Report text available as:

  • TXT
  • PDF   (PDF provides a complete and accurate display of this text.) Tip ?

112th Congress 
 2d Session                      SENATE                          Report
                                                                112-150
_______________________________________________________________________

                                                       Calendar No. 329
 
               NATURAL HAZARDS RISK REDUCTION ACT OF 2011

                               __________


                              R E P O R T


                                 OF THE


           COMMITTEE ON COMMERCE, SCIENCE, AND TRANSPORTATION

                                   on

                                 S. 646



                                     

               February 27, 2012.--Ordered to be printed



       SENATE COMMITTEE ON COMMERCE, SCIENCE, AND TRANSPORTATION

                      one hundred twelfth congress

                             second session

            JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER IV, West Virginia, Chairman
DANIEL K. INOUYE, Hawaii             KAY BAILEY HUTCHISON, Texas
JOHN F. KERRY, Massachusetts         OLYMPIA J. SNOWE, Maine
BARBARA BOXER, California            JIM DeMINT, South Carolina
BILL NELSON, Florida                 JOHN THUNE, South Dakota
MARIA CANTWELL, Washington           ROGER F. WICKER, Mississippi
FRANK R. LAUTENBERG, New Jersey      JOHNNY ISAKSON, Georgia
MARK PRYOR, Arkansas                 ROY BLUNT, Missouri
CLAIRE McCASKILL, Missouri           JOHN BOOZMAN, Arkansas
AMY KLOBUCHAR, Minnesota             PATRICK J. TOOMEY, Pennsylvania
TOM UDALL, New Mexico                MARCO RUBIO, Florida
MARK WARNER, Virginia                KELLY AYOTTE, New Hampshire
MARK BEGICH, Alaska                  DEAN HELLER, Nevada
                     Ellen Doneski, Staff Director
                   James Reid, Deputy Staff Director
                     John Williams, General Counsel
                Todd Bertoson, Republican Staff Director
           Jarrod Thompson, Republican Deputy Staff Director
               Rebecca Seidel, Republican General Counsel


                                                       Calendar No. 329
112th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 2d Session                                                     112-150

======================================================================

               NATURAL HAZARDS RISK REDUCTION ACT OF 2011

                                _______
                                

               February 27, 2012.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

     Mr. Rockefeller, from the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
                Transportation, submitted the following

                                 REPORT

                         [To accompany S. 646]

    The Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, to 
which was referred the bill (S. 646) to reauthorize Federal 
natural hazards reduction programs, and for other purposes, 
having considered the same, reports favorably thereon with an 
amendment (in the nature of a substitute) and recommends that 
the bill (as amended) do pass.

                          Purpose of the Bill

  The purpose of S. 646, the Natural Hazards Risk Reduction Act 
of 2011, is to reauthorize programs that reduce public exposure 
to risk from natural disasters, specifically earthquakes, 
windstorms, and wildfires, and for other purposes.

                          Background and Needs

  Events of the past year--the Tohoku, Japan earthquake and 
tsunami; wildfires in Texas; tornadoes across the southern and 
southeastern United States; and flooding across that same 
region--have raised questions as to whether the Nation has 
properly invested in its resilience to natural disasters. The 
United States faces a large array of natural hazards requiring 
a holistic approach to research, forecasting, public outreach, 
and the application of mitigation strategies.
  A significant percentage of the U.S. population lives in 
areas subject to risk of loss of life or property from natural 
hazards, such as earthquakes, severe weather, and wildfires. 
According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration (NOAA), over half of the U.S. population lives 
within 50 miles of the coast,\1\ but severe weather events 
affect every State.\2\ Greater knowledge of the physical 
processes of natural hazards and their effects can guide the 
development of methods to mitigate losses. A 2005 analysis of 
natural hazard mitigation grants awarded by the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) found that every dollar 
invested in mitigation saved the Nation an average of four 
dollars in future disaster response costs and losses.\3\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/population.html.
    \2\http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/faq/faq_tor.php.
    \3\National Institute of Building Sciences, Multihazard Mitigation 
Council. Natural Hazard Mitigation Saves: An Independent Study to 
Assess the Future Savings from Mitigation Activities (Washington, DC, 
2005).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION PROGRAM

  Earthquakes often occur without warning and can leave in 
their wake severe damage to buildings and property, as well as 
loss of life. To help reduce these risks, Congress established 
the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) in 
1977 (P.L. 95-124) recognizing that advances in building design 
and construction, land use decisions, improvements in 
earthquake prediction and magnitude, coordinated emergency 
preparedness plans, public education, and community involvement 
could reduce earthquake-related losses.
  In May 2010, NEHRP's Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards 
Reduction completed its third annual assessment of the 
program's effectiveness (as required by P.L. 108-360) and found 
that NEHRP is a ``highly successful program'' that has improved 
public safety through earthquake awareness and preparedness.\4\ 
However, the Advisory Committee remains concerned that the 
Nation is still not well prepared for a large earthquake. To 
address this, its recommendations include: increasing the pace 
of implementation for the 2009-2013 NEHRP Strategic Plan; 
working to ensure sufficient funding for Strategic Plan 
implementation; and prioritizing investments in lifeline 
systems (energy, transportation, water, and communications) to 
achieve seismic resilience. In March 2011, a National Research 
Council report also endorsed the 2009-2013 NEHRP Strategic Plan 
and made recommendations to further increase the Nation's 
resilience to earthquakes.\5\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \4\Effectiveness of the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction 
Program: A Report from the Advisory Committee on Earthquake 
HazardsReduction, http://nehrp.gov/pdf/2010 ACEHRReport.pdf
    \5\National Research Council, National Earthquake Resilience: 
Research, Implementation, and Outreach, 2011.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  The bill would update, clarify, and, in some cases, expand 
the activities of NEHRP for earthquake risk reduction. This 
includes research and development to reduce the risk to the 
built environment, with a particular emphasis on retrofitting 
existing infrastructure, and research to determine how risk is 
perceived in an effort to improve the adoption of risk 
reduction measures. The bill would also take an all-hazards 
approach to the Interagency Coordinating Committee and expand 
it to include the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program 
(NWIRP).

NATIONAL WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION PROGRAM

  Windstorms, such as tornadoes and hurricanes, can cause 
widespread damage, with or without advanced notice. The spring 
of 2011 was an unusually active tornado season in the United 
States. April alone saw 753 tornadoes, the highest on record in 
a single month, with an estimated 364 fatalities.\6\ A single 
EF-5 tornado hit Joplin, Missouri, a town of just under 50,000 
people, on May 22, 2011, with winds in excess of 200 mph 
leaving 159 people dead\7\ and $2 billion to $3 billion in 
disaster costs--the costliest in the State's history.\8\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \6\NOAA 2011 tornado information, http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/
2011_tornado_information.html.
    \7\NWS Central Region Service Assessment, Joplin, Missouri, 
Tornado--May 22, 2011. http://www.nws.noaa.gov/os/assessments/pdfs/
Joplin_tornado.pdf.
    \8\``Missouri Department of Insurance says Joplin disaster will be 
the most costly insurance payout in State history,'' Live Insurance 
News, July 27, 2011. http://www.liveinsurancenews.com/missouri-
department-of-insurance-says-joplin-disaster-will-be-the-most-costly-
insurance-payout-in-state-history/854253/.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Modeled after NEHRP, Congress established NWIRP in 2004 with 
a goal of achieving a major measurable reduction in the loss of 
life and property from windstorms. The National Windstorm 
Impact Reduction Act of 2004 (42 U.S.C. 15701 et seq.) directed 
the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the 
National Science Foundation (NSF), FEMA, and NOAA to develop a 
coordinated research and development program to mitigate damage 
from windstorms; however, the program has struggled with 
interagency coordination since its inception. Building again 
off of the successful NEHRP model, S. 646 would establish NIST 
as the lead agency for NWIRP. S. 646 would also direct NWIRP to 
reduce the risks of windstorms to the built environment, 
improve the understanding of windstorms and their impacts, and 
facilitate adoption of risk reduction measures--priorities 
provided in the National Science and Technology Council's 2006 
report, ``Windstorm Impact Reduction Implementation Plan.''\9\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \9\http://www.sdr.gov/
Windstorm_%20Impact%20Reduction%20Implementation%20Plan%20FINAL.pdf.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAM ACT

  The National Construction Safety Team (NCST) Act of 2002 (15 
U.S.C. 7301 et seq.) authorized the Director of NIST to 
establish and deploy National Construction Safety Teams to 
investigate building failures. The framework for the teams was 
modeled after National Transportation Safety Board authorities 
for investigating transportation-related accidents. NIST has 
used its authority to investigate a number of major building 
failures, the most prominent being the collapse of World Trade 
Center Towers 1, 2, and 7. These investigations led to a number 
of recommendations that have been incorporated into building 
codes for future construction.\10\ Most recently under the NCST 
Act, NIST is conducting a comprehensive study of the building 
performance and emergency communications during the May 22, 
2011, tornado in Joplin, Missouri.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \10\National Construction Safety Team Act FY 2008 Annual Report to 
Congress, http://www.nist.gov/el/disasterstudies/ncst/upload/
ncst_report_congress2008.pdf.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  The changes in S. 646 would provide NIST with flexibility in 
implementing the NCST Act by adding the authority to 
investigate infrastructure failures, and providing the Director 
72 hours after a building or infrastructure failure to decide 
whether to pursue an investigation.

WILDFIRES AT THE WILDLAND-URBAN INTERFACE

  Development in the wildland-urban interface--an area where 
urban structures meet undeveloped wildland--continues to grow. 
Homes in these areas are particularly vulnerable to fires that 
start and spread through unpopulated wildlands. For instance, 
the Station fire near Los Angeles from August to October 2009 
was the 10th largest in California since 1933, destroying more 
than 200 structures and costing approximately $90 million to 
contain.\11\,\12\ The bill would expand NIST's fire 
research authority to include fires at the wildland-urban 
interface with a goal of improving building codes, urban 
planning, and firefighting strategies.\13\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \11\http://inciweb.org/incident/1856/.
    \12\http://inciweb.org/incident/article/9535/.
    \13\http://www2.bfrl.nist.gov/userpages/wmell/public.html.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         Summary of Provisions

  S. 646 would reauthorize and update NEHRP for fiscal years 
(FYs) 2011 through 2015 and authorize appropriations totaling 
$905,656,000 over the five-year period for NIST, FEMA, the U.S. 
Geological Survey (USGS), and NSF. The majority of the funding 
would go to USGS for real-time seismic monitoring systems and 
NSF for basic research, including social science aspects to 
reduce risks ($471,640,000 and $340,448,000, respectively). The 
remainder of the funding would go to NIST ($39,214,000) for 
research and development to improve building standards and 
practices and FEMA ($54,354,000) to facilitate the adoption of 
model building codes and other mitigation measures. NIST would 
remain the lead agency for the program and also take over 
responsibility for organizing investigations under the post-
earthquake investigations program.
  The bill would reauthorize and revise NWIRP for FYs 2011 
through 2015 and authorize appropriations totaling $136,710,300 
for the five-year period for NIST, FEMA, NSF, and NOAA. The 
majority of the funding would go to FEMA ($51,403,100) for 
development and implementation of risk assessment tools and 
mitigation techniques and NSF ($51,403,100) for basic windstorm 
research, including community preparedness and response. The 
remainder of the funding would go to NIST ($21,873,600) for 
research and development to improve building standards and 
practices, and NOAA ($12,030,500) to support research and data 
collection, including a competitive grant program in these 
areas. The bill would establish NIST as the lead agency 
following the successful NEHRP model.
  The bill would repeal provisions establishing the Interagency 
Coordinating Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction and 
replace it with the establishment of an Interagency 
Coordinating Committee on Natural Hazards Risk Reduction, 
chaired by the Director of NIST. The committee would oversee 
planning and coordination for both NEHRP and NWIRP, and other 
natural hazard mitigation, as appropriate.
  Finally, the bill would expand the National Construction 
Safety Team Act of 2002 to allow for the deployment of teams to 
investigate infrastructure failure events that lead to a 
substantial loss of life, as well as buildings, and amend the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology Act (15 U.S.C. 
271 et seq.) to include research relating to protecting homes 
and communities from fires at the wildland-urban interface.

                          Legislative History

  S. 646, the Natural Hazards Risk Reduction Act of 2011, was 
introduced on March 17, 2011, by Senator Boxer and referred to 
the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. 
Senators Feinstein, Cantwell, and Rockefeller have cosponsored 
the bill. Representative Wu introduced a companion bill, H.R. 
1379, on April 5, 2011.
  On May 3, 2011, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``America's Natural Disaster Preparedness: Are Federal 
Investments Paying Off?'' and heard testimony from Dr. William 
Hooke, Senior Policy Fellow and Director, American 
Meteorological Society; Mr. Bob Ryan, Senior Meteorologist, 
ABC7/WJLA-TV; Dr. Anne Kiremidjian, Professor, Department of 
Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, on 
behalf of the American Society of Civil Engineers; and Dr. 
Clint Dawson P.E., Professor, Institute for Computational 
Engineering and Sciences, University of Texas at Austin. The 
hearing examined how investments in mitigation and preparedness 
through the programs reauthorized by S. 646 would save lives 
and reduce reconstruction costs during future disasters.
  On May 5, 2011, the Committee met in open Executive Session 
and, by a voice vote, ordered S. 646 reported with an amendment 
in the nature of a substitute.

                            Estimated Costs

  In accordance with paragraph 11(a) of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate and section 403 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the Committee provides the 
following cost estimate, prepared by the Congressional Budget 
Office:

S.646--Natural Hazards Risk Reduction Act of 2011

    Summary: S. 646 would reauthorize federal programs aimed at 
developing methods to reduce damage caused by earthquakes and 
windstorms. The bill also would reauthorize several committees 
that advise federal agencies on implementing those programs. 
Assuming appropriation of the authorized and necessary amounts, 
CBO estimates that implementing the legislation would cost $803 
million over the 2012-2016 period and $43 million after 2016. 
Enacting S. 646 would not affect direct spending or revenues; 
therefore, pay-as-you-go procedures do not apply.
    S. 646 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) 
and would impose no costs on state, local, or Tribal 
governments.
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: The estimated 
budgetary impact of S. 646 is shown in the following table. The 
costs of this legislation fall within budget functions 250 
(general science, space, and technology), 300 (natural 
resources and environment), 370 (commerce and housing credit), 
and 450 (community and regional development).

