, New Mexico, Washington, 
Colorado, Illinois, Tennessee, New York, and Virginia, and many 
thousands more at universities and companies all across the country. 
Not only would some of the country's best and brightest find their 
careers interrupted or ended, but the Nation would also lose the fruits 
of their hard work and creativity. DOE programs and the National Labs 
fill a void in the U.S. innovation pipeline that industry and 
universities cannot or will not do alone, tackling some of our most 
important national challenges at the cutting edge of questions about 
material sciences, energy sciences, emerging sources of energy, and 
conservation.
    Democratic Members believe that we must take a comprehensive 
approach to assure a safer, more sustainable energy future for our 
children, and this includes supporting activities from basic to applied 
research, and beyond. Assuming that the current level of private 
investment in energy technologies is sufficient, that companies will do 
all of the necessary cutting-edge research on their own, or that the 
marketplace will naturally pick cleaner technologies, grossly 
oversimplifies the complexity and scale of the energy and environmental 
challenges that we face today, and threatens our future international 
competitiveness. With the U.S. accounting for roughly eight percent of 
global oil reserves and a quarter of global oil demand, we cannot drill 
our way to energy independence. If the country is to have any hope of 
developing a long-term solution to the depletion of fossil fuels, or of 
reducing pollution from our need to continue to use fossil fuels in 
many applications for generations to come, those answers will likely be 
found through research by the National Labs, universities, and 
companies supported by DOE. However, those answers will be much harder 
to find if we undercut DOE's vital research efforts.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

    Democratic Members endorse the President's request for NOAA. We are 
particularly concerned that funds sufficient to launch the full array 
of weather and climate sensors and satellites be made available in the 
FY 2012 budget. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
    Democratic Members are pleased that the President's request 
provides support for the NIST lab complex as well as the Industrial 
Technology Services. The budget request is consistent with COMPETES Act 
goals and continues the Manufacturing Extension Program (MEP) on its 
doubling path. The MEP remains a very effective tool for supporting 
small businesses. This program's focus on improving manufacturing 
capabilities is almost unique across the Federal government.

Department of Homeland Security (DHS)

    The Democratic Members are supportive of the President's request 
for DHS Science and Technology. We are particularly pleased with the 
strong support shown in that budget for the Staffing for Adequate Fire 
and Emergency Response (SAFER) grants which support our Nation's 
emergency response community. However, the cuts to the Assistance to 
Firefighter Grants (AFG) program are troubling, and we would prefer 
that this program be fully funded at the FY 2010 level.

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

    The Majority's Views and Estimates state that: ``Due to EPA's 
disturbing pattern of regulating based on insufficient or faulty 
scientific evidence, the Committee feels that it is unnecessary to 
continue EPA's research at existing levels until reforms are 
undertaken.'' Democratic Members strongly reject this view and support 
the President's request for EPA science.
    The Majority make specific reference to the Integrated Risk 
Information System (IRIS). The Majority's characterization of the 
program is unrecognizable to anyone who has studied the record. EPA is 
currently trying to gain greater control over the IRIS process, an 
effort that the Majority describes as resulting in ``decreased 
transparency'' so that they can begin adding entries at a pace greater 
than two or three a year. The assertion that the IRIS ``system is being 
used for ulterior purposes'' is not buttressed by analysis. The problem 
with science at EPA is not that they do not do it well or that they 
abuse it, but that it is used by those who fear regulation to postpone 
risk assessments. IRIS entries go through multi-year reviews and some 
have even been forced to National Academy Assessments, and these 
endless efforts go on more than a decade without ever leading to an 
entry. That is not EPA's doing, but rather reflects the efforts of 
those who use the argument of scientific uncertainty to demand just one 
more study, one more literature review, one more outside panel before 
any regulation can ever be approved for action. IRIS has been the 
subject of multiple hearings by the Investigations and Oversight 
Subcommittee in the 110th and 111th Congresses as well as multiple 
reports by the Government Accountability Office (GAO)--the facts are 
available for anyone to review.

Department of Transportation (DOT)

    Democratic Members of the Committee support DOT's continuing 
research into ways to build and maintain infrastructure in a manner 
that is energy efficient and reduces impacts on the environment; to 
identify and address deterioration and other potential safety problems 
with new and existing infrastructure; and to find efficient, sensible 
ways to reduce traffic congestion. We particularly support programs 
that would successfully transition research findings to state and local 
transportation planners. Regarding the Federal Aviation Administration 
(FAA), Democratic Members are supportive of FAA's Research, Development 
and Technology initiatives, including NextGen, and urge funding of such 
initiatives in FY 2012 at the level requested by the Administration. In 
addition, Democratic Members look forward to receiving additional 
information at an upcoming hearing before finalizing our views on the 
proposed increase for the FAA's Office of Commercial Space 
Transportation.
<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>

                        HISTORY OF APPOINTMENTS

              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY

                     U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                  FOR THE ONE HUNDRED TWELFTH CONGRESS

January 6, 2011--H. Res. 6

Ralph M. Hall, Texas, named Chair of the Science, Space, and Technology 
Committee.

January 5, 2011--H. Res. 7

Eddie Bernice Johnson, Texas, named Ranking Member of the Science, 
Space, and Technology Committee.

January 18, 2011--H. Res. 37

Republican Members assigned to the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology:

F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr., Lamar S. Smith of Texas, Dana Rohrabacher, 
Roscoe G. Bartlett, Frank D. Lucas, Judy Biggert, W. Todd Akin, Randy 
Neugebauer, Michael T. McCaul, Paul C. Broun of Georgia, Sandy Adams, 
Benjamin Quayle, Charles J. ``Chuck'' Fleischmann, E. Scott Rigell, 
Steven M. Palazzo, Mo Brooks, Andy Harris.

January 19, 2011--H. Res. 39

Democratic Members assigned to the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology:

Jerry F. Costello, Lynn C. Woolsey, Zoe Lofgren of California, David 
Wu, Brad Miller of North Carolina, Daniel Lipinski, Gabrielle Giffords, 
Donna F. Edwards, Marcia L. Fudge, Ben R. Lujan, Paul D. Tonko, Jerry 
McNerney, John P. Sarbanes, Terri A. Sewell, Frederica S. Wilson, 
Hansen Clarke.

February 9, 2011--H. Res. 78

Randy Hultgren, Chip Cravaack, Larry Bucshon, and Dan Benishek 
appointed to the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology.

August 3, 2011

Mr. Wu resigned from the United States House of Representatives.

January 26, 2012

Ms. Giffords resigned from the United States House of Representatives.

February 16, 2012--H. Res. 533

Ms. Bonamici appointed to the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology.

March 20, 2012--H. Res. 590

Mr. Sarbanes resigned from the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology.

March 20, 2012--H. Res. 590

Ms. Fudge resigned from the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology.

                         Subcommittee Selection

February 9, 2011--Republican Subcommittee Assignments

                         Energy & Environment:

Andy Harris (Chair), Dana Rohrabacher, Roscoe G. Bartlett, Frank D. 
Lucas, Judy Biggert, W. Todd Akin, Randy Neugebauer, Paul C. Broun, 
Charles J. ``Chuck'' Fleischmann, Ralph M. Hall (Ex Officio)

                      Investigations & Oversight:

Paul C. Broun (Chair), F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr., Sandy Adams, Randy 
Hultgren, Larry Bucshon, Dan Benishek, Ralph M. Hall (Ex Officio)

                     Research & Science Education:

Mo Brooks (Chair), Roscoe G. Bartlett, Benhamin Quayle, Steven M. 
Palazzo, Andy Harris, Randy Hultgren, Larry Bucshon, Dan Benishek, 
Ralph M. Hall (Ex Officio)

                          Space & Aeronautics:

Steven M. Palazzo (Chair), F. James Sensenbrenner, Lamar S. Smith, Dana 
Rohrabacher, Frank D. Lucas, W. Todd Akin, Michael T. McCaul, Sandy 
Adams, E. Scott Rigell, Mo Brooks, Ralph M. Hall (Ex Officio)

                        Technology & Innovation:

Benjamin Quayle (Chair), Lamar S. Smith, Judy Biggert, Randy 
Neugebauer, Michael T. McCaul, Charles J. ``Chuck'' Fleischmann, E. 
Scott Rigell, Randy Hultgren, Chip Cravaack, Ralph M. Hall (Ex Officio)

February 9, 2011--Democratic Subcommittee Assignments

                         Energy & Environment:

Brad Miller (Ranking Member), Lynn C. Woolsey, Ben R. Lujan, Paul D. 
Tonko, Zoe Lofgren, Jerry McNerney, Eddie Bernice Johnson (Ex Officio)

                      Investigations & Oversight:

Donna F. Edwards (Ranking Member), Zoe Lofgren, Brad Miller, Jerry 
McNerney, Eddie Bernice Johnson (Ex Officio)

                     Research & Science Education:

Daniel Lipinski (Ranking Member), Hansen Clarke, Paul D. Tonko, John P. 
Sarbanes, Terri A. Sewell, Eddie Bernice Johnson (Ex Officio)

                          Space & Aeronautics:

Gabrielle Giffords (Ranking Member), Marcia L. Fudge, Jerry F. 
Costello, Terri A. Sewell, David Wu, Donna F. Edwards, Frederica S. 
Wilson, Eddie Bernice Johnson (Ex Officio)

                        Technology & Innovation:

David Wu (Ranking Member), John P. Sarbanes, Frederica S. Wilson, 
Daniel Lipinski, Gabrielle Giffords, Ben R. Lujan, Eddie Bernice 
Johnson (Ex Officio)

October 26, 2011--Democratic Subcommittee Assignments

Ms. Edwards assigned as Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on 
Technology Innovation.

