S. Rept. 112-74 - 112th Congress (2011-2012)
September 07, 2011, As Reported by the Appropriations Committee

Report text available as:

Formatting necessary for an accurate reading of this legislative text may be shown by tags (e.g., <DELETED> or <BOLD>) or may be missing from this TXT display. For complete and accurate display of this text, see the PDF.




Senate Report 112-74 - DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2012




[Senate Report 112-74]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]


                                                       Calendar No. 156
112th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 1st Session                                                     112-74

======================================================================



 
       DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2012
                                _______
                                

               September 7, 2011.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

          Ms. Landrieu, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                                 REPORT

                        [To accompany H.R. 2017]

    The Committee on Appropriations, to which was referred the 
bill (H.R. 2017) making appropriations for the Department of 
Homeland Security for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
2012, and for other purposes, reports the same to the Senate 
with an amendment and recommends that the bill as amended do 
pass.



Total obligational authority, fiscal year 2012

Total of bill as reported to the Senate\1\ \2\ \3\ \6\.. $46,898,157,000
Amount of 2011 appropriations\4\........................  43,321,245,000
Amount of 2012 budget estimate\1\ \2\ \5\...............  45,015,556,000
Amount of House allowance...............................  41,789,835,000
Bill as recommended to Senate compared to--
    2011 appropriations.................................  +3,576,912,000
    2012 budget estimate................................  +1,882,601,000
    House allowance.....................................  +5,108,322,000

\1\Includes $103,387,000 in rescissions, compared to $41,942,000 of 
proposed cancellations.
\2\Includes a permanent indefinite appropriation of $261,871,000 for the 
Coast Guard healthcare fund contribution.
\3\Includes $258,000,000 for the Coast Guard for the costs of overseas 
contingency operations.
\4\Includes rescissions totaling $556,907,000 pursuant to Public Law 
112-10. Includes permanent indefinite appropriation of $265,321,000 for 
the Coast Guard healthcare fund contribution. Includes $254,000,000 for 
the Coast Guard for the costs of overseas deployments and other 
activities.
\5\Excludes up to $258,278,000 for Coast Guard overseas contingency 
operations requested in Department of Defense ``Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy''.
\6\Includes $4,200,000,000 for the FEMA Disaster Relief Fund designated 
by Congress as disaster relief pursuant to Public Law 112-25.


                                CONTENTS

                              ----------                              

                    DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

                                                                   Page
Overview and Summary of the Bill.................................     5
Title I:
    Departmental Management and Operations:
        Office of the Secretary and Executive Management.........    10
        Office of the Under Secretary for Management.............    15
        Office of the Chief Financial Officer....................    20
        Office of the Chief Information Officer..................    23
        Analysis and Operations..................................    25
        Office of Inspector General..............................    26
Title II:
    Security, Enforcement, and Investigations:
        U.S. Customs and Border Protection:
            Salaries and Expenses................................    29
            Automation Modernization.............................    43
            Border Security Fencing, Infrastructure, and 
              Technology.........................................    43
            Air and Marine Interdiction, Operations, Maintenance, 
              and Procurement....................................    45
            Construction and Facilities Management...............    48
        U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement:
            Salaries and Expenses................................    51
            Automation Modernization.............................    62
            Construction.........................................    63
        Transportation Security Administration:
            Aviation Security....................................    64
            Surface Transportation Security......................    74
            Transportation Threat Assessment and Credentialing...    76
            Transportation Security Support......................    78
            Federal Air Marshals.................................    81
        Coast Guard:
            Operating Expenses...................................    82
            Environmental Compliance and Restoration.............    91
            Reserve Training.....................................    92
            Acquisition, Construction, and Improvements..........    92
            Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation..........   100
            Retired Pay..........................................   101
        United States Secret Service:
            Salaries and Expenses................................   101
            Acquisition, Construction, Improvements, and Related 
              Expen- 
              ses................................................   104
Title III:
    Protection, Preparedness, Response, and Recovery:
        National Protection and Programs Directorate:
            Management and Administration........................   105
            Infrastructure Protection and Information Security...   107
            Federal Protective Service...........................   112
            United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator 
              Technology.........................................   113
        Office of Health Affairs.................................   115
        Federal Emergency Management Agency:
            Operating Expenses...................................   118
            State and Local Programs.............................   129
            Firefighter Assistance Grants........................   134
            Emergency Management Performance Grants..............   135
            Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program..........   135
            United States Fire Administration....................   136
            Disaster Relief Fund.................................   136
            Disaster Assistance Direct Loan Program Account......   138
            Flood Hazard Mapping and Risk Analysis...............   138
            National Flood Insurance Fund........................   139
            National Predisaster Mitigation Fund.................   140
            Emergency Food and Shelter...........................   141
Title IV:
    Research and Development, Training, and Services:
        United States Citizenship and Immigration Services.......   142
        Federal Law Enforcement Training Center:
            Salaries and Expenses................................   145
            Acquisitions, Construction, Improvements, and Related 
              Expenses...........................................   146
        Science and Technology:
            Management and Administration........................   146
            Research, Development, Acquisition, and Operations...   147
        Domestic Nuclear Detection Office:
            Management and Administration........................   151
            Research, Development, and Operations................   152
            Systems Acquisition..................................   154
Title V: General Provisions......................................   156
Program, Project, and Activity...................................   163
Compliance With Paragraph 7, Rule XVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Sen- 
  ate............................................................   164
Compliance With Paragraph 7(c), Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules 
  of the Senate..................................................   164
Compliance With Paragraph 12, Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   165
Budgetary Impact of Bill.........................................   171
Comparative Statement of New Budget Authority....................   172

                    OVERVIEW AND SUMMARY OF THE BILL

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Fiscal year
                                       Fiscal year      2012\1\ \2\ \3\
                                     2012\1\ \2\ \4\     \5\  Committee
                                         request         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Title I--Departmental Management       $1,231,644,000     $1,155,904,000
 and Operations...................
Title II--Security, Enforcement,       33,196,186,000     33,108,434,000
 and Investigations...............
Title III--Protection,                  8,218,392,000     11,193,890,000
 Preparedness, Response, and
 Recovery.........................
Title IV--Research and                  2,154,061,000      1,461,337,000
 Development, Training, and
 Services.........................
Title V--General Provisions.......        215,273,000        -21,408,000
                                   -------------------------------------
      Total, new budget                45,015,556,000     46,898,157,000
       (obligational authority)...
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes $103,387,000 in rescissions, compared to $41,942,000 of
  proposed cancellations.
\2\Includes permanent indefinite appropriation of $261,871,000 for the
  Coast Guard healthcare fund contribution.
\3\Includes $258,000,000 for the Coast Guard for the costs of overseas
  contingency operations.
\4\Excludes up to $258,278,000 for Coast Guard overseas contingency
  operations requested in Department of Defense ``Operation and
  Maintenance, Navy''.
\5\Includes $4,200,000,000 for the FEMA Disaster Relief Fund designated
  by Congress as disaster relief pursuant to Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends total appropriations of 
$46,898,157,000 for the Department of Homeland Security for 
fiscal year 2012, $1,882,601,000 more than the budget request. 
Of this amount, $45,458,000,000, including $258,000,000 for 
Coast Guard overseas contingency operations and $4,200,000,000 
for the FEMA Disaster Relief Fund designated by Congress as 
disaster relief pursuant to Public Law 112-25, is for 
discretionary programs.
    The Committee recommends discretionary appropriations, 
excluding Coast Guard overseas contingency operations and the 
FEMA Disaster Relief Fund adjustment, of $41,000,000,000, 
$666,545,000 below fiscal year 2011 and $2,533,457,000 below 
the President's request.

                                Overview

    Recent events have served to highlight the significant and 
evolving threats to America's homeland. The death of Osama bin 
Laden, a historic accomplishment, could inspire new attacks, 
including acts by homegrown terrorists. The Fort Hood shooting 
was committed by a United States citizen. The New York City 
subway bomb plot was organized by a legal resident alien. The 
Times Square bombing attempt was precipitated by a naturalized 
citizen.
    In the 2011 State of the Union Address, the President 
stated that al Qaeda and its affiliates continue to plan 
attacks against us. He stressed that extremists are trying to 
inspire acts of violence by those within our borders. According 
to the Attorney General, in the last 2 years, 126 individuals 
have been indicted for terrorist-related activities, including 
50 United States citizens.
    In addition, threats from abroad continue to be a serious 
concern, as evidenced by the 2009 Christmas Day bomb plot and 
the October 2010 air cargo bombing attempt. The Homeland 
Security Secretary has testified that the threat of a terrorist 
attack is as high as it has been since September 11, 2001.
    We face persistent cybersecurity threats from individuals, 
sophisticated criminal organizations, and nation states, that 
desire to do us harm. Violence in Mexico is at unprecedented 
levels and many are concerned that the violence will cross the 
border. In addition to these threats, natural disasters 
continue to have a significant impact on cities and rural 
communities. The Department of Homeland Security must prepare 
for and respond to such natural disasters. Since January 1, 
2011, the President has issued disaster declarations in 47 
States.
    The Department of Homeland Security seeks to mature and 
strengthen homeland security at all levels of government, the 
private sector, and our citizenry. As we approach the 10th 
anniversary of the attacks of 9/11, the 9th anniversary of the 
establishment of the Department of Homeland Security, and the 
recent 6th anniversary of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, it is 
critical that the Nation develop and maintain a constant, 
capable, and vigilant posture to protect ourselves against 
existing and evolving threats. The Department must also ensure 
that all levels of government and the private sector 
effectively prepare for and respond to natural disasters.
    In addition, the Department must effectively carry out its 
many statutory responsibilities, including securing our 
borders, enforcing our immigration laws, facilitating trade, 
protecting our currency, securing cyber systems, combating drug 
trafficking, securing the aviation sector and other modes of 
transportation, and promoting the safety of life and property 
at sea. In carrying out such missions in fiscal year 2010, the 
Department of Homeland Security:

                              COAST GUARD

  --Responded to 22,220 search and rescue incidents, saving 
        4,329 lives and protecting $87,000,000 in property;
  --Interdicted 2,088 undocumented migrants attempting to 
        illegally enter the United States;
  --Removed 202,439 pounds of cocaine and 36,739 pounds of 
        marijuana bound for the United States; seized 56 
        vessels, and detained 229 suspected drug smugglers;
  --Conducted 1,300 escorts of naval vessels to ensure their 
        safe transit through U.S. waterways;
  --Conducted 52,018 waterborne patrols to protect Critical 
        Infrastructure and Key Resources; and
  --Performed over 14,800 inspections at facilities to ensure 
        compliance, identifying over 5,400 deficiencies of 
        safety, security, and environmental protection 
        regulations.

                U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION [CBP]

  --CBP officers at more than 330 ports of entry inspected 352 
        million travelers and more than 105.8 million cars, 
        trucks, buses, trains, vessels and aircraft;
  --Nationwide, Border Patrol apprehensions of illegal aliens 
        decreased from nearly 724,000 in fiscal year 2008 to 
        approximately 463,382 in fiscal year 2010, a 36 percent 
        reduction, indicating that, as a result of increased 
        enforcement and restrained economic conditions, fewer 
        people are attempting to illegally cross the border;
  --CBP Agriculture Specialists seized more than 1.7 million 
        prohibited plant materials, meat, and animal byproducts 
        in fiscal year 2010, a 9.5 percent increase in seizures 
        compared to fiscal year 2009; and
  --CBP seized $147,000,000 in currency (inbound and outbound) 
        at and between U.S. ports of entry--a more than 30 
        percent increase from last fiscal year;
  --CBP seized a total of 4,147,008 pounds of narcotics;
  --CBP deployed 17 new Mobile Non-Intrusive Inspection Systems 
        and 22 additional large-scale Non-Intrusive Inspection 
        [NII] technology imaging systems. The large-scale 
        systems were used to conduct over 7.3 million 
        examinations at ports of entry that resulted in over 
        1,300 seizures, including 288,000 pounds of narcotics.

            U.S. IMMIGRATION AND CUSTOMS ENFORCEMENT [ICE]:

  --Initiated 126,425 new investigations;
  --Made over 25,141 criminal arrests;
  --Removed approximately 400,000 illegal aliens;
  --Seized $422,600,000 in currency and monetary instruments;
  --Seized nearly 1.9 million pounds of narcotics and other 
        dangerous drugs;
  --Seized $126,100,000 of contraband and other illegal 
        merchandise; and
  --Responded to 1,133,130 inquiries and calls for assistance 
        from other Federal, State and local law enforcement 
        agencies through ICE's Law Enforcement Support Center.

                      UNITED STATES SECRET SERVICE

  --Secret Service protective details and field agents ensured 
        100 percent incident-free protection for 5,906 domestic 
        travel stops and 515 international travel stops.
  --Foreign dignitary protection reached a record 2,495 travel 
        stops, including visits by 236 heads of state and 
        government, and 107 spouses from over 147 countries.
  --Dignitary protection also included security operations for 
        the Nuclear Security Summit in April 2010 and the 65th 
        anniversary of the United Nations General Assembly in 
        September 2010.
  --Additionally, the protective mission was supported through 
        the completion of 7,726 protective surveys.
  --In the area of criminal investigations, Secret Service 
        field offices closed a total of 9,137 cases in fiscal 
        year 2010, an increase of 7.8 percent over fiscal year 
        2009. These cases led to a reported 8,930 arrests.
  --Additionally, the Secret Service continued to strengthen 
        its partnerships with U.S. Attorney offices, sustaining 
        a high conviction rate of 94.7 percent for all referred 
        cases.
  --The Secret Service's longstanding investigative priority of 
        combating financial crime led to an estimated 
        $13,500,000,000 in potential losses prevented, of which 
        $6,950,000,000 involved cyber crimes.
  --Building on these successes, the number of financial crime 
        cases closed increased 7.1 percent from fiscal year 
        2009 levels, and resulted in 5,589 arrests, reflecting 
        of the Secret Service's ability to adapt to emerging 
        financial and cyber crime threats.

      UNITED STATES CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION SERVICES [USCIS]:

  --Completed more than 677,000 naturalization applications;
  --Processed more than 16.4 million employment verification 
        queries through E-Verify;
  --Naturalized more than 11,000 military service members and 
        qualified family members;
  --Interviewed more than 95,000 refugee applicants;
  --Processed more than 28,000 asylum applications; and
  --Maintained an average processing time for naturalization 
        applications of approximately 4.5 months.

              TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION [TSA]

  --Screened more than 628 million people and more than 425 
        million checked bags;
  --Prevented passengers from bringing more than 863 firearms 
        onto planes;
  --Conducted 7,679 Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response 
        [VIPR] operations at increased-risk locations 
        nationwide: 3,895 in surface modes and 3,784 in 
        aviation modes; and
  --Deployed 617 canine teams to 78 airports to screen air 
        cargo.

          NATIONAL PROTECTION AND PROGRAMS DIRECTORATE [NPPD]

  --Handled more than 107,000 cyber security incidents through 
        the U.S.-Computer Emergency Readiness Team and 4 
        million cybersecurity incidents in the Federal 
        Government. This generated 5,000 security products for 
        the general public and 500 for Federal departments and 
        agencies. The US-CERT provides in-depth detection, 
        tracking, and mitigation of cybersecurity threats 24 
        hours a day, 365 days a year;
  --Responded to more than 135 requests for technical 
        assistance which is provided to all 56 States and U.S. 
        territories to align State and national communications 
        systems for use during disasters;
  --Conducted six region-wide assessments to identify and 
        mitigate vulnerabilities to interdependent critical 
        infrastructure in major metropolitan areas;
  --Provided security at more than 9,000 Federal facilities, 
        including conducting 1,000 facility security 
        assessments.

               FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY [FEMA]

  --Supported disaster response and recovery for major 
        disasters, including 81 presidentially declared 
        disasters in assisting 41 States;
  --Managed deployment of the 28 National Urban Search and 
        Rescue Teams. All 28 teams were deployed during 
        Hurricane Katrina, and all, or portions, of the USAR 
        teams were deployed 16 times in 2010.

                 OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL [OIG]

  --The OIG issued approximately 125 management audit reports, 
        including 50 financial assistance grant reports. The 
        audits identified over $100,000,000 of questioned 
        costs, of which nearly $30,000,000 was determined to be 
        unsupported. The OIG recovered $15,000,000 as a result 
        of identifying disallowed costs in prior audit reports 
        and investigations. In addition, the OIG identified 
        over $65,000,000 in funds put to better use;
  --OIG investigations resulted in approximately 350 arrests, 
        275 indictments, 270 convictions and 125 personnel 
        actions. In addition the Office of Investigations 
        closed 1,150 investigations and 13,000 complaints and 
        initiated 1,400 new investigations and 915 reports; and
  --Investigative recoveries, fines, restitutions and cost 
        savings totaled $124,300,000.

            FEDERAL LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAINING CENTER [FLETC]

  --FLETC facilities provided basic and some advanced training 
        to approximately 65,000 law enforcement agents from 90 
        Federal agencies; and
  --The Rural Policing Institute trained over 5,000 State, 
        local, campus and tribal law enforcement officers in 
        locations throughout the United States and Indian 
        Country through distance learning, with plans to 
        increase each year.

                               References

    This report refers to several Public Laws by short title as 
follows: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, Public 
Law 111-5, is referenced as ARRA; Implementing Recommendations 
of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007, Public Law 110-53, is 
referenced as the 9/11 Act; Security and Accountability for 
Every Port Act of 2006, Public Law 109-347, is referenced as 
the SAFE Port Act; Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and 
Emergency Assistance Act, Public Law 93-288, is referenced as 
the Stafford Act; and Intelligence Reform and Terrorism 
Prevention Act of 2004, Public Law 108-458, is referenced as 
the Intelligence Reform Act.
    Any reference in this report to the Secretary shall be 
interpreted to mean the Secretary of Homeland Security.
    Any reference to the Department or DHS shall be interpreted 
to mean the Department of Homeland Security.
    Any reference in this report to a departmental component 
shall be interpreted to mean directorates, components, 
agencies, offices, or other organizations in the Department.
    Any reference to ``full-time equivalents'' shall be 
referred to as FTE.
    Any reference to ``program, project, and activity'' shall 
be referred to as PPA.
    Any reference to a ``Homeland Security Presidential 
Directive'' shall be referred to as HSPD.
    Any reference to ``Government Accountability Office'' shall 
be referred to as GAO.
    Any reference to the ``Office of Inspector General'' of the 
Department of Homeland Security shall be referenced to as OIG.

                    DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

                                TITLE I

                 DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS

            Office of the Secretary and Executive Management

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $136,544,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................     142,533,000
House allowance.........................................      62,350,000
Committee recommendation................................     135,433,000

    The Office of the Secretary and Executive Management 
supports the Department by providing direction, management, and 
policy guidance to operating components. The specific 
activities funded by this account include: the Immediate Office 
of the Secretary; the Immediate Office of the Deputy Secretary; 
the Office of the Chief of Staff; the Office of 
Counternarcotics Enforcement; the Office of the Executive 
Secretary; the Office of Policy; the Office of Public Affairs; 
the Office of Legislative Affairs; the Office of the General 
Counsel; the Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties; the 
Citizenship and Immigration Services Ombudsman; the Office of 
Intergovernmental Affairs; and the Privacy Office.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $135,433,000 for the Office of the 
Secretary and Executive Management, $1,111,000 below the fiscal 
year 2011 level and $7,100,000 below the request level. This 
reduction is necessary to sustain critical activities within 
the Department's operating components and make necessary 
investments to address known gaps and vulnerabilities. The 
recommendation includes requested reductions for efficiencies, 
contract support, and administrative savings. The Committee 
includes a program increase for the Office for Civil Rights and 
Civil Liberties [OCRCL] to improve oversight of immigration 
enforcement programs. The Committee directs that a briefing be 
provided not later than 30 days after the OCRCL completes the 
initial review of these programs, including its findings and 
recommendations. This briefing should be conducted jointly by 
OCRCL and ICE officials.
    The specific levels recommended by the Committee as 
compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget request levels are 
as follows:

                                OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY AND EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                  Fiscal year
                                                                 Fiscal year      2012 budget       Committee
                                                                 2011 enacted       request      recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Immediate Office of the Secretary............................            4,641            5,164            5,000
Immediate Office of the Deputy Secretary.....................            2,674            1,918            1,918
Office of the Chief of Staff.................................            2,572            2,802            2,600
Office of Counternarcotics Enforcement.......................            2,997            3,814            2,130
Office of the Executive Secretary............................            8,104            8,402            8,100
Office of Policy.............................................           41,133           42,423           40,000
Office of Public Affairs.....................................            6,368            6,419            6,370
Office of Legislative Affairs................................            6,698            6,341            6,340
Office of Intergovernmental Affairs..........................            2,632            2,908            2,650
Office of General Counsel....................................           23,762           22,422           22,422
Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties..................           20,367           24,613           23,000
Citizenship and Immigration Services Ombudsman...............            6,188            6,336            6,300
Privacy Officer..............................................            8,408            8,971            8,603
                                                              --------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of the Secretary and Executive Management          136,544          142,533          135,433
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

           COORDINATION OF FEDERAL CHEMICAL SECURITY EFFORTS

    The Committee understands that the National Protection and 
Program's Directorate's [NPPD's] Office of Infrastructure 
Protection [IP] and the Coast Guard continue to work toward 
harmonization of chemical security responsibilities established 
by Chemical Facilities Anti-Terrorism Standards [CFATS] 
regulations and Maritime Transportation Security Act [MTSA] 
regulatory programs. A comprehensive regulatory review of the 
respective security regimes has been completed and both 
components are working toward a Memorandum of Understanding 
[MOU] to enable sharing of data and sharing of risk 
methodologies between NPPD's Infrastructure Security Compliance 
Division's Chemical Security Assessment Tool and the Coast 
Guard's Maritime Security Risk Analysis Model. The Committee 
expects the execution of this MOU will be completed in the fall 
of 2011. The Deputy Secretary is directed to continue quarterly 
reporting to the Committee on these matters. The reports shall 
include an update on: the development of a more comprehensive 
picture of security issues at the Nation's chemical facilities; 
whether regulatory gaps exist that may pose an unacceptable 
security risk; and the identification and elimination of 
redundancies between current regulatory regimes. In addition, 
the quarterly updates shall include information on the 
Department's continuing efforts to determine whether and how to 
require MTSA-covered facilities that possess CFATS chemicals of 
interest to complete and submit CFATS Top-Screens. Finally, the 
report shall provide updates regarding the efforts with other 
Federal entities, such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation 
and the Transportation Security Administration, including 
specific milestones and agreements that will be reached to 
further coordinate chemical security efforts.

                                REAL ID

    The Committee directs the Office of Policy to report on the 
status of each State in implementing each REAL ID element 
required for material compliance, a plan to increase compliance 
of each element required for material compliance by January 
2013, and strategies related to compliance with the 
requirements of REAL ID. This report shall be submitted to the 
Committee by April 13, 2012.

                           EXPENDITURE PLANS

    The Committee directs the Office of Counternarcotics 
Enforcement, the Office of Policy, the Office of 
Intergovernmental Affairs, the Office for Civil Rights and 
Civil Liberties, the Office of Citizenship and Immigration 
Services Ombudsman, and the Privacy Officer each to submit an 
expenditure plan for fiscal year 2012 no later than 60 days 
after the date of enactment of this act. Each plan shall 
include details on: staffing, expenses, contracts, obligations, 
funds by sub-offices (if appropriate), and how resources are 
aligned to specific activities and initiatives in fiscal year 
2012. The Office of Counternarcotics Enforcement expenditure 
plan shall include efforts to address the recommendations made 
in OIG-10-80.

                               USER FEES

    The conference report accompanying Public Law 111-83 
directed the Department to submit a contingency plan to address 
gaps between actual and budgeted collections. The Committee 
directs the Secretary to submit a revised plan no later than 90 
days after the date of enactment of this act and to update that 
plan quarterly.

                   BIOMETRIC AIR EXIT IMPLEMENTATION

    The Committee includes language in the bill withholding 
$35,000,000 from obligation until the Department of Homeland 
Security submits to the Committees a comprehensive plan to 
initiate implementation of a biometric air exit capability in 
fiscal year 2012, or a written certification to the Congress 
that it is the position of the administration that the 
statutory requirements for biometric air exit be repealed.

                      COMPACT OF FREE ASSOCIATION

    In 1986, the United States entered into a Compact of Free 
Association [COFA] with the Federated States of Micronesia 
[FSM] and the Republic of the Marshall Islands [RMI]. In 1994, 
the United States entered into a similar relationship with the 
Republic of Palau. The Compacts set forth the bilateral terms 
for government, economic, and security relations between the 
United States and the Freely Associated States [FAS] and the 
laws approving the Compacts set forth the U.S. policy context 
and interpretation for Compacts. Section 141 of the Compacts 
provides that certain FAS citizens ``may be admitted to, 
lawfully engage in occupations, and establish residence as a 
nonimmigrant in the United States and its territories.'' 
However, the Congress also stated, in section 104(e)(1), that 
``it is not the intent of Congress to cause any adverse 
consequences for an affected jurisdiction.''
    At present, it is estimated that affected areas of the 
United States are spending upwards of $200,000,000 annually for 
education, healthcare, and other services for FAS migrants, 
including high-cost treatments such as dialysis and 
chemotherapy. These impact costs are increasing annually. 
Public health officials are particularly concerned about the 
rate of certain diseases such as tuberculosis and Hanson's 
Disease which have a high incidence in Micronesia and among 
recent Compact migrants. There is also concern regarding 
growing social tensions in affected communities as local 
government agencies are forced to reduce the level of services 
to U.S.-citizen residents to offset the costs associated with 
the FAS migrants.
    The Committee recognizes that the scope of these impacts 
will have to be addressed by multiple Federal agencies and 
believes that the administration must develop a comprehensive, 
interagency approach to reduce the financial burden placed on 
affected jurisdictions. Therefore, the Committee directs the 
President to convene, within 45 days after the date of 
enactment of this act, a National Security Council Interagency 
Policy Committee on Freely Associated State Affairs, with 
representation from the relevant departments and agencies 
including the Departments of State, the Interior, Defense, 
Education, Homeland Security, and Health and Human Services, 
and the U.S. Agency for International Development, to develop 
an action plan to reduce the impact of FAS migration on 
Federal, State, local, and territorial governments, 
particularly those in affected jurisdictions. The Committee 
directs the President to submit the action plan to the 
Committee not later than 180 days after enactment of this act.
    The Committee notes that persons admitted to the United 
States as nonimmigrants pursuant to the Compact of Free 
Association Amendments Act of 2003 (Public Law 108-188) are 
subject to most, but not all, inadmissibility provisions of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act. The Committee is concerned 
regarding the lack of enforcement of certain grounds of 
inadmissibility under the Compact such as the health-related 
and public charge grounds of inadmissibility and deportability. 
The Committee also is concerned about the growing negative 
budgetary impacts that the admission as nonimmigrants of 
nationals of the FAS is having on State, local, and Federal 
governments. The Committee directs DHS to report, within 90 
days after the date of enactment of this act, on the 
Secretary's plan to issue regulations to implement all legally 
allowable grounds of inadmissibility under the Compact which 
apply to nationals from the FAS including, but not limited to, 
a feasibility and cost analysis of establishing a pre-screening 
process and promulgating regulations pursuant to the 
appropriate sections of Public Law 108-188 to establish a 
process, based on the existing Advance Permission to Enter 
process (I-192), to provide advanced permission for prospective 
travelers from the FAS to enter the United States. As part of 
this report, the Committee urges DHS to consider including 
modifications to the Electronic System for Travel Authorization 
to address the unique requirements of the population of 
individuals covered by Public Law 108-188.

                 RECEPTION AND REPRESENTATION EXPENSES

    Within the total amount recommended for the Office of the 
Secretary and Executive Management, up to $51,000 is included 
for reception and representation expenses. The Department is to 
continue to submit quarterly reports to the Committee detailing 
the obligation of all DHS Reception and Representation Expenses 
by purpose and dollar amount.

                            DETAILEE REPORT

    The Committee requires the Department to continue to report 
on detailees, but changes this from a quarterly to an annual 
requirement to be submitted with the budget request for fiscal 
year 2013. The format of this submission shall be drafted in 
accordance with the revised guidance set forth in Senate Report 
110-84.

           FEDERALLY FUNDED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTERS

    The Department is directed to report semi-annually to the 
Committee on the current projects tasked to Federally Funded 
Research and Development Centers [FFRDCs], the funding 
obligated by component, including the purposes for the funds, 
and any projects completed in the prior 6-month period, with 
the first report due February 15, 2012. The Committee has yet 
to receive a report for fiscal years 2010 or 2011 pursuant to 
the requirement in conference report [111-298]. These reports 
are to be submitted expeditiously.

            SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORATE CAPABILITIES

    Significant progress has been made in the last 2 years by 
the Science and Technology [S&T] Directorate in unifying the 
Department's test and evaluation [T&E] processes, particularly 
for large acquisition programs. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary to continue to improve the Department's T&E 
capabilities, policies, and procedures. The Department's 
acquisition process would also benefit from the early 
involvement of the S&T Directorate and the Department's FFRDCs 
in assisting departmental entities to better identify mission 
needs, conduct analysis of alternatives that could result in a 
material solution determination, and develop operational 
requirements including concepts of operations. The Under 
Secretary for Management and the Under Secretary for Science 
and Technology shall brief the Committee on efforts to leverage 
S&T's expertise in this area no later than 90 days after the 
date of enactment of this act.

                U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS RESOURCE ASSESSMENT

    The Assistant Secretary for Policy shall brief the 
Committee no later than 90 days after the date of enactment of 
this act on the current level of DHS resources, by component, 
in the U.S. Virgin Islands [USVI] and an assessment of the need 
for additional resources, by component, to be stationed there 
permanently based on threat and workload requirements. This 
assessment should include a review of DHS components with no 
presence currently in the USVI.

           OVERTIME LIMITATION FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT PERSONNEL

    The Committee encourages the Department to review the 
existing overtime caps in place for agency law enforcement 
personnel to determine if they reflect the actual requirement 
for overtime funding and, if necessary, propose an adjustment 
to the cap as part of the President's fiscal year 2013 budget.

                       COMBATING BORDER VIOLENCE

    The Committee urges CBP and ICE to increase its ongoing 
cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Investigations [FBI] to 
combat and address any signs of increased drug trafficking 
organization violence which may be occurring in U.S. border and 
other communities. While the FBI's May 23, 2011, preliminary 
report on annual crime statistics for 2010 indicates that 
reports of violent crime and property crime appear to be down 
in California and Arizona border towns, reports of violent 
crime have ticked upwards slightly in Texas. It is important 
that Federal law enforcement maintain a strong presence on the 
border in support of State and local law enforcement to 
immediately respond to any changes in the levels of violence. 
The Committee directs CBP and ICE, jointly with the FBI, to 
brief the Appropriations Subcommittees on Homeland Security and 
Commerce, Justice, Science at least semiannually on the 
situation on the border and its impact on border communities.

                             CYBERSECURITY

    In an effort to improve coordination between the Federal 
Government and the private sector and to exploit and enhance 
the capabilities of both sectors, the Committee directs the 
Deputy Secretary, jointly with the Deputy Secretary of Defense, 
to submit a report to the Appropriations Committee no later 
than May 1, 2012, evaluating the costs and benefits of 
establishing a National Guard cybersecurity team and/or an 
equivalent civilian team that could be deployed to help prevent 
or recover from a cybersecurity attack. The report should 
include an outline of the recommended command hierarchy, 
including responsibility for deploying teams; describe 
organizational responsibilities for providing guidance and 
training; and discuss how critical relationships will be 
established across the various agencies with cybersecurity 
responsibilities.

                     PORT SECURITY TRAINING PROGRAM

    The Committee is concerned that the Department has not yet 
taken any steps to implement section 821 of Coast Guard 
Authorization Act of 2010 (Public Law 111-281) to enhance and 
upgrade Federal waterfront facility security officer [FSO] 
training, and lead to the Federal certification of FSOs. 
Implementation will help harmonize security training at marine 
terminals. The Committee encourages the Department to help 
develop the national training program.

              Office of the Under Secretary for Management

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $239,453,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................     249,058,000
House allowance.........................................     106,870,000
Committee recommendation................................     237,131,000

    The Under Secretary for Management oversees management and 
operations of the Department, including procurement and 
acquisition, human capital, and property management. The 
specific activities funded by this account include the 
Immediate Office of the Under Secretary for Management, the 
Office of the Chief Security Officer, the Office of the Chief 
Procurement Officer, the Office of the Chief Human Capital 
Officer, and the Office of the Chief Administrative Officer.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $237,131,000 for the Office of the 
Under Secretary for Management, $11,927,000 below the amount 
requested and $2,322,000 below the amount enacted in fiscal 
year 2011. The Committee's recommendation includes funding for 
robust oversight of major acquisitions, recruitment and 
development of a skilled workforce, and security measures to 
safeguard DHS personnel, property, facilities, and information. 
The Committee supports the one-DHS concept, which can only be 
executed when such missions are appropriately funded and 
effective government is not accomplished by excessive funding 
cuts for these essential capabilities. Unless specifically 
addressed in this report, reductions taken to individual 
offices below the request are due to a constrained budget 
environment and to focus limited resources on the Department's 
critical operational missions.
    The specific levels recommended by the Committee, as 
compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget request levels, are 
as follows:

                                  OFFICE OF THE UNDER SECRETARY FOR MANAGEMENT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2011  Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Immediate Office of the Under Secretary for Management....             2,733             7,558             2,558
Office of the Chief Security Officer......................            71,760            71,236            71,236
Office of the Chief Procurement Officer...................            74,597            78,771            78,000
Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer:
    Salaries and Expenses.................................            24,477            28,161            25,165
    Human Resources Information Technology Program........            17,097            16,686            14,172
Office of the Chief Administrative Officer:
    Salaries and expenses.................................            43,300            41,248            41,000
    Nebraska Avenue Complex...............................             5,489             5,398             5,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of the Under Secretary for Management.           239,453           249,058           237,131
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

         IMMEDIATE OFFICE OF THE UNDER SECRETARY FOR MANAGEMENT

    The Committee recommends $2,558,000 for the Immediate 
Office of the Under Secretary, $175,000 less than the fiscal 
year 2011 level and $5,000,000 below the budget request. The 
recommendation includes a reduction of $175,000 below fiscal 
year 2011 for administrative savings, professional services, 
and operational support, as requested.
    The Committee denies the request for $5,000,000 for another 
study of the need for Coast Guard icebreakers in the Arctic 
region. As the ice recedes in the Arctic region, commerce and 
natural resource exploration is expected to increase 
significantly. It is critical that the Coast Guard be given the 
tools to operate effectively in this remote area of the world, 
a region that is rich with potential natural resources. Yet, 
the Coast Guard has no operating polar class heavy icebreakers 
and virtually no infrastructure in the region. The Polar Star, 
first deployed in 1976, is being repaired, but only because 
Congress took the initiative to fund the repair. When the 
repair is complete in 2013, the Polar Star is expected to have 
a useful life of only 7-10 years. It takes approximately 8-10 
years to build a polar class icebreaker, yet the administration 
has no plans for new assets. Russia, on the other hand, 
currently has six operational icebreakers, including nuclear-
powered vessels and is preparing to aggressively pursue the 
estimated 22 percent of the world's undiscovered natural 
resources in the Arctic.
    Since fiscal year 2005, the Committee has urged the Office 
of Management and Budget and the Department of Homeland 
Security to address this issue. In fiscal year 2005, the 
Committee required the National Academy of Sciences [NAS] to 
conduct a comprehensive study of the role of Coast Guard 
icebreakers in supporting United States operations in the 
Antarctic and the Arctic. The NAS report concluded that the 
Nation ``should immediately begin to program, design, and 
construct two new polar icebreakers to replace the Polar Star 
and Polar Sea.''
    The Committee funded a Presidentially requested study of 
Coast Guard requirements for assets in the Arctic region in 
fiscal year 2009. The report, completed in July 2010, wasn't 
submitted to the Committee until July 2011. The report 
concluded that the Coast Guard requires ``three heavy and three 
medium icebreakers to fulfill its statutory missions'' and 
``six heavy and four medium icebreakers to fulfill its 
statutory missions and maintain the continuous presence 
requirements of the Naval Operations Concept.''
    Current and past Coast Guard Commandants have testified to 
this need and the United States Transportation Command 
concluded that the United States has national, strategic, and 
economic interests in the Arctic which requires construction of 
new polar icebreakers. Yet two successive administrations have 
failed to seek funding for these assets.
    Given the extensive consensus that has been built over the 
past 5 years, the Committee does not believe yet another 
icebreaker study is necessary and instead urges the Department 
to move forward on fulfilling the Nation's icebreaking 
requirements for the polar regions by developing a concept of 
operations and a resource plan. This process can be achieved by 
leveraging existing resources and expertise from the Coast 
Guard and the Science and Technology Directorate. As a result 
of the current fiscal climate and need to provide the best 
value to the taxpayer, the development of a concept of 
operations shall include consideration of using Government-
owned vessels as well as non Government-owned vessels to 
achieve the Nation's icebreaking needs. The Committee is to be 
briefed on the development of this plan no later than 90 days 
after the date of enactment of this act.

                           OFFICE OF SECURITY

    The Committee recommends $71,236,000 for the Office of 
Security, a decrease of $524,000 from the fiscal year 2011 
level and the same as the budget request. This amount includes 
decreases for administrative savings, professional services, 
and operational support, and the transfer of $1,050,000 and six 
positions to the Office of Intelligence and Analysis for 
counterintelligence activities. The recommendation includes a 
program increase, as requested, of $2,000,000 for the 
Classified National Security Information Program for State, 
Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Entities. In accordance with 
Executive Order 12549, this program will ensure that classified 
information shared with these entities meets Federal security 
standards for sharing classified information.

                OFFICE OF THE CHIEF PROCUREMENT OFFICER

    The Committee recommends $78,000,000 for the Office of the 
Chief Procurement Officer [OCPO], an increase of $3,403,000 
above the fiscal year 2011 level and $771,000 below the budget 
request. This recommendation includes requested decreases for 
adjustments-to-base that include reductions for administrative 
savings, professional services, and operational support. The 
increase of $3,403,000 above fiscal year 2011 is provided to 
enhance the Department's acquisition workforce capabilities and 
to strengthen cost estimating by adding cost analysts to each 
of the eight major components for oversight of large-scale 
procurements. The total amount for these initiatives is below 
the request due to a constrained budget environment.

                FEDERAL ACQUISITION WORKFORCE INITIATIVE

    Within the budgets of selected components, the Committee 
provides funding to increase the Department's acquisition 
workforce capacity and capabilities. The Department, like many 
other Federal agencies, is plagued by a lack of qualified 
acquisition professionals to develop, manage, and oversee 
acquisition programs appropriately. The Committee has been 
highly critical of the performance of many DHS acquisition 
programs and has aggressively funded additional FTE to bolster 
procurement oversight within the OCPO and in the components. In 
cases where the component requests were not funded at the 
requested amount, the Committee expects those components to use 
existing appropriations and fee authority [where appropriate] 
to hire and train highly qualified acquisition personnel.
    The Committee is disappointed in the initial assessment of 
Department-wide gaps in key acquisition disciplines. What the 
Committee received was simply a table with core acquisition 
needs by component. The Committee is looking for the analysis 
behind the numbers, the risks of not filling the positions, and 
the long-term strategy to fill competency gaps. The OCPO is to 
brief the Committee on these matters no later than 60 days 
after the date of enactment of this act.

           ACQUISITION PROFESSIONAL CAREER INTERNSHIP PROGRAM

    The Committee directs the OCPO to submit to the Committee, 
in conjunction with the President's fiscal year 2013 budget 
request, a report on the Acquisition Professional Internship 
Program as detailed in House Report 111-157.

                       ACQUISITION REVIEW PROCESS

    The Committee directs the OCPO to continue reporting 
quarterly on major acquisitions as outlined in Senate Report 
111-31. The Committee expects these reports to cover all major 
acquisition programs as required in Senate Report 111-31. The 
Department is to ensure that each acquisition covered in the 
report includes:
  --A discussion of current gaps and shortfalls, the 
        capabilities to be fielded, and the number of planned 
        increments;
  --Acquisition review board status of each acquisition, 
        including the current acquisition phase and date of the 
        last Acquisition Decision Event approval;
  --Whether or not an Independent Verification and Validation 
        has been implemented, with an explanation for the 
        decision;
  --A rating of the cost risk, schedule risk, and technical 
        risk associated with each acquisition project;
  --A table detailing unobligated balances to date and 
        anticipated unobligated balances at the close of the 
        fiscal year for each acquisition addressed in the 
        report; and
  --The date and cause of program breaches.

               OFFICE OF THE CHIEF HUMAN CAPITAL OFFICER

    The Committee recommends $39,337,000 for the Office of the 
Chief Human Capital Officer [OCHCO], $2,237,000 below the 
fiscal year 2011 level and $5,510,000 below the request. This 
recommendation includes requested reductions for administrative 
savings, professional services, and operational support. The 
increase of $688,000 in salaries and expenses is to enhance the 
Balanced Workforce Program Office, workforce training programs, 
and leadership development programs. The OCHCO shall brief the 
Committee no later than 90 days after the enactment of this act 
on its progress in implementing these programs in addition to 
its ongoing hiring reform initiatives, efforts to close 
mission-critical competency gaps, performance metrics, and an 
acquisition plan for an automated employee performance 
management and appraisal tool.
    The recommendation provides a total of $14,172,000 for 
Human Resources Information Technology, $2,514,000 below the 
request. The reduction is due to carryover balances available 
for this program.

                      OVER-RELIANCE ON CONTRACTORS

    The estimated number of contractors providing services in 
support of various DHS programs is 110,000 compared to 
approximately 221,000 Federal employees. According to the 
Department's congressional justification, ``The Quadrennial 
Homeland Security Review and the Bottom-Up Review have both 
confirmed a critical need to balance the DHS workforce by 
ensuring strong Federal control of all DHS work and reducing 
reliance on contractors.'' Initially, the Department identified 
3,500 contractor positions that should be eliminated or 
converted to Federal employee positions. As of April 2011, the 
Department has eliminated nearly 3,200 positions, of which 
2,400 were converted into new Federal jobs. The estimated 
savings associated with this effort is $28,000,000. The 
Department's fiscal year 2012 budget proposes to convert 
another 1,881 additional contract positions to Federal 
positions, anticipated as a result of the Balanced Workforce 
Strategy analysis. The Committee supports the Department's 
continued efforts to convert contractor positions to Federal 
jobs through its Balanced Workforce Initiative and the OCHCO-
managed program office leading the Department's efforts to 
examine the appropriate workforce best suited to meet mission 
needs. The Committee directs the Undersecretary for Management 
and Chief Human Capital Officer to brief the Committee no later 
than November 30, 2011, on its ongoing review, implementation 
plans, and the estimated savings associated with this effort 
and how those savings were calculated.

                       HUMAN RESOURCES SERVICING

    The Department has informed the Committee that beginning in 
fiscal year 2012, it plans to obtain human resources services 
from the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center [FLETC] 
instead of OCHCO's Human Resources Management Services [HRMS] 
division. There are multiple reasons for this functional 
transfer; however the primary factor is due to HRMS's 
difficulty complying with regulatory requirements in its 
recruitment and staffing missions. According to the Department, 
based on concerns raised by the Office of Personnel Management, 
the HRMS Delegated Examining Authority has been withdrawn from 
the Department's HRMS division, effective October 1, 2011. As a 
result, DHS has decided to partner with FLETC through an 
Interagency Agreement to fulfill its human resource service 
requirements, with FLETC being fully reimbursed through the 
Working Capital Fund for its services. The Department has 
assured the Committee this partnership will result in reduced 
costs for human resources service needs for headquarters 
components and will deliver these services in a more efficient 
manner. The Committee does not object to this arrangement as 
long as it does not adversely impact FLETC's mission 
requirements. The OCHCO and FLETC are to brief the Committee no 
later than 6 months after the date of enactment of this act on 
the execution of this plan.

               OFFICE OF THE CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER

    The Committee recommends $41,000,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses, a decrease of $2,300,000 below the fiscal year 2011 
level and $248,000 below the level requested in the budget.
    The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for continued 
facilities maintenance and upgrades at the Nebraska Avenue 
Complex [NAC], $489,000 below the fiscal year 2011 level and 
$398,000 below the request. This funding allows for the 
completion of the perimeter fence improvement project, the site 
utility upgrade project, and for other mechanical, electrical 
and building upgrades.
    The Chief Administrative Officer is to brief the Committee 
no later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this act 
on recommendations for savings from the identification of 
excess surplus property as described in the June 10, 2010, 
Presidential memorandum entitled ``Disposing of Unneeded 
Federal Real Estate.''

                 Office of the Chief Financial Officer

Appropriations, 2011....................................     $53,323,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................      62,395,000
House allowance.........................................      50,860,000
Committee recommendation................................      51,000,000

    The Office of the Chief Financial Officer is responsible 
for the fiscal management and financial accountability of the 
Department of Homeland Security. The Office of the Chief 
Financial Officer provides guidance and oversight of the 
Department's budget execution while ensuring that funds are 
allocated and expended in accordance with relevant laws and 
policies. This account funds the Budget Division, Office of 
Financial Operations, Office of Performance Analysis and 
Evaluation, Office of Financial Management, Resource Management 
Transition Office, and the Office of the Government 
Accountability Office/Office of Inspector General Audit 
Liaison.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $51,000,000 for the Office of the 
Chief Financial Officer [OCFO], a decrease of $2,323,000 below 
the fiscal year 2011 level and $11,395,000 less than the budget 
request. As a result of the Department's decision to cancel 
acquisition plans for the Transformation and Systems 
Consolidation [TASC] project and subsequent re-evaluation of 
its approach to improve DHS financial management systems, the 
recommendation does not include the $11,000,000 program request 
for TASC. The Committee recognizes the Department's need to 
improve the reliability and transparency of its financial data, 
and directs DHS to maintain frequent communications with the 
Committee on financial management improvement plans necessary 
to support the Department's missions. The Committee notes that 
balances remain available for TASC from prior year 
appropriations and this amount can be obligated in fiscal year 
2012 if a new strategy is approved by the DHS Acquisition 
Review Board; however, the Department must complete an 
independent evaluation to validate the strategy prior to 
obligating any of these funds.

                  ANNUAL APPROPRIATIONS JUSTIFICATIONS

    The Committee directs the CFO to ensure annual 
appropriations justifications are prepared for each component 
within the Department in support of the President's budget, as 
required under section 1105(a) of title 31, United States Code 
and submitted on the day the President's budget is delivered to 
Congress. The CFO shall submit as part of the fiscal year 2013 
budget justification the following: detailed information by 
appropriations account and PPA on all reimbursable agreements 
and significant uses of the Economy Act for each fiscal year; a 
detailed table identifying the last year that authorizing 
legislation was provided by Congress for each PPA; the amount 
of the authorization and the appropriation in the last year of 
authorization; and a report on the status of overdue Committee 
reports, plans, and briefings for fiscal years 2011 and 2012. 
In addition, with the Department's Explanation of Changes to 
General Provisions, to be included in the Department's annual 
congressional budget justification to the Committee, the CFO 
shall provide the text and citation of all Department 
appropriations provisions enacted to date that are permanent 
law.
    The CFO shall ensure that adequate justification is given 
to each increase, decrease, transfer, and staffing change 
proposed in the fiscal year 2013 budget justification, and that 
each item directed by the Committees to be provided as part of 
the fiscal year 2013 budget justification is delivered as 
mandated.
    Consistent with section 874 of Public Law 107-296, the 
Department shall submit a Future Years Homeland Security 
Program [FYSP] budget as part of the fiscal year 2013 budget 
justification. Having a forward-looking budget forecast 
provides a reasonable understanding of future program and 
acquisition needs and the proportionate resources needed to 
execute the Department's mission of protection and defense of 
the homeland, as well as emergency planning and response. The 
submission for fiscal years 2012-2016 was designated as ``For 
Official Use Only''. The Committee sees no reason why this 
designation is necessary and expects the submission for fiscal 
years 2013-2017 to be accessible to the public.

                  BUDGET EXECUTION AND STAFFING REPORT

    The Committee includes bill language requiring the 
Department to continue to submit to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations a monthly budget execution report 
showing the status of obligations and costs for all components 
of the Department and on-board staffing levels (Federal 
employees and contractors). The report shall include the total 
obligational authority appropriated (new budget authority plus 
unobligated carryover), undistributed obligational authority, 
amount allotted, current year obligations, unobligated 
authority (the difference between total obligational authority 
and current year obligations), beginning unexpended 
obligations, year-to-date costs, and ending unexpended 
obligations. This budget execution information is to be 
provided at the level of detail shown in the tables displayed 
at the end of this report for each departmental component and 
the Working Capital Fund. This report shall be submitted no 
later than 45 days after the close of each month.

                           EXPENDITURE PLANS

    The Committee continues requiring expenditure plans for 
specific DHS programs. These plans are intended to provide 
Congress with information to effectively oversee a particular 
program and hold the Department accountable for program 
results. Expenditure plans required by the Committee shall 
include, at a minimum: a description of how the plan satisfies 
any relevant legislative conditions for the expenditure plan; 
planned capabilities and benefits; cost and schedule 
commitments; measures of progress against commitments made in 
previous plans; how the program is being managed to provide 
reasonable assurance that the promised program capabilities, 
benefits, and cost and schedule commitments will be achieved; 
historical funding for the program, if applicable; and an 
obligation and outlay schedule.

                     OVERDUE QUARTERLY SBI REPORTS

    In addition to delayed expenditure plans, there are a 
number of regular reports that the Committees have required be 
submitted, in some cases for many years. For instance, the 
Committees have required quarterly submission of a report which 
in essence is a compilation of border security-related facts--
such as apprehensions at the border, number of illegal aliens 
removed, and miles of the border under effective control. The 
report is a snapshot of what the Department and its component 
agencies have accomplished during the previous quarter and the 
past years. The report is not supposed to be a press document 
requiring extensive narrative and/or ``spin''. Yet the reports 
continue to be delayed--in one case almost 6 months after the 
end of the fiscal year. This is unacceptable. The Committee 
directs the Department to submit these reports no later than 30 
days after the end of each quarter.
    Currently, the SBI quarterly reports are limited to 
statistics covering actions taken but lack any measurement of 
effectiveness or consequences. All future SBI quarterly 
reports, beginning with the first quarter of fiscal year 2012, 
shall include: (a) estimates of the impact of consequence 
programs (such as Operation Streamline) on the rate of 
recidivism of illegal border crossers; and, (b) for ports of 
entry, the maritime domain, and between the ports of entry, (1) 
estimates of total attempted border crossings, (2) the rate of 
apprehension of attempted border crossings, and (3) the inflow 
into the United States of illegal entrants that evade 
apprehension.

                Office of the Chief Information Officer

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $332,726,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................     277,972,000
House allowance.........................................     122,120,000
Committee recommendation................................     267,972,000

    The Office of the Chief Information Officer is responsible 
for oversight of information technology [IT] development, 
oversight of IT acquisition, alignment of IT systems and 
infrastructure to the enterprise architecture to support the 
missions and activities of the Department.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $267,972,000, of which 
$105,578,000 is for salaries and expenses, and $162,394,000 is 
to be available until fiscal year 2014 for Department-wide 
technology investments overseen by the Office of the Chief 
Information Officer [OCIO]. The recommendation is a decrease of 
$64,754,000 from the fiscal year 2011 level and $10,000,000 
below the level proposed in the budget request.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                                     OFFICE OF THE CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                   Fiscal year
                                                                   Fiscal year     2012 budget      Committee
                                                                  2011 enacted       request     recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Salaries and expenses..........................................          86,738         105,578          105,578
Information technology services................................          51,314          38,800           38,800
Infrastructure and security activities.........................         147,108          89,525           79,525
Homeland security data network.................................          47,566          44,069           44,069
                                                                ------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of the Chief Information Officer...........         332,726         277,972          267,972
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommendation includes $105,578,000, as 
requested, to provide oversight of technology management, 
shared services, and acquisition strategy for the Department. 
Funding is included, as requested, to support the Office of 
Accessible Systems and Technology.
    The Committee supports the realignment of $20,713,000 and 
147 FTE from the CIO's Department-wide IT projects to the 
Salaries and Expenses PPA. The Committee also supports the no-
cost annualization of 70 FTE that were formerly contract 
positions. Finally, the Committee includes $253,000, as 
requested, to strengthen acquisition workforce capabilities.

                       MULTI-YEAR INVESTMENT PLAN

    The Committee includes bill language requiring a multi-year 
investment plan be submitted to the Committees on 
Appropriations with the fiscal year 2013 budget submission to 
Congress.

                    INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES

    The Committee recommendation includes $38,800,000 for 
Information Technology Services, as requested in the budget. 
Consistent with the request, the recommended amount includes: a 
$2,700,000 increase for the implementation of DHS-wide 
standards for the sharing of common services, establishment of 
interoperable systems, and other systems integration 
priorities; and a $7,600,000 increase for enterprise data 
management to establish procedures and practices across the 
components to lower development costs and decrease operations 
and maintenance costs.

                 INFRASTRUCTURE AND SECURITY ACTIVITIES

    The Committee recommendation includes $79,525,000 for 
Infrastructure and Security Activities, $10,000,000 below the 
amount requested in the budget. The recommended amount 
includes: a $12,268,000 increase, as requested, to continue 
development of a single sign-on capability; and a $10,000,000 
increase, $10,000,000 below the request, to consolidate 
component messaging systems into the two DHS data centers and 
transition to an ``everything as a service'' model. The 
Committee believes these are vital investments necessary to 
ensure that a mature infrastructure is in place that meets the 
Department's needs. The Department is directed to continue to 
provide quarterly briefings to the Committee on the progress on 
implementing OneNet and migration to Networx. The reduction 
below the request reflects amounts to consolidate component 
messaging systems that will not be obligated in fiscal year 
2012. The reduction below fiscal year 2011 reflects requested 
savings in administrative services, realignment of personnel to 
the salaries and expenses PPA, and nonrecurring funds for Data 
Center migration for DHS headquarters offices.

                         DATA CENTER MIGRATION

    The Committee provides $76,390,000 specifically to various 
Departmental components for data center migration. The CIO 
shall continue to provide quarterly briefings to the Committees 
on the progress of data center development and migration. The 
Committee is aware that component data center migration 
schedules may shift during the course of the fiscal year based 
on changing circumstances and priorities. As a result, the bill 
includes a general provision allowing the Secretary to transfer 
funds made available for data center migration, as necessary, 
among components based on revised schedules and priorities with 
15 days prior notice to the Committees. The OCIO is also 
directed to include information on revised schedules in the 
quarterly briefings.
    Consistent with section 888 of Public Law 107-296, the 
Committee instructs the Department to implement the 
consolidation plan in a manner that shall not result in a 
reduction to the Coast Guard's Operations Systems Center 
mission or its Government-employed or contract staff levels. A 
general provision is included for this purpose.

                        Analysis and Operations

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $334,360,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................     355,368,000
House allowance.........................................     344,368,000
Committee recommendation................................     339,368,000

    The account supports activities to improve the analysis and 
sharing of threat information, including activities of the 
Office of Intelligence and Analysis [I&A] and the Office of 
Operations Coordination.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $339,368,000 for Analysis and 
Operations. This is an increase of $5,008,000 above the fiscal 
year 2011 level and a decrease of $16,000,000 from the budget 
request. The details of these recommendations are included in a 
classified annex accompanying this report.

                   DHS INTELLIGENCE EXPENDITURE PLAN

    The Committee requires the Department's Chief Intelligence 
Officer to submit an expenditure plan for fiscal year 2012 no 
later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this act.
    The plan shall include the following:
  --fiscal year 2012 expenditures and staffing allotted for 
        each program as compared to fiscal years 2011 and 2010;
  --all funded versus on-board positions, including Federal 
        FTE, contractors, and reimbursable and nonreimbursable 
        detailees;
  --an explanation for maintaining contract staff in lieu of 
        Federal FTE;
  --a plan, including dates or timeframes for achieving key 
        milestones, to reduce the office's reliance on contract 
        staff in lieu of Federal FTE;
  --funding, by object classification, including a comparison 
        to fiscal years 2011 and 2010; and
  --the number of I&A-funded employees supporting organizations 
        outside I&A and within DHS.
    The expenditure plan shall focus the activities of the 
Office on areas where the Department can provide unique 
expertise or serve intelligence customers who are not supported 
by other components of the Intelligence Community, consistent 
with current statute and Executive orders, and in a way that 
does not impair intelligence support to the senior leadership 
of the Department of Homeland Security.

                           FEDERAL WORKFORCE

    The Committee supports the Department's plans to more 
appropriately balance the I&A workforce with Federal employees 
as compared to a reliance on contract employees. To help meet 
this objective, the Committee encourages the Department to seek 
hiring authority on par with other Intelligence Community 
agencies.

                             C2 GAP FILLER

    The Committee denies funding for the C2 Gap Filler project 
due to an insufficient justification, the need to support core 
DHS operations, and the lack of clarity surrounding future 
costs and requirements.

