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                                                       Calendar No. 303
112th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 2d Session                                                     112-137

======================================================================



 
     FERAL SWINE ERADICATION AND CONTROL PILOT PROGRAM ACT OF 2011

                                _______
                                

                January 26, 2012.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

    Mrs. Boxer, from the Committee on Environment and Public Works, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                         [To accompany S. 893]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Environment and Public Works, to which was 
referred a bill (S. 893) to authorize the Secretary of the 
Interior to provide financial assistance to the State of 
Louisiana for a pilot program to develop measures to eradicate 
or control feral swine and to assess and restore wetlands 
damaged by feral swine, having considered the same, reports 
favorably thereon without amendment and recommends that the 
bill do pass.

                    GENERAL STATEMENT AND BACKGROUND

    According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, feral 
swine are present in at least 39 states and cause extensive 
damage to natural habitats, including wetlands, as well as 
private property and crops. While digging for food (rooting), 
feral swine displace native wildlife and destroy vegetation, 
leading to increased erosion and invasive plant infestation. 
They compete with native species for food resources and prey on 
young livestock and small animals. Feral swine also carry 
diseases that affect pets, livestock, wildlife, and humans.
    In testimony before the Committee, the U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service highlighted the feral swine population in on 
Lake Ophelia National Wildlife Refuge in central Louisiana, 
which has reached an epidemic level an estimated one swine per 
four acres of habitat. Roughly 30 to 50 percent of grain crops 
planted on the refuge to support waterfowl populations are 
destroyed by feral swine. An aggressive and sustained effort 
utilizing multiple techniques is needed to control feral swine 
populations on national wildlife refuges and parks in order to 
protect native wildlife and their habitats.
    The Feral Swine Eradication and Control Pilot Program Act 
of 2011 authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to provide 
financial assistance to the State of Louisiana to pay up to 75 
percent of the cost of carrying out a pilot program to 
eradicate feral swine. The bill authorizes such sums as are 
necessary for fiscal years 2012 through 2016.

                     OBJECTIVES OF THE LEGISLATION

    To authorize the Secretary of the Interior to provide 
financial assistance to the State of Louisiana for a pilot 
program to develop measures to eradicate or control feral swine 
and to assess and restore wetlands damaged by feral swine.

                      SECTION-BY-SECTION ANALYSIS

Section 1. Short title

    Section 1 provides that this Act may be cited as the Feral 
Swine Eradication and Control Pilot Program Act of 2011.'

Section 2. Findings and purpose

    Section 2 provides the general purpose of the bill, along 
with several findings which: recognize the economic and 
environmental importance of Louisiana wetlands; acknowledge the 
damaging impacts of increasing nonnative invasive feral swine 
populations on Louisiana wetlands; and, determine that the 
methodologies under the Coastwide Nutria Control Program 
established under the Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection, 
and Restoration Act may provide the basis for control and 
restoration of wetlands damaged by feral swine.

Section 3. Feral swine eradication and control pilot program

    Section 3 outlines the eligible activities for assistance 
under the Act, including: study and assess the nature and 
extent of wetland damage caused by feral swine; develop methods 
to eradicate or control feral swine; and develop methods to 
restore damaged wetlands. Section 3 also establishes 
coordination and cost share requirements, limits administrative 
expenses, and authorizes such sums as are necessary for fiscal 
years 2012 through 2016.

                          LEGISLATIVE HISTORY

    S. 893 was introduced on May 5, 2011 by Senator Mary 
Landrieu (D-LA). The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Environment and Public Works. On September 21, 2011, the full 
Environment and Public Works Committee met to consider the 
bill. The bill was ordered reported favorably without 
amendment.

                                HEARINGS

    In the 111th Congress, the Water and Wildlife Subcommittee 
of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee held a 
legislative hearing on multiple wildlife and invasive species 
bills, including the Feral Swine Eradication and Control Act of 
2009 (S. 1965).

                             ROLLCALL VOTES

    The Committee on Environment and Public Works met to 
consider S. 893 on September 21, 2011. The bill was ordered 
favorably reported by voice vote with Senators Inhofe and 
Johanns recorded as ``No''.

                      REGULATORY IMPACT STATEMENT

    In compliance with section 11(b) of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the committee finds that S. 893 
does not create any additional regulatory burdens, nor will it 
cause any adverse impact on the personal privacy of 
individuals.

                          MANDATES ASSESSMENT

    In compliance with the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 
(Public Law 104-4), the committee noted that the Congressional 
Budget Office has found, ``S. 893 contains no intergovernmental 
or private-sector mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates 
Reform Act and would impose no costs on state, local, or tribal 
governments.''

               CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE COST ESTIMATE

                                                September 29, 2011.
Hon. Barbara Boxer,
Chairman, Committee on Environment and Public Works
U.S. Senate, Washington, DC.
    Dear Madam Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for S. 893, the Feral Swine 
Eradication and Control Pilot Program Act of 2011.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Jeff LaFave.
            Sincerely,
                                              Douglas W. Elmendorf.
    Enclosure.

S. 893--Feral Swine Eradication and Control Pilot Program Act of 2011

    S. 893 would authorize appropriations over the 2012-2016 
period for the Department of the Interior (DOI) to study and 
develop methods to control and eradicate feral swine in 
Louisiana and to restore wetlands damaged by such animals. 
Based on information from DOI and assuming appropriation of the 
necessary amounts, CBO estimates that implementing the 
legislation would cost $1 million a year over the 2012-2016 
period. Enacting S. 893 would not affect direct spending or 
revenues; therefore, pay-as-you-go procedures do not apply.
    S. 893 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act and 
would impose no costs on state, local, or tribal governments. 
Louisiana would benefit from the program authorized in the 
bill. Any costs to the state would be incurred voluntarily as a 
condition of receiving federal assistance.
    The CBO staff contact for this estimate is Jeff LaFave. The 
estimate was approved by Theresa Gullo, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

                        CHANGES IN EXISTING LAW

    Section 12 of rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of the Senate 
requires the committee to publish changes in existing law made 
by the bill as reported. Passage of this bill will make no 
changes to existing law.