Mr. Tonko assigned as Ranking Member on the Subcommittee on 
Investigations and Oversight.

Mr. Clarke assigned to the Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics.

January 26, 2012

Ms. Giffords resigned from the United States House or Representatives.

March 20, 2012

Mr. Sarbanes resigned from the Subcommittee on Research and Science 
Education and Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation.

March 20, 2012

Ms. Fudge resigned from the Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics.

March 28, 2012

Ms. Bonamici was assigned to the Subcommittee on Research and Science 
Education and the Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation.

July 10, 2012

Mr. Tonko resigned his seat on the Subcommittee on Research and Science 
Education

November 29, 2012

Mr. Curson was assigned to the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology

                  RULES GOVERNING PROCEDURE, COMMITTEE

                   ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY

                         FOR THE 112th CONGRESS

RULE 1. GENERAL PROVISIONS

        (a)  IN GENERAL.--The Rules of the House of Representatives, so 
        far as applicable, shall govern the Committee and its 
        Subcommittees, except that a motion to recess from day to day, 
        or a motion to recess subject to the call of the chair (within 
        24 hours), or a motion to dispense with the first reading (in 
        full) of a bill or resolution, if printed copies are available, 
        is a non-debatable motion of privilege in the Committee. [House 
        Rule XI 1(a)]

        (b)  SUBCOMMITEES.--Each Subcommittee is a part of the 
        Committee and is subject to the authority and direction of the 
        Committee and its rules so far as applicable. Written rules 
        adopted by the Committee, not inconsistent with the Rules of 
        the House, shall be binding on each Subcommittee of the 
        Committee. [House Rule XI 1(a)]

        (c)  COMMITTEE RULES.--The Committee's rules shall be publicly 
        available in electronic form and published in the Congressional 
        Record not later than 30 days after the Chair of the Committee 
        is elected in each odd-numbered year. [House Rule XI 2(a)(2)]

        (d)  AVAILABILITY OF PUBLICATIONS.--To the maximum extent 
        feasible, the Committee shall make its publications available 
        in electronic form, including on the Committee website. [House 
        Rule XI 2(e)(4)]

        (e)  COMMITTEE WEBSITE.--The Chair of the Committee shall 
        maintain an official Committee website for the purpose of 
        furthering the Committee's legislative and oversight 
        responsibilities, including communicating information about the 
        Committee's activities to Committee Members and other Members 
        of the House. The Ranking Minority Member of the Committee may 
        maintain a similar website for the same purpose, including 
        communicating information about the activities of the minority 
        to Committee Members and other Members of the House.

        (f)  VICE CHAIR; PRESIDING MEMBER.--The Chair shall designate a 
        member of the majority party to serve as Vice Chair of the 
        Committee, and shall designate a majority member of each 
        Subcommittee to serve as Vice Chair of each subcommittee. The 
        vice chair of the Committee or subcommittee, as the case may 
        be, shall preside at any meeting or hearing during the 
        temporary absence of the Chair. If the Chair or Vice Chair of 
        the Committee or Subcommittee are not present at any meeting or 
        hearing, the ranking member of the majority party who is 
        present shall preside at the meeting or hearing. [House Rule XI 
        2(d)]

        (g)  MOTION TO GO TO CONFERENCE.--The Chair is directed to 
        offer a motion under clause l of Rule XXII of the Rules of the 
        House whenever the Chair considers it appropriate. [House Rule 
        XI 2(a)(3)]

        (h)  CONFERENCE COMMITEES.--Recommendations of conferees to the 
        Speaker shall provide a ratio of majority party Members to 
        minority party Members which shall be no less favorable to the 
        majority party than the ratio of the Committee.

        (i)  USE OF HEARING ROOMS.--In consultation with the Ranking 
        Minority Member, the Chair of the Committee shall establish 
        guidelines for the use of Committee hearing rooms.

        (j)  NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION.--All national security 
        information bearing a classification of secret or higher which 
        has been received by the Committee or a Subcommittee shall be 
        deemed to have been received in Executive Session and shall be 
        given appropriate safekeeping. The Chair of the Committee may 
        establish such regulations and procedures as in the Chair's 
        judgment are necessary to safeguard classified information 
        under the control of the Committee. Such procedures shall, 
        however, ensure access to this information by any Member of the 
        Committee or any other Member of the House of Representatives 
        who has requested the opportunity to review such material.

        (k)  OTHER PROCEDURES.--The Chair of the Committee, after 
        consultation with the Ranking Minority Member of the Committee, 
        may establish such other procedures and take such actions as 
        may be necessary to carry out these rules or to facilitate the 
        effective operation of the Committee.

Rule 2. REGULAR, ADDITIONAL, AND SPECIAL MEETINGS

        (a)  REGULAR MEETINGS.--Unless dispensed with by the Chair of 
        the Committee, the Committee shall meet on the second (2nd) 
        Wednesday of each month at 10:00 a.m. if the House is in 
        session. If the House is not in session on that day and the 
        Committee has not met during such month, the Committee shall 
        meet at the earliest practicable opportunity when the House is 
        again in session. [House Rule XI 2(b)]

        (b)  ADDITIONAL MEETINGS.--The Chair of the Committee may call 
        and convene, as the Chair considers necessary and in accordance 
        with Rule 4(b), additional meetings of the Committee for the 
        consideration of any bill or resolution pending before the 
        Committee or for the conduct of other Committee business. The 
        Committee shall meet for such purpose under that call of the 
        Chair. [House Rule XI 2(c)(1)]

        (c)  SPECIAL MEETINGS.--Rule XI 2(c) of the Rules of the House 
        of Representatives is hereby incorporated by reference. [House 
        Rule XI 2(c)(2)]

Rule 3. MEETINGS AND HEARINGS GENERALLY

        (a)  IN GENERAL.--Meetings and hearings of the Committee shall 
        be called to order and presided over by the Chair, or in the 
        Chair's absence, by the Vice Chair of the Committee or by the 
        ranking majority member of the Committee present as Acting 
        Chair. [House Rule XI 2(d)]

        (b)  OPENING STATEMENTS.--Insofar as is practicable, the Chair, 
        after consultation with the Ranking Minority Member, shall 
        limit the total time of opening statements by Members to no 
        more than 10 minutes, the time to be divided equally between 
        the Chair and Ranking Minority Member.

        (c)  ADDRESSING THE COMMITTEE.--The time any one (1) Member may 
        address the Committee on any bill, motion, or other matter 
        under consideration by the Committee or the time allowed for 
        the questioning of a witness at hearings before the Committee 
        will be limited to five (5) minutes, and then only when the 
        Member has been recognized by the Chair. This time limit may be 
        waived by the Chair pursuant to unanimous consent. [House Rule 
        XI 2(j)(2)]

        (d)  REQUESTS FOR WRITTEN MOTIONS.--Any motion made at a 
        meeting of the Committee and which is entertained by the Chair 
        of the Committee or the Subcommittee shall be presented in 
        writing upon the demand of any Member present and a copy made 
        available to each Member present.

        (e)  OPEN MEETINGS AND HEARINGS.--Each meeting for the 
        transaction of business, including the markup of legislation, 
        and each hearing of the Committee or a Subcommittee shall be 
        open to the public, including to radio, television, and still 
        photography coverage, unless closed in accordance with clause 
        2(g) or 2(k)(5) of rule XI of the Rules of the House of 
        Representatives.

        (f)  AUDIO AND VISUAL COVERAGE.------

                (1)  Whenever a hearing or meeting conducted by the 
                Committee is open to the public, these proceedings 
                shall be open to coverage by audio and visual means, 
                except as provided in Rule XI 4(f)(2) of the House of 
                Representatives.

                (2)  To the maximum extent practicable the audio and 
                video coverage shall be in a manner that allows the 
                public to easily listen to and view the proceedings.

                (3)  Operation and use of any Committee internet 
                broadcast system shall be fair and nonpartisan and in 
                accordance with all other applicable rules of the 
                Committee and the House.

                (4)  To the maximum extent practicable, the Committee 
                shall maintain the recordings of the coverage of such 
                hearings or meetings in a manner easily accessible to 
                the public.

                (5)  The Chair of the Committee or Subcommittee may not 
                limit the number of television, or still cameras to 
                fewer than two (2) representatives from each medium 
                (except for legitimate space or safety considerations, 
                in which case pool coverage shall be authorized).

                (6)  Radio and television tapes, television films, and 
                Internet recordings of any Committee hearings or 
                meetings that are open to the public may not be used, 
                or made available for use, as partisan political 
                campaign material to promote or oppose the candidacy of 
                any person for elective public office.