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 By fiscal year, in millions of dollars--
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
                                                            2012     2013     2014     2015     2016   2012-2016
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  CHANGES IN SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION

Title I: National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program:
    Authorization Levela................................      177      181      185      191        0       734
    Estimated Outlays...................................      111      152      176      189       71       699
Title II: National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program:b
    Authorization Level.................................       26       26       29       30        0       111
    Estimated Outlays...................................       13       21       26       30       14       104
Title III: Advisory Committees:
    Estimated Authorization Level.......................        *        *        *        *        *         1
    Estimated Outlays...................................        *        *        *        *        *         1
    Total Changes:
        Estimated Authorization Level...................      203      207      214      221        0       846
        Estimated Outlays...............................      124      173      202      219       85      803
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Notes: * = less than $500,000. Amounts may not sum to totals because of rounding.
aOf appropriations received in fiscal year 2010, agencies that participate in the National Earthquake Hazards
  Reduction Program allocated about $130 million to carry out the program. Those agencies have not completed
  their allocations of fiscal year 2011 appropriations for the program.
bOf appropriations received in fiscal year 2010, agencies that carry out activities related to the National
  Windstorm Impact Reduction Program allocated about $25 million for those purposes. Those agencies have not
  completed their allocations of fiscal year 2011 appropriations for activities related to the program.

    Basis of estimate: For this estimate, CBO assumes that S. 
646 will be enacted in 2011 and that the authorized and 
necessary amounts will be appropriated for each fiscal year 
(beginning in fiscal year 2012). Estimated outlays are based on 
historical spending patterns for similar activities.
    Over the 2012-2015 period, title I would authorize 
appropriations totaling $381 million for the United States 
Geological Survey, $276 million for the National Science 
Foundation (NSF), $45 million for the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency (FEMA), and $32 million for the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to carry out the 
National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program. Assuming 
appropriation of the authorized amounts, CBO estimates that 
implementing the provisions of title I would cost $699 million 
over the 2012-2016 period and $35 million after 2016.
    Over the 2012-2015 period, title II would authorize 
appropriations totaling $42 million for NSF, $42 million for 
FEMA, $18 million for NIST, and $9 million for the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to carry out the 
National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program. Assuming 
appropriation of the authorized amounts, CBO estimates that 
implementing the provisions of title II would cost $104 million 
over the 2012-2016 period and $7 million after 2016.
    Title III would reauthorize several committees that advise 
federal agencies on implementing the National Earthquake 
Hazards Reduction Program and the National Windstorm Impact 
Reduction Program. Based on information from NIST regarding 
administrative costs for similar committees, CBO estimates that 
the agency would spend about $150,000 a year to maintain those 
committees. In total, CBO estimates that implementing the 
provisions of title III would cost $750,000 over the 2012-2016 
period, assuming appropriation of the necessary amounts.
    Intergovernmental and private-sector impact: S. 646 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in UMRA and would impose no costs on state, local, or 
Tribal governments.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal Costs: Jeff LaFave; Impact on 
State, Local, and Tribal Governments: Melissa Merrell; Impact 
on the Private Sector: Amy Petz.
    Estimate approved by: Theresa Gullo, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

                      Regulatory Impact Statement

  In accordance with paragraph 11(b) of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee provides the 
following evaluation of the regulatory impact of the 
legislation, as reported:

                       NUMBER OF PERSONS COVERED

  The bill would authorize appropriations for the program 
agencies of NEHRP and NWIRP for FYs 2011 through 2015. The 
Committee believes that the bill would not subject any 
individuals or businesses affected by the bill to any 
additional regulations.

                            ECONOMIC IMPACT

  Over the five-year period from FY 2011 to FY 2015, the bill 
would authorize a total of $905.66 million in appropriations to 
FEMA, USGS, NSF, and NIST for NEHRP activities and $136.71 
million in appropriations to FEMA, NOAA, NSF, and NIST for 
NWIRP activities. These funding levels are not expected to have 
an inflationary impact on the Nation's economy.

                                PRIVACY

  The bill would have little, if any, negative impact on the 
personal privacy of individuals.

                               PAPERWORK

  Except for individuals voluntarily serving on either the 
NEHRP or NWIRP Advisory Committee, the reported bill would not 
increase paperwork requirements for private individuals or 
businesses. For the Federal Government, the bill would require 
reports from the Interagency Coordinating Committee on Natural 
Hazards Risk Reduction and the Advisory Committees for NEHRP 
and NWIRP detailing strategic plans, biennial progress reports, 
and coordinated budgets.

                   Congressionally Directed Spending

  In compliance with paragraph 4(b) of rule XLIV of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee provides that no 
provisions contained in the bill, as reported, meet the 
definition of congressionally directed spending items under the 
rule.

                      Section-by-Section Analysis


Section 1. Short Title.

  This section would provide that the legislation be cited as 
the ``Natural Hazards Risk Reduction Act of 2011.''

Section 2. Findings.

  This section would describe the findings of this Act.

                          TITLE I--EARTHQUAKES

Section 101. Short Title.

  This section would provide that this title be cited as the 
``National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program Reauthorization 
Act of 2011.''

Section 102. Findings.

  This section would repeal the Congressional findings in 
section 2 of the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977 (42 
U.S.C. 7701).

Section 103. Definitions.

  This section would strike the definitions of the 
``Interagency Coordination Committee'' and the ``Advisory 
Committee'' from section 4 of the Earthquake Hazards Reduction 
Act of 1977 (42 U.S.C. 7703).

Section 104. National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program.

  This section would update, clarify, and, in some cases, 
expand the activities of NEHRP, including research and 
development to reduce the risk to the built environment, with a 
particular emphasis on retrofitting existing infrastructure, 
and research to determine how risk is perceived in an effort to 
improve the adoption of risk reduction measures.
  The section would describe the responsibilities of each of 
the program agencies, including NIST, FEMA, USGS, and NSF. NIST 
would remain the Program's lead agency responsible for planning 
and coordination. Additionally, NIST would be directed to 
conduct research and development to improve building codes, 
standards, and practices for buildings, structures, and 
lifelines. FEMA would be directed to facilitate the development 
and adoption of standards, codes, and practices to mitigate 
earthquake risks, and to operate a State assistance grant 
program to enhance seismic safety. USGS would be required to 
characterize and identify earthquake hazards, assess earthquake 
risks, monitor seismic activity, and provide real-time 
earthquake information. NSF would be responsible for supporting 
basic research to further the understanding of earthquakes, 
earthquake engineering, and community preparation and response 
to earthquakes.
  This section would also require the Interagency Coordinating 
Committee on Natural Hazards Risk Reduction to provide annual 
guidance to the Program agencies in preparation of their budget 
requests for activities related to the Program and to submit an 
annual Program budget to the Office of Management and Budget 
(OMB).

Section 105. Post-Earthquake Investigations Program.

  This section would direct NEHRP to include a post-earthquake 
investigations program for major earthquakes in an attempt to 
apply any lessons learned to reduce the loss of lives and 
property in future earthquakes. The lead Program agency would 
be responsible for organizing the investigation in consultation 
with all Program agencies. The investigation would begin as 
rapidly as possible, could be conducted by grantees or 
contractors, and results would be disseminated widely.

Section 106. Authorization of Appropriations.

  For the purposes of carrying out this Act in FYs 2011 through 
2015, this section would authorize a total of $54,354,000 for 
FEMA; $471,640,000 for USGS, of which $190,000,000 would be 
available for completion of the Advanced National Seismic 
Research and Monitoring System; $340,448,000 for NSF; and 
$39,214,000 for NIST.

                             TITLE II--WIND

Section 201. Short Title.

  This section would provide that this title be cited as the 
``National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act Reauthorization of 
2011.''

Section 202. Purpose.

  This section would provide that the purpose of the Windstorm 
Impact Reduction Program is to achieve a measurable reduction 
in losses of life and property from windstorms.

Section 203. Definitions.

  This section would amend the definition of ``Director'' in 
the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act of 2004 (42 U.S.C. 
15702(1)) to specify the Director of NIST.

Section 204. National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program.

  This section would define the activities of NWIRP to reduce 
the risks of windstorms to the built environment, to improve 
the understanding of windstorms and their impacts, and to 
facilitate adoption of risk reduction measures.
  The section would describe the responsibilities of each of 
the program agencies, including NIST, FEMA, NOAA, and NSF. NIST 
would be identified as the lead agency responsible for planning 
and coordinating NWIRP. Additionally, NIST would be directed to 
conduct research and development to improve building codes, 
standards, and practices for buildings, structures, and 
lifelines. FEMA would support the development of risk 
assessment tools and mitigation techniques; data collection and 
analysis after windstorm events; and outreach to facilitate 
mitigation measures. NOAA would support research and data 
collection to improve the understanding of windstorms and their 
impacts. NSF would support basic research to further the 
understanding of windstorms, wind engineering, and community 
preparation and response.

Section 205. Authorization of Appropriations.

  For the purposes of carrying out this Act in FYs 2011 through 
2015, this section would authorize a total of $51,403,100 for 
FEMA; $51,403,100 for NSF; $21,873,600 for NIST; and 
$12,030,500 for NOAA.

 TITLE III--INTERAGENCY COORDINATING COMMITTEE ON NATURAL HAZARDS RISK 
                               REDUCTION

Section 301. Interagency Coordinating Committee on Natural Hazards Risk 
        Reduction.

  This section would establish an Interagency Coordinating 
Committee on Natural Hazards Risk Reduction, chaired by the 
Director of NIST and including the Directors of FEMA, USGS, 
NOAA, NSF, the Office of Science and Technology Policy, OMB, 
and the head of any other Federal agency the Committee 
considers appropriate. The Committee would be tasked with 
overseeing the planning and coordination of NEHRP and NWIRP, 
and also developing strategic plans, progress reports, and 
coordinated budgets for both programs.
  Similar to the National Advisory Committee on Windstorm 
Impact Reduction, this section would mandate that the Director 
of NIST establish an Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards 
Reduction comprised of relevant non-Federal employee experts to 
offer guidance and recommendations on research, development, 
and technology transfer activities to mitigate the impacts of 
natural disasters. Each advisory committee would be required to 
report to the Director of NIST at least once every two years on 
the priorities and coordination of the programs, and ways to 
improve the programs.
  Not later than two years after enactment, this section would 
also require the Subcommittee on Disaster Reduction of the 
Committee on Environment and Natural Resources of the National 
Science and Technology Council to submit a report to Congress 
identifying the current Federal research, development, and 
technology transfer activities that address mitigation for all 
types of natural hazards, and opportunities to create synergies 
between the various research activities.

       TITLE IV--NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAM ACT AMENDMENTS

Section 401. National Construction Safety Team Act Amendments.

  This section would expand the National Construction Safety 
Team Act (15 U.S.C. 7301 et seq.) to include infrastructure in 
addition to buildings, and to give the Director of NIST 72 
hours to decide whether to deploy a NCST after an event causing 
the failure of building(s) and/or infrastructure involving the 
loss or potential for loss of life.

                     TITLE V--FIRE RESEARCH PROGRAM

Section 501. Fire Research Program.

  This section would amend section 16(a)(1) of the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology Act (15 U.S.C. 
278f(a)(1)) to include ``fires at the wildland-urban 
interface'' to NIST's existing fire research authority.

                        Changes in Existing Law

  In compliance with paragraph 12 of rule XXVI of the Standing 
Rules of the Senate, changes in existing law made by the bill, 
as reported, are shown as follows (existing law proposed to be 
omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new material is printed 
in italic, existing law in which no change is proposed is shown 
in roman):

                EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION ACT OF 1977

[SEC. 2. CONGRESSIONAL FINDINGS.

                            [42 U.S.C. 7701]

  [The Congress finds and declares the following:
          [(1) All 50 States are vulnerable to the hazards of 
        earthquakes, and at least 39 of them are subject to 
        major or moderate seismic risk, including Alaska, 
        California, Hawaii, Illinois, Massachusetts, Missouri, 
        Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, South Carolina, 
        Utah, and Washington. A large portion of the population 
        of the United States lives in areas vulnerable to 
        earthquake hazards.
          [(2) Earthquakes have caused, and can cause in the 
        future, enormous loss of life, injury, destruction of 
        property, and economic and social disruption. With 
        respect to future earthquakes, such loss, destruction, 
        and disruption can be substantially reduced through the 
        development and implementation of earthquake hazards 
        reduction measures, including (A) improved design and 
        construction methods and practices, (B) land-use 
        controls and redevelopment, (C) prediction techniques 
        and early-warning systems, (D) coordinated emergency 
        preparedness plans, and (E) public education and 
        involvement programs.
          [(3) An expertly staffed and adequately financed 
        earthquake hazards reduction program, based on Federal, 
        State, local, and private research, planning, 
        decisionmaking, and contributions would reduce the risk 
        of such loss, destruction, and disruption in seismic 
        areas by an amount far greater than the cost of such 
        program.
          [(4) A well-funded seismological research program in 
        earthquake prediction could provide data adequate for 
        the design, of an operational system that could predict 
        accurately the time, place, magnitude, and physical 
        effects of earthquakes in selected areas of the United 
        States.
          [(5) The geological study of active faults and 
        features can reveal how recently and how frequently 
        major earthquakes have occurred on those faults and how 
        much risk they pose. Such long-term seismic risk 
        assessments are needed in virtually every aspect of 
        earthquake hazards management, whether emergency 
        planning, public regulation, detailed building design, 
        insurance rating, or investment decision.
          [(6) The vulnerability of buildings, lifelines, 
        public works, and industrial and emergency facilities 
        can be reduced through proper earthquake resistant 
        design and construction practices. The economy and 
        efficacy of such procedures can be substantially 
        increased through research and development.
          [(7) Programs and practices of departments and 
        agencies of the United States are important to the 
        communities they serve; some functions, such as 
        emergency communications and national defense, and 
        lifelines, such as dams, bridges, and public works, 
        must remain in service during and after an earthquake. 
        Federally owned, operated, and influenced structures 
        and life-lines should serve as models for how to reduce 
        and minimize hazards to the community.
          [(8) The implementation of earthquake hazards 
        reduction measures would, as an added benefit, also 
        reduce the risk of loss, destruction, and disruption 
        from other natural hazards and manmade hazards, 
        including hurricanes, tornadoes, accidents, explosions, 
        landslides, building and structural cave-ins, and 
        fires.
          [(9) Reduction of loss, destruction, and disruption 
        from earthquakes will depend on the actions of 
        individuals, and organizations in the private sector 
        and governmental units at Federal, State, and local 
        levels. The current capability to transfer knowledge 
        and information to these sectors is insufficient. 
        Improved mechanisms are needed to translate existing 
        information and research findings into reasonable and 
        usable specifications, criteria, and practices so that 
        individuals, organizations, and governmental units may 
        make informed decisions and take appropriate actions.
          [(10) Severe earthquakes are a worldwide problem. 
        Since damaging earthquakes occur infrequently in any 
        one nation, international cooperation is desirable for 
        mutual learning from limited experiences.
          [(11) An effective Federal program in earthquake 
        hazards reduction will require input from and review by 
        persons outside the Federal Government expert in the 
        sciences of earthquake hazards reduction and in the 
        practical application of earthquake hazards reduction 
        measures.]

SEC. 4. DEFINITIONS.