                     STATE AND LOCAL FUSION CENTERS

    The Committee directs I&A to brief the Committee quarterly 
on progress in placing DHS intelligence professionals in State 
and local fusion centers [SLFC]. These briefings shall include: 
the qualification criteria used by DHS to decide where and how 
to place DHS intelligence analysts and related technology; 
total Federal expenditures to support each center to date and 
during the most recent quarter of the current fiscal year, in 
the same categorization as materials submitted to the 
Committees on Appropriations on March 23, 2007; the location of 
each fusion center, including identification of those with DHS 
personnel, both operational and planned; the schedule for 
operational stand-up of planned fusion centers and their 
locations; the number of DHS-funded employees located at each 
fusion center, including details on whether the employees are 
contract or Government staff; the privacy protection policies 
of each center, including the number of facility personnel 
trained in Federal privacy, civil rights, and civil liberties 
laws and standards; and the number of local law enforcement 
agents at each center approved or pending approval to receive 
and review classified intelligence information. The Committee 
also expects that performance metrics will be developed to 
judge the success of I&A's SLFC program. These metrics shall be 
presented at the first quarterly briefing.

                      Office of Inspector General

Appropriations, 2011\1\.................................    $113,646,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................     144,318,000
House allowance\1\......................................     124,000,000
Committee recommendation\1\.............................     125,000,000

\1\Excludes $16,000,000 made available from the FEMA Disaster Relief 
Fund.

    This account finances the Office of Inspector General's 
activities, including audits, inspections, investigations, and 
other reviews of programs and operations of the Department of 
Homeland Security to promote economy, efficiency, and 
effectiveness and to prevent and detect fraud, waste, and 
abuse.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $125,000,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General [OIG] for fiscal year 2012, $11,354,000 above 
the fiscal year 2011 level and $3,318,000 below the comparable 
budget request. In addition, the Committee includes bill 
language transferring $16,000,000 needed by the OIG for audits 
and investigations related to natural disasters from the 
Disaster Relief Fund [DRF]. The OIG is required to notify the 
Committee no less than 15 days prior to all transfers from the 
DRF. Included in the recommendation are increased resources for 
integrity oversight and investigations. The Committee directs 
the Inspector General to submit a plan for expenditure of all 
funds no later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this 
act.
    The Committee is pleased that the Secretary, pursuant to 
Public Law 110-161, established a direct link to the DHS OIG on 
the DHS Web site. The Committee directs the Secretary to update 
and maintain the Web link.

                          INTEGRITY OVERSIGHT

    Since fiscal year 2006, U.S. Customs and Border Protection 
has hired more than 19,176 new employees, a 46 percent 
increase, and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has 
hired over 4,747 new personnel, a 31 percent increase. The 
Committee is concerned due to the rapid hiring in CBP and ICE, 
that there is the potential for increased corruption. To avoid 
corruption and misconduct, it is imperative that all agents, 
especially new hires, receive comprehensive training in ethics 
and public integrity. The OIG provides ethics training to all 
agencies and is in charge of investigating all allegations of 
criminal misconduct throughout the Department. It is essential 
that the OIG, CBP, and ICE work jointly and cooperatively to 
combat corruption. Within the total funding recommended, the 
Committee provides the OIG an increase of no less than 
$4,000,000 for integrity investigations. The Inspector General 
shall submit a plan to the Committee on Appropriations no later 
than 45 days after the date of enactment of this act for the 
expenditure of integrity oversight funds in coordination with 
CBP and ICE.

                                TITLE II

               SECURITY, ENFORCEMENT, AND INVESTIGATIONS

                   U.S. Customs and Border Protection

                                SUMMARY

    U.S. Customs and Border Protection is responsible for 
enforcing laws regarding admission of foreign-born persons into 
the United States, and ensuring that all goods and persons 
entering and exiting the United States do so legally.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends total resources of 
$11,655,225,000, including direct appropriations of 
$10,242,040,000 and estimated fee collections of 
$1,413,185,000.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                               U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION--FUNDING SUMMARY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2011  Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Appropriations:
    Salaries and expenses.................................         8,196,198         8,725,555         8,762,103
    Automation modernization..............................           335,902           364,030           334,275
    Border Security Fencing, Infrastructure, and                     573,024           527,623           400,000
     Technology [BSFIT]...................................
    Air and Marine interdiction, operations, maintenance,            515,294           470,566           506,566
     and procurement......................................
    Construction and facilities management................           259,480           283,822           239,096
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Appropriations...............................         9,879,898        10,371,596        10,242,040
                                                           =====================================================
Estimated fee collections:
    Immigration inspection user fee.......................           525,443           527,629           527,629
    Immigration enforcement fines.........................             1,037             1,041             1,041
    ESTA..................................................  ................            44,524            44,524
    Land border inspection fee............................            28,598            28,909            28,909
    COBRA fee.............................................           390,974           440,521           385,521
    APHIS inspection fee..................................           318,472           323,000           323,000
    Global entry user fee.................................             2,500             2,615             2,615
    Puerto Rico Trust Fund................................            89,980            91,779            91,779
    Small airport user fee................................             8,164             8,167             8,167
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Estimated fee collections....................         1,365,168         1,468,185         1,413,185
                                                           =====================================================
      Total, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, available        11,245,066        11,839,781        11,655,225
       funding............................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2011....................................  $8,196,198,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................   8,725,555,000
House allowance.........................................   8,769,518,000
Committee recommendation................................   8,762,103,000

    The U.S. Customs and Border Protection [CBP] Salaries and 
Expenses appropriation provides funds for border security, 
immigration, customs, agricultural inspections, regulating and 
facilitating international trade, collecting import duties, and 
enforcing U.S. trade laws. In addition to directly appropriated 
resources, fee collections are available for the operations of 
CBP from the following sources:
    Immigration Inspection User Fee.--CBP collects user fees to 
fund the costs of international inspections activities at 
airports and seaports, as authorized by the Immigration and 
Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1356).
    Electronic System for Travel Authorization Fee.--CBP 
collects fees to cover the cost of operating and implementing a 
system to pre-screen visitors from countries participating in 
the Visa Waiver Program prior to their arrival in the United 
States to avoid security risks, as authorized by section 
711(h)(3)(B) of the 9/11 Act (Public Law 110-53).
    Immigration Enforcement Fine.--CBP collects fines from 
owners of transportation lines and persons for unauthorized 
landing of aliens, as authorized by the Immigration and 
Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1356).
    Land Border Inspection Fee.--CBP collects fees for 
processing applications for the Dedicated Commuter Lanes 
program, the Automated Permit Ports program, the Canadian 
Border Boat Landing program, and both Canadian and Mexican Non-
Resident Alien Border Crossing Cards, as authorized by the 
Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1356).
    Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act [COBRA] 
Fee.--CBP collects fees for inspection services involving 
customs-related functions. The COBRA user fee statutory 
authority (19 U.S.C. 58c) specifies the types of expenses to be 
reimbursed and the order for the reimbursement of these types 
of expenses.
    Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Inspection 
Fee.--CBP receives as a transfer a distribution of agriculture 
inspection fees collected by the United States Department of 
Agriculture. The user fees, as authorized by the Food, 
Agriculture, Conservation, and Trade Act of 1990 (21 U.S.C. 
136), are charged to offset costs for the services related to 
the importation, entry, or exportation of animals and animal 
products.
    Global Entry User Fee.--CBP collects fees to cover the cost 
of a registered traveler program to expedite screening and 
processing of international passengers as authorized under the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2008, section 565(3)(B).
    Puerto Rico Trust Fund.--Customs duties, taxes, and fees 
collected in Puerto Rico by CBP are deposited in the Puerto 
Rico Trust Fund. After providing for the expenses of 
administering CBP activities in Puerto Rico, the remaining 
amounts are transferred to the Treasurer of Puerto Rico 
pursuant to 48 U.S.C. sections 740 and 795.
    Small Airport User Fee.--The User Fee Airports Program 
authorized under 19 U.S.C. 58b and administered under 19 U.S.C. 
58c(b)(9)(A)(i), authorizes inspection services to be provided 
to participating small airports on a fully reimbursable basis. 
The fees charged under this program are set forth in a 
memorandum of agreement between the small airport facility and 
the agency, and may be adjusted annually as costs and 
requirements change.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $8,762,103,000 for salaries and 
expenses of U.S. Customs and Border Protection [CBP] for fiscal 
year 2012, including $3,274,000 from the Harbor Maintenance 
Trust Fund. The Committee includes bill language making 
available up to $150,000 for payment for rental space for 
preclearance operations and $1,000,000 for payments to 
informants. The Committee also includes bill language placing a 
$35,000 annual limit on overtime paid to any employee.
    Included in the Committee's recommendation is full funding 
requested in the budget for the law enforcement journeyman pay 
adjustment for CBP officers and Border Patrol agents and full 
annualization of officers and agents initially funded in prior 
year appropriations acts (including the 1,000 new Border Patrol 
agents funded in the Emergency Supplemental Border Security 
Appropriations Act, 2010). The Committee notes that the 
journeyman pay grade increase will affect 24,371 CBP employees 
in fiscal year 2012.
    The Committee recommends $20,692,000 for an additional 300 
CBP officers at new and expanded ports of entry; $2,212,000 for 
additional canine units; $7,499,000 to expand the Immigration 
Advisory Program to four additional overseas locations; and 
$7,500,000 for cargo container scanning pilot projects, all as 
requested in the budget. The Committee does not approve funds 
requested specifically for the acquisition workforce initiative 
but encourages CBP to use existing appropriations and fees to 
hire and train highly qualified procurement personnel.
    The Committee does not approve the Presidents' budget 
proposal to adjust the fees collected pursuant to the 
Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985 [COBRA], 
and instead recommends an additional $55,000,000 to support the 
funding requirements for CBP staffing of 21,186 officers.
    Increases above the request for officer integrity, 
screening and targeting, and antidumping and trade enforcement 
are discussed later in this report.

                      REVISED BUDGET PRESENTATION

    The Committee has been concerned about the lack of detail 
provided in the CBP ``Salaries and Expenses'' budget for two 
large categories--the Inspections, Trade, and Travel 
Facilitation at Ports of Entry PPA and the Border Security and 
Control PPA. The President's fiscal year 2012 requests of 
$2,507,235,000 and $3,530,994,000, respectively, for these PPAs 
provide insufficient detail for the Committee to make fiscally 
responsible budget recommendations. The Committee directs the 
CBP Chief Financial Officer to work with the Committee on a 
revised budget presentation for the fiscal year 2013 request.

                 FINANCIAL PLAN BY OFFICE REQUIREMENTS

    To help facilitate oversight by the Committee, CBP is 
directed to submit to the Committee within 90 days of the date 
of enactment of this act, a financial plan reflecting a 
detailed breakout of funding by office for each of the major 
PPAs in the Salaries and Expenses appropriation. This financial 
plan shall include the prior year's plan, actual expenditures 
for the prior year, as well as the planned expenditures for 
fiscal year 2012.

              PORT OF ENTRY STAFFING AND RELIANCE ON FEES

    The Committee notes that more than one-third of CBP 
officers are funded by inspection and immigration-related fees 
collected on passengers and goods entering the United States. 
Due to the global recession and decrease in travelers to the 
United States in the past few years, anticipated fee revenue 
has fallen short of its estimates. This has resulted in 
reallocations of increasingly scarce appropriated funds to meet 
the shortfalls and maintain adequate staffing at the ports of 
entry [POEs]. As discussed above, the Committee was required to 
find $55,000,000 in appropriations in this bill to meet the 
funding shortfall necessitated by the budget's reliance on a 
proposed increase in fees. If the intention is to continue to 
rely on fee revenue to pay for a significant portion of CBP 
personnel, the Department must work with CBP, the Office of 
Management and Budget, and the appropriate congressional 
authorizing committees to adjust fee levels to meet the growing 
staffing requirements.
    At the same time, the Committee urges CBP to provide 
transparency on its staffing requirements at the POEs with 
local officials, including owners and operators of the port 
authorities. While mindful of law enforcement and security 
sensitivities, the Committee believes it is important that the 
Federal Government be a good partner with local officials who 
need to make their own decisions regarding port expansion and 
investment of local resources. The Committee directs CBP to 
update the POE staffing model, with a particular emphasis on 
staffing requirements reflecting both the new and renovated 
POEs which have been brought online as well as the increase in 
cross-border commercial and passenger traffic as the economy 
improves, and submit it to the Committee not later than 180 
days after the date of enactment of this act.

     IMPROVING THE ENTRY PROCESS FOR VISITORS TO THE UNITED STATES

    In prepared testimony for the March 2, 2011, hearing before 
the Committee, the Secretary stated the second Homeland 
Security mission is to secure the Nation's borders ``to prevent 
illegal activity while facilitating lawful travel and trade.'' 
The Committee welcomes visitors to the United States, but 
remains concerned about frequent comments from constituents who 
travel internationally that the entry process coming into this 
country is lengthy and daunting. It often takes hours for 
passengers to be processed once arriving at an airport. There 
are long lines, not all arrival lanes are open and staffed, and 
the information provided to arriving passengers is often 
confusing. Additionally, travelers have expressed concerns, 
especially in the air environment, about the way they are 
treated by CBP officers upon their arrival at the airport. The 
visitors are often tired and there may be language barriers, 
but unfortunately what makes the media reports is that CBP 
officers are brusque and treat the visitor as if he or she is 
guilty while performing required entry inspections. The 
Committee understands the CBP officers' primary duty is 
security and ensuring that the individual before them is 
eligible for entry into the country, however, the officer is 
also the first impression the traveler has of America and 
Americans.
    The Committee is aware that the Department has initiated 
programs to try and address some of these issues, such as the 
Model Ports of Entry program and the Global Entry Program. The 
Committee directs the Commissioner to submit a report to the 
Committee not later than December 1, 2011, on the actions it 
has taken and programs it has implemented to improve the entry 
process experience for travelers, including customer service. 
The report should include how CBP and the Department have 
implemented the recommendations proposed by the Secure Borders 
and Open Doors Advisory Committee such as the International 
Registered Traveler program and those programs listed above. 
The report should also describe the training CBP officers are 
provided regarding ``welcoming'' visitors as they are being 
processed, including aspects of courtesy and customer service, 
as well as any reasons why officers should not be provided such 
instruction. Finally, the report should explain in detail how 
these existing programs, and others, have reduced wait times, 
how much money has been directed to these improved entry 
programs for each of fiscal years 2008-2011, and how funds 
provided in the fiscal year 2012 act will be used to continue 
and expand these and other programs. The Committee urges the 
report to discuss and explore how CBP can expand its work with 
private entities, including the tourist industry, to assist in 
this effort.
    The Committee notes that the Department operates a 
disparate number of trusted traveler programs including, but 
not limited to, Global Entry, FAST, Nexus, and SENTRI. The 
Committee directs DHS to provide a briefing to the Committee 
not later than November 1, 2011, on the scope of all DHS 
trusted traveler programs, their commonalities and differences, 
their financing mechanisms, and possibilities for 
consolidation. This review should be led by the Office of 
Policy.

                       SOUTHWEST BORDER SECURITY

    The Committee continues its multi-faceted initiative, begun 
in 2005, to improve security on the border by increasing 
personnel, technology, training, and infrastructure. Over the 
6-year period ending in fiscal year 2010, Border Patrol 
apprehensions along the Southwest Border decreased by 61 
percent, from 1,189,075 to 463,382. This reduction is an 
indication that the combined effect of the recession and our 
bipartisan efforts to secure the border are resulting in fewer 
people attempting to illegally cross the border. Similarly, 
between fiscal years 2008-2010, illegal bulk cash seizures rose 
36 percent; illegal weapons seizures rose 7 percent; and 
illegal drug seizures rose 40 percent.
    The Committee notes there has been an increased level of 
violence being directed at our Border Patrol agents and CBP 
officers stationed at and between our ports of entry. Between 
fiscal years 2008-2010, there has been an average of 1,077 
assaults on agents and officers. These assaults range from 
``rockings''--in which large rocks or hunks of concrete are 
thrown down on agents from on top of border fences--to physical 
and vehicle assaults, shootings, and other attempts to impede 
law enforcement operations. Additionally, in the past 3 years 
we have experienced the tragic killings of a Border Patrol 
Agent deliberately run down in January 2008, in the Yuma Sector 
by drug traffickers attempting to flee south into Mexico, an 
Agent shot multiple times in July 2009, while on night patrol 
near Campo Station as he followed a suspicious group of 
individuals, and an Agent shot in the mountains of the Tucson 
Sector in December, 2010, during a night patrol when he and 
fellow agents responded to reports of individuals preying on a 
group of illegal aliens. As of April 30, 2011, there have been 
413 assaults on agents and officers this fiscal year. As we 
have moved to further secure the Southwest Border, we have 
increased the cost of doing business for the smugglers while 
also increasing their levels of frustration. The Committee 
supports CBP's efforts to protect the women and men working on 
our frontlines and requests semiannual briefings on assaults on 
its personnel, as part of the briefings discussed below, with 
the first briefing no later than November 1, 2011.
    In March 2009, the Secretary of Homeland Security announced 
a major initiative to assist the Mexican Government in 
combating drug cartel violence by deploying additional CBP and 
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement [ICE] personnel and 
resources to the Southwest Border. With funds provided to CBP 
and ICE in the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2009 (Public 
Law 111-32), the Emergency Supplemental Border Security 
Appropriations Act, 2010, the Department of Homeland Security 
Appropriations Act, 2010, and the Department of Defense and 
Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act, 2011, more than 
$500,000,000 has been added above the President's requests for 
Southwest Border security, including outbound inspections to 
combat smuggling of guns and bulk cash which support the drug 
cartels. With the funds provided in fiscal years 2010 and 2011 
for CBP's air and marine operations account, 3 additional 
unmanned aircraft systems [UAS] have been funded and, once 
brought online, will bring CBP's inventory of UASs to 10 
patrolling our borders.

              MONITORING PROGRESS ON THE SOUTHWEST BORDER

    As noted above, the Congress has provided significant 
resources to address border security and respond to the 
violence in Mexico. It is important, however, to know how these 
resources have been deployed and the impact they are having on 
addressing current and potential threats. The Committee directs 
the Department to provide to the Committees semiannual 
briefings on the status of threats to the border and the 
progress being made on addressing this threat. The Department 
is directed to coordinate these briefings and include 
representatives of CBP and ICE and other DHS agencies and 
entities as appropriate.
    The Committee directs CBP to submit a report not later than 
December 1, 2011, on the costs associated with the 
establishment and operation of the Joint Field Command in the 
Tucson Sector. The report should include the purpose for its 
establishment, the analysis associated with creating this 
specific function for this Sector, the annual costs to operate 
since its creation, the level of staffing--both permanent and 
temporary duty--by quarter (including the sectors from which 
the staff have been detailed), and the length of the temporary 
duty.

                          CROSS-BORDER TUNNELS

    According to recent DHS reports, tunnels along the United 
States-Mexico border will remain an attractive alternative to 
overland drug smuggling because of increased security measures 
and aggressive enforcement activity on traditional cross-border 
routes. More than 13 cross-border tunnels have been found along 
the United States-Mexico border in fiscal year 2011, surpassing 
the 12 discovered in all of fiscal year 2010. Of these tunnels, 
more than nine have been found in Nogales. The Committee 
supports the ongoing efforts of the DHS Tunnel Task Force to 
detect and respond to new tunnels and directs continued 
submission of the required tunnel report and directs CBP to 
dedicate sufficient resources to continue detecting, responding 
to, and remediating tunnels as they are encountered. The report 
shall detail the level of support provided to this activity by 
other Federal Government agencies, including equipment used.

               DRUG TRAFFICKING ORGANIZATION ``SPOTTERS''

    The Committee is concerned that reports of activities by 
drug cartel ``spotters''--individuals stationed in key 
locations in the United States along drug and alien smuggling 
routes on the Southwest Border--are increasing. The Committee 
directs the Secretary to submit a report detailing the extent 
and scope of this activity, its impact on Federal border law 
enforcement activities, methods it uses--or is considering 
using--to stop or limit this activity, and specific Federal, 
State, or local laws violated by these individuals and their 
activities. The report should also note, if applicable, whether 
this activity is illegal and/or preventable. A classified 
version of the report should be submitted if necessary.

                   BORDER COMMUNITY LIAISON OFFICERS

    The Committee is aware that where they have been used, 
border community relations nonuniformed officers have improved 
collaboration with local border communities and helped the 
Border Patrol and Office of Field Operations more effectively 
carry out their missions. The Committee, therefore, encourages 
CBP to deploy more such officers to areas that could benefit 
from their presence, and directs CBP to brief the Committees 
not later than 90 days after enactment of this act on the role 
such officers play, and the status of service-oriented training 
for CBP Officers and Border Patrol agents.

                    CONDUCT AND INTEGRITY OVERSIGHT

    Since Congress initiated the significant increase in CBP 
staffing in 2005, the Committee has been concerned about the 
potential for increased corruption by CBP personnel. Since 
2007, the Congress has provided over $11,000,000 more than the 
Presidents have requested for program integrity efforts. Since 
fiscal year 2005, the number of CBP personnel arrested or 
indicted for acts of corruption has grown from 27 to 128. The 
Committee remains committed to addressing this problem. The 
Committee expects the administration to join in the effort to 
get ahead of this problem in the fiscal year 2013 budget.
    The Committee recommends a total of $170,681,000, 
$5,000,000 above the request for CBP to expand integrity 
training for its officers, conduct investigations, reduce the 
backlog of reviews and polygraphs, and meet the requirements of 
the Anti-Border Corruption Act of 2011 (Public Law 111-338). 
CBP has hired more than 19,176 new personnel, a 46 percent 
increase since fiscal year 2006.

                          BORDER PATROL AGENTS

    Since Congress began increasing the size of the Border 
Patrol by funding the hiring of 500 new agents in the Emergency 
Supplemental Appropriations Act for Defense, the Global War on 
Terror, and Tsunami Relief, 2005 (Public Law 109-13), a total 
of 10,106 new Border Patrol agents, and attendant support 
positions, will have been funded and hired through the end of 
fiscal year 2011. The Congress strongly supports the Border 
Patrol mission of securing our borders and fully funds the 
fiscal year 2012 request.
    Included in the amount recommended by the Committee for 
``Border Security and Control'' is a total of $3,619,604,000, 
as requested. With the 1,000 new Border Patrol agents funded as 
part of the Emergency Supplemental Border Security Act, 2010, 
combined with the funds in this act, there will be 21,370 
Border Patrol agents on duty, more than double the 9,951 agents 
on board at the end of fiscal year 2002.
    Bill language is included mandating a floor of not less 
than 21,370 Border Patrol agents on-board throughout fiscal 
year 2012.
    The Committee is impressed by the work performed by the 
National Guard on the Southwest Border assisting the Border 
Patrol in monitoring the border and reporting any incursions. 
The Committee notes that while the President announced on June 
17, 2011, an extension of the Guard on the border through the 
end of fiscal year 2011, no decision has yet been made to 
further extend its deployment into fiscal year 2012 and no 
funds have been requested in the budget for this purpose. The 
Committee urges the administration to make a determination on 
the presence of the Guard into the next fiscal year at the 
earliest practicable point and to request the appropriate level 
of funding for the National Guard to support this important 
mission.

                          OPERATION STREAMLINE

    The Committee supports Operation Streamline, a program in 
which individuals apprehended crossing the Southwest border are 
sentenced by a judge to serve a period of time in jail. In 
Border Patrol sectors where Operation Streamline is robustly in 
effect, there has been a noticeable reduction in attempted 
illegal crossings. The Committee encourages the Department to 
work with the appropriate Department of Justice agencies and 
the Judiciary to expand Operation Streamline to additional 
Border Patrol sectors.

                     NORTHERN BORDER PORT STAFFING

    The Committee commends CBP for achieving its goal of 
stationing 2,212 Border Patrol agents on the Northern Border by 
the end of calendar year 2010. The Committee remains concerned, 
however, about CBP officer staffing levels for Northern Border 
ports of entry. The Committee believes that many of the 
concerns about Northern Border staffing could be allayed by 
more complete reporting to Congress about CBP's Northern Border 
staffing plans. The Committee directs CBP to submit a plan with 
the fiscal year 2013 budget detailing specific staffing and 
funding for, and implementation of, planned Northern Border 
enforcement initiatives. The Committee also directs CBP to 
provide a briefing to the Committee not later than December 1, 
2011, on the CBP officer staffing requirements on the Northern 
Border based on increased trade flows and the current threat 
environment.

                    TRADE ENFORCEMENT AND COMPLIANCE

    The Committee is concerned that CBP may not be providing 
sufficient resources and personnel to the Office of Trade. The 
volume of trade continues to expand and as the economy improves 
the country will experience an even greater volume of trade. 
The Committee recommends $151,298,000, $5,000,000 above the 
request, for trade enforcement and compliance activities in the 
Office of Trade. The funds above the request are directed for 
the hiring of additional trade enforcement and compliance 
personnel to enhance targeted abilities to collect duties and 
develop the enforcement and compliance strategy discussed 
below. Additional funds are provided for the Automated 
Targeting System and the National Targeting Center to enhance 
trade targeting systems.
    The Committee remains focused on the need for all Federal 
Government agencies involved in international trade to 
aggressively enforce existing trade laws. During a hearing 
before the subcommittee on May 25, 2011, it became clear that 
there are specific actions that CBP and ICE, together with the 
Departments of Commerce and State and the United States Trade 
Representative, can take without the need for additional 
legislation. According to CBP's own statistics, more than 
$1,000,000,000 in duties related to antidumping from 2001 to 
2010 have yet to be collected.
    The Committee directs the Department to submit a 3-year 
strategy to develop a robust and forward-leaning trade 
compliance enforcement framework. The strategy shall include a 
detailed hiring and staffing plan for the Office of Trade to 
fill critical trade enforcement and administrative positions, 
including those dedicated to trade targeting and analysis of 
trade trends, such as CBP officers; trade specialists; Fines, 
Penalties, and Forfeitures officers; and auditors. The plan 
shall also address issues related to training requirements and 
the development of an antidumping/countervailing duty [AD/CVD] 
risk model.
    As part of the plan, the Committee encourages CBP to look 
at focused use of single transaction bonds to target higher-
risk importers as well as ``new shipper'' rules. Use of such 
bonds should be strategically based on risk-adjusted modeling. 
This strategy is to be submitted to the Committee not later 
than 180 days after the date of enactment of this act.
    Additionally, the Committee directs CBP to submit the 
updated resource optimization model required to be prepared 
under section 403 of the SAFE Port Act.

              TRADE COMPLIANCE--PRODUCT VERIFICATION TEAMS

    Due to their success in the area of textiles, the Committee 
directs CBP and ICE to work with the U.S. Trade Representative 
and the State Department to review the possible uses of product 
verification teams to combat transshipment violations for 
products subject to antidumping/countervailing duties. Further, 
the report should make recommendations to the Committee on how 
to make better use of and expand product verification teams not 
later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this act.

                   TRADE COMPLIANCE--BROKER COMMUNITY

    The Committee urges CBP to investigate ways to work with 
the broker community to encourage or require brokers to develop 
``know your customer'' programs to promote integrity within the 
importer community. It is important that customs brokers know 
the foreign entity with which they have agreed to do business. 
The Committee directs CBP to work with the Department of 
Commerce on the feasibility and impacts of requiring foreign 
importers of record to have a U.S. agent that is financially 
liable, and report the results to the Committee by April 13, 
2012.

                 TRADE COMPLIANCE--INFORMATION SHARING

    The Committee understands that current law may 
unintentionally prohibit the Department of Commerce from 
sharing proprietary information with CBP vital to determining 
violations or claims with respect to any provision of the 
Tariff Act of 1930. The Committee urges the Department to 
coordinate jointly with the Department of Commerce on a 
legislative proposal to amend the appropriate section of the 
United States Code to remove any legal barriers to sharing of 
appropriate and necessary information between these prime 
federal trade compliance and enforcement agencies.

        ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTY ENFORCEMENT REPORTS

    The Committee has ensured that, within the amounts provided 
for in this account, there will be sufficient funds to 
administer the ongoing requirements of section 754 of the 
Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1675c), referenced in subtitle F 
of title VII of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (Public Law 
109-171; 120 Stat. 154).
    The Committee directs CBP to continue to work with the 
Departments of Commerce and the Treasury, and the Office of the 
United States Trade Representative (and all other relevant 
agencies) to increase collections, and provide a public report 
on an annual basis, within 30 days of each year's distributions 
under the law. The report should summarize CBP's efforts to 
collect past due amounts and increase current collections, 
particularly with respect to cases involving unfairly traded 
United States imports from China. The report shall provide the 
amount of uncollected duties for each antidumping and 
countervailing duty order, and indicate the amount of open, 
unpaid bills for each such order. In that report, the 
Secretary, in consultation with other relevant agencies, 
including the Secretaries of the Treasury and Commerce, should 
also advise as to whether CBP can adjust its bonding 
requirements to further protect revenue without violating U.S. 
law or international obligations, and without imposing 
unreasonable costs upon importers.
    The Committee further directs the Secretary to work with 
the Secretary of Commerce to identify opportunities for the 
Commerce Department to improve the timeliness, accuracy, and 
clarity of liquidation instructions sent to CBP. Increased 
attention and interagency coordination in these areas could 
help ensure that steps in the collection of duties are 
completed in a more expeditious manner.
    Consistent with section 691a of Public Law 103-182, the 
North American Free Trade Agreement Implementing Act of 1993, 
the Committee directs the Commissioner of Customs to submit to 
Congress before the 60th day of each fiscal year a report 
regarding the collection during the preceding fiscal year of 
duties imposed under the antidumping and countervailing duty 
laws. The Committee directs CBP to work with the Departments of 
Commerce and the Treasury, and the Office of the United States 
Trade Representative (and all other relevant agencies) to 
increase collections, and provide a public report on an annual 
basis.
    The report should summarize CBP's efforts to collect past 
due amounts and increase overall current collections, 
particularly with respect to cases involving unfairly traded 
United States imports from China. The report shall provide the 
amount of uncollected duties for each antidumping and 
countervailing duty order, and indicate the amount of open, 
unpaid bills for each such order. In that report, the 
Secretary, in consultation with other relevant agencies, 
including the Secretaries of the Treasury and Commerce, should 
also advise as to whether CBP can adjust its bonding 
requirements to further protect revenue without violating U.S. 
law or international obligations, and without imposing 
unreasonable costs upon importers.
    Separately, CBP is directed to report to the Committee on 
collection of the outstanding $1,000,000,000 in antidumping/
countervailing duties, including the number of claims, the 
value of each claim, the stage of collection for each claim, 
and the date on which the claim was referred for further action 
to either the CBP Chief Counsel or U.S. Department of Justice. 
This report shall be submitted to the Committee not later than 
180 days after the date of enactment of this act.

                               JONES ACT

    CBP is charged with enforcement of U.S. cabotage laws. The 
Jones Act provides for the national and economic security of 
the United States by supporting a strong U.S. merchant marine. 
By virtue of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, as amended 
by Public Law 106-580, the coastwise laws apply to marine 
transportation between points and places in the United States, 
including the Outer Continental Shelf. U.S. vessels, mariners, 
and shipyards have been negatively impacted and underutilized 
as a result of lax enforcement of prior rulings inconsistent 
with congressional intent. The Committee urges the Department 
to levy penalties for previously documented violations, 
continue working with the Offshore Marine Service Association 
in order to investigate future potential violations, and 
dedicate adequate resources to vigorously enforce the Jones Act 
on the Outer Continental Shelf.
    The Committee is very concerned that more than 45 waivers 
of the Jones Act have been issued enabling foreign-flagged 
vessels to transport oil released from the Strategic Petroleum 
Reserve in response to extreme fluctuations in the price of 
gas. The Committee is also concerned about the lack of 
transparency in conducting these waivers. A general provision 
is included prohibiting funds from being used to issue future 
waivers until the Secretary has consulted with the Departments 
of Energy and Transportation and representatives of the United 
States flag maritime industry and taken adequate steps to 
ensure the use of United States flag vessels. The Secretary 
shall notify the Congress within 48 hours of any request for a 
waiver.

              IMPROVING TRADE PROCESSING AND COORDINATION

    The Committee has strongly supported efforts to enhance the 
processing of safe and legitimate trade while ensuring that all 
proper duties and tariffs are collected and unsafe or 
contraband products do not enter the national stream of 
commerce. The Committee provided funds for innovative programs 
such as the Container Security Initiative and the Customs-Trade 
Partnership Against Terrorism [C-TPAT] prior to their 
authorization because these programs were intended to meet both 
trade and security requirements. However, recent activities, 
including the Importer Self Assessment, may not be implemented 
as effectively as they could be. It is important that CBP work 
with the importing community, as well as coordinate with other 
government agencies such as the U.S. Food and Drug 
Administration and the Consumer Product Safety Commission to 
communicate guidelines defining what constitutes low-risk cargo 
and what additional steps importers can take to meet them and 
be considered a certified importer. The Committee recognizes 
the potential impediments to separating and clearing low risk 
cargo from cargo requiring greater inspection at individual 
ports given their different configurations and inspection 
processes. However, industry can provide valuable information 
and fresh ideas on this process and the Committee urges CBP to 
engage more regularly with industry on these issues. The 
Committee directs CBP to brief the Committee on its efforts not 
later than December 1, 2011.

                      INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS

    CBP is directed to brief the Committee by April 13, 2012, 
on progress in implementing the 5-year Intellectual Property 
Rights Enforcement Strategy submitted on July 14, 2010, to 
include progress made in implementing the items to improve 
enforcement at pre-entry, entry, and post-entry.

            TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE OUTBOUND LAND INSPECTIONS

    CBP is directed to submit to the Committee within 90 days 
of the date of enactment of this act, a 3-year strategy to 
improve the technology available to conduct outbound 
inspections along the land border and deploy such technology. 
Significant improvements could be seen in the ability of CBPOs 
to conduct outbound inspections by careful deployment of 
technology, like those technologies being tested and developed 
at the Stafford test bed by CBP.

                      FORENSIC EVIDENCE PROTOCOLS

    The Committee directs CBP and ICE to jointly brief the 
Committee not later than April 13, 2012, on what standardized 
policies for treatment of forensic evidence from crime scenes 
against Federal officials or others when local agencies are 
involved are currently in use, whether or not separate 
memoranda of understanding are necessary with local 
jurisdictions, and if all guns, bullet casings, shells, etc. 
are put through Federal systems such as E-trace and the 
National Integrated Ballistics Imaging Network.

         CARGO INSPECTION AND PASSENGER AND TRADE FACILITATION

    The Committee recommends $36,400,000, $5,000,000 above the 
request, for Automated Targeting Systems [ATS] and $51,950,000, 
$5,000,000 above the request, for the National Targeting Center 
[NTC]. Due to the changing threat, the Committee notes that CBP 
targeting priorities and methodologies have been re-engineered 
to address interdiction of possible terrorists before they 
board a flight destined for the United States. While these new 
targeting programs are effective, the restructuring has caused 
a dramatic increase in the NTC-Passenger [NTC-P] workload 
leading to significantly increased costs in both overtime and 
temporary duty augmentation of staff. The budget request funds 
permanent staffing relocations. Both the NTC-P and NTC-Cargo 
programs are being enhanced to provide around-the-clock 
tactical targeting support for CBP antiterrorism efforts. The 
funds above the request are intended to ensure that both of 
these targeting activities are appropriately staffed around-
the-clock, as well as to enhance the targeting systems to 
provide better discrimination of potential threats entering the 
country while furthering the ability to accelerate the 
processing of passengers and cargo which pose little or no 
threat.
    The Committee also recommends the $7,500,000, as requested, 
for pilots designed to improve cargo inspections. The Committee 
directs CBP to provide a detailed briefing to the Committee on 
the plans for use of the additional NTC and ATS funds as well 
as the proposed pilots by November 1, 2011.
    The Committee is concerned that DHS does not have the 
capacity to fully screen rail cars entering the United States 
for radiation. The Committee directs CBP, in conjunction with 
the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, to brief the Committee 
on the status of existing technologies and on how it intends to 
develop a strategy to work with the private sector on ways to 
perform such scanning.

               TRACKING STOLEN AND LOST TRAVEL DOCUMENTS

    The Committee is pleased that CBP has been working 
aggressively with INTERPOL to link TECS with INTERPOL's Stolen 
and Lost Travel Document [SLTD] database. Given the ability of 
terrorists and others attempting to enter this country to do us 
harm using these stolen and lost documents, it is critical that 
all DHS officials, and especially those at our ports of entry 
and at the overseas immigration advisory program [IAP] 
airports, have timely access to this information. The Committee 
directs DHS and CBP to brief the Committee on the progress made 
to enhance the linkage between the SLTD database and TECS, how 
this is used at our domestic and IAP ports, the extent to which 
information on revoked or suspended visas and other travel 
documents is included in these databases, and other steps that 
have been taken or are planned to be taken to enhance this 
capability, the resources expended to date on these efforts, 
and the requirement for additional resources to ensure the most 
robust and timely system. The Committee directs the briefing to 
occur not later than December 1, 2011.

                         DATA CENTER MIGRATION

    The Committee recommends a total of $28,385,000 for 
activities related to data center migration, $10,000,000 below 
the amount requested in the budget.

                            INVASIVE SPECIES

    The Committee directs CBP to fund activities associated 
with the control of invasive species, such as carrizo cane, and 
any mitigation efforts from within the ``Border Security 
Fencing, Infrastructure, and Technology'' account.

                        ADVANCED TRAINING CENTER

    Included in the amount recommended by the Committee is 
$39,083,836, as proposed in the budget, for programmatic 
expenses (including salaries and benefits) and the National 
Training Plan, at the Advanced Training Center. For fiscal year 
2012, the ATC staffing target is 235 employees.
    Pursuant to Public Law 106-246, the training to be 
conducted at the Center shall be configured in a manner so as 
to not duplicate or displace any Federal law enforcement 
program of the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center [FLETC]. 
Training currently being conducted at a FLETC facility shall 
not be moved to the Center.

                  TRAINING REGARDING HUMAN TRAFFICKING

    CBP plays a critical role in identifying potential human 
trafficking victims as they enter the United States. The 
Committee encourages CBP to work with appropriate nonprofit 
organizations and victim service providers to improve the 
training of CBP officers in the field to assist in the 
identification of human trafficking victims and provide 
appropriate referrals to victim service organizations.

                     FOREIGN MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE

    The Committee recognizes that trucks carrying foreign 
municipal solid waste entering the United States from Canada 
represent potential homeland security and environmental threats 
to our Nation. The Committee is also aware of successful 
efforts to address this threat, which have resulted in a 37 
percent reduction in municipally managed waste shipments to the 
United States. However, nearly 350 trash trucks still cross 
U.S. borders every day. The Committee urges DHS, in conjunction 
with CBP, to consider proposing to raise the current Customs 
User Fee for trucks carrying foreign municipal solid waste into 
the United States and include any such proposal in the fiscal 
year 2013 budget through the appropriate authorizing mechanism.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                            U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION--SALARIES AND EXPENSES
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                   Fiscal year
                                                                   Fiscal year     2012 budget      Committee
                                                                  2011 enacted       request     recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Salaries and expenses:
    Headquarters, management, and administration:
        Management and administration, border security                  516,102         688,878          672,152
         inspections and trade facilitation....................
        Management and administration, border security and              495,862         738,462          721,736
         control between ports of entry........................
        Rent...................................................         450,812         483,749          483,749
                                                                ------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Headquarters, management, and administra-         1,462,776       1,911,089        1,877,637
           tion................................................
                                                                ================================================
    Border security inspections and trade facilitation:
        Inspections, trade, and travel facilitation at ports of       2,474,344       2,507,235        2,567,235
         entry.................................................
        Harbor maintenance fee collection (Trust Fund).........           3,274           3,274            3,274
        International cargo screening..........................         103,945          68,757           68,757
        Other international programs...........................          11,119          10,684           10,684
        Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism [C-TPAT]...          45,454          44,979           44,979
        Trusted Traveler Programs..............................          10,751           6,311            6,311
        Inspection and detection technology investments........         144,162         149,537          149,537
        Automated targeting systems............................          32,389          31,400           36,400
        National Targeting Center..............................          47,347          46,950           51,950
        Training...............................................          20,778          37,834           37,834
                                                                ------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Border security inspections and trade             2,893,563       2,906,961        2,976,961
           facilitation........................................
                                                                ================================================
Border security and control between ports of entry:
    Border security and control................................       3,508,244       3,530,994        3,530,994
    Training...................................................          36,094          88,610           88,610
                                                                ------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Border security and control between ports of          3,544,338       3,619,604        3,619,604
       entry...................................................
                                                                ================================================
Air and Marine operations......................................         295,521         287,901          287,901
                                                                ------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Salaries and expenses..........................       8,196,198       8,725,555        8,762,103
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                        AUTOMATION MODERNIZATION

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $335,902,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................     364,030,000
House allowance.........................................     334,275,000
Committee recommendation................................     334,275,000

    The automation modernization account includes funds for 
major information technology systems and services for U.S. 
Customs and Border Protection [CBP], including the Automated 
Commercial Environment [ACE] and the International Trade and 
Data System projects, and connectivity of and integration of 
existing systems.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $334,275,000, to be available 
until September 30, 2014, for automation modernization.

                    INTERNATIONAL TRADE DATA SYSTEM

    Included in the amount recommended is $16,000,000, as 
requested, for the International Trade Data System.

                            EXPENDITURE PLAN

    The Committee includes bill language limiting the 
availability of $50,000,000 for development of ACE upon the 
submission of a comprehensive expenditure plan for the program. 
The Committee also expects to continue receiving the ACE 
quarterly reports. CBP is directed to brief the Committees on 
Appropriations immediately on the plan to decommission the 
Automated Commercial System [ACS], the updated program plan for 
ACE, how the ACS decommission plan is integrated into the 
program plan, and the updated master schedule for ACE 
development.

                           TECS MODERNIZATION

    The Committee directs CBP and ICE to continue to conduct 
the semiannual joint briefings for the Committee.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                                            AUTOMATION MODERNIZATION
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2011  Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Automated Commercial Environment/International Trade Data            147,794           169,755           140,000
 System [ITDS]............................................
Current operations protection and processing support......           188,108           194,275           194,275
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Automation modernization..................           335,902           364,030           334,275
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

        BORDER SECURITY FENCING, INFRASTRUCTURE, AND TECHNOLOGY

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $573,024,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................     527,623,000
House allowance.........................................     510,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     400,000,000

    The Border Security, Fencing, Infrastructure, and 
Technology account funds the capital procurement and total 
operations and maintenance costs associated with fencing, 
infrastructure, sensors, surveillance, and other border 
security technology.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

                  BORDER TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT DELAYS

    The Committee recommends $400,000,000 for Border Security 
Fencing, Infrastructure, and Technology, $127,623,000 below the 
request.
    Since fiscal year 2006, the Committee has been a strong and 
active supporter of the efforts to secure our Southwest Border 
through a strategic combination of fencing, tactical 
infrastructure, and technology, combined with a doubling of the 
size of the Border Patrol. In fact, at the initiation of this 
Committee, the Congress has appropriated $1,909,500,000 in 
regular, supplemental, and emergency funding above the amounts 
requested by this and the previous President for this account. 
These funds have been used to construct the 650 miles of 
fencing and border infrastructure mandated by the Secure Fence 
Act, as amended, and they have been used to bring more 
technology and security to Border Patrol agents than has ever 
been available.
    The Committee is extremely disappointed that the 
administration has on two occasions delayed deployment and 
expansion of security technology along the Southwest Border. As 
a result of these reviews, more than a year of technology 
deployment activity has been lost to numerous reconsiderations 
and reviews. This has resulted in the funds provided by 
Congress for deployment of border security technologies--
including existing systems which have been proven to work along 
portions of the border for years--sitting in accounts in 
Washington until a grand solution was determined. These delays 
and reviews have resulted in the Arizona Border Surveillance 
Technology Plan announced by the Secretary in January, 2011. 
Deploying, in many cases, the types of existing and basic 
technologies called for by the Congress over the past 3 years, 
this solution will cover the Arizona border--by 2015. This is 4 
years later than the estimated deployment of technology along 
the entire Southwest Border as originally envisioned by the now 
cancelled SBInet. The reduction is based on high levels of 
unobligated balances. As of July 31, 2011, the program had more 
than $440,000,000 available in unobligated balances.

                        NORTHERN BORDER SECURITY

    The Committee has strongly supported an enhanced focus on 
securing the Northern Border in addition to the Southwest and 
coastal borders. In fact, it was at the direction of this 
Committee that $20,000,000 in funding provided in this account 
in fiscal year 2007 were re-directed to begin addressing 
Northern Border requirements. Included in the amount 
recommended for this account for fiscal year 2012 is 
$45,000,000, as requested, for ongoing Northern Border security 
activities.
    The Committee is concerned about reports of increased drug 
smuggling across the Northern Border via small aircraft. This 
is a known vulnerability which began to be addressed by the 
creation and staffing of the Northern Border airwings. However, 
incidences of low-flying, radar evading aircraft across this 
border have increased. In testimony during a Senate 
subcommittee hearing in May, the Commissioner indicated that 
``22 Canadian (military) radar feeds will be sent to the Air 
and Marine Operations Center by the third quarter, November 
2011.'' The Committee appreciates this response and directs CBP 
to brief the Committees on its progress in this effort not 
later than December 1, 2011.
    The Committee also encourages Northern Border sector chiefs 
to work with State and local officials, including Canadian 
officials, on identifying any locations which might be 
conducive for limited construction of tactical infrastructure 
to address issues, such as vehicle drive-thrus, in remote or 
residential areas where towns and houses meet along the border. 
The Committee requests a briefing on these discussions, by 
Border Patrol sector, during the second quarter of fiscal year 
2012.

                            INVASIVE SPECIES

    The Committee directs CBP to fund activities associated 
with the control of invasive species, such as carrizo cane, and 
any mitigation efforts from within the ``Border Security 
Fencing, Infrastructure, and Technology'' account.

                            EXPENDITURE PLAN

    The Committee expects a timely submission of the plan 
mandated in this bill. It is the responsibility of CBP, the 
Department, and the Office of Management and Budget to ensure 
expenditure plans, when submitted, comply with the law.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                             BORDER SECURITY FENCING, INFRASTRUCTURE, AND TECHNOLOGY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2011  Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Development and deployment................................           324,620           337,000           212,377
Operations and maintenance................................           172,019           133,248           133,248
Program management........................................            76,385            57,375            54,375
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Border security fencing, infrastructure,             573,024           527,623           400,000
       and technology.....................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 AIR AND MARINE INTERDICTION, OPERATIONS, MAINTENANCE, AND PROCUREMENT

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $515,294,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................     470,566,000
House allowance.........................................     499,966,000
Committee recommendation................................     506,566,000

    The U.S. Customs and Border Protection [CBP] Air and Marine 
Interdiction, Operations, Maintenance, and Procurement [AMO] 
account funds the capital procurement and total operations and 
maintenance costs of the CBP air and marine program and 
provides support to other Federal, State, and local agencies.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $506,566,000, an increase of 
$36,000,000 above the request, to remain available until 
September 30, 2014, for air and marine interdiction, 
operations, maintenance, and procurement.
    The Committee strongly supports CBP's continued efforts to 
recapitalize its air and marine assets. Since fiscal year 2005, 
the Congress has appropriated more than $3,340,000,000 to this 
account, of which $654,985,000 has been above the amounts 
requested by the President. Working with the Office of Air and 
Marine, the Committee has provided resources to meet the 
Department's border security requirements in the air, coastal, 
and riverine environments as delineated by the CBP Air and 
Marine Recapitalization Plan. Resources to address some of 
these requirements are provided in this bill. The Committee 
notes the lengthy period of time it takes in procuring certain 
types of aircraft and other air systems because of the need to 
compete with the Department of Defense for these systems in a 
time of war, but AMO is to be commended for the creative use of 
multi-purchase awards.

   AGING AVIATION ASSETS AND STRATEGIC RECAPITALIZATION REQUIREMENTS

    The Committee continues its strong support of CBP's multi-
year effort to upgrade its fleet of aircraft. The Committee is 
troubled that approximately 45 percent of CBP's aircraft are on 
average 34 years old. The P-3 and Huey helicopters are an 
average of 42 years old and the medium-lift Black Hawk 
helicopters--used extensively on the borders--are on average 32 
years old.
    During fiscal years 2011 and 2012, CBP will retire up to 12 
twin engine patrol aircraft employed over both land and 
maritime borders, while gaining delivery of only 5 replacement 
aircraft with no additional aircraft funded. Without sufficient 
funding to maintain production, up to 6 more aircraft could be 
retired without replacements, resulting in a reduction of 13 
aircraft over the next 2 years.
    Without sustained and robust funding for a recapitalization 
effort at fiscal year 2009 levels, CBPs Office of Air and 
Marine could be required to ground 15 percent of its existing 
fleet over the next 3 years. Understandably, unsafe or 
unsupportable aircraft that cannot meet current or future CBP 
and DHS mission needs should be retired. However, the loss of 
critical aviation assets, such as Black Hawk and Huey 
helicopters, and multi-mission patrol aircraft, would be 
devastating. CBP would not be able to meet shifts in land 
border threats from the low desert to the higher terrain, or 
support the planned rapid reaction ground force without Black 
Hawks to transport, protect, and recover special tactical 
teams, and Hueys to provide rapid air mobility for large 
numbers of Border Patrol agents. Without replacement multi-
mission patrol aircraft, CBP would be limited in its ability to 
provide essential ground and coastal surveillance, air 
interdiction, and direct support for ground interdiction 
operations. The P-3 long range patrol aircraft is undergoing 
the last phase of its service life extension program, and 12 
aircraft temporarily returned to flight have scored 
considerable successes disrupting bulk drug shipments to Mexico 
and the United States, including up to 250,000 pounds of hard 
drugs and the capture of several self-propelled semi-
submersible vessels, in a single year. The program must be 
completed as planned to ensure that this vital capability can 
serve the Nation for the next 18-20 years. And the Committee 
notes the progress made on increasing Unmanned Aircraft Systems 
[UAS] operations along the land and maritime borders, including 
joint operations with the Coast Guard, with CBP accumulating 
10,000 operational hours for homeland security.
    For these reasons, the Committee recommends:
  --$42,000,000 for two additional P-3 wing sets to continue 
        the service life extension program [SLEP] of the P-3 
        fleet, as requested. This workhorse of the fleet is 
        critical in detecting and tracking the movement of 
        contraband in the transit zone headed toward the United 
        States. It plays a key role in detecting new threats 
        such as submersible and semi-submersible platforms in 
        the eastern Pacific and Caribbean;
  --$36,800,000 for new AS-350 light enforcement helicopters, 
        as requested;
  --$22,000,000 for conversion of two UH-60 helicopters from 
        the A to L configuration, as requested;
  --$4,000,000 for hardware to support previously funded 
        unmanned aircraft systems, as requested; and
  --$4,700,000 for marine vessels, as requested.
    In recognition of the inadequate resources in this request 
for recapitalization, the Committee includes $36,000,000, above 
the request for the following:
  --$21,000,000 for procurement of one additional multi-role 
        enforcement aircraft under the competitively awarded, 
        multi-year contract;
  --$9,000,000 for conversion of one additional UH-60 
        helicopter from the A to L configuration;
  --$2,000,000 for procurement of additional radar and sensors; 
        and
  --$4,000,000 for operations and maintenance directed toward 
        increased operations of CBP's unmanned aircraft 
        systems.
    The Committee directs CBP to submit not later than December 
1, 2011, an updated recapitalization plan to include details on 
efforts to address and/or replace aging, unsupportable 
aircraft, projections of aircraft retirements by type, along 
with impacts on border and maritime operations if they are 
retired without replacement. The updated plan shall also 
include requirements to complete the P-3 SLEP as originally 
scheduled, along with an estimate of the effort and resources 
needed to ensure all 16 existing aircraft are included in the 
SLEP rather than retiring the last 2 at the end of their 
original service lives. The update shall include details on any 
changes to the UAS Program since the submission of the last 
strategic plan update to the Committee, as well as a report of 
progress on the acquisition of needed marine vessels.

              ULTRA LIGHT AIRCRAFT ON THE SOUTHWEST BORDER

    The Committee is concerned about increased reports of low-
flying, ultra light aircraft being used to smuggle illegal 
drugs across the Southwest Border. It appears these aircraft 
are used to fly across the border, drop the drug loads by air 
at pre-set locations, and return across the border into Mexico. 
There were 228 reports of these incursions in fiscal year 2010, 
nearly double the previous year's total. While use of this 
inefficient method by drug trafficking organizations is yet 
another indicator of the success that has resulted from 
increased border security efforts since fiscal year 2005, these 
aircraft pose a risk to other aircraft as they are flying 
without filing a flight plan nor with required lights and 
beacons. The Committee directs CBP to provide a briefing not 
later than December 1, 2011, on the scope of this problem and 
the specific steps it is taking to counter this threat.
    The Committee notes that the lack of operation of the air 
traffic control tower in Sierra Vista, Arizona, at certain 
periods may result in the UASs stationed there not being used 
to their utmost potential. The Committee directs the Department 
to work with the Department of Defense and the Federal Aviation 
Authority to explore ways to increase effective use of CBP air 
assets.

                            NORTHERN BORDER

    The Committee discusses Northern Border security issues, 
including airspace security, in greater detail in the ``Border 
Security Fencing, Infrastructure, and Technology'' section 
above. The Committee also directs CBP to maintain the current 
number of unmanned aircraft systems on the Northern Border.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                      AIR AND MARINE INTERDICTION, OPERATIONS, MAINTENANCE, AND PROCUREMENT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2011  Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and maintenance................................           370,899           361,087           365,087
Procurement...............................................           144,395           109,479           141,479
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Air and Marine interdiction, operations,             515,294           470,566           506,566
       maintenance, and procurement.......................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                 CONSTRUCTION AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $259,480,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................     283,822,000
House allowance.........................................     234,096,000
Committee recommendation................................     239,096,000

    This appropriation provides funding to plan, construct, 
renovate, equip, and maintain buildings and facilities 
necessary for the administration and enforcement of the laws 
relating to immigration, customs, and alien registration.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $239,096,000, $44,726,000 below 
the requested amount and $20,384,000 below the fiscal year 2011 
level, for construction and facilities management activities of 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection [CBP], to be available until 
September 30, 2016.

                ADDITIONAL LAND BORDER PORT REQUIREMENTS

    The Committee notes that the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act of 2009, (Public Law 111-5) provided 
$420,000,000 for construction, repairs, maintenance, and 
security upgrades to CBP-owned ports of entry [POEs]. Of the 
167 land border ports of entry, CBP owns 41. The rest are owned 
and administered by the General Services Administration [GSA] 
or are privately owned and leased, and one is owned by the 
National Park Service. The Committee is pleased that through 
good stewardship and creative contract management, CBP was able 
to reconstruct or renovate 31 CBP-owned ports of entry, 28 of 
which were on the Northern Border.
    The Committee notes, however, that the largest land ports 
of entry, by both trade volume and staffing, are GSA-owned. It 
is important that the administration request sufficient 
resources for the GSA to rebuild and expand these large POEs to 
meet growing cargo and passenger traffic, as well as 
significant security requirements. While this administration, 
as well as last one, significantly enhanced physical security 
and staffing between the ports of the entry--especially on the 
Southwest Border--similar construction and staffing increases 
for the POEs proportional to the requirements have not been 
requested or funded. As security between the ports has 
increased, attempts by organizations to smuggle aliens and 
contraband through the ports have increased substantially. This 
growing threat needs to be addressed via a comprehensive, 
multi-Departmental strategy--with significant involvement by 
State, tribal, and local officials.
    For instance, there have been major efforts to increase 
outbound inspections for bulk cash, guns, and other contraband 
which supports the drug trafficking organizations' violence in 
Mexico. However, the existing outbound physical infrastructure 
at the POEs can in no way accommodate the ability to replicate 
the inbound inspection process. At a minimum, an additional 
$2,600,000,000 would be required on an annual basis to procure 
the equipment and hire the necessary staff to perform the same 
level of outbound inspection activity as currently is provided 
for inbound inspections. And this funding requirement does not 
account for land purchases and construction of additional port 
capacity, traffic lanes, and security. The Committee directs 
DHS, GSA, and the Office of Management and Budget to develop a 
multi-year strategy to address this growing trade and security 
problem. This effort should include recommending alternative 
options for funding POE construction and improvements, such as 
expanded use of public-private partnerships, as well as any 
necessary legislative solutions. The Committee encourages this 
group to explore creative solutions currently under evaluation 
for existing projects, as well as successful, alternatively-
funded public works projects in other countries. The Committee 
directs DHS to convene the first strategy session to begin to 
address this issue during the first quarter of fiscal year 2012 
and to brief the Committee on the initial results of that 
session not later than January 20, 2012.
    The Committee notes CBP and GSA have entered into a 
memorandum of understanding [MOU] defining and establishing a 
joint management framework for the planning, management, and 
execution of land border port of entry projects [POEs]. The MOU 
outlines the fundamental tenets that will govern the management 
of these projects. Given the importance of international trade 
to the Nation's economic vitality, it is critical that 
sufficient funding be provided to ensure our land ports of 
entry are designed and modernized to best accommodate the flow 
of commercial and passenger traffic. The Committee directs CBP 
and GSA to jointly brief the Committee on Appropriations 
semiannually on the implementation of the MOU and the status of 
POE construction.
    The Committee notes that secondary inspection operations at 
certain POEs on the Southwest border are vulnerable to 
observation by smuggling organizations south of the border. The 
Committee encourages CBP to maximize the use of existing 
resources to provide cover from exposure at these POEs and, if 
necessary, request appropriate resources to do so as part of 
the fiscal year 2013 budget request.