                (7)  It is, further, the intent of this rule that the 
                general conduct of each meeting or hearing covered 
                under authority of this rule by audio or visual means, 
                and the personal behavior of the Committee Members and 
                staff, other government officials and personnel, 
                witnesses, television, radio, and press media 
                personnel, and the general public at the meeting or 
                hearing, shall be in strict conformity with and 
                observance of the acceptable standards of dignity, 
                propriety, courtesy, and decorum traditionally observed 
                by the House in its operations, and may not be such as 
                to:

                        (A)  distort the objects and purposes of the 
                        meeting or hearing or the activities of 
                        Committee Members in connection with that 
                        meeting or hearing or in connection with the 
                        general work of the Committee or of the House; 
                        or

                        (B)  cast discredit or dishonor on the House, 
                        the Committee, or a Member, Delegate, or 
                        Resident Commissioner or bring the House, the 
                        Committee, or a Member, Delegate, or Resident 
                        Commissioner into disrepute.

                (8)  The coverage of Committee meetings and hearings by 
                audio and visual means shall be permitted and conducted 
                only in strict conformity with the purposes, 
                provisions, and requirements of this rule.

                (9)  The following shall apply to coverage of Committee 
                meetings or hearings by audio or visual means:

                        (A)  If audio or visual coverage of the hearing 
                        or meeting is to be presented to the public as 
                        live coverage, that coverage shall be conducted 
                        and presented without commercial sponsorship.

                        (B)  The allocation among the television media 
                        of the positions or the number of television 
                        cameras permitted by a Committee or 
                        Subcommittee Chair in a hearing or meeting room 
                        shall be in accordance with fair and equitable 
                        procedures devised by the Executive Committee 
                        of the Radio and Television Correspondents' 
                        Galleries.

                        (C)  Television cameras shall be placed so as 
                        not to obstruct in any way the space between a 
                        witness giving evidence or testimony and any 
                        member of the Committee or the visibility of 
                        that witness and that member to each other.

                        (D)  Television cameras shall operate from 
                        fixed positions but may not be placed in 
                        positions that obstruct unnecessarily the 
                        coverage of the hearing or meeting by the other 
                        media.

                        (E)  Equipment necessary for coverage by the 
                        television and radio media may not be installed 
                        in, or removed from, the hearing or meeting 
                        room while the Committee is in session.

                        (F)  (i) Except as provided in subdivision 
                        (ii), floodlights, spotlights, strobe lights, 
                        and flashguns may not be used in providing any 
                        method of coverage of the hearing or meeting.

                                (ii)  The television media may install 
                                additional lighting in a hearing or 
                                meeting room, without cost to the 
                                Government, in order to raise the 
                                ambient lighting level in a hearing or 
                                meeting room to the lowest level 
                                necessary to provide adequate 
                                television coverage of a hearing or 
                                meeting at the current state of the art 
                                of television coverage.

                        (G)  If requests are made by more of the media 
                        than will be permitted by a Committee or 
                        Subcommittee Chair for coverage of a hearing or 
                        meeting by still photography, that coverage 
                        shall be permitted on the basis of a fair and 
                        equitable pool arrangement devised by the 
                        Standing Committee of Press Photographers.

                        (H)  Photographers may not position themselves 
                        between the witness table and the members of 
                        the Committee at any time during the course of 
                        a hearing or meeting.

                        (I)  Photographers may not place themselves in 
                        positions that obstruct unnecessarily the 
                        coverage of the hearing by the other media.

                        (J)  Personnel providing coverage by the 
                        television and radio media shall be currently 
                        accredited to the Radio and Television 
                        Correspondents' Galleries.

                        (K)  Personnel providing coverage by still 
                        photography shall be currently accredited to 
                        the Press Photographers' Gallery.

                        (L)  Personnel providing coverage by the 
                        television and radio media and by still 
                        photography shall conduct themselves and their 
                        coverage activities in an orderly and 
                        unobtrusive manner. [House Rule XI (4)]

Rule 4. CONSIDERATION OF MEASURE OR MATTER

        (a)  IN GENERAL.--Bills and other substantive matters may be 
        taken up for consideration only when called by the Chair of the 
        Committee, except those matters which are the subject of 
        special call meetings outlined in Rule 2(c).

        (b)  NOTICE.------

                (1)  (A) The Chair of the Committee shall announce the 
                date, place, and subject matter of a committee meeting, 
                which may not commence earlier than the third day on 
                which members have notice thereof. [House Rule XI 
                2(g)(3)]

                        (B)  A committee meeting may begin sooner than 
                        specified in subdivision (A) (in which case the 
                        Chair shall make the announcement specified in 
                        subdivision (A) at the earliest possible time) 
                        if------

                                (i)  the Chair of the Committee, with 
                                the concurrence of the ranking minority 
                                member, determines there is good cause 
                                to do so; or

                                (ii)  the Committee so determines by 
                                majority vote, a quorum being present. 
                                [House Rule XI 2(g)(3)]

                (2)  (A) At least 24 hours prior to the commencement of 
                a meeting for the consideration of a measure or matter, 
                or at the time of the announcement under (b)(1)(B) made 
                within 24 hours before such meeting, the Chair shall 
                cause the text of such measure or matter to be made 
                publicly available in electronic form. [House Rule XI 
                2(g)(4)]

                        (B)  To the maximum extent practicable, a 
                        written copy of the measure or matter to be 
                        considered and the original text of the measure 
                        to be considered for purposes of markup shall 
                        be made publicly available in electronic form 
                        for at least 48 hours in advance of 
                        consideration, excluding Saturdays, Sundays and 
                        legal holidays.

                (3)  A notice provided shall be published promptly in 
                the Daily Digest and made publicly available in 
                electronic form. [House Rule XI 2(g)(3)]

        (c)  SUBMISSION OF AMENDMENTS.--To the maximum extent 
        practicable, amendments to a measure or matter shall be 
        submitted in writing to the Clerk of the Committee at least 24 
        hours prior to the consideration of the measure or matter.

        (d)  INVESTIGATIVE OR OVERSIGHT REPORTS.--A proposed 
        investigative or oversight report shall be considered as read 
        in Committee if it has been available to the Members for at 
        least 24 hours (excluding Saturdays, Sundays, or legal holidays 
        except when the House is in session on such a day). [House Rule 
        XI 1(b)(2)]

        (e)  PRIVATE BILLS.--No private bill will be scheduled by the 
        Chair of the Committee if there are two (2) or more Members who 
        object to its consideration.

Rule 5. POWER TO SIT AND ACT; SUBPOENA POWER

        (a)  IN GENERAL.------

                (1)  Notwithstanding paragraph (2), a subpoena may be 
                authorized and issued in the conduct of any 
                investigation or series of investigations or activities 
                to require the attendance and testimony of such 
                witnesses and the production of such books, records, 
                correspondence, memoranda, papers and documents as 
                deemed necessary, only when authorized by majority vote 
                of the Committee or Subcommittee (as the case may be), 
                a majority of the Committee or Subcommittee being 
                present. Authorized subpoenas shall be signed only by 
                the Chair of the Committee, or by any Member designated 
                by the Chair. [House Rule XI 2(m)(3)(A)]

                (2)  The Chair of the Committee, after consultation 
                with the Ranking Minority Member of the Committee, or, 
                if the Ranking Member cannot be reached, the Ranking 
                Minority Member of the relevant Subcommittee, may 
                authorize and issue such subpoenas as described in 
                paragraph (1) during any period in which the House has 
                adjourned for a period longer than three (3) days. 
                [House Rule XI 2(m)(3)(A)]

                (3)  A subpoena duces tecum may specify terms of return 
                other than at a meeting or a hearing of the Committee. 
                [House Rule XI 2(m)(3)(B)]

                (4)  The Chair, or any Member of the Committee 
                designated by the Chair, may administer oaths to 
                witnesses before the Committee. [House Rule XI 2(m)(2)]

        (b)  SENSITIVE OR CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION.--Unless otherwise 
        determined by the Committee or Subcommittee, certain 
        information received by the Committee or Subcommittee pursuant 
        to a subpoena not made part of the record at an open hearing 
        shall be deemed to have been received in Executive Session when 
        the Chair of the Committee, in the Chair's judgment and after 
        consultation with the Ranking Minority Member of the Committee, 
        deems that in view of all of the circumstances, such as the 
        sensitivity of the information or the confidential nature of 
        the information, such action is appropriate.

Rule 6. QUORUMS AND VOTING

        (a)  QUORUMS.------

                (1)  One-third (1/3) of the Members of the Committee 
                shall constitute a quorum for all purposes except as 
                provided in paragraphs (2) and (3) of this Rule. [House 
                Rule XI 2(h)(3)]

                (2)  A majority of the Members of the Committee shall 
                constitute a quorum for the purposes of reporting any 
                measure or matter, authorizing a subpoena, closing a 
                meeting or hearing pursuant to clause 2(g) of Rule XI 
                of the House, releasing executive session material 
                pursuant to clause 2(k)(7) of Rule XI of the Rules of 
                the House, or where required by any other Rule of the 
                House.

                (3)  Two (2) Members of the Committee shall constitute 
                a quorum for taking testimony and receiving evidence, 
                which, unless waived by the Chair of the Committee 
                after consultation with the Ranking Minority Member of 
                the Committee, shall include at least one (1) Member 
                from each of the majority and minority parties. [House 
                Rule XI 2(h)(2)]

        (b)  VOTING BY PROXY.--No Member may authorize a vote by proxy 
        with respect to any measure or matter before the Committee. 
        [House Rule XI 2(f)]

        (c)  REQUESTS FOR RECORD VOTE.--A record vote of the Members 
        may be had at the request of three (3) or more Members or, in 
        the apparent absence of a quorum, by anyone (1) Member.