                            [42 U.S.C. 7703]

  As used in this Act, unless the context otherwise requires:
          (1) The term ``includes'' and variants thereof should 
        be read as if the phrase ``but is not limited to'' were 
        also set forth.
          (2) The term ``Program'' means the National 
        Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program established under 
        section 5.
          (3) The term ``seismic'' and variants thereof mean 
        having to do with, or caused by earthquakes.
          (4) The term ``State'' means each of the States of 
        the United States, the District of Columbia, the 
        Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, 
        American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Mariana 
        Islands, and any other territory or possession of the 
        United States.
          (5) The term ``United States'' means, when used in a 
        geographical sense, all of the States as defined in 
        section 4(4).
          (6) The term ``lifelines'' means public works and 
        utilities, including transportation facilities and 
        infrastructure, oil and gas pipelines, electrical power 
        and communication facilities and infrastructure, and 
        water supply and sewage treatment facilities.
          (7) The term ``Program agencies'' means the Federal 
        Emergency Management Agency, the United States 
        Geological Survey, the National Science Foundation, and 
        the National Institute of Standards and Technology.
          [(8) The term ``Interagency Coordinating Committee'' 
        means the Interagency Coordinating Committee on 
        Earthquake Hazards Reduction established under section 
        5(a).
          [(9) The term ``Advisory Committee'' means the 
        Advisory Committee established under section 5(a)(5).]

SEC. 5. NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION PROGRAM.

                            [42 U.S.C. 7704]