                      FIVE-YEAR CONSTRUCTION PLAN

    The Committee again has included bill language requiring 
CBP, in consultation with GSA, to include the 5-year 
construction plan with the fiscal year 2013 request. The plan 
shall include a yearly update of total projected future funding 
needs.
    The Committee directs the Department to continue to work 
with the GSA on its nationwide strategy to prioritize and 
address the infrastructure needs at land border POEs and to 
comply with the requirements of the Public Buildings Act of 
1959 (40 U.S.C. 3301) and seek necessary funding.
    The Committee further directs the Department to encourage 
the use of small businesses in all phases of the contracting 
process for construction and renovation of POEs.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                                     CONSTRUCTION AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               Fiscal year    Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                               2011 enacted    budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Facility construction and sustainment......................          223,170          226,726           185,000
Program oversight and management...........................           36,310           57,096            54,096
                                                            ----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Construction and facilities management.....          259,480          283,822           239,096
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement


                                SUMMARY

    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement [ICE] is 
responsible for enforcing immigration and customs laws and 
detaining and removing deportable or inadmissible aliens.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends total resources of $5,846,435,000, 
including direct appropriations of $5,534,566,000, and 
estimated fee collections of $311,869,000.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                            U.S. IMMIGRATION AND CUSTOMS ENFORCEMENT--FUNDING SUMMARY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2011  Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                             enacted
   budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Appropriations:
    Salaries and expenses.................................         5,426,768         5,496,847         5,512,856
    Automation modernization..............................            73,852            13,860            21,710
    Construction..........................................  ................  ................  ................
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Appropriations...............................         5,500,620         5,494,407         5,534,566
                                                           =====================================================
Estimated Fee Collections:
    Immigration inspection user fee.......................           116,387           116,869           116,869
    Student exchange and visitor fee......................           120,000           120,000           120,000
    Breached bond/detention fund..........................            75,000            75,000            75,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Estimated fee collections....................           311,387           311,869           311,869
                                                           =====================================================
      Total, Available funding............................         5,812,007         5,806,276         5,846,435
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2011....................................  $5,426,768,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................   5,496,847,000
House allowance.........................................   5,523,474,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,512,856,000

    The ICE Salaries and Expenses account provides funds for 
the enforcement of immigration and customs laws, intelligence, 
and detention and removals. In addition to directly 
appropriated resources, funding is derived from the following 
offsetting collections:
    Immigration Inspection User Fee.--ICE derives funds from 
user fees to support the costs of detention and removals in 
connection with international inspections activities at 
airports and seaports, as authorized by the Immigration and 
Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1356).
    Student Exchange Visitor Program Fee.--ICE collects fees 
from foreign students, exchange visitors, and schools and 
universities to certify and monitor participating schools, and 
to conduct compliance audits.
    Immigration Breached Bond/Detention Fund.--ICE derives 
funds from the recovery of breached cash and surety bonds in 
excess of $8,000,000 as authorized by the Immigration and 
Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1356); and from a portion of fees 
charged under section 245(i) of the Immigration and Nationality 
Act to support the cost of the detention of aliens.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $5,512,856,000, for salaries and 
expenses of ICE for fiscal year 2012. The Committee includes 
bill language placing a $35,000 limit on overtime paid to any 
employee; making up to $10,000,000 available for special 
operations; making up to $2,000,000 available for the payment 
of informants; making up to $11,216,000 available to reimburse 
other Federal agencies for the costs associated with the care, 
maintenance, and repatriation of smuggled illegal aliens; 
making not less than $305,000 available for promotion of public 
awareness of the child pornography tipline and anti-child 
exploitation activities; making not less than $5,400,000 
available to facilitate agreements consistent with section 
287(g) of the Immigration and Nationality Act; limiting the use 
of funds for facilitating agreements consistent with section 
287(g) of the Immigration and Nationality Act to the same 
activities funded in fiscal year 2005; making $15,770,000 
available for activities to enforce laws against forced child 
labor, of which $6,000,000 shall remain available until 
expended; making up to $12,750 available for official reception 
and representation expenses; making $7,300,000 available until 
September 30, 2013, for the Visa Security Program, and adding 
bill language allowing support for overseas vetted units.

                SOUTHWEST BORDER ENFORCEMENT INITIATIVE

    In March 2009, the Secretary of Homeland Security announced 
a major initiative to assist the Mexican Government in 
combating drug cartel violence by deploying additional ICE and 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection [CBP] personnel and 
resources to the Southwest Border. With funds provided in the 
Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2009 (Public Law 111-32), the 
Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2010, the 
fiscal year 2010 Emergency Border Security Supplemental 
Appropriations Act, and the Department of Defense and Full-Year 
Continuing Appropriations Act, 2011, more than $135,000,000 has 
been added above the President's requests for ICE for Southwest 
Border security, including investigations into outbound 
smuggling activities of guns and bulk cash which support the 
drug cartels, expanding the number of Border Enforcement 
Security Task Forces [BESTs], as well as increasing the number 
of agents, intelligence analysts, and support personnel along 
the Southwest Border.
    Since the Mexican Government began its offensive on drug 
trafficking organizations in 2007, more than 34,000 people have 
been killed; over 15,000 in 2010 alone. While the violence has 
not spilled over the border into the United States, the level 
of violence has increased the fears of many living in the 
Southwest. As the drug cartels become more violent and fight 
each other for access to smuggling routes, often robbing each 
other of humans, drugs, or other contraband they are attempting 
to smuggle into the United States, the costs of these efforts 
escalate in both financial and human terms. These cartels are 
increasing their presence in the United States.
    ICE is uniquely situated to address this threat. It is the 
only agency whose criminal mission revolves entirely around 
cross-border crime, namely the smuggling of aliens, narcotics, 
firearms, and bulk cash. ICE has a role in every form of 
smuggling and is not limited to one type of contraband (such as 
firearms or drugs). ICE also is unique in terms of the breadth 
of its statutory authority under titles 8, 18, 19, 21, 22, 31, 
and 50 of the United States Code. ICE also has unmatched 
immigration authority among criminal investigative agencies. 
Rather than addressing domestic drug dealing or firearms 
violations, ICE is focused on cross-border narcotics and 
firearms trafficking--offenses that are driving crime on the 
Southwest Border. Thus, additional resources to ICE will 
bolster the attack on every form of border crime.
    The Committee encourages ICE to expand the use of 
ballistics imaging technology and other methods, including the 
capture and transfer of all ballistics images from guns seized 
through southbound inspections or by Mexican authorities, to 
trace weapons used in criminal acts in Mexico.

                        DOMESTIC INVESTIGATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,739,234,000, $25,000,000 above 
the request, for domestic investigations. The Committee also 
recommends $82,503,000, $1,000,000 above the request, for 
intelligence.

    TRADE COMPLIANCE AND ENFORCEMENT AND TRAFFICKING INVESTIGATIONS

    Of the funds above the request, $5,000,000 is for enhancing 
investigations of antidumping/countervailing duty [AD/CVD] 
violations, intellectual property rights [IPR] investigations, 
and severe forms of human trafficking and smuggling activities. 
Additionally, $1,000,000 is to enhance and expand intelligence 
activities to support these investigations. The Committee 
encourages ICE to consider whether additional commercial fraud 
investigators in the field offices would be a helpful resource 
addition to address the AD/CVD problem. The Committee directs 
ICE to submit to the Committee a plan for expenditure of these 
additional, targeted resources within 90 days after the date of 
enactment of this act. The Committee also directs ICE to submit 
by February 13, 2012, a 3-year strategy to improve AD/CVD 
enforcement.
    The Committee notes that IPR violations, including 
seemingly innocuous (to the average person, but extremely 
detrimental to the industry) piracy of not-yet-released movies, 
is a significant revenue source for transnational criminal 
organizations including Mexican drug cartels. According to 
officials at the IPR Coordination Center, these violations are 
a low-risk/high-profit type of crime. The Center sees more 
organized crime groups move into it because of the high-dollar 
value to it. One of the Mexican gangs actually puts a stamp on 
the counterfeit pirated DVDs that it sells, indicating the disc 
is distributed by the cartel.

              IMPROVING IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT ACTIVITIES

    The Pew Hispanic Center estimates approximately 4 million 
to 5.5 million of the estimated 11 million illegal aliens 
(approximately 45 percent) in the United States are here as a 
result of overstaying their legal visas (as opposed to crossing 
our borders). This represents a growing illegal immigration 
problem and security threat. While all of the 9/11 hijackers 
entered the United States on legally valid visas, at least 
three of them had overstayed or were otherwise in violation of 
their status. An April 2011, Government Accountability Office 
report, GAO-11-441, concludes that of the roughly 400 people 
who have been convicted of any terrorism-related crimes since 
September 11, 2001, 36 had overstayed their visas. In other 
words, almost 10 percent of the people who have been convicted 
of terrorism-related activities in the decade since 9/11 were 
legal visitors who overstayed their visas and became illegal.
    Additionally, DHS officials have reported to the Congress 
that US-VISIT processes fewer than one-half of all potential 
overstays identified by automated matching of entry and exit 
records, and the GAO, in its report, found that the program has 
an overall backlog of 1.6 million potential overstay records 
that have not yet been processed.
    The Committee notes that neither this administration nor 
previous administrations have requested the necessary funds or 
made addressing overstays a priority. Nor does ICE have the 
systems to better coordinate overstay information with the US-
VISIT program.
    The Committee provides an additional $20,000,000 above the 
request for an immigration enforcement initiative with a 
primary focus on addressing the issue of identifying and 
prioritizing the removal of visa overstays. The Committee 
directs ICE to coordinate with US-VISIT and develop a 
comprehensive strategy to address the visa overstay problem. 
The strategy should consider the suggestions offered by the 
GAO. Funds are provided to continue modernizing the Alien 
Criminal Response Information Management System [ACRIMe] to 
support the identification of criminal aliens and individuals 
attempting to overstay a visa, processing old fingerprint 
records, and hiring additional personnel to search old records 
and databases and eliminate the known, paper-based overstay 
records backlog. The Committee directs submission of the 
strategy not later than 120 days after the date of enactment of 
this act.
    The Committee understands that US-VIST has already begun to 
address its overstay backlog and provides up to $5,000,000 of 
the funds recommended in this initiative, via transfer, to US-
VISIT to continue this activity, and requests a joint briefing 
with US-VISIT and ICE officials on this effort not later than 
60 days after the date of enactment of this act.
    Additionally, $5,000,000 of the funds recommended for this 
initiative are provided for the hiring of authorized 
professional staff at the Law Enforcement Support Center in 
response to the increased workload for responses to 
immigration-related inquiries by law enforcement.

            OFFICE OF STATE, LOCAL, AND TRIBAL COORDINATION

    The Committee recommends $68,321,000 and 155 positions and 
FTE, as requested, for the Office of State, Local, and Tribal 
Government Coordination. Included in this amount is funding for 
training and information technology assistance for participants 
in the 287(g) program as well as for the Office of State, 
Local, and Tribal Coordination to support communication and 
outreach efforts.

                        IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT

    The 287(g) program is a voluntary program that allows ICE 
to train local law enforcement agents to enforce Federal 
immigration laws. After training, local law enforcement 
personnel can determine an individual's immigration status and 
file requests to ICE for the removal of individuals they 
believe are illegal immigrants. Pursuant to its internal 
policies, ICE is supposed to provide robust oversight of the 
local officers enrolled in the 287(g) program to ensure 
participants comply with all applicable Federal law enforcement 
policies and procedures. A September 2010, OIG review of the 
287(g) program [OIG-10-124] noted a number of shortcomings in 
ICE's 287(g) training and program oversight. The OIG made 33 
recommendations for ICE to improve the program. To maintain the 
integrity of the 287(g) program, ICE is to implement the OIG 
recommendations as expeditiously as possible, and is to be 
commended for having already started this process. This 
includes appropriate accountability and training standards and 
instruction on multicultural communication and the avoidance of 
racial profiling.
    The Secure Communities program also requires careful 
oversight and monitoring, but the approach has several 
advantages to 287(g): it requires minimal training by ICE for 
local employees, it is integrated into existing booking 
procedures at prisons and jails, and it imposes no additional 
workload on local employees. Further, Secure Communities 
reduces the risk of potentially bias-driven status checks by 
local officials since the backgrounds of all individuals in 
local custody are checked in an identical manner. Most 
importantly, Secure Communities also clearly delineates the 
respective roles of Federal and local authorities in 
immigration enforcement. In light of these advantages, ICE is 
to be commended for its efforts in expanding the Secure 
Communities program.

                     LAW ENFORCEMENT SUPPORT CENTER

    The Committee recommends a total of $39,990,000, 346 
positions and FTE, $5,000,000 above the amount requested in the 
budget, to assist in responding to requests for assistance from 
State and local law enforcement officers.

                         FORENSICS DOCUMENT LAB

    The Committee recommends $14,357,000, 74 positions and FTE, 
as requested, for the Forensics Document Lab [FDL]. The FDL 
provides forensic document analysis and operations support 
services to combat travel and identity document fraud.

                         DATA CENTER MIGRATION

    As part of the Department-wide effort to assign data center 
migration funding to the component agencies which will be 
migrating, the Committee recommends $5,300,000 in new funding, 
$5,200,000 below the level requested in the budget, to support 
ICE's portion of this activity in fiscal year 2012.

                  INVESTIGATIONS--WORKSITE ENFORCEMENT

    The Committee notes that Executive Order 12989--as amended, 
June 6, 2008--remains in effect. The Executive order states, in 
part:

    ``It is the policy of the executive branch to enforce fully 
the immigration laws of the United States, including the 
detection and removal of illegal aliens and the imposition of 
legal sanctions against employers that hire illegal aliens. 
Because of the worksite enforcement policy of the United States 
and the underlying obligation of the executive branch to 
enforce the immigration laws, contractors that employ illegal 
aliens cannot rely on the continuing availability and service 
of those illegal workers, and such contractors inevitably will 
have a less stable and less dependable workforce than 
contractors that do not employ such persons.''

    The Committee recommends $134,626,000 for the overall level 
of effort for worksite enforcement activities, as requested. 
The Committee notes that the number of criminal and 
administrative arrests has dropped since the new worksite 
enforcement strategy was announced on April 30, 2009. Criminal 
arrests related to worksite enforcement investigations dropped 
from 1,103 in fiscal year 2008 to only 440 in fiscal year 2010. 
Similarly, administrative arrests dropped from 5,184 in fiscal 
year 2008 to 1,224 in fiscal year 2010.
    While the Committee applauds the renewed vigor with which 
ICE is performing I-9 (workplace authorization) audits in an 
effort to target employers who knowingly hire illegal aliens, 
which is something the Committee called for in Senate Report 
110-396, it is not a complete solution.
    The Committee directs ICE to provide quarterly briefings on 
how it is meeting this level of effort no later than 30 days 
after the end of each quarter.
    The Committee directs ICE to provide an annual report on 
the number of worksite enforcement investigations opened and 
closed, employee and employer arrests--both criminal and 
administrative, and the fines assessed and collected each 
fiscal year. This report shall be submitted to the Committee 
within 45 days after the end of each fiscal year. The Committee 
also directs that the report for fiscal year 2011 should 
include the same statistics for fiscal years 2007-2010.

                             IMAGE PROGRAM

    ICE is directed to brief the Committees by April 13, 2012, 
on its progress in implementing the ICE Mutual Agreement 
between Government and Employers [IMAGE] program, and the 
strategies being used to encourage more participation in the 
program.

                         VISA SECURITY PROGRAM

    The Visa Security Program, mandated in section 428 of the 
Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pubic Law 107-296), extends the 
border overseas to prevent terrorists and other criminals from 
receiving U.S. visas. The Office of International Affairs has 
developed a multi-year expansion plan which includes a 
prioritized expansion to the 32 highest-risk visa issuing 
posts. According to the plan, the program will cover 
approximately 75 percent of the highest risk visa activity 
posts by 2013. The Committee recommends $38,289,000, $8,800,000 
above the request, to fully fund planned visa security programs 
and expand the units to four additional consular posts.

                            ICE INTELLIGENCE

    The Committee recommends $82,503,000, an increase of 
$1,000,000 above the request, for ICE intelligence activities. 
The $1,000,000 above the request is discussed under 
investigations.

            DETENTION AND REMOVAL--CUSTODY OPERATIONS (BEDS)

    The Committee recommends a total of $2,023,827,000, an 
increase of $229,421,000 above the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2011, as requested in the budget. The Committee notes that 
what appears to be a significant increase between fiscal years 
2011 and 2012 actually reflects the administration's proposal 
to fund all detention beds within ``Custody Operations'' as 
opposed to spreading the detention bed funding between that 
activity, ``Fugitive Operations'', ``Criminal Alien Program'', 
and ``Secure Communities''. The Committee strongly supports 
this proposal to streamline the process to provide proper 
accounting for bed funding. After all, a bed is a bed. This 
framework provides better transparency into the actual costs of 
each of these programs while ensuring that beds are available 
for individuals who need to be detained.
    The Committee encourages ICE to continue working to ensure 
that its detention bedspace funding model is accurate and 
reflects the actual cost of a bed as it develops the fiscal 
year 2013 budget request. The Committee also requests that it 
be briefed on the development of this bedspace cost model no 
later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this act.
    Maintaining an adequate number of detention beds is 
critical to ensuring the integrity of our detention and removal 
system while at the same time preventing a return to the ill-
advised ``catch and release'' policy. The Committee notes that 
in fiscal year 2010, ICE removed a total of 392,625 illegal 
aliens compared with 240,665 in fiscal year 2004. This clearly 
demonstrates that the additional resources the Congress has 
provided above the President's requests the past 6 fiscal years 
for securing our borders continues to have an impact.
    The bill continues current law directing that a detention 
bed level of 33,400 beds shall be maintained throughout fiscal 
year 2012.
    The Committee encourages ICE's efforts to streamline and 
make more efficient the removal process once individuals are 
determined to be removable and urges ICE to look at ways to 
increase the short-term detention capacity in certain locations 
such as the southeastern region of the United States while 
minimizing the loss of existing detention capacity, personnel, 
and contracts at the other facilities.

                      DETENTION CARE AND STANDARDS

    The Committee strongly supports ICE's recent efforts to 
review and improve upon its detention care and standards. It is 
imperative that individuals detained in ICE-owned or -
contracted facilities be provided the highest levels of care, 
including medical care, and treatment. The Committee is 
encouraged that ICE has begun this effort by reviewing its 
detention standards and placing an ICE officer in the 50 
largest contract detention facilities. This was one of the 
recommendations in the October 6, 2009, Immigration Detention 
Overview and Recommendations report. The Committee notes that 
no funds were requested in the budget to implement these 
recommendations and the Committee encourages that, to the 
extent ICE intends to act on these recommendations, sufficient 
funds be included in the fiscal year 2013 request to do so. The 
Committee also encourages ICE to consider creating an ombudsman 
to independently investigate complaints about detainee 
treatment in detention facilities and report not later than 180 
days after the date of enactment of this act on its decision in 
this regard.
    The Committee notes that a recent DHS Office of the 
Inspector General report (``Management of Mental Health Cases 
in Immigration Detention''--OIG-11-62), has identified 
significant medical staffing vacancies at ICE detention 
facilities. Clinical staffing levels have not been, but must 
be, aligned with projected healthcare needs at the various 
detention facilities, so that ratios of health professionals to 
detainees with medical and mental healthcare needs are adequate 
and consistent throughout the detention system. The Committee 
directs ICE to submit a report not later than December 1, 2011, 
detailing the specific steps it has taken since submission of 
the October 6, 2009, Immigration Detention Overview and 
Recommendations report to improve and reform the detention 
process and meet the goals outlined in that report, as well as 
what steps have been taken to rectify the issues identified in 
OIG-11-62.
    In 2003, Congress passed the Prison Rape Elimination Act 
into law. The Committee understands that ICE has revised its 
Performance Based National Detention Standards, including the 
standard concerning the prevention of sexual assault, and urges 
ICE to expeditiously approve and implement the revised 
standards.

               DETENTION AND REMOVAL--FUGITIVE OPERATIONS

    Included in the amount recommended by the Committee is 
$154,597,000, 667 positions and FTE, as requested in the 
budget. The National Fugitive Operations Program is responsible 
for reducing the fugitive alien population in the United 
States. As of May 31, 2011, ICE estimates that there are 
approximately 489,018 immigration fugitives in the United 
States, a decrease of more than 143,708 since October 2006. ICE 
works to reduce the population of these fugitives from the law 
through the use of Fugitive Operations teams. All 104 Fugitive 
Operations teams are operational and conducting enforcement 
operations. Funds associated with detention beds are provided 
in the ``Custody Operations'' account.

            DETENTION AND REMOVAL--ALTERNATIVES TO DETENTION

    The Committee recommends a total of $72,373,000, 182 
positions and FTE, as requested in the budget. The Committee 
encourages ICE to prioritize enrollment of families with 
children in this program, to continue to use intensive 
supervision, and directs ICE to brief the Committee 
semiannually on the program beginning no later than 90 days 
after the date of enactment of this act.
    The Committee directs ICE to continue to submit the report 
on collection of data on deportation of parents of U.S.-born 
children, as mandated in the joint explanatory statement 
accompanying Public Law 111-83, to the Senate Committee on 
Appropriations and the Committee on the Judiciary.

           DETENTION AND REMOVAL--TRANSPORTATION AND REMOVAL

    Included in the amount recommended by the Committee is 
$276,632,000, as requested in the budget, for all ICE-related 
transportation and removal activities.

             DETENTION AND REMOVAL--CRIMINAL ALIEN PROGRAM

    Included in the amount recommended by the Committee is 
$196,696,000, 1,211 positions and FTE, as requested in the 
budget. ICE is funded for 126 Criminal Alien Program teams and 
in fiscal year 2009 it charged over 217,000 aliens in jails. 
Funds associated with detention beds are provided in the 
``Custody Operations'' account.

                           SECURE COMMUNITIES

    The Committee recommends $184,064,000, 782 positions, and 
667 FTE, as requested. Congress initiated this program in 
fiscal year 2008 and has provided total new funding of 
$749,600,000 over the past 4 years. Secure Communities focuses 
on interoperability, using biometrics to ensure that any 
individual booked into a jail or other facility is indeed who 
he or she claims to be and also is able to determine, by 
running fingerprints against the IDENT and IAFIS databases, the 
immigration status of the individual. It is important to 
remember that Secure Communities is applied to everyone booked 
into a jail. All individuals are treated the same and no 
profiling occurs. Through the use of biometrics, ICE is able to 
determine not only immigration status, but also if the 
individual has committed more serious crimes in the past (so 
while they are booked on what appears to be a lower level 
crime, Secure Communities is able to determine the entirety of 
an alien's criminal history).
    The Committee is pleased that the administration has 
embraced this program as one of many tools at its disposal to 
identify and remove illegal aliens, particularly criminal 
aliens, and otherwise enforce our Nation's existing immigration 
laws. In fiscal year 2010, Secure Communities expanded coverage 
to establish biometric identification of arrested criminal 
aliens in more than 180 counties. Secure Communities' threat-
based deployment schedule prioritizes those counties with the 
highest threat criminal alien populations first, consisting 
primarily of counties in major metropolitan areas throughout 
the country as well as all counties along the Southwest Border. 
From fiscal years 2008 through 2010, 447,115 criminal aliens 
were removed. Between October 2008 and October 2010, the number 
of convicted criminals that ICE removed from the United States 
increased 71 percent, while the number of non-criminals removed 
dropped by 23 percent. Secure Communities estimates that after 
deploying to the additional counties funded in this request, 
ICE will cover more than 84 percent of the Nation's criminal 
alien population. The Department anticipates that, with 
continued funding, including redeployment of existing 
resources, it will establish biometric identification of 
arrested criminal aliens in all counties that are able to 
participate by calendar year 2013. The Committee notes that on 
August 5, 2011, ICE wrote the Governors of the States currently 
participating in Secure Communities clarifying the parameters 
under which the program will operate as the program moves 
toward national deployment by the end of 2013.
    The Committee has included bill language, as requested, 
ensuring that all illegal aliens encountered when enforcing our 
immigration laws are apprehended. The Committee also directs 
ICE to continue to provide quarterly briefings on progress 
being made in implementing the Secure Communities program. The 
briefings shall include Secure Communities' impact on removals 
reporting at the level of detail of the quarterly detention and 
removals report. Additionally, the briefings shall include 
quarterly data on the number of instances in which Secure 
Communities identifies when someone who is arrested is in this 
country illegally, the number of times ICE issues a detainer on 
such individuals, the major categories for the reasons why a 
decision is made to issue or not issue a detainer, and the 
number deported. The first briefing should occur no later than 
45 days after the date of enactment of this act.
    According to an April 22, 2011, Congressional Research 
Service memorandum regarding quantifying the criminal alien 
population, in fiscal year 2008 non-U.S. citizens comprised 7.1 
percent of the U.S. population while comprising 23.1 percent of 
the Federal prison population. Clearly there are significant 
numbers of criminal aliens who should be identified and removed 
upon the completion of the prison sentences.
    In anticipation of Secure Communities' full deployment in 
2013, the Committee encourages ICE to consider centralizing 
management of Secure Communities under the direction of the 
Criminal Alien Program. It is incumbent upon ICE to continue to 
ensure that all efforts are made to arrest and remove criminal 
aliens from the community by ensuring an expeditious order of 
removal and securing a final order of removal prior to the 
termination of an incarcerated alien's period of imprisonment. 
ICE is directed to brief the Committee no later than November 
1, 2011 on any plan to realign the Secure Communities program 
under the Criminal Alien Program and, if appropriate, include 
such a centralization in the President's fiscal year 2013 
budget request.

                    DETENTION AND REMOVAL REPORTING

    The Committee continues to request ICE to submit a 
quarterly report to the Committee which compares the number of 
deportation, exclusion, and removal orders sought and obtained 
by ICE. Currently, the report is broken down: by district in 
which the removal order was issued; by type of order 
(deportation, exclusion, removal, expedited removal, and 
others); by agency issuing the order; by the number of cases in 
each category in which ICE has successfully removed the alien; 
and by the number of cases in each category in which ICE has 
not removed the alien. The Committee welcomes suggestions from 
ICE on ways to provide more appropriate data in this report and 
urges ICE to provide suggestions to the Committee on revisions 
to the details of this report by November 1, 2011. The first 
fiscal year 2012 quarterly report is to be submitted no later 
than January 15, 2013.

                        PERSONNEL RECOVERY UNITS

    The recent death and injury of Special Agents in Mexico are 
reminders of the dangers law enforcement agents face in the 
line of duty. The Committee supports ICE's efforts to establish 
and maintain a personnel recovery program to ensure security of 
ICE agents and support staff overseas. The Committee directs 
ICE to establish a trained unit that will be capable of 
deploying and managing an abduction or evacuation of ICE 
personnel overseas and identifying necessary equipment and 
training for deployed agents and their direct family members 
and report back on its efforts in this regard.

                    OVERSEAS VETTED UNITS OPERATIONS

    ICE works closely with its partners in law enforcement in 
many countries around the world. One tool that has proven 
especially important has been the use of vetted units. The 
Committee has included bill language clarifying that ICE may 
use appropriated funds to continue supporting overseas vetted 
units operations.

                      FORENSIC EVIDENCE PROTOCOLS

    The Committee directs CBP and ICE to brief jointly the 
Committee not later than April 13, 2012, on what standardized 
policies for treatment of forensic evidence from crime scenes 
against Federal officials or others when local agencies are 
involved are currently in use, whether or not separate 
memoranda of understanding are necessary with local 
jurisdictions, and if all guns, bullet casings, and shells are 
put through Federal systems such as E-trace and the National 
Integrated Ballistics Imaging Network [NIBN].

    SECURITY FOR THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF IMMIGRATION AND CUSTOMS 
                              ENFORCEMENT

    Like other senior Federal law enforcement officials, the 
Assistant Secretary for ICE could be targeted by the criminal 
organizations that are under ICE investigation. Although there 
is no current evidence of specific threats against the 
Assistant Secretary for ICE, the Committee has no objection to 
on-going security evaluations and the provision of any 
protective security measures determined necessary.

                  TRAINING REGARDING HUMAN TRAFFICKING

    ICE plays a critical role in investigating criminal 
organizations trafficking individuals into the United States. 
The Committee encourages ICE to work with appropriate nonprofit 
organizations and victim service providers to improve the 
training of ICE officers in the field to assist in the 
identification of human trafficking victims and provide 
appropriate referrals to victim service organizations.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                         U.S. IMMIGRATION AND CUSTOMS ENFORCEMENT--SALARIES AND EXPENSES
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               Fiscal year    Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                               2011 enacted    budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Headquarters, management, and administration:
    Personnel compensation and benefits, services, and               295,121          237,842           227,251
     other costs...........................................
Headquarters-managed IT investment.........................          219,363          194,727           186,527
                                                            ----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Headquarters, management, and                        514,484          432,569           413,778
       administration......................................
                                                            ====================================================
Legal proceedings..........................................          221,666          215,935           215,935
                                                            ====================================================
Investigations:
    Domestic...............................................        1,702,038        1,714,234         1,739,234
    International operations...............................          112,872          114,928           114,928
    Visa Security Program..................................           35,686           29,489            38,289
                                                            ----------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Investigations...........................        1,850,596        1,858,651         1,892,451
                                                            ====================================================
Intelligence...............................................           69,842           81,503            82,503
                                                            ====================================================
Detention and removal operations:
    Custody operations.....................................        1,794,406        2,023,827         2,023,827
    Fugitive operations....................................          229,682          154,597           154,597
    Criminal Alien Program.................................          192,539          196,696           196,696
    Alternatives to detention..............................           72,075           72,373            72,373
    Transportation and Removal Program.....................          281,878          276,632           276,632
                                                            ----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Detention and removal operations...........        2,570,580        2,724,125         2,724,125
                                                            ====================================================
Identification and removal of criminal aliens (Secure                199,600          184,064           184,064
 Communities)..............................................
                                                            ====================================================
      Subtotal, Salaries and expenses......................        5,426,768        5,496,847         5,512,856
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                        AUTOMATION MODERNIZATION

Appropriations, 2011....................................     $73,852,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................      13,860,000
House allowance.........................................      23,860,000
Committee recommendation................................      21,710,000

    The Automation Modernization account provides funds for 
major information technology [IT] projects for U.S. Immigration 
and Customs Enforcement [ICE], including the Atlas Program, 
modernization of TECS (formerly known as the Traveler 
Enforcement and Compliance System), modernization of Detention 
and Removal Operations' IT systems for tracking detainees (DRO 
Modernization), and other systems.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends a total of $21,710,000, $7,850,000 
above the request. These funds are to remain available until 
expended.
    The Committee directs that, of the funds made available to 
this account, priority shall be given to TECS modernization.
    ICE must make more progress implementing its electronic 
health records (eHR) program. Given that ICE detainees are 
often transferred between several detention facilities before 
their immigration cases are decided, portable medical records 
are an important part of ensuring the health of all those held 
in the agency's custody. The ICE Chief Information Officer is 
directed to update the Committees on the status of the eHR 
initiative and the anticipated timeline for a fully implemented 
system.
    The Committee also continues the requirement for semiannual 
briefings on this activity.

                              CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2011....................................................
Budget estimate, 2012\1\................................................
House allowance\2\......................................................
Committee recommendation................................................

\1\Excludes a proposed cancellation of $16,300,000.
\2\House rescission of $11,300,000 contained in title V.

    This appropriation provides funding to plan, construct, 
renovate, equip, and maintain buildings and facilities 
necessary for the administration and enforcement of the laws 
relating to immigration, detention, and alien registration.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee notes that the President requests no funds 
for ICE Construction and proposes to cancel $16,300,000 in 
unobligated Construction balances. The Committee rejects this 
cancellation and notes that ICE is reviewing the possible 
privatization of the Service Processing Centers which it owns. 
The Department intends that carryover funds within the no-year 
Construction account will be used for emergency repairs and 
alterations, especially those focused on life and safety. The 
Committee also notes that not funding this account will have no 
impact on the ability of ICE to continue to detain illegal 
aliens at other locations around the country.
    The Committee encourages the use of public-private 
partnerships wherever possible. As it considers future use and 
possible disposal of ICE-owned Service Processing Centers, the 
Committee urges ICE to develop a comprehensive plan for 
conversion of these facilities and provide recommended options 
within the framework of a public-private partnership.
    The bill includes a general provision, requested in the 
budget, providing ICE with the authority to dispose of ICE-
owned facilities and retain the receipts to provide repairs and 
alterations to other facilities. Bill language is also included 
mandating that any sale or collocation of ICE-owned facilities 
will not result in a reduction of detention bedspace below 
33,400 beds and requiring 15-day notification to the 
Committees.

                 Transportation Security Administration

    The Transportation Security Administration [TSA] is charged 
with ensuring security across U.S. transportation systems, 
including aviation, railways, highways, pipelines, and 
waterways, and safeguarding the freedom of movement of people 
and commerce. Separate appropriations are provided for the 
following activities within TSA: aviation security; surface 
transportation security; transportation threat assessment and 
credentialing; transportation security support; and Federal Air 
Marshals.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends a total program level of 
$7,905,769,000 and a net of $5,305,449,000 for the activities 
of TSA for fiscal year 2012.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                                     TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Fiscal year 2011   Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                              enacted         budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Aviation Security......................................         5,213,307          5,401,165          5,293,566
Aviation Security Capital Fund (mandatory).............           250,000            250,000            250,000
Surface Transportation Security........................           105,749            134,748            134,748
Transportation Threat Assessment and Credentialing                162,673            183,954            163,954
 (direct appropriations)...............................
Transportation Threat Assessment and Credentialing (fee-           41,220             40,320             40,320
 funded programs)......................................
Transportation Security Support........................           986,661          1,113,697          1,042,066
Federal Air Marshals...................................           927,942            991,375            981,115
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Transportation Security Administration             7,687,552          8,115,259          7,905,769
       (gross).........................................
                                                        ========================================================
Offsetting Fee Collections--current law................        -2,100,000         -2,030,000         -2,030,000
Offsetting Fee Collections--proposed increase..........  .................          -280,000           -280,000
Aviation Security Capital Fund (mandatory).............          -250,000           -250,000           -250,000
Fee Accounts [TTAC]....................................           -41,220            -40,320            -40,320
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Transportation Security Administration             5,296,332          5,514,939          5,305,449
       (net)...........................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                           AVIATION SECURITY

Appropriations, 2011....................................  $5,213,307,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................   5,401,165,000
House allowance.........................................   5,224,556,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,293,566,000

    The Transportation Security Administration [TSA] aviation 
security account provides for Federal aviation security, 
including screening of all passengers and baggage, deployment 
of on-site law enforcement, continuation of a uniform set of 
background requirements for airport and airline personnel, and 
deployment of explosives detection technology.
    The aviation security activities include funding for: 
Federal transportation security officers [TSOs] and private 
contract screeners; air cargo security; procurement, 
installation, and maintenance of explosives detection systems; 
checkpoint support; and other aviation regulation and 
enforcement activities.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $5,293,566,000 for aviation 
security, $107,599,000 below the amount requested and 
$80,259,000 above the fiscal year 2011 level.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                                                AVIATION SECURITY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Fiscal year 2011   Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                              enacted         budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Screening Operations...................................         4,266,073          4,316,308          4,193,246
Aviation Security Direction and Enforcement............           947,234          1,084,857          1,100,320
Aviation Security Capital Fund (mandatory).............          [250,000]          [250,000]          [250,000]
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Aviation Security.........................         5,213,307          5,401,165          5,293,566
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         AVIATION SECURITY FEES

    The President's budget assumes fiscal year 2012 aviation 
security fee collections of $2,961,500,000, including a 
proposal to collect an additional $589,940,000 through an 
increase in the fee passengers pay. The Congressional Budget 
Office, in its analysis of the President's budget, has re-
estimated collections from aviation security fees to be 
$2,560,000,000. According to estimates by the Congressional 
Budget Office, this amount is made up of $2,140,000,000 from 
passengers and $420,000,000 from air carriers. The amount 
estimated to come from passengers includes the administration's 
proposal to increase aviation passenger fees by $1.50 in fiscal 
year 2012, generating an additional $280,000,000 in offsetting 
collections.
    The Aviation and Transportation Security Act (Public Law 
107-71) mandated that TSA impose a flat fee of $2.50 per 
segment and no more than $5 per one-way trip on passengers to 
pay for the costs of providing specified civil aviation 
security services. Security costs covered by offsetting fee 
collections represented 32 percent of aviation security costs 
in fiscal year 2002 as compared to 26 percent in fiscal year 
2011. The Committee recommendation includes bill language to 
increase the fee for fiscal year 2012, which will ensure that 
aviation customers, not general taxpayers, pay for a portion of 
the growth in aviation security costs. The Committee has not 
approved the President's proposal to provide the Secretary with 
permanent authority to increase aviation security fees, a 
proposal that should be considered by the Committee of 
jurisdiction.
    The Committee is also concerned about the impact airline 
checked baggage fees are having on security at airport 
checkpoints. According to TSA, there has been a notable change 
in carry-on baggage volume that directly correlates to the 
imposition of these fees. This has increased checkpoint 
security requirements and processing times. According to DHS, 
in 2000, it cost less than a $1 to screen each passenger and 
accompanying baggage. In fiscal year 2010, the average cost for 
TSA to screen a passenger and accompanying baggage has 
increased to nearly $9, due in part to airline imposed checked 
baggage fees that have resulted in TSA screening 56 million 
additional carry-on bags at airport checkpoints annually. As a 
result of additional carry-on luggage at airport security 
checkpoints, TSA estimates it is spending an additional 
$260,000,000 to support passenger throughput rates, which is 
detracting from other security programs. The Committee 
encourages the Department to seek legislation authorizing TSA 
to recoup these costs from the airlines.

                          SCREENING OPERATIONS

    The Committee recommends $4,193,246,000 for TSA screening 
operations, $123,062,000 below the amount requested and 
$72,827,000 below the fiscal year 2011 level. The 
recommendation maintains operational levels funded in fiscal 
year 2011, including the realignment of Bomb Appraisal Officers 
from the ``Passenger and baggage screener personnel, 
compensation, and benefits'' PPA to the ``Airport management 
and support'' PPA under ``Aviation Security Direction and 
Enforcement''.
    The recommendation includes the annualization of screeners 
to staff 1,000 Advanced Imaging Technology [AIT] units funded 
in prior fiscal years and the requested procurement of an 
additional 275 AIT machines and the personnel to staff them. 
TSA has indicated that the last 250 AIT machines funded in 
fiscal year 2011 and the additional 275 machines requested for 
fiscal year 2012 will be fielded later than originally 
anticipated in the budget request. Therefore, the 
recommendation includes the requested number of positions for 
AIT staffing, but the amount funded is $25,000,000 below the 
request because hires will be made later in the fiscal year.
    The recommendation includes an increase of $10,950,000 and 
175 FTE for TSA's behavior detection officer [BDO] program. Of 
this amount, $8,862,000 is included in ``Screening 
Operations''. As discussed later in this report, TSA is to 
continue evaluating this program as recommended in a recent 
independent study.
    The recommendation does not include $39,200,000 for 
portable explosives trace detection [ETD] units requested in 
the ``Checkpoint support'' PPA. All 800 ETD units TSA requires 
were already funded in fiscal year 2011.
    A total of $222,738,000 is provided for procurement and 
installation of explosives detection systems [EDS], $50,000,000 
below the request. Between ARRA and funding in fiscal years 
2010 and 2011, over $1,810,000,000 has been appropriated for 
EDS airport improvement projects. The Committee recommendation 
includes bill language providing TSA with more flexibility in 
allocating EDS funding for procurement and installation in the 
Aviation Security Capital Fund.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                                              SCREENING OPERATIONS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2011  Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Screener Workforce:
    Privatized Screening Airports.........................           144,470           144,193           144,193
    Passenger and baggage screener personnel, compensation         2,920,813         3,060,493         3,028,381
     and benefits.........................................
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Screener Workforce......................         3,065,283         3,204,686         3,172,574
                                                           =====================================================
Screener Training and Other...............................           243,402           252,526           250,776
Checkpoint Support........................................           328,843           254,093           214,893
Explosives Detection Systems/Explosives Trace Detection
 [EDS/ETD]:
    EDS/ETD purchase and installation.....................           290,843           272,738           222,738
    Screening technology maintenance and utilities........           316,247           332,265           332,265
    Operation Integration.................................            21,455  ................  ................
                                                           =====================================================
      Subtotal, EDS/ETD Systems...........................           628,545           605,003           555,003
                                                           =====================================================
      Total, Screening Operations.........................         4,266,073         4,316,308         4,193,246
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                     PRIVATIZED SCREENING AIRPORTS

    The Committee recommends $144,193,000 for privatized 
screening airports, the same amount as requested in the budget 
and $277,000 below the fiscal year 2011 level. The budget 
request supports funding requirements for the 16 airports that 
participate in the program.
    TSA shall notify the Committee if the agency expects to 
spend less than the appropriated amount due to situations where 
no additional airports express interest in converting, either 
fully or partially, to privatized screening, or where airports 
currently using privatized screening convert to using Federal 
screeners. TSA shall adjust its PPA line items, and notify the 
Committee within 10 days, to account for any changes in private 
screening contracts, including new awards under the SPP, or the 
movement from privatized screening into Federal screening. The 
Committee also expects to be briefed on any proposed changes 
being considered for the SPP program.

  PASSENGER AND BAGGAGE SCREENER PERSONNEL, COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS

    The Committee recommends $3,028,381,000 for passenger and 
baggage screener personnel, compensation, and benefits, 
$32,112,000 below the amount requested and $107,568,000 above 
the fiscal year 2011 level. The recommendation includes the 
proposed realignment of $44,100,000 and 406 FTE to the airport 
management PPA. The recommendation also includes necessary 
resources for TSA to appropriately staff 1,000 Advanced Imaging 
Technology units funded in prior years and 275 additional units 
recommended for fiscal year 2012.
    The Committee does not include a statutory cap on TSA 
screening personnel. Consistent with the 9/11 Act, the 
Secretary of Homeland Security shall recruit and hire screeners 
as may be necessary to provide appropriate levels of aviation 
security and to ensure that average passenger wait times do not 
exceed 10 minutes.
    The Committee is concerned about TSA staffing levels at the 
Nation's largest airports, especially those with a high number 
of security breaches, and whether these staffing levels are 
sufficient to prevent security breaches and keep passengers 
screening wait times less than 10 minutes.

                           BEHAVIOR DETECTION

    The Committee recommends $215,587,000 and 3,161 FTE for 
TSA's behavior detection program known as SPOT or ``Screening 
Passengers by Observation Techniques'', $7,112,000 and 175 FTE 
above the amount enacted in fiscal year 2011 and one-half of 
the requested increase. An additional $3,838,000 is included in 
other TSA appropriations to support this initiative. The SPOT 
program employs TSOs using behavior observation and analysis 
techniques to identify and screen travelers of interest. The 
Department recently completed a Science and Technology [S&T] 
sponsored study examining whether SPOT techniques result in 
correct screening decisions at airport checkpoints when 
compared to random screening. While the study found evidence 
positively connecting SPOT procedures over random screening to 
the identity of travelers purposefully trying to defeat TSA 
security, the study also concluded that additional research is 
necessary to validate the program's effectiveness. Equally 
important to the Committee is the report's strong 
recommendation for the Department to conduct ``a comprehensive 
program evaluation that includes an examination of procedures 
for employee selection, training, and performance management; 
consideration of resource management; cost-benefit analysis; 
and other such tasks that might influence the outcomes that 
result from the use of SPOT.'' TSA is to brief the Committee no 
later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this act on 
the actions taken to address these and other recommendations 
made in the S&T sponsored report, as well as steps it has taken 
to address the validation, management, and information sharing 
issues identified in GAO's May 2010 review of SPOT (GAO-10-
763).

                      SCREENER TRAINING AND OTHER

    The Committee recommends $250,776,000 for screener training 
and other, $1,750,000 below the amount requested in the budget 
and $7,374,000 above the fiscal year 2011 level. Funds are 
provided to support training of Transportation Security 
Officers [TSOs] and other direct costs associated with TSO 
operations, such as: consumable supplies, checkpoint janitorial 
services, travel for the National Deployment Force, uniform 
allowances, hazardous materials disposal, and a model workforce 
program. The recommendation includes an additional $3,861,000, 
as requested, for training, uniforms, and consumables needed to 
support the additional AIT machines and associated staffing and 
$1,750,000, as requested, for training and uniforms for new 
behavior detection officers.

                    SCREENING OF SPECIAL POPULATIONS

    The Committee is aware that security screening in the 
airport environment may be particularly challenging for 
passengers with physical or mental disabilities, like autism. 
The introduction of Advanced Imaging Technology [AIT] and new 
pat-down procedures has magnified the challenge of airport 
screening for many of these individuals. TSA shall continue to 
refine its training programs and standardize its screening 
process to ensure that the TSA workforce is more attuned to 
assisting disabled populations move through the aviation 
security process. The Committee supports ongoing efforts TSA is 
undertaking to revamp its training to include up-to-date 
disability-related information as well as planned training 
courses focusing on communications skills to provide better 
customer service to all travelers, including passengers with 
disabilities. TSA is to work in coordination with airlines, 
airports, and cross-disability/medical organizations to design 
education and outreach programs that will ensure access to the 
Nation's aviation system is available to everyone. TSA shall 
also work with airports to expand mock boarding events, such as 
those held for families with autistic children. Events like 
these provide TSOs with training on how to appropriately 
interact with and be sensitive to persons with special needs. 
TSA is to brief the Committee no later than 90 days after the 
date of enactment of this act on its efforts in this area.
    TSA shall also continue to streamline and improve the 
screening experience for young passengers and train officers to 
work with parents to ensure a secure and respectful checkpoint 
screening process.

                           CHECKPOINT SUPPORT

    The Committee recommends $214,893,000 for checkpoint 
support, $39,200,000 below the amount requested in the budget 
and $113,950,000 below the fiscal year 2011 level. Funds are 
provided to field test and deploy equipment for passenger 
screening, carry-on baggage screening, checkpoint 
reconfiguration, electronic surveillance of checkpoints, and 
operational integration of systems.
    The recommendation includes $76,983,000, as requested, to 
procure an additional 275 AIT units in fiscal year 2012, 
bringing the total number of AIT units funded to 1,275. AIT 
screens passengers for concealed weapons (metal and nonmetal), 
explosives, and other prohibited items, and is the most 
effective passenger screening technology currently available. 
TSA estimates that approximately 80 percent of the traveling 
public will be screened by AIT if the request is approved 
compared to only 60 percent if denied. This percentage 
difference equates to approximately 350,000 passengers a day 
that would otherwise use the walk-through metal detector, which 
cannot detect nonmetal weapons and explosives.
    The Committee is encouraged by TSA efforts to deploy 
automated target recognition [ATR] capability with AIT 
millimeter wave units. ATR displays a generic outline of a 
person on a monitor attached to an AIT unit, which 
significantly improves privacy protections through the 
elimination of private rooms where human operators view AIT 
images. Testing results have shown that an AIT with ATR 
technology outperforms an AIT with an image operator and has 
increased the speed at security lanes where it has been 
deployed. TSA is to brief the Committee not later than 30 days 
after the date of enactment of this act on AIT. The briefing is 
to include: procurement details; cost; schedule; associated 
staffing requirements; utilization rates; deployments; and 
progress on ATR development for AIT backscatter units and ATR 
deployment.
    The recommendation does not include $39,200,000, as 
requested, to purchase 385 portable ETD units to detect residue 
from explosives material on passengers at lanes not covered by 
an AIT. All 800 ETD units necessary to reach TSA's full 
operating capability were already funded in fiscal year 2011.
    Funds are also included, as requested, to purchase other 
checkpoint security systems, including: next generation 
explosives trace detectors; automated wait time technology; 
shoe scanning devices; advanced technology; and advanced 
surveillance camera systems for airports.

                           EXIT LANE SECURITY

    No later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this 
act, the Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security 
(Transportation Security Administration) shall submit a report 
that makes recommendations for improving the security of each 
location at an airport where passengers exit the sterile area. 
The report shall include:
  --an assessment of the differences in configurations of such 
        locations; and
  --an evaluation of options for improving security at such 
        locations, such as increasing personnel assigned to 
        exit lanes and the use of technology to improve 
        security.
    The report shall be submitted to the Committee on 
Appropriations and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation.
    A general provision is included providing for increased 
penalties for violating security regulations at airports.

                      EXPLOSIVES DETECTION SYSTEMS

    The Committee recommends $222,738,000 in discretionary 
appropriations for explosives detection systems [EDS] 
procurement and installation, $50,000,000 below the amount 
requested in the budget and $68,105,000 below the fiscal year 
2011 level. An additional $250,000,000 in mandatory spending 
will be available from Aviation Security Capital Fund [ASCF] 
fee collections. The total discretionary and mandatory funding 
will allow TSA to fund recapitalization and in-line projects at 
over 20 airports.
    Current law requires that the $250,000,000 in annual 
mandatory funding deposited into the ASCF is to be available 
for airport security improvement projects, such as facility 
modifications. However, procurement and installation of EDS 
equipment associated with these projects is not permitted. With 
a diminishing base of airport applications seeking large 
improvement projects and the need to replace aging EDS machines 
currently deployed at airports, the recommendation includes 
bill language, as requested, to permit ASCF funding to be used 
to procure and install EDS equipment during fiscal year 2012. 
This change will allow TSA to more effectively, economically, 
and expeditiously plan and implement the acquisition and 
replacement of existing EDS units. TSA is to work with the 
appropriate Committees of jurisdiction if it desires a 
permanent solution to this problem.
    The Committee supports TSA's efforts to complete a 
competitive procurement process for all three classes of EDS 
machines, including more rigid requirements for detection, 
lower false alarm rates, and screening. TSA shall regularly 
brief the Committee on its progress to meet this goal, 
including results from certification testing at the 
Transportation Security Laboratory and operational test and 
evaluation at selected airports. The Committee is aware of 
schedule delays that have occurred in the acquisition process. 
The briefings shall also include updates on TSA's strategy to 
avoid such delays. TSA shall also update the Committee on its 
implementation of recommendations made by GAO to ensure that 
TSA's plans to enhance detection requirements are met (GAO-11-
327SU).

           EXPENDITURE PLANS FOR EDS/CHECKPOINT TECHNOLOGIES

    The Committee includes statutory language under the 
``Transportation Security Support'' appropriation withholding 
the obligation of $25,000,000 for headquarters administration 
until TSA submits to the Committee, no later than 60 days after 
the date of enactment of this act, detailed expenditure plans 
for fiscal year 2012 for checkpoint security and EDS 
refurbishment, procurement, and installations on an airport-by-
airport basis. The withholding is included to encourage timely 
submissions of materials necessary for robust and informed 
oversight. The plans shall include specific technologies for 
purchase, program schedules and major milestones, a schedule 
for obligation of the funds, and a table detailing actual 
versus anticipated unobligated balances at the close of the 
fiscal year. TSA shall brief the Committee at the end of the 
second, third, and fourth quarters with an update on EDS and 
checkpoint expenditures, including an explanation of any 
deviation from the original plan.

                FIVE-YEAR STRATEGIC PLAN OF INVESTMENTS

    TSA's budget submission, as it is currently structured, 
provides limited understanding of TSA's total acquisition costs 
for passenger screening technologies and how these technologies 
link to TSA's near-term and long-term vision for its screening 
responsibilities. It is important for the Committee to have a 
better understanding of future acquisition needs and the 
resources necessary to execute them. While the budget 
justification includes the total number of assets necessary to 
meet full operating capability, it does not include a future-
years financial plan to achieve the desired end state. 
Therefore, the Committee directs TSA to include a 5-year budget 
estimate within the annual congressional budget justification, 
beginning with fiscal year 2013, that includes projected 
funding levels for the next 5 fiscal years individually for all 
passenger screening technology acquisitions. The plan shall 
also indicate the total cost and estimated completion date for 
each technology.

   INSTALLATION OF OPTIMAL BAGGAGE SCREENING SYSTEMS AND FTE SAVINGS

    With the large influx of funding provided in this act and 
in prior appropriations acts for EDS procurement and 
installation, TSA is able to greatly expedite the deployment of 
in-line checked baggage screening systems, thereby permitting a 
reduction in personnel. For instance, by the end of fiscal year 
2011, TSA estimates that 187 airports will have optimal checked 
baggage screening solutions. TSA shall report to the 
Committees, in tandem with the annual budget request, on the 
savings achieved and anticipated by fiscal year from the 
installation of new in-line systems.

 AIRPORTS THAT HAVE INCURRED ELIGIBLE COSTS FOR IN-LINE BAGGAGE SYSTEM 
                               DEPLOYMENT

    As required by the 9/11 Act, TSA is to give funding 
consideration to airports that incurred eligible costs for EDS 
and that were not recipients of funding agreements. The fiscal 
year 2012 EDS expenditure plan shall identify airports eligible 
for funding pursuant to section 1604(b)(2) of Public Law 110-53 
and funding, if any, allocated to reimburse those airports.

             SCREENING TECHNOLOGY MAINTENANCE AND UTILITIES

    The Committee recommends $332,265,000 for screening 
technology maintenance and utilities, the same level as 
requested in the budget and $16,018,000 above the fiscal year 
2011 level.

                         OPERATION INTEGRATION

    Funding for operation integration is included within the 
``checkpoint support'' and ``EDS procurement and installation'' 
PPA's as requested. Funds are provided to test, evaluate, and 
analyze pre-production or production representative systems 
under realistic conditions, including operation by those who 
will use the equipment in the field in a variety of 
environmental conditions.

              AVIATION SECURITY DIRECTION AND ENFORCEMENT

    The Committee recommends $1,100,320,000 for aviation 
security direction and enforcement, $15,463,000 above the 
amount requested in the budget and $153,086,000 above the 
fiscal year 2011 level. The following table summarizes the 
Committee's recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 
and budget request levels:

                                   AVIATION SECURITY DIRECTION AND ENFORCEMENT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2011  Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Aviation regulation and other enforcement.................           318,285           373,239           382,989
Airport management and support............................           489,142           571,503           571,216
Federal flight deck officer and flight crew support.......            25,118            25,461            25,461
Air cargo.................................................           114,689           114,654           120,654
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Aviation Security Direction and Enforcement..           947,234         1,084,857         1,100,320
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

               AVIATION REGULATION AND OTHER ENFORCEMENT

    The Committee recommends $382,989,000 for aviation 
regulation and other enforcement, $9,750,000 above the amount 
requested in the budget and $64,704,000 above the fiscal year 
2011 level. The recommended amount provides for law enforcement 
and regulatory activities at airports to: ensure compliance 
with required security measures, respond to security incidents, 
and provide international support for worldwide security 
requirements. The recommendation includes amounts requested to 
annualize efforts initiated in fiscal year 2011 to strengthen 
international programs in high-risk areas around the world and 
other targeted security enhancements.
    The recommendation includes a program increase of 
$22,945,000, as requested, for 12 additional multi-modal 
Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response [VIPR] teams with 6 
teams dedicated to aviation and 6 teams dedicated to surface 
transportation security. This amount brings the total number of 
VIPR teams to 37. VIPR teams were authorized by the 9/11 Act to 
augment the security of any mode of transportation at any 
location within the United States. These teams, made up of TSA 
employees, including Federal Air Marshals, Transportation 
Security Officers, surface transportation inspectors, and 
canine teams, are deployed to airports, rail stations, and 
other venues in response to intelligence-driven threats, or for 
deterrence through risk-based deployments. TSA shall provide an 
expenditure plan detailing how and where these new VIPR teams 
will be deployed no later than 60 days after the date of 
enactment of this act.
    The recommendation also includes $6,250,000 above the 
request for 25 new canine teams in addition to the 100 canine 
teams being acquired in fiscal year 2011. The Committee 
continues to believe that the most effective explosives-
screening process relies on multiple capabilities, including 
screeners, technology, and canines.
    Finally, the recommendation includes an increase of 
$3,500,000 for international security enhancements. This 
initiative is further described under the ``Air cargo'' PPA.

                     AIRPORT MANAGEMENT AND SUPPORT

    The Committee recommends $571,216,000 for airport 
management and support, $287,000 below the amount requested in 
the budget and $82,074,000 above the fiscal year 2011 level. 
Funds are provided for: the workforce to support TSA Federal 
security directors; Bomb Appraisal Officers; Explosives 
Security Specialists; the Transportation Security Operations 
Center; airport rent and furniture; a vehicle fleet; airport 
parking; and employee transit benefits. The recommended amount 
includes the transfer of funding for Bomb Appraisal Officers 
from the ``Passenger and baggage screener personnel, 
compensation, and benefits'' PPA and Explosives Security 
Specialists from the Federal Air Marshals ``Management and 
administration'' PPA. This shift is appropriate as these 
employees report directly to Federal Security Directors.
    The recommendation also includes $2,882,000 to support new 
personnel associated with the AIT, BDO, and VIPR initiatives.