        (d)  POSTPONEMENT OF PROCEEDINGS.--The Chair of the Committee, 
        or of any Subcommittee, is authorized to postpone further 
        proceedings when a record vote is ordered on the question of 
        approving a measure or matter or on adopting an amendment, and 
        to resume proceedings on a postponed question at any time after 
        reasonable notice. Upon resuming proceedings on a postponed 
        question, notwithstanding any intervening order for the 
        previous question, an underlying proposition shall remain 
        subject to further debate or amendment to the same extent as 
        when the question was postponed. [House Rule XI 2(h)(4)]

Rule 7. HEARING PROCEDURES

        (a)  ANNOUNCEMENT OF HEARING.--The Chair shall make a public 
        announcement of the date, place, and subject matter of a 
        hearing, and to the extent practicable, a list of witnesses at 
        least one (1) week before the commencement of the hearing. If 
        the Chair, with the concurrence of the Ranking Minority Member, 
        determines there is good cause to begin the hearing sooner, or 
        if the Committee so determines by majority vote, a quorum being 
        present for the transaction of business, the Chair shall make 
        the announcement at the earliest possible date. Any 
        announcement made under this Rule shall be promptly published 
        in the Daily Digest, and made available in electronic form. 
        [House Rule XI 2(g)(3)]

        (b)  WITNESS STATEMENT; TESTIMONY.------

                (1)  Insofar as is practicable, no later than 48 hours 
                in advance of his or her appearance, each witness who 
                is to appear before the Committee shall file in printed 
                copy and in electronic form a written statement of his 
                or her proposed testimony and a curriculum vitae. 
                [House Rule XI 2(g)(5)]

                (2)  Each witness shall limit his or her presentation 
                to a five (5) minute summary, provided that additional 
                time may be granted by the Chair of the Committee or 
                Subcommittee when appropriate.

                (3)  In the case of a witness appearing in a 
                nongovernmental capacity, a written statement of 
                proposed testimony shall include a disclosure of the 
                amount and source (by agency and program) of each 
                Federal grant (or subgrant thereof) or contract (or 
                subcontract thereof) received during the current fiscal 
                year or either of the two previous fiscal years by the 
                witness or by an entity represented by the witness. 
                Such statements, with appropriate redactions to protect 
                the privacy of the witness, shall be made publicly 
                available in electronic form not later than one day 
                after the witness appears. [House Rule XI 2(g)(5)]

        (c)  QUESTIONING WITNESSES.--The right to interrogate a witness 
        before the Committee shall alternate between Majority and 
        Minority Members. Each Member shall be limited to five (5) 
        minutes in the interrogation of witnesses until such time as 
        each Member present who wishes to be recognized has been 
        recognized once for that purpose. No member may be recognized 
        for a second period of interrogation until each Member present 
        has been recognized at least once. [House Rule XI 2(j)(2)]

        (d)  EXTENDED QUESTIONING OF WITNESSES BY MEMBERS.--
        Notwithstanding Rule 3(c), upon a motion, the Chair, in 
        consultation with the Ranking Minority Member, may designate an 
        equal number of Members from each party to question a witness 
        for a period of time equally divided between the majority party 
        and the minority party, not to exceed one (1) hour in the 
        aggregate or, upon a motion, may designate staff from each 
        party to question a witness for equal specific periods that do 
        not exceed one (1) hour in the aggregate. [House Rule XI 
        2(j)(2)]

        (e)  MINORITY WITNESSES.--Whenever any hearing is conducted by 
        the Committee on any measure or matter, the minority Members of 
        the Committee shall be entitled, upon request to the Chair by a 
        majority of them before the completion of the hearing, to call 
        witnesses selected by the minority to testify with respect to 
        the measure or matter during at least one (1) day of hearing 
        thereon. [House Rule XI 2(j)(1)]

        (f)  ADDITIONAL QUESTIONS FOR THE RECORD.--Members of the 
        Committee have two (2) weeks from the date of a hearing to 
        submit additional questions for the record to be answered by 
        witnesses who have appeared in person. The letters of 
        transmittal and any responses thereto shall be printed in the 
        hearing record.

        (g)  ADDITIONAL HEARING PROCEDURES.--Rule XI 2(k) of the Rules 
        of the House of Representatives is hereby incorporated by 
        reference.

Rule 8. PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING MEASURES OR MATTERS

        (a)  FILING OF REPORTS.------

                (1)  It shall be the duty of the Chair of the Committee 
                to report or cause to be reported promptly to the House 
                any measure approved by the Committee and to take or 
                cause to be taken the necessary steps to bring the 
                matter to a vote. To the maximum extent practicable, 
                the written report of the Committee on such measures 
                shall be made available to the Committee membership for 
                review at least 24 hours in advance filing. [House Rule 
                XIII 2(b)(1)]

                (2)  The report of the Committee on a measure which has 
                been approved by the Committee shall be filed within 
                seven (7) calendar days (exclusive of days on which the 
                House is not in session) after the day on which there 
                has been filed with the Clerk of the Committee a 
                written request, signed by the majority of the Members 
                of the Committee, for the reporting of that measure. 
                Upon the filing of any such request, the Clerk of the 
                Committee shall transmit immediately to the Chair of 
                the Committee notice of the filing of that request. 
                [House Rule XIII 2(b)(2)]

        (b)  CONTENTS OF REPORT.--The report of the Committee on a 
        measure or matter that has been approved by the Committee shall 
        include the matters required by clauses 2(c) and 3 of rule XIII 
        of the Rules of the House.

        (c)  SUPPLEMENTAL; MINORITY, OR ADDITIONAL VIEWS.--Clause 2(I) 
        of House Rule XI is hereby incorporated by reference.

        (d)  IMMEDIATE PRINTING; SUPPLEMENTAL REPORTS.--This Rule does 
        not preclude------

                (1)  the immediate filing or printing of a Committee 
                report unless a timely request for the opportunity to 
                file supplemental, minority, or additional views has 
                been made as provided by this Rule; or

                (2)  the filing by the Committee of any supplemental 
                report upon any measure or matter which may be required 
                for the correction of any technical error in a previous 
                report made by that Committee upon that measure or 
                matter.

        (e)  REPORT LANGUAGE ON USE OF FEDERAL RESOURCES.--No 
        legislative report filed by the Committee on any measure or 
        matter reported by the Committee shall contain language which 
        has the effect of specifying the use of federal resources more 
        explicitly (inclusively or exclusively) than that specified in 
        the measure or matter as ordered reported, unless such language 
        has been approved by the Committee during a meeting or 
        otherwise in writing by a majority of the Members.

Rule 9. OTHER COMMITTEE PUBLICATIONS

        (a)  HOUSE REPORTS.------

                (1)  Any document published by the Committee as a House 
                Report, other than a report of the Committee on a 
                measure which has been approved by the Committee, shall 
                be approved by the Committee at a meeting, and Members 
                shall have the same opportunity to submit views as 
                provided for in Rule 8(c).

                (2)  Not later than the 30th day after June 1 and 
                December 1, the Committee shall submit to the House a 
                semiannual report on the activities of the Committee.

        (b)  OTHER DOCUMENTS.------

                (1)  Subject to paragraph (2) and (3), the Chair of the 
                Committee may approve the publication of any document 
                as a Committee print which in the Chair's discretion 
                the Chair determines to be useful for the information 
                of the Committee.

                (2)  Any document to be published as a Committee print 
                which purports to express the views, findings, 
                conclusions, or recommendations of the Committee or any 
                of its Subcommittees, other than a report of the 
                Committee on a measure which has been approved by the 
                Committee, must be approved by the Committee or its 
                Subcommittees, as applicable, in a meeting or otherwise 
                in writing by a majority of the Members, and such 
                Members shall have the right to submit supplemental, 
                minority, or additional views for inclusion in the 
                print within at least 48 hours after such approval.

                (3)  Any document to be published as a Committee print, 
                other than a document described in subsection (2) of 
                this Rule, shall------

                        (A)  include on its cover the following 
                        statement: ``This document has been printed for 
                        informational purposes only and does not 
                        represent either findings or recommendations 
                        adopted by this Committee;'' and

                        (B)  not be published following the sine die 
                        adjournment of a Congress, unless approved by 
                        the Chair of the Committee after consultation 
                        with the Ranking Minority Member of the 
                        Committee.