  (a) Establishment.--
          (1) In general.--There is established the National 
        Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program.
          [(2) Program activities.--The activities of the 
        Program shall be designed to--
                  [(A) develop effective measures for 
                earthquake hazards reduction;
                  [(B) promote the adoption of earthquake 
                hazards reduction measures by Federal, State, 
                and local governments, national standards and 
                model code organizations, architects and 
                engineers, building owners, and others with a 
                role in planning and constructing buildings, 
                structures, and lifelines through--
                          [(i) grants, contracts, cooperative 
                        agreements, and technical assistance;
                          [(ii) development of standards, 
                        guidelines, and voluntary consensus 
                        codes for earthquake hazards reduction 
                        for buildings, structures, and 
                        lifelines;
                          [(iii) development and maintenance of 
                        a repository of information, including 
                        technical data, on seismic risk and 
                        hazards reduction; and
                  [(C) improve the understanding of earthquakes 
                and their effects on communities, buildings, 
                structures, and lifelines, through 
                interdisciplinary research that involves 
                engineering, natural sciences, and social, 
                economic, and decisions sciences; and
                  [(D) develop, operate, and maintain an 
                Advanced National Seismic Research and 
                Monitoring System established under section 13 
                of the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977 
                (42 U.S.C. 7707), the George E. Brown, Jr. 
                Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation 
                established under section 14 of that Act (42 
                U.S.C. 7708), and the Global Seismographic 
                Network.]
          (2) Program activities.--The activities of the 
        Program shall be designed to--
                  (A) research and develop effective methods, 
                tools, and technologies to reduce the risk 
                posed by earthquakes to the built environment, 
                especially to lessen the risk to existing 
                structures and lifelines;
                  (B) improve the understanding of earthquakes 
                and their effects on households, businesses, 
                communities, buildings, structures, and 
                lifelines, through interdisciplinary and 
                multidisciplinary research that involves 
                engineering, natural sciences, and social 
                sciences; and
                  (C) facilitate the adoption of earthquake 
                risk reduction measures by households, 
                businesses, communities, local, State, and 
                Federal governments, national standards and 
                model building code organizations, architects 
                and engineers, building owners, and others with 
                a role in planning for disasters and planning, 
                constructing, retrofitting, and insuring 
                buildings, structures, and lifelines through--
                          (i) grants, contracts, cooperative 
                        agreements, and technical assistance;
                          (ii) development of standards, 
                        guidelines, voluntary consensus 
                        standards, and other design guidance 
                        for earthquake hazards risk reduction 
                        for buildings, structures, and 
                        lifelines;
                          (iii) outreach and information 
                        dissemination to communities on 
                        location-specific earthquake hazards 
                        and methods to reduce the risks from 
                        those hazards; and
                          (iv) development and maintenance of a 
                        repository of information, including 
                        technical data, on seismic risk and 
                        hazards reduction.
          [(3) Interagency Coordinating Committee on Earthquake 
        Hazards Reduction.--
                  [(A) In general.--There is established an 
                Interagency Coordinating Committee on 
                Earthquake Hazards Reduction chaired by the 
                Director of the National Institute of Standards 
                and Technology (referred to in this subsection 
                as the ``Director'').
                  [(B) Membership.--The committee shall be 
                composed of the directors of--
                          [(i) the Federal Emergency Management 
                        Agency;
                          [(ii) the United States Geological 
                        Survey;
                          [(iii) the National Science 
                        Foundation;
                          [(iv) the Office of Science and 
                        Technology Policy; and
                          [(v) the Office of Management and 
                        Budget.
                  [(C) Meetings.--The Committee shall meet not 
                less than 3 times a year at the call of the 
                Director.
                  [(D) Purpose and duties.--The Interagency 
                Coordinating Committee shall oversee the 
                planning, management, and coordination of the 
                Program. The Interagency Coordinating Committee 
                shall--
                          [(i) develop, not later than 6 months 
                        after the date of enactment of the 
                        National Earthquake Hazards Reduction 
                        Program Reauthorization Act of 2004 and 
                        update periodically--
                                  [(I) a strategic plan that 
                                establishes goals and 
                                priorities for the Program 
                                activities described under 
                                subsection (a)(2); and(II) a 
                                detailed management plan to 
                                implement such strategic plan; 
                                and
                          [(ii) develop a coordinated 
                        interagency budget for the Program that 
                        will ensure appropriate balance among 
                        the Program activities described under 
                        subsection (a)(2), and, in accordance 
                        with the plans developed under clause 
                        (i), submit such budget to the Director 
                        of the Office of Management and Budget 
                        at the time designated by that office 
                        for agencies to submit annual budgets.
          [(4) Annual report.--The Interagency Coordinating 
        Committee shall transmit, at the time of the 
        President's budget request to Congress, an annual 
        report to the Committee on Science and the Committee on 
        Resources of the House of Representatives, and the 
        Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of 
        the Senate. Such report shall include--
                  [(A) the Program budget for the current 
                fiscal year for each agency that participates 
                in the Program, and for each major goal 
                established for the Program activities under 
                subparagraph (3)(A);
                  [(B) the proposed Program budget for the next 
                fiscal year for each agency that participates 
                in the Program, and for each major goal 
                established for the Program activities under 
                subparagraph (3)(A);
                  [(C) a description of the activities and 
                results of the Program during the previous 
                year, including an assessment of the 
                effectiveness of the Program in furthering the 
                goals established in the strategic plan under 
                (3)(A);
                  [(D) a description of the extent to which the 
                Program has incorporated the recommendations of 
                the Advisory Committee;
                  [(E) a description of activities, including 
                budgets for the current fiscal year and 
                proposed budgets for the next fiscal year, that 
                are carried out by Program agencies and 
                contribute to the Program, but are not included 
                in the Program; and
                  [(F) a description of the activities, 
                including budgets for the current fiscal year 
                and proposed budgets for the following fiscal 
                year, related to the grant program carried out 
                under subsection (b)(2)(A)(i).
          [(5) Advisory Committee.--
                  [(A) In general.--The Director shall 
                establish an Advisory Committee on Earthquake 
                Hazards Reduction of at least 11 members, none 
                of whom may be an employee (as defined in 
                subparagraphs (A) through (F) of section 
                7342(a)(1) of title 5, United States Code, 
                including representatives of research and 
                academic institutions, industry standards 
                development organizations, State and local 
                government, and financial communities who are 
                qualified to provide advice on earthquake 
                hazards reduction and represent all related 
                scientific, architectural, and engineering 
                disciplines. The recommendations of the 
                Advisory Committee shall be considered by 
                Federal agencies in implementing the Program.
                  [(B) Assessment.--The Advisory Committee 
                shall assess--
                          [(i) trends and developments in the 
                        science and engineering of earthquake 
                        hazards reduction;
                          [(ii) effectiveness of the Program in 
                        carrying out the activities under 
                        (a)(2);
                          [(iii) the need to revise the 
                        Program; and
                          [(iv) the management, coordination, 
                        implementation, and activities of the 
                        Program.
                  [(C) Report.--Not later than 1 year after the 
                date of enactment of the National Earthquake 
                Hazards Reduction Program Reauthorization Act 
                of 2004 and at least once every 2 years 
                thereafter, the Advisory Committee shall report 
                to the Director on its findings of the 
                assessment carried out under subparagraph (B) 
                and its recommendations for ways to improve the 
                Program. In developing recommendations, the 
                Committee shall consider the recommendations of 
                the United States Geological Survey Scientific 
                Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee.
                  [(D) Federal Advisory Committee Act 
                application.--Section 14 of the Federal 
                Advisory Committee Act (5 App. U.S.C. 14) shall 
                not apply to the Advisory Committee.]
  [(b) Responsibilities of Program Agencies.--
          [(1) Lead agency.--The National Institute of 
        Standards and Technology shall have the primary 
        responsibility for planning and coordinating the 
        Program. In carrying out this paragraph, the Director 
        of the Institute shall--
                  [(A) ensure that the Program includes the 
                necessary steps to promote the implementation 
                of earthquake hazard reduction measures by 
                Federal, State, and local governments, national 
                standards and model building code 
                organizations, architects and engineers, and 
                others with a role in planning and constructing 
                buildings and lifelines;
                  [(B) support the development of performance-
                based seismic engineering tools, and work with 
                appropriate groups to promote the commercial 
                application of such tools, through earthquake-
                related building codes, standards, and 
                construction practices;
                  [(C) request the assistance of Federal 
                agencies other than the Program agencies, as 
                necessary to assist in carrying out this Act; 
                and
                  [(D) work with the Federal Emergency 
                Management Agency, the National Science 
                Foundation, and the United States Geological 
                Survey, to develop a comprehensive plan for 
                earthquake engineering research to effectively 
                use existing testing facilities and 
                laboratories (existing at the time of the 
                development of the plan), upgrade facilities 
                and equipment as needed, and integrate new, 
                innovative testing approaches to the research 
                infrastructure in a systematic manner.
                  [(E), (F) [Redesignated]
          [(2) Department of Homeland Security; Federal 
        Emergency Management Agency.--
                  [(A) Program responsibilities.--The Under 
                Secretary of Homeland Security for Emergency 
                Preparedness and Response (the Director of the 
                Federal Emergency Management Agency)--
                          [(i) shall work closely with national 
                        standards and model building code 
                        organizations, in conjunction with the 
                        National Institute of Standards and 
                        Technology, to promote the 
                        implementation of research results;
                          [(ii) shall promote better building 
                        practices within the building design 
                        and construction industry including 
                        architects, engineers, contractors, 
                        builders, and inspectors;
                          [(iii) shall operate a program of 
                        grants and assistance to enable States 
                        to develop mitigation, preparedness, 
                        and response plans, prepare inventories 
                        and conduct seismic safety inspections 
                        of critical structures and lifelines, 
                        update building and zoning codes and 
                        ordinances to enhance seismic safety, 
                        increase earthquake awareness and 
                        education, and encourage the 
                        development of multi-State groups for 
                        such purposes;
                          [(iv) shall support the 
                        implementation of a comprehensive 
                        earthquake education and public 
                        awareness program, including 
                        development of materials and their wide 
                        dissemination to all appropriate 
                        audiences and support public access to 
                        locality-specific information that may 
                        assist the public in preparing for, 
                        mitigating against, responding to and 
                        recovering from earthquakes and related 
                        disasters;
                          [(v) shall assist the National 
                        Institute of Standards and Technology, 
                        other Federal agencies, and private 
                        sector groups, in the preparation, 
                        maintenance, and wide dissemination of 
                        seismic resistant design guidance and 
                        related information on building codes, 
                        standards, and practices for new and 
                        existing buildings, structures, and 
                        lifelines, and aid in the development 
                        of performance-based design guidelines 
                        and methodologies supporting model 
                        codes for buildings, structures, and 
                        lifelines that are cost effective and 
                        affordable;
                          [(vi) shall develop, coordinate, and 
                        execute the National Response Plan when 
                        required following an earthquake, and 
                        support the development of specific 
                        State and local plans for each high 
                        risk area to ensure the availability of 
                        adequate emergency medical resources, 
                        search and rescue personnel and 
                        equipment, and emergency broadcast 
                        capability;
                          [(vii) shall develop approaches to 
                        combine measures for earthquake hazards 
                        reduction with measures for reduction 
                        of other natural and technological 
                        hazards including performance-based 
                        design approaches;
                          [(viii) shall provide preparedness, 
                        response, and mitigation 
                        recommendations to communities after an 
                        earthquake prediction has been made 
                        under paragraph (3)(D); and
                          [(ix) may enter into cooperative 
                        agreements or contracts with States and 
                        local jurisdictions and other Federal 
                        agencies to establish demonstration 
                        projects on earthquake hazard 
                        mitigation, to link earthquake research 
                        and mitigation efforts with emergency 
                        management programs, or to prepare 
                        educational materials for national 
                        distribution.
                  [(B) State assistance program criteria.--In 
                order to qualify for assistance under 
                subparagraph (A)(i), a state must--
                          [(i) demonstrate that the assistance 
                        will result in enhanced seismic safety 
                        in the State;
                          [(ii) provide a share of the costs of 
                        the activities for which assistance is 
                        being given, in accordance with 
                        subparagraph (C); and
                          [(iii) meet such other requirements 
                        as the Director of the Agency shall 
                        prescribe.
                  [(C) Non-Federal cost sharing.--
                          [(i) In the case of any State which 
                        has received, before October 1, 1990, a 
                        grant from the Agency for activities 
                        under this Act which included a 
                        requirement for cost sharing by 
                        matching such grant, any grant obtained 
                        from the Agency for activities under 
                        subparagraph (A)(i) after such date 
                        shall not include a requirement for 
                        cost sharing in an amount greater than 
                        50 percent of the cost of the project 
                        for which the grant is made.
                          [(ii) In the case of any State which 
                        has not received, before October 1, 
                        1990, a grant from the Agency for 
                        activities under this Act which 
                        included a requirement for cost sharing 
                        by matching such grant, any grant 
                        obtained from the Agency for activities 
                        under subparagraph (A)(i) after such 
                        date--
                                  [(I) shall not include a 
                                requirement for cost sharing 
                                for the first fiscal year of 
                                such a grant;
                                  [(II) shall not include a 
                                requirement for cost sharing in 
                                an amount greater than 25 
                                percent of the cost of the 
                                project for which the grant is 
                                made for the second fiscal year 
                                of such grant, and an cost 
                                sharing requirement may be 
                                satisfied through in-kind 
                                contributions;
                                  [(III) shall not include a 
                                requirement for cost sharing in 
                                an amount greater than 35 
                                percent of the cost of the 
                                project for which the grant is 
                                made for the third fiscal year 
                                of such grant, and any cost 
                                sharing requirement may be 
                                satisfied through in-kind 
                                contributions; and
                                  [(IV) shall not include a 
                                requirement for cost sharing in 
                                an amount greater than 50 
                                percent of the cost of the 
                                project for which the grant is 
                                made for the fourth and 
                                subsequent fiscal years of such 
                                grant.
          [(3) United States Geological Survey.--The United 
        States Geological Survey shall conduct research and 
        other activities necessary to characterize and identify 
        earthquake hazards, assess earthquake risks, monitor 
        seismic activity, and improve earthquake predictions. 
        In carrying out this paragraph, the Director of the 
        United States Geological Survey shall--
                  [(A) conduct a systematic assessment of the 
                seismic risks in each region of the Nation 
                prone to earthquakes, including, where 
                appropriate, the establishment and operation of 
                intensive monitoring projects on hazardous 
                faults, seismic microzonation studies in urban 
                and other developed areas where earthquake risk 
                is determined to be significant, and 
                engineering seismology studies;
                  [(B) work with officials of State and local 
                governments to ensure that they are 
                knowledgeable about the specific seismic risks 
                in their areas;
                  [(C) develop standard procedures, in 
                consultation with the Director of the Federal 
                Emergency Management Agency and the Director of 
                the National Institute of Standards and 
                Technology, for issuing earthquake predictions, 
                including aftershock advisories;
                  [(D) issue when necessary, and notify the 
                Director of the Federal Emergency Management 
                Agency and the Director of the National 
                Institute of Standards and Technology of, an 
                earthquake prediction or other earthquake 
                advisory, which may be evaluated by the 
                National Earthquake Prediction Evaluation 
                Council, which shall be exempt from the 
                requirements of section 10(a)(2) of the Federal 
                Advisory Committee Act when meeting for such 
                purposes;
                    [(E) operate, using the National Earthquake 
                Information Center, a forum for the 
                international exchange of earthquake 
                information which shall--
                          [(i) promote the exchange of 
                        information on earthquake research and 
                        earthquake preparedness between the 
                        United States and other nations;
                          [(ii) maintain a library containing 
                        selected reports, research papers, and 
                        data produced through the Program;
                          [(iii) answer requests from other 
                        nations for information on United 
                        States earthquake research and 
                        earthquake preparedness programs; and
                          [(iv) direct foreign requests to the 
                        agency involved in the Program which is 
                        best able to respond to the request;
                  [(F) operate a National Seismic System;
                  [(G) support regional seismic networks, which 
                shall complement the National Seismic Network; 
                and
                  [(H) work with the National Science 
                Foundation, the Federal Emergency Management 
                Agency, and the National Institute of Standards 
                and Technology to develop a comprehensive plan 
                for earthquake engineering research to 
                effectively use existing testing facilities and 
                laboratories (in existence at the time of the 
                development of the plan), upgrade facilities 
                and equipment as needed, and integrate new, 
                innovative testing approaches to the research 
                infrastructure in a systematic manner.
                  [(I) work with other Program agencies to 
                coordinate Program activities with similar 
                earthquake hazards reduction efforts in other 
                countries, to ensure that the Program benefits 
                from relevant information and advances in those 
                countries; and
                  [(J) maintain suitable seismic hazard maps in 
                support of building codes for structures and 
                lifelines, including additional maps needed for 
                performance-based design approaches.
          [(4) National Science Foundation.--The National 
        Science Foundation shall be responsible for funding 
        research on earth sciences to improve the understanding 
        of the causes and behavior of earthquakes, on 
        earthquake engineering, and on human response to 
        earthquakes. In carrying out this paragraph, the 
        Director of the National Science Foundation shall--
                  [(A) encourage prompt dissemination of 
                significant findings, sharing of data, samples, 
                physical collections, and other supporting 
                materials, and development of intellectual 
                property so research results can be used by 
                appropriate organizations to mitigate 
                earthquake damage;
                  [(B) in addition to supporting individual 
                investigators, support university research 
                consortia and centers for research in 
                geosciences and in earthquake engineering;
                  [(C) work closely with the United States 
                Geological Survey to identify geographic 
                regions of national concern that should be the 
                focus of targeted solicitations for earthquake-
                related research proposals;
                  [(D) support research that improves the 
                safety and performance of buildings, 
                structures, and lifeline systems using large-
                scale experimental and computational facilities 
                of the George E. Brown Jr. Network for 
                Earthquake Engineering Simulation and other 
                institutions engaged in research and the 
                implementation of the National Earthquake 
                Hazards Reduction Program;
                  [(E) emphasize, in earthquake engineering 
                research, development of economically feasible 
                methods to retrofit existing buildings and to 
                protect lifelines to mitigate earthquake 
                damage;
                  [(F) support research that studies the 
                political, economic, and social factors that 
                influence the implementation of hazard 
                reduction measures;
                  [(G) include to the maximum extent 
                practicable diverse institutions, including 
                Historically Black Colleges and Universities 
                and those serving large proportions of 
                Hispanics, Native Americans, Asian-Pacific 
                Americans, and other underrepresented 
                populations; and
                  [(H) develop, in conjunction with the Federal 
                Emergency Management Agency, the National 
                Institute of Standards and Technology, and the 
                United States Geological Survey, a 
                comprehensive plan for earthquake engineering 
                research to effectively use existing testing 
                facilities and laboratories (in existence at 
                the time of the development of the plan), 
                upgrade facilities and equipment as needed, and 
                integrate new, innovative testing approaches to 
                the research infrastructure in a systematic 
                manner.
          [(5) National Institute of Standards and 
        Technology.--In addition to the lead agency 
        responsibilities described under paragraph (1), the 
        National Institute of Standards and Technology shall be 
        responsible for carrying out research and development 
        to improve building codes and standards and practices 
        for structures and lifelines. In carrying out this 
        paragraph, the Director of the National Institute of 
        Standards and Technology shall--
                  [(A) work closely with national standards and 
                model building code organizations, in 
                conjunction with the Agency, to promote the 
                implementation of research results;
                  [(B) promote better building practices among 
                architects and engineers;
                  [(C) work closely with national standards 
                organizations to develop seismic safety 
                standards and practices for new and existing 
                lifelines;
                  [(D) support the development and commercial 
                application of cost effective and affordable 
                performance-based seismic engineering by 
                providing technical support for seismic 
                engineering practices and related building 
                code, standards, and practices development; and
                  [(E) work with the National Science 
                Foundation, the Federal Emergency Management 
                Agency, and the United States Geological Survey 
                to develop a comprehensive plan for earthquake 
                engineering research to effectively use 
                existing testing facilities and laboratories 
                (in existence at the time of the development of 
                the plan), upgrade facilities and equipment as 
                needed, and integrate new, innovative testing 
                approaches to the research infrastructure in a 
                systematic manner.]
  (b) Responsibilities of Program Agencies.--
          (1) Lead agency.--The National Institute of Standards 
        and Technology (in this section referred to as the 
        ``Institute'') shall be responsible for planning and 
        coordinating the Program. In carrying out this 
        paragraph, the Director of the Institute shall--
                  (A) ensure that the Program includes the 
                necessary components to promote the 
                implementation of earthquake hazards risk 
                reduction measures by households, businesses, 
                communities, local, State, and Federal 
                governments, national standards and model 
                building code organizations, architects and 
                engineers, building owners, and others with a 
                role in preparing for disasters, or the 
                planning, constructing, retrofitting, and 
                insuring of buildings, structures, and 
                lifelines;
                  (B) support the development of performance-
                based seismic engineering tools, and work with 
                the appropriate groups to promote the 
                commercial application of such tools, through 
                earthquake-related building codes, standards, 
                and construction practices;
                  (C) ensure the use of social science research 
                and findings in informing research and 
                technology development priorities, 
                communicating earthquake risks to the public, 
                developing earthquake risk mitigation 
                strategies, and preparing for earthquake 
                disasters;
                  (D) coordinate all Federal post-earthquake 
                investigations; and
                  (E) when warranted by research or 
                investigative findings, issue recommendations 
                for changes in model codes to the relevant code 
                development organizations, and report back to 
                Congress on whether such recommendations were 
                adopted.
          (2) National Institute of Standards and Technology.--
        In addition to the lead agency responsibilities 
        described under paragraph (1), the Institute shall be 
        responsible for carrying out research and development 
        to improve building codes and standards and practices 
        for buildings, structures, and lifelines. In carrying 
        out this paragraph, the Director of the Institute 
        shall--
                  (A) work, in conjunction with other 
                appropriate Federal agencies, to support the 
                development of improved seismic standards and 
                model codes;
                  (B) in coordination with other appropriate 
                Federal agencies, work closely with standards 
                and model code development organizations, 
                professional societies, and practicing 
                engineers, architects, and others involved in 
                the construction of buildings, structures, and 
                lifelines, to promote better building 
                practices, including by--
                          (i) developing technical resources 
                        for practitioners on new knowledge and 
                        standards of practice; and
                          (ii) developing methods and tools to 
                        facilitate the incorporation of 
                        earthquake engineering principles into 
                        design and construction practices;
                  (C) develop tools, technologies, methods, and 
                practitioner guidance to feasibly and cost-
                effectively retrofit existing buildings and 
                structures to increase their earthquake 
                resiliency; and
                  (D) work closely with national standards 
                organizations, and other interested parties, to 
                develop seismic safety standards and practices 
                for new and existing lifelines.
          (3) Federal Emergency Management Agency.--
                  (A) In general.--The Federal Emergency 
                Management Agency (in this paragraph referred 
                to as the ``Agency''), consistent with the 
                Agency's all hazards approach, shall be 
                responsible for facilitating the development 
                and adoption of standards, model building 
                codes, and better seismic building practices, 
                developing tools to assess earthquake hazards, 
                promoting the adoption of hazard mitigation 
                measures, and carrying out a program of direct 
                assistance to States and localities to mitigate 
                earthquake risks to buildings, structures, 
                lifelines, and communities.
                  (B) Director's duties.--The Director of the 
                Agency shall--
                          (i) work closely with other relevant 
                        Federal agencies, standards and model 
                        building code development 
                        organizations, architects, engineers, 
                        and other professionals, to facilitate 
                        the development and adoption of 
                        standards, model codes, and design and 
                        construction practices to increase the 
                        earthquake resiliency of new and 
                        existing buildings, structures, and 
                        lifelines in the--
                                  (I) preparation, maintenance, 
                                and wide dissemination of 
                                design guidance, model building 
                                codes and standards, and 
                                practices to increase the 
                                earthquake resiliency of new 
                                and existing buildings, 
                                structures, and lifelines;
                                  (II) development of 
                                performance based design 
                                guidelines and methodologies 
                                supporting model codes for 
                                buildings, structures, and 
                                lifelines; and
                                  (III) development of methods 
                                and tools to facilitate the 
                                incorporation of earthquake 
                                engineering principles into 
                                design and construction 
                                practices;
                          (ii) develop tools, technologies, and 
                        methods to assist local planners, and 
                        others, to model and predict the 
                        potential impact of earthquake damage 
                        in seismically hazardous areas; and
                          (iii) support the implementation of a 
                        comprehensive earthquake education and 
                        public awareness program, including the 
                        development of materials and their wide 
                        dissemination to all appropriate 
                        audiences, and support public access to 
                        locality-specific information that may 
                        assist the public in preparing for, 
                        mitigating against, responding to, and 
                        recovering from earthquakes and related 
                        disasters.
                  (C) State assistance grant program.--The 
                Director of the Agency shall operate a program 
                of grants and assistance to enable States to 
                develop mitigation, preparedness, and response 
                plans, compare inventories and conduct seismic 
                safety inspections of critical structures and 
                lifelines, update building and zoning codes and 
                ordinances to enhance seismic safety, increase 
                earthquake awareness and education, and 
                encourage the development of multistate groups 
                for such purposes. The Director shall operate 
                such programs in coordination with the all 
                hazards mitigation and preparedness programs 
                authorized by the Robert T. Stafford Disaster 
                Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 
                5121 et seq.), in order to ensure that such 
                programs are as consistent as possible. In 
                order to qualify for assistance under this 
                subparagraph, a State must--
                          (i) demonstrate that the assistance 
                        will result in enhanced seismic safety 
                        in the State;
                          (ii) provide 50 percent of the costs 
                        of the activities for which assistance 
                        is being given, except that the 
                        Director may lower or waive the cost-
                        share requirement for these activities 
                        in exceptional cases of economic 
                        hardship; and
                          (iii) meet such other requirements as 
                        the Director of the Agency shall 
                        prescribe.
                  (D) Federal Emergency Management Agency role 
                and responsibility.--Nothing in this Act shall 
                be construed to diminish the role and 
                responsibility of the Federal Emergency 
                Management Agency with regard to all hazards 
                preparedness, response, recovery, and 
                mitigation.
          (4) United States Geological Survey.--The United 
        States Geological Survey (in this paragraph referred to 
        as the ``Survey'') shall conduct research and other 
        activities necessary to characterize and identify 
        earthquake hazards, assess earthquake risks, monitor 
        seismic activity, and provide real-time earthquake 
        information. In carrying out this paragraph, the 
        Director of the Survey shall--
                  (A) conduct a systematic assessment of the 
                seismic risks in each region of the Nation 
                prone to earthquakes, including, where 
                appropriate, the establishment and operation of 
                intensive monitoring projects on hazardous 
                faults, detailed seismic hazard and risk 
                studies in urban and other developed areas 
                where earthquake risk is determined to be 
                significant, and engineering seismology 
                studies;
                  (B) work with officials of State and local 
                governments to ensure that they are 
                knowledgeable about the specific seismic risks 
                in their areas;
                  (C) develop standard procedures, in 
                consultation with the Director of the Federal 
                Emergency Management Agency, for issuing 
                earthquake alerts, including aftershock 
                advisories, and, to the extent possible, ensure 
                that such alerts are compatible with the 
                Integrated Public Alerts and Warning System 
                program authorized by section 202 of the Robert 
                T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency 
                Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5132);
                  (D) issue when justified, and notify the 
                Director of the Federal Emergency Management 
                Agency of, an earthquake prediction or other 
                earthquake advisory, which may be evaluated by 
                the National Earthquake Prediction Evaluation 
                Council;
                  (E) operate, as integral parts of the 
                Advanced National Seismic Research and 
                Monitoring System, a National Earthquake 
                Information Center and a national seismic 
                network, together providing timely and accurate 
                information on earthquakes world-wide;
                  (F) support the operation of regional seismic 
                networks in areas of higher seismic risk;
                  (G) develop and support seismic 
                instrumentation of buildings and other 
                structures to obtain data on their response to 
                earthquakes for use in engineering studies and 
                assessment of damage;
                  (H) monitor and assess Earth surface 
                deformation as it pertains to the evaluation of 
                earthquake hazards and impacts;
                  (I) work with other Program agencies to 
                maintain awareness of, and where appropriate 
                cooperate with, earthquake risk reduction 
                efforts in other countries, to ensure that the 
                Program benefits from relevant information and 
                advances in those countries;
                  (J) maintain suitable seismic hazard maps in 
                support of building codes for structures and 
                lifelines, including additional maps needed for 
                performance-based design approaches, and, to 
                the extent possible, ensure that such maps are 
                developed consistent with the multihazard 
                advisory maps authorized by section 203(k) of 
                the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and 
                Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5133(k));
                  (K) conduct a competitive, peer-reviewed 
                process which awards grants and cooperative 
                agreements to complement and extend related 
                internal Survey research and monitoring 
                activities; and
                  (L) operate, in cooperation with the National 
                Science Foundation, a Global Seismographic 
                Network for detection of earthquakes around the 
                world and research into fundamental earth 
                processes.
          (5) National Science Foundation.--The National 
        Science Foundation shall be responsible for funding 
        basic research that furthers the understanding of 
        earthquakes, earthquake engineering, and community 
        preparation and response to earthquakes. In carrying 
        out this paragraph, the Director of the National 
        Science Foundation shall--
                  (A) support multidisciplinary and 
                interdisciplinary research that will improve 
                the resiliency of communities to earthquakes, 
                including--
                          (i) research that improves the safety 
                        and performance of buildings, 
                        structures, and lifelines, including 
                        the use of the largescale experimental 
                        and computational facilities of the 
                        George E. Brown, Jr. Network for 
                        Engineering Earthquake Simulation;
                          (ii) research to support more 
                        effective earthquake mitigation and 
                        response measures, such as developing 
                        better knowledge of the specific types 
                        of vulnerabilities faced by segments of 
                        the community vulnerable to 
                        earthquakes, addressing the barriers 
                        they face in adopting mitigation and 
                        preparation measures, and developing 
                        methods to better communicate the risks 
                        of earthquakes and to promote 
                        mitigation; and
                          (iii) research on the response of 
                        communities, households, businesses, 
                        and emergency responders to 
                        earthquakes;
                  (B) support research to understand earthquake 
                processes, earthquake patterns, and earthquake 
                frequencies;
                  (C) encourage prompt dissemination of 
                significant findings, sharing of data, samples, 
                physical collections, and other supporting 
                materials, and development of intellectual 
                property so research results can be used by 
                appropriate organizations to mitigate 
                earthquake damage;
                  (D) work with other Program agencies to 
                maintain awareness of, and where appropriate 
                cooperate with, earthquake risk reduction 
                research efforts in other countries, to ensure 
                that the Program benefits from relevant 
                information and advances in those countries; 
                and
                  (E) include to the maximum extent practicable 
                diverse institutions, including Historically 
                Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-
                serving institutions, Tribal Colleges and 
                Universities, Alaska Native-serving 
                institutions, and Native Hawaiian-serving 
                institutions.
  (c) Budget Coordination.--
          (1) Guidance.--The Interagency Coordinating Committee 
        on Natural Hazards Risk Reduction established under 
        section 301 of the Natural Hazards Risk Reduction Act 
        of 2011 shall each year provide guidance to the other 
        Program agencies concerning the preparation of requests 
        for appropriations for activities related to the 
        Program, and shall prepare, in conjunction with the 
        other Program agencies, an annual Program budget to be 
        submitted to the Office of Management and Budget.
          (2) Reports.--Each Program agency shall include with 
        its annual request for appropriations submitted to the 
        Office of Management and Budget a report that--
                  (A) identifies each element of the proposed 
                Program activities of the agency;
                  (B) specifies how each of these activities 
                contributes to the Program; and
                  (C) states the portion of its request for 
                appropriations allocated to each element of the 
                Program.