     FEDERAL FLIGHT DECK OFFICER AND FLIGHT CREW TRAINING PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $25,461,000 for Federal flight 
deck officer and flight crew training programs, the same amount 
as requested in the budget and $343,000 above the fiscal year 
2011 level. Funds are provided to deputize qualified airline 
pilots who volunteer to be Federal law enforcement officers. 
This program provides initial and recurrent law enforcement 
training. Funds are also provided for the Crew Member Self-
Defense Training program for the purpose of teaching crew 
members basic self defense concepts and techniques.

                               AIR CARGO

    The Committee recommends $120,654,000 for air cargo 
security activities, an increase of $6,000,000 above the amount 
requested in the budget and $5,965,000 above the fiscal year 
2011 level. Funds are provided to secure the air cargo supply 
chain, conveyances, and people.
    By August 2010, TSA achieved 100 percent screening of air 
cargo that is placed on passenger aircraft for domestic 
flights, but 100 percent screening of air cargo loaded onto 
inbound international passenger flights has yet to be achieved. 
Given recent aviation based terrorist plots, including the 
October 2010 plot to blow up air cargo aircraft destined for 
the United States, the Committee was encouraged when the 
Secretary directed TSA to expedite the achievement of 100 
percent screening of inbound cargo from 2013 to the end of 
2011. The Department has also placed a stronger emphasis on 
all-cargo flights to the United States through airport 
vulnerability assessments and the air cargo advance screening 
project, which targets high risk cargo before boarding. To 
strengthen efforts for air cargo screening and security on 
inbound passenger and all-cargo aircraft, $6,000,000 is 
recommended above the request under this PPA and an additional 
$3,500,000 is recommended under the ``Aviation regulation and 
other enforcement'' PPA. These amounts will enable TSA to hire 
an additional 29 international air cargo inspectors and 24 
transportation security specialists to conduct assessments of 
all-cargo airports from which flights depart to the United 
States or from which U.S. all-cargo carriers fly to any 
location, and to increase the frequency of visits to verify 
protective measures at higher-risk airports. As part of the 
fiscal year 2012 air cargo expenditure plan, TSA shall describe 
its investment areas and activities associated with this 
initiative.
    TSA is directed to brief the Committee no later than 45 
days after the date of enactment of this act, in a classified 
session if appropriate, on its progress in implementing the 
recommendations contained in OIG-10-119, ``Evaluation of 
Screening of Air Cargo Transported on Passenger Aircraft.''
    The Committee includes statutory language under 
``Transportation Security Support'' restricting $25,000,000 
from being obligated for headquarters administration until TSA 
submits to the Committee, no later than 60 days after the date 
of enactment of this act, an expenditure plan on the allocation 
of air cargo funds, including carryover balances. Due to delays 
in receiving the air cargo expenditure plan in prior years, the 
withholding is included to encourage timely submissions of 
materials necessary for robust and informed oversight.

                    SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $105,749,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................     134,748,000
House allowance.........................................     129,748,000
Committee recommendation................................     134,748,000

    Surface transportation security provides funding for 
personnel and operational resources to assess the risk of a 
terrorist attack on nonaviation modes, standards and procedures 
to address those risks, and to ensure compliance with 
established regulations and policies.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $134,748,000 for surface 
transportation security, the same amount as requested in the 
budget and $28,999,000 above the fiscal year 2011 level. Funds 
are available to assess the risk of terrorist attacks for all 
nonaviation transportation modes, issue regulations to improve 
the security of those modes, and enforce regulations to ensure 
the protection of the transportation system. The following 
table summarizes the Committee's recommendations as compared to 
the fiscal year 2011 and budget request levels:

                                         SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2011  Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Staffing and operations...................................            39,712            38,514            38,514
Surface transportation security inspectors and canines....            66,037            96,234            96,234
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Surface Transportation Security..............           105,749           134,748           134,748
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

        SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY STAFFING AND OPERATIONS

    The Committee recommends $38,514,000 for surface 
transportation security staffing and operations, the same 
amount as requested in the budget and $1,198,000 below the 
fiscal year 2011 level.

         SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY INSPECTORS AND CANINES

    The Committee recommends $96,234,000 for surface 
transportation security inspectors and canines, the same amount 
as requested in the budget and $30,197,000 above the fiscal 
year 2011 level.
    Since 2004, there have been 1,300 terrorist attacks 
worldwide against mass transit, buses and passenger rail, 
resulting in more than 4,000 deaths and 14,000 injuries. It is 
now more important than ever to increase our defenses against 
similar attacks here in the United States. Recent intelligence 
gathered from Osama bin Laden's compound revealed evidence that 
al Qaeda considered rail lines high value targets. The 
recommendation provides a 46 percent increase over fiscal year 
2011, and includes the request of $24,049,000 to annualize the 
15 ``surface'' focused Visible Intermodal Prevention and 
Response [VIPR] teams funded in fiscal year 2010. As discussed 
under ``Aviation Security Direction and Enforcement'', the 
recommendation includes funding for 12 new multi-modal VIPR 
teams, which will expand deployments in the surface sector. In 
total, TSA anticipates 7,700 VIPR operations in surface modes, 
a 26 percent increase over fiscal year 2011.
    In addition, $5,660,000 is provided, as requested, to 
annualize 100 additional surface transportation security 
inspectors funded in fiscal year 2010; and $1,280,000 is 
provided, as requested, for cooperative agreement stipends with 
State and local canine teams.

                              RAIL TUNNELS

    Not later than 6 months after the date of the enactment of 
this act, TSA shall submit a report that:
  --makes recommendations for improving the security of 
        passenger and mass transit of rail tunnels;
  --identifies the frequency of passenger rail and mass transit 
        tunnel security breaches; and
  --assesses differences in configurations of such locations; 
        and options for improving security at such locations, 
        such as increasing personnel assigned to such locations 
        and the use of technology to improve security.
    The report shall be submitted to the following Senate 
committees:
  --the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation;
  --the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
        Affairs; and
  --the Committee on Appropriations.

           TRANSPORTATION THREAT ASSESSMENT AND CREDENTIALING

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $162,673,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................     183,954,000
House allowance.........................................     183,954,000
Committee recommendation................................     163,954,000

    Transportation threat assessment and credentialing includes 
several TSA credentialing programs: Secure Flight, Crew 
Vetting, Screening Administration and Operations, Registered 
Traveler, Transportation Worker Identification Credential, 
Hazardous Materials Commercial Drivers License Endorsement 
Program, and Alien Flight School.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends a direct appropriation of 
$163,954,000 for transportation threat assessment and 
credentialing, $20,000,000 below the amount requested in the 
budget and $1,281,000 above the fiscal year 2011 level. In 
addition, an estimated $40,320,000 in fee collections is 
available for these activities in fiscal year 2012, as proposed 
in the budget.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                               TRANSPORTATION THREAT ASSESSMENT AND CREDENTIALING
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2011  Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Direct Appropriations:
    Secure Flight.........................................            84,194            92,414            92,414
    Crew and other vetting programs.......................            78,479            91,540            71,540
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, direct appropriations.....................           162,673           183,954           163,954
                                                           =====================================================
Fee Collections:
    Transportation worker identification credential.......             9,200             8,300             8,300
    Hazardous materials...................................            12,000            12,000            12,000
    Alien flight school (transfer from DOJ)...............             4,000             4,000             4,000
    Certified cargo screening program.....................             5,200             5,200             5,200
    Large aircraft security program.......................             1,200             1,200             1,200
    Secure identification display area checks.............             8,000             8,000             8,000
    Other security threat assessments.....................               100               100               100
    General aviation at DCA...............................               100               100               100
    Indirect air cargo....................................             1,400             1,400             1,400
    Sensitive security information........................                20                20                20
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, fee collections...........................            41,220            40,320            40,320
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                             SECURE FLIGHT

    The Committee recommends $92,414,000 for Secure Flight, the 
same amount as requested in the budget and $8,220,000 above the 
fiscal year 2011 level. As recommended by the 9/11 Commission 
and mandated by the Intelligence Reform Act, this program 
assumed the responsibility of airline passenger watch list 
matching from the air carriers to the Federal Government.
    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$12,371,000 as requested for expanded watchlist matching, of 
which $8,764,000 is included under the ``Secure Flight'' PPA. 
This increase is to accommodate an expanded population of names 
screened from the Terrorist Screening Database following the 
December 25, 2009, bomb plot to blow up Northwest Airlines 
flight 253.

                    CREW AND OTHER VETTING PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $71,540,000 for Crew and Other 
Vetting Programs, $20,000,000 below the amount requested in the 
budget and $6,939,000 below the fiscal year 2011 level.
    The Committee recommendation includes funds to annualize 
personnel provided in fiscal year 2011 to support vetting 
infrastructure improvements and pay related adjustments.
    The Committee supports TSA's efforts to modernize its 
vetting and credentialing infrastructure, which is currently 
made up of disconnected and duplicative systems. This has 
resulted in high system complexity and lengthy adjudication 
processes due to manual reviews. TSA intends to modernize its 
system to address these issues and improve vetting and 
credentialing services. However, due to schedule delays 
associated with the award of the modernization contract, 
significant balances of funds available in fiscal year 2011 
will now carry over into fiscal year 2012. Therefore, the 
Committee provides $27,800,000 instead of $57,800,000 requested 
in the budget. With carryover funding, approximately 
$65,500,000 is estimated to be available for this effort in 
fiscal year 2012. TSA is to brief the Committee quarterly on 
its efforts to develop this system.

           EXPEDITED PASSENGER SCREENING FOR KNOWN TRAVELERS

    Since the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, TSA has 
made significant modifications to security procedures and 
introduced new technology with the aim of securing the flying 
public. However, the screening process for passengers remains a 
``one-size fits all'' approach, resulting in the common 
complaint that flight crews, children, and the elderly are 
being screened at the same level as others with potentially 
higher-risk profiles. The Committee is aware that TSA is 
examining implementation of a risk-based security approach that 
would more appropriately redirect resources from those 
passengers comprising a lower security risk to those with 
unknown or higher-risk information. The Committee supports 
TSA's exploration of procedures aligned more closely with 
threat and risk, as well as its plans to conduct proof of 
concept (pilot) projects to test these processes.
    Recognizing aviation passenger vetting infrastructure will 
need additional capability to assist with identifying low-risk 
travelers, the Committee provides $10,000,000 above the request 
for TSA to develop a systems architecture, procure hardware and 
software to handle expanded processing requirements to support 
proof of concepts and incremental capabilities to expand the 
known traveler populations. Furthermore, the Committee directs 
TSA to provide a briefing on risk-based security no later than 
90 days after the date of enactment of this act. The briefing 
shall include, as appropriate, information and interim results 
of any pilots and associated timelines, implementation of risk-
based screening procedures on a larger scale, or the conclusion 
that implementation of such processes is not feasible and the 
reasons for that conclusion.

            TRANSPORTATION WORKER IDENTIFICATION CREDENTIAL

    The Committee is concerned that Transportation Worker 
Identification Credential [TWIC] applicants are required to 
make multiple trips to TWIC enrollment centers, which are 
occasionally at some distance from the applicants' homes or 
places of work. The Committee directs TSA to expand Universal 
Enrollment Centers, which will result in no less than a 50 
percent expansion in the number of available TWIC enrollment 
sites. Furthermore, TSA is to brief the Committee no later than 
180 days after the date of enactment of this act on the 
projected resource requirements, security impacts, and a 
potential timeline to effect changes in the TWIC enrollment 
system to permit cards to be shipped directly to the recipient.

                    TRANSPORTATION SECURITY SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $986,661,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................   1,113,697,000
House allowance.........................................   1,032,790,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,042,066,000

    The transportation security support account supports the 
operational needs of TSA's extensive airport/field personnel 
and infrastructure. Transportation security support includes: 
headquarters' personnel, pay, benefits and support; 
intelligence; mission support centers; human capital services; 
and information technology support.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,042,066,000 for transportation 
security support activities, $71,631,000 below the amount 
requested in the budget and $55,405,000 above the fiscal year 
2011 level.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                                         TRANSPORTATION SECURITY SUPPORT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                   Fiscal year
                                                                   Fiscal year     2012 budget      Committee
                                                                  2011 enacted       request     recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Headquarters administration....................................         254,000         320,794          293,474
Information technology.........................................         466,092         485,612          453,100
Human capital services.........................................         233,658         264,299          252,500
Intelligence...................................................          32,911          42,992           42,992
                                                                ------------------------------------------------
      Total, Transportation Security Support...................         986,661       1,113,697        1,042,066
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      HEADQUARTERS ADMINISTRATION

    The Committee recommends $293,474,000 for headquarters 
administration, $27,320,000 below the amount requested in the 
budget and $39,474,000 above the fiscal year 2011 level.
    The recommended amount includes funding to support 
increases for AIT staffing, VIPR teams, expanded watchlist 
vetting, and additional BDO hires. Because the recommendation 
includes half of the increase requested for BDO staffing, the 
support amount is reduced accordingly.
    The recommendation includes the requested TSA-wide 
reduction of $114,009,000 for management efficiencies, 
administrative savings, and operational support. TSA is to 
brief the Committee with a full accounting of how these 
reductions will be achieved no later than 90 days after the 
date of enactment of this act.
    The recommended amount also includes $1,998,000, as 
requested, to hire 15 additional personnel to increase TSA's 
acquisition workforce capacity and capabilities. Recent 
findings by the DHS Inspector General in report OIG-10-72 found 
that TSA ``did not have an adequate number of properly trained 
core acquisition staff to administer contracts and oversee 
support services contractors' performance.'' Further, the 
report concluded that TSA ``did not have reasonable assurance 
that contractors were performing as required, that it 
contracted for the services it needed, that it received the 
services it paid for, or that taxpayers were receiving the best 
value.'' The Committee agrees with TSA's assessment that 
additional resources are necessary for disciplined oversight 
processes and robust acquisition program management.
    The recommended amount includes $2,000,000 above the 
request for TSA's Office of Professional Responsibility. TSA 
recently established this Office to ensure that allegations of 
misconduct are thoroughly investigated and that discipline is 
appropriate and fair across the agency. This Office is 
currently being funded within existing resources, including 
detailees. The Committee believes the importance of this 
program warrants dedicated funding.
    TSA shall continue semi-annual briefings on covert testing 
activities to include the latest metrics gathered from recent 
tests and resulting mitigating factors.
    TSA shall brief the Committee no later than September 23, 
2011, on a proposed budget account structure that allows for a 
1-year appropriation for salaries and expenses.
    The Committee includes bill language withholding the 
obligation of $25,000,000 for headquarters administration 
until: fiscal year 2012 expenditure plans for air cargo 
security, explosives detection systems procurement and 
installation, and checkpoint support are provided to the 
Committee. The expenditure plans are due no later than 60 days 
after the date of enactment of this act.

                         INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

    The Committee recommends $453,100,000 for information 
technology, $32,512,000 below the amount requested in the 
budget and $12,992,000 below the fiscal year 2011 level.
    The recommended amount includes IT funding to support 
increases for AIT staffing, VIPR teams, expanded watchlist 
vetting, and additional BDO hires. Because the recommendation 
includes half of the increase requested for BDO staffing, the 
support amount is reduced accordingly.
    The recommendation does not include $20,300,000 proposed 
for data center consolidation in order to fund critical 
operational priorities. This decrease is without prejudice to 
the merits of the data consolidation initiative.

                         HUMAN CAPITAL SERVICES

    The Committee recommends $252,500,000 for human capital 
services, $11,799,000 below the amount requested in the budget 
and $18,842,000 above the fiscal year 2011 level.
    The recommended amount includes human capital funding to 
support increases for AIT staffing, VIPR teams, expanded 
watchlist vetting, and additional BDO hires. Because the 
recommendation includes half of the increase requested for BDO 
staffing, the support amount is reduced accordingly. The 
recommendation also includes funding requested for recruitment 
costs and drug testing to support new screener hires.

                              INTELLIGENCE

    The Committee recommends $42,992,000 for the Office of 
Intelligence, the same amount as requested in the budget and 
$10,081,000 above the fiscal year 2011 level. The 
recommendation includes $6,793,000 to annualize Field 
Intelligence Officers added in fiscal year 2010 and expand the 
number of officers by an additional 21 positions in fiscal year 
2012.

                          PASSENGER COMPLAINTS

    The Committee directs TSA to make every effort possible to 
ensure that the traveling public is aware of the process in 
which complaints about the screening experience can be made. 
The Committee is aware that TSA operates multiple channels by 
which individuals can contact the agency. The primary portal is 
the TSA Contact Center for passengers to transmit questions, 
complaints and concerns about aviation travel, the screening 
process, or other TSA-related issues. The Committee directs GAO 
to conduct a review of TSA's policies and procedures for 
resolving passenger complaints, including an examination of the 
organizational independence of the office. GAO's review is to 
be completed no later than 9 months after the date of enactment 
of this act.

                RISK-BASED DECISIONMAKING AND BUDGETING

    The Committee directs TSA to submit, concurrent with the 
fiscal year 2013 budget request, supporting documentation that 
explicitly explains how TSA's comprehensive risk assessments 
for all transportation modes were used to allocate resources 
across and within each mode. This documentation should also 
identify the corresponding allocation of resources being 
proposed in the budget request (by appropriations account, 
program, project, and activity) that address these priorities. 
This annual submission shall be made in classified or 
unclassified formats, as appropriate.

                          FEDERAL AIR MARSHALS

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $927,942,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................     991,375,000
House allowance.........................................     961,375,000
Committee recommendation................................     981,115,000

    The Federal Air Marshals [FAMs] protect the air 
transportation system against terrorist threats, sabotage, and 
other acts of violence. The FAMs account provides funds for the 
salaries, benefits, travel, training, and other expenses of the 
program.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $981,115,000 for the Federal Air 
Marshals, $10,260,000 below the amount requested in the budget 
and $53,173,000 above the fiscal year 2011 level. To help 
inform the long-term staffing needs of the Federal Air 
Marshals, the Committee directs FAMS to conduct an independent 
review of the definition of flights presenting ``high-security 
risks''. This recommendation was part of a recent TSA report on 
FAMS long-term staffing levels. FAMS is to brief the Committee 
on the results of the review no later than 120 days after the 
date of enactment of this act. The briefing shall include an 
analysis of whether the current risk assessment model was 
validated by the review and if changes are necessary that would 
warrant upward or downward adjustments to current staffing 
levels.
    The Committee directs TSA to submit quarterly reports on 
mission coverage, staffing levels, and hiring rates as in prior 
years.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                                              FEDERAL AIR MARSHALS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2011  Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Management and administration.............................           805,275           860,260           850,000
Travel and training.......................................           122,667           131,115           131,115
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Air Marshals.........................           927,942           991,375           981,115
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                              Coast Guard


                                SUMMARY

    The Coast Guard's primary responsibilities are the 
enforcement of all applicable Federal laws on the high seas and 
waters subject to the jurisdiction of the United States; 
promotion of safety of life and property at sea; assistance to 
navigation; protection of the marine environment; and 
maintenance of a state of readiness to function as a 
specialized service in the Navy in time of war, as authorized 
by sections 1 and 2 of title 14, United States Code.
    The Commandant of the Coast Guard reports directly to the 
Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends a total program level of 
$10,350,762,000 for the activities of the Coast Guard for 
fiscal year 2012. The following table summarizes the 
Committee's recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 
and budget request levels:

                                          COAST GUARD--FUNDING SUMMARY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                           Fiscal year 2012
                                                         Fiscal year 2011       budget            Committee
                                                             enacted\1\       request\2\      recommendations\3\
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operating Expenses.....................................         6,894,031         6,819,505           7,078,054
Environmental Compliance and Restoration...............            13,172            16,699              16,699
Reserve Training.......................................           133,365           136,778             134,278
Acquisition, Construction, and Improvements............         1,516,744         1,421,924           1,391,924
Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation............            24,696            19,779              27,779
Health Care Fund Contribution (Permanent Indefinite               265,321           261,871             261,871
 Appropriations).......................................
Retired Pay............................................         1,400,700         1,440,157           1,440,157
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Coast Guard...............................        10,248,029        10,116,713          10,350,762
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes $254,000,000 for overseas contingency operations.
\2\Excludes a proposed transfer of up to $258,278,000 from Navy ``Operation and Maintenance'' for overseas
  contingency operations.
\3\Includes $258,000,000 for overseas contingency operations.

    The Coast Guard will pay an estimated $261,871,000 in 
fiscal year 2012 to the Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care 
Fund for the costs of military Medicare-eligible health 
benefits earned by its uniformed service members. The 
contribution is funded by permanent indefinite discretionary 
authority pursuant to the National Defense Authorization Act 
for fiscal year 2005 (Public Law 108-375).

                           OPERATING EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2011\1\.................................  $6,894,031,000
Budget estimate, 2012\2\................................   6,819,505,000
House allowance\3\......................................   7,071,061,000
Committee recommendation\3\.............................   7,078,054,000

\1\Includes $254,000,000 for overseas contingency operations.
\2\Excludes a proposed transfer of up to $258,278,000 from Navy 
``Operation and Maintenance'' for overseas contingency operations.
\3\Includes $258,000,000 (Senate) and $258,278,000 (House) for overseas 
contingency operations.

    The Operating Expenses appropriation provides funds for the 
operation and maintenance of multipurpose vessels, aircraft, 
and shore units strategically located along the coasts and 
inland waterways of the United States and in selected areas 
overseas. The program activities of this appropriation fall 
into the following categories:
    Search and Rescue.--As one of its earliest and most 
traditional missions, the Coast Guard maintains a nationwide 
system of boats, aircraft, cutters, and rescue coordination 
centers on 24-hour alert.
    Aids to Navigation.--To help mariners determine their 
location and avoid accidents, the Coast Guard maintains a 
network of manned and unmanned aids to navigation along the 
Nation's coasts and on its inland waterways. In addition, the 
Coast Guard operates radio stations in the United States and 
abroad to serve the needs of the armed services and marine and 
air commerce.
    Marine Safety.--The Coast Guard ensures compliance with 
Federal statutes and regulations designed to improve safety in 
the merchant marine industry and operates a recreational 
boating safety program.
    Marine Environmental Protection.--The primary objectives of 
the marine environmental protection program are to minimize the 
dangers of marine pollution and to assure the safety of ports 
and waterways.
    Enforcement of Laws and Treaties.--The Coast Guard is the 
principal maritime enforcement agency with regard to Federal 
laws on the navigable waters of the United States and the high 
seas, including fisheries, drug smuggling, illegal immigration, 
and hijacking of vessels.
    Ice Operations.--In the Arctic and Antarctic, Coast Guard 
icebreakers escort supply ships, support research activities 
and Department of Defense operations, survey uncharted waters, 
and collect scientific data. The Coast Guard also assists 
commercial vessels through ice-covered waters.
    Defense Readiness.--During peacetime, the Coast Guard 
maintains an effective state of military preparedness to 
operate as a service in the Navy in time of war or national 
emergency at the direction of the President. As such, the Coast 
Guard has primary responsibility for the security of ports, 
waterways, and navigable waters up to 200 miles offshore.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $7,078,054,000 for Coast Guard 
Operating Expenses, including $24,500,000 from the Oil Spill 
Liability Trust Fund and $598,000,000 for Coast Guard defense-
related activities. Of this amount, the Committee recommends 
not to exceed $17,000 for official reception and representation 
expenses.
    The recommended funding level is $258,549,000 above the 
request and $184,023,000 above the fiscal year 2011 level. The 
Committee's recommendation is $549,000 above the net request 
for Coast Guard Operating Expenses when excluding funds 
requested for overseas contingency operations.
    The recommendation includes necessary adjustments to base, 
such as increases in mandatory pay allowances, military 
personnel entitlements, asset sustainment, and operating and 
maintenance funds for new assets. These increases are partially 
offset by one-time cost reductions, terminations, 
decommissioning of aging assets, efficiencies, and 
administrative savings, as requested. In addition, the 
Committee's recommendation includes the following program 
initiatives requested for fiscal year 2012: $10,666,000 for 
enhancements to marine safety; $11,485,000 for an expansion of 
marine environmental response capabilities; $9,300,000 for 
military family child care; $39,000,000 for restoration of 
polar operations funding; $8,600,000 for network security 
upgrades; and $6,300,000 for the Distress Alerting Satellite 
System.
    The Committee recommends the following increases above the 
President's request to address several unfunded priorities in 
the fiscal year 2012 budget request: $3,700,000 to annualize 
positions funded in fiscal year 2011 to enhance marine 
environmental response capabilities such as oil spills; 
$20,300,000 for critical depot level maintenance for aging 
high-endurance and medium-endurance cutters to address a 
backlog of over $341,000,000; and $4,000,000 for boat pursuit 
and tactical training of maritime law enforcement units.
    The Committee recommends the following reductions from the 
President's request: a reduction of $12,000,000 in technical 
adjustments for pay, allowances, and operating expenses due to 
a current trend of lower than anticipated military healthcare 
expenditures; a reduction of $5,571,000 for surface and air 
asset follow-on operational costs due to delays in the delivery 
of new assets to operating units; a reduction of $1,880,000 for 
operations and maintenance of the Manned Covert Surveillance 
Aircraft due to delays in the delivery of the aircraft and lack 
of test and evaluation results; and a reduction of $8,000,000 
for data center migration. The reduction to data center 
migration is without prejudice, but is necessary to meet higher 
priority operational demands within a constrained budget 
environment.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                                               OPERATING EXPENSES
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2011  Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Military pay and allowances...............................         3,345,303         3,447,753         3,434,061
Civilian pay and benefits.................................           737,702           780,556           784,256
Training and recruiting...................................           204,087           213,282           213,321
Operating funds and unit level maintenance................         1,138,474         1,109,323         1,109,623
Centrally managed accounts................................           345,174           351,478           342,653
Intermediate and depot level maintenance..................           869,291           917,113           936,140
Overseas contingency operations...........................           254,000             (\1\)           258,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Operating Expenses...........................         6,894,031         6,819,505         7,078,054
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Excludes a proposed transfer of up to $258,278,000 from Navy ``Operation and Maintenance'' for overseas
  contingency operations.

                    OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS

    The Committee provides $258,000,000 for Coast Guard 
operations in support of overseas contingency operations. While 
funding for these activities was requested in the Department of 
Defense budget for the Navy, the Committee adopted a practice 
beginning in the fiscal year 2009 Supplemental Appropriations 
Act to appropriate these amounts directly to the Coast Guard. 
The Committee continues this practice and urges the 
administration to budget for Coast Guard overseas contingency 
operations under the Department of Homeland Security in future 
budget requests. The Coast Guard shall brief the Committee no 
later than 30 days after the date of enactment of this act on 
any changes expected during fiscal year 2012 or projected 
transition costs expected in fiscal year 2013 on its mission in 
Iraq.

                             MARINE SAFETY

    The Committee provides $10,666,000, as requested, for 105 
personnel the Coast Guard has identified as necessary to 
effectively regulate the growing maritime industry. Personnel 
to be hired include Marine Safety Inspectors, Investigators, 
and Fishing Vessel Safety Examiners at Coast Guard Sectors. As 
the Coast Guard updates its Marine Safety Performance Plan, it 
shall include recommendations made in OIG report [OIG-11-22], 
which are to produce a resource baseline, performance targets, 
performance milestones and completion dates, and total 
resources needed to achieve goals and objectives. The Coast 
Guard shall brief the Committee no later than 90 days after the 
date of enactment of this act on the data resulting from these 
efforts.

                     MARINE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE

    The Committee provides $15,185,000, $3,700,000 above the 
request to enhance marine environmental response activities. 
The amount provided above the request is to annualize 
additional positions funded in fiscal year 2011. This funding 
addresses critical resource and capability gaps by funding 87 
new billets to enhance marine environmental response functions 
and environmental response competencies and annualizes 
positions added in fiscal year 2011. Within the 87 billets, 33 
are for a new National Incident Management and Assist Team, 
which will provide dedicated, trained, and experienced 
personnel to directly support Coast Guard Incident Commanders 
and their units during response to releases of oil and 
hazardous materials. While the fiscal year 2012 request 
addresses immediate resource and capability needs, it is 
necessary for the Coast Guard to conduct a long-term mission 
requirements analysis to fully understand its future needs for 
this mission. Therefore, no later than 120 days after the date 
of enactment of this act, the Coast Guard shall submit to the 
Committee a plan to quantify the resource, training, and 
experience gaps within the marine environmental protection 
mission and develop a 5-year strategic plan to implement 
necessary capability and capacity enhancements to improve 
mission performance. This plan is to include funding estimates 
for each year of the plan.

                      SUPPORT OF MILITARY FAMILIES

    The Committee strongly supports the requested initiatives 
to improve the quality of life for military members and their 
families. The recommendation includes a total of $9,300,000 in 
``Operating Expenses'', as requested, to improve access to 
affordable, quality childcare and put the Coast Guard closer to 
being on par with other military branches in this area. The 
recommendation also includes $20,000,000, as requested, to 
address critical housing shortfalls in areas where there is a 
lack of affordable accommodations. In some locations, existing 
housing does not comply with life-safety codes and funds are 
needed to meet current construction code and habitability 
standards. In other areas, the limited availability of year-
round rental housing in remote locations has forced some Coast 
Guard members to commute long distances between their home and 
duty station, and many are paying out of pocket expenses well 
beyond their basic allowance for housing [BAH] for adequate 
housing closer to their duty station. A Coast Guard analysis 
has shown that continuing BAH for military members in these 
areas is more expensive than housing acquisition and 
maintenance costs over a 30-year period of time.
    Because the amount for military housing construction in 
fiscal year 2011 was not determined until after the release of 
the President's budget, the Coast Guard may choose to re-
prioritize its most pressing housing needs for fiscal year 2012 
and should submit an expenditure plan to the Committee 
reflecting those priorities no later than 30 days after the 
date of enactment of this act.

                    CRITICAL DEPOT LEVEL MAINTENANCE

    The Committee recommends $20,300,000 above the request to 
address the Coast Guard's critical depot level maintenance 
backlog for its aging assets. Increasing equipment failures and 
rising maintenance costs have outpaced current funding levels. 
Between fiscal year 2008 and fiscal year 2010, the Coast Guard 
deferred over $341,000,000 in maintenance requirements for 
aviation and cutter assets due to fiscal constraints and 
competing mission requirements. The age and condition of legacy 
assets has decreased their reliability and increased the cost 
to maintain them. The percent of operational time Coast Guard 
cutters are free of major equipment failures continues to 
decline. In fiscal year 2010, the 378-foot High Endurance 
Cutter fleet, which is over 43 years old on average, was free 
of major equipment failures just 41 percent of the time 
compared to 58 percent in fiscal year 2008. The 270-foot medium 
Endurance Cutter fleet, which is over 34 years old on average, 
was free of major equipment failures just 49 percent of the 
time in fiscal year 2010 compared to 81 percent in fiscal year 
2008. Until legacy fleets are replaced with new assets, the 
Coast Guard needs to be properly resourced to operate what it 
has so it can perform its many missions, including drug and 
migrant interdiction, port security, search and rescue, and oil 
spill response.

                POLAR OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE FUNDING

    The Committee fully funds the request of $39,000,000 for 
the Coast Guard's polar icebreaking program. Reclaiming budget 
authority for this program will enable the Coast Guard to make 
critical decisions with respect to operations and maintenance 
of its polar icebreakers. Many unanswered questions remain 
relating to the Coast Guard's long-term ability to maintain a 
presence in the polar regions. In a report issued last 
September, the Government Accountability Office said the Coast 
Guard lacks adequate infrastructure or equipment in the Arctic. 
This has been a growing concern due to the melting ice in the 
Arctic region. In a separate report, the DHS-OIG recommended 
that the Coast Guard work with the administration to clarify 
its Arctic and Antarctic mission requirements, something this 
Committee has been urging for years. The Coast Guard's high 
latitude study, which was completed in 2010, concluded that 
additional icebreaking assets are necessary in the polar 
regions. This followed a National Academy of Sciences study 
that made similar conclusions. Given the extensive consensus 
that has been built in recent years, the Committee denies the 
request for the DHS Under Secretary for Management to conduct 
redundant assessment of capabilities necessary to operate in 
the polar regions. The Committee instead urges the Department 
to move forward on fulfilling the Nation's icebreaking 
requirements for the polar regions by developing a concept of 
operations and a resource plan.
    The Coast Guard is required to submit to the Committee the 
results of its business case analysis for replacing or 
performing service life extensions on the Coast Guard's two 
heavy polar icebreakers. This effort was required in Senate 
Report 111-31 relating to appropriations for fiscal year 2010 
and the Coast Guard Authorization Act, 2010 (Public Law 111-
281).

                      LAW ENFORCEMENT ENHANCEMENTS

    The Committee recommends $4,000,000 above the request for 
small boat pursuit and tactical training to ensure Coast Guard 
boat crews are properly trained in pursuit tactics and 
interdiction of non-compliant vessels, like drug running go-
fast boats and semi-submersibles. This initiative is consistent 
with the Commandant's testimony before the subcommittee where 
he expressed a desire for improved proficiency in such high 
risk operations.

                   GULF OF MEXICO OIL SPILL RESPONSE

    In 2010, the Coast Guard led the response to the fire and 
subsequent sinking of the Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit 
Deepwater Horizon. The Coast Guard recently issued the Incident 
Specific Preparedness Review [ISPR], which addresses specific 
areas of the response to the spill. According to the report, 
``this incident exposed deficiencies in planning and 
preparedness for an uncontrolled release of oil from an 
offshore drilling operation.'' It notes that the Coast Guard's 
marine environmental response programs ``have atrophied over 
the past decade.'' The report identifies a number of areas for 
improvement, including: Area Contingency Plans for Spills of 
National Significance; development of a national planning 
process that identifies environmentally sensitive areas and the 
means to protect them; and engagement with key stakeholders. 
The ISPR also noted that many lessons learned from previous 
spills, the Cosco Busan and Cape Mohican, ``are not addressed 
programmatically or implemented effectively and, as such, had 
little role in enhancing the Coast Guard's planning, 
preparedness, and response programs.'' As such, the ISPR report 
recommends that the Coast Guard ``draw from lessons learned in 
this report, and institute an autonomous program, not unlike a 
private sector quality control program to select, implement, 
and assess the outcome of lessons learned.'' As a result of the 
ISPR's recommendations, the Coast Guard shall submit to the 
Committee an action plan on how the recommendations will be 
addressed no later than 90 days after the date of enactment of 
this act. The Committee expects the Coast Guard to allocate 
some of the $15,185,000 provided in this act for marine 
environmental response activities to conduct testing of Area 
Contingency Plans.

     COAST GUARD REIMBURSEMENT FOR SPILLS OF NATIONAL SIGNIFICANCE

    The catastrophic blowout, fire, and subsequent sinking of 
the Deepwater Horizon Offshore Drilling Unit is the Nation's 
first declared Spill of National Significance and is considered 
by the Coast Guard to be the most challenging and complex oil 
spill response ever conducted. The Coast Guard mobilized over 
47,000 people to remove and mitigate damages attributed to the 
estimated 4.9 million barrels of oil discharged into the Gulf 
of Mexico and amassed a fleet of more than 6,400 vessels 
including skimmers, vessels of opportunity, research vessels, 
Coast Guard cutters, and other specialized vessels to handle 
the myriad of individual activities that supported the 
response. At the height of the response, the Coast Guard itself 
deployed over 7,000 Coast Guard personnel, 60 Coast Guard 
vessels, and 22 Coast Guard aircraft. Due to the magnitude of 
the response, the Coast Guard expended resources far in excess 
of funds ``normally available'' for its statutory marine 
environmental protection mission. The Coast Guard's latest 
estimate of the cost is over $252,000,000. The unprecedented 
scope and duration of the response detracted from and deferred 
performance in other mission activities, and accelerated the 
planned depreciation of capital assets.
    While the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 suggests a broad 
reimbursement policy for Federal agencies engaged in removal 
activities, certain Coast Guard activities such as the salaries 
of active duty and civilian personnel diverted from regular 
operations to the oil spill response and significant costs of 
the operation of vessels, equipment, and aircraft diverted from 
other duties to respond to the oil spill are not subject to 
reimbursement to the Coast Guard. The Coast Guard pays these 
costs out of its base operating funds. As a result, the Coast 
Guard is unable to reclaim funds to restore operational 
capacity and reconstitute readiness following an unprecedented 
surge event even though a Spill of National Significance is of 
such magnitude that the Coast Guard costs for removal 
activities will far exceed Coast Guard resources and personnel 
normally available for oil spill response. For future Spills of 
National Significance, the Coast Guard should be fully 
compensated for its costs. The Committee has included a general 
provision permitting the Coast Guard to claim recoverable 
costs. This language expressly authorizes the Secretary to 
accept reimbursements for Coast Guard removal costs, treat such 
reimbursements as credits to Coast Guard accounts that bore the 
expense at the time of reimbursement, and make such 
reimbursements available, without further appropriations, for 
the operation, maintenance, and replacement of Coast Guard 
vessels, aircraft, and equipment.

                  MANAGEMENT EFFICIENCIES AND OFFSETS

    The Committee recommendation includes $140,040,000, as 
proposed in the budget, for various reductions from 
efficiencies and offsets. No later than 120 days after the date 
of enactment of this act, the Coast Guard is directed to brief 
the Committee on how such efficiencies and other reductions 
will be achieved. The briefing shall include a detailed listing 
of the specific efficiencies and offsets taken to achieve the 
targeted reductions. The briefing shall also address any 
shortfalls related to rising energy prices and what activities 
are being diverted to address them.

               STEM-TO-STERN REVIEW OF DEPLOYABLE FORCES

    As the Commandant discussed in his 2011 State of the Coast 
Guard address, he has ordered a ``stem-to-stern'' review of 
Coast Guard Deployable Specialized Forces and their concept of 
operations. The purpose of the review is to look at required 
capabilities, training, tactics, equipment, procedures, and 
resources. The Coast Guard is to brief the Committee no later 
than 60 days after the date of enactment of this act on the 
review's outcomes, including, but not limited to, any changes 
to current concept of operations, training standards, and 
regionalization requirements.

                         HIGH-ENDURANCE CUTTERS

    In fiscal year 2010, the Committee appropriated $4,000,000 
for the Coast Guard to assess the High Endurance Cutter fleet 
to determine the most effective use of funds to operate the 
vessels until replaced by National Security Cutters [NSC]. 
Unfortunately, minimal work has been put into this effort with 
less than $500,000 of this funding being obligated since 
October 2009. Given the additional delays in delivering the 
final NSC, as noted in the fiscal year 2012 budget request 
(final NSC delivery in 2018 versus 2016), the Coast Guard is 
urged to accelerate its work in this area. As part of its 
periodic acquisitions briefings to the Committee, the Coast 
Guard is to provide an update on the progress made on this 
effort. The Coast Guard's update shall include a discussion of 
the potential need for a future sustainment project to bridge 
operational gaps between full operating condition of the NSC 
fleet and the decommissioning sequence for remaining HECs.

                         SMALL VESSEL SECURITY

    In January 2011, the Department released its Small Vessel 
Security Implementation Report to the public, which focused on 
the mitigation of risks associated with the millions of 
commercial and small vessels that use our ports and waterways. 
The Coast Guard and its DHS partner components shall 
periodically brief the Committee on the short-term and long-
term actions being taken to carry out the DHS National Small 
Vessel Security Strategy, including a discussion of resources, 
technology, and statutory requirements.
    One of the Strategy's four primary goals is to ``exploit 
technology to enhance our ability to detect, determine the 
intent of, and, where necessary, interdict small vessels.'' The 
Committee is aware of efforts by the Department's Science and 
Technology [S&T] Directorate, in partnership with the Coast 
Guard and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 
[NOAA], to use currently deployed coastal NOAA weather radar 
systems to identify and track small vessels. This capability 
may prove to be highly beneficial to the Coast Guard's efforts 
to track ``dark boats'', such as drug runners and other craft 
engaged in illicit activities. In fiscal year 2012, S&T funding 
will be used to develop, test, evaluate and, if successful, 
transition this system to the Coast Guard. The Coast Guard and 
S&T shall keep the Committee updated on its efforts in this 
area.

                     FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT

    The Coast Guard shall continue to periodically brief the 
Committee on its efforts to address material weaknesses in its 
financial management enterprise that prevent accurate, 
complete, and timely financial information. These weaknesses 
have contributed to the inability of financial auditors to 
provide an unqualified opinion on the Department's balance 
sheets. The Coast Guard is to continue working with the 
Department's Office of the Chief Financial Officer on these 
efforts.

                            COAST GUARD YARD

    The Committee recognizes the Coast Guard Yard at Curtis 
Bay, Maryland, is a critical component of the Coast Guard's 
core logistics capability which directly supports fleet 
readiness. The Committee further recognizes the Yard has been a 
vital part of the Coast Guard's readiness and infrastructure 
for more than 100 years and believes that sufficient industrial 
work should be assigned to the Yard to maintain this 
capability.

                          ANTI-FOULING SYSTEMS

    The Committee understands that the Department of State has 
not forwarded ratification documents to the International 
Maritime Organization for the International Convention on the 
Control of Harmful Anti-Fouling Systems [AFS] on Ships. 
Ratification of the treaty is vital to the Coast Guard's 
mission of marine environmental protection. Therefore, the 
Committee urges the Coast Guard to provide a plan no later than 
90 days after the date of enactment of this act for completing 
delegation of authority requirements so that the Coast Guard 
may initiate implementation of the AFS Convention to minimize 
the dangers of marine pollution and to assure the safety of 
ports and waterways.

            TRANSPORTATION WORKER IDENTIFICATION CREDENTIAL

    The Coast Guard, in coordination with the Transportation 
Security Administration, shall brief the Committee no later 
than 120 days after the date of enactment of this act on the 
progress being made to implement the recommendations made by 
the Government Accountability Office [GAO] in report (GAO-11-
657) relating to internal control weaknesses of the 
Transportation Worker Identification Credential program.

                           VESSEL CONVEYANCE

    The Committee does not include requested bill language 
related to the scrapping of decommissioned vessels. The 
requested language, which would authorize the Secretary of 
Homeland Security to transfer all right, title, and interest in 
decommissioned vessels of the Coast Guard to the Secretary of 
Transportation for disposal is an authorizing matter and not 
under the jurisdiction of the Appropriations Committee. The 
Coast Guard is encouraged to work with the appropriate 
authorizing committees to achieve its intended goal.

                   REPORTING REQUIREMENTS WITHOLDING

    In an effort to encourage timely submissions to the 
Committees of materials necessary for robust and informed 
oversight, the Committee withholds $75,000,000 from obligation 
from the Coast Guard's ``Headquarters Directorates'' until the 
Quarterly Acquisition Report for the second quarter of fiscal 
year 2012 and a comprehensive 5-year Capital Investment Plan 
for fiscal years 2013-2017 have been submitted to the 
Committee.

                   EXECUTIVE TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT

    The Coast Guard shall include in its annual justification 
any plans to alter the executive transportation aircraft 
program.

                ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE AND RESTORATION

Appropriations, 2011....................................     $13,172,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................      16,699,000
House allowance.........................................      10,198,000
Committee recommendation................................      16,699,000

    The Environmental Compliance and Restoration account 
provides funds to address environmental problems at former and 
current Coast Guard units as required by applicable Federal, 
State, and local environmental laws and regulations. Planned 
expenditures for these funds include major upgrades to 
petroleum and regulated substance storage tanks, restoration of 
contaminated ground water and soils, remediation efforts at 
hazardous substance disposal sites, and initial site surveys 
and actions necessary to bring Coast Guard shore facilities and 
vessels into compliance with environmental laws and 
regulations.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $16,699,000 for environmental 
compliance and restoration, $3,527,000 above the fiscal year 
2011 level and the same as the budget request. The Committee is 
concerned that since the Department made the decision to 
terminate LORAN on January 8, 2010, little effort has been made 
by the Coast Guard to begin the environmental assessment and 
remediation efforts to prepare for divestiture of LORAN 
properties and start taking advantage of the ability to recoup 
property sales from the more valuable sites. The Coast Guard 
reported in April 2010 that, depending on the results of the 
environmental due diligence assessments, remediation costs 
could range from $58,000,000, for a best-case scenario, to 
$242,000,000 for a worst-case scenario. Within the amount 
provided for this account, $2,640,000 is provided, as 
requested, for the Coast Guard to begin these assessments so it 
can remove these assets from its inventory and eliminate 
environmental liability and caretaker costs. No later than 60 
days after the date of enactment of this act, the Coast Guard 
shall brief the Committee on its plan of action to complete 
these assessments, including a schedule for property 
divestiture.

                          PROPERTY CONVEYANCE

    The Committee is aware of Coast Guard land set to be 
conveyed to the City of Marquette, Michigan, as authorized in 
Public Law 111-281, the Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2010. 
Since 2005, both the Coast Guard and the City of Marquette have 
worked amicably to facilitate the construction of a new Coast 
Guard station in the region, yet the conveyance of the former 
Coast Guard station to the city cannot commence without the 
necessary environmental assessment. No later than 90 days after 
the date of enactment of this act, the Coast Guard is directed 
to provide a report describing its plans for the conveyance of 
the Marquette land to the local governmental authority.

                            RESERVE TRAINING

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $133,365,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................     136,778,000
House allowance.........................................     131,778,000
Committee recommendation................................     134,278,000

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $134,278,000 for Reserve Training, 
$913,000 above the fiscal year 2011 level and $2,500,000 below 
budget request. The reduction is due to a trend in lapsed 
balances.

              ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

Appropriations, 2011....................................  $1,516,744,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................   1,421,924,000
House allowance.........................................   1,151,673,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,391,924,000

    Funding in this account supports the acquisition, 
construction, and improvement [AC&I] of vessels, aircraft, 
information management resources, shore facilities, aids to 
navigation, and military housing required to execute the Coast 
Guard's missions and achieve its performance goals.
    Vessels.--The vessel program provides funding to 
recapitalize and/or improve the Coast Guard's fleet of aging 
boats and cutters.
    Aircraft.--The aircraft program is the primary 
recapitalization and sustainment effort for the Coast Guard's 
aging aircraft.
    Other Equipment.--The Coast Guard invests in numerous 
management information and decision support systems that will 
result in increased efficiencies, including Rescue 21 (formerly 
the National Distress and Response System Modernization 
Project), and the Nationwide Automatic Identification System.
    Shore Facilities and Aids to Navigation.--The Coast Guard 
invests in the acquisition, construction, rebuilding, and 
improvement of shore facilities, aids to navigation, and 
related equipment.
    Military Housing.--The Coast Guard invests in Military 
Housing facilities to ensure military members have access to 
housing in areas where there is a lack of affordable 
accommodations.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,391,924,000 for acquisitions, 
construction, and improvements, including $20,000,000 from the 
Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund. The recommended amount is 
$30,000,000 below the request and $124,820,000 below the fiscal 
year 2011 level.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                                   ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2011  Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Vessels:
    Survey and Design--Vessel and Boats...................  ................             6,000             6,000
    Response Boat Medium..................................            41,916           110,000           110,000
    In-Service Cutter Sustainment.........................  ................            14,000            14,000
    National Security Cutter..............................           690,616            77,000            77,000
    Offshore Patrol Cutter................................            44,910            25,000            25,000
    Fast Response Cutter..................................           239,520           358,000           358,000
    Cutter Boats..........................................             2,994             5,000             5,000
    Medium Endurance Cutter Sustainment...................            29,940            47,000            47,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Vessels and Critical Infrastructure.......         1,049,896           642,000           642,000
                                                           =====================================================
Aircraft:
    CGNR 6017 Airframe Replacement........................  ................            18,300            18,300
    Maritime Patrol Aircraft..............................            39,920           129,500           104,500
    HH-60 Conversion Projects.............................            31,936            56,100            56,100
    HC-130H Conversions/Sustainment Projects..............            24,950            62,000            62,000
    HH-65 Conversion/Sustainment Projects.................  ................            24,000            24,000
    HC-130J Fleet Introduction............................             3,992  ................  ................
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Aircraft..................................           100,798           289,900           264,900
                                                           =====================================================
Other:
    Government Program Management.........................            44,910            35,000            30,000
    Systems Engineering and Management....................            28,942            17,140            17,140
    C4ISR.................................................            30,439            34,500            34,500
    Technology Obsolescence Prevention....................               998  ................  ................
    CG-Logistics Information Management System  [CG-LIMS].  ................             6,500             6,500
    National Automatic Identification System..............  ................             5,000             5,000
    Rescue 21.............................................            35,928            65,000            65,000
    Interagency Operation Centers.........................  ................             3,000             3,000
    Deepwater Logistics...................................            49,900  ................  ................
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Other.....................................           191,117           166,400           161,140
                                                           =====================================================
Shore Facilities and Aids to Navigation:
    Major Shore, ATON, and Survey and Design..............            63,867            92,900            92,900
    Major Acquisition Systems Infrastructure..............  ................            94,500            94,500
    Minor Shore...........................................             3,199             6,292             6,292
    Military Housing......................................             1,996  ................  ................
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Shore Facilities and Aids to Navigation...            69,062           193,692           193,692
                                                           =====================================================
Military Housing..........................................  ................            20,000            20,000
Personnel and Related Support:
    Core Acquisition Costs................................               509               600               600
    Direct Personnel Costs................................           105,362           109,592           109,592
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Personnel and Related Support.............           105,871           110,192           110,192
                                                           =====================================================
      Total, Acquisition, Construction, and Improvements..         1,516,744         1,421,924         1,391,924
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          RESPONSE BOAT-MEDIUM

    The Committee recommends $110,000,000 for the Response 
Boat-Medium [RB-M] acquisition, as requested. These funds will 
allow the Coast Guard to purchase 40 RB-Ms in fiscal year 2012, 
bringing the total funded to 155 of 180 boats. The RB-M is a 
critical asset for the Coast Guard to replace aging 41-foot 
Utility Boats that are less able to handle Coast Guard mission 
requirements, particularly maritime security requirements that 
have changed significantly since September 11, 2001, and serve 
as a platform for boardings, search and rescues, and port 
security. Recent studies have identified the lack of response 
boats as an impediment to fully implementing the Coast Guard's 
mission requirements. The recommended amount optimizes 
production, reduces project management costs, and generates 
savings of approximately $362,000 per RB-M.

                     IN-SERVICE CUTTER SUSTAINMENT

    The Committee recommends $14,000,000, as requested, to 
begin service life extensions for the Coast Guard's aging fleet 
of nine 140-foot icebreaking tugs, which are critical to 
operations on the Great Lakes and Northeast coast. These tugs 
help clear shipping channels in the winter, and support law 
enforcement operations and enforce environmental regulations in 
all seasons. However, most of these vessels have been operating 
year round under taxing conditions for more than 30 years and 
are now in need of refurbishment to be able to sustain their 
high-operational tempo.
    While the Committee is pleased sustainment requirements for 
the non-Deepwater fleet are beginning to be addressed, the 
Coast Guard has not developed a long-term fiscal plan to deal 
with other assets such as the 225-foot seagoing buoy tenders, 
175-foot coastal buoy tenders, 87-foot patrol boats, and 47-
foot motor life boats. The Coast Guard is to develop a long-
term plan of investments to address the in-service cutter 
sustainment requirements, which shall be submitted to the 
Committee no later than 180 days after the date of enactment of 
this act. The plan shall identify how the Coast Guard Yard, 
which has proven to be an ideal facility for conducting life 
cycle event ship repairs, will be utilized for these mid-life 
availabilities.

                        NATIONAL SECURITY CUTTER

    The Coast Guard operates a fleet of 378-foot high endurance 
cutters [HECs] that are over 43 years old on average, and are 
increasingly unreliable and expensive to maintain. By 
comparison, the average Navy ship is 14 years old. The Coast 
Guard's current plan is to acquire eight National Security 
Cutters [NSCs] to replace 12 HECs (of which two have been 
decommissioned with the arrival of the first two NSCs). To 
date, over $3,100,000,000 has been appropriated for five NSCs, 
of which two have been delivered to the Coast Guard and the 
third will be delivered by the end of fiscal year 2011. NSC-4 
is under contract and is expected to be delivered in 2014.
    The request in fiscal year 2012 of $77,000,000 for NSC-5 
has been superseded by the fact that full funding was 
appropriated for the cutter in fiscal year 2011. Therefore, the 
Committee redirects these funds to acquire long lead time 
materials necessary for production of NSC-6. According to the 
Department, this will accelerate the production schedule for 
the cutter and result in direct savings of $45,000,000 to 
$60,000,000 compared to delaying the request for long lead 
acquisition to the fiscal year 2013 budget.
    As noted in prior years, the Committee strongly supports 
the procurement of one National Security Cutter per year until 
all eight planned ships are procured. The continuation of 
production without a break will ensure that these ships, which 
are vital to the Coast Guard's mission, are procured at the 
lowest cost, and that they enter the Coast Guard fleet as soon 
as possible. The Committee is concerned that the 
administration's current acquisition policy requires the Coast 
Guard to attain total acquisition cost for a vessel, including 
long lead time materials, production costs, and post production 
costs, before a production contract can be awarded. This has 
the potential to create shipbuilding inefficiencies, forces 
delayed obligation of production funds, and requires post 
production funds far in advance of when they will be used. As 
the Secretary noted in her testimony before the Committee, ``we 
fully expect to build out the eight cutters.'' The Department 
should therefore be in a position to acquire NSCs in the most 
efficient manner within the guidelines of strict governance 
measures. Therefore, the Committee includes language in the 
bill specifying that funds made available by this act shall be 
available to contract for long lead time materials for Coast 
Guard vessels, notwithstanding the availability of funds for 
production costs or post-production costs.

                          FAST RESPONSE CUTTER

    The Committee recommends $358,000,000 for the Coast Guard's 
Fast Response Cutter [FRC], as requested. This funding will 
allow the Coast Guard to acquire six FRC hulls (13-18). 
Procuring six Fast Response Cutters in fiscal year 2012 will 
maximize the production line and generate cost savings of 
$5,000,000 per hull for a total savings to the taxpayers of 
$30,000,000. Funding six boats instead of four will also allow 
the Coast Guard to decommission two additional aging 110-foot 
Island Class Patrol Boats already beyond the end of their 
projected service life and expensive to maintain. Each FRC will 
provide 2,500 annual operating hours and an improved sea 
keeping ability, resulting in better habitability and full 
mission capability in higher sea states.
    The Committee commends the Coast Guard's due diligence in 
working with the Naval Engineering Technical Authority to 
improve the structural design for the FRC hull to prevent the 
potential need for any structural repairs prior to the end of 
the cutter's 20-year service life. Based on the continued 
involvement of the Coast Guard's technical authorities and 
consultation with third party independent classification 
societies, the identification and improvement of the structural 
design prior to launching the first FRC prevented required 
changes that would have been far more costly and impactful to 
operations than if they were identified later in the lifecycle 
of the cutter class.
    The recommendation also includes funding for Re-procurement 
Package and Data Rights, as requested, which is necessary to 
support the planned re-competition of the next Fast Response 
Cutter procurement. Not funding this effort in fiscal year 2012 
would result in an FRC production gap, driving up procurement 
costs and out-year operating and maintenance costs of legacy 
assets well beyond their service life.

                  MEDIUM ENDURANCE CUTTER SUSTAINMENT

    The recommendation includes $47,000,000 for the Medium 
Endurance Cutter Sustainment Project, as requested. Funding 
will complete sustainment work on five 270-foot cutters. This 
funding is intended to improve mission effectiveness of these 
vessels to allow them to meet their goals for program 
availability through the remainder of their service lives. This 
program has been successful in significantly reducing the 
number of major equipment failures on these vessels resulting 
in a much higher percentage of time they are fully mission 
capable.

                         OFFSHORE PATROL CUTTER

    The recommendation includes $25,000,000 for the Offshore 
Patrol Cutter, as requested. Funding is provided for pre-
acquisition activities. The Committee expects the Coast Guard 
to provide quarterly briefings to the Committee on the status 
of this procurement, including critical decision points and 
dates.

                    ROTARY WING REPLACEMENT AIRCRAFT

    Since September 2008, the Coast Guard has lost four 
helicopters in accidents. To date, funding has been 
appropriated to replace only one of those assets. The 
recommendation includes $36,600,000, $18,300,000 above the 
request to replace two additional helicopters. Funds for the 
second aircraft are provided in title V of the bill. The Coast 
Guard is to brief the Committee no later than 60 days after the 
date of enactment of this act on its plans for replacing lost 
rotary wing operational assets.

                        MARITIME PATROL AIRCRAFT

    The Committee recommends $104,500,00 for the Maritime 
Patrol Aircraft [MPA], $25,000,000 below the budget request. 
Funds are recommended for the acquisition of two aircraft 
(MPAs-16 & 17), which will provide an additional 2,400 hours to 
address the Coast Guard's MPA flight-hour gap. The Committee 
recognizes the importance of the mission system pallet, which 
is the electronic equipment to collect, compile, interpret, and 
disseminate data from the MPA's sensors. However, the Coast 
Guard is no longer purchasing these pallets from the original 
systems integrator and has not identified a new acquisition 
strategy to purchase them, making it unlikely that any funding 
for pallets would be obligated in fiscal year 2012. Therefore, 
the recommendation does not include funding for this purpose.

                       UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS

    The Committee is aware of efforts by the Coast Guard to 
evaluate both ship-based and land-based Unmanned Aircraft 
Systems [UAS] for mission requirements. Both platforms have the 
potential to enhance the Coast Guard's capability to execute 
statutory requirements in the maritime domain. A recent Coast 
Guard report concluded that upgraded sensors and greater 
persistence could effectively extend a cutter's immediate 
surveillance horizon by as much as 35 percent. This is why the 
Committee is concerned with the absence of funding in the 
budget request and the long-term Capital Investment Plan for 
the acquisition of UAS. Prior to the establishment of a UAS 
acquisition program, additional testing is necessary to 
determine the viability of ship-based UAS systems on major 
Coast Guard cutters. Therefore, the Committee includes 
$8,000,000 under ``Research, Development, Test, and 
Evaluation'' for the shipboard ground control equipment 
necessary for ship-aircraft interface activities. The Committee 
is also aware of $3,200,000 that remains available from Coast 
Guard prior year appropriations for this purpose.

                               RESCUE 21

    The Committee provides $65,000,000 for Rescue 21, as 
requested. Rescue 21 is the Coast Guard's command, control, and 
communications system to improve the ability to assist mariners 
in distress and save lives and property at sea. Rescue 21 is 
replacing the legacy National Distress and Response System 
[NDRS] and is being deployed in stages. As requested, funds 
will complete deployment in the Great Lakes and the OCONUS 
Islands (San Juan, Puerto Rico; Honolulu, Hawaii; and Guam). 
The funding will also recapitalize the legacy NDRS in the 
Western Rivers (Sectors Ohio Valley, Upper Mississippi River, 
and Lower Mississippi River); continue deployment to Alaska; 
and continue installation of Rescue 21 communications equipment 
on vessels. The Coast Guard is directed to continue quarterly 
briefings to the Committee on the status of the program, 
including any changes to the schedule outlined in the request.

               NATIONWIDE AUTOMATIC IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM

    The Committee recommends $5,000,000, as requested, for the 
Nationwide Automatic Identification System [NAIS], which is the 
Coast Guard's system to identify, track, and exchange 
information with vessels operating in or approaching U.S. 
waters. The funding is to continue the recapitalization and 
permanent replacement of the temporary NAIS infrastructure 
located in 58 ports. As requested, the fiscal year 2012 funding 
will be used to deploy equipment for a permanent system to 
Sectors New Orleans and Galveston. The Coast Guard also plans 
additional site surveys that are necessary prior to the 
deployment of the permanent NAIS solution. The Coast Guard is 
to brief the Committee no later than 60 days after the date of 
enactment of this act on its revised acquisition program 
baseline and plans to complete sector deployment, including 
resource estimates.

                SHORE FACILITIES AND AIDS TO NAVIGATION

    The Committee recommends $193,692,000 for shore facilities 
and aids to navigation, as requested. The Coast Guard has 
estimated its shore facilities construction backlog to be over 
$500,000,000. The Coast Guard shall provide the Committee with 
a prioritized list of projects (including the estimated cost 
for each) in the backlog and the Coast Guard's plans to address 
them by January 15, 2012.

                  COAST GUARD TRAINING CENTER BARRACKS

    Not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of 
this act, the Coast Guard is to submit to the Committee a 
report that outlines its plan for upgrading the barracks at the 
Coast Guard's Training Center, including sprinkler systems and 
gender equal facilities.

                MAJOR ACQUISITION SYSTEMS INFRASTRUCTURE

    The Committee recognizes the importance of shore facility 
infrastructure modifications, upgrades, and new construction 
associated with homeporting new or modified cutters, boats, and 
aircraft. Facility upgrades are necessary to maximize the 
operational effectiveness of new assets being delivered. 
Unfortunately, the Coast Guard's congressional justification 
for this program includes limited information associated with 
homeport infrastructure costs for Fast Response Cutters, 
National Security Cutters, and other infrastructure needs 
necessary to support new assets. In several cases, the request 
includes funding for facility construction or upgrades for 
homeports that have yet to be identified by the Coast Guard. 
The Committee is left to wonder whether the amounts requested 
are truly reliable. The Committee expects the Coast Guard to 
improve its internal planning for placement of new assets and 
associated facility improvements necessary to accommodate them. 
No later than 30 days after the date of enactment of this act, 
the Coast Guard is to provide the Committee a detailed 
expenditure plan briefing on the selected homeports requiring 
appropriations in fiscal year 2012.

                      COAST GUARD MILITARY HOUSING

    The Committee provides $20,000,000, as requested, for the 
recapitalization, improvement, and acquisition of housing to 
support military families. As discussed under the ``Operating 
Expenses'' section of this report, the Coast Guard shall 
provide an expenditure plan to the Committee if a 
reprioritization of military housing needs is required.

                             AC&I PERSONNEL

    The Committee provides $110,192,000 for personnel and 
related support, as requested. The Committee is concerned with 
the Coast Guard's ability to track these costs. In fiscal year 
2011, the Coast Guard required a reprogramming to cover an 
increase in personnel hired that exceeded amounts appropriated. 
If the Coast Guard had proper internal controls in place to 
verify actual costs, this issue could have been prevented. The 
Coast Guard is to brief the Committee no later than 90 days 
after the date of enactment of this act on acquisition 
personnel management, vacancy rates, how billets are assigned 
to acquisition programs, and oversight of contract support.
    According to a recent report by GAO, the Coast Guard has 
leveraged expertise from other agencies to support various 
acquisition programs. However, according to GAO, Coast Guard 
program staff has access to just 5 of 81 agreements. GAO has 
recommended improvement in this area in order for Coast Guard 
acquisition program managers to have better insight into the 
work DOD and other agencies are performing. Therefore, the 90-
day briefing requirement shall also include a discussion of 
efforts to catalogue all interagency agreements with the DOD.

                     QUARTERLY ACQUISITION REPORTS

    The Commandant is directed to continue to submit to the 
Committee quarterly acquisition and mission emphasis reports 
consistent with deadlines articulated under section 360 of 
division I of Public Law 108-7. The Coast Guard shall continue 
submitting these reports in the same format as required in 
fiscal year 2010, with the following modifications:
  --For small boat purchases and leases from the ``Operating 
        Expenses'' appropriation, the reports shall include the 
        quantity, planned obligations for the fiscal year, 
        obligations to date, and expenditures to date. The 
        report shall also include an investment description for 
        each purchase or lease planned for the fiscal year, 
        including a description of the capability gap being 
        addressed or enhancement to Coast Guard mission 
        performance;
  --The project risk sections shall include the top 5 risks for 
        each Coast Guard acquisition identified in the report, 
        consistent with those on the risk watch list in 
        quarterly program manager reports. The risks should 
        include those that may have future budget implications, 
        such as spare parts. If the project has no risks, that 
        should be clearly stated in the report;
  --The Coast Guard is to submit the quarterly acquisition 
        reports by the 15th day of each fiscal quarter in order 
        to be of timely use to the Committee.

                           FLEET MIX ANALYSIS

    In July 2010, the Government Accountability Office [GAO] 
recommended that the Coast Guard review the cost and mix of its 
assets and identify trade-offs given fiscal constraints. 
According to GAO testimony in April 2011, ``The Department of 
Homeland Security agreed with the recommendation; however, the 
Coast Guard has not yet implemented it.'' Since 2008, the Coast 
Guard has been conducting a study called the ``Fleet Mix 
Analysis'' to analyze asset requirements and to validate and 
recommend fleet mix options to best execute operational 
missions. Phase 1 of the analysis has been completed, but it 
was unconstrained by cost considerations and led to unrealistic 
conclusions considering the current fiscal environment. Phase 2 
of the Fleet Mix Analysis is underway, which is examining 
performance of alternative fleet mixes while applying fiscal 
constraints. The Coast Guard expects to complete this study in 
fiscal year 2011. The Committee is also aware of a separate 
Departmental study that is in the final stages of Departmental 
review called the ``Cutter Fleet Mix Analysis''. The Coast 
Guard shall submit both the ``Fleet Mix Analysis'' (Phases 1 
and 2) and the ``Cutter Fleet Mix Analysis'' to the Committee 
and GAO once they are completed, but no later than 30 days 
after the date of enactment of this act. GAO shall provide an 
assessment of the results no later than 120 days following the 
submission of the report to the Committee.

                          UNFUNDED PRIORITIES

    The Committee directs the Commandant to provide to the 
Congress, at the time of the President's budget submission, a 
list of approved but unfunded Coast Guard priorities and the 
funds needed for each.

              RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION

Appropriations, 2011....................................     $24,696,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................      19,779,000
House allowance.........................................      12,779,000
Committee recommendation................................      27,779,000

    The Coast Guard's Research and Development program develops 
techniques, methods, hardware, and systems that directly 
contribute to increasing the productivity and effectiveness of 
the Coast Guard's operating missions. This account provides 
funds to operate and maintain the Coast Guard Research and 
Development Center.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $27,779,000 for the Coast Guard's 
research, development, test, and evaluation activities, 
$8,000,000 above the budget request and $3,083,000 above the 
fiscal year 2011 level.
    Included in the amount recommended by the Committee is 
$8,000,000 for ship-based unmanned aircraft systems [UAS]. This 
funding, in addition to amounts previously appropriated, is 
required to purchase the necessary shipboard integration 
equipment and support an advanced concept technology 
demonstration.
    The Committee encourages the Coast Guard to research and 
develop a composite or hybrid-composite year-round ice buoy 
that will perform the same functions as legacy buoys.

                              RETIRED PAY

Appropriations, 2011....................................  $1,400,700,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................   1,440,157,000
House allowance.........................................   1,440,157,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,440,157,000

    This account provides for the retired pay of military 
personnel of the Coast Guard and Coast Guard Reserve, members 
of the former Lighthouse Service, and for annuities payable to 
beneficiaries of retired military personnel under the retired 
serviceman's family protection plan (10 U.S.C. 1431-1446) and 
survivor benefit plan (10 U.S.C. 1447-1455); payments for 
career status bonuses under the National Defense Authorization 
Act; and payments for medical care of retired personnel and 
their dependents under the Dependents Medical Care Act (10 
U.S.C., ch. 55).

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,440,157,000, as proposed in the 
budget, for retired pay. This amount is $39,457,000 more than 
the fiscal year 2011 level.

                      United States Secret Service


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2011....................................  $1,511,332,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................   1,691,751,000
House allowance.........................................   1,666,451,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,670,237,000

    The United States Secret Service's [USSS], salaries and 
expenses appropriation provides funds for the security of the 
President, the Vice President, and other dignitaries and 
designated individuals; for enforcement of laws relating to 
obligations and securities of the United States and laws 
relating to financial crimes; and for protection of the White 
House and other buildings within the Washington, DC, 
metropolitan area.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,670,237,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses. This is an increase of $158,905,000 from the fiscal 
year 2011 level and $21,514,000 below the amount proposed in 
the budget.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                               UNITED STATES SECRET SERVICE--SALARIES AND EXPENSES
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                   Fiscal year
                                                                   Fiscal year     2012 budget      Committee
                                                                  2011  enacted      request     recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Headquarters, management, and administration...................         226,284         246,602          201,088
Information Integration and Technology Transformation..........  ..............  ..............           43,843
Protection:
    Protection of persons and facilities.......................         769,978         847,963          831,963
    Protective intelligence activities.........................          67,688          68,125           68,125
    National Special Security Event Fund.......................             998          19,307           19,307
    Presidential candidate nominee protection..................          17,831         113,462          113,462
    White House mail screening.................................          22,370          24,315           18,472
                                                                ------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Protection.....................................         878,865       1,073,172        1,051,329
                                                                ================================================
Investigations:
    Domestic field operations..................................         256,897         223,991          223,991
    International field office administration, operations, and           30,644          30,971           32,971
     train-  ing...............................................
    Electronic crimes special agent program and electronic               56,042          53,051           53,051
     crimes task forces........................................
    Support for missing and exploited children.................           8,349           8,366            8,366
                                                                ------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Investigations.................................         351,932         316,379          318,379
                                                                ================================================
Training: Rowley Training Center...............................          54,251          55,598           55,598
                                                                ------------------------------------------------
      Total, Salaries and expenses.............................       1,511,332       1,691,751        1,670,237
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       SECRET SERVICE ACTIVITIES

    The Committee fully funds the request for the 2012 
Presidential campaign, protective intelligence, domestic 
investigations, Electronic Crimes Task Forces, support for 
missing and exploited children, and training. The Committee 
includes $10,000,000, $8,000,000 below the request, for data 
center migration activities.
    The Committee notes that priority for Operational Mission 
Support funding is given to White House Communication Agency 
interoperability and cyber security improvements. The Committee 
directs the Secret Service to provide a report not later than 
90 days after the date of enactment of this act on how it plans 
to obligate the Operational Mission Support and data center 
migration activities, the level of funding directed to these 
activities in this act, the anticipated funding requirements in 
the out-years to complete each activity, and the prioritization 
given to each activity.
    The Committee is aware that due to various efficiencies 
found by the Secret Service and its decision not to open the 
``third mail processing lane'', the actual requirements to 
operate the White House mail screening facility is $18,472,000, 
$5,843,000 below the request. The Committee recommends 
$18,472,000.

                    NATIONAL SPECIAL SECURITY EVENTS

    The Committee recommends $19,307,000, as requested, for 
support to currently planned and unanticipated National Special 
Security Events [NSSEs] for fiscal year 2012. As the Secret 
Service knows in advance of a number of NSSEs scheduled to 
occur during the fiscal year, it has been able to plan its 
budget accordingly. The Committee directs the USSS to provide 
quarterly briefings on the use of these funds, with the first 
briefing to occur not later than 30 days after the end of the 
first quarter.

         INFORMATION INTEGRATION AND TECHNOLOGY TRANSFORMATION

    The Committee recommends $43,843,000 for Information 
Integration and Technology Transformation [IITT], the level 
requested. In order to provide the appropriate level of 
visibility to this critical activity, the Committee has created 
a new program, project, and activity line for Information 
Integration and Technology Transformation programs. This 
includes the movement of $7,000,000 requested for IITT 
activities in the ``Protection of persons and facilities'' PPA 
and $36,843,000 in the ``Headquarters, management, and 
administration'' PPA.
    The Committee has been concerned that the Secret Service 
has not had a complete understanding of its information 
technology requirements, the scope of the problem, and how to 
develop a multi-year plan to address it. In the fiscal year 
2010 DHS Appropriations Act, the Committee directed the USSS to 
work with the DHS Chief Information Officer [CIO] to develop an 
information technology modernization plan that is consistent 
with DHS guidance on data center migration and enterprise 
architecture requirements. This requirement has assisted the 
USSS in focusing on the need to better address this critical 
requirement. The Committee includes statutory language 
withholding $20,000,000 of these funds from obligation until 
the DHS CIO certifies to the Committee not later than December 
1, 2011, that Secret Service modernization activities are 
consistent with the Department's guidance.
    The Committee also directs the USSS to provide greater 
detail in the justifications accompanying the fiscal year 2013 
budget request on all USSS information technology activities.

                  INTERNATIONAL ACTIVITIES AND OFFICES

    The Secret Service's efforts to combat U.S. currency 
counterfeiting in Colombia have proven effective. In 
anticipation of counterfeiting activities growing in 
neighboring Peru, the USSS has sought and received approval 
from the State Department and the Peruvian government for 
authority to have a permanent presence in Peru. Previously, 
USSS support to Peruvian law enforcement has been conducted on 
a rotating, temporary basis. The Committee encourages execution 
of the permanent presence.
    Additionally, financial crimes continue to emerge in 
eastern Asia as a threat to the economic stability of the 
United States. Given the growing Chinese economy and the fact 
that Beijing is the most visited Asian destination of Secret 
Service protectees, the Committee understands that the USSS 
also has requested and recently received final approval by the 
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People's Republic of China 
for the establishment of a permanent Secret Service office in 
Beijing. The Committee supports the establishment of a Resident 
office in Lima, Peru, and recommends $2,000,000 to open and 
staff the office. The Committee understands that the Secret 
Service has sufficient base investigative funding to open the 
Beijing office, but requests a briefing on the future funding 
requirements no later than November 4, 2011. Additionally, the 
Committee directs the USSS to provide a briefing on the 
establishment of both offices not later than February 17, 2012.

                          FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

    On April 27, 2010, GAO advised the Congress that it had 
confirmed an Antideficiency Act violation by the United States 
Secret Service for Presidential candidate protection activities 
during the 2008 election. On August 8, 2011, DHS sent to the 
President and Congress the Antideficiency Act report mandated 
by law confirming the January 2009, violations and identifying 
corrective actions. The Committee is disappointed that it was 
more than 15 months between Congress being advised by GAO of 
the violation and Congress' receipt of the formal report. The 
Committee directs the Department to adhere to the corrective 
actions it has established to prevent future violations by 
improving policies and procedures to ensure that information 
related to potential future shortfalls are identified for 
appropriate action so as to avoid a violation of the law. The 
Committee also directs the Secret Service to develop written 
procedures for preparing and reviewing budget execution reports 
as specified in the Secretary's August 8, 2011, letter.

     ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, IMPROVEMENTS, AND RELATED EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2011....................................      $3,967,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................       6,780,000
House allowance.........................................       6,780,000
Committee recommendation................................       5,380,000

    This appropriation provides funding for security upgrades 
of existing facilities; to continue development of the current 
master plan; to maintain and renovate existing facilities, 
including the James J. Rowley Training Center (Center); and to 
ensure efficient and full utilization of the Center.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $5,380,000, $1,400,000 below the 
request and $1,413,000 above the fiscal year 2011 level, for 
infrastructure improvements and other activities at the James 
J. Rowley Training Center due to higher funding priorities 
within a constrained allocation.

                               TITLE III

            PROTECTION, PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND RECOVERY

              National Protection and Programs Directorate

    The National Protection and Programs Directorate aims to 
foster better integration of national approaches between 
strategic homeland security programs, facilitate infrastructure 
protection, ensure broad emergency communications capabilities, 
integrate risk management, provide identity safeguards for 
visitors to this country, and ensure the protection of Federal 
buildings and facilities.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                                  NATIONAL PROTECTION AND PROGRAMS DIRECTORATE
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                Fiscal year    Fiscal year 2012     Committee
                                                               2011  enacted    budget request   recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Management and administration...............................           43,490           55,156            37,875
Infrastructure protection and information security:
    Infrastructure protection...............................          323,036          322,278           317,415
    Cybersecurity...........................................          363,054          459,098           449,959
    Telecommunications......................................          152,673          150,365           146,165
    Assistant Secretary for Cybersecurity and Communications  ...............            4,744             4,744
Federal Protective Service..................................        1,115,000        1,261,537         1,261,537
United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator                  333,944          302,271           297,402
 Technolo-  gy..............................................
Cancellation................................................  ...............         (-25,642)  ...............
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, US-VISIT....................................          333,944          276,629           297,402
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Protection and Programs Directorate           2,331,197        2,529,807         2,515,097
       (gross)..............................................
                                                             ===================================================
Offsetting fee collections..................................       -1,115,000       -1,261,537        -1,261,537
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Protection and Programs Directorate           1,216,197        1,268,270         1,253,560
       (net)................................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                     MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2011....................................     $43,490,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................      55,156,000
House allowance.........................................      42,511,000
Committee Recommendation................................      37,875,000

    This account funds salaries and expenses for the Office of 
the Under Secretary, which oversees all activities of the 
National Protection and Programs Directorate [NPPD]. This 
account also funds business operations, information technology 
support services, and the Office of Risk Management and 
Analysis.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $37,875,000, for Management and 
Administration, of which $33,634,000 is for Directorate 
Administration and $4,241,000 is for the Office of Risk 
Management and Analysis. In total, this is $5,615,000 below the 
fiscal year 2011 level, and $17,281,000 below the budget 
request.
    The total amount includes no funding, instead of 
$12,000,000 as requested in the budget, for data center 
migration. NPPD is encouraged to submit a budget request for 
the costs associated with data center migration in fiscal year 
2013.

                            BUDGET EXECUTION

    To date, most National Protection and Programs Directorate 
programs have had appropriated funding available for execution 
over a 2-year period. This was important when new missions were 
being developed and programs were in their infancy. For the 
most complex programs, or programs sensitive to procurement 
changes, it is still important to have some portion of funding 
available beyond the fiscal year in which it is appropriated in 
order to responsibly operate programs. However, many NPPD 
programs have reached a point where the majority of funds can 
be executed in the year the funds are appropriated. 
Unfortunately, NPPD has not prioritized aligning budget 
execution with the fiscal year, which in turn causes high 
carryover balances. This continued practice puts important 
programs at risk of reductions. The Committee directs the NPPD, 
Office of the Chief Financial Officer, to provide a strategic 
plan, within 30 days after the date of enactment of this act, 
regarding how it will align budget execution with the fiscal 
year including specific detail about realigning obligation 
timeframes. Further, the plan shall identify the rare instances 
where execution of funds must occur beyond the fiscal year of 
the appropriation and provide a justification for why this is 
necessary. Finally, NPPD is directed to provide specific detail 
and a justification in the fiscal year 2013 budget submission 
for any funding request that includes availability for longer 
than the fiscal year in which the funds are requested.

                 OFFICE OF RISK MANAGEMENT AND ANALYSIS

    The Committee recommends $4,241,000 for the Office of Risk 
Management and Analysis [RMA], a reduction of $5,281,000 from 
the budget request and $4,636,000 below the fiscal year 2011 
level.
    The Committee has repeatedly expressed concern about the 
ability of RMA to provide applicable risk management and 
analysis products for practical use by departmental components. 
The National Academy of Sciences [NAS] found in a recent report 
that the Department's risk analysis capabilities and methods 
are inadequate to support decisionmaking because validity and 
reliability was untested. The NAS study recommended major 
reforms to the RMA approach to risk modeling and strategic 
planning, yet no reform or strategic plan has been proposed. 
Expenditure plans and official responses to questions for the 
record that have been required by the Committees on 
Appropriations have not aided in a better understanding of the 
strategic direction of RMA. The Under Secretary is directed to 
provide a strategic plan for the orderly termination of the 
Office during fiscal year 2012, including transfers of existing 
capabilities that are valuable for other DHS offices such as 
NPPD, FEMA, and the Office of Policy. Should the Under 
Secretary determine that a substantially reorganized office can 
more effectively accomplish risk management goals for the 
Department with the resources provided, the Committee will 
entertain a reprogramming request.

           INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION AND INFORMATION SECURITY

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $838,763,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................     936,485,000
House allowance.........................................     891,243,000
Committee recommendation................................     918,283,000

    Infrastructure Protection and Information Security [IPIS] 
assists the entities and people responsible for securing the 
Nation's critical infrastructure assets. In addition, IPIS 
works collaboratively with public, private, and international 
entities to secure cyberspace and U.S. cyber assets, and reduce 
the vulnerability of the Nation's telecommunications and 
information technology infrastructures.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends total appropriations of 
$918,283,000 for Infrastructure Protection and Information 
Security [IPIS] programs. The Committee rejects the proposal to 
move funding for the National Computer Forensic Institute to 
the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center and directs NPPD to 
maintain the current program in fiscal year 2012.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                               INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION AND INFORMATION SECURITY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                  Fiscal year
                                                                  Fiscal year     2012 budget       Committee
                                                                 2011  enacted      request      recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Infrastructure protection and information security:
    Infrastructure protection:
        Infrastructure and analysis and planning..............          80,170          74,518            72,700
        Sector management and governance......................          82,194          87,045            84,000
        Regional field operations.............................          64,742          61,367            61,367
        Infrastructure security compliance....................          95,930          99,348            99,348
                                                               -------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Infrastructure protection.................         323,036         322,278           317,415
                                                               =================================================
Assistant Secretary for Cybersecurity and Communications......  ..............           4,744             4,744
                                                               =================================================
Information security:
    Cybersecurity:
        Cybersecurity coordination............................           4,990           5,000             5,000
        US-Computer Incident Response Team [US-CERT]                    77,432          82,114            80,000
         Operations...........................................
        Federal network security..............................          19,651          40,923            35,000
        Network security deployment...........................         176,017         233,602           232,500
        Global cybersecurity management.......................          17,506          24,527            24,527
        Critical infrastructure cyber protection and awareness          52,637          61,364            61,364
        Business operations...................................          14,821          11,568            11,568
                                                               -------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Cybersecurity.............................         363,054         459,098           449,959
                                                               =================================================
Telecommunications:
    Priority telecommunications services......................          56,170          56,824            56,824
    Programs to study and enhance telecommunications..........          16,624          13,441            13,441
    Critical infrastructure protection programs...............          14,854          11,352            11,352
    Next generation networks..................................          21,053          25,253            21,053
    Office of emergency communications........................          43,972          43,495            43,495
                                                               -------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Telecommunications............................         152,673         150,365           146,165
                                                               -------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Information security..........................         515,727         609,463           596,124
                                                               -------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Infrastructure protection and information              838,763         936,485           918,283
       security...............................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION

    The Committee recommends $317,415,000 for Infrastructure 
Protection, $4,863,000 below the request and $5,621,000 below 
the fiscal year 2011 level.
    The Committee includes no less than $15,968,000, for the 
National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center [NISAC] 
and $22,268,000 for vulnerability assessments, the same amounts 
as requested in the budget.
    The Government Accountability Office [GAO] found in a 
recent report (GAO-10-722) that the Department's efforts to 
assess and promote resiliency, as called for in Homeland 
Security Presidential Directive-7, related to Critical 
Infrastructure Identification, Prioritization, and Protection, 
are evolving but that program management could be strengthened. 
Recommendations were specifically made by GAO for the 
Department to develop resiliency performance measures, update 
guidelines, and develop a feasible approach to disseminate 
resiliency information. Further, a June 2011 report by the 
Office of Inspector General (OIG-11-89) found that planning, 
management, and systems issues hinder DHS' efforts to protect 
the Nation's cyber infrastructure. NPPD is directed to provide 
a briefing to the Committee on the resolution of the 
recommendations from both reports within 30 days after the date 
of enactment of this act.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of continued 
public-private partnership activities between industry, which 
is the predominate owner of the Nation's infrastructure, and 
the Government as it relates to security of critical 
infrastructure. The Committee notes that the fiscal year 2012 
budget request indicates that NPPD will streamline various 
methods and processes for coordination and information sharing 
with industry partners through National Infrastructure 
Protection Plan management, Critical Infrastructure Key 
Resources coordination, and Sector-Specific Agency management. 
The Committee directs NPPD to provide a report to the Committee 
no later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this act 
on the results from a thorough review of all efforts related to 
coordinating and executing plans; implementing performance 
metrics; sustaining systemic communication; executing Sector-
Specific Agency functions; and providing education, training 
and outreach. Further, the Committee directs GAO to review the 
results of the NPPD report and related efforts of the 
streamlining process no later than 60 days after receiving the 
report to determine the extent to which they were designed to 
ensure mission clarity; useful and actionable work products; 
efficacy of planning and information sharing; and that cost 
savings are achieved where possible.
    The Committee encourages NISAC to continue to work with the 
National Incident Management Systems and Advanced Technologies 
Institute at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.
    NPPD is encouraged to review products that have been 
cleared by the Food and Drug Administration, have received 
Designation and Certification under the SAFETY Act, and are on 
the Department of Defense list of approved treatments for 
decontamination and neutralization for possible use at covered 
facilities for post-attack readiness.
    The Committee is concerned that there are not enough 
inspection, enforcement, and compliance personnel to 
effectively implement the Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism 
Standards. NPPD is directed to provide quarterly updates to the 
Committee on the number of: inspections completed; inspections 
pending; inspection, enforcement, and compliance personnel on-
board, and position vacancies. The Committee encourages the 
Department to explore possible internal collaborations among 
DHS agencies, including the Coast Guard, on inspections.

                             CYBERSECURITY

    The Committee recommends $449,959,000 for Cybersecurity, 
$9,139,000 below the request and $86,905,000 above the fiscal 
year 2011 level.
    When launching the Cyberspace Policy Review, the President 
declared that, ``the cyber threat is one of the most serious 
economic and national security challenges we face as a nation'' 
and that ``America's economic prosperity in the 21st century 
will depend on cybersecurity.'' A June 2011 report by the 
Office of Inspector General (OIG-11-89) found that progress has 
been made in some areas but that planning, management, and 
systems issues hinder DHS' efforts to protect cyber space. NPPD 
is directed to brief the Committee on its progress to address 
and implement the OIG findings no later than 30 days after the 
date of enactment of this act.
    Of the amount provided, $14,876,000 is for cyber education 
and $8,012,000 is for outreach and awareness, as requested. The 
Committee urges NPPD to continue to work with partners in 
ensuring a focus on professional development and building a 
knowledge-based workforce on cybersecurity.
    The Committee directs the Secretary, in conjunction with 
the Department of Education, Department of Defense, the 
National Institutes of Standards and Technology, and the 
National Science Foundation to provide a report on program 
investments to date for promoting cybersecurity education and 
digital literacy. Further, the Committee urges the departments 
and agencies to coordinate efforts and develop a robust program 
for promoting cybersecurity education and digital literacy. The 
Department of Homeland Security shall brief the Committee by 
March 1, 2012, on its plans to educate 1,700,000 students over 
the next 10 years.
    The Committee understands that NPPD is coordinating with 
the Department of Defense regarding pilot programs that will 
illustrate how innovative technologies can be deployed across 
Government agencies and key elements of the private sector 
consistent with an executable operational concept. Further, the 
Committee is aware that NPPD engages directly with industry to 
better understand existing and developing cybersecurity 
technologies in the private sector. These efforts contribute to 
the President's Cyberspace Policy Review and the Comprehensive 
National Cyber Security Initiative. NPPD is directed to brief 
the Committee, no later than 45 days after the date of 
enactment of this act, on the status of this work to evaluate 
cybersecurity technologies, including: the number of pilots 
being conducted; the cost, purpose, and timeframe for each; and 
how the findings of each will be implemented.
    In the joint explanatory statement accompanying the 
Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2010, the 
Committee directed NPPD, in conjunction with the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency [FEMA], to develop the necessary 
tools for all levels of governments to complete a cyber network 
security assessment. NPPD, in conjunction with FEMA, is 
directed to provide a briefing to the Committee on the specific 
timeframe in which the effort will be completed and implemented 
no later than 45 days after the date of enactment of this act. 
Further, the briefing shall provide an update on how this 
effort and other on-going efforts by both components contribute 
to completion of the recommendation in the September 2010 
Report to Congress of the Local, State, Tribal, and Federal 
Preparedness Task Force to ``ensure national cybersecurity 
efforts address local, State, Tribal, and Territorial 
preparedness implications''.

                           TELECOMMUNICATIONS

    The Committee recommends $146,165,000 for 
Telecommunications, $4,200,000 below the request and $6,508,000 
below the fiscal year 2011 level. Of the total amount, the 
Committee includes $43,495,000 for the Office of Emergency 
Communications [OEC], the same amount as the budget request, 
and $477,000 below the fiscal year 2011 level.
    It has been 10 years since the terrorist attacks on 
September 11, 2001. The failure of communications during that 
incident has been cited in the 9/11 Commission report and has 
been the subject of many recommendations for resolution. When 
Hurricane Katrina struck, another call to resolve 
communications issues was made. Since that time, the Federal 
Government and the Department of Homeland Security have devoted 
significant resources to solving the interoperable 
communications problem--over $4,500,000,000 in Federal homeland 
security grants alone. The Committee notes that the initial 
goal established in the National Emergency Communication Plan--
that 90 percent of high-risk urban areas be able to demonstrate 
response level communications within an hour of routine events 
with multi-jurisdictions--has been successfully completed 
within the required timeframe of calendar year 2010.
    While progress has been made, there is much more to do. The 
emergence of commercial broadband services provide emergency 
responders with new opportunities to improve communications. 
Despite this potential, public safety faces several challenges 
in integrating new technologies and proving their reliability. 
The Committee directs OEC to report to the Committee no later 
than 180 days after the date of enactment of this act on the 
progress since September 2001 to improve emergency 
communications and what challenges lie ahead. Particular focus 
should be placed on the adoption of broadband technologies and 
the key issues and barriers still facing the emergency response 
agencies on this issue. The report is to include any needed 
update to the National Emergency Communications Plan to reflect 
the emergence of broadband technologies for public safety and 
this update shall be developed in cooperation with State, 
local, and tribal governments, relevant Federal agencies, 
emergency response providers, and the private sector. Further, 
the report shall include a plan to develop and disseminate 
training and best practices on governance, standard operating 
procedures, equipment purchases, and related issues for 
broadband technologies; and to deliver technical assistance to 
public safety agencies on broadband technologies.
    The Committee also directs OEC, in conjunction with the 
Federal Communications Commission [FCC], to brief the Committee 
on planning, analysis, and coordination efforts with the FCC 
and other Federal agencies for deployment and operation of the 
Public Safety Broadband Network no later than 45 days after the 
date of enactment of this act.
    Through the Emergency Communications Preparedness Center, 
the OEC leads an interagency body that serves as the focal 
point and clearinghouse for intergovernmental emergency 
communications information sharing, and for strategic 
assessment on Federal coordination to advance emergency 
communications. OEC is directed to provide the annual report 
required in the 21st Century Emergency Communication Act of 
2006 (6 U.S.C. 576) regarding a strategic assessment, and 
coordination efforts, of Federal agencies to advance the 
ability to have interoperable communications during a disaster 
without delay.
    The Next Generation Network Priority Services program was 
established to address the ramifications of continuously 
evolving communications technology on the Government's ability 
to deliver national security and emergency preparedness voice 
communications. The Committee recognizes that while 
improvements to program management have been made, NPPD still 
has much work to do in fiscal year 2012 with industry before 
this program can be fully implemented. NPPD is directed to 
provide a report to the Committee no later than 60 days after 
the date of enactment of this act on the milestones reached to 
date and the timeframe for execution of this program.

                       FEDERAL PROTECTIVE SERVICE

Appropriations, 2012\1\.................................  $1,115,000,000
Budget estimate, 2012\1\................................   1,261,537,000
House allowance\1\......................................   1,261,537,000
Committee recommendation\1\.............................   1,261,537,000

\1\Fully funded by offsetting collections paid by General Services 
Administration tenants and credited directly to this appropriation.

    The Federal Protective Service [FPS] is responsible for the 
security and protection of Federal property under the control 
of the General Services Administration [GSA]; and for the 
enforcement of laws for the protection of persons and property, 
the prevention of breaches of peace, and enforcement of any 
rules and regulations made and promulgated by the GSA 
Administrator and/or the Secretary. The FPS authority can also 
be extended by agreement to any area with a significant Federal 
interest. The FPS account provides funds for the salaries, 
benefits, travel, training, and other expenses of the program, 
offset by collections paid by GSA tenants and credited to the 
account.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,261,537,000, as requested, for 
salaries and expenses of the Federal Protective Service for 
fiscal year 2012; this amount is fully offset by collections of 
security fees.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                                           FEDERAL PROTECTIVE SERVICE
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2011  Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Basic security............................................           220,000           247,478           247,478
Building specific security................................           420,000           501,039           501,039
Reimbursable security fees (contract guard services)......           475,000           513,020           513,020
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Protective Service...................         1,115,000         1,261,537         1,261,537
Offsetting fee collections................................        -1,115,000        -1,261,537        -1,261,537
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          ADEQUATE RESOURCING

    Since fiscal year 2007, the Committee has expressed concern 
over the apparent lack of adequate resourcing for FPS. The 
attacks on the World Trade Center in 1993 and 2001, the 
Oklahoma City bombing, the attacks and shootings at the 
Pentagon and Fort Hood, and the plane attack on the Internal 
Revenue Service building in Texas are indicative of the threat 
to the Federal workforce. In fact, according to the Social 
Security Administration [SSA] Inspector General, threats 
against SSA employees have risen from 897 in 2007 to 2,336 in 
2010. Therefore, the Committee is pleased to see an increase of 
121 FTE is included in the budget request. However, concerns 
remain that FPS is still not properly resourced to complete its 
mission. Despite a known need for a workforce analysis study 
and strategic human capital plan, neither has been finalized.
    FPS is currently funded through fees assessed to 
participating agencies by the Office of Management and Budget 
[OMB]. A provision is included requiring the Secretary and the 
Director of OMB to certify that FPS is sufficiently funded to 
support a staff of 1,371 FTE staff, including at least 1,007 
FTE Police Officers, Inspectors, Area Commanders, and Special 
Agents, the same amount as included in the request, by December 
31, 2011. Further, a new provision is included requiring that 
FPS submit a strategic human capital plan that aligns fee 
collections to personnel requirements based on a current threat 
assessment with the fiscal year 2013 budget submission. In 
addition, the Committee directs GAO to report to the Committee 
within 60 days after the receipt of the plan on its validity.
    The Committee notes that GAO recommended in a recent report 
(GAO-11-492) that FPS conduct regular fee reviews and make the 
findings of the reviews available to customers. Further, GAO 
recommended that FPS evaluate its fee structure and the timing 
of budgetary decisions. FPS is directed to brief the Committee 
quarterly on the progress of fulfilling such recommendations.
    The Committee is aware that the Department has decided to 
assume full security and protection responsibilities for 
agencies that have previously carried this function out through 
a delegation of authority from the Secretary of Homeland 
Security. The Committee understands the Department's desire to 
have better insight into the security operations at all Federal 
facilities, but the Committee cautions that a ``one size fits 
all,'' solution could have negative budgetary consequences for 
the agencies that lose this delegated authority, while at the 
same time potentially not improving security performance beyond 
currently provided levels. FPS is directed to submit to the 
Committees and to GAO, within 60 days of the date of enactment 
of this act, the proposed plan to assume security and 
protection responsibilities from agencies that currently hold 
delegated authority. The plan shall include a cost/benefit 
analysis of the various models, including the costs associated 
with FPS carrying out the function compared to the current 
costs of those services as provided by the agencies receiving 
the delegation. The Committee directs GAO to review this issue 
and develop a set of recommendations for consideration by the 
Congress on security and protection models that could be 
implemented at the affected agencies. GAO shall report to the 
Committees with its findings within 180 days of the date of 
enactment of this act.

    UNITED STATES VISITOR AND IMMIGRANT STATUS INDICATOR TECHNOLOGY

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $333,944,000
Budget estimate, 2012\1\................................     276,629,000
House allowance.........................................     297,402,000
Committee recommendation................................     297,402,000

\1\Includes a proposed cancellation of $25,642,000.

    The United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator 
Technology [US-VISIT] account funds the development of a system 
to collect, maintain, and share appropriate information through 
an integrated information technology system, which determines 
the eligibility of aliens for admissions and benefits.
    The US-VISIT program office has lead responsibility within 
the Department of Homeland Security to work with the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation [FBI] on the further integration of the 
Automated Biometric Identification System [IDENT] and the FBI's 
Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System [IAFIS].

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $297,402,000, $4,869,000 below the 
budget request excluding the proposed cancellation of 
$25,642,000 which the Committee rejects, to remain available 
until September 30, 2014, for the United States Visitor and 
Immigrant Status Indicator Technology [US-VISIT].

                         VISA OVERSTAY BACKLOG

    If the Government has records of individuals entering the 
United States who are supposed to depart by a date certain, it 
is irresponsible to ignore these out-of-status individuals. 
This represents both a potential national security threat while 
further undermining our immigration system. In this regard, the 
Committee is pleased that US-VISIT is beginning to address its 
backlog of visa overstay records. The Committee directs US-
VISIT, jointly with ICE, to submit a report to the Committee on 
how it will complete this activity no later than 90 days after 
the date of enactment of this act. The Committee provides up to 
$5,000,000, available by transfer from ICE, Salaries and 
Expenses, to assist in this effort.

                  IMPLEMENTATION OF BIOMETRIC AIR EXIT

    The Committee strongly supports the full implementation of 
a biometric air exit capability at the earliest practicable 
time.
    The Committee is concerned that the Department of Homeland 
Security has failed to implement a comprehensive biometric air 
exit program. The Committee strongly believes it is the 
responsibility of the Department to ensure that the visa waiver 
program works efficiently without compromising our national 
security and reminds the Department that expansion of the visa 
waiver program is prohibited by law until a biometric air exit 
system is in place.
    The Committee includes language in the bill providing that 
not less than $18,000,000 in prior-year balances shall remain 
available until expended solely for implementation of a 
biometric air exit capability.

                               BRIEFINGS

    All current quarterly briefings on US-VISIT programs shall 
be provided on a semiannual basis.

       UNIQUE IDENTITY/IAFIS INTEGRATION AND 10-PRINT TRANSITION

    Since the creation of the Department, this Committee has 
strongly supported and encouraged real-time interoperability 
between the IDENT and IAFIS biometric databases and the 
transition to capturing 10 fingerprints of all visitors to the 
United States. The Committee notes that the interoperability 
effort from September 2006 through April 30, 2010, has 
identified more than 55,900 individuals with wants and warrants 
or who are known or suspected terrorists and has prevented 
their entry into the United States. The Committee recognizes 
that the FBI's transition to the Next Generation Identification 
of fingerprinting technology is an ongoing, multi-year process, 
and the Committee fully funds the $32,600,000 request for 
Unique Identity as US-VISIT continues its portion of the 
interoperability effort with the FBI. The Committee directs the 
US-VISIT program office to continue aggressively pursuing this 
issue and to continue providing semiannual briefings on 
progress being made on Unique Identity.

   US-VISIT'S KEY ROLE IN IDENTITY MANAGEMENT AND NATIONAL BIOMETRIC 
                               ACTIVITIES

    Due to its cross-cutting nature, US-VISIT not only offers 
high-quality identity management services to all DHS 
operational components, but also provides a unique opportunity 
for sharing information and collaborative planning and problem 
solving among biometric stakeholders at the Departments of 
State, Justice, Defense, and the Intelligence Community. In 
short, US-VISIT continues to grow and develop as a resource 
that benefits not only DHS but other national and international 
efforts.
    It is vital that the Department recognize the importance 
and impact of biometrics in safeguarding the security of the 
United States, and as such, should take a leadership role in 
biometric identification in the U.S. Government. The Department 
needs to formally designate US-VISIT as the biometric service 
provider for the entire Department.
    The Committee is encouraged by the progress US-VISIT has 
made in working closely with an increasing number of foreign 
governments as they seek to implement biometrics into their 
immigration and border management processes, exploring more and 
more opportunities for gaining global cooperation and 
collaboration to combat terrorism and international crime. The 
Committee urges greater coordination with the Department of 
Defense on biometrics use and sharing. The Committee directs 
US-VISIT to provide a report to the Committee not later than 60 
days after the date of enactment of this act detailing 
interagency cooperation on biometrics and US-VISIT's role in 
developing partnerships to strengthen global security.
    The Committee notes that US-VISIT 1.0 may enable the US-
VISIT program to fulfill its mission and requirements for 
effectiveness and suitability going forward. The Committee 
directs US-VISIT to include in the first quarterly briefing 
update on how US-VISIT 1.0 would ensure that US-VISIT can 
continue to meet growing and evolving biometric and biographic 
identity services for its customers.

                        Office of Health Affairs

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $139,455,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................     160,949,000
House allowance.........................................     165,949,000
Committee recommendation................................     159,450,000

                                SUMMARY

    The Office of Health Affairs [OHA], headed by the Chief 
Medical Officer who also serves as the Assistant Secretary for 
Health Affairs, leads the Department on medical issues related 
to natural and man-made disasters; serves as the principal 
advisor to the Secretary on medical and public health issues; 
coordinates biodefense activities within the Department; and 
serves as the Department's primary contact with other 
Departments and State, local, and tribal governments on medical 
and public health issues.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                                            OFFICE OF HEALTH AFFAIRS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                   Fiscal year
                                                                   Fiscal year     2012 budget      Committee
                                                                  2011 enacted       request     recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
BioWatch.......................................................         100,780         115,164          115,164
National Biosurveillance Integration Center....................           7,000           7,014            3,514
Rapidly Deployable Chemical Detection System...................           2,400           (\1\)            (\1\)
Chemical Defense Program.......................................  ..............           2,439            5,439
Planning and coordination......................................           2,276           6,162            6,162
Salaries and expenses..........................................          26,999          30,170           29,171
                                                                ------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of Health Affairs..........................         139,455         160,949          159,450
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Similar activities funded under Chemical Defense Program.

                                BIOWATCH

    The Committee recommends $115,164,000 for the BioWatch 
program, $14,384,000 above the fiscal year 2011 level and the 
same amount as the budget request. From its inception, the 
Committee has expressed great concern about the troubled 
implementation and slow progress of the BioWatch program. While 
concerns remain, the Committee recognizes that progress is 
being made with the development and maturity of the BioWatch 
program, including an effort to work more cooperatively with 
Federal, State, and local partners. The Committee remains 
committed to ensuring the Nation has an early warning network 
to detect a biological agent to speed response and recovery 
from a terrorist event. The Committee encourages OHA to pursue 
a vigorous schedule and to rectify emerging problems as soon as 
possible to ensure that important advancements in this critical 
program can be deployed.

              NATIONAL BIOSURVEILLANCE INTEGRATION CENTER

    The Committee is supportive of the mission to identify, 
track, and provide alerts for a biological event of national 
concern. However, the Committee remains concerned about the 
lack of a strategic approach to the mission by the National 
Biosurveillance Integration Center. To date, an adequate plan 
has not been forthcoming. Therefore, funding for the Center is 
reduced by $3,486,000 from the fiscal year 2011 level. The 
remaining amount is provided for the orderly transition of the 
Center's most necessary and mission critical functions to 
another coordination or operations center. OHA is directed to 
provide the Committee a report, no later than 45 days after the 
date of enactment of this act, regarding the best options for 
collocation of the necessary functions of the Center with 
another coordination or operations center, and a timeframe to 
complete a relocation.

                        CHEMICAL DEFENSE PROGRAM

    Pursuant to the President's budget request, the Rapidly 
Deployable Chemical Defense System PPA has been renamed to 
better reflect the growth of the program from a singular focus 
on a deployable system to a focus that also includes planning, 
preparedness, response, and strategic communication.
    The Committee recommends $5,439,000 for the Chemical 
Defense Program, which is $3,039,000 above the fiscal year 2011 
level for similar activities and $3,000,000 above the budget 
request. The increase is provided to complete at least two 
additional demonstration projects in OHA's ongoing effort to 
build an end-to-end chemical defense architecture. The site 
shall be competitively selected through the current process 
based on requirements, priorities, and specifications of the 
overarching chemical detection architecture. The Committee 
expects that OHA will prioritize demonstration projects based 
on risk, and understands that new demonstrations are being 
considered at airports, outdoor stadiums, and ports. The 
Committee is concerned that current demonstration projects do 
not address the threat of terrorist attacks, vessel collisions, 
or accidental releases at shoreline or riverine chemical 
facilities and refineries in population centers within the 
United States and urges the development of a new demonstration 
project to address the threat to this critical infrastructure 
sector within 1 year.

                       PLANNING AND COORDINATION

    The Committee recommends $6,162,000, which is $3,886,000 
above the fiscal year 2011 level and the same amount as the 
budget request. As requested, the increase reflects a 
realignment of funding from the BioWatch PPA. The Committee 
notes the important role the Food, Agriculture, and Veterinary 
Defense Division related to Homeland Security Presidential 
Directive-9 plays in advising Departmental leadership on 
security issues regarding food, water, agro-defense, 
veterinary, and zoonotic diseases and directs OHA to adequately 
support this important activity.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $29,171,000 for salaries and 
expenses, $999,000 below the budget request and $2,172,000 
above the fiscal year 2011 level.

                  Federal Emergency Management Agency


                                MISSION

    The primary mission of the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency [FEMA] is to reduce the loss of life and property and 
protect the Nation from all hazards, including natural 
disasters, acts of terrorism, and other manmade disasters, by 
leading and supporting the Nation in a risk-based, 
comprehensive emergency management system of preparedness, 
protection, response, recovery, and mitigation.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends a total program level of 
$9,780,880,000 for activities of FEMA for fiscal year 2012.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                                       FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Fiscal year 2011   Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                              enacted         budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operating Expenses\1\..................................        \2\786,824            814,924         \3\904,550
State and local programs...............................         2,225,041          3,844,663       \3\1,476,681
Firefighter Assistance Grants..........................           808,380               (\4\)           750,000
Emergency Management Performance Grants................           339,320               (\4\)           350,000
Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program............              -265               -896               -896
United States Fire Administration......................            45,497             42,538             45,038
Disaster Relief Fund...................................         2,644,700          1,800,000       \5\6,000,000
Disaster Assistance Direct Loan Program Account........               294                295                295
Flood hazard mapping and risk analysis.................           181,636            102,712             92,712
National Flood Insurance Fund..........................          (169,000)          (171,000)          (171,000)
National Predisaster Mitigation Fund...................            49,900             84,937             42,500
Emergency food and shelter.............................           119,760            100,000            120,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Emergency Management Agency.......         7,201,087          6,789,173          9,780,880
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Formerly Management and Administration.
\2\Excludes a transfer of $105,600,000 from Disaster Relief Fund.
\3\Funding levels reflect a change in PPA structure and a realignment of programs.
\4\Funding proposed under State and local programs.
\5\Includes $4,200,000,000 designated by Congress as disaster relief pursuant to Public Law 112-25.

                         OPERATING EXPENSES\1\

Appropriations, 2011\2\.................................    $786,824,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................     814,924,000
House allowance\2\......................................     707,298,000
Committee recommendation\3\.............................     904,550,000

\1\Formerly Management and Administration.
\2\Excludes a transfer of $105,600,000 from Disaster Relief Fund.
\3\Funding levels reflect a change in PPA structure and a realignment of 
programs.

    Funding for FEMA's Operating Expenses [OE] provides for the 
development and maintenance of an integrated, nationwide 
capability to prepare for, mitigate against, respond to, and 
recover from the consequences of major disasters and 
emergencies, regardless of cause, in partnership with Federal 
agencies, State, local, and tribal governments, volunteer 
organizations, and the private sector. OE supports FEMA's 
programs by coordinating between Headquarters and Regional 
Offices the policy, managerial, resource, and administrative 
actions.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    FEMA has experienced significant growth over the last 
decade, and especially since Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Since 
2005, FEMA's base has increased by 104 percent to support 
preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation activities 
Nationwide. FEMA's permanent workforce has grown by 75 percent. 
During this period of growth, FEMA has also received new 
authorities and reorganized many times. To effectively manage 
and sustain such change, discipline is required and 
transparency is needed. Therefore, the Committee includes a new 
program, project, and activity [PPA] structure, an account name 
change, and a realignment of certain programs into existing 
accounts. The funding for the ``Management and Administration'' 
account is now provided under ``Operating Expenses''. Further, 
the funding in the ``Operating Expenses'' account is divided 
into PPAs that more clearly identify FEMA operations. Finally, 
funding for Technical Assistance and Evaluations and 
Assessments is provided under ``Operating Expenses'' instead of 
under ``State and Local Programs''; and funding for the 
Emergency Management Institute is provided under ``State and 
Local Programs'' instead of under ``Operating Expenses'' to 
better align similar programs.
    Activities, as outlined the President's budget and the 
accompanying congressional justification materials, are funded 
in the following PPAs. The Administrative and Regional Offices 
PPA includes the Office of the Administrator, Office of Policy 
and Program Analysis, Office of External Affairs, Disability 
Integration and Coordination, Office of Equal Rights, Office of 
Chief Counsel, Office of Chief Financial Officer, Office of 
National Capital Region Coordination, Regional Operations, 
Federal Coordinating Officers, and Evaluations and Assessments. 
The Preparedness and Protection PPA includes the Office of 
Preparedness and National Protection, National Continuity, 
National Preparedness Directorate, Grants Programs Directorate, 
and Technical Assistance. The Response PPA includes the Office 
of Response and Recovery, Response Programs, and Logistics 
Programs. The Recovery PPA includes Recovery Programs. The 
Mitigation PPA includes Mitigation Programs. The Mission 
Support PPA includes Office of the Associate Administrator, 
Chief Administrative Officer, Chief Security Officer, Chief 
Information Officer, Chief Human Capital Officer, Chief 
Procurement Officer, and Regional Support. The Centrally 
Managed Accounts PPA includes Centrally Managed Functions in 
the Office of the Chief Financial Officer; and Enterprise 
Operations in the Office of the Chief Administrative Officer, 
Chief Information Officer, and Chief Security Officer. The 
Emergency Management Institute is funded under the ``State and 
Local Programs'' account.
    FEMA shall submit the fiscal year 2013 budget in an account 
and PPA structure identical to the structure enacted in this 
act and presented in this report. Furthermore, any report, 
briefing, or explanatory materials submitted to the Committee 
in fiscal year 2013 should be presented in this same structure.
    Bill language is included providing temporary authority to 
FEMA to transfer funding among PPAs in the ``Operating 
Expenses'' account. FEMA shall notify the Committees if this 
authority is exercised. The notification shall include a 
specific and clear justification for the reason the authority 
was exercised. This provision is for fiscal year 2012 only and 
shall only be exercised in cases when critical funding 
decisions did not anticipate the PPA limitations. None of the 
funds shall be used to create a new PPA, eliminate a PPA, 
increase funds for a PPA which has been denied or restricted, 
use funds otherwise directed by Congress or the Committee, or 
to contract out any functions in accordance with section 503 of 
this act.
    The specific levels recommended by the Committee, as 
compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget request levels, are 
as follows:

                                               OPERATING EXPENSES
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               Fiscal year        Committee
                                                               Fiscal year     2012 budget    recommendations\1\
                                                              2011 enacted       request             \3\
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations activities......................................   \2\\3\744,663      \3\780,492  ...................
Office of National Capital Region Coordination.............           6,981           5,319  ...................
Urban search and rescue....................................          35,180          29,113  ...................
Administrative and Regional Offices........................  ..............  ..............            112,157
Office of National Capital Region Coordination.............  ..............  ..............             (6,981)
Preparedness and Protection................................  ..............  ..............         \3\117,373
Response...................................................  ..............  ..............            226,228
Urban Search and Rescue Response Systems...................  ..............  ..............            (41,250)
Recovery...................................................  ..............  ..............             80,373
Mitigation.................................................  ..............  ..............             43,675
Mission support............................................  ..............  ..............            210,271
Centrally managed accounts.................................  ..............  ..............            114,473
                                                            ----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Operating expenses............................         786,824         814,924           904,550
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Reflects a change in PPA structure and a realignment of programs.
\2\Excludes a transfer of $105,600,000 from Disaster Relief Fund.
\3\Excludes a transfer from State and local programs.

                           PROGRAM ACTIVITIES

    Of the amounts provided, not less than: $2,000,000 is for 
the Emergency Management Assistance Compact under the 
Preparedness and Protection PPA; $2,589,000 is for the National 
Hurricane Program under the Response PPA; $8,798,000 is for the 
National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program and $9,360,000 is 
for the National Dam Safety Program under the Mitigation PPA; 
and $7,200,000 is for data center migration under the Centrally 
Managed Accounts PPA. FEMA is directed to provide full funding 
to operate and maintain the 11 sites of the Pre-Positioned 
Equipment Program to ensure the Nation has full coverage with 
minimal response time provided by this important program.

             FISCAL MANAGEMENT AND TRANSPARENCY IN SPENDING

    The Committee includes a provision directing FEMA to submit 
its fiscal year 2013 budget request, including justification 
materials, by office within the newly established PPA 
structure. Each office and FEMA region shall include: (1) 
budget detail by object classification; (2) the number of FTE 
on-board; (3) the number of FTE vacancies; and (4) the 
appropriation account(s) used to support the office and the 
programs managed by the office. This level of detail provides 
improved transparency and refined tracking of actual spending 
which is imperative given FEMA's growth in size and mission. 
The documents transmitting this information should be updated 
to reflect the new PPA structure.

                       CORE MANAGEMENT FUNCTIONS

    The Committee is pleased to note that that the 
Administrator's fiscal year 2012-2016 Future Year Homeland 
Security Program emphasizes establishing priorities, defining 
outcomes, developing strategies, and budgeting for activities. 
The Administrator directed FEMA leaders to develop performance 
plans and budgets that will achieve results and force an open 
dialogue regarding priorities and available resources.
    Because of investments made to rebuild FEMA over the last 
decade, and especially since Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, 
catastrophic planning is more integrated among the levels of 
government; shelter facility data is better managed between the 
public and private sectors; and the disaster contract 
acquisition process is now proactive, not reactive. Progress 
has been made, but improvements must be maintained and there is 
still much to do. For example, the National Disaster Recovery 
Framework has not been completed; an effective risk and 
preparedness assessment system is not in place; FEMA 
information systems are not sufficient; and the human resources 
study is not complete. Each of these efforts, while not costly, 
require FEMA to have a strong base and the necessary resources 
to finish initiatives that are not final. For this reason, the 
Committee is deeply concerned about the proposed cuts to FEMA's 
base.
    The fiscal year 2012 budget proposes $999,468,000 in total 
for FEMA Management and Administration--once all the transfers 
are accounted for--which is $78,863,000 below the fiscal year 
2011 level. No other component in the Department was subjected 
to such a significant cut to its base operations. Some proposed 
reductions are a result of onetime costs such as $23,300,000 
for proposed FEMA facility upgrades. Other proposed reductions 
are a result of cost savings to travel, printing, and supplies, 
which appear prudent in challenging fiscal times. However, the 
Committee rejects proposed reductions to FEMA's business and 
information technology systems. This proposal looks like the 
beginning of a trend observed in previous cycles that FEMA has 
been through. In tough budget times, readiness efforts are 
trimmed. This did not serve the Nation well in the response to 
Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, or Andrew, or Hugo. For this 
reason, the Committee has rejected the proposed cuts that are 
not related to onetime costs or reasonable savings.
    Further, the Committee recognizes that without a focused 
effort to institutionalize change to FEMA's core functions, 
achievements gained to date, and those still needed, will give 
way to the crisis of the day. Therefore, the Deputy 
Administrator is directed to provide quarterly briefings to the 
Committee on the specific progress made to stabilize the core 
administrative functions, sound budget practices, strategic 
human capital planning, and modernization of information 
systems. Briefings shall include an update on the on-going 
process to complete a fiscal review of each of FEMA's contracts 
and programs and implementation of the new PPA structure 
established in fiscal year 2012 by this Committee. Briefings 
shall provide an update on the execution of the Integrated 
Strategic Workforce Planning Initiative to determine the 
required mission capabilities, identify manpower requirements 
to achieve the capabilities, and the development and execution 
of workforce strategies. Finally, FEMA shall provide detailed 
information regarding the status of fulfilling the OIG 
recommendations in two recent reports: April 2011 FEMA Faces 
Challenges in Modernizing Information Technology (OIG-11-69) 
and May 2011 Information Technology Management Letter (OIG-11-
79).

                INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND MODERNIZATION

    The Committee notes with great concern the OIG findings 
about the challenges FEMA faces in modernizing information 
technology (OIG-11-69). The OIG states that Information 
Technology [IT] systems play a critical role in supporting 
FEMA's response and recovery efforts. However, the OIG found 
that systems have not fully supported the agency's needs during 
major disasters and efforts to modernize systems have been 
hindered by staffing and funding shortages. While FEMA has a 
number of IT infrastructure modernization initiatives underway, 
the OIG also found that FEMA does not have a comprehensive 
strategic information modernization plan; an adequate 
understanding of existing technology resources; or needed 
integration with stakeholders. FEMA generally concurred with 
the findings. This failure inhibits both FEMA internal 
functions and its ability to coordinate with homeland security 
and emergency management partners.
    For example, there are four systems that handle 80 percent 
of processing disaster assistance requests, and each operates 
on a different technical platform. As a result, data is not 
synchronized and personnel have to manually reconcile 
information to process the requests. Further, FEMA does not 
have an electronic capability for States to use when requesting 
assistance during a disaster. States must fax an assistance 
request form to FEMA personnel who then enter the information 
into a tracking system. The problem is further highlighted with 
mitigation grants. An average of 100 to 200 applications are 
received during each disaster for mitigation funding. Each 
application must be submitted on paper and then manually 
entered into a system for processing. FEMA officials cite that 
most States are themselves using Web-enabled systems that 
provide capability for automated requests and real time 
information sharing on assistance needs during a disaster. Yet, 
FEMA's antiquated systems prevent it from using this more 
efficient and cost effective process.
    The OIG found that efforts to modernize some of FEMA's 
critical systems have been put on hold due to DHS consolidation 
plans. As a result, ``legacy systems do not provide the 
functionality needed to support FEMA's disaster response 
mission operation in a timely and effective manner.'' This is a 
serious impediment to modernization.
    The majority of the OIG investigation covered FEMA's 
disaster response and recovery systems. The Committee notes 
that planning and preparedness IT systems were not a focal 
point--mostly because these systems do not exist. State and 
local governments are making significant use of scalable, 
virtual workspaces on a platform that leverages existing social 
networks, especially in regional collaboration efforts. Such a 
platform supports the type of collaboration required by the 
March 30, 2011, Presidential Policy Directive--8 [PPD-8], 
related to National Preparedness, as well as other homeland 
security policies and goals. Yet, FEMA is in great jeopardy of 
being left out of the needed collaboration with its partners, 
as required by the Directive, due to a lack of modern systems.
    For these reasons, the Committee rejects the short-sighted 
budget proposal to reduce FEMA's information technology 
resources and restores funding to invest in IT modernization 
for preparedness, response, recovery, mitigation, and mission 
support. As a part of the modernization effort, the Committee 
provides $5,500,000 specifically to expand and fully implement 
a preparedness, coordination, and planning platform in support 
of PPD-8. The Deputy Administrator is directed to brief the 
Committee within 30 days after the date of enactment of this 
act on the implementation of the OIG findings and a plan to 
implement a FEMA IT modernization effort. Further, FEMA is 
directed to provide the Committee an expenditure plan within 90 
days after the date of enactment of this act for all IT 
modernization efforts. The plan shall include a clear 
description of approaches to meet long-term needs, including at 
least a ten year timeframe, in an efficient and innovative way. 
Finally, FEMA is directed to provide a complete long-term 
strategic plan, in conjunction with the fiscal year 2013 budget 
submission, to the Committee. The long-term strategic plan 
shall clearly identify the way in which IT efforts support the 
agency's mission and drive investments; clear and complete 
enterprise architecture; and prioritized needs.
    Finally, requirements for automation of virtual sharing of 
information are highlighted in other sections of this report. 
Making use of technology is a low cost way to improve 
effectiveness and should be maximized.

                              PREPAREDNESS

    The Committee is pleased that FEMA has initiated a 
Strategic Foresight Initiative to ensure emergency management 
officials at all levels are anticipating future issues 
associated with evolving natural and man-made events. The 
Committee encourages FEMA to sustain this activity, which will 
identify dynamics likely to affect emergency management such as 
the evolving terrorist threat, critical infrastructure and 
global interdependencies, technological innovation, 
environmental issues, and shifts in demographics.
    The Committee is concerned a large electromagnetic flux 
could affect the operations of the Nation's infrastructure and 
safety on a national scale and affect the assets needed to 
respond to problems associated with such an event, such as 
communications systems. FEMA is directed to brief the Committee 
within 30 days after the date of enactment of this act, on the 
potential impacts to emergency response and recovery related to 
such an event. The briefing should also include what 
preparedness measures have been completed and are still needed 
to mitigate the effects of such an event. The Committee 
recognizes that many Federal agencies have a role in studying 
the issue and encourages FEMA to coordinate with those agencies 
to garner the best information available on this issue for the 
emergency management community.
    The Office of Individual and Community Preparedness shall 
brief the Committee within 60 days of the date of enactment of 
this act regarding the specific actions that will be taken to 
further individual and community preparedness and the 
associated resource requirements. The briefing shall include a 
discussion on how resiliency is increased through citizen 
preparedness, and how childhood education regarding 
preparedness can facilitate community readiness. Further, FEMA 
is directed to create an easily assessable inventory of 
shareable products that have been developed through the 
Citizens Corps Program to further individual and community 
preparedness. The Committee understands the products range from 
school curricula to emergency information which is translated 
into foreign languages. Sharing this information will maximize 
the investments made to date.
    Additionally, the Committee is pleased with the progress of 
efforts of the Children's Working Group which was created to 
coordinate Federal agency efforts to accommodate the unique 
needs of children in disasters. Accomplishments include 
guidance which was issued to ensure disaster plans are in place 
at juvenile justice centers, and the pre-staging of commodities 
such as infant formula, baby food, and diapers for disaster 
response. The Committee notes that FEMA was required to 
establish the National Emergency Family Registry and Locator 
System in the Post-Katrina Emergency Management Reform Act. The 
Committee remains concerned that the system for reconnecting 
children after they are separated from their families during a 
disaster is still reliant on a non-automated paper system that 
unnecessarily adds to the time it takes to reunify families. 
Therefore, the Committee provides no less than $500,000 for 
FEMA to automate the unaccompanied minors' registry and call 
center.

          ASSESSING READINESS AND FEDERAL GRANT CONTRIBUTIONS

    Congress called for an assessment of the Nation's emergency 
response capabilities in the Post-Katrina Emergency Management 
Reform Act in October of 2006. Homeland Security Appropriations 
Acts have stressed the need for progress on this front since 
fiscal year 2008, and have committed resources to it, 
especially related to the effectiveness of grants. Because of a 
lack of transparency and no clear progress on assessments, GAO 
was directed to provide a quarterly review of FEMA's efforts to 
complete evaluations and assessments of preparedness and the 
effectiveness of grants to the Committee. GAO found that 
between fiscal years 2008 and 2010, FEMA budgeted over 
$58,000,000 for no less than seven evaluation efforts. Further, 
GAO found that as of March 2010, FEMA had initiated yet another 
new framework to assess national preparedness capabilities 
after evaluating the limitations and lack of usefulness of each 
of the previous efforts. Still today, there is no metric in 
place that describes the Nation's preparedness and how grant 
programs contribute to that effort.
    On March 30, 2011, President Obama signed Presidential 
Policy Directive-8 on National Preparedness. It also calls for 
a National Preparedness System, which includes a comprehensive 
approach to assess national preparedness that uses a consistent 
methodology to measure readiness for all levels of government 
to prevent, protect against, mitigate against, respond to, and 
recover from disasters. The Secretary of Homeland Security is 
directed to submit a description of the system no later than 
November 24, 2011. FEMA has been assigned as the lead component 
on this effort. Bill language has been included requiring the 
Secretary to submit the description of the system to the 
Congress.
    The Committee notes that investments funded with State and 
local first responder grants have significantly improved 
disaster response capabilities. During the recent tornadoes in 
Arkansas, the State used its wireless network, largely funded 
with homeland security grant funding, which enabled an 
efficient response by first responders to the impacted areas, 
including enabling the National Guard to communicate on the 
same system. In Alabama, rescue response units that were 
purchased with State Homeland Security Grant Program funding, 
were deployed during recent unprecedented tornadoes. In 
Missouri, investments in personal protective gear, night vision 
goggles, medical equipment, generators, search and rescue 
tools, and communications assets--all supported with grant 
funding--were used to respond to the devastating tornadoes.
    The first responder capacity built in the Nation with grant 
funds is undeniable. Unfortunately, there is no assessment in 
place that clearly demonstrates the Nation's readiness posture 
and what gaps in capability remain. A lack of a demonstrable 
measure of effectiveness has made funding to build readiness 
capability susceptible to reductions. Budget pressures at all 
levels of government require a focus on sustaining capability. 
Therefore, FEMA is directed to develop guidance for grantees on 
best practices to manage current funding to ensure the most 
necessary capabilities are sustained. FEMA is encouraged to 
provide flexibility in grant expenditures to ensure the least 
amount of degradation to current capabilities occurs. FEMA is 
directed to brief the Committee quarterly on the specific 
processes being put in place to manage the grant programs in a 
way that promotes sustainability of current capacity.
    A provision is included requiring the Administrator to 
submit the National Preparedness Report and a comprehensive 
plan to implement a system to measure the effectiveness of 
grants to State and local communities to the Committee in 
fiscal year 2012. Further, $1,400,000, 25 percent of the funds 
for the Office of the Administrator, is withheld from 
obligation until the Report and a plan are submitted. The 
report shall include options for revising the programs to make 
them more effective and more easily administered. The Committee 
encourages FEMA to use a truly innovative approach to the grant 
programs and cautions that simply submitting the same proposal 
to combine several of the programs is not advancing discussion. 
To that end, the report shall also address the status of 
implementation of each of the seven recommendations made in the 
September 2010, Report to Congress of the Local, State, Tribal, 
and Federal Preparedness Task Force regarding grant 
administration which included topics for further study, reform, 
and linkage to capability assessments.

                         PREPAREDNESS TASKFORCE

    The Committee appreciates the effort of the Local, State, 
Tribal, and Federal Preparedness Task Force and the timely 
report transmitted to the Congress in September, 2010, which 
includes recommendations related to the homeland security and 
emergency management policies, grant administration, and 
assessments. FEMA, in cooperation with the Office of 
Intergovernmental Affairs, is directed to continue regular 
briefings to the Committee regarding the progress of and 
timeline for implementation of the findings of the Task Force. 
The Committee expects the initial briefing will include 
additional information about incentives for communities to take 
pre-event steps to reduce the length and magnitude of recovery; 
revitalizing Regional Advisory Councils; conducting threat and 
hazard identification risk assessments; linking grant programs 
to capability assessments; and the use of the Emergency 
Management Accreditation Program nationwide. Additionally, all 
briefings required of FEMA in this report that address a topic 
for which a recommendation was made shall address that 
recommendation in the briefing.

                    PUBLIC AND PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS

    Disaster preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery 
are efforts that particularly lend themselves to public and 
private partnerships. In order to effectively respond and 
recover from an event, the two sectors must work together to 
protect citizens during a disaster, and help communities 
rebuild. FEMA is directed to provide a report to the Committee 
no later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this act 
on options to better use public and private partnerships to 
maximize cooperation and accomplish projects that neither 
sector can complete on their own.

                                PLANNING

    The need for planning related to natural-, technological-, 
or human-caused emergencies or disasters has been met with 
varying degrees of acceptance and resistance among the many 
disciplines and levels of government that must participate to 
make any disaster planning effort successful. The most recent 
version of the FEMA Comprehensive Preparedness Guide 101 (CPG 
101), released in November 2010, states that planning provides 
a methodical way to engage the whole community in thinking 
through the life cycle of a potential crisis, determining 
required capabilities, and establishing a framework for roles 
and responsibilities. The goal of CPG 101 is to assist in 
making the planning process routine across all phases of 
emergency management and for all homeland security mission 
areas. The Committee applauds the effort to better clarify and 
unify planning efforts. However, it remains unclear how 
committed the emergency management community, as a whole, is to 
completing comprehensive planning, at all levels of government, 
to ensure that trained and skilled planners are dedicated to 
the effort. The Committee directs FEMA, in conjunction with the 
Homeland Security Studies and Analysis Institute or another 
appropriate federally funded research and development center, 
to review and report to the Committees on Appropriations no 
later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this act 
regarding the status of planning nationwide, including 
catastrophic planning, as well as the need to complete 
exercises to test the plans. The review shall include the 
extent to which CPG-101 has been implemented in communities 
across the Nation and its effectiveness in standardizing the 
planning process across all phases of emergency management and 
homeland security mission areas.

                          TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

    The Committee recommends $10,000,000 for technical 
assistance, the same amount as the budget request, and $978,000 
below fiscal year 2011. The Committee recognizes the importance 
of the technical assistance program, which delivers quick and 
effective problem solving tools for homeland security partners 
and supports the delivery of technical assistance for three 
major areas, as outlined in the budget request: grants 
management; planning; and prevention and protection activities. 
In administering grants management technical assistance, FEMA 
should focus on assistance related to expediting the drawdown 
of Federal funds.

                      EVALUATIONS AND ASSESSMENTS

    The Committee recommends $10,000,000 for evaluations and 
assessments, $3,972,000 below the fiscal year 2011 level and 
$4,000,000 below the request. The Committee views the 
responsibilities encompassed by evaluations and assessments as 
crucial to policy development, grant funding determinations, 
and measuring the outcomes of the Nation's preparedness 
efforts.

                  NATIONAL DISASTER RECOVERY FRAMEWORK

    The Committee is pleased that FEMA has undertaken the 
development of a National Disaster Recovery Framework to 
identify the roles and responsibilities of all levels of 
government, individuals, and the nonprofit and private sectors 
during each phase of the recovery process. The Committee also 
recognizes that the Presidential Policy Directive-8, related to 
National Preparedness, which was issued by the President on 
March 30, 2011, calls for a Recovery Framework. Additional 
efforts are required to clarify leadership and coordination 
issues in the draft framework released in February 2010, and 
FEMA is directed to remain focused on this effort and provide 
the necessary resources to improve, finalize, operationalize, 
and implement the framework.

                            REGIONAL OFFICES

    The Committee understands that FEMA is delegating certain 
authorities from headquarters to the offices of the Regional 
Administrators. FEMA is directed to brief the Committees on 
Appropriations within 30 days of the date of enactment of this 
act regarding this effort. The briefing shall include a list of 
authorities that have been or will be delegated; a timeframe 
for implementation; and what procedures will be instituted to 
ensure consistent application of FEMA policies across the 
Nation.

                    NATIONWIDE CYBER SECURITY REVIEW

    In the joint explanatory statement accompanying the 
Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2010, the 
Committee directed NPPD, in conjunction with FEMA, to develop 
the necessary tools for all levels of governments to complete a 
cyber network security assessment. NPPD, in conjunction with 
FEMA, is directed to provide a briefing to the Committee on the 
specific timeframe in which the effort will be completed and 
implemented. Further, the briefing shall provide an update on 
how this effort and other on-going efforts by both components 
contribute to completion of the recommendation in the September 
2010, Report to Congress of the Local, State, Tribal, and 
Federal Preparedness Task Force to ``ensure national 
cybersecurity efforts address local, State, tribal, and 
territorial preparedness implications''.

             OFFICE OF NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION COORDINATION

    The Committee recommends $6,981,000 for the Office of 
National Capital Region Coordination [ONCRC], $1,662,000 above 
the budget request and the same amount as the fiscal year 2011 
level. Congress established the ONCRC to enhance domestic 
preparedness through cooperation of the Federal, State, and 
local governments in the unique environment of the National 
Capital Region.
    The Committee is concerned that events of low significance 
such as a single crime scene investigation, and well known and 
predictable events such as a snowstorm, let alone no-notice 
events such as the August 24, 2011, earthquake still often 
bring the National Capital Region traffic patterns to a 
standstill. This does not bode well for an unexpected man-made 
event. While there are very real infrastructure challenges in 
the metropolitan area, in many cases severe impacts could be 
mitigated through coordinated information and decision-making. 
The Committee further notes that the ONCRC is charged with 
several key responsibilities prescribed in the Homeland 
Security Act of 2002, including developing a process for 
receiving meaningful input from entities; and ensuring adequate 
planning, information sharing, and execution of preparedness 
activities in the National Capital Region. The Committee is 
concerned that National Capital Region partners have not 
employed a more fulsome use of technology tools for planning 
and information sharing to fulfill these requirements. Planning 
and sharing information is especially complex in the National 
Capital Region because of the multiple local and State 
jurisdictions, the District of Columbia, and large presence of 
Federal Government agencies.
    The Committee notes that several urban areas and regional 
planning partners have successfully implemented Web-based 
virtual preparedness, coordination, and planning, software 
platforms for improved coordination involving many communities. 
Therefore, ONCRC is directed to employ a similar technology 
solution within the funds provided. ONCRC is directed to brief 
the Committee on the implementation timeframe for this effort 
within 30 days of the date of enactment of this act.
    The Committee remains concerned that planning for 
evacuation of the National Capital Region during a disaster has 
not incorporated all of the pertinent officials from the 
appropriate local communities and States in the decision-making 
process. Therefore, the Committee includes bill language 
requiring inclusion of the Governors of the State of West 
Virginia and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in the National 
Capital Region decision-making and planning process for mass 
evacuations. The Committee again directs the Department to 
include officials from the counties and municipalities that 
contain the evacuation routes and their tributaries in the 
planning process.

                URBAN SEARCH AND RESCUE RESPONSE SYSTEM

    The Committee recommends $41,250,000 for the Urban Search 
and Rescue System, $12,137,000 above the request and $6,070,000 
above the fiscal year 2011 level. The Committee is concerned 
that the current geographic distribution of Urban Search and 
Rescue Teams is not adequate to meet the Nation's disaster 
response needs, and that the 28 existing teams do not have 
adequate equipment to respond to chemical, biological, 
radiological, nuclear, or explosive [CBRNE] events. The 
Committee therefore provides $12,137,000 above the President's 
request for additional CBRNE equipment and to establish at 
least one additional team in under-represented regions at 
substantial risk of a natural or man-made disaster, by working 
with the States to identify existing capabilities that can be 
incorporated into the Urban Search and Rescue Response System 
Task Force network. Further, the Committee directs FEMA to 
establish the additional Team within one year. Finally, FEMA is 
directed to provide an expenditure plan for the Urban Search 
and Rescue Response System no later than 60 days after the date 
of enactment of this act.

                        STATE AND LOCAL PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2011....................................  $2,225,041,000
Budget estimate, 2012\1\................................   3,844,663,000
House allowance.........................................   1,000,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,476,681,000

\1\Includes $670,000,000 proposed for Firefighter Assistance Grants and 
$350,000,000 proposed for Emergency Management Performance Grants, which 
continue to be funded in separate accounts.

    State and local programs provide grants for training, 
equipment (including interoperable communications equipment), 
exercises, and technical assistance to improve readiness for 
potential disasters.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                                            STATE AND LOCAL PROGRAMS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2011  Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grants:
    State Homeland Security Grants........................          633,730         1,050,000           430,000
        Operation Stonegarden.............................          (54,890)          (50,000)          (50,000)
    Urban Area Security Initiative........................          723,550           920,000           400,000
    Regional Catastrophic Preparedness Grants.............           14,970   ................  ................
    Metropolitan Medical Response System..................           34,930   ................  ................
    Citizens Corps........................................            9,980            13,000   ................
    Public Transportation Security Assistance/Railroad              249,500           300,000           200,000
     Security Assistance/Over-the-Road Bus Security
     Assistance...........................................
    Port Security Grants..................................          249,500           300,000           200,000
    Buffer Zone Protection Program........................  ................           50,000   ................
    Driver's License Security Grants......................           44,910   ................  ................
    Emergency Operations Centers..........................           14,970   ................           15,000
    Firefighter Assistance Grants.........................             (\1\)          670,000              (\1\)
    Emergency Management Performance Grants...............             (\1\)          350,000              (\1\)
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Grants....................................        1,976,040         3,653,000         1,245,000
                                                           =====================================================
Education, Training, and Exercises:
    Emergency Management Institute........................             (\1\)             (\1\)           16,181
    Center for Domestic Preparedness......................           62,375            62,500            62,500
    National Domestic Preparedness Consortium.............           92,814            44,500            93,000
    National Exercise Program.............................           39,920            40,000            34,000
    Continuing training...................................           28,942            20,663            26,000
    Technical Assistance..................................           10,978            10,000              (\1\)
    Evaluations and Assessments...........................           13,972            14,000              (\1\)
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Education, Training, and Exercises........          249,001           191,663           231,681
                                                           =====================================================
      Total, State and Local Programs.....................        2,225,041         3,844,663        1,476,681
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Funds appropriated/requested under a separate account.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,476,681,000 for State and local 
programs. The Committee does not approve the budget request to 
fund Firefighter Assistance Grants and Emergency Management 
Performance Grants under this heading. Each program is funded 
in a separate account, consistent with previous years. The 
Committee includes a provision providing 5.8 percent of the 
total amount appropriated for State and local programs for 
transfer to FEMA ``Operating Expenses'' for the Preparedness 
and Protection PPA. This is consistent with the structure of 
previous years. The Committee also includes a provision 
allowing grantees to use no more than 5 percent of grant 
funding for management and administrative costs.
    The Committee includes specific timeframes for grant dollar 
distribution and expects FEMA and the Department to comply with 
the law to ensure homeland security funds are distributed in a 
timely manner. For each of the grant programs, grant guidance 
shall be issued in 25 days, applicants shall apply within 90 
days after guidance is issued, and FEMA shall act on the 
application within 90 days after applications are due.
    The funds provided for State and local grants are to be 
used for purposes consistent with each program as authorized 
and may not, with certain exceptions, be used for construction 
activities.
    For purposes of eligibility for funds under this heading, 
any county, city, village, town, district, borough, parish, 
port authority, transit authority, intercity rail provider, 
commuter rail system, freight rail provider, water district, 
regional planning commission, council of government, Indian 
tribe with jurisdiction over Indian country, authorized tribal 
organization, Alaska Native village, independent authority, 
special district, or other political subdivision of any State 
shall constitute a ``local unit of government.''
    The Department is encouraged to consider the need for mass 
evacuation planning and pre-positioning of equipment for areas 
potentially impacted by mass evacuations in allocating first 
responder funds. The Committee notes the Department's efforts 
to support the homeland security needs of federally recognized 
tribes and encourages FEMA to continue its efforts in ensuring 
federally recognized tribes are included in homeland security 
efforts through State and local planning efforts. The 
Department is encouraged to require State and local governments 
to address child care services and facilities in response and 
recovery plans, exercises, and training. Additionally, the 
Committee is concerned that State and local cyber security 
issues are not receiving the required resources and attention 
and the Department is encouraged to require State and local 
governments to include Chief Information Officers in planning 
efforts. FEMA is encouraged to require States to use grant 
funding for training against cyber attacks on critical State 
and local infrastructure. The Committee directs FEMA to issue 
guidance to States, no later than 30 days after the date of 
enactment of this act, regarding the funding available from all 
grant programs to retrofit facilities for the purposes of 
sheltering during the response phase of a disaster. Further, 
FEMA shall provide technical assistance to any State seeking 
support regarding a plan for such sheltering. The Committee is 
concerned that drinking water and sanitation security needs, 
especially related to emergency response initiatives, are not 
adequately addressed and the Department is encouraged to 
require State and local governments to include rural water 
associations in planning efforts as well.
    The Committee is supportive of the Department's efforts to 
evaluate applications based on risk and effectiveness. The 
Department should continue its efforts to evaluate State 
Homeland Security Grant Program [SHSGP] and Urban Area Security 
Initiative [UASI] applications based on how effectively these 
grants will address identified homeland security needs. The 
Department shall work aggressively to ensure grant applicants 
have the same information that is available to the Department 
with regard to threat, vulnerability, and consequence to ensure 
applications reflect true risk.
    The Committee expects FEMA to continue to fully engage 
subject matter experts within the Department when appropriate 
in the development of grant guidance and the determination of 
awards.

                 STATE HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends $430,000,000 for the State 
Homeland Security Grant Program [SHSGP], of which $50,000,000 
shall be for Operation Stonegarden Grants, $203,730,000 and 
$4,890,000 below the fiscal year 2011 level respectively. 
Activities previously funded under Metropolitan Medical 
Response System, Citizens Corps, Driver's License Security 
Program, Buffer Zone Protection Program and the Interoperable 
Emergency Communications Grant Program in fiscal year 2011 are 
eligible for funding under SHSGP. Operation Stonegarden grants 
shall continue to be competitively awarded and shall not be 
restricted to any particular border. As in previous years, FEMA 
is directed to ensure all border States shall be eligible to 
apply in fiscal year 2012.

              URBAN AREA SECURITY INITIATIVE GRANT PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends $400,000,000 for the Urban Area 
Security Initiative [UASI] Grant Program, $323,550,000 below 
the fiscal year 2011 level. Of this amount, the recommendation 
includes $10,000,000 for nonprofit entities determined to be at 
risk by the Secretary. Eligibility for nonprofit entities shall 
not be limited to UASI communities. Activities previously 
funded under Metropolitan Medical Response System, Citizens 
Corps, Buffer Zone Protection Program, and the Interoperable 
Emergency Communications Grant Program are eligible for funding 
under UASI.

              LAW ENFORCEMENT TERRORISM PREVENTION PROGRAM

    In accordance with section 2006 of the Homeland Security 
Act of 2002, the Law Enforcement Terrorism Prevention Program 
[LETPP] is funded through a required set aside of 25 percent of 
the funds appropriated through the SHSGP and UASI programs. The 
Committee directs FEMA to provide clear guidance to States and 
urban areas to ensure that the intent of LETPP is fully 
realized.
    Further, FEMA is directed to provide a report no later than 
120 days after the date of enactment of this act, in 
conjunction with the DHS Office for State and Local Law 
Enforcement, on the expenditures in this program to date and 
their specific applicability to prevention.

            REGIONAL CATASTROPHIC PREPAREDNESS GRANT PROGRAM

    The Regional Catastrophic Preparedness Grant Program was 
established in fiscal year 2007 in order to provide incentives 
to State and local governments to develop coordinated regional 
plans for responding to a catastrophic event. Absent such 
incentives in large metropolitan areas, governors often did not 
coordinate effectively with mayors, mayors did not coordinate 
effectively with neighboring mayors or with county officials. 
Since the program was established, $155,000,000 has been spent 
developing coordinated plans in areas that DHS determined were 
at the highest risk for a catastrophic event. The Committee 
recognizes that the grant recipients, having completed a 
majority of the planning effort, are entering the next phase of 
testing the plans through exercises. Having finalized plans, no 
funding is provided for the Regional Catastrophic Preparedness 
Grant Program in fiscal year 2012. The Committee expects that 
FEMA will continue to assist grantees with program 
implementation and FEMA is directed to continue its support and 
assistance to grantees through the remaining performance period 
of the grants. FEMA is directed to provide a report no later 
than 180 days after the date of enactment of this act on the 
accomplishments of this program. The report shall include a 
discussion of how successes can be transitioned into future 
catastrophic planning efforts and how on-going planning needs 
can be sustained and regularly exercised in the long term.

                   CHILDREN'S NEEDS DURING A DISASTER

    On June 8, 2011, Administrator Fugate testified to the 
progress that has been made in incorporating the 
recommendations of the FEMA Children's Working Group into 
Federal agency efforts to ensure that children have their 
unique needs met during a disaster. Since children compromise 
approximately 25 percent of the United States population, it is 
imperative that State and local governments pre-plan for the 
needs of children. The Committee directs FEMA to provide a 
report, no later than 120 days after the date of enactment of 
this act, on the expenditures in all the grant programs that 
specifically lend to ensuring the needs of children are taken 
into account during a disaster and to establish measurable 
benchmarks for meeting those needs.

    PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ASSISTANCE AND RAILROAD SECURITY 
                               ASSISTANCE

    The Committee recommends $200,000,000 for Public 
Transportation Security Assistance [PTSA], Railroad Security 
Assistance [RSA], and Over-The-Road Bus Security Assistance. Of 
the recommended amount, no less than $20,000,000 is provided 
for Amtrak security needs. Since 2004, there have been 1,300 
terrorist attacks worldwide against mass transit, buses and 
passenger rail, resulting in more than 4,000 deaths and 14,000 
injuries. It is essential that FEMA continue to work with 
grantees to ensure that funds are used rapidly and effectively. 
The Committee remains concerned about the slow pace of spending 
these funds and directs FEMA to brief the Committees on 
Appropriations no later than 90 days after the date of 
enactment of this act on efforts to expedite the effective 
expenditure of these funds.

                          PORT SECURITY GRANTS

    The Committee recommends $200,000,000 for the Port Security 
Grant Program. The Committee notes that physical security, 
preparedness and planning for response to a disaster, and 
training of port facility officials at the Nation's ports is 
imperative to economic security.

                      EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTERS

    The Committee recommends $15,000,000 for Emergency 
Operations Centers, $30,000 above the fiscal year 2011 level.

                    CENTER FOR DOMESTIC PREPAREDNESS

    The Committee recommends $62,500,000 for the Center for 
Domestic Preparedness, $125,000 above the fiscal year 2011 
level and the same amount as the request level. Included in 
this amount is funding for the Noble Training Center.

               NATIONAL DOMESTIC PREPAREDNESS CONSORTIUM

    The Committee recommends $93,000,000 for the National 
Domestic Preparedness Consortium, instead of $44,500,000, as 
proposed in the budget. The Consortium, authorized by the 9/11 
Act (Public Law 110-53), has conducted training in all 50 
States and each U.S. territory. Over 1.6 million first 
responders have been trained. The existing Consortium members 
have proven to be an effective delivery system for this 
important training.

                       CONTINUING TRAINING GRANTS

    The Committee provides $26,000,000 for continuing training 
grants, $5,337,000 above the request and $2,942,000 below 
fiscal year 2011, of which State and local government 
intelligence awareness training shall be no less than 
$1,000,000 above the level funded in fiscal year 2011. The 
Committee supports full funding of programs that deliver 
homeland security curricula in the form of executive education 
programs and accredited master's degree education. The 
Committee also notes the importance of the Mobile Education 
Team providing half-day, graduate-level seminars on homeland 
security challenges for Governors, mayors, and senior staff 
being conducted prior to any emergency their community may 
experience.

                       NATIONAL EXERCISE PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends $34,000,000 for the National 
Exercise Program, $5,920,000 below fiscal year 2011, and 
$6,000,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee understands the national exercise program is 
under review, by the Department and FEMA, to ensure exercises 
validate response capabilities and provide assessments of 
plans, organization, training, and equipment needs which are 
relevant to realistic scenarios. FEMA is directed to brief the 
Committee no later than 90 days after the date of enactment of 
this act on any planned and needed program reforms. The 
briefing shall include a discussion on how exercises can 
produce specific and measurable accomplishments such as 
effective regional response protocol, information sharing, and 
citizen preparedness. Further, the briefing shall provide 
information regarding an effective way to use reconstruction of 
actual events that have already occurred as opportunities to 
validate response capabilities and assess plans, organization, 
training, and equipment needs.

                         TRAINING AND EDUCATION

    The Committee recognizes that training and education for 
first responders, emergency managers, and those who participate 
in disaster management is critical.
    The Committee understands that FEMA is reviewing its 
training and education programs to ensure efficiency and 
effectiveness. FEMA is directed to report to the Committees on 
Appropriations no later than 180 days after the date of 
enactment of this act regarding a comprehensive approach to 
training and education and identifying any gaps, including a 
plan to address those gaps.
    The report shall include a review of the need for 
additional capacity for current and emerging training needs 
such as those for planning, cybersecurity, intelligence, and 
catastrophic planning, response, and recovery. Additionally, 
FEMA should consider the need for education programs that 
develop critical leadership skills, enabling managers to 
operate in a complex, dynamic disaster environment.

                     FIREFIGHTER ASSISTANCE GRANTS

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $808,380,000
Budget estimate, 2012\1\................................................
House allowance.........................................     670,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     750,000,000

\1\Budget proposes $670,000,000 under State and Local Programs.

    Firefighter assistance grants, as authorized by section 33 
of the Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974 (15 
U.S.C. 2229), assist local firefighting departments for the 
purpose of protecting the health and safety of the public and 
fire fighting personnel, including volunteers and emergency 
medical service personnel, against fire and fire-related 
hazards.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $750,000,000 for firefighter 
assistance grants, including $375,000,000 for firefighter 
assistance grants, and $375,000,000 for firefighter staffing 
grants, to remain available until September 30, 2013. This is 
$58,380,000 below the fiscal year 2011 level and $80,000,000 
above the level requested in ``State and Local Programs''.
    The Committee directs the Department to continue the 
present practice of funding applications according to local 
priorities and those established by the United States Fire 
Administration, and to continue direct funding to fire 
departments and the peer review process. Up to 5 percent of 
grant funds shall be for program administration.
    The Committee notes that the U.S. Fire Service Needs 
Assessment, which was required in the explanatory statement 
accompanying the Department of Homeland Security Appropriations 
Act, 2010, to be submitted no later than April 9, 2010, has not 
been received by the Committee. In the event that the Office of 
Management and Budget review process results in further delay, 
the Committee expects the Department to submit the assessment 
forthwith.

                EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE GRANTS

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $339,320,000
Budget estimate, 2012\1\................................................
House allowance.........................................     350,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     350,000,000

\1\Budget proposes $350,000,000 under State and Local Programs.

    Funding requested in this account provides support to the 
Nation's all-hazards emergency management system and helps to 
build State and local emergency management capability.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $350,000,000 for emergency 
management performance grants [EMPG], the same level as the 
amount requested in the budget within the ``State and Local 
Programs'' account and $10,680,000 above the fiscal year 2011 
level. EMPG is an essential source of funding for State and 
local emergency management.
    The Committee directs FEMA to retain EMPG as a separate 
grant program, and not to combine its funding with any other 
grant allocation or application process. Not to exceed 3 
percent of grant funds shall be for administrative expenses.

              RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PROGRAM

Appropriations, 2011\1\.................................      ($265,000)
Budget estimate, 2012\1\................................       (896,000)
House allowance\1\......................................       (896,000)
Committee recommendation\1\.............................       (896,000)

\1\Fee collections are estimated to exceed costs.

    The Radiological Emergency Preparedness [REP] program 
assists State and local governments in the development of off-
site radiological emergency preparedness plans within the 
emergency planning zones of commercial nuclear power facilities 
licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission [NRC]. The fund 
is financed from fees assessed and collected from the NRC 
licensees to recover the amounts anticipated to be obligated in 
the next fiscal year for expenses related to REP program 
activities.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee provides for the receipt and expenditure of 
fees collected, as authorized by Public Law 105-276. The budget 
estimates fee collections to exceed expenditures by $896,000 in 
fiscal year 2012.
    The Committee notes that the events surrounding the Great 
East Japan Earthquake in March 2011, especially with regard to 
the effect on the nuclear power plant, serve as a reminder that 
scenarios should be regularly reviewed and exercises should 
comport with the most up-to-date information about potential 
impacts. FEMA is directed to brief the Committees, no later 
than 30 days after the date of enactment of this act, on the 
process it undertakes to ensure information about the impact of 
a disaster is regularly reviewed and exercises are updated to 
account for possible consequences.

                   UNITED STATES FIRE ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2011....................................     $45,497,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................      42,538,000
House allowance.........................................      42,538,000
Committee recommendation................................      45,038,000

    The mission of the United States Fire Administration [USFA] 
is to reduce losses, both economic and human, due to fire and 
other emergencies through training, research, coordination and 
support. USFA also prepares the Nation's first responder and 
healthcare leaders through ongoing, and when necessary, 
expedited training regarding how to evaluate and minimize 
community risk, improve protection to critical infrastructure, 
and be better prepared to react to all hazard and terrorism 
emergencies.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $45,038,000 for the USFA, which is 
$459,000 below the fiscal year 2011 level and $2,500,000 above 
the request.

                          DISASTER RELIEF FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2011....................................  $2,644,700,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................   1,800,000,000
House allowance\1\......................................   2,650,000,000
Committee recommendation\2\.............................   6,000,000,000

\1\In addition, $1,000,000,000 of emergency spending is included for 
Disaster Relief in title VI.
\2\Includes $4,200,000,000 designated by Congress as disaster relief 
pursuant to Public Law 112-25.

    Through the Disaster Relief Fund [DRF], the Department 
provides a significant portion of the total Federal response to 
victims in presidentially declared major disasters and 
emergencies. Major disasters are declared when a State requests 
Federal assistance and proves that a given disaster is beyond 
the local and State capacity to respond. Under the DRF, FEMA 
will continue to operate the primary assistance programs, 
including Federal assistance to individuals and households; and 
public assistance, which includes the repair and reconstruction 
of State, local, and nonprofit infrastructure. The post-
disaster hazard mitigation set-aside to States, as part of the 
DRF, works as a companion piece to the National Predisaster 
Mitigation Fund.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,800,000,000 for disaster 
relief, the same amount as the budget request. The Committee 
remains frustrated that the Office of Management and Budget 
refuses to be forthcoming and transparent regarding estimates 
for the Disaster Relief Fund. Lack of information and a clear 
strategy to pay for disasters has forced the Disaster Relief 
Fund to a level of funding so low that new recovery projects 
were put on hold for 6 months in 2010 and have been put on hold 
again in August of 2011. In an attempt to avoid stopping 
recovery projects in fiscal year 2011, the Department of 
Homeland Security base budget was cut to pay for a predicted 
shortfall in the Disaster Relief Fund. This funding shift came 
at the expense of State and local preparedness grants. It makes 
no sense to cut funding for programs that prepare for future 
events to fund past disasters. The Committee also includes bill 
language requiring an expenditure plan and quarterly reports 
for disaster readiness and support costs; and a monthly report 
and a quarterly report on the disaster relief expenditures. 
Additionally, the Committee recommends bill language 
transferring $16,000,000 to the Department of Homeland Security 
Office of Inspector General for audits and investigations.
    In addition, pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(D) of the 
Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 
(Public Law 99-177), as amended, $4,200,000,000 is designated 
as disaster relief. This additional funding will begin to 
address the shortfall in fiscal year 2012 for natural disasters 
in all 50 States. The Committee expects FEMA to regularly 
update its estimates of the shortfall. Most of this funding is 
for catastrophic disasters such as Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, 
Gustav, and Ike, the Mississippi River floods of 2008 and 2011, 
the Tennessee flood of 2010, the recent tornadoes, flooding in 
the Upper Midwest, and Hurricane Irene.
    The Committee is concerned that the slow and cumbersome 
pace of public assistance project awards is delaying recovery 
in areas that need it most. FEMA is directed to expedite public 
assistance projects for past disasters, especially those 
related to catastrophic events.
    The Administrator of FEMA shall respond to the State of 
Louisiana's request of April 29, 2011, for recalculation of 
assistance available under section 404 of the Stafford Act 
within 30 days of the date of enactment of this act.
    The Committee recognizes that mitigation projects, 
particularly those related to home buyouts, are often complex 
and involve many layers of government and their governing laws 
and practices. Nonetheless, the Committee is frustrated with 
the extraordinary length of time it sometimes takes to make a 
final decision on allowable mitigation projects, which causes a 
delay in important mitigation work. This is particularly 
egregious in regard to homeowners who may find themselves 
without a decision on the purchase of a flooded home under the 
program even 3 years or more after a flood. FEMA is directed to 
report to the Committee no later than 60 days after the date of 
enactment of this act on methods to expedite decisionmaking 
regarding mitigation projects among all levels of government, 
including revisions to FEMA practices and guidance that may be 
issued to State and local governments.
    The Committee urges the Administrator to reimburse 
verifiable costs incurred for mitigation work performed by 
homeowners under section 404 of the Stafford Act, including 
costs incurred by homeowners that did not receive timely and 
accurate information regarding reasonable cost guidelines for 
otherwise eligible mitigation work that exceeds amounts 
specified in the prevailing Unit Cost Guidance.

            DISASTER ASSISTANCE DIRECT LOAN PROGRAM ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2011....................................        $294,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................         295,000
House allowance.........................................         296,000
Committee recommendation................................         295,000

    Disaster assistance loans authorized by the Robert T. 
Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 
U.S.C. 5162) are loans to States for the non-Federal portion of 
cost sharing funds, and community disaster loans to local 
governments incurring a substantial loss of tax and other 
revenues as a result of a major disaster. The funds requested 
for this program include direct loans and a subsidy based on 
criteria including loan amount and interest charged. As 
required by the Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990 (2 U.S.C. 661 
et seq.), this account records, for this program, the subsidy 
costs associated with the direct loans obligated in 1992 and 
beyond (including modifications of direct loans), as well as 
administrative expenses of the program. The subsidy amounts are 
estimated on a present value basis; the administrative expenses 
are estimated on a cash basis.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $295,000, as proposed in the 
budget, in subsidy costs for disaster assistance direct loans.
    Bill language is included directing the gross obligations 
for the principal amount of direct loans to not exceed 
$25,000,000.

               FLOOD HAZARD MAPPING AND RISK ANALYSIS\1\

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $181,636,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................     102,712,000
House allowance.........................................     102,712,000
Committee recommendation................................      92,712,000

\1\Formerly called the Flood Map Modernization Fund.

    This appropriation supports the functions necessary to 
develop, and keep current, flood risk information and flood 
maps. The flood maps are used to determine appropriate risk-
based premium rates for the National Flood Insurance Program, 
to complete flood hazard determinations required of the 
Nation's lending institutions, and to develop appropriate 
disaster response plans for Federal, State, and local emergency 
management personnel.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $92,712,000 for Flood Hazard 
Mapping and Risk Analysis, $10,000,000 below the budget request 
and $88,924,000 below the fiscal year 2011 level.
    Updating our Nation's Flood Insurance Rate Maps and 
certifying the safety of our levees is an important task, and 
the Committee supports efforts to provide better information to 
residents about flood risk in their communities. The Committee 
urges FEMA to continue to work with the United States Army 
Corps of Engineers [USACE] to ensure the accuracy of the maps, 
coordinate outreach to local stakeholders throughout this 
process, and better coordinate answers to questions about flood 
mapping, flood insurance, and flood control infrastructure 
projects. In a recent report (GAO-11-689R) GAO found that FEMA 
and USACE have indicated that they do not have the information 
system capability to fully complete the reporting requirements 
included in Senate Report 111-118 accompanying the fiscal year 
2010 Supplemental Disaster Relief and Summer Jobs Act, 
including providing GAO with the relevant information needed to 
review the agencies timely response to communities involving 
water control infrastructure. In the report, GAO recommends 
alternatives to ensure FEMA fulfills the reporting requirement 
without incurring the purported expenses claimed by the 
agencies. FEMA, in conjunction with the Corps, is directed to 
brief the Committee within 30 days of the date of enactment of 
this act on the alternatives that are most feasible to ensure 
completion of the report and to provide the report to the 
Committee and to the GAO within 90 days.
    The Committee is pleased that FEMA has offered communities 
the option to request review of pending flood maps by 
Scientific Resolution Panels comprised of independent experts 
and encourages the continuation of this adjudicative option. 
The Committee also commends FEMA for improving the accuracy of 
its flood risk analysis by modifying mapping procedures to 
account for all levees within a community, including those 
which offer varying degrees of protection, on newly developed 
Flood Insurance Risk Maps.
    FEMA is directed to convene a joint task force with USACE 
to better align NFIP levee accreditation requirements with 
levee inspections performed by or for USACE such that 
information and data collected for either purpose can be used 
interchangeably to the maximum extent practicable toward 
satisfying levee accreditation requirements. FEMA shall provide 
a report to the Committee on the progress of this task force 
within 6 months after the date of enactment of this act.

                     NATIONAL FLOOD INSURANCE FUND

Appropriations, 2011\1\.................................  ($169,000,000)
Budget estimate, 2012\1\................................   (171,000,000)
House allowance\1\......................................   (171,000,000)
Committee recommendation\1\.............................   (171,000,000)

\1\Fully offset by fee collections.

    The National Flood Insurance Fund is a fee-generated fund 
which provides funding for the National Flood Insurance 
Program. This program enables property owners to purchase flood 
insurance otherwise unavailable in the commercial market. The 
National Flood Insurance Act of 1968 authorizes the Federal 
Government to provide flood insurance on a national basis. This 
insurance is available to communities which enact and enforce 
appropriate floodplain management measures and covers virtually 
all types of buildings and their contents up to $350,000 for 
residential types and $1,000,000 for all other types.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $171,000,000, as proposed in the 
budget, for the National Flood Insurance Fund, of which 
$40,000,000 is for expenses under section 1366 of the National 
Flood Insurance Act (42 U.S.C. 4104c) to provide assistance 
planning to States and communities for implementing floodplain 
management measures to reduce or eliminate the long-term risk 
of flood damage to buildings and other structures eligible for 
insurance under the National Flood Insurance Program.
    The Committee does not recommend elimination of funding for 
the Severe Repetitive Loss Program, as proposed in the budget. 
Instead, FEMA is directed to streamline the process and 
eligibility requirements for the program to ensure its most 
effective use to prevent loss of property and save disaster 
relief resources. FEMA is directed to brief the Committee on 
the implementation of the improved process within 60 days after 
the date of enactment of this act.

                  NATIONAL PREDISASTER MITIGATION FUND

Appropriations, 2011....................................     $49,900,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................      84,937,000
House allowance.........................................      40,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      42,500,000

    The National Predisaster Mitigation [PDM] Fund provides 
grants to States, communities, territories, and Indian tribal 
governments for hazard mitigation planning and implementing 
mitigation projects prior to a disaster event. PDM grants are 
awarded on a competitive basis. This program operates 
independent of the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program, funded 
through the Disaster Relief Fund, which provides grants to a 
State in which a disaster has been declared.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $42,500,000 for PDM, $42,437,000 
below the request and $7,400,000 below the fiscal year 2011 
level. The Committee continues to support predisaster 
mitigation, and recognizes the importance of coordinating 
predisaster mitigation projects with projects being completed 
through the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program.
    The Committee recommendation includes language in the bill 
that provides that up to $3,000,000 of the funds may be made 
available for administrative purposes.

                       EMERGENCY FOOD AND SHELTER

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $119,760,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................     100,000,000
House allowance.........................................     120,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     120,000,000

    This appropriation funds grants to nonprofit and faith-
based organizations at the local level to supplement their 
programs for emergency food and shelter to provide for the 
immediate needs of the homeless.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $120,000,000 for Emergency Food 
and Shelter, which is $20,000,000 above the budget request 
level and $240,000 above the fiscal year 2011 level. The 
Committee continues to support the Emergency Food and Shelter 
Program, and recognizes it as one program, in conjunction with 
other Federal programs, that serves those in immediate need of 
food and shelter assistance.

                                TITLE IV

            RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, TRAINING, AND SERVICES

           United States Citizenship and Immigration Services

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $146,300,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................     369,477,000
House allowance.........................................     132,361,000
Committee recommendation................................     120,924,000

    United States Citizenship and Immigration Services [USCIS] 
funds expenses necessary for the administration of laws and the 
provision of services related to people seeking to enter, 
reside, work, and naturalize in the United States. In addition 
to directly appropriated resources, fee collections are 
available for the operations of USCIS.
    Immigration Examinations Fees.--USCIS collects fees from 
persons applying for immigration benefits to support the 
adjudication of applications, as authorized by the Immigration 
and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1356).
    H1-B and L Fraud Prevention and Detection Fees.--USCIS 
collects fees from petitioners seeking a beneficiary's initial 
grant of H1-B or L nonimmigrant classification or those 
petitioners seeking to change a beneficiary's employer within 
those classifications (Public Law 108-447).
    H1-B Nonimmigrant Petitioner Fees.--USCIS collects fees 
from petitioners using the H1-B program (Public Law 108-447).

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends total resources of $2,891,650,000, 
including direct appropriations of $120,924,000 and estimated 
fee collections of $2,770,726,000.
    The Committee recommends no funding for the acquisition 
workforce initiative, instead of $1,467,000 as requested in the 
budget. However, the Committee encourages USCIS to use existing 
appropriations and fee authority to hire and train qualified 
procurement personnel.

                                E-VERIFY

    The Committee recommends $102,424,000 for the E-verify 
program, as requested. The Committee supports E-Verify and the 
effort the Department is performing to improve E-Verify's 
ability to automatically verify those who are work authorized, 
detect identity fraud, and detect system misuse and 
discrimination. E-Verify is both a tool for employers committed 
to maintaining a legal workforce and a deterrent to illegal 
immigration. The Committee notes progress continues to be made 
on reducing the mismatch rate.
    The growth in E-Verify use by employers has significantly 
increased from fewer than 25,000 employers in fiscal year 2007 
to more than 250,000 employers in fiscal year 2011. The May 26, 
2011, Supreme Court decision regarding the constitutionality of 
States' mandating use of E-Verify likely will result in 
continued use of this system in maintaining a legal workforce. 
The Committee directs the Director of USCIS to provide a report 
not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this act 
identifying the costs of expanding the use of E-Verify.
    The Committee urges USCIS to continue to work to enhance 
the system to further improve performance, to continue its 
public outreach and education campaign, and to perform a new, 
independent evaluation of the system during the first quarter 
of fiscal year 2012. The Committee further expects USCIS to 
commit additional resources to compliance enforcement.

                        ASYLUM AND REFUGEE FEES

    The budget proposes $203,400,000 in direct appropriations 
to cover the costs associated with processing asylum and 
refugee applications. The Committee notes that section 286(m) 
of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1356(m)) 
provides the Department with broad discretion on how fees 
collected may be used. Specifically, it states that immigration 
examination fees ``may be set at a level that will ensure 
recovery of the full costs of providing all such services, 
including the costs of similar services provided without charge 
to asylum applicants or other immigrants. Such fees may also be 
set at a level that will recover any additional costs 
associated with the administration of the fees collected.''
    The Committee recommends no appropriated funds for asylum 
and refugee services or the systematic alien verification for 
entitlements program. The Committee notes that Congress is 
unable to use appropriated dollars to fund these programs in 
this time of reduced appropriations and a need to prioritize 
limited discretionary dollars. The Committee expects USCIS to 
immediately revise its fee schedule to accommodate the costs of 
these programs--as was done for approximately 20 years until 
November 23, 2010. The Committee urges USCIS to further revise 
its fees in recognition of the reality that no additional 
appropriations will be available to cover the costs of these 
activities. The Committee further directs the Department to 
submit a reprogramming within 30 days after the date of 
enactment of this act, to reflect the continuation of these 
activities as fee-funded. The Committee notes that funding for 
military naturalization activities has been requested in the 
Department of Defense [DOD] budget and expects that any issues 
related to Department of Defense authority to pay for such 
activities will be resolved in the authorization process. No 
funding is provided to USCIS for this purpose. The Committee 
also notes that approximately $91,000,000 in the H and L Fund 
for fraud investigations was carried over into fiscal year 2011 
and are available to be used for these and other purposes.
    To the extent required, the Committee urges USCIS and DOD 
to enter into a memorandum of understanding that all future 
costs of military naturalizations will be borne by DOD.

                         IMMIGRANT INTEGRATION

    The Committee recommends $8,000,000 for immigrant 
integration grants, $3,000,000 below the level provided in 
fiscal year 2011 and $11,749,000 below the level requested in 
the budget. The Committee believes it is important to assist 
individuals following the law and working to become citizens. 
However, the Committee directs that no appropriations be used 
to operate the Office of Citizenship Services and that its 
operation continue to be fee-funded. Additionally, the 
Committee is concerned that costs to administer the grant 
program currently may exceed 11 percent of the grant award 
total and directs that no more than 5 percent of the 
appropriated grant funds be used to administer the program in 
fiscal year 2012.

                         DATA CENTER MIGRATION

    The Committee recommends $10,500,000, for data center 
migration activities, a reduction of $2,000,000 below the 
request.

                       NATURALIZATION CEREMONIES

    The Committee encourages USCIS to work with local public 
and private groups to schedule naturalization and oath of 
allegiance ceremonies as part of Flag Day, Independence Day, 
and Constitution Day celebrations.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The following table, which includes appropriations and 
estimated fee collections, summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                       UNITED STATES CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION SERVICES--PROGRAM SUMMARY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2011  Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Appropriations:
    E-Verify..............................................           103,193           102,424           102,424
    Data Center consolidation.............................             2,157            12,500            10,500
    Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlements [SAVE].  ................            29,937  ................
    Immigrant Integration Programs........................            11,000            19,749             8,000
    REAL ID Act implementation............................  ................  ................  ................
    Asylum and refugee services...........................            29,950           203,400  ................
    Acquisition workforce.................................  ................             1,467  ................
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Appropriations...............................           146,300           369,477           120,924
                                                           =====================================================
Fee collections:
    Adjudication services (fee account):
        District operations...............................         1,169,135         1,157,137         1,157,137
        Service Center operations.........................           508,281           519,518           519,518
        Asylum, Refugee and international operations......            62,630            88,364           291,764
        Records operations................................           102,471           103,902           103,902
        Business transformation...........................           164,025           234,400           234,400
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Adjudication services.................         2,006,542         2,103,321         2,306,721
                                                           =====================================================
    Information and customer services (fee account):                  83,501            85,773            85,773
     Information and customer services....................
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
    Administration (fee account):
        Administration....................................           336,514           348,295           348,295
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
    SAVE, (fee account)...................................  ................  ................            29,937
                                                           =====================================================
      Total, fee collections..............................         2,426,557         2,537,389         2,770,726
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                Federal Law Enforcement Training Center


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2011\1\.................................    $235,447,000
Budget estimate, 2012\2\................................     238,957,000
House allowance\2\......................................     238,957,000
Committee recommendation\2\.............................     238,957,000

\1\Includes $1,306,000 for Federal Law Enforcement Accreditation.
\2\Includes $1,304,000 for Federal Law Enforcement Accreditation.

    The Federal Law Enforcement Training Center Salaries and 
Expenses appropriation provides funds for basic and some 
advanced training to Federal law enforcement personnel from 
more than 80 agencies. This account also allows for research of 
new training methodologies; provides for training to certain 
State, local, and foreign law enforcement personnel on a space-
available basis; and accreditation of Federal law enforcement 
training programs.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $238,957,000 for salaries and 
expenses of the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center [FLETC] 
for fiscal year 2012. Within the funds provided is $29,716,000 
for Management and Administration and $1,304,000 for the 
Federal Law Enforcement Training Accreditation Board.
    The Committee includes bill language requiring the Director 
of FLETC to ensure all training centers are operated at the 
highest capacity feasible throughout the fiscal year. The 
Committee also expects the Director to maintain training at or 
near capacity before entering into new leases with private 
contractors or establishing new partner organizations.

                           INTEGRITY TRAINING

    The Federal Government has experienced a significant 
increase in law enforcement officer hiring in the years since 
the tragic attacks on September 11, 2001. The Committee 
believes it is critical that all Federal law enforcement 
personnel, especially new hires, receive comprehensive training 
in ethics and public integrity. The Committee notes that 
Federal law enforcement personnel receive ethics training as 
part of their basic training at FLETC and expects that all 
newly hired Federal law enforcement officers will receive such 
training wherever they are trained.

                             ACCREDITATION

    The Federal Law Enforcement Training Accreditation [FLETA] 
process sets the standards for Federal law enforcement 
training. The accreditation of a Federal law enforcement 
academy or program provides assurance that the academy 
voluntarily submitted to a process of self-regulation; and, 
that they have successfully achieved compliance with a set of 
standards that have been collectively established by their 
peers within their professional community that demonstrate 
adherence to quality, effectiveness, and integrity. The focus 
of the effort is to accredit Federal academies; entry-level and 
advanced or specialized training programs; instructor training; 
and other programs that affect multiple Federal, State, and 
local law enforcement officers. The Committee recommends 
$1,304,000 for the FLETA Board. FLETA should lead the Federal 
law enforcement training accreditation process to continue the 
implementation of measuring and assessing the quality and 
effectiveness of Federal law enforcement training programs, 
facilities, and instructors.

     ACQUISITIONS, CONSTRUCTION, IMPROVEMENTS, AND RELATED EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2011....................................     $35,385,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................      37,456,000
House allowance.........................................      35,456,000
Committee recommendation................................      33,456,000

    This account provides for the acquisition and related costs 
for expansion and maintenance of facilities of the Federal Law 
Enforcement Training Center [FLETC]. This includes construction 
and maintenance of facilities and environmental compliance. The 
environmental compliance funds ensure compliance with 
Environmental Protection Agency and State environmental laws 
and regulations.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $33,456,000, $4,000,000 below the 
President's request and $1,929,000 below the fiscal year 2011 
amount, for acquisition, construction, improvements, and 
related expenses for expansion and maintenance of FLETC 
facilities requested in the budget.

                         Science and Technology


                                SUMMARY

    The mission of Science and Technology [S&T] is to conduct, 
stimulate, and enable homeland security research, development, 
testing, and to facilitate the timely transition of 
capabilities to Federal, State, local, and tribal end-users.

                     MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $140,918,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................     149,365,000
House allowance.........................................     140,565,000
Committee recommendation................................     143,000,000

    The Management and Administration account funds salaries 
and expenses related to the Office of the Under Secretary for 
Science and Technology, and headquarters.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $143,000,000 for management and 
administration of programs and activities carried out by S&T. 
Of this amount, the Committee recommends not to exceed $10,000 
for official reception and representation expenses.
    The recommended amount is $6,365,000 below the budget 
request and $2,082,000 above the fiscal year 2011 level. The 
recommendation does not include funding for data center 
migration, however the Department is encouraged to resubmit the 
request with the fiscal year 2013 budget.

           RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, ACQUISITION, AND OPERATIONS

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $686,659,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................   1,027,067,000
House allowance.........................................     398,213,000
Committee recommendation................................     657,000,000

    Science and Technology [S&T] supports the mission of DHS 
through basic and applied research, fabrication of prototypes, 
research and development to mitigate the effects of weapons of 
mass destruction, as well as acquiring and field testing 
equipment.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $657,000,000, for research, 
development, acquisition, and operations of S&T. The 
recommended amount is $370,067,000 below the request and 
$29,659,000 below the fiscal year 2011 level.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                    SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY-RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, ACQUISITION, AND OPERATIONS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Fiscal year 2011   Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                                enacted        budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Borders and Maritime Security............................            32,167  .................  ................
Chemical and Biological..................................           166,577  .................  ................
Command, Control, and Interoperability...................            68,593  .................  ................
Explosives...............................................           111,813  .................  ................
Human Factors............................................            11,458  .................  ................
Infrastructure and Geophysical...........................            25,056  .................  ................
Innovation...............................................            31,330  .................  ................
Test and Evaluation, Standards...........................            18,130  .................  ................
Transition...............................................            41,645  .................  ................
Research, Development, and Innovation....................  ................           659,850            439,783
RD&I: Apex R&D...........................................  ................           [17,900]  ................
RD&I: Border Security....................................  ................           [42,965]  ................
RD&I: Chem/Bio/Radiological/Nuclear/Explosives Defense...  ................          [342,462]  ................
RD&I: Counter Terrorist R&D..............................  ................           [26,707]  ................
RD&I: Cyber Security.....................................  ................           [64,102]  ................
RD&I: Disaster Resilience................................  ................          [165,714]  ................
Acquisition and Operations Support.......................  ................            54,154             54,154
Laboratory Facilities (operations and construction)......           140,000           276,500            126,500
University Programs......................................            39,890            36,563             36,563
                                                          ------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Research, Development, Acquisition and                 686,659         1,027,067            657,000
       Operations........................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                            BUDGET STRUCTURE

    The President's request includes a new budget account 
structure for the Research, Development, Acquisition and 
Operations appropriation. This new structure proposes to 
reorganize 12 PPAs focused on various research areas into four 
new PPAs and moves the vast majority of S&T's research programs 
into one PPA called ``Research, Development, and Innovation 
[RD&I]''. The Committee does not support the consolidation of 
all research areas into one account, as it reduces transparency 
and accountability of S&T's primary research funding. 
Therefore, the Committee slightly modifies the requested budget 
structure by including the six research areas identified in the 
budget request as PPAs under RD&I: Apex Research and 
Development [R&D]; Border Security; Chemical, Biological, 
Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives Defense; Counter 
Terrorist R&D; Cyber Security; and Disaster Resilience. Due to 
the reduction below the request, the recommendation does not 
allocate resources between the RD&I PPAs. However, S&T is to 
provide a PPA distribution to the Committee for RD&I no later 
than 30 days after the date of enactment of this act.

                         REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

    S&T is directed to continue to provide the following:
  --quarterly briefings to the Committee on the test and 
        evaluation status of all level 1 acquisitions;
  --a report on results of its research and development for the 
        prior fiscal year; and
  --a report on the amounts de-obligated from projects during 
        the prior fiscal year and what projects those funds 
        were subsequently obligated to.
    The reports listed above are to be submitted in conjunction 
with the fiscal year 2013 President's budget request. Further, 
the report on the results of research and development should 
detail all technologies, technology improvements, or 
capabilities delivered to front line users, and if the 
technology or capability was the result of a project reviewed 
and prioritized by the Integrated Product Team process.
    The Committee is aware of several S&T efforts underway to 
ensure that technology solutions being developed have realistic 
objectives, support the Department's missions, and can be 
transitioned to the end user for operational use. No later than 
120 days after the enactment of this act, S&T is to brief the 
Committee on its progress in implementing its new strategic 
initiatives, including:
  --transition to use (moving new technologies from concept to 
        practical application);
  --improving private sector partnerships;
  --technology foraging;
  --acquisition support for DHS components;
  --support of the First Responder Community; and
  --addressing high-priority ``urgent'' problems identified by 
        component heads--known as Apex R&D Projects.

                                APEX R&D

    The Committee notes that S&T is embarking on a new program 
called Apex, which is focused on high-priority and high-value 
projects needed in a short turn-around for DHS components. 
Unlike other S&T research initiatives, Apex projects are 
collaborative efforts between DHS component heads and the Under 
Secretary of S&T. In fiscal year 2012, S&T plans to focus its 
Apex funding on the Secret Service to provide technology 
solutions for its protective mission. S&T began an operational 
analysis of the Service's protective mission technology in 
fiscal year 2011, which will form the basis of the Apex 
program's focus in fiscal year 2012. The Committee is 
supportive of the Apex concept, especially since it is focused 
on expediting technology solutions to the field. S&T and the 
Secret Service are to brief the Committee no later than 60 days 
after the date of enactment of this act and periodically 
thereafter on progress made to field improved technologies for 
the Service's protective mission, including a schedule for 
evaluation and testing of technical solutions in relevant 
operational environments.

                          DISASTER RESILIENCE

    The Committee notes that, within the last decade, record-
breaking hurricanes, tornadoes, and floods have devastated the 
Southeast Region of the United States. These events have cost 
our Nation thousands of lives and billions of dollars. This 
region also has the potential for a significant earthquake. 
Therefore, the Committee encourages S&T to continue 
competitively awarded work with appropriate universities and 
existing Federal research centers to address these unique 
challenges.

                             CYBERSECURITY

    The Committee believes that sophisticated cyber attacks, 
such as those launched against Estonia, Georgia, and elsewhere 
around the world, could have devastating consequences if such 
attacks targeted America's economic power. Disrupting U.S. 
financial services could result in a renewed global economic 
downturn based on perceived insecurities in the electronic 
infrastructure relied upon for market transactions. Within the 
amount provided for RD&I, the Committee encourages S&T to 
robustly fund cyber security research and development, 
including programs that will assist the U.S. financial industry 
in preparing for and defending against cyber attacks.

           FIRST RESPONDER COMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT STANDARDS

    S&T, in conjunction with the Director of the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology, shall continue assessing 
the compliance of first responder communication equipment with 
common standards for digital public safety radio communications 
(Project 25 standards).

                       TEST AND EVALUATION [T&E]

    Within the amount provided for ``Acquisition, Operations 
and Support'', no less than $6,641,000 shall be for S&T to 
establish policies and procedures for and coordinate and 
monitor the T&E activities across the DHS acquisition 
framework. Testing and evaluation of new technologies prior to 
their acquisition and deployment will, in the long-run, save 
money through the prevention of wasteful spending.

                         LABORATORY FACILITIES

    The Committee recommendation includes $126,500,000 for 
Laboratory Facilities, $150,000,000 below the amount requested 
and $13,500,000 below fiscal year 2011. The recommendation 
includes $108,300,000 for laboratory operations and $18,200,000 
for infrastructure improvements at the Transportation Security 
Laboratory, as requested.
    The recommendation does not include $150,000,000 in 
construction costs for the National Bio and Agro-Defense 
Facility [NBAF]. The Committee recognizes the need for a next-
generation biological and agricultural defense facility to 
protect the country's agriculture and public health. As 
mandated by Public Law 112-10, the Department is in the process 
of updating its Site Specific Risk Assessment [SSRA] for the 
NBAF site, which will be reviewed by NAS. The Department 
estimates completion of the SSRA by January 2012 and completion 
of the NAS evaluation by June 2012. Until these important 
assessments are completed, it is pre-mature to recommend 
construction funding for this project. The Committee is also 
concerned that the $150,000,000 is not a useable construction 
segment for the NBAF project. The Committee directs S&T to 
provide an updated cost schedule coupled with useable and 
realistic funding segments no later than 30 days after the date 
of enactment of this act.

                        RADIOLOGICAL AND NUCLEAR

    The Committee recommendation approves the transfer of the 
Radiological and Nuclear research program from the Domestic 
Nuclear Detection Office. The amount dedicated to this program 
shall be determined by S&T and submitted with it's RD&I PPA 
allocation to the Committee. The Committee strongly endorses 
the consolidation of this research into S&T, and directs S&T to 
conduct an independent review of all of the current research 
projects within this area and the state of technology 
development across the private sector before determining the 
research priorities for fiscal year 2012.

                          UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommendation includes $36,563,000 for 
University Programs, as requested.

                   Domestic Nuclear Detection Office


                                SUMMARY

    The Domestic Nuclear Detection Office [DNDO] is responsible 
for development of technologies to detect and report attempts 
to import, possess, store, develop, or transport nuclear and 
radiological material.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $268,000,000 for activities of 
DNDO for fiscal year 2012. The recommendation is a decrease of 
$73,744,000 below the fiscal year 2011 level and a decrease of 
$63,739,000 below the level proposed in the budget request.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                                        DOMESTIC NUCLEAR DETECTION OFFICE
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2011  Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Management and Administration.............................            36,918            41,120            37,000
Research, Development, and Operations.....................           274,886           206,258           191,000
Systems Acquisition.......................................            29,940            84,361            40,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Domestic Nuclear Detection Office............           341,744           331,739           268,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                     MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2011....................................     $36,918,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................      41,120,000
House allowance.........................................      40,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      37,000,000

    The Management and Administration account funds salaries, 
benefits, and expenses for DNDO.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommendation includes $37,000,000 for 
Management and Administration. The recommendation is an 
increase of $82,000 above the fiscal year 2011 level and 
$4,120,000 below the level proposed in the budget request. Of 
this amount the Committee recommends not to exceed $3,000 for 
official reception and representation expenses.

                     STRATEGIC PLAN OF INVESTMENTS

    The Committee includes bill language requiring DNDO to 
establish a strategic plan of investments necessary to 
implement the Department's responsibilities under the domestic 
component of the global nuclear detection architecture. The 
plan is to:
  --identify the various elements of the domestic architecture, 
        the roles and responsibilities of each Departmental 
        entity;
  --investments being made in fiscal years 2012 and 2013 to 
        secure pathways into the United States (sea, land, and 
        air);
  --investments necessary to close known vulnerabilities and 
        gaps, including associated costs and timeframes, and 
        estimates of feasibility and cost effectiveness; and
  -- how R&D funding is furthering the implementation of the 
        domestic architecture.
    While the strategic plan of investments is to cover the 
Department's implementation responsibilities, it shall include 
a section on DNDO's focus on surge capabilities and the ability 
of Federal, State, and local level assets to be mobilized 
together to respond to suspected radiological threats.

                 RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND OPERATIONS

Appropriations, 2011....................................    $274,886,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................     206,258,000
House allowance.........................................     245,194,000
Committee recommendation................................     191,000,000

    The Research, Development and Operations account funds the 
development of nuclear detection systems and the integration 
and advancement of national nuclear forensics capabilities.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommendation includes $191,000,000 for 
Research, Development and Operations. The recommendation is a 
decrease of $83,866,000 below the fiscal year 2011 level and 
$15,258,000 below the level proposed in the budget request. The 
recommendation includes the transfer of the transformational 
research and development program to the Science and Technology 
Directorate.
    Even with the transfer of long-term Radiological and 
Nuclear R&D to the Science and Technology Directorate, the 
Committee notes that the request for DNDO includes $104,256,000 
in other R&D activities in fiscal year 2012. Given the 
constrained fiscal environment, the Committee directs the 
Department to evaluate whether it would be appropriate to 
consolidate DNDO's ``Systems Development'' and ``Test and 
Evaluation Infrastructure and Operations'' activities within 
the Science and Technology Directorate, the primary DHS 
research component. The Committee sees potential savings and 
efficiencies through the elimination of unnecessary overhead 
and consolidation of redundant programs that may exist between 
the two organizations. In addition, the evaluation should 
consider providing the acquisition dollars both for radiation 
portal monitors and human portable radiation detection systems 
directly to the operational components that operate them. 
DNDO's primary DHS customers (U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection, Coast Guard, and Transportation Security 
Administration) have well established and mature acquisition 
programs. It makes little sense to have another acquisition 
structure requiring administrative overhead simply to segregate 
the procurement of radiation detection equipment from all other 
acquisitions. The results of this evaluation shall be provided 
to the Committee no later than 120 days after the date of 
enactment of this act.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                                      RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND OPERATIONS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2011  Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Systems Engineering and Architecture......................            33,195            31,858            31,230
Systems Development.......................................            52,851            69,689            60,000
Transformational Research and Development.................            96,326  ................  ................
Assessments...............................................            38,139            43,104            40,000
Operations Support........................................            32,756            36,837            35,000
National Technical Nuclear Forensics Center...............            21,619            24,770            24,770
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Research, Development, and Operations........           274,886           206,258           191,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          QUARTERLY BRIEFINGS

    The Committee believes DNDO must aggressively pursue its 
preventive radiation/nuclear detection mission, and go beyond 
addressing the potential threat posed by the use of cargo 
containers to transport nuclear or radioactive materials or 
weapons. It is critical that DNDO prioritize its efforts based 
on risk and with attention to pathways such as general 
aviation, the maritime domain, land border threats, including 
rail, and in areas between ports of entry, and in urban areas 
and critical locations in the Nation's interior. The Committee 
is aware of several ongoing DNDO studies to determine 
vulnerabilities and mitigation solutions in these areas and 
therefore directs DNDO to continue quarterly briefings on 
progress in developing technological solutions; the status of 
such technologies, including their strengths and weaknesses; 
and timetables to develop and deploy them. Specific programs to 
be covered include the State and Local Rad/Nuc challenge, human 
portable tripwire program, cargo imaging for shielded nuclear 
threats, long-range radiation detection, rail cargo scanning 
for international rail, small vessel standoff detection 
program, and air cargo scanning. The briefings shall include 
results from test and evaluation assessments, where applicable.
    The Committee also directs DNDO to continue quarterly 
briefings on developments of red team exercises and assessments 
and progress in developing alternatives to existing detection 
materials and systems, in particular progress in finding 
alternatives to neutron detectors based on Helium-3.

                          TEST AND EVALUATION

    The Committee applauds DNDO's objective to minimize 
internal ``end-to-end'' development efforts and rely more 
heavily on the private sector to develop new technologies and 
improve existing systems. However, to successfully carry out 
this new focus, a strong test and evaluation process is 
necessary to ensure external solutions meet Federal standards. 
Thorough testing and evaluation of new technologies prior to 
their acquisition and deployment is also essential to prevent 
wasteful and unnecessary spending. Therefore, the Committee 
fully funds the request for Test and Evaluation Infrastructure 
and Operations.
    The Committee encourages DNDO to test new radiation 
detection technologies that the commercial sector may offer, 
such as those that have the potential to detect shielded and 
unshielded nuclear materials like advanced radiography and muon 
tomography.

                          SYSTEMS ACQUISITION

Appropriations, 2011....................................     $29,940,000
Budget estimate, 2012...................................      84,361,000
House allowance.........................................      52,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      40,000,000

    The Systems Acquisition account funds the acquisition of 
equipment for front line users across the Department.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommendation includes $40,000,000 for 
Systems Acquisition. The recommendation is an increase of 
$10,060,000 above the fiscal year 2011 level and a decrease of 
$44,361,000 below the level proposed in the budget request.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2011 and budget 
request levels:

                                               SYSTEMS ACQUISITION
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2011  Fiscal year 2012      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Radiation Portal Monitor Program..........................  ................            37,361             8,000
Securing the Cities.......................................            19,940            27,000            22,000
Human Portable Radiation Detection Devices................            10,000            20,000            10,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Systems Acquisition..........................            29,940            84,361            40,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       RADIATION PORTAL MONITORS

    The Committee recommendation includes $8,000,000 for the 
Radiation Portal Monitor [RPM] program instead of the 
$37,361,000 requested. The request to procure and deploy 44 
Advanced Spectroscopic Portal [ASP] monitors is denied given 
that the Secretary has suspended all further development on 
ASP. The $8,000,000 is for DNDO to purchase and deploy legacy 
RPMs to address gaps in coverage at our seaports, land ports, 
airports, and rail entrances.

                          SECURING THE CITIES

    The Committee recommendation includes $22,000,000 for 
Securing the Cities [STC] instead of $27,000,000, as requested. 
Of this amount, $20,000,000 is to continue efforts in New York 
City, as requested and $2,000,000 to initiate the establishment 
of a STC program in another major U.S. city. Prior to 
obligating funds for a new STC and no later than 120 days after 
the date of enactment of this act, the Committee directs DNDO 
to report on its efforts to implement the recommendations made 
in the ``External Strategic Assessment'' of the STC program. 
This report shall specify DNDO's efforts to: establish a 
detailed cost analysis to understand life cycle costs; a 
Federal exit strategy and transition plan; and performance 
measures to judge the success of the program.

               HUMAN PORTABLE RADIATION DETECTION SYSTEMS

    The Committee recommendation includes $10,000,000 for the 
Human Portable Radiation Detection Systems program, the same 
level funded in fiscal year 2011.

          ADVANCED SPECTROSCOPIC PORTAL MONITORS CERTIFICATION

    Bill language is included prohibiting the Department from 
full-scale procurement of ASP monitors until the Secretary 
submits a report to the Committees on Appropriations certifying 
that a significant increase in operational effectiveness will 
be achieved. In addition, separate and distinct certifications 
shall be submitted by the Secretary prior to the procurement of 
ASPs for primary and secondary deployment that address the 
requirements for operational effectiveness of each type of 
deployment. Finally, DNDO is prohibited from engaging in high-
risk concurrent development and production of mutually 
dependent software and hardware components of detection 
systems.

                                TITLE V

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

                    (INCLUDING RESCISSIONS OF FUNDS)

    Section 501. The bill includes a provision that no part of 
any appropriation shall remain available for obligation beyond 
the current fiscal year unless expressly provided.
    Section 502. The bill includes a provision that unexpended 
balances of prior appropriations may be merged with new 
appropriations accounts and used for the same purpose, subject 
to reprogramming guidelines.
    Section 503. The bill includes a provision that provides 
authority to reprogram appropriations within an account and to 
transfer up to 5 percent between appropriations accounts with 
15-day advance notification of the Committees on 
Appropriations. A detailed funding table identifying each 
congressional control level for reprogramming purposes is 
included at the end of this statement. These reprogramming 
guidelines shall be complied with by all departmental 
components funded by this act.
    The Committee expects the Department to submit 
reprogramming requests on a timely basis, and to provide 
complete explanations of the reallocations proposed, including 
detailed justifications of the increases and offsets, and any 
specific impact the proposed changes will have on the budget 
request for the following fiscal year and future-year 
appropriations requirements. Each request submitted to the 
Committees should include a detailed table showing the proposed 
revisions at the account, program, project, and activity level 
to the funding and staffing (full-time equivalent) levels for 
the current fiscal year and to the levels required for the 
following fiscal year. The Committee continues to be 
disappointed by the quality, level of detail, and timeliness of 
the Department's proposed reprogrammings.
    The Committee expects the Department to manage its programs 
and activities within the levels appropriated. The Committee 
reminds the Department that reprogramming or transfer requests 
should be submitted only in the case of an unforeseeable 
emergency or situation that could not have been predicted when 
formulating the budget request for the current fiscal year. 
When the Department submits a reprogramming or transfer request 
to the Committees on Appropriations and does not receive 
identical responses from the House and Senate, it is the 
responsibility of the Department to reconcile the House and 
Senate differences before proceeding, and if reconciliation is 
not possible, to consider the reprogramming or transfer request 
unapproved.
    The Department shall not propose a reprogramming or 
transfer of funds after June 30 unless there are extraordinary 
circumstances, which place human lives or property in imminent 
danger.
    Section 504. The bill includes a provision relating to the 
Department's Working Capital Fund [WCF] that: extends the 
authority of the Department's WCF in fiscal year 2012; 
prohibits funds appropriated or otherwise made available to the 
Department from being used to make payments to the WCF, except 
for the activities and amounts allowed in the President's 
fiscal year 2012 budget; makes funds available for the WCF 
available until expended; ensures departmental components are 
only charged for direct usage of each WCF service; makes funds 
provided to the WCF available only for purposes consistent with 
the contributing component; requires the WCF to be paid in 
advance or reimbursed at rates which will return the full cost 
of each service; and subjects the WCF to the requirements of 
section 503 of this act. The WCF table included in the 
Department's congressional justification accompanying the 
President's fiscal year 2012 budget shall serve as the control 
level for reprogramming and transfer purposes in compliance 
with section 503 of this act.
    Section 505. The bill includes a provision that not to 
exceed 50 percent of unobligated balances remaining at the end 
of fiscal year 2012 from appropriations made for salaries and 
expenses shall remain available through fiscal year 2013, 
subject to reprogramming.
    Section 506. The bill includes a provision providing that 
funds for intelligence activities are specifically authorized 
during fiscal year 2012 until the enactment of an act 
authorizing intelligence activities for fiscal year 2012.
    Section 507. The bill includes a provision requiring 
notification of the Committees 3 business days before any grant 
allocation, grant award, contract award (including Federal 
Acquisition Regulation-covered contracts), other transaction 
agreement, a task or delivery order on a DHS multiple award 
contract, letter of intent, or public announcement of the 
intention to make such an award totaling in excess of 
$1,000,000. If the Secretary determines that compliance would 
pose substantial risk to health, human life, or safety, an 
award may be made without prior notification but the Committees 
shall be notified within 5 full business days after such award 
or letter is issued. Additionally, FEMA is required to brief 
the Committees 5 full business days prior to announcing 
publicly the intention to make an award under State and Local 
Programs.
    Section 508. The bill includes a provision that no agency 
shall purchase, construct, or lease additional facilities for 
Federal law enforcement training without the advance approval 
of the Committees on Appropriations.
    Section 509. The bill includes a provision that none of the 
funds may be used for any construction, repair, alteration, or 
acquisition project for which a prospectus, if required under 
chapter 33 of title 40, United States Code, has not been 
approved. The bill excludes funds that may be required for 
development of a proposed prospectus.
    Section 510. The bill includes a provision that 
consolidates, continues, and modifies by reference prior-year 
statutory bill language into one provision. These provisions 
concern contracting officers' training, Federal building energy 
performance, fleet and transportation efficiency, and sensitive 
security information protocols.
    Section 511. The bill includes a provision that none of the 
funds may be used in contravention of the Buy American Act.
    Section 512. The bill includes a provision prohibiting any 
person other than the privacy officer appointed under 
subsection (a) of section 222 of the Homeland Security Act of 
2002 to alter, direct that changes may be made, delay, or 
prohibit the transmission to Congress of any report prepared 
under paragraph (6) of such subsection.
    Section 513. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds to be used to amend the oath of allegiance required by 
section 337 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 
1448).
    Section 514. The bill includes a provision regarding 
competitive sourcing for United States Citizenship and 
Immigration Services.
    Section 515. The bill includes a provision requiring the 
Chief Financial Officer to submit monthly budget execution and 
staffing reports within 45 days after the close of each month.
    Section 516. The bill includes a provision directing that 
any funds appropriated or transferred to TSA ``Aviation 
Security'', ``Administration'', and ``Transportation Security 
Support'' in fiscal years 2004 and 2005, that are recovered or 
deobligated shall be available only for procurement and 
installation of explosives detection systems, air cargo, 
baggage, and checkpoint screening systems, subject to 
notification. Quarterly reports must be submitted identifying 
any funds that are recovered or deobligated.
    Section 517. The bill includes a provision requiring any 
funds appropriated to Coast Guard for 110-123 foot patrol boat 
conversions that are recovered, collected, or otherwise 
received as a result of negotiation, mediation, or litigation, 
shall be available until expended for the Fast Response Cutter 
program.
    Section 518. The bill includes a provision relating to 
undercover investigative operations authority of the Secret 
Service.
    Section 519. The bill includes a provision classifying the 
functions of instructor staff at FLETC as inherently 
governmental for purposes of the Federal Activities Inventory 
Reform Act of 1998.
    Section 520. The bill includes a provision prohibiting the 
obligation of funds appropriated to the Office of the Secretary 
and Executive Management, the Office of the Under Secretary for 
Management, or the Office of the Chief Financial Officer for 
grants or contracts awarded by any means other than full and 
open competition. Certain exceptions apply. This provision does 
not require new competitions of existing contracts during their 
current terms. The IG is required to review Departmental 
contracts awarded noncompetitively and report on the results to 
the Committees.
    Section 521. The bill includes a provision regarding the 
enforcement of section 4025(1) of the Intelligence Reform and 
Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (Public Law 108-458; 118 Stat. 
3724) regarding butane lighters. This provision is made 
permanent in fiscal year 2012.
    Section 522. The bill includes a provision prohibiting the 
Secretary of Homeland Security from reducing operations within 
the Coast Guard's Civil Engineering Program except as 
specifically authorized by a statute enacted after the date of 
enactment of this act.
    Section 523. The bill includes a provision that precludes 
DHS from using funds in this act to carry out reorganization 
authority. This prohibition is not intended to prevent the 
Department from carrying out routine or small reallocations of 
personnel or functions within components of the Department, 
subject to section 503 of this act.
    Section 524. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funding to grant an immigration benefit to any individual 
unless the results of background checks required by statute to 
be completed prior to the grant of benefit have been received 
by DHS.
    Section 525. The bill includes a provision prohibiting the 
use of funds to destroy or put out to pasture any horse or 
other equine belonging to the Federal Government unless 
adoption has been offered first.
    Section 526. The bill includes a provision regarding 
waivers of the Jones Act.
    Section 527. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds from being used to reduce the Coast Guard's Operations 
Systems Center mission or its Government-employed or contract 
staff.
    Section 528. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds to be used to conduct or implement the results of a 
competition under Office of Management and Budget Circular A-76 
with respect to the Coast Guard National Vessel Documentation 
Center.
    Section 529. The bill includes a provision extending other 
transactional authority for DHS through fiscal year 2012 and 
eliminates a GAO reporting requirement that is no longer 
necessary.
    Section 530. The bill includes a provision requiring the 
Secretary to link all contracts that provide award fees to 
successful acquisition outcomes.
    Section 531. The bill includes a provision prohibiting the 
obligation of funds for the Office of Secretary and Executive 
Management for any new hires that are not verified through the 
E-Verify Program.
    Section 532. The bill includes a provision contained in 
Public Laws 109-295, 110-161, 110-329, 111-83, and 112-10 
related to prescription drugs.
    Section 533. The bill includes a provision requiring the 
Secretary of Homeland Security, in conjunction with the 
Secretary of the Treasury, to notify the Committees on proposed 
transfers of surplus balances from the Department of the 
Treasury Forfeiture Fund to any agency within the Department of 
Homeland Security.
    The Committee notes that the Fund is comprised of assets 
forfeited to the Federal Government as the result of law 
enforcement investigations and operations conducted primarily 
by agencies of the Department of the Treasury and DHS. The 
President's budget proposes to rescind/transfer $630,000,000 of 
the Fund and gives the credit to agencies under the 
jurisdiction of the Financial Services and General Government 
Appropriations Subcommittee. Approximately one-third of the 
Forfeiture Fund balance proposed for rescission is the result 
of DHS law enforcement activities. The Committee directs the 
President, if he proposes to rescind Treasury Forfeiture Funds 
in his fiscal year 2013 budget, to divide the funds equitably 
between the two Departments based upon their contributions to 
the Fund.
    Section 534. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds from being used to plan, test, pilot, or develop a 
national identification card.
    Section 535. The bill includes a provision requiring a 
report summarizing damage assessment information used to 
determine whether to declare a major disaster.
    Section 536. The bill includes a provision relating to the 
liquidation of Plum Island assets and how the proceeds from 
this sale may be applied.
    Section 537. The bill includes a provision directing that 
any official required by this act to report or certify to the 
Committees on Appropriations may not delegate such authority 
unless expressly authorized to do so in this act.
    Section 538. The bill includes a provision extending the 
risk-based security standards for chemical facilities cited in 
section 550 of Public Law 109-295, as amended, for 1 year.
    Section 539. The bill includes a provision extending 
current law concerning individuals detained at the Naval 
Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
    Section 540. The bill includes a permanent FLETC provision 
regarding the definition of the term ``rural''.
    Section 541. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds in this act to be used for first-class travel.
    Section 542. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds to be used for adverse personnel actions for employees 
who use protective equipment or measures, including surgical 
masks, N95 respirators, gloves, or hand-sanitizers in the 
conduct of their official duties.
    Section 543. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds to be used to employ workers in contravention of section 
274A(h)(3) of the Immigration and Nationality Act.
    Section 544. The bill includes language pertaining to the 
construction of the National Bio- and Agro-defense facility in 
Manhattan, Kansas.
    Section 545. A provision is included that provides an 
additional amount of $10,000,000 for the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency ``State and Local Programs'' to reimburse 
costs incurred by State and local governments affected by 
National Special Security Events, including use of services, 
personnel, equipment, and facilities. The Federal Emergency 
Management Agency shall brief the Committees on Appropriations 
within 60 days of the date of enactment of this act regarding 
the process to distribute this funding, including the 
application process and eligible costs. Funds shall remain 
available until September 30, 2013 and are not subject to any 
legislated timeframes required under ``State and Local 
Programs''.
    Section 546. The bill includes a provision providing some 
flexibility to the Department for financing a response to an 
immigration emergency.
    Section 547. The bill includes a provision permitting 
administrative law judges to be available temporarily to serve 
on an arbitration panel as needed for cases related to 
Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.
    Section 548. The bill includes a provision on the proper 
disposal of personal information collected through the 
Registered Traveler program.
    Section 549. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds appropriated or otherwise made available by this act to 
pay for award or incentive fees for contractors with below 
satisfactory performance or performance that fails to meet the 
basic requirements of the contract.
    Section 550. The bill includes language that requires 
certification that the 100 percent screening of air cargo 
carried on passenger aircraft mandate contained in the 9/11 Act 
has been met and biannual reports on the strategy to meet this 
mandate if certification does not occur 180 days after the date 
of enactment of this act.
    Section 551. The bill includes language that requires the 
Secretary to ensure screening of passengers and crews for 
transportation and national security purposes are consistent 
with applicable laws, regulations, and guidance on privacy and 
civil liberties.
    Section 552. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds appropriated or otherwise made available by this act for 
DHS to enter into a Federal contract unless the contract meets 
requirements of the Federal Property and Administrative 
Services Act of 1949 or Chapter 137 of title 10 U.S.C., and the 
Federal Acquisition Regulation, unless the contract is 
otherwise authorized by statute without regard to this section.
    Section 553. The bill includes a provision allowing the 
Secretary to transfer data center migration funds made 
available by this act between appropriations for the same 
purpose after notifying the Committees 15 days in advance. The 
bill provides an additional $15,000,000 for data center 
migration activities to be allocated by the Secretary pursuant 
to this section.
    Section 554. The bill includes a provision allowing the 
Advanced Training Center to charge fees in fiscal year 2012 and 
thereafter for any service or thing of value it provides to the 
Federal Government or non-government entities or individuals, 
so long as the fee does not exceed the full costs associated 
with the service or thing of value. Any fees that are collected 
are to be deposited in a separate account and used without 
further appropriation for necessary expenses of the Advanced 
Training Center program.
    Section 555. The bill includes a provision related to the 
sale of LORAN properties.
    Section 556. The bill includes a provision permitting the 
Department to sell ICE-owned detention facilities and use the 
proceeds from any sale for improvement to other facilities 
provided that any such sale will not result in the maintenance 
of less than 33,400 detention beds. ICE is required to notify 
the Committees on Appropriations 15 days prior to announcing 
any sale.
    Section 557. The bill includes language that provides a 
total of $55,979,000 for consolidation of the new DHS 
headquarters at St. Elizabeths and consolidation of mission 
support activities. Within 60 days after the date of enactment 
of this act, the Secretary shall submit an expenditure plan to 
the Committee highlighting how these funds will be allocated. 
The Committee is concerned that current and projected future 
year funding limitations will result in the Coast Guard being 
the only departmental entity located at the consolidated 
headquarters site. The Committee directs the Department to 
reexamine the planned mix of DHS offices that are to be located 
at the St. Elizabeths campus. Initial results of this analysis 
shall be presented to the Committee with the expenditure plan. 
Quarterly briefings on the consolidation plans, including any 
deviation from the expenditure plan, status of approvals, and 
project schedule should occur thereafter.
    Section 558. The bill includes language authorizing an 
increase to aviation security passenger fees for fiscal year 
2012.
    Section 559. The Committee, in recognition of on-going 
fiscal distress in local communities, includes a provision 
which requires that Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency 
Response Grants shall be used to retain firefighters, instead 
of only for increasing the number of firefighters. The 
provision also prohibits funds to be used to enforce certain 
requirements of the Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 
1974 related to the program. The Committee expects this 
provision to be applied in the same manner as similar 
provisions in Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2009, and the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 for the fiscal 
year 2009 and 2010 program.
    Section 560. The bill includes language pertaining to 
spills of national significance and reimbursement for the Coast 
Guard.
    Section 561. The bill includes a provision to impose 
increased penalties on individuals who circumvent security 
screening at airports.
    Section 562. A provision is included related to recoupment 
of debts in cases where funds were distributed based on an 
error made by FEMA.
    Section 563. A provision is included regarding 
reimbursement by FEMA of Small Business Administration Loans 
for eligible hazard mitigation activity. Execution of this 
authority shall not result in an individual being reimbursed 
more than once for the same mitigation activity.
    Section 564. The bill includes language waiving certain 
requirements for the fiscal year 2011 SAFER grant program.
    Section 565. The bill includes language that makes 
available an additional $18,300,000 for Coast Guard to replace 
a rotary wing airframe. The Coast Guard has lost four 
helicopters to accidents over the past few years. This 
provision is designated as an emergency and is offset with 
unobligated emergency balances.
    Section 566. The bill includes language rescinding 
unobligated balances made available to the Department when it 
was created in 2003.
    Section 567. The bill includes a $7,000,000 rescission of 
the unobligated, prior year balances available for U.S. 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement, ``Salaries and Expenses''.
    Section 568. The bill includes a $10,000,000 rescission of 
the unobligated, prior year balances available for U.S. 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement, ``Automation 
Modernization''.
    Section 569. The bill includes a provision rescinding 
$48,503,000 in unobligated prior-year balances from TSA.
    Section 570. The bill includes a provision rescinding 
$20,000,000 in unobligated prior-year balances available for 
Science and Technology, ``Research, Development, Acquisition, 
and Operations''.

                     PROGRAM, PROJECT, AND ACTIVITY

    In fiscal year 2012, for purposes of the Balanced Budget 
and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-177), 
as amended, the following information provides the definition 
of the term ``program, project, and activity'' for the 
components of the Department of Homeland Security under the 
jurisdiction of the Homeland Security Subcommittee of the 
Committee on Appropriations. The term ``program, project, and 
activity'' shall include the most specific level of budget 
items identified in the Department of Homeland Security 
Appropriations Act, 2012, the House and Senate Committee 
reports, and the conference report and accompanying joint 
explanatory statement of the managers of the committee of 
conference.
    If a percentage reduction is necessary, in implementing 
that reduction, components of the Department of Homeland 
Security shall apply any percentage reduction required for 
fiscal year 2012 to all items specified in the justifications 
submitted to the Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives in support of the fiscal year 2012 
budget estimates, as amended, for such components, as modified 
by congressional action.

  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 7 of rule XVI requires that Committee reports 
accompanying general appropriations bills identify each 
recommended amendment which proposes an item of appropriation 
which is not made to carry out the provisions of an existing 
law, a treaty stipulation, or an act or resolution previously 
passed by the Senate during that session.
    The Committee recommends funding for the following programs 
or activities which currently lack authorization for fiscal 
year 2012:
    U.S. Customs and Border Protection: Salaries and Expenses; 
Automation Modernization; Border Security Fencing, 
Infrastructure, and Technology; Air and Marine Interdiction, 
Operations, Maintenance, and Procurement; and Construction and 
Facilities Management;
    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement: Salaries and 
Expenses; and Automation Modernization;
    Transportation Security Administration: Aviation Security; 
Surface Transportation Security; Transportation Threat 
Assessment and Credentialing; Transportation Security Support; 
and Federal Air Marshals;
    Coast Guard: Operating Expenses; Environmental Compliance 
and Restoration; Reserve Training; Acquisition, Construction, 
and Improvements; Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation; 
and Retired Pay;
    United States Secret Service: Salaries and Expenses; and 
Acquisition, Construction, Improvements, and Related Expenses;
    National Protection and Programs Directorate: Management 
and Administration; and U.S. Visitor and Immigrant Status 
Indicator Technology;
    Office of Health Affairs;
    Federal Emergency Management Agency: Operating Expenses; 
State and Local Programs; Disaster Relief; Flood Hazard Mapping 
and Risk Analysis; Firefighter Assistance Grants; National 
Flood Insurance Fund; and Emergency Food and Shelter;
    United States Citizenship and Immigration Services.

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(c), RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, on September 7, 
2011, the Committee ordered reported H.R. 2017, making 
appropriations for the Department of Homeland Security for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 2012 and for other purposes, 
with an amendment in the nature of a substitute, by a recorded 
vote of 00-00, a quorum being present. The vote was as follows:
    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, on September 7, 
2011, the Committee ordered favorably reported en bloc the 
fiscal year 2012 budget allocation a proposed by the Chairman, 
and a bill (H.R. 2112) making appropriations for Agriculture, 
Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related 
Agencies programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
2012, and for other purposes, with an amendment in the nature 
of a substitute; a bill (H.R. 2354) making appropriations for 
energy and water development and related agencies for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 2012, and for other purposes, 
with an amendment in the nature of a substitute; and a bill 
(H.R. 2017) making appropriations for the Department of 
Homeland Security for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
2012, and for other purposes, with an amendment in the nature 
of a substitute; provided, that each bill be subject to further 
amendment and that each bill be consistent with its spending 
allocations, by a recorded vote of 28-2, a quorum being 
present. The vote was as follows:
        Yeas                          Nays
Chairman Inouye                     Mrs. Hutchison\1\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\By unanimous consent, the Committee permitted Senator Hutchison 
to change her vote to ``nay''.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. Leahy                           Mr. Johnson (WI)
Mr. Harkin
Ms. Mikulski
Mr. Kohl
Mrs. Murray
Mrs. Feinstein
Mr. Durbin
Mr. Johnson (SD)
Ms. Landrieu
Mr. Reed
Mr. Lautenberg
Mr. Nelson
Mr. Pryor
Mr. Tester
Mr. Brown
Mr. Cochran
Mr. McConnell
Mr. Shelby
Mr. Alexander
Ms. Collins
Ms. Murkowski
Mr. Graham
Mr. Kirk
Mr. Coats
Mr. Blunt
Mr. Moran
Mr. Hoeven

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of rule XXVI requires that Committee reports 
on a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any statute 
or part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the statute or 
part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and (b) a 
comparative print of that part of the bill or joint resolution 
making the amendment and of the statute or part thereof 
proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through type and 
italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate typographical 
devices the omissions and insertions which would be made by the 
bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form recommended by 
the committee.''
    In compliance with this rule, the following changes in 
existing law proposed to be made by the bill are shown as 
follows: existing law to be omitted is enclosed in black 
brackets; new matter is printed in italics; and existing law in 
which no change is proposed is shown in roman.

                       TITLE 6--DOMESTIC SECURITY


               Chapter 1--Homeland Security Organization


  Subchapter VIII--Coordination With Non-Federal Entities; Inspector 
 General; United States Secret Service; Coast Guard; General Provisions


                          PART D--ACQUISITIONS

Sec. 391. Research and development projects

(a) Authority

    [Until September 30, 2011] Until September 30, 2012, and 
subject to subsection (d), the Secretary may carry out a pilot 
program under which the Secretary may exercise the following 
authorities:

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

[(b) Report

    [Not later than 2 years after the effective date of this 
chapter, and annually thereafter, the Comptroller General shall 
report to the Committee on Government Reform of the House of 
Representatives and the Committee on Governmental Affairs of 
the Senate on--
            [(1) whether use of the authorities described in 
        subsection (a) of this section attracts nontraditional 
        Government contractors and results in the acquisition 
        of needed technologies; and
            [(2) if such authorities were to be made permanent, 
        whether additional safeguards are needed with respect 
        to the use of such authorities.]

[(c)] (b) Procurement of temporary and intermittent services

    The Secretary may--
            (1) procure the temporary or intermittent services 
        of experts or consultants (or organizations thereof) in 
        accordance with section 3109(b) of title 5; and
            (2) whenever necessary due to an urgent homeland 
        security need, procure temporary (not to exceed 1 year) 
        or intermittent personal services, including the 
        services of experts or consultants (or organizations 
        thereof), without regard to the pay limitations of such 
        section 3109.

[(d)] (c) Additional requirements

        (1) In general


            The authority of the Secretary under this section 
        shall terminate [September 30, 2011,] September 30, 
        2012, unless before that date the Secretary--
                    (A) issues policy guidance detailing the 
                appropriate use of that authority; and
                    (B) provides training to each employee that 
                is authorized to exercise that authority.

        (2) Report

            The Secretary shall provide an annual report to the 
        Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and the 
        House of Representatives, the Committee on Homeland 
        Security and Governmental Affairs of the Senate, and 
        the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of 
        Representatives detailing the projects for which the 
        authority granted by subsection (a) was used, the 
        rationale for its use, the funds spent using that 
        authority, the outcome of each project for which that 
        authority was used, and the results of any audits of 
        such projects.

    [(e)] (d) Definition of nontraditional Government 
contractor

            In this section, the term ``nontraditional 
        Government contractor'' has the same meaning as the 
        term ``nontraditional defense contractor'' as defined 
        in section 845(e) of the National Defense Authorization 
        Act for Fiscal Year 1994 (Public Law 103-160; 10 U.S.C. 
        2371 note).
                                ------                                


                TITLE 42--THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELFARE


                 Chapter 46--Justice System Improvement


   Subchapter VII--FBI Training of State and Local Criminal Justice 
                               Personnel


Sec. 3771. Training and manpower development

(a) Functions, powers, and duties of Director of Federal Bureau 
            of Investigation

    The Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation is 
authorized to--

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Prior Provisions

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



  Employment of Annuitants by Federal Law Enforcement Training Center

    Pub. L. 107-206, title I, Sec. 1202, Aug. 2, 2002, 116 
Stat. 887, as amended by Pub. L. 109-295, title IV, Oct. 4, 
2006, 120 Stat. 1374; Pub. L. 110-161, div. E, title IV, Dec. 
26, 2007, 121 Stat. 2068; Pub. L. 110-329, div. D, title IV, 
Sept. 30, 2008, 122 Stat. 3677, provided that:
    ``(a) The Federal Law Enforcement Training Center may, for 
a period ending not later than [December 31, 2012] December 31, 
2014, appoint and maintain a cadre of up to 350 Federal 
annuitants: (1) without regard to any provision of title 5, 
United States Code, which might otherwise require the 
application of competitive hiring procedures; and (2) who shall 
not be subject to any reduction in pay (for annuity allocable 
to the period of actual employment) under the provisions of 
section 8344 or 8468 of such title 5 or similar provision of 
any other retirement system for employees. A re-employed 
Federal annuitant as to whom a waiver of reduction under 
paragraph (2) applies shall not, for any period during which 
such waiver is in effect, be considered an employee for 
purposes of subchapter III of chapter 83 or chapter 84 of title 
5, United States Code, or such other retirement system 
(referred to in paragraph (2)) as may apply.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                        TITLE 49--TRANSPORTATION


                    SUBTITLE VII--AVIATION PROGRAMS


                         Chapter 463--Penalties


                    PART A--AIR COMMERCE AND SAFETY

                 SUBPART IV--ENFORCEMENT AND PENALTIES

Sec. 46301. Civil penalties

    (a) General Penalty.--(1) A person is liable to the United 
States Government for a civil penalty of not more than $25,000 
(or $1,100 if the person is an individual or small business 
concern) for violating--

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (5) Penalties applicable to individuals and small business 
concerns.--
            (A) An individual (except an airman serving as an 
        airman) or small business concern is liable to the 
        Government for a civil penalty of not more than $10,000 
        for violating--
                    (i) chapter 401 (except sections 40103(a) 
                and (d), 40105, 40106(b), 40116, and 40117), 
                section 44502 (b) or (c), chapter 447 (except 
                sections 44717-44723), [or chapter 449] chapter 
                449 (except sections 44902, 44903(d), 44904, 
                and 44907-44909), or section 46314(a) of this 
                title; or

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Sec. 46314. Entering aircraft or airport area in violation of security 
                    requirements

    (a) Prohibition.-- * * *
    [(b) Criminal Penalty.--(1) A person violating subsection 
(a) of this section shall be fined under title 18, imprisoned 
for not more than one year, or both.
    [(2) A person violating subsection (a) of this section with 
intent to commit, in the aircraft or airport area, a felony 
under a law of the United States or a State shall be fined 
under title 18, imprisoned for not more than 10 years, or 
both.]
    (b) Criminal Penalty.--A person violating subsection (a) of 
this section shall be fined under title 18, imprisoned for not 
more than 10 years, or both.
    (c) Notice of Penalties.--
            (1) In general.--Each operator of an airport in the 
        United States that is required to establish an air 
        transportation security program pursuant to section 
        44903(c) shall ensure that signs that meet such 
        requirements as the Secretary of Homeland Security may 
        prescribe providing notice of the penalties imposed 
        under sections 46301(a)(5)(A)(i) and subsection (b) of 
        this section, are displayed near all screening 
        locations, all locations where passengers exit the 
        sterile area, and such other locations at the airport 
        as the Secretary of Homeland Security determines 
        appropriate.
            (2) Effect of signs on penalties.--An individual 
        shall be subject to the penalty provided for under 
        section 46301(a)(5)(A)(i) and subsection (b) of this 
        section without regard to whether signs are displayed 
        at an airport as required by paragraph (1).
                                ------                                


 DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2007, PUBLIC LAW 
                                109-295


                                TITLE V


                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 501. * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    Sec. 532. (a) United States Secret Service Use of Proceeds 
Derived From Criminal Investigations.--During fiscal year 
[2011] 2012 and thereafter, with respect to any undercover 
investigative operation of the United States Secret Service 
(hereafter referred to in this section as the ``Secret 
Service'') that is necessary for the detection and prosecution 
of crimes against the United States--

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    Sec. 550. (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (b) Interim regulations issued under this section shall 
apply until the effective date of interim or final regulations 
promulgated under other laws that establish requirements and 
standards referred to in subsection (a) and expressly supersede 
this section: Provided, That the authority provided by this 
section shall terminate [on October 4, 2011]  on October 4, 
2012
                                ------                                


 DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2010, PUBLIC LAW 
                                 111-83


                                TITLE V


                           GENERAL PROVISIONS


                    (INCLUDING RESCISSIONS OF FUNDS

    Sec. 559. (a) Subject to subsection (b), none of the funds 
appropriated or otherwise made available by this Act may be 
available to operate the Loran-C signal after January 4, 2010.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (e) If the certifications described in subsection (b) are 
made, the Secretary of Homeland Security, acting through the 
Commandant of the Coast Guard, may, notwithstanding any other 
provision of [law, sell] law, hereafter sell any real and 
personal property under the administrative control of the Coast 
Guard and used for the Loran-C system, by directing the 
Administrator of General Services to sell such real and 
personal property, subject to such terms and conditions that 
the Secretary believes to be necessary to protect government 
interests and program requirements of the Coast Guard: 
Provided, That the proceeds, less the costs of sale incurred by 
the General Services Administration, [shall be deposited] shall 
hereafter be deposited as offsetting collections into the Coast 
Guard ``Environmental Compliance and Restoration'' account and, 
[subject to appropriation,] without further appropriations, 
shall be available until expended for environmental compliance 
and restoration purposes associated with the Loran-C system, 
for the costs of securing and maintaining equipment that may be 
used as a backup to the Global Positioning System or to meet 
any other Federal navigation requirement, for the demolition of 
improvements on such real property, and for the costs 
associated with the sale of such real and personal property, 
including due diligence requirements, necessary environmental 
remediation, and reimbursement of expenses incurred by the 
General Services Administration: Provided further, That after 
the completion of such activities, the unexpended balances 
shall be available for any other environmental compliance and 
restoration activities of the Coast Guard.
                                ------                                


  DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AND FULL-YEAR CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 
                        2011, PUBLIC LAW 112-10


         DIVISION B--FULL-YEAR CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS, 2011


                      TITLE VI--HOMELAND SECURITY

    Sec. 1647. (a) * * *
    (b) No funding [provided in this division] made available 
in this or any other Act shall be used for construction of the 
National Bio- and Agro-defense Facility until the Department of 
Homeland Security has, pursuant to the schedule submitted by 
the Department of Homeland Security on March 31, 2011, to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and House of 
Representatives--

                        BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL


  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS
                                                     AMENDED
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  Budget authority               Outlays
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                                                               Committee    Amount  in   Committee    Amount  in
                                                               allocation      bill      allocation      bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with Committee allocations
 to its subcommittees of amounts in the budget resolution
 for 2012: Subcommittee on Homeland Security:
    Mandatory...............................................        1,440        1,440        1,402     \1\1,402
    Discretionary...........................................       41,000       45,458       44,985    \1\45,275
        Security............................................       41,000       45,458           NA           NA
        Nonsecurity.........................................  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........
Projection of outlays associated with the recommendation:
    2012....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........    \2\26,858
    2013....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        9,102
    2014....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        5,590
    2015....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        2,496
    2016 and future years...................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        2,307
Financial assistance to State and local governments for                NA        5,257           NA          251
 2012.......................................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\2\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
 
NA: Not applicable.
 
Consistent with the funding recommended in the bill for disaster funding and overseas contingency operations and
  in accordance with section 251(b)(2)(D) of the BBEDCA and section 106 of the Deficit Control Act of 2011, the
  Committee anticipates that the Budget Committee will file a revised section 302(a) allocation for the
  Committee on Appropriations reflecting an upward adjustment of $4,458,000,000 in budget authority plus
  associated outlays.


                 COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2011 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL YEAR 2012
                                                                                    [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                                            Senate Committee recommendation compared with (+ or
                                                                                                                                                                      )
                               Item                                       2011         Budget estimate   House allowance      Committee    -----------------------------------------------------
                                                                      appropriation                                        recommendation         2010
                                                                                                                                              appropriation    Budget estimate   House allowance
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
                  DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
 
          TITLE I--DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
 
                      Departmental Operations
 
Office of the Secretary and Executive Management:
    Immediate Office of the Secretary.............................            4,641             5,164             4,641             5,000              +359              -164              +359
    Immediate Office of the Deputy Secretary......................            2,674             1,918             1,918             1,918              -756   ................  ................
    Office of the Chief of Staff..................................            2,572             2,802             2,000             2,600               +28              -202              +600
    Office of Counternarcotics Enforcement........................            2,997             3,814             3,200             2,130              -867            -1,684            -1,070
    Executive Secretary...........................................            8,104             8,402             8,200             8,100                -4              -302              -100
    Office of Policy..............................................           41,133            42,423            34,000            40,000            -1,133            -2,423            +6,000
    Office of Public Affairs......................................            6,368             6,419             5,800             6,370                +2               -49              +570
    Office of Legislative Affairs.................................            6,698             6,341             6,000             6,340              -358                -1              +340
    Office of Intergovernmental Affairs...........................            2,632             2,908             2,750             2,650               +18              -258              -100
    Office of General Counsel.....................................           23,762            22,422            22,400            22,422            -1,340   ................              +22
    Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties...................           20,367            24,613            21,100            23,000            +2,633            -1,613            +1,900
    Citizenship and Immigration Services Ombudsman................            6,188             6,336             6,200             6,300              +112               -36              +100
    Privacy Officer...............................................            8,408             8,971             8,491             8,603              +195              -368              +112
    House floor amendment.........................................  ................  ................          -64,350   ................  ................  ................          +64,350
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................          136,544           142,533            62,350           135,433            -1,111            -7,100           +73,083
 
Office of the Under Secretary for Management:
    Immediate Office of the Under Secretary for Management........            2,733             7,558             2,550             2,558              -175            -5,000                +8
    Office of Security............................................           71,760            71,236            70,200            71,236              -524   ................           +1,036
    Office of the Chief Procurement Officer.......................           74,597            78,771            75,150            78,000            +3,403              -771            +2,850
 
    Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer:
        Salaries and expenses.....................................           24,477            28,161            25,660            25,165              +688            -2,996              -495
        Human resources...........................................           17,097            16,686            15,680            14,172            -2,925            -2,514            -1,508
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal................................................           41,574            44,847            41,340            39,337            -2,237            -5,510            -2,003
 
    Office of the Chief Administrative Officer:
        Salaries and expenses.....................................           43,300            41,248            40,700            41,000            -2,300              -248              +300
        Nebraska Avenue Complex (NAC).............................            5,489             5,398             5,000             5,000              -489              -398   ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal................................................           48,789            46,646            45,700            46,000            -2,789              -646              +300
 
        House floor amendment.....................................  ................  ................         -128,070   ................  ................  ................         +128,070
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Office of the Under Secretary for Manage-               239,453           249,058           106,870           237,131            -2,322           -11,927          +130,261
           ment...................................................
 
Office of the Chief Financial Officer.............................           53,323            62,395            50,860            51,000            -2,323           -11,395              +140
 
Office of the Chief Information Officer:
    Salaries and expenses.........................................           86,738           105,578           105,500           105,578           +18,840   ................              +78
    Information technology services...............................           51,314            38,800            38,800            38,800           -12,514   ................  ................
    Infrastructure and security activities........................          147,108            89,525            73,000            79,525           -67,583           -10,000            +6,525
    Homeland Security Data Network................................           47,566            44,069            44,000            44,069            -3,497   ................              +69
    House floor amendment.........................................  ................  ................         -139,180   ................  ................  ................         +139,180
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................          332,726           277,972           122,120           267,972           -64,754           -10,000          +145,852
 
Analysis and Operations...........................................          334,360           355,368           344,368           339,368            +5,008           -16,000            -5,000
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Departmental Operations..............................        1,096,406         1,087,326           686,568         1,030,904           -65,502           -56,422          +344,336
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
                    Office of Inspector General
 
Operating expenses................................................          113,646           144,318           124,000           125,000           +11,354           -19,318            +1,000
    Transfer from Disaster relief fund............................          (15,968)  ................          (16,000)          (16,000)             (+32)         (+16,000)  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of Inspector General..........................          129,614           144,318           140,000           141,000           +11,386            -3,318            +1,000
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
      Total, title I, Departmental Management and Operations......        1,210,052         1,231,644           810,568         1,155,904           -54,148           -75,740          +345,336
      (by transfer)...............................................          (15,968)  ................          (16,000)          (16,000)             (+32)         (+16,000)  ................
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
        TITLE II--SECURITY, ENFORCEMENT, AND INVESTIGATIONS
 
                U.S. Customs and Border Protection
 
Salaries and expenses:
    Headquarters, Management, and Administration:
        Management and administration, border security inspections          516,102           688,878           670,494           672,152          +156,050           -16,726            +1,658
         and trade facilitation...................................
        Management and administration, border security and control          495,862           738,462           720,009           721,736          +225,874           -16,726            +1,727
         between ports of entry...................................
        Rent......................................................          450,812           483,749           483,749           483,749           +32,937   ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal................................................        1,462,776         1,911,089         1,874,252         1,877,637          +414,861           -33,452            +3,385
 
    Border security inspections and trade facilitation:
        Inspections, trade, and travel facilitation at ports of           2,474,344         2,507,235         2,562,235         2,567,235           +92,891           +60,000            +5,000
         entry....................................................
        Harbor maintenance fee collection (trust fund)............            3,274             3,274             3,274             3,274   ................  ................  ................
        International cargo screening.............................          103,945            68,757            79,557            68,757           -35,188   ................          -10,800
        Other international programs..............................           11,119            10,684            10,684            10,684              -435   ................  ................
        Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT)......           45,454            44,979            44,979            44,979              -475   ................  ................
        Trusted Traveler programs.................................           10,751             6,311             6,311             6,311            -4,440   ................  ................
        Inspection and detection technology investments...........          144,162           149,537           149,537           149,537            +5,375   ................  ................
        Automated targeting systems...............................           32,389            31,400            46,400            36,400            +4,011            +5,000           -10,000
        National Targeting Center.................................           47,347            46,950            46,950            51,950            +4,603            +5,000            +5,000
        Training..................................................           20,778            37,834            37,834            37,834           +17,056   ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal................................................        2,893,563         2,906,961         2,987,761         2,976,961           +83,398           +70,000           -10,800
 
    Border security and control between ports of entry:
        Border security and control...............................        3,508,244         3,530,994         3,530,994         3,530,994           +22,750   ................  ................
        Training..................................................           36,094            88,610            88,610            88,610           +52,516   ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal................................................        3,544,338         3,619,604         3,619,604         3,619,604           +75,266   ................  ................
 
    Air and Marine Operations.....................................          295,521           287,901           287,901           287,901            -7,620   ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Salaries and expenses.............................        8,196,198         8,725,555         8,769,518         8,762,103          +565,905           +36,548            -7,415
          Appropriations..........................................       (8,192,924)       (8,722,281)       (8,766,244)       (8,758,829)        (+565,905)         (+36,548)          (-7,415)
          Harbor maintenance trust fund...........................           (3,274)           (3,274)           (3,274)           (3,274)  ................  ................  ................
 
Automation modernization:
    Automated Commercial Environment/International Trade Data               147,794           169,755           140,000           140,000            -7,794           -29,755   ................
     System.......................................................
    Current operations protection and processing support (COPPS)..          188,108           194,275           194,275           194,275            +6,167   ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................          335,902           364,030           334,275           334,275            -1,627           -29,755   ................
 
Border security fencing, infrastructure, and technology (BSFIT):
    Development and deployment....................................          324,620           337,000           312,377           212,377          -112,243          -124,623          -100,000
    Operations and maintenance....................................          172,019           133,248           133,248           133,248           -38,771   ................  ................
    Program management............................................           76,385            57,375            54,375            54,375           -22,010            -3,000   ................
    House floor amendment.........................................  ................  ................           10,000   ................  ................  ................          -10,000
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................          573,024           527,623           510,000           400,000          -173,024          -127,623          -110,000
 
Air and Marine Interdiction, Operations, Maintenance, and
 Procurement:
    Operations and maintenance....................................          370,899           361,087           361,087           365,087            -5,812            +4,000            +4,000
    Procurement...................................................          144,395           109,479           138,879           141,479            -2,916           +32,000            +2,600
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................          515,294           470,566           499,966           506,566            -8,728           +36,000            +6,600
 
Construction and facilities management:
    Facility construction and sustainment.........................          223,170           226,726           180,000           185,000           -38,170           -41,726            +5,000
    Program oversight and management..............................           36,310            57,096            54,096            54,096           +17,786            -3,000   ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................          259,480           283,822           234,096           239,096           -20,384           -44,726            +5,000
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, U.S. Customs and Border Protection direct                    9,879,898        10,371,596        10,347,855        10,242,040          +362,142          -129,556          -105,815
       appropriations.............................................
 
Fee accounts:
    Immigration inspection user fee...............................         (525,443)         (527,629)         (527,629)         (527,629)          (+2,186)  ................  ................
    Immigration enforcement fines.................................           (1,037)           (1,041)           (1,041)           (1,041)              (+4)  ................  ................
    ESTA..........................................................  ................          (44,524)          (44,524)          (44,524)         (+44,524)  ................  ................
    Land border inspection fee....................................          (28,598)          (28,909)          (28,909)          (28,909)            (+311)  ................  ................
    COBRA passenger inspection fee................................         (390,974)         (440,521)         (385,521)         (385,521)          (-5,453)         (-55,000)  ................
    APHIS inspection fee..........................................         (318,472)         (323,000)         (323,000)         (323,000)          (+4,528)  ................  ................
    Global Entry user fee.........................................           (2,500)           (2,615)           (2,615)           (2,615)            (+115)  ................  ................
    Puerto Rico collections.......................................          (89,980)          (91,779)          (91,779)          (91,779)          (+1,799)  ................  ................
    Small airport user fee........................................           (8,164)           (8,167)           (8,167)           (8,167)              (+3)  ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, fee accounts......................................       (1,365,168)       (1,468,185)       (1,413,185)       (1,413,185)         (+48,017)         (-55,000)  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, U.S. Customs and Border Protection...................       11,245,066        11,839,781        11,761,040        11,655,225          +410,159          -184,556          -105,815
          Appropriations..........................................       (9,879,898)      (10,371,596)      (10,347,855)      (10,242,040)        (+362,142)        (-129,556)        (-105,815)
          Fee accounts............................................       (1,365,168)       (1,468,185)       (1,413,185)       (1,413,185)         (+48,017)         (-55,000)  ................
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
             U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement
 
Salaries and expenses:
    Headquarters management and administration (non-detention and
     removal operations):
        Personnel compensation and benefits, services and other             295,121           237,842           234,251           227,251           -67,870           -10,591            -7,000
         costs....................................................
        Headquarters managed IT investment........................          219,363           194,727           184,227           186,527           -32,836            -8,200            +2,300
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal................................................          514,484           432,569           418,478           413,778          -100,706           -18,791            -4,700
 
    Legal proceedings.............................................          221,666           215,935           215,935           215,935            -5,731   ................  ................
 
    Investigations:
        Domestic..................................................        1,702,038         1,714,234         1,714,234         1,739,234           +37,196           +25,000           +25,000
 
        International investigations:
            International operations..............................          112,872           114,928           114,928           114,928            +2,056   ................  ................
            Visa Security Program.................................           35,686            29,489            32,489            38,289            +2,603            +8,800            +5,800
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal............................................          148,558           144,417           147,417           153,217            +4,659            +8,800            +5,800
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Investigations............................        1,850,596         1,858,651         1,861,651         1,892,451           +41,855           +33,800           +30,800
 
    Intelligence..................................................           69,842            81,503            81,503            82,503           +12,661            +1,000            +1,000
 
    Detention and removal operations:
        Custody operations........................................        1,794,406         2,023,827         2,050,545         2,023,827          +229,421   ................          -26,718
        Fugitive operations.......................................          229,682           154,597           154,597           154,597           -75,085   ................  ................
        Criminal alien program....................................          192,539           196,696           196,696           196,696            +4,157   ................  ................
        Alternatives to detention.................................           72,075            72,373            72,373            72,373              +298   ................  ................
        Transportation and removal program........................          281,878           276,632           276,632           276,632            -5,246   ................  ................
        House floor amendment.....................................  ................  ................            1,000   ................  ................  ................           -1,000
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal................................................        2,570,580         2,724,125         2,751,843         2,724,125          +153,545   ................          -27,718
 
    Comprehensive identification and removal of criminal aliens...          199,600           184,064           194,064           184,064           -15,536   ................          -10,000
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Salaries and expenses.............................        5,426,768         5,496,847         5,523,474         5,512,856           +86,088           +16,009           -10,618
 
Automation modernization..........................................           73,852            13,860            23,860            21,710           -52,142            +7,850            -2,150
 
Construction......................................................  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................
    Cancellation of unobligated balances..........................  ................          -16,300   ................  ................  ................          +16,300   ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement direct              5,500,620         5,494,407         5,547,334         5,534,566           +33,946           +40,159           -12,768
       appropriations.............................................
 
Fee accounts:
    Immigration inspection user fee...............................         (116,387)         (116,869)         (116,869)         (116,869)            (+482)  ................  ................
    Breached bond/detention fund..................................          (75,000)          (75,000)          (75,000)          (75,000)  ................  ................  ................
    Student exchange and visitor fee..............................         (120,000)         (120,000)         (120,000)         (120,000)  ................  ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................         (311,387)         (311,869)         (311,869)         (311,869)            (+482)  ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.............       (5,812,007)       (5,806,276)       (5,859,203)       (5,846,435)         (+34,428)         (+40,159)         (-12,768)
          Appropriations..........................................       (5,500,620)       (5,510,707)       (5,547,334)       (5,534,566)         (+33,946)         (+23,859)         (-12,768)
          Fee accounts............................................         (311,387)         (311,869)         (311,869)         (311,869)            (+482)  ................  ................
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
              Transportation Security Administration
 
Aviation security:
    Screening operations:
        Screener workforce:
            Privatized screening..................................          144,470           144,193           144,193           144,193              -277   ................  ................
            Screener personnel, compensation, and benefits........        2,920,813         3,060,493         3,030,167         3,028,381          +107,568           -32,112            -1,786
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal............................................        3,065,283         3,204,686         3,174,360         3,172,574          +107,291           -32,112            -1,786
 
        Screener training and other...............................          243,402           252,526           245,165           250,776            +7,374            -1,750            +5,611
        Checkpoint support........................................          328,843           254,093           181,285           214,893          -113,950           -39,200           +33,608
 
        EDS/ETD Systems:
            EDS procurement and installation......................          290,843           272,738           222,738           222,738           -68,105           -50,000   ................
            Screening technology maintenance & utilities..........          316,247           332,265           332,265           332,265           +16,018   ................  ................
            Operations integration................................           21,455   ................  ................  ................          -21,455   ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal............................................          628,545           605,003           555,003           555,003           -73,542           -50,000   ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Screening operations......................        4,266,073         4,316,308         4,155,813         4,193,246           -72,827          -123,062           +37,433
 
    Aviation security direction and enforcement:
        Aviation regulation and other enforcement.................          318,285           373,239           354,294           382,989           +64,704            +9,750           +28,695
        Airport management and support............................          489,142           571,503           568,334           571,216           +82,074              -287            +2,882
        FFDO and flight crew training.............................           25,118            25,461            25,461            25,461              +343   ................  ................
        Air cargo.................................................          114,689           114,654           120,654           120,654            +5,965            +6,000   ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal................................................          947,234         1,084,857         1,068,743         1,100,320          +153,086           +15,463           +31,577
 
    Aviation security capital fund (mandatory)....................         (250,000)         (250,000)         (250,000)         (250,000)  ................  ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Aviation security (gross)............................        5,213,307         5,401,165         5,224,556         5,293,566           +80,259          -107,599           +69,010
 
Offsetting fee collections (current law)..........................       -2,100,000        -2,030,000        -2,030,000        -2,030,000           +70,000   ................  ................
Aviation passenger security fee(proposed fee increase)............  ................         -280,000   ................         -280,000          -280,000   ................         -280,000
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Aviation security (net, discretionary)...............        3,113,307         3,091,165         3,194,556         2,983,566          -129,741          -107,599          -210,990
 
Surface transportation security:
    Staffing and operations.......................................           39,712            38,514            38,514            38,514            -1,198   ................  ................
    Surface transportation security inspectors and canines........           66,037            96,234            91,234            96,234           +30,197   ................           +5,000
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................          105,749           134,748           129,748           134,748           +28,999   ................           +5,000
 
Transportation Threat Assessment and Credentialing:
    Secure Flight.................................................           84,194            92,414            92,414            92,414            +8,220   ................  ................
    Crew and other vetting programs...............................           78,479            91,540            91,540            71,540            -6,939           -20,000           -20,000
    TWIC fees.....................................................           (9,200)           (8,300)           (8,300)           (8,300)            (-900)  ................  ................
    Hazardous materials fees......................................          (12,000)          (12,000)          (12,000)          (12,000)  ................  ................  ................
    Alien Flight School fees (by transfer from DOJ)...............           (4,000)           (4,000)           (4,000)           (4,000)  ................  ................  ................
    Certified cargo screening program.............................           (5,200)           (5,200)           (5,200)           (5,200)  ................  ................  ................
    Large aircraft security program...............................           (1,200)           (1,200)           (1,200)           (1,200)  ................  ................  ................
    Secure identification display area checks.....................           (8,000)           (8,000)           (8,000)           (8,000)  ................  ................  ................
    Other security threat assessments.............................             (100)             (100)             (100)             (100)  ................  ................  ................
    General aviation at DCA.......................................             (100)             (100)             (100)             (100)  ................  ................  ................
    Indirect air cargo............................................           (1,400)           (1,400)           (1,400)           (1,400)  ................  ................  ................
    Sensitive security information (SSI) fees.....................              (20)              (20)              (20)              (20)  ................  ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................          203,893           224,274           224,274           204,274              +381           -20,000           -20,000
          Direct appropriations...................................         (162,673)         (183,954)         (183,954)         (163,954)          (+1,281)         (-20,000)         (-20,000)
          Fee funded programs.....................................          (41,220)          (40,320)          (40,320)          (40,320)            (-900)  ................  ................
 
Transportation security support:
    Headquarters administration...................................          254,000           320,794           289,798           293,474           +39,474           -27,320            +3,676
    Information technology........................................          466,092           485,612           450,000           453,100           -12,992           -32,512            +3,100
    Human capital services........................................          233,658           264,299           250,000           252,500           +18,842           -11,799            +2,500
    Intelligence..................................................           32,911            42,992            42,992            42,992           +10,081   ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................          986,661         1,113,697         1,032,790         1,042,066           +55,405           -71,631            +9,276
 
Federal Air Marshals:
    Management and administration.................................          805,275           860,260           845,260           850,000           +44,725           -10,260            +4,740
    Travel and training...........................................          122,667           131,115           116,115           131,115            +8,448   ................          +15,000
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................          927,942           991,375           961,375           981,115           +53,173           -10,260           +19,740
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Transportation Security Administration...............        7,687,552         8,115,259         7,822,743         7,905,769          +218,217          -209,490           +83,026
 
Offsetting fee collections........................................      (-2,100,000)      (-2,310,000)      (-2,030,000)      (-2,310,000)        (-210,000)  ................        (-280,000)
Aviation security capital fund....................................         (250,000)         (250,000)         (250,000)         (250,000)  ................  ................  ................
Fee funded programs...............................................          (41,220)          (40,320)          (40,320)          (40,320)            (-900)  ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Transportation Security Administration (net).........        5,296,332         5,514,939         5,502,423         5,305,449            +9,117          -209,490          -196,974
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
                            Coast Guard
 
Operating expenses:
    Military pay and allowances...................................        3,345,303         3,447,753         3,434,872         3,434,061           +88,758           -13,692              -811
    Civilian pay and benefits.....................................          737,702           780,556           775,063           784,256           +46,554            +3,700            +9,193
    Training and recruiting.......................................          204,087           213,282           213,282           213,321            +9,234               +39               +39
    Operating funds and unit level maintenance....................        1,138,474         1,109,323         1,109,450         1,109,623           -28,851              +300              +173
    Centrally managed accounts....................................          345,174           351,478           343,348           342,653            -2,521            -8,825              -695
    Intermediate and depot level maintenance......................          869,291           917,113           936,768           936,140           +66,849           +19,027              -628
        (Defense function)........................................         (594,000)         (598,278)         (598,278)         (598,000)          (+4,000)            (-278)            (-278)
    Overseas contingency operations (defense function)............          254,000   ................          258,278           258,000            +4,000          +258,000              -278
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................        6,894,031         6,819,505         7,071,061         7,078,054          +184,023          +258,549            +6,993
          Appropriations..........................................       (6,640,031)       (6,819,505)       (6,812,783)       (6,820,054)        (+180,023)            (+549)          (+7,271)
          Overseas contingency operations (Defense function)......         (254,000)  ................         (258,278)         (258,000)          (+4,000)        (+258,000)            (-278)
 
Environmental compliance and restoration..........................           13,172            16,699            10,198            16,699            +3,527   ................           +6,501
Reserve training..................................................          133,365           136,778           131,778           134,278              +913            -2,500            +2,500
 
Acquisition, construction, and improvements:
    Vessels:
        Survey and design-vessels and boats.......................  ................            6,000             6,000             6,000            +6,000   ................  ................
        Response boat-medium......................................           41,916           110,000            90,691           110,000           +68,084   ................          +19,309
        In-service cutters sustainment............................  ................           14,000            14,000            14,000           +14,000   ................  ................
        National security cutter..................................          690,616            77,000   ................           77,000          -613,616   ................          +77,000
        Offshore patrol cutter....................................           44,910            25,000            25,000            25,000           -19,910   ................  ................
        Fast response cutter......................................          239,520           358,000           240,000           358,000          +118,480   ................         +118,000
        Cutter boats..............................................            2,994             5,000             5,000             5,000            +2,006   ................  ................
        Medium endurance cutter sustainment.......................           29,940            47,000            47,000            47,000           +17,060   ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal................................................        1,049,896           642,000           427,691           642,000          -407,896   ................         +214,309
 
    Aircraft:
        Airframe replacement (CGNR 6017)..........................  ................           18,300   ................           18,300           +18,300   ................          +18,300
        Maritime patrol aircraft..................................           39,920           129,500           129,500           104,500           +64,580           -25,000           -25,000
        HH-60 conversion projects.................................           31,936            56,100   ................           56,100           +24,164   ................          +56,100
        HH-60 acquisition/conversion/sustainment..................  ................  ................           74,400   ................  ................  ................          -74,400
        HC-130H conversion/sustainment projects...................           24,950            62,000   ................           62,000           +37,050   ................          +62,000
        Long range surveillance aircraft..........................  ................  ................           62,000   ................  ................  ................          -62,000
        HH-65 acquisition/conversion/sustainment..................  ................  ................           61,000   ................  ................  ................          -61,000
        HH-65 conversion/sustainment projects.....................  ................           24,000   ................           24,000           +24,000   ................          +24,000
        HC-130J Fleet introduction................................            3,992   ................  ................  ................           -3,992   ................  ................
        Unmanned aircraft systems.................................  ................  ................            2,000   ................  ................  ................           -2,000
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal................................................          100,798           289,900           328,900           264,900          +164,102           -25,000           -64,000
 
    Other:
        Government program management.............................           44,910            35,000            30,000            30,000           -14,910            -5,000   ................
        Systems engineering and integration.......................           28,942            17,140            17,140            17,140           -11,802   ................  ................
        C\4\ISR...................................................           30,439            34,500            44,500            34,500            +4,061   ................          -10,000
        Technology obsolesce prevention...........................              998   ................  ................  ................             -998   ................  ................
        CG-LIMS...................................................  ................            6,500             6,500             6,500            +6,500   ................  ................
        Nationwide automatic identification system (NAIS).........  ................            5,000             5,000             5,000            +5,000   ................  ................
        National distress and response system Rescue 21...........           35,928            65,000            65,000            65,000           +29,072   ................  ................
        Interagency operational centers...........................  ................            3,000             3,000             3,000            +3,000   ................  ................
        Deepwater Logistics.......................................           49,900   ................  ................  ................          -49,900   ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal................................................          191,117           166,140           171,140           161,140           -29,977            -5,000           -10,000
 
    Shore Facilities and Aids to Navigation:
        Major Shore, ATON and Survey and design...................           63,867            92,900            50,000            92,900           +29,033   ................          +42,900
        Major acquisition systems infrastructure..................  ................           94,500            66,000            94,500           +94,500   ................          +28,500
        Minor shore...............................................            3,199             6,292   ................            6,292            +3,093   ................           +6,292
        Military housing..........................................            1,996   ................  ................  ................           -1,996   ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal................................................           69,062           193,692           116,000           193,692          +124,630   ................          +77,692
 
    Military housing..............................................  ................           20,000   ................           20,000           +20,000   ................          +20,000
 
    Personnel and related support:
        Core acquisition costs....................................              509               600               600               600               +91   ................  ................
        Direct personnel costs....................................          105,362           109,592           107,342           109,592            +4,230   ................           +2,250
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal................................................          105,871           110,192           107,942           110,192            +4,321   ................           +2,250
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Acquisition, construction, and improvements...        1,516,744         1,421,924         1,151,673         1,391,924          -124,820           -30,000          +240,251
 
Research, development, test, and evaluation.......................           24,696            19,779            12,779            27,779            +3,083            +8,000           +15,000
Health care fund contribution (permanent indefinite discretionary)          265,321           261,871           261,871           261,871            -3,450   ................  ................
Retired pay (mandatory)...........................................        1,400,700         1,440,157         1,440,157         1,440,157           +39,457   ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Coast Guard..........................................       10,248,029        10,116,713        10,079,517        10,350,762          +102,733          +234,049          +271,245
          Appropriations..........................................       (9,994,029)      (10,116,713)       (9,821,239)      (10,092,762)         (+98,733)         (-23,951)        (+271,523)
          Overseas contingency operations.........................         (254,000)  ................         (258,278)         (258,000)          (+4,000)        (+258,000)            (-278)
      (Mandatory).................................................       (1,400,700)       (1,440,157)       (1,440,157)       (1,440,157)         (+39,457)  ................  ................
      (Discretionary).............................................       (8,847,329)       (8,676,556)       (8,639,360)       (8,910,605)         (+63,276)        (+234,049)        (+271,245)
 
                   United States Secret Service
 
Salaries and expenses:
    Protection:
        Protection of persons and facilities......................          769,978           847,963           847,963           831,963           +61,985           -16,000           -16,000
        Protective intelligence activities........................           67,688            68,125            68,125            68,125              +437   ................  ................
        National special security event fund......................              998            19,307            12,307            19,307           +18,309   ................           +7,000
        Presidential candidate nominee protection.................           17,831           113,462           113,462           113,462           +95,631   ................  ................
        White House mail screening................................           22,370            24,315            24,315            18,472            -3,898            -5,843            -5,843
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal................................................          878,865         1,073,172         1,066,172         1,051,329          +172,464           -21,843           -14,843
 
    Investigations:
        Domestic field operations.................................          256,897           223,991           223,991           223,991           -32,906   ................  ................
        International field office administration, operations, and           30,644            30,971            30,971            32,971            +2,327            +2,000            +2,000
         training.................................................
        Electronic crimes special agent program and electronic               56,042            53,051            53,051            53,051            -2,991   ................  ................
         crimes task forces.......................................
        Support for missing and exploited children................            8,349             8,366             8,366             8,366               +17   ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal................................................          351,932           316,379           316,379           318,379           -33,553            +2,000            +2,000
 
    Headquarters, management and administration...................          226,284           246,602           228,302           201,088           -25,196           -45,514           -27,214
    Rowley training center........................................           54,251            55,598            55,598            55,598            +1,347   ................  ................
    Information integration & technology transformation...........  ................  ................  ................           43,843           +43,843           +43,843           +43,843
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Salaries and expenses.............................        1,511,332         1,691,751         1,666,451         1,670,237          +158,905           -21,514            +3,786
 
Acquisition, construction, improvements, and related expenses.....            3,967             6,780             6,780             5,380            +1,413            -1,400            -1,400
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, United States Secret Service.........................        1,515,299         1,698,531         1,673,231         1,675,617          +160,318           -22,914            +2,386
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
      Total, title II, Security, Enforcement, and Investigations..       32,440,178        33,196,186        33,150,360        33,108,434          +668,256           -87,752           -41,926
              Appropriations......................................      (32,186,178)      (33,212,486)      (32,892,082)      (32,850,434)        (+664,256)        (-362,052)         (-41,648)
              Overseas deployments and other activities...........         (254,000)  ................         (258,278)         (258,000)          (+4,000)        (+258,000)            (-278)
              Rescissions/cancellations...........................  ................         (-16,300)  ................  ................  ................         (+16,300)  ................
          (Fee Accounts)..........................................       (1,717,775)       (1,820,374)       (1,765,374)       (1,765,374)         (+47,599)         (-55,000)  ................
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
    TITLE III--PROTECTION, PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND RECOVERY
 
           National Protection and Programs Directorate
 
Management and administration:
    Administrative activities.....................................           34,613            45,634            33,634            33,634              -979           -12,000   ................
    Risk management and analysis..................................            8,877             9,522             8,877             4,241            -4,636            -5,281            -4,636
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................           43,490            55,156            42,511            37,875            -5,615           -17,281            -4,636
 
Infrastructure Protection and Information Security:
    Infrastructure protection:
        Infrastructure analysis and planning......................           80,170            74,518            71,518            72,700            -7,470            -1,818            +1,182
        Sector management and governance..........................           82,194            87,045            81,545            84,000            +1,806            -3,045            +2,455
        Regional field operations.................................           64,742            61,367            57,367            61,367            -3,375   ................           +4,000
        Infrastructure security compliance........................           95,930            99,348            91,848            99,348            +3,418   ................           +7,500
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Infrastructure protection.....................          323,036           322,278           302,278           317,415            -5,621            -4,863           +15,137
 
    Assistant Secretary for Cybersecurity/Communication...........  ................            4,744   ................            4,744            +4,744   ................           +4,744
 
    Information Security:
        Cybersecurity:
            Cybersecurity Coordination............................            4,990             5,000             4,000             5,000               +10   ................           +1,000
            U.S. Computer Response Team (US-CERT) Opera-  tions...           77,432            82,114            79,116            80,000            +2,568            -2,114              +884
            Federal Network Security..............................           19,651            40,923            28,924            35,000           +15,349            -5,923            +6,076
            Network Security Deployment...........................          176,017           233,602           229,101           232,500           +56,483            -1,102            +3,399
            Global Cyber Security Management......................           17,506            24,527            24,527            24,527            +7,021   ................  ................
            Critical Infrastructure/Cyber Protect/Awareness.......           52,637            61,364            61,364            61,364            +8,727   ................  ................
            Business Operations...................................           14,821            11,568            11,568            11,568            -3,253   ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Cybersecurity.............................          363,054           459,098           438,600           449,959           +86,905            -9,139           +11,359
 
    Telecommunications:
        Priority telecommunications services......................           56,170            56,824            56,824            56,824              +654   ................  ................
        Programs to study and enhance telecommunications..........           16,624            13,441            13,441            13,441            -3,183   ................  ................
        Critical infrastructure protection programs...............           14,854            11,352            11,352            11,352            -3,502   ................  ................
        Next generation networks..................................           21,053            25,253            25,253            21,053   ................           -4,200            -4,200
        Office of emergency communications........................           43,972            43,495            43,495            43,495              -477   ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Telecommunications............................          152,673           150,365           150,365           146,165            -6,508            -4,200            -4,200
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Information Security..........................          515,727           609,463           588,965           596,124           +80,397           -13,339            +7,159
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Infrastructure Protection and Information               838,763           936,485           891,243           918,283           +79,520           -18,202           +27,040
           Security...............................................
 
Federal Protective Service:
    Basic security................................................          220,000           247,478           247,478           247,478           +27,478   ................  ................
    Building-specific security....................................          420,000           501,039           501,039           501,039           +81,039   ................  ................
    Reimbursable Security Fees (contract guard services)..........          475,000           513,020           513,020           513,020           +38,020   ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Federal Protective Service........................        1,115,000         1,261,537         1,261,537         1,261,537          +146,537   ................  ................
      Offsetting collections......................................       -1,115,000        -1,261,537        -1,261,537        -1,261,537          -146,537   ................  ................
 
U.S. Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology............          333,944           302,271           297,402           297,402           -36,542            -4,869   ................
    Rescission....................................................  ................          -25,642   ................  ................  ................          +25,642   ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................          333,944           276,629           297,402           297,402           -36,542           +20,773   ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Protection and Programs Directorate.........        1,216,197         1,268,270         1,231,156         1,253,560           +37,363           -14,710           +22,404
          Appropriations..........................................       (2,331,197)       (2,555,449)       (2,492,693)       (2,515,097)        (+183,900)         (-40,352)         (+22,404)
          Rescissions/cancellations...............................  ................         (-25,642)  ................  ................  ................         (+25,642)  ................
          Offsetting collections..................................      (-1,115,000)      (-1,261,537)      (-1,261,537)      (-1,261,537)        (-146,537)  ................  ................
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
                     Office of Health Affairs
 
BioWatch..........................................................          100,780           115,164           115,164           115,164           +14,384   ................  ................
National biosurveillance integration center.......................            7,000             7,014            12,013             3,514            -3,486            -3,500            -8,499
Rapidly deployable chemical detection system......................            2,400   ................  ................  ................           -2,400   ................  ................
Chemical defense program..........................................  ................            2,439             2,439             5,439            +5,439            +3,000            +3,000
Planning and coordination.........................................            2,276             6,162             6,162             6,162            +3,886   ................  ................
Salaries and expenses.............................................           26,999            30,170            30,171            29,171            +2,172              -999            -1,000
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of Health Affairs.............................          139,455           160,949           165,949           159,450           +19,995            -1,499            -6,499
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
                Federal Emergency Management Agency
 
Management and administration:
    Operating activities..........................................          744,663           780,492           666,555   ................         -744,663          -780,492          -666,555
        Defense function..........................................          (74,551)          (99,099)          (99,099)  ................         (-74,551)         (-99,099)         (-99,099)
    Urban search and rescue response system.......................           35,180            29,113            35,250   ................          -35,180           -29,113           -35,250
    Office of National Capital Region Coordination................            6,981             5,319             5,493   ................           -6,981            -5,319            -5,493
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................          786,824           814,924           707,298   ................         -786,824          -814,924          -707,298
          (Defense)...............................................          (74,551)          (99,099)          (99,099)  ................         (-74,551)         (-99,099)         (-99,099)
          (Nondefense)............................................         (712,273)         (715,825)         (608,199)  ................        (-712,273)        (-715,825)        (-608,199)
 
    (Transfer from Disaster relief fund)..........................         (105,389)  ................         (105,600)  ................        (-105,389)  ................        (-105,600)
    (Transfer from state and local programs)......................         (129,052)         (184,544)         (100,000)  ................        (-129,052)        (-184,544)        (-100,000)
    (Available from firefighter assistance grants)................          (46,886)  ................          (67,000)  ................         (-46,886)  ................         (-67,000)
    (Available from emergency mgnt performance grants)............          (10,180)  ................          (35,000)  ................         (-10,180)  ................         (-35,000)
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Management and administration.....................        1,078,331           999,468         1,014,898   ................       -1,078,331          -999,468        -1,014,898
 
Operating expenses:
    Administrative and regional offices...........................  ................  ................  ................          112,157          +112,157          +112,157          +112,157
        Office of National Capital Region Coordination............  ................  ................  ................           (6,981)          (+6,981)          (+6,981)          (+6,981)
    Preparedness and protection...................................  ................  ................  ................          117,373          +117,373          +117,373          +117,373
    Response......................................................  ................  ................  ................          226,228          +226,228          +226,228          +226,228
        Urban search and rescue response system...................  ................  ................  ................          (41,250)         (+41,250)         (+41,250)         (+41,250)
    Recovery......................................................  ................  ................  ................           80,373           +80,373           +80,373           +80,373
    Mitigation....................................................  ................  ................  ................           43,675           +43,675           +43,675           +43,675
    Mission support...............................................  ................  ................  ................          210,271          +210,271          +210,271          +210,271
    Centrally managed accounts....................................  ................  ................  ................          114,473          +114,473          +114,473          +114,473
        Defense function..........................................  ................  ................  ................          (99,099)         (+99,099)         (+99,099)         (+99,099)
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal................................................  ................  ................  ................          904,550          +904,550          +904,550          +904,550
              (Defense)...........................................  ................  ................  ................          (99,099)         (+99,099)         (+99,099)         (+99,099)
              (Nondefense)........................................  ................  ................  ................         (805,451)        (+805,451)        (+805,451)        (+805,451)
 
    (Transfer from state and local programs)......................  ................  ................  ................          (85,647)         (+85,647)         (+85,647)         (+85,647)
    (Available from firefighter assistance grants)................  ................  ................  ................          (37,500)         (+37,500)         (+37,500)         (+37,500)
    (Available from emergency mgmt performance grants)............  ................  ................  ................          (10,500)         (+10,500)         (+10,500)         (+10,500)
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operating expenses................................  ................  ................  ................        1,038,197        +1,038,197        +1,038,197        +1,038,197
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Management & admin/Operating expenses.............        1,078,331           999,468         1,014,898         1,038,197           -40,134           +38,729           +23,299
 
Grants and Training:
    State and local programs:
        Homeland security.........................................  ................  ................          752,337   ................  ................  ................         -752,337
        State Homeland Security Grant Program.....................          578,840   ................  ................          380,000          -198,840          +380,000          +380,000
            Operation Stonegarden.................................           54,890   ................           55,000            50,000            -4,890           +50,000            -5,000
            Driver's license security grants......................           44,910   ................  ................  ................          -44,910   ................  ................
            Citizen Corps.........................................            9,980   ................  ................  ................           -9,980   ................  ................
            Metropolitan medical response.........................           34,930   ................  ................  ................          -34,930   ................  ................
        Urban area security initiative............................          723,550   ................  ................          400,000          -323,550          +400,000          +400,000
            Nonprofit security grants.............................          (19,000)  ................  ................          (10,000)          (-9,000)         (+10,000)         (+10,000)
        Regional catastrophic preparedness grants.................           14,970   ................  ................  ................          -14,970   ................  ................
 
        Public transportation security assistance and railroad              249,500   ................  ................          200,000           -49,500          +200,000          +200,000
         security assistance......................................
            Amtrak security.......................................          (19,960)  ................  ................          (20,000)             (+40)         (+20,000)         (+20,000)
            Over-the-road bus security assistance.................           (4,990)  ................  ................  ................          (-4,990)  ................  ................
        Port security grants......................................          249,500   ................  ................          200,000           -49,500          +200,000          +200,000
        Buffer Zone Protection Program grants.....................  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................
        Emergency Operations Centers..............................           14,970   ................  ................           15,000               +30           +15,000           +15,000
 
        National Programs:
            National Domestic Preparedness Consortium.............           92,814   ................           44,500   ................          -92,814   ................          -44,500
            Center for Domestic Preparedness......................           62,375   ................           62,500   ................          -62,375   ................          -62,500
            National exercise program.............................           39,920   ................           40,000   ................          -39,920   ................          -40,000
            Technical assistance..................................           10,978   ................           10,000   ................          -10,978   ................          -10,000
            Continuing training grants............................           28,942   ................           25,663   ................          -28,942   ................          -25,663
            Evaluations and assessments...........................           13,972   ................           10,000   ................          -13,972   ................          -10,000
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal............................................          249,001   ................          192,663   ................         -249,001   ................         -192,663
 
        Education, Training, and Exercises:
            Emergency Management Institute........................  ................  ................  ................           16,181           +16,181           +16,181           +16,181
            Center for Domestic Preparedness......................  ................  ................  ................           62,500           +62,500           +62,500           +62,500
            National Domestic Preparedness Consortium.............  ................  ................  ................           93,000           +93,000           +93,000           +93,000
            National Exercise Program.............................  ................  ................  ................           34,000           +34,000           +34,000           +34,000
            Continuing training...................................  ................  ................  ................           26,000           +26,000           +26,000           +26,000
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Education, Training & Exercises...........  ................  ................  ................          231,681          +231,681          +231,681          +231,681
 
        State and Regional Preparedness Program:
            State Homeland Security Grant Program.................  ................        1,050,000   ................  ................  ................       -1,050,000   ................
            Operation Stonegarden.................................  ................          (50,000)  ................  ................  ................         (-50,000)  ................
            Citizen Corps Grants..................................  ................           13,000   ................  ................  ................          -13,000   ................
            Assistance to Firefighters Grants.....................  ................          670,000   ................  ................  ................         -670,000   ................
            Emergency Management Performance Grants...............  ................          350,000   ................  ................  ................         -350,000   ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, State and Regional Preparedness Program...  ................        2,083,000   ................  ................  ................       -2,083,000   ................
 
        Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) Preparedness Program:
            Urban Area Security Initiative........................  ................          920,000   ................  ................  ................         -920,000   ................
            Port Security Grants..................................  ................          300,000   ................  ................  ................         -300,000   ................
            Rail/Public Transportation Security Grants............  ................          300,000   ................  ................  ................         -300,000   ................
            Amtrak................................................  ................          (20,000)  ................  ................  ................         (-20,000)  ................
            Buffer Zone Protection Program........................  ................           50,000   ................  ................  ................          -50,000   ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, MSA Preparedness Program..................  ................        1,570,000   ................  ................  ................       -1,570,000   ................
 
        Training, Measurement and Exercise Program:
            National Exercise Program.............................  ................           40,000   ................  ................  ................          -40,000   ................
            Continuing training Grants............................  ................           20,663   ................  ................  ................          -20,663   ................
            Center for Domestic Preparedness......................  ................           62,500   ................  ................  ................          -62,500   ................
            National Domestic Preparedness Consortium.............  ................           44,500   ................  ................  ................          -44,500   ................
            Technical assistance and evaluation...................  ................           24,000   ................  ................  ................          -24,000   ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Training, Measurement and Exercise Program  ................          191,663   ................  ................  ................         -191,663   ................
 
        (Defense function)........................................  ................          (50,000)          (50,000)          (50,000)         (+50,000)  ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, State and Local Programs......................        2,225,041         3,844,663         1,000,000         1,476,681          -748,360        -2,367,982          +476,681
              (Defense)...........................................  ................          (50,000)          (50,000)          (50,000)         (+50,000)  ................  ................
              (Nondefense)........................................       (2,225,041)       (3,794,663)         (950,000)       (1,426,681)        (-798,360)      (-2,367,982)        (+476,681)
 
        (transfer to Operating expenses)..........................        (-129,052)        (-184,544)        (-100,000)         (-85,647)         (+43,405)         (+98,897)         (+14,353)
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, State and Local Programs (net)................        2,095,989         3,660,119           900,000         1,391,034          -704,955        -2,269,085          +491,034
 
    Firefighter assistance grants:
        Fire grants...............................................          404,190   ................          335,000           375,000           -29,190          +375,000           +40,000
        Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response (SAFER)           404,190   ................          335,000           375,000           -29,190          +375,000           +40,000
         Act grants...............................................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal..............................................          808,380   ................          670,000           750,000           -58,380          +750,000           +80,000
 
        (available to Operating expenses).........................         (-46,886)  ................         (-35,000)         (-37,500)          (+9,386)         (-37,500)          (-2,500)
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Firefighter assistance grants.................          761,494   ................          635,000           712,500           -48,994          +712,500           +77,500
 
    Emergency management performance grants.......................          339,320   ................          350,000           350,000           +10,680          +350,000   ................
        (available to Operating expenses).........................         (-10,180)  ................         (-35,000)         (-10,500)            (-320)         (-10,500)         (+24,500)
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal................................................          329,140   ................          315,000           339,500           +10,360          +339,500           +24,500
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Grants and training...........................        3,372,741         3,844,663         2,020,000         2,576,681          -796,060        -1,267,982          +556,681
 
Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program.......................             -265              -896              -896              -896              -631   ................  ................
United States Fire Administration.................................           45,497            42,538            42,538            45,038              -459            +2,500            +2,500
 
Disaster Relief Fund..............................................        2,644,700         1,800,000         2,650,000         1,800,000          -844,700   ................         -850,000
    (Disaster relief category)....................................  ................  ................  ................        4,200,000        +4,200,000        +4,200,000        +4,200,000
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Disaster Relief Fund..............................        2,644,700         1,800,000         2,650,000         6,000,000        +3,355,300        +4,200,000        +3,350,000
 
    (transfer to Operating expenses)..............................        (-105,389)  ................        (-105,600)  ................        (+105,389)  ................        (+105,600)
    (transfer to Inspector General)...............................         (-15,968)  ................         (-16,000)         (-16,000)             (-32)         (-16,000)  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, net of transfers..................................        2,523,343         1,800,000         2,528,400         5,984,000        +3,460,657        +4,184,000        +3,455,600
 
Disaster assistance direct loan program account:
    (Limitation on direct loans)..................................          (25,000)          (25,000)          (25,000)          (25,000)  ................  ................  ................
    Direct loan subsidy...........................................              294               295               296               295                +1   ................               -1
Flood hazard mapping and risk analysis............................          181,636           102,712           102,712            92,712           -88,924           -10,000           -10,000
 
National flood insurance fund:
    Salaries and expenses.........................................           22,145            22,000            22,000            22,000              -145   ................  ................
    Flood plain management and mapping............................          146,855           149,000           149,000           149,000            +2,145   ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................          169,000           171,000           171,000           171,000            +2,000   ................  ................
    Offsetting fee collections....................................         -169,000          -171,000          -171,000          -171,000            -2,000   ................  ................
 
National predisaster mitigation fund..............................           49,900            84,937            40,000            42,500            -7,400           -42,437            +2,500
Emergency food and shelter........................................          119,760           100,000           120,000           120,000              +240           +20,000   ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Emergency Management Agency..................        7,201,087         6,789,173         5,681,948         9,780,880        +2,579,793        +2,991,707        +4,098,932
      (by transfer)...............................................         (291,507)         (184,544)         (307,600)         (133,647)        (-157,860)         (-50,897)        (-173,953)
      (transfer out)..............................................        (-307,475)        (-184,544)        (-291,600)        (-149,647)        (+157,828)         (+34,897)        (+141,953)
      (Limitation on direct loans)................................          (25,000)          (25,000)          (25,000)          (25,000)  ................  ................  ................
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
      Total, title III, Protection, Preparedness, Response and            8,556,739         8,218,392         7,079,053        11,193,890        +2,637,151        +2,975,498        +4,114,837
       Recovery Directorate.......................................
          Appropriations..........................................       (8,556,739)       (8,244,034)       (7,079,053)       (6,993,890)      (-1,562,849)      (-1,250,144)         (-85,163)
          Rescissions.............................................  ................         (-25,642)  ................  ................  ................         (+25,642)  ................
          Disaster relief category................................  ................  ................  ................       (4,200,000)      (+4,200,000)      (+4,200,000)      (+4,200,000)
      By transfer.................................................         (291,507)         (184,544)         (307,600)         (133,647)        (-157,860)         (-50,897)        (-173,953)
      Transfer out................................................        (-307,475)        (-184,544)        (-291,600)        (-149,647)        (+157,828)         (+34,897)        (+141,953)
      (Limitation on direct loans)................................          (25,000)          (25,000)          (25,000)          (25,000)  ................  ................  ................
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
    TITLE IV--RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, TRAINING, AND SERVICES
 
        United States Citizenship and Immigration Services
 
Appropriations:
    Acquisition workforce.........................................  ................            1,467   ................  ................  ................           -1,467   ................
    Data center consolidation.....................................            2,157            12,500   ................           10,500            +8,343            -2,000           +10,500
    Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlements................  ................           29,937            29,937   ................  ................          -29,937           -29,937
    E-Verify program..............................................          103,193           102,424           102,424           102,424              -769   ................  ................
    Immigrant integration programs................................           11,000            19,749   ................            8,000            -3,000           -11,749            +8,000
    Asylum and refugee services...................................           29,950           203,400   ................  ................          -29,950          -203,400   ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................          146,300           369,477           132,361           120,924           -25,376          -248,553           -11,437
 
Adjudication services (fee account):
    District operations...........................................       (1,169,135)       (1,157,137)  ................       (1,157,137)         (-11,998)  ................      (+1,157,137)
    Service center operations.....................................         (508,281)         (519,518)  ................         (519,518)         (+11,237)  ................        (+519,518)
    Asylum, Refugee and International Operations..................          (62,630)          (88,364)  ................         (291,764)        (+229,134)        (+203,400)        (+291,764)
    Records operations............................................         (102,471)         (103,902)  ................         (103,902)          (+1,431)  ................        (+103,902)
    Business transformation.......................................         (164,025)         (234,400)  ................         (234,400)         (+70,375)  ................        (+234,400)
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Adjudication services.............................        2,006,542         2,103,321   ................        2,306,721          +300,179          +203,400        +2,306,721
 
Information and customer services (fee account):
    Information and customer services.............................          (83,501)          (85,773)  ................          (85,773)          (+2,272)  ................         (+85,773)
 
Administration (fee account):
    Administration................................................         (336,514)         (348,295)  ................         (348,295)         (+11,781)  ................        (+348,295)
Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlements (SAVE) (fee          ................  ................  ................          (29,937)         (+29,937)         (+29,937)         (+29,937)
 account).........................................................
 
Immigration Examinations Fee Account:
    Adjudication services:
        District operations.......................................  ................  ................       (1,132,630)  ................  ................  ................      (-1,132,630)
        Service center operations.................................  ................  ................         (494,333)  ................  ................  ................        (-494,333)
        Asylum, refugee and international operations..............  ................  ................         (293,978)  ................  ................  ................        (-293,978)
        International operations..................................  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................
        Records operations........................................  ................  ................         (103,902)  ................  ................  ................        (-103,902)
        Business transformation...................................  ................  ................         (234,400)  ................  ................  ................        (-234,400)
            (Digitization program) display only non-add...........  ................  ................          (29,000)  ................  ................  ................         (-29,000)
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal............................................  ................  ................        2,259,243   ................  ................  ................       -2,259,243
 
    Information and customer services:
        Operating expenses........................................  ................  ................          (85,773)  ................  ................  ................         (-85,773)
 
    Administration:
        Operating expenses........................................  ................  ................         (348,295)  ................  ................  ................        (-348,295)
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Immigration Examinations Fee Acct.............  ................  ................        2,693,311   ................  ................  ................       -2,693,311
 
H1-B Visa Fee Account:
    Adjudication services:
        Service center operations.................................  ................  ................          (13,000)  ................  ................  ................         (-13,000)
 
H1-B and L Fraud Prevention Fee Account:
    Adjudication services:
        District operations.......................................  ................  ................          (24,507)  ................  ................  ................         (-24,507)
        Asylum and refugee operating expenses.....................  ................  ................           (1,386)  ................  ................  ................          (-1,386)
        Service center operations.................................  ................  ................          (12,185)  ................  ................  ................         (-12,185)
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal................................................  ................  ................           38,078   ................  ................  ................          -38,078
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Total, United States Citizenship and Immigration               (2,572,857)       (2,906,866)       (2,876,750)       (2,891,650)        (+318,793)         (-15,216)         (+14,900)
           Services...............................................
              Appropriations......................................         (146,300)         (369,477)         (132,361)         (120,924)         (-25,376)        (-248,553)         (-11,437)
 
              Fee accounts........................................       (2,426,557)       (2,537,389)       (2,744,389)       (2,770,726)        (+344,169)        (+233,337)         (+26,337)
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
              Federal Law Enforcement Training Center
 
Salaries and expenses:
    Law enforcement training......................................          234,141           207,937           207,937           207,937           -26,204   ................  ................
    Management and administration.................................  ................           29,716            29,716            29,716           +29,716   ................  ................
    Accreditation.................................................            1,306             1,304             1,304             1,304                -2   ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Salaries and expenses.............................          235,447           238,957           238,957           238,957            +3,510   ................  ................
 
Acquisitions, construction, improvements, and related expenses:              35,385            37,456            35,456            33,456            -1,929            -4,000            -2,000
 direct appropriation.............................................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Law Enforcement Training Center..............          270,832           276,413           274,413           272,413            +1,581            -4,000            -2,000
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
                      Science and Technology
 
Management and administration.....................................          140,918           149,365           140,565           143,000            +2,082            -6,365            +2,435
 
Research, development, acquisition, and operations:
    Border and maritime security..................................           32,167   ................  ................  ................          -32,167   ................  ................
    Chemical and biological.......................................          166,577   ................  ................  ................         -166,577   ................  ................
    Command, control, and interoperability........................           68,593   ................  ................  ................          -68,593   ................  ................
    Explosives....................................................          111,813   ................  ................  ................         -111,813   ................  ................
    Human factors.................................................           11,458   ................  ................  ................          -11,458   ................  ................
    Infrastructure and geophysical................................           25,056   ................  ................  ................          -25,056   ................  ................
    Innovation....................................................           31,330   ................  ................  ................          -31,330   ................  ................
    Test and evaluations/standards................................           18,130   ................  ................  ................          -18,130   ................  ................
    Transition....................................................           41,645   ................  ................  ................          -41,645   ................  ................
    Research, development, and innovation.........................  ................          659,850           106,500           439,783          +439,783          -220,067          +333,283
        Apex R&D..................................................  ................          (17,900)  ................  ................  ................         (-17,900)  ................
        Border Security...........................................  ................          (42,965)  ................  ................  ................         (-42,965)  ................
        Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and..........  ................         (342,462)  ................  ................  ................        (-342,462)  ................
        Counter Terrorism Defense.................................  ................          (26,707)  ................  ................  ................         (-26,707)  ................
        Cyber Security............................................  ................          (64,102)  ................  ................  ................         (-64,102)  ................
        Disaster Resilience.......................................  ................         (165,714)  ................  ................  ................        (-165,714)  ................
    Acquisition and operations support............................  ................           54,154            53,650            54,154           +54,154   ................             +504
    Laboratory facilities(operations and construction)............          140,000           276,500           201,500           126,500           -13,500          -150,000           -75,000
    University programs...........................................           39,890            36,563            36,563            36,563            -3,327   ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................          686,659         1,027,067           398,213           657,000           -29,659          -370,067          +258,787
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Science and Technology...............................          827,577         1,176,432           538,778           800,000           -27,577          -376,432          +261,222
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
                 Domestic Nuclear Detection Office
 
Management and administration.....................................           36,918            41,120            40,000            37,000               +82            -4,120            -3,000
 
Research, development, and operations:
    Systems engineering and architecture..........................           33,195            31,858            30,000            31,230            -1,965              -628            +1,230
    Systems development...........................................           52,851            69,689            69,000            60,000            +7,149            -9,689            -9,000
    Transformational research and development.....................           96,326   ................           45,000   ................          -96,326   ................          -45,000
    Assessments...................................................           38,139            43,104            40,000            40,000            +1,861            -3,104   ................
    Operations support............................................           32,756            36,837            36,424            35,000            +2,244            -1,837            -1,424
    National Technical Nuclear Forensics Center...................           21,619            24,770            24,770            24,770            +3,151   ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................          274,886           206,258           245,194           191,000           -83,886           -15,258           -54,194
 
Systems acquisition:
    RPM/ASP program...............................................  ................           37,361            20,000             8,000            +8,000           -29,361           -12,000
    Securing the Cities...........................................           19,940            27,000            22,000            22,000            +2,060            -5,000   ................
    HPRDS program.................................................           10,000            20,000            10,000            10,000   ................          -10,000   ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................           29,940            84,361            52,000            40,000           +10,060           -44,361           -12,000
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Domestic Nuclear Detection Office....................          341,744           331,739           337,194           268,000           -73,744           -63,739           -69,194
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
      Total, title IV, Research and Development, Training, and            1,586,453         2,154,061         1,282,746         1,461,337          -125,116          -692,724          +178,591
       Services...................................................
      (Fee Accounts)..............................................       (2,426,557)       (2,537,389)       (2,744,389)       (2,770,726)        (+344,169)        (+233,337)         (+26,337)
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
                    TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS
 
Rescissions.......................................................         -556,907   ................  ................  ................         +556,907   ................  ................
NSSE reimbursement fund...........................................            7,485   ................  ................  ................           -7,485   ................  ................
ICE Salaries and expenses (rescission)............................  ................  ................          -20,997   ................  ................  ................          +20,997
Violent crime reduction programs (rescission).....................  ................  ................             -595   ................  ................  ................             +595
ICE construction (rescission).....................................  ................  ................          -11,300   ................  ................  ................          +11,300
NSSE Reimbursement funds..........................................  ................  ................  ................           10,000           +10,000           +10,000           +10,000
Data center migration.............................................  ................  ................  ................           15,000           +15,000           +15,000           +15,000
St. Elizabeths/Mission support....................................           77,245           215,273   ................           55,979           -21,266          -159,294           +55,979
Reimbursement for Spills of National Significance (Sec. 560)......  ................  ................  ................            1,000            +1,000            +1,000            +1,000
CG AC&I aircraft replacement (emergency)..........................  ................  ................  ................           18,300           +18,300           +18,300           +18,300
CG AC&I (rescission, emergency)...................................  ................  ................  ................           -7,300            -7,300            -7,300            -7,300
USCIS (rescission, emergency).....................................  ................  ................  ................           -7,000            -7,000            -7,000            -7,000
TSA Aviation Security (rescission, emergency).....................  ................  ................  ................           -4,000            -4,000            -4,000            -4,000
CG AC&I (rescission) (legacy).....................................  ................  ................  ................           -2,577            -2,577            -2,577            -2,577
ICE S&E (rescission) (legacy).....................................  ................  ................  ................           -4,000            -4,000            -4,000            -4,000
Violent Crime (rescission) (legacy)...............................  ................  ................  ................             -407              -407              -407              -407
DHS Office for Domestic Preparedness (rescission).................  ................  ................  ................           -3,121            -3,121            -3,121            -3,121
FEMA National Pre-Disaster Mitigation Fund (legacy) (rescission)..  ................  ................  ................             -678              -678              -678              -678
CBP S&E (rescission) (legacy).....................................  ................  ................  ................           -7,101            -7,101            -7,101            -7,101
ICE S&E (rescission)..............................................  ................  ................  ................           -7,000            -7,000            -7,000            -7,000
ICE Auto Mod (rescission).........................................  ................  ................  ................          -10,000           -10,000           -10,000           -10,000
TSA (rescission)..................................................  ................  ................  ................          -48,503           -48,503           -48,503           -48,503
S&T RDA&O (rescission)............................................  ................  ................  ................          -20,000           -20,000           -20,000           -20,000
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
      Total, title V, General Provisions..........................         -472,177           215,273           -32,892           -21,408          +450,769          -236,681           +11,484
          Appropriations..........................................          (84,730)         (215,273)  ................          (81,979)          (-2,751)        (-133,294)         (+81,979)
          Emergency appropriations................................  ................  ................  ................          (18,300)         (+18,300)         (+18,300)         (+18,300)
          Rescissions.............................................        (-556,907)  ................         (-32,892)        (-103,387)        (+453,520)        (-103,387)         (-70,495)
          Rescission of emergency appropriations..................  ................  ................  ................         (-18,300)         (-18,300)         (-18,300)         (-18,300)
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
   TITLE VI--EMERGENCY SUPPLEMENTAL FUNDING FOR DISASTER RELIEF
 
Section 601:
    Public Law 110-329, Div. A Sec. 129 DOE loan program            ................  ................         -500,000   ................  ................  ................         +500,000
     (rescission of emergency funding)............................
    Transfer from DOE to Disaster Relief (emergency)..............  ................  ................       (1,000,000)  ................  ................  ................      (-1,000,000)
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
      Total, title VI, Emergency Supplemental Funding for Disaster  ................  ................         -500,000   ................  ................  ................         +500,000
       Relief.....................................................
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
      Grand total.................................................       43,321,245        45,015,556        41,789,835        46,898,157        +3,576,912        +1,882,601        +5,108,322
          Mandatory...............................................       (1,400,700)       (1,440,157)       (1,440,157)       (1,440,157)         (+39,457)  ................  ................
          General purpose discretionary...........................      (41,920,545)      (43,575,399)      (40,349,678)      (45,458,000)      (+3,537,455)      (+1,882,601)      (+5,108,322)
              Appropriations......................................      (42,223,452)      (43,617,341)      (40,624,292)      (41,103,387)      (-1,120,065)      (-2,513,954)        (+479,095)
              Emergency appropriations............................  ................  ................  ................          (18,300)         (+18,300)         (+18,300)         (+18,300)
              Overseas contingency operations.....................         (254,000)  ................         (258,278)         (258,000)          (+4,000)        (+258,000)            (-278)
              Disaster relief category............................  ................  ................  ................       (4,200,000)      (+4,200,000)      (+4,200,000)      (+4,200,000)
              Rescission/cancellation.............................        (-556,907)         (-41,942)         (-32,892)        (-103,387)        (+453,520)         (-61,445)         (-70,495)
              Rescission of emergency appropriations..............  ................  ................        (-500,000)         (-18,300)         (-18,300)         (-18,300)        (+481,700)
 
(Fee funded programs).............................................       (4,144,332)       (4,357,763)       (4,509,763)       (4,536,100)        (+391,768)        (+178,337)         (+26,337)
(Limitation on direct loans)......................................          (25,000)          (25,000)          (25,000)          (25,000)  ................  ................  ................
(by transfer).....................................................         (307,475)         (184,544)         (323,600)         (149,647)        (-157,828)         (-34,897)        (-173,953)
(transfer out)....................................................        (-307,475)        (-184,544)        (-291,600)        (-149,647)        (+157,828)         (+34,897)        (+141,953)
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------