        (c)  JOINT INVESTIGATION OR STUDY.--A report of an 
        investigation or study conducted jointly by the Committee and 
        one (1) or more other Committee(s) may be filed jointly, 
        provided that each of the Committees complies independently 
        with all requirements for approval and filing of the report. 
        [House Rule XI 1(b)(2)]

        (d)  POST ADJOURNMENT FILING OF COMMITTEE REPORTS.------

                (1)  After an adjournment of the last regular session 
                of a Congress sine die, an investigative or oversight 
                report approved by the Committee may be filed with the 
                Clerk at any time, provided that if a Member gives 
                notice at the time of approval of intention to file 
                supplemental, minority, or additional views, that 
                Member shall be entitled to not less than seven (7) 
                calendar days in which to submit such views for 
                inclusion with the report. [House Rule XI 1(b)(4)]

                (2)  After an adjournment sine die of a regular session 
                of a Congress or after December 15, whichever occurs 
                first, the Chair of the Committee may file the second 
                and fourth semiannual Activity Report for that Congress 
                with the Clerk of the House at anytime and without the 
                approval of the Committee, provided that a copy of the 
                report has been available to each Member of the 
                Committee for at least seven (7) calendar days and that 
                the report includes any supplemental, minority, or 
                additional views submitted by a Member of the 
                Committee. [House Rule XI 1(d)]

Rule 10. GENERAL OVERSIGHT AND INVESTIGATIVE RESPONSIBILITIES

        (a)  OVERSIGHT.------

                (1)  IN GENERAL.--The Committee shall conduct oversight 
                of matters within the jurisdiction of the Committee in 
                accordance with House Rule X, clause 2 and shall review 
                and study on a continuing basis laws, programs, and 
                Government activities relating to nonmilitary research 
                and development. [House Rule X 3(k)]

                (2)  OVERSIGHT PLAN.--Not later than February 15 of the 
                first session of a Congress, the Committee shall meet 
                in open session, with a quorum present, to adopt its 
                oversight plan for that Congress for submission to the 
                Committee on Oversight and Government Reform and the 
                Committee on House Administration, in accordance with 
                the provisions of clause 2(d) of Rule X of the House of 
                Representatives. [House Rule X 2(d)]

        (b)  INVESTIGATIONS.------

                (1)  IN GENERAL.--The Chair of the Committee may 
                undertake any formal investigation in the name of the 
                Committee after consultation with the Ranking Minority 
                Member of the Committee.

                (2)  SUBCOMMITEE INVESTIGATIONS.--The Chair of any 
                Subcommittee shall not undertake any formal 
                investigation in the name of the Committee or 
                Subcommittee without formal approval by the Chair of 
                the Committee, in consultation with other appropriate 
                Subcommittee Chairs, and after consultation with the 
                Ranking Minority Member of the Committee. The Chair of 
                any Subcommittee shall also consult with the Ranking 
                Minority Member of the Subcommittee before undertaking 
                any investigation in the name of the Committee.

Rule 11. SUBCOMMITTEES

        (a)  ESTABLISHMENT AND JURISDICTION OF SUBCOMMITEES.--The 
        Committee shall have the following standing Subcommittees with 
        the jurisdiction indicated.

                (1)  SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT.--
                Legislative jurisdiction and general oversight and 
                investigative authority on all matters relating to 
                energy research, development, and demonstration and 
                projects therefor, commercial application of energy 
                technology, and environmental research, including:

                        (A)  Department of Energy research, 
                        development, and demonstration programs;

                        (B)  Department of Energy laboratories;

                        (C)  Department of Energy science activities;

                        (D)  energy supply activities;

                        (E)  nuclear, solar and renewable energy, and 
                        other advanced energy technologies;

                        (F)  uranium supply and enrichment, and 
                        Department of Energy waste management and 
                        environment, safety, and health activities, as 
                        appropriate;

                        (G)  fossil energy research and development;

                        (H)  clean coal technology;

                        (I)  energy conservation research and 
                        development;

                        (J)  energy aspects of climate change;

                        (K)  pipeline research, development, and 
                        demonstration projects;

                        (L)  energy and environmental standards;

                        (M)  energy conservation, including building 
                        performance, alternate fuels for and improved 
                        efficiency of vehicles, distributed power 
                        systems, and industrial process improvements;

                        (N)  Environmental Protection Agency research 
                        and development programs;

                        (O)  the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
                        Administration, including all activities 
                        related to weather, weather services, climate, 
                        the atmosphere, marine fisheries, and oceanic 
                        research;

                        (P)  risk assessment activities; and

                        (Q)  scientific issues related to environmental 
                        policy, including climate change.

                (2)  SUBCOMMITEE ON TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION.--
                Legislative jurisdiction and general oversight and 
                investigative authority on all matters relating to 
                competitiveness, technology, standards, and innovation, 
                including:

                        (A)  standardization of weights and measures, 
                        including technical standards, standardization, 
                        and conformity assessment;

                        (B)  measurement, including the metric system 
                        of measurement;

                        (C)  the Technology Administration of the 
                        Department of Commerce;

                        (D)  the National Institute of Standards and 
                        Technology;

                        (E)  the National Technical Information 
                        Service;

                        (F)  competitiveness, including small business 
                        competitiveness;

                        (G)  tax; antitrust, regulatory and other legal 
                        and governmental policies as they relate to 
                        technological development and 
                        commercialization;

                        (H)  technology transfer, including civilian 
                        use of defense technologies;

                        (I)  patent and intellectual property policy;

                        (J)  international technology trade;

                        (K)  research, development, and demonstration 
                        activities of the Department of Transportation;

                        (L)  surface and water transportation research, 
                        development, and demonstration programs;

                        (M)  earthquake programs (except for NSF) and 
                        fire research programs, including those related 
                        to wildfire proliferation research and 
                        prevention;

                        (N)  biotechnology policy;

                        (O)  research, development, demonstration, and 
                        standards-related activities of the Department 
                        of Homeland Security;

                        (P)  Small Business Innovation Research and 
                        Technology Transfer; and

                        (Q)  voting technologies and standards.

                (3)  SUBCOMMITEE ON RESEARCH AND SCIENCE EDUCATION.--
                Legislative jurisdiction and general oversight and 
                investigative authority on all matters relating to 
                science policy and science education, including:

                        (A)  the Office of Science and Technology 
                        Policy;

                        (B)  all scientific research, and scientific 
                        and engineering resources (including human 
                        resources), science, technology, engineering 
                        and mathematics education;

                        (C)  intergovernmental mechanisms for research, 
                        development, and demonstration and cross-
                        cutting programs;

                        (D)  international scientific cooperation;

                        (E)  National Science Foundation, including 
                        earthquake programs;

                        (F)  university research policy, including 
                        infrastructure and overhead;

                        (G)  university research partnerships, 
                        including those with industry;

                        (H)  science scholarships;

                        (I)  computing, communications, networking, and 
                        information technology;

                        (J)  research and development relating to 
                        health, biomedical, and nutritional programs;

                        (K)  research, development, and demonstration 
                        relating to nanoscience, nanoengineering, and 
                        nanotechnology;

                        (L)  to the extent appropriate, agricultural, 
                        geological, biological and life sciences 
                        research;

                        (M)  and materials research, development, and 
                        demonstration and policy.

                (4)  SUBCOMMITTEE ON SPACE AND AERONAUTICS.--
                Legislative jurisdiction and general oversight and 
                investigative authority on all matters relating to 
                astronautical and aeronautical research and 
                development, including:

                        (A)  national space policy, including access to 
                        space;

                        (B)  sub-orbital access and applications;

                        (C)  National Aeronautics and Space 
                        Administration and its contractor and 
                        government-operated labs;

                        (D)  space commercialization, including 
                        commercial space activities relating to the 
                        Department of Transportation and the Department 
                        of Commerce;

                        (E)  exploration and use of outer space;

                        (F)  international space cooperation;

                        (G)  the National Space Council;

                        (H)  space applications, space communications 
                        and related matters;

                        (I)  earth remote sensing policy;

                        (J)  civil aviation research, development, and 
                        demonstration;

                        (K)  research, development; and demonstration 
                        programs of the Federal Aviation 
                        Administration; and

                        (L)  space law.

                (5)  SUBCOMMITTEE ON INVESTIGATIONS AND OVERSIGHT.--
                General and special investigative authority on all 
                matters within the jurisdiction of the Committee on 
                Science, Space, and Technology.

        (b)  RATIOS.--A majority of the majority Members of the 
        Committee shall determine an appropriate ratio of majority to 
        minority Members of each Subcommittee and shall authorize the 
        Chair of the Committee to negotiate that ratio with the 
        minority party; Provided, however, that the ratio of majority 
        Members to minority Members on each Subcommittee (including any 
        ex-officio Members) shall be no less favorable to the majority 
        party than the ratio for the Committee.

        (c)  EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS.--The Chair of the Committee and 
        Ranking Minority Member of the Committee shall serve as ex-
        officio Members of all Subcommittees and shall have the right 
        to vote and be counted as part of the quorum and ratios on all 
        matters before the Subcommittee.

        (d)  REFERRAL OF LEGISLATION.--The Chair of the Committee shall 
        refer all legislation and other matters referred to the 
        Committee to the Subcommittee or Subcommittees of appropriate 
        primary and secondary jurisdiction within two (2) weeks of the 
        matters being referred to the Committee, unless the Chair of 
        the Committee deems consideration is to be by the Committee. 
        Subcommittee Chairs may make requests for referral of specific 
        matters to their Subcommittee within the two (2) week period if 
        they believe Subcommittee jurisdictions so warrant.

        (e)  PROCEDURES.------

                (1)  No Subcommittee shall meet to consider for markup 
                or approval any measure or matter when the Committee or 
                any other Subcommittee of the Committee is meeting to 
                consider any measure or matter for markup or approval.