SEC. 11. POST-EARTHQUAKE INVESTIGATIONS PROGRAM.

                           [42 U.S.C. 7705e]

  [There is established within the United States Geological 
Survey a post-earthquake investigations program, the purpose of 
which is to investigate major earthquakes, so as to learn 
lessons which can be applied to reduce the loss of lives and 
property in future earthquakes. The United States Geological 
Survey, in consultation with each Program agency, shall 
organize investigations to study the implications of the 
earthquake in the areas of responsibility of each Program 
agency. The investigations shall begin as rapidly as possible 
and may be conducted by grantees and contractors. The Program 
agencies shall ensure that the results of investigations are 
disseminated widely. The Director of the Survey is authorized 
to utilize earthquake expertise from the Agency, the National 
Science Foundation, the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology, other Federal agencies, and private contractors, on 
a reimbursable basis, in the conduct of such earthquake 
investigations.] The Program shall include a post-earthquake 
investigations program, the purpose of which is to investigate 
major earthquakes so as to learn lessons which can be applied 
to reduce the loss of lives and property in future earthquakes. 
The lead Program agency, in consultation with each Program 
agency, shall organize investigations to study the implications 
of the earthquakes in the areas of responsibility of each 
Program agency. The investigations shall begin as rapidly as 
possible and may be conducted by grantees and contractors. The 
Program agencies shall ensure that the results of the 
investigations are disseminated widely. At a minimum, 
investigations under this section shall include--
          (1) analysis by the National Science Foundation and 
        the United States Geological Survey of the causes of 
        the earthquake and the nature of the resulting ground 
        motion;
          (2) analysis by the National Science Foundation and 
        the National Institute of Standards and Technology of 
        the behavior of structures and lifelines, both those 
        that were damaged and those that were undamaged; and
          (3) analysis by each of the Program agencies of the 
        effectiveness of the earthquake hazards mitigation 
        programs and actions relating to its area of 
        responsibility under the Program, and how those 
        programs and actions could be strengthened.

SEC. 12. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

                            [42 U.S.C. 7706]

  (a) General Authorization For The Program.--
          (1) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        President to carry out the provisions of sections 5 and 
        6 of this Act (in addition to any authorizations for 
        similar purposes included in other Acts and the 
        authorizations set forth in subsections (b) and (c) of 
        this section), not to exceed $1,000,000 for the fiscal 
        year ending September 30, 1978, not to exceed 
        $2,000,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
        1979, and not to exceed $2,000,000 for the fiscal year 
        ending September 30, 1980.
          (2) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        Director to carry out the provisions of sections 5 and 
        6 of this Act for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
        1981--
                  (A) $1,000,000 for continuation of the 
                Interagency Committee on Seismic Safety in 
                Construction and the Building Seismic Safety 
                Council programs,
                  (B) $1,500,000 for plans and preparedness for 
                earthquake disasters,
                  (C) $500,000 for prediction response 
                planning,
                  (D) $600,000 for architectural and 
                engineering planning and practice programs,
                  (E) $1,000,000 for development and 
                application of a public education program,
                  (F) $3,000,000 for use by the National 
                Science Foundation in addition to the amount 
                authorized to be appropriated under subsection 
                (c), which amount includes $2,400,000 for 
                earthquake policy research and $600,000 for the 
                strong ground motion element of the siting 
                program, and
                  (G) $1,000,000 for use by the Center for 
                Building Technology, National Bureau of 
                Standards in addition to the amount authorized 
                to be appropriated under subsection (d) for 
                earthquake activities in the Center.
          (3) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        Director for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1982, 
        $2,000,000 to carry out the provisions of sections 5 
        and 6 of this Act.
          (4) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        Director, to carry out the provisions of sections 5 and 
        6 of this Act, $1,281,000 for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1983.
          (5) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        Director, to carry out the provisions of sections 5 and 
        6 of this Act, for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
        1984, $3,705,000, and for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1985, $6,096,000.
          (6) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        Director, to carry out the provisions of sections 5 and 
        6 of this Act, for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
        1986, $5,596,000, and for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1987, $5,848,000.
          (7) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        Director of the Agency, to carry out this Act 
        $5,778,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
        1988, $5,788,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1989, $8,798,000 for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1990, $14,750,000 for the fiscal year 
        ending September 30, 1991, $19,000,000 for the fiscal 
        year ending September 30, 1992, $22,000,000 for the 
        fiscal year ending September 30, 1993, $25,000,000 for 
        the fiscal year ending September 30, 1995, $25,750,000 
        for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1996, 
        $20,900,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
        1998, $21,500,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1999; $19,861,000 for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 2001, of which $450,000 is for National 
        Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program-eligible efforts of 
        an established multi-state consortium to reduce the 
        unacceptable threat of earthquake damages in the New 
        Madrid seismic region through efforts to enhance 
        preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation; 
        $20,705,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
        2002; and $21,585,000 for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 2003.
          (8) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        Federal Emergency Management Agency for carrying out 
        this title--
                  (A) $21,000,000 for fiscal year 2005,
                  (B) $21,630,000 for fiscal year 2006,
                  (C) $22,280,000 for fiscal year 2007,
                  (D) $22,950,000 for fiscal year 2008, and
                  (E) $23,640,000 for fiscal year 2009,of which 
                not less than 10 percent of available program 
                funds actually appropriated shall be made 
                available each such fiscal year for supporting 
                the development of performance-based, cost-
                effective, and affordable design guidelines and 
                methodologies in codes for buildings, 
                structures, and lifelines.
          (9) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        Federal Emergency Management Agency for carrying out 
        this Act--
                  (A) $10,238,000 for fiscal year 2011;
                  (B) $10,545,000 for fiscal year 2012;
                  (C) $10,861,000 for fiscal year 2013;
                  (D) $11,187,000 for fiscal year 2014; and
                  (E) $11,523,000 for fiscal year 2015.
  (b) Geological Survey.--
          (1) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        Secretary of the Interior for purposes of carrying out, 
        through the Director of the United States Geological 
        Survey, the responsibilities that may be assigned to 
        the Director under this Act not to exceed $27,500,000 
        for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1978; not to 
        exceed $35,000,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1979; not to exceed $40,000,000 for the fiscal year 
        ending September 30, 1980; $32,484,000 for the fiscal 
        year ending September 30, 1981; $34,425,000 for the 
        fiscal year ending September 30, 1982; $31,843,000 for 
        the fiscal year ending September 30, 1983; $35,524,000 
        for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1984; 
        $37,300,200 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
        1985[;] $35,578,000 for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1986; $37,179,000 for the fiscal year 
        ending September 30, 1987; $38,540,000 for the fiscal 
        year ending September 30, 1988; $41,819,000 for the 
        fiscal year ending September 30, 1989; $55,283,000 for 
        the fiscal year ending September 30, 1990, of which 
        $8,000,000 shall be for earthquake investigations under 
        section 11; $50,000,000 for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1991; $54,500,000 for the fiscal year 
        ending September 30, 1992; $62,500,000 for the fiscal 
        year ending September 30, 1993; $49,200,000 for the 
        fiscal year ending September 30, 1995; $50,676,000 for 
        the fiscal year ending September 30, 1996; $52,565,000 
        for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1998, of which 
        $3,800,000 shall be used for the Global Seismic Network 
        operated by the Agency; and $54,052,000 for the fiscal 
        year ending September 30, 1999, of which $3,800,000 
        shall be used for the Global Seismic Network operated 
        by the Agency. There are authorized to be appropriated 
        to the Secretary of the Interior for purposes of 
        carrying out, through the Director of the United States 
        Geological Survey, the responsibilities that may be 
        assigned to the Director under this Act $48,360,000 for 
        fiscal year 2001, of which $3,500,000 is for the Global 
        Seismic Network and $100,000 is for the Scientific 
        Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee established under 
        section 210 of the Earthquake Hazards Reduction 
        Authorization Act of 2000; $50,415,000 for fiscal year 
        2002, of which $3,600,000 is for the Global Seismic 
        Network and $100,000 is for the Scientific Earthquake 
        Studies Advisory Committee; and $52,558,000 for fiscal 
        year 2003, of which $3,700,000 is for the Global 
        Seismic Network and $100,000 is for the Scientific 
        Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee. Of the amounts 
        authorized to be appropriated under this paragraph, at 
        least--
                  (A) $8,000,000 of the amount authorized to be 
                appropriated for the fiscal year ending 
                September 30, 1998;
                  (B) $8,250,000 of the amount authorized for 
                the fiscal year ending September 30, 1999;
                  (C) $9,000,000 of the amount authorized to be 
                appropriated for fiscal year 2001;
                  (D) $9,250,000 of the amount authorized to be 
                appropriated for fiscal year 2002; and
                  (E) $9,500,000 of the amount authorized to be 
                appropriated for fiscal year 2003,shall be used 
                for carrying out a competitive, peer-reviewed 
                program under which the Director, in close 
                coordination with and as a complement to 
                related activities of the United States 
                Geological Survey, awards grants to, or enters 
                into cooperative agreements with, State and 
                local governments and persons or entities from 
                the academic community and the private sector.
          (2) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        United States Geological Survey for carrying out this 
        title--
                  (A) $77,000,000 for fiscal year 2005, of 
                which not less than $30,000,000 shall be made 
                available for completion of the Advanced 
                National Seismic Research and Monitoring System 
                established under section 13;
                  (B) $84,410,000 for fiscal year 2006, of 
                which not less than $36,000,000 shall be made 
                available for completion of the Advanced 
                National Seismic Research and Monitoring System 
                established under section 13;
                  (C) $85,860,000 for fiscal year 2007, of 
                which not less than $36,000,000 shall be made 
                available for completion of the Advanced 
                National Seismic Research and Monitoring System 
                established under section 13;
                  (D) $87,360,000 for fiscal year 2008, of 
                which not less than $36,000,000 shall be made 
                available for completion of the Advanced 
                National Seismic Research and Monitoring System 
                established under section 13; and
                  (E) $88,900,000 for fiscal year 2009, of 
                which not less than $36,000,000 shall be made 
                available for completion of the Advanced 
                National Seismic Research and Monitoring System 
                established under section 13.
          (3) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        United States Geological Survey for carrying out this 
        Act--
                  (A) $90,000,000 for fiscal year 2011, of 
                which $36,000,000 shall be made available for 
                completion of the Advanced National Seismic 
                Research and Monitoring System;
                  (B) $92,100,000 for fiscal year 2012, of 
                which $37,000,000 shall be made available for 
                completion of the Advanced National Seismic 
                Research and Monitoring System;
                  (C) $94,263,000 for fiscal year 2013, of 
                which $38,000,000 shall be made available for 
                completion of the Advanced National Seismic 
                Research and Monitoring System;
                  (D) $96,491,000 for fiscal year 2014, of 
                which $39,000,000 shall be made available for 
                completion of the Advanced National Seismic 
                Research and Monitoring System; and
                  (E) $98,786,000 for fiscal year 2015, of 
                which $40,000,000 shall be made available for 
                completion of the Advanced National Seismic 
                Research and Monitoring System.
  (c) National Science Foundation.--
          (1) To enable the Foundation to carry out 
        responsibilities that may be assigned to it under this 
        Act, there are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        Foundation not to exceed $27,500,000 for the fiscal 
        year ending September 30, 1978; not to exceed 
        $35,000,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
        1979; not to exceed $40,000,000 for the fiscal year 
        ending September 30, 1980; $26,600,000 for the fiscal 
        year ending September 30, 1981; $27,150,000 for the 
        fiscal year ending September 30, 1982; $25,000,000 for 
        the fiscal year ending September 30, 1983; $25,800,000 
        for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1984; 
        $28,665,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
        1985[;] $27,760,000 for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1986; $29,009,000 for the fiscal year 
        ending September 30, 1987; $28,235,000 for the fiscal 
        year ending September 30, 1988; $31,634,000 for the 
        fiscal year ending September 30, 1989; $38,454,000 for 
        the fiscal year ending September 30, 1990. Of the 
        amounts authorized for Engineering under section 
        101(d)(1)(B) of the National Science Foundation 
        Authorization Act of 1988, $24,000,000 is authorized 
        for carrying out this Act for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1991, and of the amounts authorized for 
        Geosciences under section 101(d)(1)(D) of the National 
        Science Foundation Authorization Act of 1988, 
        $13,000,000 is authorized for carrying out this Act for 
        the fiscal year ending September 30, 1991. Of the 
        amounts authorized for Research and Related Activities 
        under section 101(e)(1) of the National Science 
        Foundation Authorization Act of 1988, $29,000,000 is 
        authorized for engineering research under this Act, and 
        $14,750,000 is authorized for geosciences research 
        under this Act, for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1992. Of the amounts authorized for Research and 
        Related Activities under section 101(f)(1) of the 
        National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 1988, 
        $34,500,000 is authorized for engineering research 
        under this Act, and $17,500,000 is authorized for 
        geosciences research under this Act, for the fiscal 
        year ending September 30, 1993. There are authorized to 
        be appropriated, out of funds otherwise authorized to 
        be appropriated to the National Science Foundation: (1) 
        $16,200,000 for engineering research and $10,900,000 
        for geosciences research for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1995, (2) $16,686,000 for engineering 
        research and $11,227,000 for geosciences research for 
        the fiscal year ending September 30, 1996, (3) 
        $18,450,000 for engineering research and $11,920,000 
        for geosciences research for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1998, (4) $19,000,000 for engineering 
        research and $12,280,000 for geosciences research for 
        the fiscal year ending September 30, 1999. There are 
        authorized to be appropriated to the National Science 
        Foundation $19,000,000 for engineering research and 
        $11,900,000 for geosciences research for fiscal year 
        2001; $19,808,000 for engineering research and 
        $12,406,000 for geosciences research for fiscal year 
        2002; and $20,650,000 for engineering research and 
        $12,933,000 for geosciences research for fiscal year 
        2003.
          (2) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        National Science Foundation for carrying out this 
        title--
                  (A) $38,000,000 for fiscal year 2005;
                  (B) $39,140,000 for fiscal year 2006;
                  (C) $40,310,000 for fiscal year 2007;
                  (D) $41,520,000 for fiscal year 2008; and
                  (E) $42,770,000 for fiscal year 2009.
          (3) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        National Science Foundation for carrying out this Act--
                  (A) $64,125,000 for fiscal year 2011;
                  (B) $66,049,000 for fiscal year 2012;
                  (C) $68,030,000 for fiscal year 2013;
                  (D) $70,071,000 for fiscal year 2014; and
                  (E) $72,173,000 for fiscal year 2015.
  (d) National Institute of Standards and Technology.--
          (1) To enable the National Institute of Standards and 
        Technology to carry out responsibilities that may be 
        assigned to it under this Act, there are authorized to 
        be appropriated $425,000 for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1981; $425,000 for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1982; $475,000 for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1983; $475,000 for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1984; $498,750 for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1985[;] $499,000 for the fiscal year 
        ending September 30, 1986; $521,000 for the fiscal year 
        ending September 30, 1987; $525,000 for the fiscal year 
        ending September 30, 1988; $525,000 for the fiscal year 
        ending September 30, 1989; $2,525,000 for the fiscal 
        year ending September 30, 1990; $1,000,000 for the 
        fiscal year ending September 30, 1991; $3,000,000 for 
        the fiscal year ending September 30, 1992; and 
        $4,750,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
        1993. There are authorized to be appropriated, out of 
        funds otherwise authorized to be appropriated to the 
        National Institute of Standards and Technology, 
        $1,900,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
        1995, $1,957,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1996, $2,000,000 for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1998, $2,060,000 for the fiscal year 
        ending September 30, 1999, $2,332,000 for fiscal year 
        2001, $2,431,000 for fiscal year 2002, and $2,534,300 
        for fiscal year 2003.
          (2) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        National Institute of Standards and Technology for 
        carrying out this title--
                  (A) $10,000,000 for fiscal year 2005,
                  (B) $11,000,000 for fiscal year 2006,
                  (C) $12,100,000 for fiscal year 2007,
                  (D) $13,310,000 for fiscal year 2008, and
                  (E) $14,640,000 for fiscal year 2009, of 
                which $2,000,000 shall be made available each 
                such fiscal year for supporting the development 
                of performance-based, cost-effective, and 
                affordable codes for buildings, structures, and 
                lifelines.
          (3) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        National Institute of Standards and Technology for 
        carrying out this Act--
                  (A) $7,000,000 for fiscal year 2011;
                  (B) $7,700,000 for fiscal year 2012;
                  (C) $7,931,000 for fiscal year 2013;
                  (D) $8,169,000 for fiscal year 2014; and
                  (E) $8,414,000 for fiscal year 2015.
  (e), (f) [Repealed]