                (2)  Each Subcommittee is authorized to meet, hold 
                hearings, receive testimony or evidence, mark up 
                legislation, and report to the Committee on all matters 
                referred to it. For matters within its jurisdiction, 
                each Subcommittee is authorized to conduct legislative, 
                investigative, forecasting, and general oversight 
                hearings; to conduct inquiries into the future; and to 
                undertake budget impact studies.

                (3)  Subcommittee Chairs shall set meeting dates after 
                consultation with the Chair of the Committee and other 
                Subcommittee Chairs with a view toward avoiding 
                simultaneous scheduling of Committee and Subcommittee 
                meetings or hearings wherever possible.

                (4)  Any Member of the Committee may have the privilege 
                of sitting with any Subcommittee during its hearings or 
                deliberations and may participate in such hearings or 
                deliberations, but no Member who is not a Member of the 
                Subcommittee shall vote on any matter before such 
                Subcommittee, except as provided in subsection (c) of 
                this Rule.

                (5)  During consideration of any measure or matter for 
                markup or approval in a Subcommittee proceeding, a 
                record vote may be had at the request of one (1) or 
                more Members of that Subcommittee.

                (6)  Each Subcommittee of the Committee shall provide 
                the Full Committee with copies of such records of votes 
                taken in the subcommittee and such other records with 
                respect to the subcommittee as the Chair deems 
                necessary for the Committee to comply with the rules 
                and regulations of the House.

        (f)  CONSIDERATION OF SUBCOMMITTEE REPORTS.--After ordering a 
        measure or matter reported, a Subcommittee shall issue a 
        Subcommittee report in such form as the Chair of the Committee 
        shall specify. To the maximum extent practicable, reports and 
        recommendations of a Subcommittee shall not be considered by 
        the Committee until after the intervention of 48 hours, 
        excluding Saturdays, Sundays and legal holidays, from the time 
        the report is submitted and made available to the Members of 
        the Committee and printed hearings thereon shall be made 
        available, if feasible, to the Members of the Committee, except 
        that this Rule may be waived at the discretion of the Chair of 
        the Committee after consultation with the Ranking Minority 
        Member of the Committee.

Rule 12. COMMITTEE RECORDS

        (a)  TRANSCRIPTS.--The transcripts of those hearings conducted 
        by the Committee and Subcommittees shall be published as a 
        substantially verbatim account of remarks actually made during 
        the proceedings, subject only to technical, grammatical, and 
        typographical corrections authorized by the person making the 
        remarks involved. Transcripts of markups shall be recorded and 
        published in the same manner as hearings before the Committee 
        and shall be included as part of the legislative report unless 
        waived by the Chair of the Committee. [House Rule XI 
        2(e)(1)(A)]

        (b)  KEEPING OF RECORDS.------

                (1)  The Committee shall keep a complete record of all 
                Committee action, which shall include a record of the 
                votes on any question on which a record vote is 
                demanded. The result of each record vote shall be 
                included in the report of the Committee, made available 
                by the Committee for inspection by the public at 
                reasonable times in the offices of the Committee and 
                shall be made publicly available in electronic form 
                within 48 hours of such record vote. [House Rule XI 
                2(e)(1)(B)]

                (2)  Information made available for public inspection 
                shall include a description of the amendment, motion, 
                order, or other proposition and the name of each Member 
                voting for and each Member voting against such 
                amendment, motion, order, or proposition, and the names 
                of those Members present but not voting. [House Rule XI 
                2(e)(1)(B)]

                (3)  Not later than 24 hours after the adoption of any 
                amendment to a measure or matter considered by the 
                Committee, the Chair shall cause the text of each such 
                amendment to be made publicly available in electronic 
                form. [House Rule XI 2(e)(6)]

        (c)  AVAILABILITY OF ARCHIVED RECORDS.--The records of the 
        Committee at the National Archives and Records Administration 
        shall be made available for public use in accordance with Rule 
        VII of the Rules of the House of Representatives. The Chair of 
        the Committee shall notify the Ranking Minority Member of the 
        Committee of any decision, pursuant to Rule VII 3(b)(3) or 
        clause 4(b) of the Rules of the House of Representatives, to 
        withhold a record otherwise available, and the matter shall be 
        presented to the Committee for a determination on the written 
        request of any Member of the Committee. [House Rule XI 2(e)(3)]

        (d)  PROPERTY OF HOUSE.------

                (1)  Except as provided for in paragraph (2), all 
                Committee hearings, records, data, charts, and files 
                shall be kept separate and distinct from the 
                congressional office records of the Member serving as 
                its Chair. Such records shall be the property of the 
                House, and each Member, Delegate, and Resident 
                Commissioner, shall have access thereto.

                (2)  A Member, Delegate, or Resident Commissioner, 
                other than Members of the Committee on Standards of 
                Official Conduct, may not have access to the records of 
                the Committee respecting the conduct of a Member, 
                Delegate, Resident Commissioner, officer, or employee 
                of the House without the specific prior permission of 
                the Committee. [House Rule XI 2(e)(2)]


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 112th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Feb. 10, 2011                  Organizational Meeting of the Committee on Science,     Business Meeting-1
                                Space, and Technology
                               (Meeting held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Feb. 16, 2011                  A Review of the Federal Aviation Administration's       112-1*
                                Research and Development Programs.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Space and
                                Aeronautics)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Feb. 17, 2011                  An Overview of the Administration's Federal Research    112-2*
                                and Development Programs.
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science and           .........................
                                Technology).
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mar. 2, 2011                   The National Aeronautics and Space Administration       112-3*
                                Fiscal Year 2012
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science and           .........................
                                Technology).
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mar. 3, 2011                   The Department of Energy Fiscal Year 2012 Research and  112-4*
                                Development Budget Request.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research and       .........................
                                Science Education).
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mar. 10, 2011                  An Overview of the Fiscal Year 2012 Research and        112-5*
                                Development Budget Proposals at the National Oceanic
                                and Atmospheric Administration and the Environmental
                                Protection Agency.
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space, and   .........................
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mar. 11, 2011                  An Overview of the Fiscal Year 2012 Budget Proposals    112-6*
                                at the National Science Foundation and the National
                                Institute of Standards and Technology.
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space, and   .........................
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 112th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mar. 15, 2011------------------An Overview of Science and Technology Research and------112-7*-------------------
                                Development Programs and Priorities at the Department
                                of Homeland Security.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Technology and
                                Innovation)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mar. 17, 2011                  H. R. 970, the Federal Aviation Research and            H. Rept. 112-52**
                                Development Reauthorization Act of 2011
                               (Markup held by the Committee on Science, Space, and    .........................
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mar. 30, 2011                  A Review of NASA's Exploration Program in Transition:   112-8*
                                Issues for Congress and Industry.
                                (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Space and         .........................
                                Aeronautics)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mar. 31, 2011                  Climate Change: Examining the Processes Used to Create  112-9*
                                Science and Policy.
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space, and   .........................
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mar. 31, 2011                  The Role of Small Business in Innovation and Job        112-10*
                                Creation: The SBIR and STTR Program.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Technology and     .........................
                                Innovation).
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Apr. 6, 2011                   Behavioral Science and Security: Evaluating TSA's SPOT  112-11*
                                Program.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Investigations     .........................
                                and Oversight)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Apr. 6, 2011                   Offshore Drilling Safety and Response Technologies.     112-12*
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Energy and         .........................
                                Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 112th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Apr. 7, 2011                   Are We Prepared? Assessing Earthquake Risk Reduction    112-13*
                                Reduction in the United States.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Technology and     .........................
                                Innovation)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Apr. 13, 2011                  Green Jobs and Red Tape: Assessing Federal Efforts to   112-14*
                                Encourage Employment.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Investigations     .........................
                                and Oversight)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Apr. 13, 2011                  The Creating Jobs Through Small Business Innovation      H. R. 1425
                                Act of 2011
                               (Markup held by the Subcommittee on Technology and      .........................
                                Innovation)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Apr. 14, 2011                  Nanotechnology: Oversight of the National               112-15*
                                Nanotechnology Initiative and Priorities for the
                                Future.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research and       .........................
                                Science Education)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
May 4, 2011                    H. R. 1425, Creating Jobs Through Small Business        H. REPT. 112-90 PT. 1**
                                Innovation Act of 2011
                               (Markup held by the Committee on Science, Space, and    .........................
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
May 5, 2011                    Office of Commercial Space Transportation's Fiscal      112-16*
                                Year 2012 Budget Request.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Space and          .........................
                                Aeronautics)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
May 11, 2011                   Review of Hydraulic Fracturing Technology and           112-17*
                                Practices
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space, and   .........................
                                Technology).
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
May 13, 2011                   Nuclear Energy Risk Management                          112-18*
                               (Joint Hearing held by the Subcommittees on             .........................
                                Investigations and Oversight and Energy and
                                Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 112th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
May 25, 2011                   Protecting Information in the Digital Age: Federal      112-19*
                                Cybersecurity Research and Development Efforts.
                               (Joint Hearing held by Subcommittees on Research and    .........................
                                Science Education and Technology and Innovation)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
May 26, 2011                   NASA's Commercial Cargo Providers: Are They Ready to    112-20*
                                Supply the Space Station in the Post Shuttle Era?
                                (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Space and         .........................
                                Aeronautics)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 1, 2011                   Harmful Algal Blooms: Action Plans for Scientific       112-21*
                                Solutions.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Energy and         .........................
                                Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 2, 2011                   Social, Behavioral and Economic Science Research:       112-22*
                                Oversight of the Need for Federal Investments and
                                Priorities for Funding.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research and       .........................
                                Science Education)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 14, 2011                  Transportation Research Priorities: Maximizing Return   112-23*
                                on Investment of Taxpayer Dollars.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Technology and     .........................
                                Innovation)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 14, 2011                  The Federal Perspective on a National Critical          112-24*
                                Materials Strategy.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Investigations     .........................
                                and Oversight)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 15, 2011                  An Examination of DOE's Clean Technology Programs.      112-25*
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Energy and         .........................
                                Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 112th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 16, 2011                  STEM Education in Action: Learning Today. Leading       112-26*
                                Tomorrow.
                               (Hearing held by the Full Committee on Science, Space   .........................
                                and Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 22, 2011                  First Semiannual Report of Activities of the Committee  Business Meeting-2 H.
                                on Science, Space, and Technology.                      REPT. 112-112**
                               ......................................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 22, 2011                  Examining NOAA's Climate Service Proposal.              112-27*
                               (Hearing held by the Full Committee on Science, Space,  .........................
                                and Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 7, 2011                   Hitting the Ethanol Blend Wall: Examining the Science   112-28*
                                on E15.
                               (Hearing held by the Full Committee on Science, Space,  .........................
                                and Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 12, 2011                  A Review of NASA's Space Launch System.                 112-29*
                               Oversight of the Need for Federal Investments and
                                Priorities for Funding.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research and       .........................
                                Science Education)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 13, 2011                  Border Security Technology Innovation Act of 2011.      H. R. 2463
                               (Markup held by the Subcommittee on Technology and      .........................
                                Innovation)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 14, 2011                  Harmful Algal Blooms and Hypoxia Research and Control.  H. REPT. 112-333, Part
                                                                                        I**
                               Amendments Act of 2011 (Markup held by the              .........................
                                Subcommittee on Energy and Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 14, 2011                  EPA's IRIS Program: Evaluating the Science and Process  112-30*
                                Behind Chemical Risk Assessment.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Investigations     .........................
                                and Oversight)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 112th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 21, 2011                  H.R. 2096, Cybersecurity Enhancement Act of 2011.       H. REPT. 112-264**
                               (Markup held by the Full Committee on Science, Space,   .........................
                                and Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 26, 2011                  The Merit Review Process: Ensuring Limited Federal      112-31*
                                Resources are Invested in the Best Science.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research and       .........................
                                Science Education)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 28, 2011                  H.R. 2484, Harmful Algal Blooms and Hypoxia Research    H. REPT. 112-333, PART
                                and Control Amendments Act of 2011                      I**
                               (Markup held by the Full Committee on Science, Space,   .........................
                                and Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
September 8, 2011              Empowering Consumers and Promoting Innovation Through   112-32*
                                the Smart Grid.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Technology and     .........................
                                Innovation)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
September 8, 2011              Impacts of the LightSquared Network on Federal Science  112-33*
                                Activities.
                               (Hearing held by the Full Committee on Science, Space,  .........................
                                and Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
September 13, 2011             STEM in Action: Inspiring the Science and Engineering   112-34*
                                Workforce of Tomorrow.
                                (Hearing held by the Full Committee on Science,        .........................
                                Space, and Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
September 15, 2011             Out of Thin Air: EPA's Cross-State Air Pollution Rule.  112-35*
                               (Hearing held by the Full Committee on Science, Space,  .........................
                                and Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 112th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
September 21, 2011             The Next IT Revolution: Cloud Computing Opportunities   112-36*
                                and Challenges.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Technology and     .........................
                                Innovation)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
September 21, 2011             Oversight of the Networking and Information Technology  112-37*
                                Research and Development Program and Priorities for
                                the Future.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research and       .........................
                                Science Education)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
September 22, 2011             NASA Human Spaceflight Past, Present, and Future:       112-38*
                                Where Do We Go From Here?
                               (Hearing held by the Full Committee on Science, Space,  .........................
                                and Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
September 23, 2011             From NPOESS to JPSS: An Update on the Nation's          112-39*
                                Restructured Polar Weather Satellite Program.
                               (Joint Hearing held by the Subcommittee on              .........................
                                Investigations and Oversight and the Subcommittee on
                                Energy and Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
September 26, 2011             STEM Education in Action: Communities Preparing for     112-40*
                                Jobs of the Future.
                               (Field Hearing-Hearing held by the Full Committee)      .........................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
October 4, 2011                Quality Science for Quality Air.                        112-41*
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Energy and         .........................
                                Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
October 12, 2011               What Makes for Successful K-12 STEM Education: A        112-42*
                                Closer Look at Effective STEM Education Approaches.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research and       .........................
                                Science Education)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
October 12, 2011               The International Space Station: Lessons from the       112-43*
                                Soyuz Rocket Failure and Return to Flight.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Space and          .........................
                                Aeronautics)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 112th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
October 13, 2011               The Endangered Species Act: Reviewing the Nexus of      112-44*
                                Science and Policy.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Investigations     .........................
                                and Oversight)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
October 13, 2011               Advancing Coal Research and Development for a Secure    112-45*
                                Energy Future.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Energy and         .........................
                                Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
October 26, 2011               NASA's Commercial Crew Development Program:             112-46*
                                Accomplishments and Challenges.
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space, and   .........................
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
October 27, 2011               Review of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's       112-47*
                                Nuclear Future Draft Recommendations. (Joint Hearing
                                held by Subcommittee on
                               Investigations and Oversight and Subcommittee on        .........................
                                Energy and Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
November 2, 2011               Creating and Growing New Business: Fostering U.S.       112-48*
                                Innovation.
                               (Hearing held by Subcommittee on Technology and         .........................
                                Innovation)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
November 2, 2011               Conflicts and Unintended Consequences of Motor Fuel     112-49*
                                Standards.
                               (Hearing held by Subcommittee on Energy and             .........................
                                Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
November 3, 2011               STEM In Action: Transferring Knowledge from the         112-50*
                                Workplace to the Classroom.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research and       .........................
                                Science Education)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
November 15, 2011              Natural Hazards Risk Reduction Act 2011                 Committee Print, the
                                                                                        ``Natural Hazards Risk
                                                                                        Reduction Act 2011''
                               (Markup held by Subcommittee on Technology and          .........................
                                Innovation)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 112th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
November 15, 2011              Exploring Mars and Beyond: What's Next for U.S.         112-51*
                                Planetary Science?
                               (Hearing held by Subcommittee on Space and              .........................
                                Aeronautics)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
November 17, 2011              Fostering Quality Science at EPA: The Need for Common   112-52*
                                Sense Reform.
                               (Hearing held by Subcommittee on Energy and             .........................
                                Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
November 30, 2011              Stimulus Oversight: An Update on Accountability,        112-53*
                                Transparency, and Performance.
                               (Hearing held by Subcommittee on Investigations and     .........................
                                Oversight)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
November 30, 2011              Fostering Quality Science at EPA: Perspectives on       112-54*
                                Common Sense Reform.
                                (Hearing held by Subcommittee on Investigations and    .........................
                                Oversight)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
December 1, 2011               H.R. 3479, Natural Hazards Risk Reduction Act of 2011.  H. REPT. 112-666, PART
                                (Markup held by Full Committee on Science, Space, and   I***
                                Technology )
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
December 6, 2011               The Next Great Observatory: Assessing the James Webb    112-55*
                                Space Telescope.
                               (Hearing held by Full Committee)                        .........................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
December 7, 2011               Energy Critical Elements: Identifying Research Needs    112-56
                                and Strategic Priorities.
                               (Hearing held by Subcommittee on Energy and             .........................
                                Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
December 23, 2011              Second Semiannual Report of Activities - Committee on   H. REPT. 112-347**
                                Science, Space, and Technology.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 112th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

January 24, 2012---------------A Review of the Advanced Research Projects Agency-------112-57-------------------
                                Energy.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Investigations     .........................
                                and Oversight)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
February 1, 2012               Fractured Science- Examining EPA's Approach to Ground   112-58
                                Water Research: Pavillion Analysis
                                (Hearing held by Subcommittee on Energy and            .........................
                                Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
February 3, 2012               Fostering Quality Science at EPA: Perspectives on       112-59
                                Common Sense Reform-Day II
                                (Hearing held by Subcommittee on Energy and            .........................
                                Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
February 7, 2012               H.R. 3834, Advancing America's Networking and           H. REPT. 112-420**
                                Information Technology Research and Development Act
                                of 2012. Passed by Voice Vote.
                               (Markup held by Committee on Science Space and          .........................
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
February 7, 2012               To Provide a Comprehensive Assessment of the            H.R. 3199
                                Scientific and Technical Research on the Implications
                                of the Use of Mid-Level Ethanol Blends, and for other
                                purposes.
                               (Markup held by Committee on Science, Space, and        .........................
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
February 8, 2012               Assessing America's Nuclear Future- A Review of the     112-60
                                Blue Ribbon Commission's Report to the Secretary of
                                Energy.
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space and    .........................
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
February 17, 2012              An Overview of the Administration's Federal Research    112-61
                                and Development Budget for Fiscal Year 2013.
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space, and   .........................
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 112th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