SEC. 14. NETWORK FOR EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING SIMULATION.

                            [42 U.S.C. 7708]

  [(a) Establishment.--]The Director of the National Science 
Foundation shall establish the George E. Brown, Jr. Network for 
Earthquake Engineering Simulation that will upgrade, link, and 
integrate a system of geographically distributed experimental 
facilities for earthquake engineering testing of full-sized 
structures and their components and partial-scale physical 
models. The system shall be integrated through networking 
software so that integrated models and databases can be used to 
create model-based simulation, and the components of the system 
shall be interconnected with a computer network and allow for 
remote access, information sharing, and collaborative research.
  [(b) Authorization of Appropriations.--In addition to amounts 
appropriated under section 12(c), there are authorized to be 
appropriated to the National Science Foundation for the George 
E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation--
          [(1) $28,200,000 for fiscal year 2001;
          [(2) $24,400,000 for fiscal year 2002;
          [(3) $4,500,000 for fiscal year 2003;
          [(4) $17,000,000 for fiscal year 2004;
          [(5) $20,000,000 for fiscal year 2005, all of which 
        shall be available for operations and maintenance;
          [(6) $20,400,000 for fiscal year 2006, all of which 
        shall be available for operations and maintenance;
          [(7) $20,870,000 for fiscal year 2007, all of which 
        shall be available for operations and maintenance;
          [(8) $21,390,000 for fiscal year 2008, all of which 
        shall be available for operations and maintenance; and
          [(9) $21,930,000 for fiscal year 2009, all of which 
        shall be available for operations and maintenance.]

            NATIONAL WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION ACT OF 2004

[SEC. 202. FINDINGS.

                           [42 U.S.C. 15701]

  [The Congress finds the following:
          [(1) Hurricanes, tropical storms, tornadoes, and 
        thunderstorms can cause significant loss of life, 
        injury, destruction of property, and economic and 
        social disruption. All States and regions are 
        vulnerable to these hazards.
          [(2) The United States currently sustains several 
        billion dollars in economic damages each year due to 
        these windstorms. In recent decades, rapid development 
        and population growth in high-risk areas has greatly 
        increased overall vulnerability to windstorms.
          [(3) Improved windstorm impact reduction measures 
        have the potential to reduce these losses through--
                  [(A) cost-effective and affordable design and 
                construction methods and practices;
                  [(B) effective mitigation programs at the 
                local, State, and national level;
                  [(C) improved data collection and analysis 
                and impact prediction methodologies;
                  [(D) engineering research on improving new 
                structures and retrofitting existing ones to 
                better withstand windstorms, atmospheric-
                related research to better understand the 
                behavior and impact of windstorms on the built 
                environment, and subsequent application of 
                those research results; and
                  [(E) public education and outreach.
          [(4) There is an appropriate role for the Federal 
        Government in supporting windstorm impact reduction. An 
        effective Federal program in windstorm impact reduction 
        will require interagency coordination, and input from 
        individuals, academia, the private sector, and other 
        interested non-Federal entities.]

SEC. 202. PURPOSE.

  It is the purpose of the Congress in this title to achieve a 
major measurable reduction in losses of life and property from 
windstorms through the establishment and maintenance of an 
effective Windstorm Impact Reduction Program. The objectives of 
such Program shall include--
          (1) the education of households, businesses, and 
        communities about the risks posed by windstorms, and 
        the identification of locations, structures, lifelines, 
        and segments of the community which are especially 
        vulnerable to windstorm damage and disruption, and the 
        dissemination of information on methods to reduce those 
        risks;
          (2) the development of technologically and 
        economically feasible design and construction methods 
        and procedures to make new and existing structures, in 
        areas of windstorm risk, windstorm resilient, giving 
        high priority to the development of such methods and 
        procedures for lifelines, structures associated with a 
        potential high loss of life, and structures that are 
        especially needed in times of disasters, such as 
        hospitals and public safety and shelter facilities;
          (3) the implementation, in areas of major windstorm 
        risk, of instrumentation to record and gather data on 
        windstorms and the characteristics of the wind during 
        those events, and continued research to increase the 
        understanding of windstorm phenomena;
          (4) the development, publication, and promotion, in 
        conjunction with State and local officials and 
        professional organizations, of model building codes and 
        standards and other means to encourage consideration of 
        information about windstorm risk in making decisions 
        about land use policy and construction activity; and
          (5) the facilitation of the adoption of windstorm 
        risk mitigation measures in areas of windstorm risk by 
        households, businesses, and communities through 
        outreach, incentive programs, and other means.

SEC. 203. DEFINITIONS.

                           [42 U.S.C. 15702]

  In this title:
          (1) Director.--The term ``Director'' means the 
        [Director of the Office of Science and Technology 
        Policy] Director of the National Institute of Standards 
        and Technology.
          (2) Program.--The term ``Program'' means the National 
        Windstorm Impact Reduction Program established by 
        section 204(a).
          (3) State.--The term ``State'' means each of the 
        States of the United States, the District of Columbia, 
        the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the United States 
        Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth 
        of the Northern Mariana Islands, and any other 
        territory or possession of the United States.
          (4) Windstorm.--The term ``windstorm'' means any 
        storm with a damaging or destructive wind component, 
        such as a hurricane, tropical storm, tornado, or 
        thunderstorm.

[SEC. 204. NATIONAL WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION PROGRAM.

                           [42 U.S.C. 15703]

  [(a) Establishment.--There is established the National 
Windstorm Impact Reduction Program.
  [(b) Objective.--The objective of the Program is the 
achievement of major measurable reductions in losses of life 
and property from windstorms. The objective is to be achieved 
through a coordinated Federal effort, in cooperation with other 
levels of government, academia, and the private sector, aimed 
at improving the understanding of windstorms and their impacts 
and developing and encouraging implementation of cost-effective 
mitigation measures to reduce those impacts.
  [(c) Interagency Working Group.--Not later than 90 days after 
the date of enactment of this Act, the Director shall establish 
an Interagency Working Group consisting of representatives of 
the National Science Foundation, the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration, the National Institute of Standards 
and Technology, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and 
other Federal agencies as appropriate. The Director shall 
designate an agency to serve as Chair of the Working Group and 
be responsible for the planning, management, and coordination 
of the Program, including budget coordination. Specific agency 
roles and responsibilities under the Program shall be defined 
in the implementation plan required under subsection (e). 
General agency responsibilities shall include the following:
          [(1) The National Institute of Standards and 
        Technology shall support research and development to 
        improve building codes and standards and practices for 
        design and construction of buildings, structures, and 
        lifelines.
          [(2) The National Science Foundation shall support 
        research in engineering and the atmospheric sciences to 
        improve the understanding of the behavior of windstorms 
        and their impact on buildings, structures, and 
        lifelines.
          [(3) The National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
        Administration shall support atmospheric sciences 
        research to improve the understanding of the behavior 
        of windstorms and their impact on buildings, 
        structures, and lifelines.
          [(4) The Federal Emergency Management Agency shall 
        support the development of risk assessment tools and 
        effective mitigation techniques, windstorm-related data 
        collection and analysis, public outreach, information 
        dissemination, and implementation of mitigation 
        measures consistent with the Agency's all-hazards 
        approach.
  [(d) Program Components.--
          [(1) In general.--The Program shall consist of three 
        primary mitigation components: improved understanding 
        of windstorms, windstorm impact assessment, and 
        windstorm impact reduction. The components shall be 
        implemented through activities such as data collection 
        and analysis, risk assessment, outreach, technology 
        transfer, and research and development. To the extent 
        practicable, research activities authorized under this 
        title shall be peer-reviewed, and the components shall 
        be designed to be complementary to, and avoid 
        duplication of, other public and private hazard 
        reduction efforts.
          [(2) Understanding of windstorms.--Activities to 
        enhance the understanding of windstorms shall include 
        research to improve knowledge of and data collection on 
        the impact of severe wind on buildings, structures, and 
        infrastructure.
          [(3) Windstorm impact assessment.--Activities to 
        improve windstorm impact assessment shall include--
                  [(A) development of mechanisms for collecting 
                and inventorying information on the performance 
                of buildings, structures, and infrastructure in 
                windstorms and improved collection of pertinent 
                information from sources, including the design 
                and construction industry, insurance companies, 
                and building officials;
                  [(B) research, development, and technology 
                transfer to improve loss estimation and risk 
                assessment systems; and
                  [(C) research, development, and technology 
                transfer to improve simulation and 
                computational modeling of windstorm impacts.
          [(4) Windstorm impact reduction.--Activities to 
        reduce windstorm impacts shall include--
                  [(A) development of improved outreach and 
                implementation mechanisms to translate existing 
                information and research findings into cost-
                effective and affordable practices for design 
                and construction professionals, and State and 
                local officials;
                  [(B) development of cost-effective and 
                affordable windstorm-resistant systems, 
                structures, and materials for use in new 
                construction and retrofit of existing 
                construction; and
                  [(C) outreach and information dissemination 
                related to cost-effective and affordable 
                construction techniques, loss estimation and 
                risk assessment methodologies, and other 
                pertinent information regarding windstorm 
                phenomena to Federal, State, and local 
                officials, the construction industry, and the 
                general public.
  [(e) Implementation Plan.--Not later than 1 year after date 
of enactment of this title, the Interagency Working Group shall 
develop and transmit to the Congress an implementation plan for 
achieving the objectives of the Program. The plan shall 
include--
          [(1) an assessment of past and current public and 
        private efforts to reduce windstorm impacts, including 
        a comprehensive review and analysis of windstorm 
        mitigation activities supported by the Federal 
        Government;
          [(2) a description of plans for technology transfer 
        and coordination with natural hazard mitigation 
        activities supported by the Federal Government;
          [(3) a statement of strategic goals and priorities 
        for each Program component area;
          [(4) a description of how the Program will achieve 
        such goals, including detailed responsibilities for 
        each agency; and
          [(5) a description of plans for cooperation and 
        coordination with interested public and private sector 
        entities in each program component area.
  [(f) Biennial Report.--The Interagency Working Group shall, 
on a biennial basis, and not later than 180 days after the end 
of the preceding 2 fiscal years, transmit a report to the 
Congress describing the status of the windstorm impact 
reduction program, including progress achieved during the 
preceding two fiscal years. Each such report shall include any 
recommendations for legislative and other action the 
Interagency Working Group considers necessary and appropriate. 
In developing the biennial report, the Interagency Working 
Group shall consider the recommendations of the Advisory 
Committee established under section 205.]