February 28, 2012--------------An Overview of the National Science Foundation Budget---112-62-------------------
                                for Fiscal Year 2013.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research Science   .........................
                                Education)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
February 29, 2012              Promoting Innovation, Competition, and Economic         112-63
                                Growth: Principles for Effective Domestic and
                                International Standards Development.
                                (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Technology and    .........................
                                Innovation)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
February 29, 2012              NASA Cybersecurity: An Examination of the Agency's      112-64
                                Information Security.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Investigations     .........................
                                and Oversight)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
March 1, 2012                  An Overview of the Department of Energy Research and    112-65
                                Development Budget for Fiscal Year 2013.
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space, and   .........................
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
March 6, 2012                  An Overview of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric     112-66
                                Administration and the Environmental Protection
                                Agency Budgets for Fiscal Year 2013.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Technology and     .........................
                                Innovation)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
March 6, 2012                  An Overview of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric     112-67
                                Administration and the Environmental Protection
                                Agency Budgets for Fiscal Year 2013.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Energy and         .........................
                                Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
March 7, 2012                  An Overview of the National Aeronautics and Space       112-68
                                Administration Budget for Fiscal Year 2013.
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space, and   .........................
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 112th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

March 8, 2012------------------NSF Major Research Equipment and Facilities-------------112-69-------------------
                                Management: Ensuring Fiscal Responsibility and
                                Accountability.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research and       .........................
                                Science)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
March 20, 2012                 An Overview of the Office of Commercial Space           112-70
                                Transportation Budget for Fiscal Year 2013.
                               (Held by the Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics)     .........................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
March 27, 2012                 Fostering the U.S. Competitive Edge: Examining the      112-71
                                Effect of Federal Policies on Competition Innovation,
                                and Job Growth.
                               (Held by the Subcommittee on Technology and             .........................
                                Innovation)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
March 28, 2012                 Securing the Promise of the International Space         112-72
                                Station: Challenges and Opportunities.
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space, and   .........................
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
March 28, 2012                 To Observe and Protect: How NOAA Procures Data for      112-73
                                Weather Forecasting.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Energy and         .........................
                                Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
March 29, 2012                 Federally Funded Research: Examining Public Access and  112-74
                                Scholarly Publication Interests.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Investigations     .........................
                                and Oversight)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
April 11, 2012                 Tapping America's Unconventional Oil Resources for Job  112-75
                                Creation and Affordable Domestic Energy: Technology
                                and Policy Pathways.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Investigations     .........................
                                and Oversight)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 112th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

April 18, 2012-----------------NSF Major Multi-User Research Facilities Management:----112-76-------------------
                                Ensuring Fiscal Responsibility and Accountability.
                                (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research and      .........................
                                Science Education)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
April 18, 2012                 Avoiding the Spectrum Crunch: Growing the Wireless      112-77
                                Economy through Innovation.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Technology and     .........................
                                Innovation)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
April 19, 2012                 Joint Hearing - Impact of Tax Policies on the           112-78
                                Commercial Application of Renewable Energy
                                Technology.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Investigations &   .........................
                                Oversight and Energy and Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
April 25, 2012                 Joint Hearing - How the Report on Carcinogens Uses      112-79
                                Science to Meet its Statutory Obligations, and its
                                Impact on Small Business Jobs.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Investigations     .........................
                                and Oversight and Subcommittee Healthcare and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
April 26, 2012                 An Overview of the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission    112-80
                                Directorate Budget for Fiscal Year 2013.
                                (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Space and         .........................
                                Aeronautics)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
April 30, 2012                 STEM Education in Action: Local Schools, Non Profits,   112-81
                                and Business Doing Their Part to Secure America's
                                Future.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee Research and Science  .........................
                                Education)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
May 8, 2012                    The Science Behind Green Building Rating Systems.       112-82
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Investigations     .........................
                                and Oversight)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 112th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

May 9, 2012--------------------Ensuring the Best Stewardship of American Taxpayer------112-83-------------------
                                Dollars at the National Science Foundation.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research and       .........................
                                Science Education)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
May 10, 2012                   Supporting American Jobs and the Economy through        112-84
                                Expanded Energy Production: Challenges and
                                Opportunities of Unconventional Resources Technology.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Energy and         .........................
                                Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
May 17, 2012                   Working for Fire Safe America: Examining United States  112-85
                                Fire Administration Priorities.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Technology and     .........................
                                Innovation)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
May 31, 2012                   Assembling the Facts: Examining the Proposed National   112-86
                                Network for Manufacturing Innovation.
                               (Hearing held by Subcommittee on Technology and         .........................
                                Innovation)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 6, 2012                   An Examination of FAA's Launch Indemnification          112-87
                                Program.
                               (Hearing Held by Subcommittee on Space and              .........................
                                Aeronautics)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 6, 2012                   EPA's Impact on Jobs and Energy Affordability:          112-88
                                Understanding the Real Costs and Benefits of
                                Environmental Regulations.
                               (Hearing held by Subcommittee on Energy and             .........................
                                Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 19, 2012                  Best Practices in Transforming Research into            112-89
                                Innovation: Creative Approaches to the Bayh-Dole Act.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Technology and     .........................
                                Innovations)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 112th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

June 19, 2012------------------The Science of How Hunting Assists Species--------------112-90-------------------
                                Conservation and Management.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Energy and         .........................
                                Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 20, 2012                  The Office of Science and Technology Policy: Examining  112-91
                                Priorities and Effectiveness of the Nation's Science
                                Policies.
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space, and   .........................
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 21, 2012                  Department of Energy User Facilities: Utilizing the     112-92
                                tools of Science to Drive Innovation through
                                Fundamental Research.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Energy and         .........................
                                Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 27, 2012                  The Role of Research Universities in Securing           112-93
                                America's Future Prosperity: challenges and
                                Expectations.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research &         .........................
                                Science Education)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 27, 2012                  Continuing Oversight of the Nation's Weather Satellite  112-94
                                Programs: An Update on JPSS and GOES-R.
                               (Joint Hearing held by the Subcommittee on              .........................
                                Investigations & Oversight and Subcommittee on Energy
                                & Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 28, 2012                  Third Semiannual Report of Activities of the Committee  Business Meeting-3 H.
                                on Science, Space, and Technology.                      REPT. 112-555**
                               ......................................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 12, 2012                  Spurring Economic Growth and Competitiveness Through    112-95
                                NASA Derived Technologies.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Space and          .........................
                                Aeronautics)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 16, 2012                  Innovation Corps: A Review of a New National Science    112-96
                                Foundation Program to Leverage Research Investments.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee Research and Science  .........................
                                Education)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 112th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

July 19, 2012------------------Keeping America Secure: The Science Supporting the------112-97-------------------
                                Development of Threat Detection Technologies.
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space, and   .........................
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 25, 2012                  Drought Forecasting, Monitoring and Decision-making: A  112-98
                                Review of the National Integrated Drought Information
                                System.
                               (Hearing held by Committee on Science, Space, and       .........................
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 26, 2012                  Review of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Management   112-99
                                and Activities: Assuring Appropriate and Effective
                                Use of Taxpayer Funding.
                               (Hearing held by Subcommittee on Energy and             .........................
                                Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
August 1, 2012                 The Relationship Between Business and Research          112-100
                                Universities: Collaborations Fueling American
                                Innovation and Job Creation.
                               (Hearing held by Subcommittee Research and Science
                                Education)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
August 1, 2012                 The Emerging Commercial Suborbital Reusable Launch      112-101
                                Vehicle Market.
                               (Hearing held by Subcommittee on Space and              .........................
                                Aeronautics)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
September 12, 2012             Examining NASA's Development of the Space Launch        112-102
                                System and Orion Crew Capsule.
                               (Hearing held by Subcommittee on Space and              .........................
                                Aeronautics)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
September 12, 2012             Mismanagement of Funds at the National Weather Service  112-103
                                and the Impact on the Future of Weather Forecasting.
                               (Hearing held by the Investigations and Oversight)      .........................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
September 14, 2012             Recent Development in NASA's Commercial Crew            112-104
                                Acquisition Strategy.
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space and    .........................
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
November 14, 2012              Is ``Meaningful Use'' Delivering Meaningful Results?:   112-105
                                An Examination of Health Information Technology
                                Standards and Interoperability.
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Technology and     .........................
                                Innovation)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
November 15, 2012              The U. S. Antarctic Program: Achieving Fiscal and       112-106
                                Logistical Efficiency While Supporting Sound Science.
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
November 28, 2012              National Priorities for Solar and Space Physics         112-107
                                Research and Applications for Space Weather
                                Prediction.
                               (Hearing held by Subcommittee on Space and              .........................
                                Aeronautics)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
November 30, 2012              Tapping America's Energy Potential Through Research     112-108
                                and Development.
                               (Hearing held by Subcommittee on Energy and             .........................
                                Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
December 5, 2012               The Impact of International Technology Transfer on      112-109
                                American Research and Development.
                               (Hearing held by the Investigations and Oversight)      .........................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
December 12, 2012              The Future of NASA: Perspectives on Strategic Vision    112-110
                                for America's Space Program.
                               (Committee on Science, Space, and Technology)           .........................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*Hearings that have been printed.
**Reports that have been printed.