SEC. 204. NATIONAL WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION PROGRAM.

  (a) Establishment.--There is established the National 
Windstorm Impact Reduction Program.
  (b) Program Activities.--The activities of the Program shall 
be designed to--
                  (1) research and develop cost-effective, 
                feasible methods, tools, and technologies to 
                reduce the risks posed by windstorms to the 
                built environment, especially to lessen the 
                risk to existing structures and lifelines;
                  (2) improve the understanding of windstorms 
                and their impacts on households, businesses, 
                communities, buildings, structures, and 
                lifelines, through interdisciplinary and 
                multidisciplinary research that involves 
                engineering, natural sciences, and social 
                sciences; and
                  (3) facilitate the adoption of windstorm risk 
                reduction measures by households, businesses, 
                communities, local, State and Federal 
                governments, national standards and model 
                building code organizations, architects and 
                engineers, building owners, and others with a 
                role in planning for disasters and planning, 
                constructing, retrofitting, and insuring 
                buildings, structures, and lifelines through--
                          (A) grants, contracts, cooperative 
                        agreements, and technical assistance;
                          (B) development of hazard maps, 
                        standards, guidelines, voluntary 
                        consensus standards, and other design 
                        guidance for windstorm risk reduction 
                        for buildings, structures, and 
                        lifelines;
                          (C) outreach and information 
                        dissemination to communities on site 
                        specific windstorm hazards and ways to 
                        reduce the risks from those hazards; 
                        and
                          (D) development and maintenance of a 
                        repository of information, including 
                        technical data, on windstorm hazards 
                        and risk reduction;
  (c) Responsibilities of Program Agencies.--
          (1) Lead agency.--The National Institute of Standards 
        and Technology (in this section referred to as the 
        ``Institute'') shall be responsible for planning and 
        coordinating the Program. In carrying out this 
        paragraph, the Director of the Institute shall--
                  (A) ensure that the Program includes the 
                necessary components to promote the 
                implementation of windstorm risk reduction 
                measures by households, businesses, 
                communities, local, State, and Federal 
                governments, national standards and model 
                building code organizations, architects and 
                engineers, building owners, and others with a 
                role in planning and preparing for disasters, 
                and planning constructing, and retrofitting, 
                and insuring buildings, structures, and 
                lifelines;
                  (B) support the development of performance-
                based engineering tools, and work with the 
                appropriate groups to promote the commercial 
                application of such tools, through wind-related 
                building codes, standards, and construction 
                practices;
                  (C) ensure the use of social science research 
                and findings in informing the development of 
                technology and research priorities, in 
                communicating windstorm risks to the public, in 
                developing windstorm risk mitigation 
                strategies, and in preparing for windstorm 
                disasters;
                  (D) coordinate all Federal post-windstorm 
                investigations; and
                  (E) when warranted by research or 
                investigative findings, issue recommendations 
                for changes in model codes to the relevant code 
                development organizations, and report back to 
                Congress on whether such recommendations were 
                adopted.
          (2) National Institute of Standards and Technology.--
        In addition to the lead agency responsibilities 
        described under paragraph (1), the Institute shall be 
        responsible for carrying out research and development 
        to improve model codes, standards, design guidance and 
        practices for the construction and retrofit of 
        buildings, structures, and lifelines. In carrying out 
        this paragraph, the Director of the Institute shall--
                  (A) support the development of 
                instrumentation, data processing, and archival 
                capabilities, and standards for the 
                instrumentation and its deployment, to measure 
                wind, wind loading, and other properties of 
                severe wind and structure response;
                  (B) coordinate with other appropriate Federal 
                agencies to make the data described in 
                subparagraph (A) available to researchers, 
                standards and code developers, and local 
                planners;
                  (C) support the development of tools and 
                methods for the collection of data on the loss 
                of and damage to structures, and data on 
                surviving structures after severe windstorm 
                events;
                  (D) improve the knowledge of the impact of 
                severe wind on buildings, structures, 
                lifelines, and communities;
                  (E) develop cost-effective windstorm impact 
                reduction tools, methods, and technologies;
                  (F) work, in conjunction with other 
                appropriate Federal agencies, to support the 
                development of wind standards and model codes; 
                and
                  (G) in conjunction with other appropriate 
                Federal agencies, work closely with standards 
                and model code development organizations, 
                professional societies, and practicing 
                engineers, architects, and others involved in 
                the construction of buildings, structures, and 
                lifelines, to promote better building 
                practices, including by--
                          (i) supporting the development of 
                        technical resources for practitioners 
                        to implement new knowledge; and
                          (ii) supporting the development of 
                        methods and tools to incorporate wind 
                        engineering principles into design and 
                        construction practices.
          (3) Federal Emergency Management Agency.--The Federal 
        Emergency Management Agency, consistent with the 
        Agency's all hazards approach, shall support the 
        development of risk assessment tools and effective 
        mitigation techniques, assist with windstorm-related 
        data collection and analysis, and support outreach, 
        information dissemination, and implementation of 
        windstorm preparedness and mitigation measures by 
        households, businesses, and communities, including by--
                  (A) working to develop or improve risk-
                assessment tools, methods, and models;
                  (B) working closely with other appropriate 
                Federal agencies to develop and facilitate the 
                adoption of windstorm impact reduction 
                measures, including by--
                          (i) developing cost-effective 
                        retrofit measures for existing 
                        buildings, structures, and lifelines to 
                        improve windstorm performance;
                          (ii) developing methods, tools, and 
                        technologies to improve the planning, 
                        design, and construction of new 
                        buildings, structures, and lifelines;
                          (iii) supporting the development of 
                        model wind codes and standards for 
                        buildings, structures, and lifelines; 
                        and
                          (iv) developing technical resources 
                        for practitioners that reflect new 
                        knowledge and standards of practice; 
                        and
                  (C) developing and disseminating guidelines 
                for the construction of windstorm shelters.
        Nothing in this Act shall be construed to diminish the 
        role and responsibility of the Federal Emergency 
        Management Agency with regard to all hazards 
        preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation.
          (4) National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
        Administration.--The National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
        Administration shall support atmospheric sciences 
        research and data collection to improve the 
        understanding of the behavior of windstorms and their 
        impact on buildings, structures, and lifelines, 
        including by--
                  (A) working with other appropriate Federal 
                agencies to develop and deploy instrumentation 
                to measure speed and other characteristics of 
                wind, and to collect, analyze, and make 
                available such data;
                  (B) working with officials of State and local 
                governments to ensure that they are 
                knowledgeable about, and prepared for, the 
                specific windstorm risks in their area;
                  (C) supporting the development of suitable 
                wind speed maps and other derivative products 
                that support building codes and other hazard 
                mitigation approaches for buildings, 
                structures, and lifelines, and, to the extent 
                possible, ensure that such maps and other 
                derivative products are developed consistent 
                with the multihazard advisory maps authorized 
                by section 203(k) of the Robert T. Stafford 
                Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act 
                (42 U.S.C. 5133(k));
                  (D) conducting a competitive, peer-reviewed 
                process which awards grants and cooperative 
                agreements to complement the National Oceanic 
                and Atmospheric Administration's wind-related 
                and storm surge-related research and data 
                collection activities;
                  (E) working with other appropriate Federal 
                agencies and State and local governments to 
                develop or improve risk-assessment tools, 
                methods, and models; and
                  (F) working with other appropriate Federal 
                agencies to develop storm surge models to 
                better understand the interaction between 
                windstorms and bodies of water.
          (5) National Science Foundation.--The National 
        Science Foundation shall be responsible for funding 
        basic research that furthers the understanding of 
        windstorms, wind engineering, and community preparation 
        and response to windstorms. In carrying out this 
        paragraph, the Director of the National Science 
        Foundation shall--
                  (A) support multidisciplinary and 
                interdisciplinary research that will improve 
                the resiliency of communities to windstorms, 
                including--
                          (i) research that improves the safety 
                        and performance of buildings, 
                        structures, and lifelines;
                          (ii) research to support more 
                        effective windstorm mitigation and 
                        response measures, such as developing 
                        better knowledge of the specific types 
                        of vulnerabilities faced by segments of 
                        the community vulnerable to windstorms, 
                        addressing the barriers they face in 
                        adopting mitigation and preparation 
                        measures, and developing methods to 
                        better communicate the risks of 
                        windstorms and to promote mitigation; 
                        and
                          (iii) research on the response of 
                        communities to windstorms, including on 
                        the effectiveness of the emergency 
                        response, and the recovery process of 
                        communities, households, and 
                        businesses;
                  (B) support research to understand windstorm 
                processes, windstorm patterns, and windstorm 
                frequencies;
                  (C) encourage prompt dissemination of 
                significant findings, sharing of data, samples, 
                physical collections, and other supporting 
                materials, and development of intellectual 
                property so research results can be used by 
                appropriate organizations to mitigate windstorm 
                damage;
                  (D) work with other Program agencies to 
                maintain awareness of, and where appropriate 
                cooperate with, windstorm risk reduction 
                research efforts in other countries, to ensure 
                that the Program benefits from relevant 
                information and advances in those countries; 
                and
                  (E) include to the maximum extent practicable 
                diverse institutions, including Historically 
                Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-
                serving institutions, Tribal Colleges and 
                Universities, Alaska Native-serving 
                institutions, and Native Hawaiian-serving 
                institutions.

SEC. 205. NATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION.

                           [42 U.S.C. 15704]

  [(a) Establishment.--The Director shall establish a National 
Advisory Committee on Windstorm Impact Reduction, consisting of 
not less than 11 and not more than 15 non-Federal members 
representing a broad cross section of interests such as the 
research, technology transfer, design and construction, and 
financial communities; materials and systems suppliers; State, 
county, and local governments; the insurance industry; and 
other representatives as designated by the Director.
  [(b) Assessment.--The Advisory Committee shall assess--
          [(1) trends and developments in the science and 
        engineering of windstorm impact reduction;
          [(2) the effectiveness of the Program in carrying out 
        the activities under section 204(d);
          [(3) the need to revise the Program; and
          [(4) the management, coordination, implementation, 
        and activities of the Program.
  [(c) Biennial Report.--At least once every two years, the 
Advisory Committee shall report to Congress and the Interagency 
Working Group on the assessment carried out under subsection 
(b).]
  (a) Establishment.--The Director shall establish a commission 
to be known as the ``National Advisory Committee on Windstorm 
Impact Reduction'' (hereafter in this section referred to as 
the ``Advisory Committee'').
  (b) Membership.--
          (1) Composition.--The Advisory Committee shall be 
        composed of not fewer than 7 members selected by the 
        Director--
                  (A) from research and academic institutions, 
                industry standards development organizations, 
                emergency management agencies, State and local 
                government, and business communities;
                  (B) who represent all related scientific, 
                architectural, and engineering disciplines; and
                  (C) who are qualified to provide advice on 
                windstorm impact reduction.
          (2) Prohibition.--A member of the Advisory Committee 
        may not be an employee of the Federal Government.
  (c) Duties.--The Advisory Committee shall develop 
recommendations for Federal agencies on implementation of the 
Program.
  (d) Sunset Exemption.--Section 14 of the Federal Advisory 
Committee Act shall not apply to the Advisory Committee 
established under this section.

[SEC. 207. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

                           [42 U.S.C. 15706]

  [(a) Federal Emergency Management Agency. There are 
authorized to be appropriated to the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency for carrying out this title--
          [(1) $8,700,000 for fiscal year 2006;
          [(2) $9,400,000 for fiscal year 2007; and
          [(3) $9,400,000 for fiscal year 2008.
  [(b) National Science Foundation. There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the National Science Foundation for carrying 
out this title--
          [(1) $8,700,000 for fiscal year 2006;
          [(2) $9,400,000 for fiscal year 2007; and
          [(3) $9,400,000 for fiscal year 2008.
  [(c) National Institute of Standards and Technology. There 
are authorized to be appropriated to the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology for carrying out this title--
          [(1) $3,000,000 for fiscal year 2006;
          [(2) $4,000,000 for fiscal year 2007; and
          [(3) $4,000,000 for fiscal year 2008.
  [(d) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. There 
are authorized to be appropriated to the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration for carrying out this title--
          [(1) $2,100,000 for fiscal year 2006;
          [(2) $2,200,000 for fiscal year 2007; and
          [(3) $2,200,000 for fiscal year 2008.]

SEC. 207. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  (a) Federal Emergency Management Agency.--There are 
authorized to be appropriated to the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency for carrying out this title--
          (1) $9,682,000 for fiscal year 2011;
          (2) $9,972,500 for fiscal year 2012;
          (3) $10,271,600 for fiscal year 2013;
          (4) $10,579,800 for fiscal year 2014; and
          (5) $10,897,200 for fiscal year 2015.
  (b) National Science Foundation.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the National Science Foundation for carrying 
out this title--
          (1) $9,682,000 for fiscal year 2011;
          (2) $9,972,500 for fiscal year 2012;
          (3) $10,271,600 for fiscal year 2013;
          (4) $10,579,800 for fiscal year 2014; and
          (5) $10,897,200 for fiscal year 2015.
  (c) National Institute of Standards and Technology.--There 
are authorized to be appropriated to the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology for carrying out this title--
          (1) $4,120,000 for fiscal year 2011;
          (2) $4,243,600 for fiscal year 2012;
          (3) $4,370,900 for fiscal year 2013;
          (4) $4,502,000 for fiscal year 2014; and
          (5) $4,637,100 for fiscal year 2015.
  (d) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.--There 
are authorized to be appropriated to the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration for carrying out this title--
          (1) $2,266,000 for fiscal year 2011;
          (2) $2,334,000 for fiscal year 2012;
          (3) $2,404,000 for fiscal year 2013;
          (4) $2,476,100 for fiscal year 2014; and
          (5) $2,550,400 for fiscal year 2015.

                 NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAM ACT

SEC. 2. NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAMS.

                            [15 U.S.C. 7301]

  (a) Establishment.--The Director of the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology (in this Act referred to as the 
``Director'') is authorized to establish National Construction 
Safety Teams (in this Act referred to as a ``Team'') for 
deployment after events causing the failure of [a building or 
buildings] a building, buildings, or infrastructure that has 
resulted in substantial loss of life or that posed significant 
potential for substantial loss of life. [To the maximum extent 
practicable, the Director shall establish and deploy a Team 
within 48 hours after such an event.] The Director shall make a 
decision whether to deploy a Team within 72 hours after such an 
event. The Director shall promptly publish in the Federal 
Register notice of the establishment of each Team.
  (b) Purpose of Investigation; Duties.--
          (1) Purpose.--The purpose of investigations by Teams 
        is to improve the safety and structural integrity of 
        [buildings] buildings or infrastructure in the United 
        States.
          (2) Duties.--A Team shall--
                  (A) establish the likely technical cause or 
                causes of the [building] building or 
                infrastructure failure;
                  (B) evaluate the technical aspects of 
                evacuation and emergency response procedures;
                  (C) recommend, as necessary, specific 
                improvements to building standards, codes, and 
                practices based on the findings made pursuant 
                to subparagraphs (A) and (B); and
                  (D) recommend any research and other 
                appropriate actions needed to improve the 
                structural safety of [buildings] buildings or 
                infrastructure, and improve evacuation and 
                emergency response procedures, based on the 
                findings of the investigation.
  (c) Procedures.--
          (1) Development.--Not later than 3 months after the 
        date of the enactment of this Act, the Director, in 
        consultation with [the United States Fire 
        Administration and] other appropriate Federal agencies, 
        shall develop procedures for the establishment and 
        deployment of Teams. The Director shall update such 
        procedures as appropriate. Such procedures shall 
        include provisions--
                  (A) regarding conflicts of interest related 
                to service on the Team;
                  (B) defining the circumstances under which 
                the Director will establish and deploy a Team;
                  (C) prescribing the appropriate size of 
                Teams;
                  (D) guiding the disclosure of information 
                under section 7;
                  (E) guiding the conduct of investigations 
                under this Act, including procedures for 
                providing written notice of inspection 
                authority under section 4(a) and for ensuring 
                compliance with any other applicable law;
                  (F) identifying and prescribing appropriate 
                conditions for the provision by the Director of 
                additional resources and services Teams may 
                need;
                  (G) to ensure that investigations under this 
                Act do not impede and are coordinated with any 
                search and rescue efforts being undertaken at 
                the site of the [building] building or 
                infrastructure failure;
                  (H) for regular briefings of the public on 
                the status of the investigative proceedings and 
                findings;
                  (I) guiding the Teams in moving and 
                preserving evidence as described in section 
                4(a)(4), (b)(2), and (d)(4);
                  (J) providing for coordination with Federal, 
                State, and local entities that may sponsor 
                research or investigations of [building] 
                building or infrastructure failures, including 
                research conducted under the Earthquake Hazards 
                Reduction Act of 1977 and the National 
                Windstorm Impact Reduction Act of 2004; and
                  (K) regarding such other issues as the 
                Director considers appropriate.
          (2) Publication.--The Director shall publish promptly 
        in the Federal Register final procedures, and 
        subsequent updates thereof, developed under paragraph 
        (1).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 4. AUTHORITIES.

                            [15 U.S.C. 7303]

  (a) Entry and Inspection.--In [investigating a building] 
investigating building and infrastructure failure under this 
Act, members of a Team, and any other person authorized by the 
Director to support a Team, on display of appropriate 
credentials provided by the Director and written notice of 
inspection authority, may--
          (1) enter property where [a building] a building or 
        infrastructure failure being investigated has occurred, 
        or where [building] building or infrastructure 
        components, materials, and artifacts with respect to 
        the [building] building or infrastructure failure are 
        located, and take action necessary, appropriate, and 
        reasonable in light of the nature of the property to be 
        inspected to carry out the duties of the Team under 
        section 2(b)(2) (A) and (B);
          (2) during reasonable hours, inspect any record 
        (including any design, construction, or maintenance 
        record), process, or facility related to the 
        investigation;
          (3) inspect and test any [building] building or 
        infrastructure components, materials, and artifacts 
        related to the [building] building or infrastructure 
        failure; and
          (4) move such records, components, materials, and 
        artifacts as provided by the procedures developed under 
        section 2(c)(1).
  (b) Avoiding Unnecessary Interference and Preserving 
Evidence.--An inspection, test, or other action taken by a Team 
under this section shall be conducted in a way that--
          (1) does not interfere unnecessarily with services 
        provided by the owner or operator of the [building] 
        building or infrastructure components, materials, or 
        artifacts, property, records, process, or facility; and
          (2) to the maximum extent feasible, preserves 
        evidence related to the [building] building or 
        infrastructure failure, consistent with the ongoing 
        needs of the investigation.
  (c) Coordination.--
          (1) With search and rescue efforts.--A Team shall not 
        impede, and shall coordinate its investigation with, 
        any search and rescue efforts being undertaken at the 
        site of the [building] building or infrastructure 
        failure.
          (2) With other research.--A Team shall coordinate its 
        investigation, to the extent practicable, with 
        qualified researchers who are conducting engineering or 
        scientific (including social science) research relating 
        to the [building] building or infrastructure failure.
          (3) Memoranda of understanding.--The National 
        Institute of Standards and Technology shall enter into 
        a memorandum of understanding with each Federal agency 
        that may conduct or sponsor a related investigation, 
        providing for coordination of investigations.
          (4) With State and local authorities.--A Team shall 
        cooperate with State and local authorities carrying out 
        any activities related to a Team's investigation.
  (d) Interagency Priorities.--
          [(1) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph (2) 
        or (3), a Team investigation shall have priority over 
        any other investigation of any other Federal agency.]
          (1) In general.--Except as otherwise provided in this 
        subsection, a Team investigation shall have priority 
        over any other investigation which is related to the 
        purpose and duties set forth in section 2(b) and 
        undertaken by any other Federal agency.
          (2) National Transportation Safety Board.--If the 
        National Transportation Safety Board is conducting an 
        investigation related to an investigation of a Team, 
        the National Transportation Safety Board investigation 
        shall have priority over the Team investigation. Such 
        priority shall not otherwise affect the authority of 
        the Team to continue its investigation under this Act.
          (3) Criminal acts.--If the Attorney General, in 
        consultation with the Director, determines, and 
        notifies the Director, that circumstances reasonably 
        indicate that the [building] building or infrastructure 
        failure being investigated by a Team may have been 
        caused by a criminal act, the Team shall relinquish 
        investigative priority to the appropriate law 
        enforcement agency. The relinquishment of investigative 
        priority by the Team shall not otherwise affect the 
        authority of the Team to continue its investigation 
        under this Act.
          (4) Preservation of evidence.--If a Federal law 
        enforcement agency suspects and notifies the Director 
        that a [building] building or infrastructure failure 
        being investigated by a Team under this Act may have 
        been caused by a criminal act, the Team, in 
        consultation with the Federal law enforcement agency, 
        shall take necessary actions to ensure that evidence of 
        the criminal act is preserved.
          (5) Infrastructure investigations.--With respect to 
        an investigation relating to an infrastructure failure, 
        a Federal agency with primary jurisdiction over the 
        failed infrastructure which is conducting an 
        investigation and asserts priority over the Team 
        investigation shall have such priority. Such priority 
        shall not otherwise affect the authority of the Team to 
        continue its investigation under this Act.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 7. DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION.

                            [15 U.S.C. 7306]

  (a) General Rule.--Except as otherwise provided in this 
section, a copy of a record, information, or investigation 
submitted or received by a Team shall be made available to the 
public [on request and at reasonable cost].
  (b) Exceptions.--Subsection (a) does not require the release 
of--
          (1) information described by section 552(b) of title 
        5, United States Code, or protected from disclosure by 
        any other law of the United States; or
          (2) information described in subsection (a) by the 
        National Institute of Standards and Technology or by a 
        Team until the report required by section 8 is issued.
  (c) Protection of Voluntary Submission of Information.--
Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a Team, the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology, and any agency 
receiving information from a Team or the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology, shall not disclose voluntarily 
provided safety-related information if that information is not 
directly related to the [building] building or infrastructure 
failure being investigated and the Director finds that the 
disclosure of the information would inhibit the voluntary 
provision of that type of information.
  (d) Public Safety Information.--A Team and the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology shall not publicly 
release any information it receives in the course of an 
investigation under this Act if the Director finds that the 
disclosure of that information might jeopardize public safety.

SEC. 8. NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAM REPORT.

                            [15 U.S.C. 7307]

  Not later than 90 days after completing an investigation, a 
Team shall issue a public report which includes--
          (1) an analysis of the likely technical cause or 
        causes of the [building] building or infrastructure 
        failure investigated;
          (2) any technical recommendations for changes to or 
        the establishment of evacuation and emergency response 
        procedures;
          (3) any recommended specific improvements to building 
        standards, codes, and practices; and
          (4) recommendations for research and other 
        appropriate actions needed to help prevent future 
        [building] building or infrastructure failures.

SEC. 9. NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY ACTIONS.

                            [15 U.S.C. 7308]

  After the issuance of a public report under section 8, the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology shall 
comprehensively review the report and, working with [the United 
States Fire Administration and] other appropriate Federal and 
non-Federal agencies and organizations--
          (1) conduct, or enable or encourage the conducting 
        of, appropriate research recommended by the Team; and
          (2) promote (consistent with existing procedures for 
        the establishment of building standards, codes, and 
        practices) the appropriate adoption by the Federal 
        Government, and encourage the appropriate adoption by 
        other agencies and organizations, of the 
        recommendations of the Team with respect to--
                  (A) technical aspects of evacuation and 
                emergency response procedures;
                  (B) specific improvements to building 
                standards, codes, and practices; and
                  (C) other actions needed to help prevent 
                future [building] building or infrastructure 
                failures.

SEC. 10. NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY ANNUAL REPORT.

                            [15 U.S.C. 7309]

  Not later than February 15 of each year, the Director shall 
transmit to the Committee on Science of the House of 
Representatives and to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation of the Senate a report that includes--
          (1) a summary of the investigations conducted by 
        Teams during the prior fiscal year;
          (2) a summary of recommendations made by the Teams in 
        reports issued under section 8 during the prior fiscal 
        year and a description of the extent to which those 
        recommendations have been implemented; and
          (3) a description of the actions taken to improve 
        [building] building and infrastructure safety and 
        structural integrity by the National Institute of 
        Standards and Technology during the prior fiscal year 
        in response to reports issued under section 8.

SEC. 11. ADVISORY COMMITTEE.

                            [15 U.S.C. 7310]

  (a) Establishment and Functions.--The Director, in 
consultation with [the United States Fire Administration and] 
other appropriate Federal agencies, shall establish an advisory 
committee to advise the Director on carrying out this Act and 
to review the procedures developed under section 2(c)(1) and 
the reports issued under section 8.
  (b) Annual Report.--On January 1 of each year, the advisory 
committee shall transmit to the Committee on Science of the 
House of Representatives and to the Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation of the Senate a report that 
includes--
          (1) an evaluation of Team activities, along with 
        recommendations to improve the operation and 
        effectiveness of Teams; and
          (2) an assessment of the implementation of the 
        recommendations of Teams and of the advisory committee.
  (c) Duration of Advisory Committee.--Section 14 of the 
Federal Advisory Committee Act shall not apply to the advisory 
committee established under this section.

[SEC. 12. ADDITIONAL APPLICABILITY.

                            [15 U.S.C. 7311]

  [The authorities and restrictions applicable under this Act 
to the Director and to Teams shall apply to the activities of 
the National Institute of Standards and Technology in response 
to the attacks of September 11, 2001.]

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


           NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY ACT

SEC. 16. FIRE RESEARCH CENTER.

                            [15 U.S.C. 278f]

  (a) Establishment; Programs of Research; Functions of 
Secretary; Dissemination of Information.--There is hereby 
established within the Department of Commerce a Fire Research 
Center which shall have the mission of performing and 
supporting research on all aspects of fire with the aim of 
providing scientific and technical knowledge applicable to the 
prevention and control of fires. The content and priorities of 
the research program shall be determined in consultation with 
the Administrator of the United States Fire Administration. In 
implementing this section, the Secretary is authorized to 
conduct, directly or through contracts or grants, a fire 
research program, including--
          (1) basic and applied fire research for the purpose 
        of arriving at an understanding of the fundamental 
        processes underlying all aspects of fire. Such research 
        shall include scientific investigations of--
                  (A) the physics and chemistry of combustion 
                processes;
                  (B) the dynamics of flame ignition, flame 
                spread, and flame extinguishment;
                  (C) the composition of combustion products 
                developed by various sources and under various 
                environmental conditions;
                  (D) the early stages of fires in buildings 
                and other structures, structural subsystems and 
                structural components in all other types of 
                fires, including, but not limited to, fires at 
                the wildland-urban interface, forest fires, 
                brush fires, fires underground, oil blowout 
                fires, and waterborne fires, with the aim of 
                improving early detection capability;
                  (E) the behavior of fires involving all types 
                of buildings and other structures and their 
                contents (including mobile homes and highrise 
                buildings, construction materials, floor and 
                wall coverings, coatings, furnishings, and 
                other combustible materials), and all other 
                types of fires, including fires at the 
                wildland-urban interface, forest fires, brush 
                fires, fires underground, oil blowout fires, 
                and waterborne fires;
                  (F) the unique fire hazards arising from the 
                transportation and use, in industrial and 
                professional practices, of combustible gases, 
                fluids, and materials;
                  (G) design concepts for providing increased 
                fire safety consistent with habitability, 
                comfort, and human impact in buildings and 
                other structures;
                  (H) such other aspects of the fire process as 
                may be deemed useful in pursuing the objectives 
                of the fire research program; and
                  (I) methods, procedures, and equipment for 
                arson prevention, detection, and investigation;
          (2) research into the biological, physiological, and 
        psychological factors affecting human victims of fire, 
        and the performance of individual members of fire 
        services, including--
                  (A) the biological and physiological effects 
                of toxic substances encountered in fires;
                  (B) the trauma, cardiac conditions, and other 
                hazards resulting from exposure to fire;
                  (C) the development of simple and reliable 
                tests for determining the cause of death from 
                fires;
                  (D) improved methods of providing first aid 
                to victims of fires;
                  (E) psychological and motivational 
                characteristics of persons who engage in arson, 
                and the prediction and cure of such behavior;
                  (F) the conditions of stress encountered by 
                firefighters, the effects of such stress, and 
                the alleviation and reduction of such 
                conditions; and
                  (G) such other biological, psychological, and 
                physiological effects of fire as have 
                significance for purposes of control or 
                prevention of fires; and
          (3) operation tests, demonstration projects, and fire 
        investigations in support of the activities set forth 
        in this section.
The Secretary shall insure that the results and advances 
arising from the work of the research program are disseminated 
broadly. He shall encourage the incorporation, to the extent 
applicable and practicable, of such results and advances in 
building codes, fire codes, and other relevant codes, test 
methods, fire service operations and training, and standards. 
The Secretary is authorized to encourage and assist in the 
development and adoption of uniform codes, test methods, and 
standards aimed at reducing fire losses and costs of fire 
protection.
  (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--For purposes of this 
section, there are authorized to be appropriated an amount not 
to exceed $5,650,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
1980, which amount includes--
          (1) $525,000 for programs which are recommended in 
        the report submitted to the Congress by the 
        Administrator of the United States Fire Administration 
        pursuant to section 24(b)(1) of the Federal Fire 
        Prevention and Control Act of 1974 (15 U.S.C. 
        2220(b)(1)[)]; and
          (2) $119,000 for adjustments required by law in 
        salaries, pay, retirement, and employee benefits.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *