H. Rept. 113-116 - 113th Congress (2013-2014)
June 18, 2013, As Reported by the Appropriations Committee

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House Report 113-116 - AGRICULTURE, RURAL DEVELOPMENT, FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2014




[House Report 113-116]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]


113th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                    113-116
======================================================================
 
   AGRICULTURE, RURAL DEVELOPMENT, FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, AND 
               RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2014

                                _______
                                

 June 18, 2013.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

          Mr. Aderholt, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                     MINORITY AND ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 2410]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and 
Drug Administration, and Related Agencies for fiscal year 2014.

                                OVERVIEW

    The fiscal year 2014 discretionary spending in this bill 
totals $19,450,000,000, which is a decrease of $1,286,294,000 
below the fiscal year 2013 enacted level of $20,736,294,000 
(defined as the amount provided within Public Law 113-6 and 
excluding emergency funding, disaster relief adjustments, the 
251A sequester, and any other adjustments imposed by the Office 
of Management and Budget pursuant to section 3004 of Public Law 
113-6), and a decrease of $515,818,000 below the budget request 
level of $19,965,818,000. The President's request did not 
include funding for Food for Peace, Title II grants. Overall, 
the bill results in a reduction of more than six percent in 
discretionary spending from fiscal year 2013.
    The funding levels provided in this appropriations bill 
continue to demonstrate how seriously this Committee takes the 
responsibility to rein in discretionary spending. The 
Committee's actions to reduce spending on the many agencies, 
programs, and activities funded in this bill will help address 
the Nation's debt, deficit, and economic challenges.

                         Oversight and Hearings

    Consistent with the Committee on Appropriations Oversight 
Plan, as approved and transmitted to the Committee on Oversight 
and Government Reform and the Committee on House Administration 
in January 2013, the Subcommittee began the fiscal year 2014 
process by maintaining the Committee's strong commitment to 
comprehensive oversight of Federal discretionary spending under 
the Subcommittee's jurisdiction. In order to thoroughly review 
the President's budget request for fiscal year 2014 and examine 
how funds appropriated in previous years had been managed, the 
Subcommittee held 11 hearings for the mission areas, agencies, 
and programs of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the 
Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Commodity Futures 
Trading Commission (CFTC). The hearings included:
        USDA Food Safety--March 13, 2013
        USDA Food, Nutrition, and Consumer Services--March 14, 
        2013
        USDA Inspector General--March 21, 2013
        Commodity Futures Trading Commission--April 12, 2013
        Secretary of Agriculture--April 16, 2013
        USDA Research, Education, and Economics--April 17, 2013
        USDA Marketing and Regulatory Programs--April 18, 2013
        USDA Rural Development--April 24, 2013
        USDA Natural Resources and Environment--April 24, 2013
        USDA Farm and Foreign Agricultural Services--April 25, 
        2013
        Food and Drug Administration--April 26, 2013
    The Subcommittee began its fiscal year 2014 hearings with 
USDA's Food Safety mission area to investigate the potential 
for meat inspector furloughs to limit the nation's meat and 
poultry supply and cause economic hardship for livestock and 
poultry producers. The Subcommittee next called before it the 
Food, Nutrition, and Consumer Services mission area to review 
USDA's management of the $103 billion in annual spending for 
domestic feeding programs. Unfortunately, these programs have 
high rates of waste, fraud, and abuse, and even though spending 
on them increases every year, management improvements have been 
slow to come. Continuing the discussion, the Subcommittee heard 
from USDA's Office of the Inspector General on its work to find 
and deter this waste, fraud, and abuse, and to improve the 
administration of USDA's numerous agencies and programs. In its 
hearing with CFTC, the Subcommittee questioned the agency's 
emphasis on hiring staff rather than improving technology 
systems to provide the agency a more efficient way to do 
business. The Subcommittee took its concerns directly to USDA 
Secretary Vilsack regarding the accounting and budget gimmicks 
in the budget request that are used to claim savings and sought 
answers on the Department's priorities. Agricultural research 
is a critical part of USDA and is broadly supported by the 
Subcommittee. However, the Subcommittee was disappointed USDA 
did not comply with the request for additional information on 
certain grant programs so the Subcommittee could improve its 
oversight activities. There is a significant opportunity within 
USDA's Marketing and Regulatory Program mission area to 
increase sales of U.S. agricultural products, thus supporting 
U.S. jobs and industry. Yet, the administration nonsensically 
proposed to reduce funding for the Animal and Plant Health 
Inspection Service (APHIS), which is vital to this effort, and 
was discussed in detail in this hearing. The Subcommittee 
focused once again on the struggles of the Natural Resources 
Conservation Service (NRCS) to right the wrongs in its 
financial management and accounting practices and discussed 
Rural Development's proposal to reduce funding by $106 million 
for its water and waste disposal program, which has a backlog 
greater than $3 billion. Rural Development's proposals to 
create a new, unproven $55 million grant program through the 
appropriations process and cuts for rural housing programs 
received skeptical attention. Altogether, the administration's 
proposal is bad news for families and communities in rural 
America. The Subcommittee discussed how agricultural exports 
continue to be a bright spot in our nation's trade balance, but 
that the administration failed to capitalize on that success by 
doing more in this area. Instead the Department focused on an 
effort to move the Food for Peace program from USDA to the U.S. 
Agency for International Development; an idea that has little 
congressional support. In the final hearing on FDA, the 
Subcommittee delved into sequestration in an attempt to 
reconcile the conflicting information provided by the agency 
and administration regarding sequestration's effect on food and 
drug safety.
    The Subcommittee will monitor the issues identified and 
discussed at the hearings, as well as others relevant to the 
management of USDA, FDA, CFTC, and the Farm Credit 
Administration and will maintain its oversight efforts 
throughout the 113th Congress to ensure taxpayer dollars are 
being invested wisely and prudently on behalf of the American 
people.

                                TITLE I


                         AGRICULTURAL PROGRAMS


                 Production, Processing, and Marketing


                        Office of the Secretary


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)



2013 appropriation*...................................       $45,222,000
2014 budget estimate..................................        44,148,000
Provided in the bill..................................        40,516,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................        -4,706,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................       -3,632,000

*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.


    The following table reflects the amount provided by the 
Committee for each office and activity:

                         OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY
                         [Dollars in Thousands]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               Committee
                                          FY 2013*   FY 2014
                                          enacted    estimate  provision
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Office of the Secretary................     $4,924     $5,086     $4,550
Office of Tribal Relations.............        485        502        498
Office of Homeland Security and              1,458      1,507      1,295
 Emergency Coordination................
Office of Advocacy and Outreach........      1,386      1,217      1,185
Office of the Assistant Secretary for          784        809        820
 Administration........................
Departmental Administration............     23,633     22,993     20,760
Office of the Assistant Secretary for        3,772      3,897      3,504
 Congressional Relations...............
Office of Communications...............      8,780      8,137      7,904
                                        --------------------------------
      Total............................    $45,222    $44,148   $40,516
------------------------------------------------------------------------
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Secretary, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $40,516,000. The Committee recommendation 
includes the following offices under the Office of the 
Secretary: Office of the Secretary; Office of Tribal Relations; 
Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Coordination; Office 
of Advocacy and Outreach; Office of the Assistant Secretary for 
Administration; Departmental Administration; Office of the 
Assistant Secretary for Congressional Relations; and Office of 
Communications.
    Pay Cost.--The Committee does not include requested funding 
for a civilian pay increase across the Department. Should the 
President provide a civilian pay increase for 2014, it is 
assumed that the cost of such a pay increase will be absorbed 
within existing appropriations for fiscal year 2014.
    CCC Report.--The Committee directs the Secretary to provide 
a report on November 15, 2013, and May 16, 2014, on planned 
uses of funding under the authorities of Section 4 and Section 
11 of the Commodity Credit Corporation Act.
    Food Aid Reform.--The bill continues to fund Food for Peace 
Title II grants. There is agreement on the goals of reducing 
food insecurity around the globe and furthering the national 
security interests of the United States. However, there 
continues to be disagreement on how to achieve these goals in 
the most efficient and effective manner. The program as 
currently structured almost doubles the return on the 
taxpayer's investment by supporting American jobs and farmers 
while contributing to food security abroad. At this time, the 
Committee cannot agree to the food aid reform proposal. The 
proposed changes could cause the program to operate outside of 
the structure, transparency, and dedicated constituencies 
provided under the Food for Peace Act.
    Notification.--Within 30 days from the enactment of this 
Act, the Secretary shall notify the House and Senate Committees 
on Appropriations on the allocation of the funds provided to 
the Assistant Secretary for Congressional Relations by USDA 
agency, along with an explanation for the agency-by-agency 
distribution of the funds.
    Late Reports.--Reports requested by the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees are an important part of the exercise 
of the Committees' oversight mandate. The Committee is 
concerned by the Department's consistent delinquency in 
completing these reports. The Committee is dismayed that 18 
reports are late, due to excessively long reviews, especially 
in the Office of the Secretary. The Committee finds it 
unacceptable that some reports are almost a year overdue. The 
dates and directives specified in the House, Senate, or 
conference report are mandatory. The Committee reserves the 
right to call before it any agency that does not submit its 
report or reports on time.
    State Office Collocation.--The Committee continues to 
direct that any reallocation of resources related to the 
collocation of state offices scheduled for 2014 and subsequent 
years is subject to the Committee's reprogramming procedures.
    Administrative Provision.--The Committee directs the 
Secretary to advise the Committees on Appropriations, through 
the Office of Budget and Program Analysis, of the status of all 
reports requested of the Department in this bill at the time of 
submission of the fiscal year 2015 budget and monthly 
thereafter. The Committee reminds the Secretary that all 
correspondence related to the directives in this bill must be 
addressed to the Committee on Appropriations.
    Loan and Grant Programs.--The Committee directs the 
Department, through the Office of Budget and Program Analysis, 
to provide quarterly reports to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
on the status of obligations and funds availability for the 
loan and grant programs provided in this bill.
    The Committee further directs that if an estimate of loan 
activity for any program funded in Titles I and III of this 
bill indicates that a limitation on authority to make 
commitments for a fiscal year will be reached before the end of 
that fiscal year, or in any event whenever 75 per centum of the 
authority to make commitments has been utilized, the Secretary 
shall promptly notify the Committees in writing, through the 
Office of Budget and Program Analysis.
    Invasive Species.--The Committee recognizes the threats 
posed by invasive plant species and the need to protect, 
restore, and enhance native plants, including those that are 
endangered or threatened. The Committee encourages the 
Agricultural Research Service, the Natural Resources 
Conservation Service, and the National Institute of Food and 
Agriculture to support the research, education, and 
conservation of native plants.
    BioPreferred Program.--The Committee directs the Department 
to expeditiously implement changes to the program to include 
forest products that meet the biobased content requirements as 
included in the 2013 farm bill.
    Farmer-Owned Cooperatives.--The Committee recognizes USDA's 
long track record working with farmer-owned cooperatives and 
encourages the Secretary to share the Deparment's knowledge and 
best practices with other Federal agencies that have 
cooperative development programs.
    Flexibility in Loan and Loan Guarantee Levels.--The bill 
includes language to exceed by up to 25 percent the limitation 
on loan and loan guarantee levels without budget authority upon 
written notification to the Committees on Appropriations.

                          Executive Operations


                     OFFICE OF THE CHIEF ECONOMIST




2013 appropriation*...................................       $15,606,000
2014 budget estimate..................................        12,854,000
Provided in the bill..................................        15,245,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................          -361,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................       +2,391,000

*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Chief Economist, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $15,245,000.
    Drought Resilience.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance of understanding and being prepared for drought and 
encourages the Office of the Chief Economist to continue to 
work with partners on drought-related issues.
    Policy Research.--The Committee includes $4,000,000 for 
policy research under 7 U.S.C. 3155 for entities with existing 
institutional capacity, including staff, databases, models, and 
long-term, well-documented experience, to conduct complex 
economic and baseline analysis for the benefit of USDA, the 
Congressional Budget Office, and the Congress.

                       NATIONAL APPEALS DIVISION




2013 appropriation*...................................       $13,868,000
2014 budget estimate..................................        12,940,000
Provided in the bill..................................        12,584,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................        -1,284,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................         -356,000

*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the National Appeals Division, the Committee provides 
an appropriation of $12,584,000.

                 OFFICE OF BUDGET AND PROGRAM ANALYSIS




2013 appropriation*...................................        $8,822,000
2014 budget estimate..................................        11,129,000
Provided in the bill..................................         8,767,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................           -55,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................       -2,362,000

*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of Budget and Program Analysis, the 
Committee provides an appropriation of $8,767,000.

                Office of the Chief Information Officer





2013 appropriation*...................................       $42,925,000
2014 budget estimate..................................        44,159,000
Provided in the bill..................................        42,925,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................             - - -
    2014 budget estimate..............................       -1,234,000

*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Chief Information Officer, the 
Committee provides an appropriation of $42,925,000.
    Cybersecurity Priorities.--The Committee continues to be 
concerned with the shortcomings in information technology (IT) 
security efforts at USDA. Despite recent Congressional 
investments and progress under new OCIO leadership, USDA's 
Office of Inspector General's independent evaluation of USDA's 
IT security program and practices in 2012 revealed continued 
material weaknesses in the design and effectiveness of USDA's 
overall IT security program. The Committee directs USDA to 
report to the Committee no later than 60 days after the date of 
enactment on the most recent efforts and progress made toward 
securing IT data and infrastructure from cyber threats.

                 Office of the Chief Financial Officer





2013 appropriation*...................................        $6,090,000
2014 budget estimate..................................         6,243,000
Provided in the bill..................................         6,090,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................             - - -
    2014 budget estimate..............................         -153,000

*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Chief Financial Officer, the 
Committee provides an appropriation of $6,090,000.
    Assessments.--The Committee remains concerned that the 
assessments the Department charges its agencies for government- 
and department-wide activities continue to escalate. Since 
these assessments are borne by the agencies, and Congress did 
not specifically provide increases to the agencies for these 
costs, most of the funding for the increase has come at the 
expense of programs. The Committee continues to direct the 
Office of the Chief Financial Officer to scrutinize the need 
for each activity, to consider its benefit to the mission of 
each agency, and to limit spending wherever possible, 
especially in regards to assessments for the creative media and 
broadcast center; promotional, voluntary activities; and 
activities not specifically authorized by Congress.

           Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights





2013 appropriation*...................................          $871,000
2014 budget estimate..................................           898,000
Provided in the bill..................................           871,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................             - - -
    2014 budget estimate..............................          -27,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, 
the Committee provides an appropriation of $871,000.

                         Office of Civil Rights



2013 appropriation*...................................       $22,122,000
2014 budget estimate..................................        21,550,000
Provided in the bill..................................        20,540,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................        -1,582,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................       -1,010,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of Civil Rights, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $20,540,000.

                  Agriculture Buildings and Facilities


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)


2013 appropriation*...................................      $239,686,000
2014 budget estimate..................................       233,095,000
Provided in the bill..................................        64,658,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................      -175,028,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................     -168,437,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.


    For Agriculture Buildings and Facilities, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $64,658,000. Section 732 requires 
the agencies to fund GSA rental payments from within the 
discretionary levels appropriated in this Act. The Committee is 
concerned that GSA rental expenses have risen by more than 
thirty-three percent over the past ten years, and without more 
agency attention to these costs, GSA rent will continue to 
increase. By requiring agencies to bear the expense of GSA rent 
directly, the Committee expects agencies to focus on ways to 
reduce these costs.
    The following table represents the Committee's specific 
recommendations for this account:

                         [Dollars in Thousands]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     2013    2014 budget     Committee
                                   enacted*    request    recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Rental Payments.................   $175,694     $164,270           - - -
Department of Homeland Security
Building Security...............     13,134       14,000         $13,800
Building Operations.............     50,858       54,825          50,858
Total...........................    239,686      233,095         64,658
------------------------------------------------------------------------
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                     Hazardous Materials Management


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)


2013 appropriation*...................................        $3,892,000
2014 budget estimate..................................         3,600,000
Provided in the bill..................................         3,520,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................          -372,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................          -80,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Hazardous Materials Management, the Committee provides 
an appropriation of $3,520,000.

                      Office of Inspector General



2013 appropriation*...................................       $86,779,000
2014 budget estimate..................................        89,902,000
Provided in the bill..................................        86,779,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................             - - -
    2014 budget estimate..............................       -3,123,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of Inspector General, the Committee provides 
an appropriation of $86,779,000.
    Anti-Fraud Efforts.--The Committee appreciates OIG's 
continued efforts to raise public awareness of successful 
Federal investigations of fraud. Such efforts are intended to 
deter participants from engaging in the misuse of taxpayer 
dollars and to maintain a high level of integrity in all of 
USDA's programs. The Committee encourages OIG to expand its 
efforts, working with all of USDA's agencies to deter fraud, 
waste, and abuse in the Department's programs.

                     Office of the General Counsel



2013 appropriation*...................................       $43,941,000
2014 budget estimate..................................        45,014,000
Provided in the bill..................................        40,558,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................        -3,383,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................       -4,456,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Office of the General Counsel, the Committee provides 
an appropriation of $40,558,000.

                            Office of Ethics



2013 appropriation*...................................        $3,319,000
2014 budget estimate..................................             - - -
Provided in the bill..................................         3,337,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................           +18,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................       +3,337,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of Ethics, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $3,337,000.

  Office of the Under Secretary for Research, Education, and Economics



2013 appropriation*...................................          $871,000
2014 budget estimate..................................           898,000
Provided in the bill..................................           871,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................             - - -
    2014 budget estimate..............................          -27,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Under Secretary for Research, 
Education, and Economics, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $871,000.
    Brown Marmorated Stink Bug.--The Committee appreciates the 
continuing work of ARS and NIFA regarding the Brown Marmorated 
Stink Bug. This pest is causing significant damage to 
agricultural crops, particularly the apple crop in the mid-
Atlantic States, and has spread to more than 30 States and the 
District of Columbia. The Committee encourages ARS and NIFA to 
work collaboratively with APHIS and state partners to identify 
and implement appropriate controls.
    Herbicide Resistance Research.--The Committee encourages 
ARS and NIFA to address herbicide resistance through research, 
education, and extension. Research may include: identification 
of herbicide resistant weed populations, characterization of 
mechanisms of resistance, and development of innovative weed 
management strategies. The Committee encourages ARS and NIFA to 
work closely with NRCS and to incorporate, where appropriate, 
the conservation technical and financial assistance available 
to producers for adopting resistance management strategies.
    Lyme Disease Research.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance of the ongoing research efforts of ARS and NIFA 
regarding tick-borne illnesses. As the agency continues to 
build upon its research efforts to protect humans and livestock 
from tick-borne illnesses, the Committee encourages the ARS, in 
conjunction with other agencies, to maintain its efforts and 
consider both the human and economic impacts of Lyme disease on 
communities in the United States.

                       Economic Research Service



2013 appropriation*...................................       $75,452,000
2014 budget estimate..................................        78,506,000
Provided in the bill..................................        75,452,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................             - - -
    2014 budget estimate..............................       -3,054,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Economic Research Service, the Committee provides 
an appropriation of $75,452,000.
    Local and Regional Food Production.--The Committee directs 
ERS to coordinate USDA's agencies involved in data collection, 
analysis, and research to make available the best data related 
to the production, pricing, distribution, and marketing of 
locally and regionally produced agricultural products and to 
identify data gaps. The Committee requests that ERS provide a 
report that assesses the scope and trends in local and regional 
food systems and to make that report publically available on 
the agency's website.

                National Agricultural Statistics Service



2013 appropriation*...................................      $174,967,000
2014 budget estimate..................................       159,601,000
Provided in the bill..................................       154,762,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................       -20,205,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................       -4,839,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the National Agricultural Statistics Service, the 
Committee provides an appropriation of $154,762,000, of which 
$42,295,000 is for the Census of Agriculture.
    NASS Reports.--The Committee requests NASS to report to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate on the 
resources required to restart surveys and reports for those 
commodities that do not have marketing orders or other publicly 
supported production information by March 1, 2014.

                     Agricultural Research Service


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES


2013 appropriation*...................................    $1,074,163,000
2014 budget estimate..................................     1,124,003,000
Provided in the bill..................................     1,074,163,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................             - - -
    2014 budget estimate..............................      -49,840,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Salaries and Expenses of the Agricultural Research 
Service, the Committee provides an appropriation of 
$1,074,163,000.
    The Committee concurs with the agency's proposed 
redirection of ongoing research within the same location. The 
Committee directs ARS to maintain existing investments before 
beginning any new initiatives.
    Aerial Application Research.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance of the ARS Aerial Application Technology Program. 
The program conducts innovative research making aerial 
applications more efficient, effective, and precise. Research 
for aerial application serves the public good as a vital tool 
for the future, as agriculture strives to meet the food, fiber, 
and bio-energy demands of a growing population.
    Cheat Grass Eradication.--The Committee encourages ARS to 
continue research on cheat grass eradication, control, and the 
reduction of fuel loads, including late-season grazing 
techniques, and to work with the NRCS on this effort.
    Citrus Greening Disease Research.--The Committee commends 
ARS's research efforts on citrus greening disease and 
encourages the agency to continue working to develop methods to 
reduce transmission and enhance immunity in citrus trees and to 
work with industry, universities, growers, and other partners 
to develop effective control mechanisms.
    Classical Plant Breeding.--The Committee is aware of the 
need for classical plant breeding and encourages ARS to invest 
in research to improve genetic resources and cultivars for the 
benefit of U.S. producers, seed companies, processors, and 
consumers. This research should focus on breeding improved 
germplasm and varieties with higher yields, improved disease 
and pest resistance, and resilience to weather extremes. 
Additionally, methods and tools should be developed to enable 
classical breeders to choose better breeding parents and speed 
up variety development.
    Domestic and Bighorn Sheep.--The Committee recognizes the 
challenges caused by infectious disease problems arising from 
wildlife-domestic animal agriculture interactions, particularly 
between domestic sheep and wild bighorn sheep. Research has 
recently produced an experimental vaccine to protect bighorn 
populations from disease but much work still needs to be done 
in this area. The Committee encourages ARS to work to determine 
the role of domestic sheep in causing die-offs of bighorn sheep 
from respiratory disease and develop methods to reduce 
transmission and enhance immunity.
    Emerging Cereal Rust Diseases.--The Committee continues to 
be concerned about emerging cereal rust diseases, particularly 
Ug99, and the threat they pose to domestic and world food 
supplies. The Committee encourages ARS to continue its work on 
these diseases, including the development of Ug99-resistant 
wheat varieties.
    Food Pathogen Detection.--The Committee notes the advances 
in the detection of dangerous pathogens in the food supply and 
encourages ARS to continue research to increase the efficiency 
and cost-effectiveness of new technologies.
    FOV Race 4 Cotton Research.--The Committee recognizes the 
serious threat that fusarium oxysporum f. sp. Vasinfectum 
(FOV), particularly the strain FOV Race 4, poses to the U.S. 
cotton industry. The Committee encourages ARS to continue 
research efforts to combat FOV Race 4 and to work with industry 
and other partners to develop effective control measures to 
eradicate this disease and prevent its spread nationwide.
    Horticultural Research and Education.--The Committee 
recognizes that the U.S. National Arboretum has completed a 
comprehensive strategic plan. This plan emphasizes the role of 
the Arboretum as a center of discovery and education, as well 
as a destination for more than half a million visitors every 
year. This plan effectively captures the essence of the value 
of the Arboretum, and the Committee urges ARS to exercise 
existing authorities and provide the necessary resources to 
support implementation of the plan's goals. The Committee 
requests a report on the progress toward implementation of the 
Arboretum's Strategic Plan by March 1, 2014.
    Human Nutrition Research.--The Committee remains concerned 
about the high rate of obesity in the Nation and believes that 
research on human nutrition to help prevent childhood obesity 
and the medical issues related to obesity are important. In 
addition, there is strong evidence that nutrition plays a vital 
role in how a person ages. The Committee encourages ARS to 
continue research relating both to childhood and adult obesity 
as well as the effect of nutrition on aging.
    Lower Mississippi River Basin.--The Committee recognizes 
the groundwater problems in the Lower Mississippi River Basin 
and encourages ARS to continue research to quantify how 
appropriate use of conservation practices and technology affect 
water quantity.
    National Agricultural Library.--The Committee requests that 
ARS maintain a focus on agriculture-related legal issues within 
the National Agricultural Library. The Committee recognizes 
agriculture-related legal issues are being litigated on an 
increasingly frequent basis, the complexity and scope of these 
legal issues continues to broaden, and that the National 
Agricultural Library plays an important role in assisting all 
stakeholders understand these issues.
    Natural Products Research.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance of developing natural products for use in 
agriculture in order to produce more toxicologically and 
environmentally benign pest management tools and to improve the 
nutriceutical value of crops.
    New England Plant, Soil, and Water Research.--The Committee 
directs ARS to report on its efforts to meet the challenges 
faced by farmers and ranchers in New England and make any 
recommendations to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House and Senate by March 1, 2014.
    Office of Pest Management Policy.--The Committee commends 
the Office of Pest Management Policy for its work providing the 
Department, other Federal agencies, producers, and others 
scientifically sound analysis of pest management issues 
important to agriculture, especially methyl bromide transition 
and pesticide resistance, and encourages the agency to continue 
to support this office.
    Research on Sediments.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance of finding solutions to the problems associated with 
soil erosion, including erosion and sedimentation in stream 
channels and the loss of nutrients and agricultural chemicals 
from farm fields.
    Wheat and Barley Scab Initiative.--The Committee expresses 
support for this initiative and directs the agency to continue 
research on wheat and barley scab and related issues.

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES


2013 appropriation*...................................             - - -
2014 budget estimate..................................      $155,000,000
Provided in the bill..................................             - - -
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................             - - -
    2014 budget estimate..............................     -155,000,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For ARS Buildings and Facilities, the Committee is unable 
to provide funding for new construction due to the tight budget 
cap.

               National Institute of Food and Agriculture


                   RESEARCH AND EDUCATION ACTIVITIES


2013 appropriation*...................................      $720,076,000
2014 budget estimate..................................       801,140,000
Provided in the bill..................................       718,714,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................        -1,362,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................      -82,426,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Research and Education Activities, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $718,714,000.
    Agricultural Research Enhancement Awards.--The Committee 
continues to direct that not less than 10 percent of the 
competitive research grant funds be used for USDA's agriculture 
research enhancement awards program, including USDA-EPSCoR, in 
accordance with 7 U.S.C. 450i.
    Aquaculture Research.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance of the domestic aquaculture industry and encourages 
NIFA to fund research related to genetics, disease, systems, 
and economics.
    Budget Request for Fiscal Year 2015.--For the fiscal year 
2015 budget request, the Committee directs the Department to 
include in the budget funding levels proposed to be allocated 
to and the expected publication date, scope, and allocation 
level for each request for awards to be published under (1) 
each priority area specified in section 2(b)(2) of the 
Competitive, Special, and Facilities Research Grant Act (7 
U.S.C. 450i(b)(2)); (2) each research and extension project 
carried out under section 1621(a) of the Food, Agriculture, 
Conservation, and Trade Act of 1990 (7 U.S.C. 5811(a)); (3) 
each grant awarded under section 1672B(a) of the Food, 
Agriculture, Conservation, and Trade Act of 1990 (7 U.S.C. 
5925b(a)); (4) each research, education, and extension project 
carried out under section 406 of the Research Reform Act of 
1998 (7 U.S.C. 7626); and (5) each research and extension 
project carried out under section 412 of the Agricultural 
Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (7 U.S.C. 
7632). The term `request for awards' means a funding 
announcement published by NIFA that provides detailed 
information on funding opportunities at the Institute, 
including the purpose, eligibility, restrictions, focus areas, 
evaluation criteria, regulatory information, and instructions 
on how to apply for such opportunities.
    Grants for Insular Areas.--The Committee provides 
authorization for Grants for Insular Areas to be used to 
upgrade agriculture and food sciences facilities and equipment 
in addition to being used for resident instruction and distance 
education programs at the land-grant institutions in the 
Insular Areas.
    Livestock and Poultry Waste Research.--The Committee 
recognizes the benefits of improved methods of managing animal 
waste in livestock and poultry production and encourages NIFA 
to support research and development of innovative technologies, 
particularly those that are operationally and economically 
feasible and have a high probability of widespread 
implementation.
    Program Consolidation and Streamlining.--The Committee 
accepts NIFA's proposal to consolidate sustainable agriculture 
programs and pest management programs.
    Regional Research.--The Committee recognizes that State and 
regional research has a history of success in addressing 
critical pest, disease, and production problems specific to 
their region, and that these programs help producers across the 
Nation remain productive.
    STEM Initiatives.--The Committee recognizes the importance 
of programs to advance the education and training of minorities 
in STEM careers for the Nation's national and economic security 
and encourages NIFA to continue to support these initiatives.
    STEM Program Effectiveness.--The Committee is concerned 
about STEM workforce development for underrepresented 
minorities and notes the National Academy of Science's 
recommendations for increasing the participation and success of 
minority students. The Committee encourages the Department to 
emphasize STEM education improvement with the Historically 
Black Colleges and Universities.
    The following table reflects the amount provided by the 
Committee:

                                        RESEARCH AND EDUCATION ACTIVITIES
                                             [Dollars in Thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                    2013       2014    Committee
               Program/Activity                          Authorization            enacted    estimate  provision
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Hatch Act                                      7 U.S.C. 361a-i.................   $230,394   $236,334   $236,334
McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry Act      16 U.S.C. 582a through a-7......     32,106     32,934     32,934
Research at 1890 Institutions (Evans-Allen     7 U.S.C. 3222...................     49,619     50,898     50,898
 Program)
Payments to the 1994 Institutions............  534(a)(1) of P.L. 103-382.......      3,251      3,335      3,335
Education Grants for 1890 Institutions.......  7 U.S.C. 3152(b)................     18,850     19,336     19,336
Education Grants for Hispanic-Serving          7 U.S.C. 3241...................      8,987      9,219      9,219
 Institutions.
Education Grants for Alaska Native and Native  7 U.S.C. 3156...................      3,114      3,194      3,194
 Hawaiian-Serving Institutions
Research Grants for 1994 Institutions........  536 of P.L. 103-382.............      1,756      1,801      1,801
Capacity Building for Non Land-Grant Colleges  7 U.S.C. 3319i..................      4,387      - - -      - - -
 of Agriculture
Grants for Insular Areas.....................  7 U.S.C. 3222b-2, 3363 and 3362.      1,609      1,650      1,800
Agriculture and Food Research Initiative.....  7 U.S.C. 450i(b)................    290,468    383,376    290,657
Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment...........  7 U.S.C. 3151a..................      4,670      4,790      4,790
Continuing Animal Health and Disease Research  7 U.S.C. 3195...................      3,899      - - -      4,000
 Program
Supplemental and Alternative Crops...........  7 U.S.C. 3319d..................        804      - - -      - - -
Critical Agricultural Materials Act..........  7 U.S.C. 178 et seq.............      1,054      - - -      - - -
Multicultural Scholars, Graduate Fellowship    7 U.S.C. 3152(b)................      8,774      - - -      9,000
 and Institution Challenge Grants
Secondary and 2-year Post-Secondary Education  7 U.S.C. 3152(j)................        877      - - -        900
Aquaculture Centers..........................  7 U.S.C. 3322...................      3,899      3,920      3,920
Sustainable Agriculture Research and           7 U.S.C. 5811...................     14,107     22,667     19,049
 Education.
Farm Business Management.....................  7 U.S.C. 5925f..................      1,414      - - -      - - -
Sun Grant Program............................  7 U.S.C. 8114...................      2,437      - - -      - - -
Improved Pest Control:
    Expert IPM Decision Support System.......  7 U.S.C. 450i(c)................        149      - - -      - - -
    Integrated Pest Management...............  ................................      2,303      - - -      - - -
    Minor Crop Pest Management (IR-4)........  ................................     11,614     11,913     11,913
    Pest Management Alternatives.............  ................................      1,367      - - -      - - -
                                                                                --------------------------------
      Total, Improved Pest Control...........  ................................     15,433     11,913     11,913
Special Research Grants:
    Global Change/UV Monitoring..............  7 U.S.C. 450i(c)................      1,370      1,405      1,405
    Potato Research..........................  ................................      1,316      - - -      - - -
    Forest Products Research.................  ................................      1,609      - - -      - - -
                                                                                --------------------------------
      Total, Special Research Grants.........  ................................      4,295      1,405      1,405
Necessary Expenses of Research and Education
 Activities:
    Grants Management Systems................  ................................      7,633      7,830      7,830
    Federal Administration--Other Necessary    ................................      6,239      6,538      6,399
     Expenses for Research and Education
     Activities
                                                                                --------------------------------
      Total, Necessary Expenses..............  ................................     13,872     14,368     14,229
                                                                                ================================
        Total, Research and Education          ................................    720,076    801,140    718,714
         Activities.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

              NATIVE AMERICAN INSTITUTIONS ENDOWMENT FUND


2013 appropriation*...................................     ($11,880,000)
2014 budget estimate..................................      (11,880,000)
Provided in the bill..................................      (11,880,000)
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................             - - -
    2014 budget estimate..............................             - - -
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Native American Institutions Endowment Fund, the 
Committee provides $11,880,000.
    The Committee notes that the endowment fund has a cost of 
$5,000,000 for fiscal year 2014.

                          EXTENSION ACTIVITIES


2013 appropriation*...................................      $463,896,000
2014 budget estimate..................................       459,037,000
Provided in the bill..................................       459,011,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................        -4,885,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................          -26,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Extension Activities, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $459,011,000.
    EFNEP and Persons with Disabilities.--The Committee 
recognizes the importance of agricultural education and 
vocational training for persons with developmental disabilities 
and encourages collaborations between non-profit organizations 
and elementary and secondary schools. In particular, the 
Committee encourages NIFA to use the Expanded Food and 
Nutrition Education Program to explore opportunities to support 
initiatives that strive to provide agricultural education and 
vocational experiences by pairing schools with non-profit 
organizations dedicated to improving the lives of persons with 
disabilities.
    The following table reflects the amount provided by the 
Committee:

               NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE

                          EXTENSION ACTIVITIES

                                             [Dollars in Thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                  FY 2013    FY 2014   Committee
               Program/Activity                          Authorization            enacted    estimate  provision
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Smith-Lever Act, Section 3(b) and (c)          7 U.S.C. 343(b) and (c) and        $286,612   $294,000   $294,000
 programs and Cooperative Extension             208(c) of P.L. 93-471.
Extension Services at 1890 Institutions......  7 U.S.C. 3221...................     41,522     42,592     42,592
Extension Services at 1994 Institutions......  7 U.S.C. 343(b)(3)..............      4,204      4,312      4,312
Facility Improvements at 1890 Institutions...  7 U.S.C. 3222b..................     19,234     19,730     19,730
Renewable Resources Extension Act............  16 U.S.C. 1671 et. seq..........      3,607      4,060      3,700
Rural Health and Safety Education Programs...  7 U.S.C. 2662(i)................      1,462      - - -      - - -
Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database         7 U.S.C. 7642...................        975      - - -      1,250
 Program.
Women and Minorities in STEM Fields..........  7 U.S.C. 5925...................        390      - - -        400
Grants to Youth Organizations................  7 U.S.C. 7630...................        711      - - -      - - -
Smith-Lever Act, Section 3(d):
    Food and Nutrition Education.............  7 U.S.C. 343(d).................     66,227     67,934     67,934
    Pest Management..........................  ................................      9,669      - - -      - - -
    Farm Safety and Youth Farm Safety          ................................      4,494      4,610      4,610
     Education Programs
    New Technologies for Agricultural          ................................      1,511      1,750      1,550
     Extension.
    Children, Youth, and Families at Risk....  ................................      7,409      8,395      7,600
    Federally Recognized Tribes Extension      ................................      2,963      3,039      3,039
     Program.
    Sustainable Agriculture Programs.........  ................................      4,578      - - -      - - -
                                                                                --------------------------------
      Total, Section 3(d)....................  ................................     96,851     85,728     84,733
Necessary Expenses of Extension Activities:
    Agriculture in the K-12 Classroom........  ................................        538      - - -        552
    Federal Administration--Other Necessary    ................................      7,790      8,615      7,742
     Expenses for Extension Activities
                                                                                --------------------------------
      Total, Necessary Expenses..............  ................................      8,328      8,615      8,294
                                                                                ================================
        Total, Extension Activities..........  ................................    463,896    459,037    459,011
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         INTEGRATED ACTIVITIES


2013 appropriation*...................................       $20,942,000
2014 budget estimate..................................        28,129,000
Provided in the bill..................................        31,137,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................       +10,195,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................       +3,008,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Integrated Activities, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $31,137,000. The following table reflects the 
amount provided by the Committee.

               NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE

                         INTEGRATED ACTIVITIES

                                             (Dollars in Thousands)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                             FY 2013      FY 2014     Committee
                   Program/activity                       Authorization      enacted      estimate    provision
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Water Quality Program.................................      7 U.S.C. 7626       $4,387        - - -        - - -
Regional Pest Management Centers......................      7 U.S.C. 7626        3,899        - - -        - - -
Methyl Bromide Transition Program.....................      7 U.S.C. 7626        1,946        - - -       $1,996
Organic Transition Program............................      7 U.S.C. 7626        3,899       $4,000        4,000
Regional Rural Development Centers....................   7 U.S.C. 450i(c)          973          998          998
Food and Agriculture Defense Initiative...............      7 U.S.C. 3351        5,838        5,988        7,000
Crop Protection/Pest Management Program...............      7 U.S.C. 7626        - - -       17,143       17,143
                                                       ---------------------------------------------------------
    Total, Integrated Activities......................                          20,942       28,129       31,137
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  Office of the Under Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs



2013 appropriation*...................................          $871,000
2014 budget estimate..................................           898,000
Provided in the bill..................................           871,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................             - - -
    2014 budget estimate..............................          -27,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Under Secretary for Marketing and 
Regulatory Programs, the Committee provides an appropriation of 
$871,000.

               Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)


2013 appropriation*...................................      $801,198,000
2014 budget estimate..................................       797,601,000
Provided in the bill..................................       803,538,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................        +2,340,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................       +5,937,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Salaries and Expenses, the Committee provides an appropriation 
of $803,538,000.
    The following table reflects the amounts provided by the 
Committee:
                                                     Committee provision

Animal Health Technical Services........................     $34,500,000
Aquatic Animal Health...................................       2,272,000
Avian Health............................................      52,340,000
Cattle Health...........................................      93,000,000
Equine, Cervid, and Small Ruminant Health...............      19,169,000
National Veterinary Stockpile...........................       2,750,000
Swine Health............................................      23,000,000
Veterinary Biologics....................................      16,457,000
Veterinary Diagnostics..................................      31,611,000
Zoonotic Disease Management.............................       9,023,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
    Subtotal, Animal Health.............................     284,122,000

Agricultural Quarantine Inspection (Appropriated).......      25,298,000
Cotton Pests............................................      12,720,000
Field Crop & Rangeland Ecosystem Pests..................       8,877,000
Pest Detection..........................................      27,500,000
Plant Protection Methods Development....................      20,673,000
Specialty Crop Pests....................................     148,489,000
Tree & Wood Pests.......................................      48,290,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
    Subtotal, Plant Health..............................     291,847,000

Wildlife Damage Management..............................      86,104,000
Wildlife Services Methods Development...................      19,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
    Subtotal, Wildlife Services.........................     105,104,000

Animal & Plant Health Regulatory Enforcement............      16,275,000
Biotechnology Regulatory Services.......................      18,215,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
    Subtotal, Regulatory Services.......................      34,490,000

Contingency Fund........................................           - - -
Emergency Preparedness & Response.......................      17,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
    Subtotal, Safeguarding and Emergency Preparedness...      17,000,000

Agriculture Import/Export...............................      14,181,000
Overseas Technical and Trade Operations.................      20,114,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
    Subtotal, Safe Trade & International Technical 
      Assistance........................................      34,295,000

Animal Welfare..........................................      27,087,000
Horse Protection........................................         500,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
    Subtotal, Animal Welfare............................      27,587,000

APHIS Information Technology Infrastructure.............       4,167,000
Physical/Operational Security...........................       4,926,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
    Subtotal, Agency Management.........................       9,093,000
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
        Total, Salaries & Expenses......................     803,538,000

    Animal Welfare.--The bill funds the Animal Welfare program 
at $27,587,000, in order to ensure that minimum standards of 
care and treatment are provided for certain animals bred for 
commercial sale, used in research, transported commercially, or 
exhibited to the public.
    Brown Marmorated Stink Bug.--The Committee is aware of the 
growing threat to fruits, vegetables, other crops, and 
ornamentals throughout the mid-Atlantic region from the Brown 
Marmorated Stink Bug. It has been found in more than 30 States 
and the District of Columbia. The Committee directs APHIS to 
treat this pest as a priority and to continue to assist ARS, 
NIFA, and state partners with biological control technology 
once such tools are available.
    Budget Restructure.--The Committee does not support the 
request in the President's fiscal year 2014 budget for APHIS to 
fund two separate accounts for Equine and Cervid Health and 
Sheep and Goat Health.
    Cervid Health.--The latest data from 2007 indicate that the 
cervid industry in the U.S. accounts for 5,600 deer farms and 
1,900 elk farms, has an economic value of $894 million, and 
supports nearly 30,000 jobs. This industry is currently 
adapting to a 2012 interim final rule that established a 
national, voluntary herd certification program (HCP) that 
provides uniform herd certification standards and will support 
the domestic and international marketability of U.S. cervid 
herds. The Committee believes that the industry requires 
additional support to ensure that the newly implemented chronic 
wasting disease HCP is successful. Therefore, APHIS should 
spend no less than $3,000,000 for cervid health activities. 
Within the funds provided, APHIS should give consideration to 
indemnity payments if warranted.
    Citrus Health Response Program (CHRP).--CHRP is a 
nationwide effort to protect the U.S. industry from the ravages 
of invasive pests and diseases. Funds provided for this program 
allow APHIS to partner with States and local entities to 
address the challenges of a disease-spreading vector until a 
cure can be developed. In addition to the funds provided in 
this account, the Committee encourages APHIS to utilize the 
funds available in the Plant Pest and Disease Management and 
Disaster Prevention account to the greatest extent possible in 
an attempt to sustain the economic viability of the citrus 
industry.
    APHIS Cargo Release.--The Committee recommends that USDA/
APHIS continue to work with the Department of Homeland 
Security's Custom and Border Protection (CBP) in order to 
facilitate the release of cargo at commercial import facilities 
by ensuring that CBP inspectors and managers earn Cargo Release 
Authority certification for those non-reportable species and 
groups of organisms listed in the Cargo Release Plan. Such 
coordination will allow CBP officials to release cargo where 
CBP may find very distinctive organisms not of agricultural 
significance and allow APHIS entomologists, plant pathologists, 
and botanists to make release decisions upon discovery of those 
reportable organisms that may pose a threat to the Nation's 
agricultural security.
    Cost Sharing with States and Other Cooperators.--The 
Committee directs APHIS to maximize the use of cost sharing 
agreements or matching requirements with States, Territories, 
producers, foreign governments, non-governmental organizations, 
and any other recipient of services in order to reduce the cost 
burden on the agency.
    Cotton Pests.--The Committee is concerned about the 
reappearance of the boll weevil in certain portions of the 
United States. The Boll Weevil Eradication Program has 
successfully eradicated the boll weevil from all U.S. cotton 
areas except for the extreme lower parts of Texas in the Lower 
Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) bordering Tamaulipas, Mexico. The LRGV 
continues an active battle to eradicate the boll weevil. The 
LRGV also serves as the barrier between Mexico and boll weevil-
free areas of the United States. The Department is directed to 
work with the U.S. cotton industry to develop a plan of action 
to protect the United States from re-infestation and report its 
findings to the Committee not less than 120 days after 
enactment of this bill.
    Danger Pay.--The Committee recognizes the concern of those 
employees in areas designated by the Department of State as a 
Section 920 post and encourages APHIS to determine compensation 
of employees in Section 920 areas similarly.
    Designated Qualified Person Program.--The Committee directs 
APHIS to maintain transparency and consistency in the 
enforcement of the Horse Protection Act when dealing with the 
regulated industry.
    Emerging Plant Pests.--The Committee expects the Secretary 
to continue to use the authority provided in this bill to 
transfer funds from the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) for 
the arrest and eradication of animal and plant pests and 
diseases that threaten American agriculture. By providing funds 
in this account, the Committee is enhancing, not replacing, the 
use of CCC funding for emergency outbreaks.
    Feral Swine Management.--The Committee is aware of the 
growing economic and ecological damage caused by feral swine 
across the United States. Conservative estimates indicate feral 
swine are present in 44 States, and agricultural losses and 
control efforts cost $1.5 billion annually. The Committee 
understands that computer models have shown that lethal methods 
combined with contraception could significantly reduce feral 
swine populations over several years. In addition to the 
Committee's support for the Department's proposed increased 
funding for feral swine management, the Committee encourages 
Wildlife Services to explore development and field testing of 
non-hormonal, species-specific oral contraceptives, such as 
phaged-peptide constructs.
    Huanglongbing.--The Committee encourages APHIS to support 
its state partners through exclusion and eradication activities 
associated with the Asian Citrus Psyllid, the primary vector of 
the bacterium that causes Huanglongbing/citrus greening 
disease. In addition, the agency should continue to work with 
ARS, citrus-producing States, industry stakeholders, and 
universities on their research efforts to develop additional 
control mechanisms.
    National Poultry Improvement Plan.--The Committee supports 
the cooperative efforts of USDA, States, academia, and industry 
as part of the National Poultry Improvement Plan (NPIP). NPIP 
is internationally recognized as an independent, government 
poultry disease control program. Sufficient resources are 
included to staff the national office, administer the program, 
and to ensure that the NPIP continues its vital, successful 
role in protecting this important industry and source of high 
quality protein-rich foods for domestic and international 
markets. Through the program's collaborative efforts, NPIP 
effectively and efficiently protects the quality, productivity, 
and economic viability of the $200 billion U.S. poultry 
industry and the nearly 900,000 jobs associated with it.
    Phytopthora ramorum.--The Committee expects APHIS to 
continue its efforts to manage P. ramorum while minimizing 
disruption to the interstate movement of plant materials and 
commercial trade. The agency should use an appropriate portion 
of funds from the Specialty Crop Pest account to expeditiously 
implement the review of the Federal order governing shipment of 
plant materials from quarantined and regulated counties, as 
well as to continue its review of the efficacy of the pre-
notification requirements for western nurseries. APHIS should 
also continue efforts to partner with the regulated States to 
develop new best management practices regarding P. ramorum 
during the effective period of the order.
    Plant Pest and Disease Management and Disaster.--The 
Committee expects APHIS to obligate the $50,000,000 provided in 
the 2008 farm bill (P.L. 110-234) in accordance with 
Congressional priorities and the criteria described under 
Special Funding Considerations (Section 10201(b)(6) of P.L. 
110-234). USDA should prioritize the funds provided by Section 
10201 for the purpose of early plant pest detection and 
surveillance in conjunction with the funds provided in this 
bill.
    Potato Cyst Nematode Eradication.--The Committee encourages 
APHIS to fund the Potato Cyst Nematode eradication program 
above the spending level in fiscal year 2013 in order to 
continue with successful efforts to eradicate this pest. If 
left untreated, this pest could spread, affecting other crops.
    Wildlife Damage Management.--While receiving support from 
cooperators to conduct wildlife management operations, special 
emphasis should be placed on those areas such as oral rabies 
vaccination, livestock protection, predator damage management, 
and other such activities that will reduce or eliminate threats 
to agricultural industries. The Committee expects APHIS to fund 
national rabies control and surveillance efforts at the same 
levels expended in fiscal years 2011 and 2012.

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES


2013 appropriation*...............................            $3,095,000
2014 budget estimate..............................             3,175,000
Provided in the bill..............................                 - - -
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation............................            -3,095,000
    2014 budget estimate..........................           -3,175,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    The Committee does not provide an appropriation for this 
account.

                     Agricultural Marketing Service


                           MARKETING SERVICES


2013 appropriation*...................................       $76,881,000
2014 budget estimate..................................        82,792,000
Provided in the bill..................................        77,035,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................          +154,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................       -5,757,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Marketing Services of the Agricultural Marketing 
Service, the Committee provides an appropriation of 
$77,035,000.
    Mandatory COOL Labeling.--The final rule dealing with 
mandatory Country of Origin Labeling of beef, pork, and other 
covered muscle meats sold in U.S. retail establishments is 
creating great uncertainty for U.S. meat packing, processing, 
and production companies as well as U.S. retail establishments. 
While the final rule became effective May 23, 2013, in order to 
comply with the World Trade Organization (WTO) findings, USDA's 
final rule will not likely meet the full demands made by the 
governments of Canada and Mexico. By USDA's own estimate, the 
range in estimated costs to industry of the final rule will be 
$53.1 million to $192.1 million and affect 7,181 firms and 
33,350 establishments. If the final rule does not produce a 
resolution, ongoing negotiations between the three countries 
will only create increased costs and indecision in how the 
firms meet regulatory requirements. Therefore, the Committee 
strongly encourages USDA to delay implementation and 
enforcement of the final rule published on May 24, 2013, (78 
Fed. Reg. 31367) until the WTO has completed all decisions 
related to cases WT/DS384 and WT/DS386.
    National Organic Program.--The Committee recommendation 
includes a one million increase above the fiscal year 2012 
level for the National Organic Program.
    Pesticide Recordkeeping Program.--The Committee concurs 
with the Administration's proposal to eliminate funding for the 
Pesticide Recordkeeping Program (PRP) and recommends that the 
States and territories operating under the Federal 
recordkeeping regulations transition to a program such as those 
operating in 23 States and one Territory with their own 
compliance review programs under federally-recognized state 
pesticide recordkeeping requirements. As noted in the 
Administration's fiscal year 2013 proposal, ``this program is 
not central to the core mission of AMS, which is to facilitate 
the competitive and efficient marketing of agricultural 
products.'' The termination of the PRP will result in a savings 
of $1.8 million as proposed in the budget.
    Program Levels.--The Committee recommendation includes 
funding at the President's request level for Marketing News and 
Surveillance and Standardization Programs.
    Seafood in Nutrition Programs.--USDA's Dietary Guidelines 
for Americans 2010 recommends increased intake of seafood, 
especially those products with high levels of omega-3 fatty 
acids. Due in large part to USDA's own regulations, canned tuna 
is currently prohibited from purchase by the Department for 
inclusion in school nutrition programs. The Committee directs 
USDA to report to the Committees on Appropriations within 60 
days of enactment on potential ways that would allow a revision 
of the Master Solicitation for Commodity Procurement to allow 
for the purchase of canned tuna. The report should address the 
requirement that all tuna be landed by U.S.-flag fishing 
vessels; the option for less than 100 percent of the value of 
the tuna product be United States produced; and the requirement 
that all tuna products are canned in the United States, its 
territories, possessions, Puerto Rico, or the Trust Territories 
of the Pacific Islands.

                 LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES


2013 limitation*......................................     ($62,592,000)
2014 budget limitation................................      (60,435,000)
Provided in the bill..................................      (60,435,000)
Comparison:
    2013 limitation...................................        -2,157,000
    2014 budget limitation............................            - - -
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    The Committee provides a limitation of $60,435,000 on 
Administrative Expenses of the Agricultural Marketing Service.

    FUNDS FOR STRENGTHENING MARKETS, INCOME, AND SUPPLY (SECTION 32)

                     MARKETING AGREEMENT AND ORDERS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)


2013 appropriation....................................     ($20,056,000)
2014 budget estimate..................................      (20,181,000)
Provided in the bill..................................      (20,181,000)
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................          +125,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................             - - -

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Marketing Agreements and Orders Program, the 
Committee provides a transfer from section 32 funds of 
$20,181,000.
    Information Technology Support.--The amount provided in 
this account includes an increase of $6,818,000 for the 
information technology upgrades of the Web-Based Supply Chain 
Management system that allows AMS, the Farm Service Agency 
(FSA), the Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS), and the U.S. 
Agency for International Development to purchase U.S. 
commodities.
    The following table reflects the status of this fund for 
fiscal years 2013 and 2014:

ESTIMATED TOTAL FUNDS AVAILABLE AND BALANCE CARRIED FORWARD FISCAL YEARS
                                2013-2014
                         [Dollars in Thousands]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                              FY 2013     FY 2014 budget
                                             estimate         estimate
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Appropriation (30% of Customs Receipts).      $8,990,117      $9,211,183
Less Transfers:
    Food and Nutrition Service..........      -7,697,031      -7,815,038
    Commerce Department.................        -131,372        -130,144
                                         -------------------------------
        Total, Transfers................      -7,828,402      -7,945,183
Prior Year Appropriation Available,              219,286         117,000
 Start of the Year......................
Prior Year Collections and Recoveries...               0               0
Unavailable for Obligations (recoveries                0               0
 & offsetting collections)..............
Transfer of Prior Year Funds to FNS             -133,000        -117,000
 (Fruit & Vegetable)....................
                                         -------------------------------
    Budget Authority....................       1,248,000       1,266,000
Rescission of Current Year Funds........        -109,608        -206,000
Appropriations Reduced by 5.1 Percent            -40,392               0
 due to Sequestration...................
Appropriations Reduced by 7.2 Percent                  0         -80,000
 due to Sequestration...................
Unavailable for Obligations (Fruit &            -117,000        -119,000
 Vegetable transfer to FNS).............
                                         -------------------------------
    Available for Obligation............         981,000         861,000
Less Obligations:
    Child Nutrition Programs                     465,000         465,000
     (Entitlement Commodities)..........
    State Option Contract...............           5,000           5,000
    Removal of Defective Commodities....           2,500           2,500
    Emergency Surplus Removal...........         106,400               0
    Small Business Support..............               0               0
    Disaster Relief.....................           5,000           5,000
    Additional Fruits, Vegetables, and           206,000         206,000
     Nuts Purchases.....................
    Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program...          41,000          40,000
    Estimated Future Needs..............         102,313          82,697
                                         -------------------------------
        Total, Commodity Procurement....         933,213         806,197
    Administrative Funds:
        Commodity Purchase Support......          27,731          34,622
        Marketing Agreements and Orders.          20,056          20,181
                                         -------------------------------
          Total, Administrative Funds...          47,787          54,803
                                         -------------------------------
    Total Obligations...................         981,000         861,000
Unobligated Balance, End of Year........               0               0
Unavailable for Obligations (Fruit and           117,000         119,000
 Vegetable transfer to FNS).............
Balances, Collections and Recoveries Not               0               0
 Available..............................
                                         ===============================
        Total End of Year Balances......         117,000         119,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                   PAYMENTS TO STATES AND POSSESSIONS


2013 appropriation*...................................        $1,298,000
2014 budget estimate..................................         1,363,000
Provided in the bill..................................         1,171,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................          -127,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................         -192,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Payments to States and Possessions, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $1,171,000.

        Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES


2013 appropriation*...................................       $39,249,000
2014 budget estimate..................................        40,531,000
Provided in the bill..................................        39,249,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................             - - -
    2014 budget estimate..............................       -1,282,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards 
Administration, the Committee provides $39,249,000.
    Program Levels.--The Committee recommendation includes 
funding at the requested level for the Grain Regulatory Program 
and funding at the fiscal year 2012 level for the Packers and 
Stockyards Program.

        LIMITATION ON INSPECTION AND WEIGHING SERVICES EXPENSES


2013 limitation.......................................     ($50,000,000)
2014 budget limitation................................      (50,000,000)
Provided in the bill..................................      (50,000,000)
Comparison:
    2013 limitation...................................             - - -
    2014 budget limitation............................             - - -

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    The Committee includes a limitation on inspection and 
weighing services expenses of $50,000,000. The bill includes 
authority to exceed by 10 percent the limitation on inspection 
and weighing services with notification to the Committees on 
Appropriations.

             Office of the Under Secretary for Food Safety



2013 appropriation*...................................          $791,000
2014 budget estimate..................................           816,000
Provided in the bill..................................           791,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................             - - -
    2014 budget estimate..............................          -25,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Under Secretary for Food Safety, the 
Committee provides an appropriation of $791,000.

                   Food Safety and Inspection Service



2013 appropriation*...................................    $1,029,879,000
2014 budget estimate..................................     1,008,473,000
Provided in the bill..................................       998,762,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................       -31,117,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................       -9,711,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Food Safety and Inspection Service, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $998,762,000.
    The Committee notes that FSIS has had $2,300,000 in its 
base budget since 2009 to fund the Cooperative Interstate 
Program, and that the budget request includes a $2,434,000 
increase for a total of $4,734,000. Four states have applied to 
the program, and three have been accepted. While the Committee 
supports CIP, the proposal to add 20 states by the end of 2014 
at an additional cost of $2,434,000 is not included in the 
recommendation.
    The following table reflects the Committee's 
recommendations for fiscal year 2014:

                         [Dollars in Thousands]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                            provision
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Federal inspection....................................          $881,855
Public health data communication infrastructure system            34,580
International food safety and inspection..............            15,841
State food safety and inspection......................            62,734
Codex alimentarius....................................             3,752
                                                       -----------------
    Total, Food Safety and Inspection Service.........           998,762
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Humane Methods of Slaughter.--FSIS shall ensure that 
inspectors hired with funding previously specified for Humane 
Methods of Slaughter Act enforcement focus their attention on 
overseeing compliance with humane handling rules for live 
animals as they arrive and are offloaded and handled in pens, 
chutes, and stunning areas, and that they receive robust 
national training, including on the Regulatory Essentials, 
Humane Animal Tracking System, and Public Health Information 
System.
    Buffalo/Bison Inspection.--The Committee urges FSIS to 
enhance its efforts to work with Tribes to set up voluntary, 
fee-for-service programs for the slaughter of Tribally-raised 
buffalo and bison. In doing so, FSIS should work with the 
Tribal Council and make the Council aware of such opportunities 
as mobile slaughter and trade associations such as the North 
American Meat Association and the American Association of Meat 
Processors which may be able to assist them in qualifying for 
inspection and starting operations.
    Regulations.--The Committee supports implementation of 
section 11016 of Public Law 110-246 and expects USDA to meet 
its statutory obligation and promulgate regulations to 
implement this section using the broad definition contained in 
its proposed rule.
    Reducing Foodborne Illnesses.--The Committee notes that the 
current poultry slaughter inspection system has been in place 
since 1957. On January 27, 2012, USDA proposed a science-based 
rule that would begin to replace this outdated approach, and 
replace it with one that is based on pathogen reduction and 
control. USDA inspectors would monitor establishment process 
controls in removing diseased birds, ensure compliance with 
Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point plans and Sanitation 
Standard Operating Procedures, conduct ante mortem inspection, 
and collect samples for pathogen testing. On-line inspectors 
will still conduct carcass-by-carcass inspection to ensure that 
diseased carcasses are condemned by establishment workers 
according to regulatory requirements. The Committee believes 
that implementation of this system, that has been tested over 
ten years, will lead to a reduction of pathogens in poultry and 
a corresponding reduction in foodborne illnesses, 
hospitalizations, and deaths. The Committee urges the 
Department to finalize this rule.

                        FARM ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS


    Office of the Under Secretary for Farm and Foreign Agricultural 
                                Services



2013 appropriation*...................................          $871,000
2014 budget estimate..................................           898,000
Provided in the bill..................................           871,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................             - - -
    2014 budget estimate..............................          -27,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Under Secretary for Farm and Foreign 
Agricultural Services, the Committee provides an appropriation 
of $871,000.
    The Committee is concerned about waste, fraud, and abuse in 
programs administered by FSA and the Risk Management Agency 
(RMA). Therefore, the Secretary is directed to certify that any 
newly approved payment, loan, grant, subsidy, or insurance 
claim from a program administered by FSA or RMA does not 
include individuals or entities that have been permanently 
debarred from participating in USDA programs.

                          Farm Service Agency


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                             Transfer from
                                                         Appropriation     program accounts     Total, FSA S&E
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2013 appropriation*.................................      $1,177,926,000      ($300,393,000)    ($1,478,319,000)
2014 budget estimate................................       1,176,460,000       (309,980,000)     (1,486,440,000)
Provided in the bill................................       1,177,926,000       (300,393,000)     (1,478,319,000)
Comparison:
2013 appropriation                                                 - - -               - - -               - - -
2014 budget estimate                                          +1,466,000        (-9,587,000)       (-8,121,000)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Salaries and Expenses of Farm Service Agency, the 
Committee provides an appropriation of $1,177,926,000 and 
transfers of $300,393,000 for a total program level of 
$1,478,319,000.

                         STATE MEDIATION GRANTS


2013 appropriation*...................................        $4,259,000
2014 budget estimate..................................         3,782,000
Provided in the bill..................................         4,259,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................             - - -
    2014 budget estimate..............................         +477,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For State Mediation Grants, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $4,259,000.

               GRASSROOTS SOURCE WATER PROTECTION PROGRAM


2013 appropriation*...................................        $5,362,000
2014 budget estimate..................................             - - -
Provided in the bill..................................         4,552,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................          -810,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................       +4,552,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Grassroots Source Water Protection Program, the 
Committee provides an appropriation of $4,552,000.

                        DAIRY INDEMNITY PROGRAM

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)


2013 appropriation....................................       \1\$100,000
2014 budget estimate..................................        \1\250,000
Provided in the bill..................................        \1\250,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................          +150,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................             - - -
\1\Current indefinite appropriation.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Dairy Indemnity Program, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of such sums as may be necessary (estimated to be 
$250,000 in the President's fiscal year 2014 budget request).

           AGRICULTURAL CREDIT INSURANCE FUND PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

                         ESTIMATED LOAN LEVELS


2013 loan level*......................................    $4,821,748,000
2014 budget estimate..................................     5,555,344,000
Provided in the bill..................................     5,381,267,000
Comparison:
    2013 loan level...................................      +559,519,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................     -174,077,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Agricultural Credit Insurance Fund program account, 
the Committee provides a loan level of $5,381,267,000.
    The following table reflects the loan levels for the 
Agricultural Credit Insurance Fund program account:

                AGRICULTURE CREDIT PROGRAMS--LOAN LEVELS
                         [Dollars in Thousands]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                   FY 2013       FY 2014      Committee
                                    level       estimate     provisions
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Farm loan programs
    Farm ownership:
        Direct................      $475,000      $575,000      $575,000
        Unsubsidized               1,500,000     2,000,000     2,000,000
         Guaranteed...........
    Farm operating:
        Direct................     1,050,090     1,223,686     1,131,752
        Unsubsidized               1,500,000     1,500,000     1,426,311
         guaranteed...........
    Emergency loans...........        34,658        34,658        26,204
    Indian tribe land                  2,000         2,000         2,000
     acquisition loans........
    Conservation loans:
        Unsubsidized                 150,000       150,000       150,000
         Guaranteed...........
    Indian highly fractionated        10,000        10,000        10,000
     land.....................
    Boll weevil eradication...       100,000        60,000        60,000
                               -----------------------------------------
        Total.................     4,821,748     5,555,344     5,381,267
------------------------------------------------------------------------


                            ESTIMATED LOAN SUBSIDY AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES LEVELS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                     Guaranteed
                                                                     Direct loan        loan      Administrative
                                                                       subsidy         subsidy        expenses
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2013 appropriation*.............................................       $78,107,000   $17,401,000   $305,034,000
2014 budget estimate............................................        73,252,000    18,300,000    314,918,000
Provided in the bill............................................        67,800,000    17,401,000    305,034,000
Comparison:
2013 appropriation                                                     -10,307,000         - - -          - - -
2014 budget estimate                                                    -5,452,000      -899,000    -9,884,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB ATB.

    The following table reflects the costs of loan programs 
under credit reform:

            AGRICULTURE CREDIT PROGRAMS--SUBSIDIES AND GRANTS
                         [Dollars in Thousands]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  FY 2013*       FY 2014      Committee
                                   enacted      estimate     provisions
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Farm loan subsidies:
    Farm ownership:
        Direct................       $19,634        $4,428        $4,428
    Farm operating:
        Direct................        57,020        67,058        62,020
        Unsubsidized                  17,401        18,300        17,401
         Guaranteed...........
    Emergency loans...........         1,284         1,698         1,284
    Indian highly fractionated           169            68            68
     land.....................
                               -----------------------------------------
        Total, Farm loan              95,508        91,552        85,201
         subsidies............
        Individual development         - - -         - - -         - - -
         accounts.............
                               -----------------------------------------
        Total.................        95,508        91,552        85,201
ACIF expenses:
    Salaries and expenses.....       297,313       306,998       297,313
    Administrative expenses...         7,721         7,920         7,721
                               -----------------------------------------
        Total, ACIF expenses..       305,034       314,918      305,034
------------------------------------------------------------------------
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                         Risk Management Agency



2013 appropriation*...................................       $73,018,000
2014 budget estimate..................................        71,496,000
Provided in the bill..................................        71,496,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................        -1,522,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................             - - -
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Risk Management Agency, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $71,496,000.
    Enhancements to Existing Crop Insurance Programs.--The 
Committee believes that crop insurance has been an invaluable 
resource for agricultural producers in times of disaster. At 
the same time, it has protected taxpayers from costly and 
unbudgeted disaster assistance bills. The Committee supports 
the ongoing efforts of the House and Senate Committees on 
Agriculture to reauthorize provisions of the Farm Bill that 
maintain and strengthen the existing crop insurance program.
    Organic Foods.--The Committee is aware of the legislative 
mandate in the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 that 
an organic price election be offered on all organic crops by 
2012 (7 U.S.C. 1522(c)(10)(C)(iii)). The Committee appreciates 
the recent announcement by the Department regarding a new 
organic price election for the 2014 insurance year. The 
Committee is concerned, however, at the pace of progress and 
requests a report from the Department within 60 days of 
enactment detailing its strategic plan and timetable to 
implement organic price elections for all organic crops 
produced in compliance with the National Organic Program 
regulations under the Organic Foods Production Act of 1990 (7 
U.S.C. 6501 et seq.).
    Timely Communication of Changes in Coverage.--Crop 
insurance represents a key risk management tool for 
agricultural producers around the country and any changes to 
their insurance policies can have an immediate impact on 
critical financial and business decisions. The Committee 
understands that RMA will implement changes in an effort to 
reduce the loss ratios in the crop insurance industry, but it 
is concerned by the timeliness and the manner in which RMA 
notifies purchasers of changes to crop insurance coverage. The 
Committee is aware of issues pertaining to the late 
notification of changes communicated to producers and insurance 
providers over the past year that may have resulted in negative 
consequences for both. The Committee expects that RMA will 
address this issue and ensure effective and efficient 
administration of the crop insurance program.

                              CORPORATIONS


                Federal Crop Insurance Corporation Fund



2013 appropriation....................................  \1\$9,517,433,00
                                                                       0
2014 budget estimate..................................  \1\9,502,944,000
Provided in the bill..................................  \1\9,502,944,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................       -14,489,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................             - - -
\1\Current indefinite appropriation.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation Fund, the 
Committee provides an appropriation of such sums as may be 
necessary (estimated to be $9,502,944,000 in the President's 
fiscal year 2014 budget request).

                   Commodity Credit Corporation Fund


                 REIMBURSEMENT FOR NET REALIZED LOSSES

                   (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)\1\


2013 appropriation....................................   $11,018,509,000
2014 budget estimate..................................    12,539,000,000
Provided in the bill..................................    12,539,000,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................    +1,520,491,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................             - - -
\1\Current indefinite appropriation.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Reimbursement for Net Realized Losses to the Commodity 
Credit Corporation, the Committee provides such sums as may be 
necessary to reimburse for net realized losses sustained but 
not previously reimbursed (estimated to be $12,539,000,000 in 
the President's fiscal year 2014 budget request).

                       HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT

                        (LIMITATION ON EXPENSES)


2013 limitation.......................................      ($5,000,000)
2014 budget estimate..................................       (5,000,000)
Provided in the bill..................................       (5,000,000)
Comparison:
    2013 limitation...................................             - - -
    2014 budget estimate..............................             - - -

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For CCC Hazardous Waste Management, the Committee provides 
a limitation of $5,000,000.

                                TITLE II


                         CONSERVATION PROGRAMS


  Office of the Under Secretary for Natural Resources and Environment



2013 appropriation*...................................          $871,000
2014 budget estimate..................................           898,000
Provided in the bill..................................           871,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................             - - -
    2014 budget estimate..............................           -27,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Under Secretary for Natural Resources 
and Environment, the Committee provides an appropriation of 
$871,000.

                 Natural Resources Conservation Service


                        CONSERVATION OPERATIONS


2013 appropriation*...................................      $810,115,000
2014 budget estimate..................................       807,937,000
Provided in the bill..................................       810,115,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................             - - -
    2014 budget estimate..............................       +2,178,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Conservation Operations, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $810,115,000.
    The Committee provides $9,066,000 for the Snow Survey and 
Water Forecasting Program; $9,164,000 for the Plant Materials 
Centers; and $77,990,000 for the Soil Surveys Program. The 
Committee provides $713,895,000 for conservation technical 
assistance and directs NRCS to maintain level funding for the 
Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) and the 
Conservation Delivery Streamlining Initiative (CDSI). The 
Committee is pleased with the results of CEAP and the agency's 
efforts to modernize the delivery of conservation programs and 
services through CDSI and encourages the continuation of these 
efforts.
    Cheat Grass Eradication.--The Committee encourages NRCS to 
continue to assist farmers and ranchers to eradicate, control, 
and reduce the fuel loads associated with cheat grass and to 
work with the ARS on its research related to cheat grass.
    Herbicide Resistance.--The Committee directs NRCS to ensure 
agency staff, partners, and producers are aware of new and 
interim conservation practice standards and conservation 
activity plans to address herbicide-resistant weeds, and that 
financial assistance through certain conservation programs is 
available to assist producers in their efforts to control these 
weeds. The Committee also directs NRCS to report to it on this 
effort by December 1, 2013.
    Farmland Protection Program.--The Committee is aware of 
concerns regarding oil and gas exploration and extraction on 
current and potential Farmland Protection Program easements and 
requests NRCS provide a report on its regulations and practices 
regarding the program and these issues by September 30, 2013.
    Fleet Management.--The Committee is aware NRCS recently 
completed a fleet management pilot program for the purpose of 
reducing costs and better utilizing its vehicle fleet to meet 
the agency's goals and mandates. The Committee encourages NRCS 
and USDA to use this data and other available fleet management 
tools to reduce the number of non-essential vehicles purchased 
and/or leased.
    National Marine Sanctuaries.--The Committee urges the 
agency to continue the collaborative agreement with the Office 
of National Marine Sanctuaries to address agricultural sources 
of runoff, such as sediments, nitrates, and pesticides.
    Sage Grouse Initiative.--The Committee supports NRCS's sage 
grouse conservation efforts. Through the initiative, NRCS 
provides technical and financial assistance to help landowners 
conserve sage grouse habitat on their land. The initiative is 
an integral part of efforts by Federal agencies, several 
western States, and private landowners to help preclude the 
listing of the sage grouse as an endangered species.

                    WATERSHED REHABILITATION PROGRAM


2013 appropriation*...................................       $14,331,000
2014 budget estimate..................................             - - -
Provided in the bill..................................        12,000,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................        -2,331,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................      +12,000,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Watershed Rehabilitation Program, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $12,000,000.

                               TITLE III


                       RURAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS


          Office of the Under Secretary for Rural Development



2013 appropriation*...................................          $871,000
2014 budget estimate..................................           898,000
Provided in the bill..................................           871,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................             - - -
    2014 budget estimate..............................          -27,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Under Secretary for Rural 
Development, the Committee provides an appropriation of 
$871,000.
    Program Consolidation.--The Committee does not concur with 
the budget proposal to consolidate Rural Development's business 
and economic development programs into the Rural Business and 
Cooperative Grants Program.
    Program Efficiency.--The Committee appreciates the proposal 
included in the budget request for the Rural Housing Service to 
improve its eligibility verification processes through the use 
of data-sharing with the Department of Health and Human 
Services and pledges to work with the authorizing Committee to 
enact the proposal.
    Regional Innovation Initiative.--The fiscal year 2014 
budget request proposes a Regional Innovation Initiative 
similar to the proposal included in the fiscal year 2013 
request. The Committee is unable to provide any funding or 
authorization for the initiative as requests for additional 
information on the specific need, purpose, and plans for the 
initiative continue to go unanswered.
    Reporting Requirements.--The Committee reminds Rural 
Development that any action that relocates an office or 
employees and reorganizes offices, programs, or activities must 
be reported to the Committees on Appropriations of the House 
and Senate as required by law.
    Strike Force Initiative.--The Committee supports Rural 
Development's continued efforts to address the issue of 
persistent poverty in rural communities through the Strike 
Force Initiative and requests a report to be provided to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations on the results of 
the initiative, including a comparison of its effectiveness to 
other Rural Development programs, within 60 days of enactment 
of this Act.

                Rural Development Salaries and Expenses


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                   Committee
                                                          FY 2013*  level   FY 2014  estimate      provisions
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Appropriations.........................................       $201,659,000       $204,695,000       $201,659,000
Transfer from:
    Rural Housing Insurance Fund Program Account.......        400,308,000        417,692,000        400,308,000
    Rural Development Loan Fund Program Account........          4,326,000          4,467,000          4,326,000
    Rural Electrification and Telecommunications Loan           33,601,000         34,694,000         33,601,000
     Program Account...................................
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, RD Salaries and Expenses................        639,894,000        661,548,000        639,894,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Salaries and Expenses of the Rural Development mission 
area, the Committee provides an appropriation of $201,659,000.

                         Rural Housing Service


              RURAL HOUSING INSURANCE FUND PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                         Administrative expenses
                                              Loan level             Subsidy level
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2013 appropriation*..................          $25,147,198,000              $74,295,000             $400,308,000
2014 budget estimate.................           24,574,712,000               18,624,000              417,692,000
Provided in the bill.................           25,060,103,000               36,066,000              400,308,000
Comparison:
2013 appropriation                                 -87,095,000              -38,229,000                    - - -
2014 budget estimate                              +485,391,000              +17,442,000             -17,384,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Rural Housing Insurance Fund program account, the 
Committee provides a loan level of $25,060,103,000.
    The following table reflects the loan levels for the Rural 
Housing Insurance Fund program account:

                         [Dollars in Thousands]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                   FY 2013       FY 2014      Committee
                                    level       estimate     provisions
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Rural Housing Insurance Fund
 Loans:
    Single family housing (sec
     502):
        Direct................      $900,000      $360,000      $820,221
        Unsubsidized              24,000,000    24,000,000    24,000,000
         guaranteed...........
    Housing repair (sec 504)..        27,952        26,280        25,362
    Rental housing (sec 515)..        31,277        28,432        28,432
    Multi-family guaranteed          150,000       150,000       150,000
     (sec 538)................
    Credit sales of acquired          10,000        10,000        10,000
     property.................
    Self-help housing land             5,000         - - -         5,000
     development fund.........
    Farm labor housing........        22,969         - - -        21,088
                               -----------------------------------------
        Total, Loan               25,147,198    24,574,712    25,060,103
         authorization........
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The following table reflects the costs of loan programs 
under credit reform:

        ESTIMATED LOAN SUBSIDY AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES LEVELS
                         [Dollars in Thousands]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                   FY 2013       FY 2014      Committee
                                    level       estimate      provision
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Rural Housing Insurance Fund
 Program Account (loan
 subsidies and grants):
    Single family housing (sec
     502):
        Direct................       $52,380        $9,792       $22,310
    Housing repair (sec 504)..         3,725         2,176         2,100
    Rental housing (sec 515)..        10,724         6,656         6,656
    Farm labor housing........         7,466         - - -         5,000
    Total, Loan subsidies.....        74,295        18,624        36,066
    Farm labor housing grants.         8,645        13,992         8,168
RHIF expenses:
        Administrative               400,308       417,692       400,308
         expenses.............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       RENTAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM


2013 appropriation*...................................      $884,332,000
2014 budget estimate..................................     1,015,050,000
Provided in the bill..................................     1,012,050,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................      +127,718,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................       -3,000,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Rental Assistance Program, the Committee provides a 
program level of $1,012,050,000.

           MULTIFAMILY HOUSING REVITALIZATION PROGRAM ACCOUNT


2013 appropriation*...................................       $27,084,000
2014 budget estimate..................................        32,575,000
Provided in the bill..................................        27,084,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................             - - -
    2014 budget estimate..............................       -5,491,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    For the Multifamily Housing Revitalization Program Account, 
the Committee provides an appropriation of $27,084,000, 
including $9,749,000 for the rural housing voucher program.

                  MUTUAL AND SELF-HELP HOUSING GRANTS


2013 appropriation*...................................       $29,246,000
2014 budget estimate..................................        10,000,000
Provided in the bill..................................        17,131,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................       -12,115,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................       +7,131,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Mutual and Self-Help Housing Grants, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $17,131,000.

                    RURAL HOUSING ASSISTANCE GRANTS


2013 appropriation*...................................       $32,303,000
2014 budget estimate..................................        25,000,000
Provided in the bill..................................        18,585,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................       -13,718,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................       -6,415,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Rural Housing Assistance Grants program, the 
Committee provides an appropriation of $18,585,000.

               RURAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)


2013 appropriation*...................................       $31,495,000
2014 budget estimate..................................        17,000,000
Provided in the bill..................................        25,251,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................        -6,244,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................       +8,251,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Rural Community Facilities Program Account, the 
Committee provides an appropriation of $25,251,000.
    The following table provides the Committee's 
recommendations:

                                             (Dollars in Thousands)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                   Committee
                                                        FY 2013*  level    FY 2014  estimate      provisions
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Loan levels:
    Community facility direct loans.................        ($2,200,000)        ($1,500,000)        ($2,200,000)
    Community facility guaranteed loans.............            (57,481)             (- - -)            (47,319)
Subsidy and grants:
    Community facility direct loans.................               - - -               - - -               - - -
    Community facility guaranteed loans.............               3,782               - - -               3,000
    Community facility grants.......................              12,673              13,000              13,000
    Rural Community Development Initiative..........               5,967               - - -               5,967
    Economic Impact Initiative......................               5,789               - - -               - - -
    Tribal college grants...........................               3,284               4,000               3,284
                                                     -----------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Rural Community Facilities Program                 31,495              17,000             25,251
         subsidy and grants.........................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB ATB.

    The following is included in bill language for the Rural 
Community Facilities Program: $5,967,000 is for the Rural 
Community Development Initiative.

                   Rural Business-Cooperative Service


                     RURAL BUSINESS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)


2013 appropriation*...................................       $83,745,000
2014 budget estimate..................................        51,777,000
Provided in the bill..................................        71,777,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................       -11,968,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................      +20,000,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Rural Business Program Account, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $71,777,000.
    The following table provides the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the budget request:

                                             (Dollars in Thousands)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                   Committee
                                                        FY 2013  level     FY 2014  estimate       provision
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Loan level:
    Business and industry guaranteed loans..........          ($821,224)          ($740,700)          ($740,730)
Subsidy and grants:
    Business and industry guaranteed loans..........              54,920              51,777              51,777
    Rural business enterprise grants................              23,707               - - -              20,000
    Rural business opportunity grants...............               2,193               - - -               - - -
    Delta regional authority........................               2,925               - - -               - - -
                                                     -----------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Rural Business Program subsidy and                 83,745              51,777              71,777
         grants.....................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The following programs are included in bill language for 
the Rural Business Program account: $500,000 for rural 
transportation technical assistance; and $3,900,000 for 
Federally Recognized Native American Tribes, of which $244,000 
is for transportation technical assistance.

              RURAL DEVELOPMENT LOAN FUND PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                Administrative
                                                          Loan  level       Subsidy  level         expenses
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2013 appropriation*.................................         $18,414,000          $5,900,000          $4,326,000
2014 budget estimate................................          18,889,000           4,082,000           4,467,000
Provided in the bill................................          18,889,000           4,082,000           4,326,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation..............................             475,000          -1,818,000               - - -
    2014 budget estimate............................               - - -               - - -           -141,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Rural Development Loan Fund program account, the 
Committee provides for a loan level of $18,889,000.
    For the loan subsidy, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $4,082,000.
    In addition, the Committee provides $4,326,000 for 
administrative expenses.

            RURAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                    (INCLUDING RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

                                                              Loan level

2013 appropriation......................................     $33,077,000
2014 budget estimate....................................      33,077,000
Provided in the bill....................................      33,077,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation..................................           - - -
    2014 budget estimate................................           - - -

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Rural Economic Development Loans Program Account, 
the Committee provides for a loan level of $33,077,000.

                  RURAL COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT GRANTS


2013 appropriation*...................................       $27,009,000
2014 budget estimate..................................        17,250,000
Provided in the bill..................................        17,250,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................        -9,759,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................             - - -
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Rural Cooperative Development Grants, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $17,250,000.
    The total includes $2,250,000 for a cooperative agreement 
for the Appropriate Technology Transfer for Rural Areas program 
and $15,000,000 for the value-added agricultural product market 
development grant program.

                    RURAL ENERGY FOR AMERICA PROGRAM


2013 appropriation*...................................        $3,315,000
2014 budget estimate..................................        19,740,000
Provided in the bill..................................         3,000,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................          -315,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................      -16,740,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Rural Energy for America Program, the Committee 
provides a loan level of $14,161,000 and an appropriation of 
$3,000,000 for the loan subsidy to make loans as authorized by 
section 9007 of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 
2002 (7 U.S.C. 8107).

                        Rural Utilities Service


             RURAL WATER AND WASTE DISPOSAL PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)


2013 appropriation*...................................      $511,288,000
2014 budget estimate..................................       304,000,000
Provided in the bill..................................       447,997,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................       -63,291,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................     +143,997,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Rural Water and Waste Disposal Program Account, the 
Committee provides an appropriation of $447,997,000.
    Guaranteed Loans.--The Committee expresses its support for 
water and waste disposal guaranteed loans and encourages RUS to 
utilize existing balances in the program during fiscal year 
2014.
    Water Supplies for Very Small Communities.--The Committee 
is aware of concerns that RUS grant programs do not adequately 
help small, disadvantaged and severely disadvantaged 
communities access the funding and expertise necessary to 
develop sustainable water supplies or otherwise improve their 
water systems. The Committee requests the agency provide a 
report to the Committees on Appropriations of the House and 
Senate by March 1, 2014, on its programs, regulations, outreach 
efforts, and other assistance provided to disadvantaged and 
severely disadvantaged communities. The report should include 
information on these communities and indicators of their 
historical access to predevelopment planning grants by State 
and recommendations for changes, including ways to better 
target predevelopment grant funding to severely disadvantaged 
communities.
    The following table provides the Committee's 
recommendations:

                                             [Dollars in Thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                   Committee
                                                           FY 2013  level     FY 2014  level       provisions
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Loan levels:
    Water and waste direct loans.......................       ($1,000,000)       ($1,200,000)       ($1,200,000)
    Water and waste guaranteed loans...................           (61,321)              - - -              - - -
    Direct Loans authorized by P.L. 83-566.............           (40,000)              - - -              - - -
Subsidy and Grants:
    Direct Subsidy.....................................             78,672              - - -              - - -
    Guaranteed Subsidy.................................                634              - - -              - - -
    Water and Waste Revolving Fund.....................                975              - - -                500
    Water Well System Grants...........................                968              - - -                968
    Grants for the Colonias and AK/HI..................             64,829              - - -             64,829
    Water and Waste Technical Assistance Grants........             18,523              - - -             18,523
    Circuit Rider Program..............................             14,623              - - -             14,623
    Solid Waste Management Grants......................              3,315              4,000              3,315
    High Energy Cost Grants............................              9,749              - - -              - - -
    Water and Waste Disposal Grants....................            319,000            300,000            345,239
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total Subsidies and Grants.....................           $511,288           $304,000           $447,997
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

   RURAL ELECTRIFICATION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                Administrative
                                                          Loan  level       Subsidy  level         expenses
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2013 appropriation*.................................      $7,790,000,000               - - -         $33,601,000
2014 budget estimate................................       4,690,000,000               - - -          34,694,000
Provided in the bill................................       5,190,000,000               - - -          33,601,000
Comparison:
2013 appropriation                                        -2,600,000,000               - - -               - - -
2014 budget estimate                                        +500,000,000               - - -         -1,093,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Rural Electrification and Telecommunications Loans 
Program Account, the Committee provides a loan level of 
$5,190,000,000. In addition, the Committee provides $33,601,000 
for administrative expenses.
    The Committee does not concur with the proposal to limit 
the use of rural electrification loans and instead expects USDA 
to work with borrowers to finance the most reliable and cost-
effective electricity source that meets their needs.
    The following table reflects the loan levels for the Rural 
Electrification and Telecommunications Loans Program account:

                                             [Dollars in Thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                   Committee
                                                       FY 2013  enacted    FY 2014  estimate      provisions
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Loan authorizations:
Electric:
    Direct, 5%......................................            $100,000               - - -               - - -
    Direct, FFB.....................................           6,500,000          $4,000,000          $4,000,000
    Guaranteed underwriting.........................             500,000               - - -             500,000
    Subtotal........................................           7,100,000           4,000,000           4,500,000
Telecommunications:
    Direct, Treasury rate...........................             690,000             690,000             690,000
    Subtotal........................................             690,000             690,000             690,000
                                                     -----------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Loan authorizations..................           7,790,000           4,690,000           5,190,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

         DISTANCE LEARNING, TELEMEDICINE, AND BROADBAND PROGRAM

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                   Committee
                                                       FY 2013*  enacted   FY 2014  estimate      provisions
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Broadband Program:
    Loan authorization..............................         $42,239,000         $63,356,000         $42,146,000
    Loan subsidy....................................           3,899,000           8,268,000           5,500,000
    Grants..........................................          10,111,000          10,372,000          10,111,000
Distance learning and telemedicine:
    Grants..........................................          24,323,000          24,950,000           24,323,00
                                                     -----------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Loan subsidy and grants..............          38,333,000          43,590,000          39,934,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Distance Learning, Telemedicine, and Broadband 
Program, the Committee provides an appropriation of 
$39,934,000, which includes $24,323,000 for distance learning 
and telemedicine grants.
    Broadband Loan Program Priorities.--Funding provided for 
the broadband program is intended to promote broadband 
availability in those areas where there is not otherwise a 
business case for private investment in a broadband network. 
The Committee directs RUS to focus expenditures on projects 
that bring broadband service to currently unserved households.

                                TITLE IV


                         DOMESTIC FOOD PROGRAMS


    Office of the Under Secretary for Food, Nutrition, and Consumer 
                                Services



2013 appropriation*...................................          $791,000
2014 budget estimate..................................           816,000
Provided in the bill..................................           791,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................             - - -
    2014 budget estimate..............................          -25,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Under Secretary for Food, Nutrition, 
and Consumer Services, the Committee provides an appropriation 
of $791,000.
    The Committee directs FNS to continue making all policy 
documents related to the WIC program (including, but not 
limited to, instructions, memoranda, guidance, and questions 
and answers) available to the public on the Internet within one 
week of their release to state WIC administrators.
    The Committee is concerned about duplicative and 
overlapping food assistance programs, with the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) having cited 18 different domestic 
programs that show signs of overlap and inefficient use of 
resources. The Committee urges FNS to review eligibility 
requirements and eliminate duplication to ensure families are 
receiving adequate but not overlapping assistance.
    The Committee expects USDA to issue guidelines to the 
appropriate state agencies on a requirement to include the USDA 
Inspector General (IG) Fraud Hotline and the IG website address 
on all SNAP and WIC Electronic Benefit Transfer cards and WIC 
coupons/vouchers or on any other information that accompanies 
the WIC instruments for the purpose of reporting potential 
fraud, waste, and abuse by vendors and/or participants. The 
Committee directs USDA to issue these guidelines no later than 
July 1, 2013.
    As part of USDA's effort to reduce fraud, ensure the 
integrity of its nutrition programs, and safeguard the 
identities of participants in nutrition assistance programs, 
the Committee directs the Secretary to provide a report 
detailing the prevalence of identity theft incidents 
perpetrated against USDA nutrition program beneficiaries; steps 
USDA is taking to protect program beneficiaries' personally 
identifiable information against unauthorized disclosure; and 
what, if any, actions are being taken to educate participants 
on the threat of identity theft.

                       Food and Nutrition Service


                        CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)


2013 appropriation....................................   $19,891,185,000
2014 budget estimate..................................    20,487,229,000
Provided in the bill..................................    20,452,229,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................      +561,044,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................       -35,000,000

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Child Nutrition Programs, the Committee provides 
$20,452,229,000. The fiscal year 2013 conference report 
provided $9.7 million for school meals equipment grants, and 
the fiscal year 2014 budget requests $35 million for this 
program. The Committee is aware of the importance of these 
funds, especially in rural areas, and will continue to monitor 
the need for this program.
    School Meals.--The Committee is concerned about the 
challenges and costs that local schools face in implementing 
the school meals final rule. While schools are still working to 
implement these nutrition standards for lunch, they also must 
begin implementing these standards for breakfast in the 2013-14 
school year. In addition, USDA recently proposed more 
regulations on schools. Before USDA can begin implementing the 
requirements for the School Breakfast Program and the proposed 
rule on nutrition standards for all foods sold in school, USDA 
is directed to receive notification from each local school 
participating in the program that it can implement the final 
rule on nutrition standards in a workable and cost-neutral 
manner. While the Committee appreciates the flexibility USDA 
has provided to schools regarding the grain and protein 
requirements for school year 2013-2014, schools will still need 
certainty into the future. USDA is encouraged to extend this 
flexibility and provide schools with a long-term policy by 
September 1, 2013, to assist them with planning and procurement 
for future school years. As schools seek to implement the new 
school meal standards, the Committee encourages USDA to 
consider ways to assist schools with technical assistance and 
training to provide healthful, cost-effective foods that 
students will eat.
    Improper Payments.--The Committee continues to be concerned 
about the staggering improper payment rates in the National 
School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP). 
For fiscal year 2012, the NSLP had an error rate of 15.53 
percent, which is $1.6 billion in improper payments. The SBP 
had an error rate of 25.18 percent, or an estimated $825 
million. These programs have some of the highest error and 
improper payment rates of all Federal programs. The Committee 
provides funding to support USDA's efforts to reduce erroneous 
payments and expects USDA to utilize any additional funds 
necessary from the State Administrative Expenses account to 
assist States and Local Educational Agencies in reducing 
errors.
    Prioritization of Monitoring and Compliance Reviews.--The 
Committee directs the Secretary to allow States to vary the 
frequency of monitoring and compliance reviews of each school 
food authority based on past school performance, with no cycle 
extending more than five years as granted in the Healthy, 
Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010.
    Child and Adult Care Food Program.--The Committee directs 
USDA to verify that CACFP sites, which provide at-risk, after-
school snacks and suppers, are in full compliance with the 
eligibility requirements for participating in the program.
    Summer Food Service Pilot Program.--Distressed counties in 
certain parts of the country face high levels of food 
insecurity. The Committee supports the efforts that authorize 
the Secretary to conduct demonstrations to test new models of 
preventing food insecurity and hunger among children during the 
summer months. The Committee directs the Secretary to provide a 
report no later than 60 days after enactment on the estimated 
implementation costs and benefits of the models that have been 
tested and provide recommendations for cost effective ways to 
promote food security in counties as defined in 40 U.S.C. 
14102.
    The following table reflects the Committee recommendations 
for the child nutrition programs:
                                                  (Dollars in thousands)
Child Nutrition Programs:
School lunch program....................................     $11,647,505
School breakfast program................................       3,842,895
Child and adult care food program.......................       3,052,176
Summer food service program.............................         467,932
Special milk program....................................          10,778
State administrative expenses...........................         247,544
Commodity procurement...................................       1,103,244
Food safety education...................................           2,649
Coordinated review......................................          10,000
Computer support and processing.........................          11,002
CACFP training and technical assistance.................           8,016
CN Studies..............................................          19,697
CN Payment Accuracy.....................................           9,617
Farm to School Team.....................................           2,170
Team Nutrition..........................................          15,004
Healthier US School Challenge...........................           2,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
    Total...............................................      20,452,229

SPECIAL SUPPLEMENTAL NUTRITION PROGRAM FOR WOMEN, INFANTS, AND CHILDREN


2013 appropriation*...................................    $6,868,934,000
2014 budget estimate..................................     7,141,625,000
Provided in the bill..................................     6,654,871,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................      -214,063,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................     -486,754,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, 
Infants, and Children (WIC), the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $6,654,871,000.
    The President's budget request includes a projection of an 
average monthly participation rate of 8.9 million women, 
infants, and children in fiscal year 2014. It is worth noting 
that previous projections for the average monthly WIC 
participation rates have been inflated. For example, the 
President's budget request in fiscal year 2012 projected an 
average monthly participation rate of 9.6 million people, when 
in fact the average participation rate was 8.9 million. In 
fiscal year 2013, the request projected participation rates of 
9.1 million, and to date, participation has been well below 
this estimate, averaging 8.7 million participants per month. 
Birth rates are an important factor in estimating WIC 
participation, and the number of births has steadily declined 
since 2007, according to the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention. Food costs also have been lower than expected. The 
Committee supports USDA's efforts to promote cost containment 
and expects some measures being implemented by States to result 
in lower food costs over the long term.
    The Committee also notes USDA has full authority to utilize 
carry over funds from the previous fiscal year and encourages 
USDA to work with States on a regular and timely basis to 
determine the availability of recovery funds as early as 
possible. Furthermore, the Secretary has $125 million in the 
WIC contingency reserve fund as a safety net to meet unexpected 
demand.
    The Committee provides for continuation of the 
breastfeeding peer counselor program, infrastructure, and 
investments in management information systems within the total 
amount provided in the bill, pending a determination by the 
Secretary that funds are available to meet caseload demand.
    The Committee will continue to monitor WIC food costs, 
participation, and carryover funds and take additional action 
as necessary to ensure that funding provided in fiscal year 
2014 is sufficient to serve all eligible applicants.
    Income Eligibility Standards.--The Committee remains 
concerned that USDA's regulations regarding income eligibility 
determinations and corresponding allowable practices, including 
the definitions of income and household, use of programs 
acceptable for adjunctive or automatic eligibility, and income 
verification procedures, have created wide disparity among the 
States, Territories, and Tribal Organizations. Concerns such as 
these were identified in the February 2013 GAO report, ``WIC 
Program: Improved Oversight of Income Eligibility Determination 
Needed.'' In partial response to the report, USDA issued income 
eligibility guidance to all state agencies on April 26, 2013. 
The Committee directs USDA to provide a report within 90 days 
of enactment detailing the training, technical assistance, and 
compliance monitoring activities that USDA will undertake in 
connection with the release of these guidelines.
    Cost Management within WIC State Agencies.--The Committee 
supports USDA's efforts to rein in the cost of WIC food items 
while ensuring the nutritional value and food choices for 
participants. As state agencies consider options for cost 
containment, the Committee directs FNS to closely monitor this 
process to ensure there are no unintended consequences for 
participants, vendors, or product manufacturers. The Committee 
is aware that USDA is conducting management evaluations of all 
state agencies since more States have had problems with vendor 
management and food cost containment. As demonstrated in USDA's 
oversight of States with violations, USDA has the ability to 
require state agencies to reduce the maximum dollar amount the 
state agency reimburses for WIC food items. The Committee 
directs the Department to provide quarterly updates to the 
Committee on the management evaluation process, including 
concerns that have arisen and steps USDA has taken to correct 
any violations. In addition, the Committee is aware that USDA 
issued moratoriums that prohibit the authorization of new WIC 
vendors in some States. While the Department should be 
applauded for efforts to control costs and address fraud, waste 
and abuse, both WIC participants and the vendors who serve 
participants may be negatively impacted by an indefinite 
moratorium. The Committee directs USDA to submit a report 
within 60 days of enactment on the actions States need to take 
to address Agency concerns, along with a timeline, for lifting 
these moratoriums.
    Vendors Offering Incentive Items to WIC Participants.--The 
practice of some vendors offering incentive items for purchases 
of WIC-authorized food items may increase the cost of WIC 
foods. Incentives may draw WIC participants who would otherwise 
shop at less expensive WIC-authorized stores. In addition, the 
price of WIC food items may be increased to cover the cost of 
incentives. The Committee encourages the Secretary to use 
existing authority to limit incentives on WIC transactions to 
help ensure that incentives do not increase WIC food costs and 
encourages the Secretary to provide recommendations for 
legislative changes that could help ensure that incentives do 
not increase WIC food costs.
    Childhood Screening.--The Committee recognizes the 
important connection between childhood lead poisoning and 
nutrition status. The Committee encourages WIC to partner with 
stakeholders in an effort to establish point-of-care blood lead 
screening activities for children who utilize WIC services in 
underserved communities where childhood lead poisoning rates 
are high.
    Eligible Foods.--The Committee encourages the Secretary to 
amend 7 CFR 246.10 in order for state agencies to include all 
varieties of fresh, whole or cut vegetables, except for 
vegetables with added sugars, fats, oils; provided that 
inclusion of such vegetables contribute towards meeting the 
special nutritional needs of program participants and increases 
the availability of low-cost, high-nutrient alternatives for 
participants throughout the year.

               SUPPLEMENTAL NUTRITION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM


2013 appropriation....................................   $77,290,160,000
2014 budget estimate..................................    78,389,610,000
Provided in the bill..................................    76,332,112,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................      -958,048,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................    -2,057,498,000

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), 
the Committee provides $76,332,112,000. The total amount 
includes $3,000,000,000 for a contingency reserve to be used 
only in the amount necessary.
    Fraud, Waste, and Abuse.--The Committee is aware of recent 
USDA efforts to strengthen the integrity of SNAP by 
establishing Federal-State data-sharing agreements to reduce 
fraud. However, the Committee recognizes more can be done to 
target fraud and has previously directed and expects USDA to 
permanently debar retailers and participants from the program 
if found guilty of fraud and abuse. To further assist in this 
effort, the Committee directs USDA to consider all options, 
including requiring that retailers participating in SNAP 
maintain a unique business identification, in order to identify 
any relationship between a disqualified SNAP retailer and all 
eligible SNAP participants to effectively screen applicants for 
criminal activity, fraud, Federal debarment, and questionable 
business practices.
    Employment and Training.--The Committee directs the 
Secretary to provide a report within 90 days of enactment on 
how the SNAP Employment and Training (E&T) program is currently 
being used to help SNAP participants gain skills and training 
to find productive employment that will allow them to 
transition from SNAP to self-sufficiency, including measurable 
results of the program. The Committee also encourages the 
Secretary to provide a five-year plan for how the E&T program, 
as well as any other resources and programs, will be used to 
help participants find employment.
    Recruitment Activities.--The Committee is concerned about 
the use of valuable tax dollars to promote enrollment of SNAP 
through radio, television, and other means of advertisements. 
The Committee is also concerned by outreach activities with 
foreign governments to encourage use of SNAP. The Committee 
strongly encourages USDA to cease these types of government-
sponsored recruitment activities.
    Prepared Foods/Beverages Purchased with SNAP Benefits.--The 
Committee is concerned that SNAP vendors are allowed to sell 
prepared food or drink with SNAP benefits beyond those 
allowances for the homeless, elderly, or disabled. The 
Committee directs USDA to tighten restrictions on SNAP 
eligibility for hot prepared foods and extend restrictions to 
other foods intended for immediate on-premise consumption such 
as hot prepared beverages and fountain drinks.
    Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.--The 
Committee is aware of the interest in transitioning the 
Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands into SNAP. The 
Committee directs the Secretary to provide a report on the 
feasibility of establishing SNAP in the Northern Mariana 
Islands, including the capabilities of the Commonwealth to 
fulfill the responsibilities of a state agency by ensuring 
participation of only eligible households, maintaining program 
integrity, paying a share of administrative costs with non-
federal funds, and other such requirements as deemed necessary 
by the Secretary to operate SNAP.
    The Emergency Food Assistance Program.--The Committee urges 
USDA to assess the availability of and consider policies and 
procedures that would make it easier for food banks and 
pantries to serve populations that may have dietary 
restrictions due to religious dietary laws.
    The following table reflects the Committee recommendations 
for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program:

[Dollars in Thousands]

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Account:
Benefits*...............................................     $66,541,196
Contingency Reserve.....................................       3,000,000

Administrative Costs:
State Administrative Costs..............................       3,999,024
Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Grant Program         350,000
Employment and Training.................................         437,405
Mandatory Other Program Costs...........................         161,744
Discretionary Other Program Costs.......................             998
    Administrative Subtotal.............................       4,949,171

Nutrition Assistance for Puerto Rico (NAP)*.............       2,000,568
American Samoa*.........................................           8,034
Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations........         104,000
TEFAP Commodities.......................................         268,500
Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands............          12,148
Community Food Project..................................           5,000
Program Access..........................................           5,000
    Subtotal............................................       2,403,250
ARRA Benefits...........................................        -561,505
    Total...............................................      76,332,112

*Totals include ARRA benefits: $452,585,000 for core SNAP; $108,485,000 
for Nutrition Assistance for Puerto Rico; and, $435,000 for American 
Samoa.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      COMMODITY ASSISTANCE PROGRAM


2013 appropriation*...................................      $247,570,000
2014 budget estimate..................................       271,701,000
Provided in the bill..................................       265,892,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................       +18,322,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................       -5,809,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    The Committee provides an appropriation of $265,892,000 for 
the Commodity Assistance Program. The recommended funding level 
for the Commodity Supplemental Food Program is $202,682,000, 
the same as the President's budget request.
    The Committee recommendation includes $16,548,000 for the 
Farmers' Market Nutrition Program.
    The Committee has included $45,592,000 for administrative 
funding for the Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP).
    For the Food Donations Programs, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $1,070,000 for Pacific Island Assistance.
    TEFAP Handling and Distribution Costs.--In addition to the 
grant funds to support commodity handling and distribution 
costs, the bill permits States to use up to 10 percent of the 
funds provided for purchasing TEFAP commodities to help with 
the costs of storing, transporting, and distributing 
commodities. The Committee expects state agencies to consult 
with their emergency feeding organizations on the need for the 
conversion of such funds.

                   NUTRITION PROGRAMS ADMINISTRATION


2013 appropriation*...................................      $139,899,000
2014 budget estimate..................................       146,592,000
Provided in the bill..................................       139,899,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................             - - -
    2014 budget estimate..............................       -6,693,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Nutrition Programs Administration, the Committee 
provides $139,899,000.
    The Committee does not provide funding for the Center for 
Nutrition Policy and Promotion to develop federal dietary 
guidance for infants and children from birth to 24 months of 
age or to promote the Dietary Guidelines for Americans or 
MyPlate. The nutrition education services provided through WIC, 
along with other Federal nutrition education programs, are 
available to assist with the dietary and nutritional needs of 
infants and children. The Committee also notes that USDA does 
significant advertising of the Dietary Guidelines, MyPlate, and 
other resources to promote healthier lifestyles. These efforts 
are combined with the ``Let's Move!'' campaign and use of this 
information by the public and private sectors.

                                TITLE V


                FOREIGN ASSISTANCE AND RELATED PROGRAMS


                      Foreign Agricultural Service


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                              Transfer from
                                                           Appropriation       export loan           Total
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2013 appropriation*....................................       $172,346,000         $6,290,000       $178,636,000
2014 budget estimate...................................        178,826,000          6,394,000        185,220,000
Provided in the bill...................................        172,866,000          6,290,000        179,156,000
Comparison:
2013 appropriation                                                +520,000                ---           +520,000
2014 budget estimate                                            -5,960,000           -104,000        -6,064,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Foreign Agricultural Service, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $172,866,000 and transfers of 
$6,290,000.
    The Committee directs the Secretary, through the Office of 
Budget and Program Analysis, in consultation with the 
Administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development, 
to submit quarterly reports to the Committee on the status of 
the Bill Emerson Humanitarian Trust, as well as to immediately 
notify the Committee when the Trust has been drawn down.
    Food for Progress.--The Committee supports the work of the 
Food for Progress program, which increases rural incomes and 
enhances food security by improving agricultural productivity, 
supporting agribusiness development, and expanding the 
availability of financial services. The Committee encourages 
USDA to consider the work of non-governmental organizations 
that are involved in small-scale agricultural biomass projects 
when issuing awards in the program. These types of projects may 
offer numerous benefits, from the production of biomass crops 
to the processing and marketing of crop and animal products.
    Performance Goals and Outcome Based Measures.--In April 
2013, USDA's Office of Inspector General released a report on 
FAS performance and said that FAS' performance measures were 
not outcome-based and do not show how the United States is 
performing in certain markets compared to its competitors. The 
Agency's overall agricultural trade strategy, Country Strategy 
Statements, and USDA's Global Market Strategy need to 
incorporate measurable goals and outcome-based measures so that 
USDA can gauge the effectiveness of the investment of 
appropriated resources. The Committee directs FAS to report no 
later than December 1, 2013, to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House and Senate on how the Agency is 
developing outcome-based measures that demonstrate results, 
and, if applicable, how FAS is changing the allocation of 
resources to promote increased foreign consumption of U.S. 
agricultural goods.

  Food for Peace Title I Direct Credit and Food for Progress Program 
                                Account


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)


2013 appropriation*...................................        $2,735,000
2014 budget estimate..................................         2,628,000
Provided in the bill..................................         2,735,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................               ---
    2014 budget estimate..............................         +107,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the administrative expenses to carry out the credit 
program of Food for Peace Title I, Food for Peace Act, and the 
Food for Progress Act, the Committee provides an appropriation 
of $2,735,000.

                     Food for Peace Title II Grants



2013 appropriation*...................................    $1,433,565,000
2014 budget estimate..................................               ---
Provided in the bill..................................     1,149,680,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................      -283,885,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................   +1,149,680,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    For Food for Peace Title II grants, the Committee provides 
$1,149,680,000.
    Food Aid Reform.--The Committee is concerned about the 
effect of the Administration's proposed reforms on food aid 
programs. The Committee directs USDA to work with USAID to 
facilitate an independent third party study and submit a report 
to the Committees on Appropriations within 60 days of enactment 
on (1) how the Administration would find the greatest possible 
efficiencies in programs under existing law and regulation 
while seeking to feed more people without increased levels of 
funding; and, (2) alternatively, explain in detail how the 
Administration's proposed reform to PL 480, Title II would be 
implemented within the existing statutory and regulatory 
framework. The study should address: efforts to combat the 
causes of hunger and malnutrition in target populations; 
efforts to address specific nutritional needs of the recipient 
community; resiliency efforts to reduce the need for emergency 
and developmental food assistance; assurance that reforms do 
not shift funding away from other existing USDA and/or USAID 
programs; actions that would need to be taken to address the 
recommendations in GAO report 11-636; and, ways agencies can 
better coordinate efforts to maximize results.

                        ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)


2013 appropriation*...................................        $6,635,000
2014 budget estimate..................................         6,748,000
Provided in the bill..................................         6,635,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................               ---
    2014 budget estimate..............................         -113,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For administrative expenses of the Commodity Credit 
Corporation Export Loans Program Account, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $6,635,000.

  MCGOVERN-DOLE INTERNATIONAL FOOD FOR EDUCATION AND CHILD NUTRITION 
                             PROGRAM GRANTS


2013 appropriation*...................................      $183,816,000
2014 budget estimate..................................       185,126,000
Provided in the bill..................................       180,320,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................        -3,496,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................       -4,806,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For McGovern-Dole International Food for Education and 
Child Nutrition Program Grants, as authorized by Section 3107 
of P.L. 107-171 (7 U.S.C. 1736o-1), the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $180,320,000.

                                TITLE VI


           RELATED AGENCIES AND FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION


                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES


                      Food and Drug Administration


                        (SALARIES AND EXPENSES)

                                             (Dollars in Thousands)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                         Appropriation         User fees        Total, FDA S&E
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2013 appropriation*.................................          $2,461,051          $1,698,804          $4,159,855
2014 budget estimate................................           2,548,905           1,794,765           4,343,670
Provided in the bill................................           2,485,399           1,794,765           4,280,164
Comparison:
2013 appropriation                                               +24,348             +95,961            +120,309
2014 budget estimate                                             -63,506                 ---            -63,506
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB ATB.

    The Committee provides an appropriation of $2,485,399,000 
in new budget authority for the Food and Drug Administration 
(FDA). In addition, the Committee recommends the following user 
fee amounts: $760,000,000--prescription drugs; $114,833,000--
medical devices; $23,600,000--animal drugs; $7,328,000--animal 
generic drugs; $534,000,000--tobacco products; $12,925,000--
food and feed recalls; $15,367,000--food reinspection; 
$305,996,000--human generic drugs; and, $20,716,000--
biosimilars. The combination of new budget authority and user 
fees provides FDA with a total discretionary salaries and 
expenses level of $4,280,164,000. This total does not include 
permanent, indefinite user fees for mammography, export, and 
color certification of $31,765,000.
    The Committee recommendation includes $63,896,000 for White 
Oak Consolidation and $9,748,700 for inspections in China. The 
Committee includes an additional $26,747,000 for food safety 
activities and an additional $2,524,000 for medical product 
safety activities.
    The Committee assumes that the pending animal drug and 
animal generic drug user fee reauthorizations will occur.
    The Committee recommendation does not include proposed user 
fees for food facility registration, food import, medical 
products reinspection, international courier, cosmetics, or 
food contact notification.
    The Committee includes an increase of $1,004,000 above the 
fiscal year 2013 funding level and not less than $10,312,000 of 
FDA headquarters funding for medical countermeasures 
initiative.
    The Committee does not include requested funding for a 
civilian pay increase across the agency. Should the President 
provide a civilian pay increase for 2014, it is assumed that 
the cost of such a pay increase will be absorbed within 
existing appropriations for fiscal year 2014. The Committee 
does include, however, $1,125,000 for the Commissioned Corps 
pay increase.
    The Committee notes that funding for the National 
Antimicrobial Response Monitoring System is estimated at 
$7,800,000 in fiscal years 2013 and 2014 and urges FDA to 
consider providing additional funding for this program if 
warranted.
    The Committee directs FDA to maintain the fiscal year 2012 
funding level for the Food Contact Notification program.
    Spending Plans.--Within 30 days of enactment, the 
Commissioner shall notify the Committees on Appropriations of 
both Houses of Congress on the allocation of the funds provided 
herein, by account, and within each account by program, 
project, and activity.
    FDA User Fee Collections/Obligations.--The Committee is 
concerned about the large unobligated balances that continue to 
occur in FDA's user fee programs. While Congress did allow for 
some exemptions from fiscal year limitations and for some 
amounts to be carried forward into subsequent fiscal years, it 
could not have been anticipated that FDA would be carrying in 
excess of $1,000,000,000 in unobligated user fees halfway into 
any fiscal year. In the Tobacco user fee program alone, the 
fiscal year 2012 unobligated balance that carried over into 
fiscal year 2013 was $600,000,000. While FDA estimates this 
figure will drop to $250,000,000 by the end of fiscal year 
2013, the Committee remains skeptical that this will occur. The 
Committee directs that not later than November 1, 2013, and 
each month thereafter through the months covered by this 
Appropriations Act, the Commissioner to submit to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House and the Senate a 
report on user fees collected for each user fee program 
included in the bill. The report shall also include monthly 
obligations incurred against such fee collections. The first 
report shall include a distinct categorization of the user fee 
balances that are being carried forward into fiscal year 2014 
for each user fee account as well as a detailed explanation of 
what accounts for the balance and what the balance will be used 
for.
    Transparency Concerns.--The Committee is concerned about 
the unpredictable nature and pace at which FDA moves guidance, 
rules, and regulations through the process. The Agency must 
understand that FDA is often viewed as a primary source of 
information for consumer decisions that impact their health and 
well-being. The Committee understands that many rules and 
regulations get through the agency and the department only to 
languish at the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). On the 
other hand, FDA has discretion to issue advisories and guidance 
without the need for OMB clearance. In a number of critical 
health areas, American consumers and industry are faced with no 
guidance at all or inconsistent messages on many important 
issues. The following is a list of examples: seafood advisory 
for pregnant women; sunscreen ingredients; new dietary 
ingredients for dietary supplements; and, Bisphenol A. The 
Committee directs FDA to report to the Committees on 
Appropriations by September 1, 2013, on how the agency plans to 
develop new methods of communicating with its stakeholders on 
future actions affecting critical policy issues, including 
estimated timeframes for when regulations, advisories, and 
guidance are planned for release and what decision points are 
necessary before these policy documents can be made.
    Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTD).--The Committee has 
become aware that Chagas disease is not on the list of 
neglected diseases as currently defined by FDA. The Committee 
urges FDA to make the necessary modifications to include Chagas 
disease in its list of neglected diseases in line with World 
Health Organization's list of NTDs. Additionally, the Committee 
directs that FDA build stronger partnerships with global 
regulatory stakeholders and strengthen its internal capacity to 
review products for neglected diseases.
    Guidance for Industry.--The Committee directs the Secretary 
of Health and Human Services to finalize Guidance for Industry 
(GFI) #213 prior to January 1, 2014. The Committee directs the 
Secretary of Health and Human Services to publish a report not 
later than one year following the date of finalization of GFI 
#213 that (1) lists the following, for each medically important 
antimicrobial new animal drug administered in feed or water to 
food-producing animals with one or more approved production 
claims (including any growth promotion, feed efficiency, or 
weight gain claims) and/or that are approved for over-the-
counter (OTC) marketing, provided that such antimicrobial is in 
a class of drugs that FDA determines accounts for 10 percent or 
more of all physician prescriptions: (a) the drug's new animal 
drug application (NADA) number(s), (b) sponsor, (c) all 
antimicrobial active ingredients contained in the drug, and, 
(d) all production claims approved for the drug; and (2) 
specifies the number of sponsors of the new animal drugs listed 
that have notified the FDA of their intent to participate in 
the voluntary process described in GFI #213. The Committee 
further directs the Secretary, beginning not later than one 
year following the finalization of GFI #213, to publish annual 
reports that (1) specify the number of antimicrobial new animal 
drugs for which sponsors have submitted applications under GFI 
#213 to change existing approvals, broken out by type of change 
sought (i.e., removal of production claims; addition of 
treatment, control, and/or prevention claims; and removal of 
OTC marketing status); and (2) list the applications submitted 
under GFI #213 that have been approved by the agency by NADA 
number, and if not approved or rejected, indicate whether the 
inaction was a result of insufficient FDA resources, 
insufficient information from sponsors or some other reason.
    Nutrition Labeling.--The Committee remains concerned with 
FDA's proposed rule to regulate Nutrition Labeling of Standard 
Menu Items at Chain Restaurants. The Committee urges FDA to use 
the proposed alternative Option 2 definition of the rule which 
only applies to restaurants or retail establishments where the 
primary and majority of business is the selling of food for 
consumption or the selling of food that is processed or 
prepared on the premises.
    The Committee believes the agency should take into account 
the increased costs and logistical challenges chain restaurants 
will face in meeting the requirements of the proposed rule. To 
meet the requirements of the law, FDA should consider a clear, 
conspicuous statement of required nutritional information on a 
prominently displayed poster adjacent to the menu board and 
nutritional information to be provided in pamphlet form 
prominently displayed next to drive-through menu boards as 
meeting such requirements.
    Food safety monitoring.--The Committee notes that the 
National Agriculture and Food Defense Strategy Plan is being 
finalized as required by Section 108 of Public Law 111-353. As 
research needs are identified to carry out this section, the 
Committee encourages FDA to consider funding research that 
would provide portable and technologically advanced testing 
platforms needed to effectively monitor and protect against 
intentional adulteration of the food supply.
    Regulations.--The Committee appreciates FDA's 
acknowledgement that exclusive tobacco products may raise 
different questions of public health and may need to be treated 
differently. Further, the Committee notes that there are key 
differentiating and unique characteristics of premium cigars 
and that any effort to bring these products under the 
``deeming'' rule should proceed with these factors being taken 
into consideration.
    Sunscreen.--Approximately two million cases of skin cancer 
are diagnosed each year and an estimated one in five Americans 
may develop skin cancer during their lifetime. Since sunscreen 
use can help prevent this disease, the Committee is concerned 
that FDA has taken no final action to approve new sunscreen 
ingredients under the Time and Extent Applications (TEA) 
process. The Committee understands that new sunscreen 
ingredient TEAs have been pending at FDA for more than 10 years 
without any approvals despite their widespread safe and 
effective use in other countries. FDA has listed final action 
on sunscreen ingredient applications in its Unified Agenda 
every year since 2008; however, no such action has ever been 
taken. Therefore, FDA shall take final action on all sunscreen 
ingredient applications currently pending by June 1, 2014, and 
shall work with Congress and stakeholders--including ingredient 
manufacturers, finished product manufacturers, dermatologists, 
cancer prevention organizations and others--to develop a new 
process that will allow safe and effective sunscreen ingredient 
market applications to receive a final decision from FDA within 
one year of application date.
    New dietary ingredients.--The Committee notes that FDA has 
not addressed issues relating to its July 2011 draft guidance 
on New Dietary Ingredients (NDI) for Dietary Supplements 
despite this Committee's urging it to do so last year. The 
Committee continues to be concerned that this guidance is being 
utilized by FDA for enforcement activities despite the document 
only being draft guidance. The Committee directs FDA to report 
back within 60 days of enactment of this Act with a timeline on 
how it intends to re-engage the dietary supplement community to 
develop a final guidance on what constitutes a NDI.
    Food Safety Centers of Excellence.--The funding provided 
for CFSAN supports the base funding for the CFSAN Centers of 
Excellence at the FY 2011 level, including Food Safety 
Modernization Act collaborative efforts with these Centers. The 
Committee encourages FDA to maintain an appropriate funding 
level for both Food Safety Modernization Act related and other 
food safety related activities performed by these Centers of 
Excellence.
    Cosmetics.--The Committee directs the Office of Cosmetics 
and Colors to respond by September 30, 2013, to a citizen 
petition setting safety levels for trace amounts of lead in 
cosmetics.
    Food and Drug Safety and Innovation Act.--The Committee is 
aware that shortages of critical drugs persist following the 
enactment of the Food and Drug Safety and Innovation Act. 
Surveys conducted by the American Association of Nurse 
Anesthetists, the American Hospital Association, and the 
American Society of Health-System Pharmacists report persistent 
shortages of drugs used in anesthesia care, oncology, and other 
services, owing primarily to problems in manufacturing, which 
impair patient access to care and patient experiences in the 
healthcare system, delay surgical procedures, and possibly 
increase overall healthcare costs. The Committee directs the 
Commissioner to continue to prioritize the public reporting of 
manufacturing shortages and to work with industry to prevent 
conditions that might lead to drug shortages.
    Food and Veterinary Medicine.--The Committee is aware of 
the important support provided to FDA's food and veterinary 
medicine programs and through its research and program 
relations with their centers of excellence. The Committee 
encourages FDA to maintain an appropriate funding level for 
both Food Safety Modernization Act related activities and the 
base work performed by these centers.
    Compounded Drugs.--The Committee is concerned by the 
quantity and volume of recalls of compounded sterile products 
and therapies. The Committee awaits the results of a study by 
GAO providing updated information on state and Federal 
oversight of compounding. Furthermore, the Committee encourages 
FDA and the States to work together to improve and strengthen 
oversight and enforcement of compounding pharmacies.
    Food Product Tracing.--Pursuant to Section 204 of the Food 
Safety Modernization Act, FDA initiated pilot projects for 
improving product tracing along the food supply system and the 
establishment of recordkeeping requirements for high-risk 
foods. These pilots were conducted by the Institute of Food 
Technologists, in consultation with various industry sectors, 
USDA, state agencies, and consumer groups. A report on these 
projects was published on March 4, 2013, and that report 
affirmed that industry and government continue to pursue 
traceability goals on separate tracks and with little 
collaboration. The Committee directs the Commissioner, in 
consultation with the Secretary of Agriculture, to create a 
science-based, international food traceability initiative 
through a collaborative public-private partnership model. 
Furthermore, the Committee directs the Commissioner to provide 
a report within 180 days of enactment of this Act detailing the 
structure, goals, and implementation status of such 
traceability initiative.
    Center for Tobacco Products Performance.--The Committee 
understands that GAO is conducting a study of FDA's premarket 
review of tobacco products. The Committee directs that, upon 
publication of that study, FDA shall use it to identify a set 
of regulatory performance standards that will address pending 
and new substantial equivalent applications, pending and new 
modified risk applications, citizen petitions, and meeting 
requests. The Committee further directs FDA to report to the 
Committees on Appropriations by March 31, 2014, on the 
implementation of such performance standards.
    Low-Risk, Expedited Imports.--The current fiscal 
environment and the growing number of import entries require 
that efforts to enhance safety must be directed towards the 
most serious compliance infractions. The Committee strongly 
encourages FDA to establish a pilot project to expedite imports 
for importers with strong safety records. Such project could be 
modeled on the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Customs-
Trade Partnership Against Terrorism and Importer Self-
Assessment programs which address security of imported 
products. The goal would be new trade facilitation methods for 
low-risk importers that provide accurate and reliable data, 
have a history of importing compliant products, and low risk 
cargo that could be incorporated into the import inspection 
process, thereby enabling FDA to better leverage financial 
resources. FDA is strongly encouraged to provide clear 
guidelines for those importers that are low-risk and to 
collaborate with CBP and other relevant agencies to enhance 
information sharing between agencies on this work. FDA is 
directed to provide a report to the Committee on its efforts in 
this regard by December 1, 2013.
    Cough and Cold Products for Children.--The Committee is 
concerned that FDA has not issued a proposed rule revising the 
monograph regulating the labeling of over-the-counter cough and 
cold products for children. The Committee directs the agency to 
publish a proposed rule by December 31, 2013, based on 
scientific evidence for safety and efficacy in pediatric 
populations and taking into consideration the October 19, 2007, 
joint recommendations of its Pediatric Advisory Committee and 
Nonprescription Drugs Advisory Committee.
    Data Collection.--To assist efforts intended to address 
antibiotic use, the Committee directs the Secretaries of Health 
and Human Services and Agriculture to require appropriate 
agencies to collaborate to (1) identify approaches for 
collecting detailed data on antibiotic use in food-producing 
animals, (2) seek stakeholder and broad public input to develop 
a proposal for collecting this information, and (3) use the 
data to assess the effectiveness of policies to curb antibiotic 
resistance. The Committee further directs FDA to ensure that 
ARS continues to analyze, characterize, and report on data 
collected through NARMS.
    Seafood Advisory.--FDA must publish a final seafood 
advisory in conjunction with all applicable parties as directed 
in House Report 112-101 and Senate Report 112-73. The advisory 
must be consistent with USDA's dietary guidelines and be 
completed and available to the public by June 30, 2013.
    User Fees.--The Committee is concerned about subjecting FDA 
user fees to sequestration as these fees are not normal tax 
revenue. It is important to maintain the integrity and industry 
support for user fee programs. The Committee encourages FDA to 
reevaluate its calculations of sequestration in regard to user 
fees.
    Statutory Deadlines.--The Committee is aware the 
Administration continues to miss statutory deadlines for 
rulemaking to implement Public Law 111-353. The Committee 
expects the Administration to meet the statutory timelines for 
implementing Public Law 111-353 and directs FDA to provide a 
report every 180 days detailing the reasons and justification 
for any proposed rule or final regulation being 120 days or 
more beyond its statutory deadline.
    Mammography Quality.--The Committee urges FDA to follow up 
the November 2011 meeting of the National Mammography Quality 
Assurance Advisory Committee by promptly reviewing the evidence 
supporting including information related to an individual's 
breast density in the mammogram patient report and physician 
report.
    Canned Tuna.--The Committee directs FDA to revise the 
standard of identity for canned tuna to adopt the drained 
weight fill of container standard as requested in the 1994 
``Citizens Petition to Amend Canned Tuna Standard of Identity, 
21 CFR 161.190, Docket No. FDA-2011-P-0763.'' According to the 
Congressional Research Service, the United States is the only 
country that uses the pressed cake weight fill of container 
standard that requires outdated 1950s technology. CODEX, the 
Association of Official Analytical Chemists, and all other 
countries use the drained weight fill of container. FDA shall 
revise the standard of identity for canned tuna to replace the 
pressed cake weight method with the drained weight method by 
December 31, 2013. FDA shall approve temporary marketing 
permits that adopt the drained weight method consistent with 
international standards until such time as final regulations 
are published updating the standard of identity for canned 
tuna.
    Impact on Small Businesses.--The Committee is concerned by 
unintended consequences of the Generic Drug User Fee Act 
(GDUFA) fee structure. While the Committee understands that 
user fees provide the resources to facilitate generic drug 
approvals, the Committee believes FDA should study the impact 
of smaller generic manufacturers' ability to pay at the same 
level as large manufacturers. The Committee directs FDA to 
provide a report to the Committees on Appropriations on the 
impact of the GDUFA fee structure on smaller generic drug 
manufacturers within 180 days of enactment of this Act.
    Abuse-Deterrent Drugs.--The Committee supports FDA's recent 
efforts to ensure that certain opioids are kept off the market 
and commends the agency for removal of those products for 
reasons of safety or effectiveness. The Committee understands 
that FDA established draft guidance in January 2013 entitled 
Evaluation and Labeling of Abuse-Deterrent Opioids, and 
encourages the agency to move expediently to finalize such 
guidance.
    Artificial Pancreas.--The Committee applauds the FDA for 
its final guidance for artificial pancreas device systems, 
released in November 2012, which provides clear and reasonable 
guidance for research and premarket review of such systems, 
which could transform the lives of those living with type 1 
diabetes. The Committee urges the FDA to ensure that the 
flexible, science-based approach reflected in its guidance is 
implemented consistently in the IDE and PMA review process to 
ensure that safety and effectiveness of innovative systems can 
be tested without delay and improved devices can become 
available to those with type 1 diabetes in the near future.
    Compounding of Sterile Injectable Prescription Drugs.--The 
Committee urges the Food and Drug Administration to use its 
existing authority to closely inspect and supervise large-scale 
compounding and repackaging of sterile injectable drugs and 
biological products, especially those administered into areas 
where there is tempered immunity.
    Food Additive Petition.--The Committee understands that a 
Food Additive Petition has been submitted to the agency 
regarding the fortification of corn masa flour with folic acid 
to prevent neural tube defects such as spina bifida. The 
Committee encourages the agency to consider this petition 
expeditiously and, if further data or information is needed 
from the petitioners, to request it in a timely fashion to 
ensure that the petition is not unduly delayed.
    Pediatric Device Consortia Program.--The Committee is 
pleased with the success of the Pediatric Device Consortia 
Grant Program, authorized under Section 305 of Public Law 110-
85. The program funds consortia to assist innovators in 
developing medical and surgical devices designed for the unique 
needs of children, needs that often go unmet by devices 
currently available on the market. The consortia funded by this 
program have assisted in the development of over 219 pediatric 
device ideas since its inception. The Committee urges the FDA's 
continued support of this important program.

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES


2013 appropriation*...................................        $5,186,000
2014 budget estimate..................................         8,788,000
Provided in the bill..................................             - - -
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................        -5,186,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................       -8,788,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    The Committee does not provide an appropriation for the 
Building and Facilities account.

                          INDEPENDENT AGENCIES


                  Commodity Futures Trading Commission



2013 appropriation*...................................      $205,294,000
2014 budget estimate..................................       315,000,000
Provided in the bill..................................       194,555,000
Comparison:
    2013 appropriation................................       -10,739,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................     -120,445,000
*FY13 enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $194,555,000, of which $35,500,000 
is for the purchase of information technology.
    Regulations.--The Committee is concerned about duplicative 
and overreaching regulations that are resource intensive. The 
Committee includes bill language directing the Commission to 
submit cost-benefit studies of these regulations to the 
Committees of jurisdiction.
    Swap Dealer De Minimis.--The Committee directs the 
Commission to submit a report within 60 days of enactment to 
the Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate that: 
(1) quantifies the number of swap dealers currently registered 
with the Commission; (2) lists the aggregate gross notional 
amount of swap activity as of the date of enactment per CFTC 
regulation 1.3(ggg)(4) for each registered swap dealer without 
individually identifiable information; (3) estimates the number 
of additional swap dealers that will register with the 
Commission if the de minimis threshold is reduced to $3 
billion; (4) lists each registered swap dealer, without 
individually identifiable information, that is deemed a 
Systemically Important Financial Institution by the Financial 
Stability Oversight Commission and/or the Financial Stability 
Board; and (5) lists the total revenue and assets of each 
registered swap dealer and corresponds with the data provided 
in criteria #2 and #3 without individually identifiable 
information.
    Administrative Law Judges.--The Committee is concerned 
about the elimination of the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ) 
program and a possible reprogramming of those funds while an 
investigation regarding CFTC's reduction-in-force is ongoing. 
Further questions have been raised by the Federal ALJ 
Conference regarding authority under the Administrative 
Procedures Act and best practices of CFTC's intention to use 
non-ALJ hearing officers. Minimum requirements for such hearing 
officers do not include a law degree, but the officers would 
still be able to make administrative case law disbarring and 
disqualifying market participants. The additional fact that 
CFTC has sole authority to hire and fire these non-ALJ hearing 
officers removes their ability to make independent decisions 
free from political influence.
    Five-year Strategic Information Technology Plan.--The 
Committee directs CFTC to develop a five-year, strategic 
technology investment plan. This plan may be produced 
individually or incorporated as an appendix to the Commission's 
five-year strategic plan. The plan should include achievable 
objectives with measurable results supported by projected 
resource requirements. The focus should be on market 
surveillance, risk management, and customer protection by 
transitioning from personnel to technology in today's 
electronic marketplace.
    Pay Cost.--The Committee does not include requested funding 
for a civilian pay increase across the Commission. Should the 
President provide a civilian pay increase for 2014, it is 
assumed that the cost of such a pay increase will be absorbed 
within existing appropriations for fiscal year 2014.

                       Farm Credit Administration


                 LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES


2013 limitation.......................................     ($63,300,000)
2014 budget estimate..................................      (63,300,000)
Provided in the bill..................................      (61,900,000)
Comparison:
    2013 limitation...................................        -1,400,000
    2014 budget estimate..............................        -1,400,000

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For a limitation on the expenses of the Farm Credit 
Administration, the Committee provides $61,900,000.
    Executive Compensation Regulation.--The bill includes 
language regarding FCA's executive compensation regulation.
    FCA Administrative Expenses.--The Committee continues to be 
concerned about the increases in FCA's administrative expenses, 
its growing assessments on Farm Credit System institutions, 
large carryover amounts, and the significant balance in its 
interest reserve fund. The Committee directs the agency to 
include a plan to substantially reduce its carryover in its 
fiscal year 2015 budget request.
    Limitation on Administrative Expenses.--The Committee 
provides FCA with authority to exceed its limitation by up to 
10 percent upon notification to the House and Senate Committees 
on Appropriations.

                               TITLE VII


                           GENERAL PROVISIONS


             (INCLUDING RESCISSIONS AND TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    The General Provisions contained in the accompanying bill 
for fiscal year 2014 are fundamentally the same as those 
included in last year's appropriations bill.
    The following general provisions are included in the bill:
    Section 701: Limitation on the purchase of passenger motor 
vehicles.
    Section 702: Transfer authority regarding the Working 
Capital Fund.
    Section 703: Limitation on certain obligations.
    Section 704: Indirect cost rates for cooperative agreements 
with nonprofit institutions.
    Section 705: Disbursement of rural development loans.
    Section 706: Authority of the Chief Information Officer 
relating to new IT systems.
    Section 707: Availability of mandatory conservation program 
funding.
    Section 708: Rural Utility Service borrower eligibility.
    Section 709: Indirect costs related to research grants.
    Section 710: Availability of agency funds for information 
technology.
    Section 711: Funding availability for liquid infant 
formula.
    Section 712: Prohibition on first-class airline travel.
    Section 713: Use of funds authorized by the Commodity 
Credit Corporation Act.
    Section 714: Limitation on funds for commodities under the 
Bill Emerson Humanitarian Trust.
    Section 715: Funding for advisory committees.
    Section 716: Indirect costs for competitive agricultural 
research grants.
    Section 717: Language regarding the Food and Nutrition Act 
of 2008.
    Section 718: Limitation on certain funds.
    Section 719: Limitation on certain funds.
    Section 720: Language on user fee proposals without 
offsets.
    Section 721: Language on reprogramming.
    Section 722: Language on fees for the business and industry 
guaranteed loan program.
    Section 723: Language on questions for the record.
    Section 724: Language regarding prepackaged news stories.
    Section 725: Language on prohibition on paid details in 
excess of 30 days.
    Section 726: Language on the mohair program.
    Section 727: Rescission of certain unobligated balances.
    Section 728: Language regarding spending plans.
    Section 729: Rescission of certain unobligated balances.
    Section 730: Language on controls over humanitarian food 
assistance.
    Section 731: Use of funds for humanitarian food assistance 
programs.
    Section 732: Language on agency rental payments.
    Section 733: Rescission of certain unobligated balances.
    Section 734: Rescission of certain unobligated balances.
    Section 735: Language regarding the Single Family Housing 
Direct Loan Program.
    Section 736: Limitation on certain funds.
    Section 737: Rescission of certain unobligated balances.
    Section 738: Rescission of certain unobligated balances.
    Section 739: Language regarding USDA loan programs.
    Section 740: This provision establishes a National 
Commission on Hunger.
    Section 741: Language is included regarding reprogramming 
of funds.
    Section 742: Language is included regarding regulations 
under the Packers and Stockyards Act.
    Section 743: Language is included regarding WIC.
    Section 744: Language is included regarding improper 
payments.
    Section 745: Language is included regarding nutrition 
programs.
    Section 746: Sense of Congress regarding hunger.
    Section 747: Language is included regarding rural housing.
    Section 748: Language is included regarding CFTC.
    Section 749: Language on horse slaughter.
    Section 750: Language is included for the Spending 
Reduction Account.

              HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES REPORT REQUIREMENTS


                           TRANSFER OF FUNDS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following lists the transfers of 
unexpended balances included in the accompanying bill.
    1. Hazardous Materials Management.--The bill allows the 
funds appropriated to the Department for hazardous materials 
management to be transferred to agencies of the Department as 
required.
    2. Departmental Administration.--The bill requires 
reimbursement for expenses related to certain hearings.
    3. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Congressional 
Relations.--The bill allows a portion of the funds appropriated 
to the Office of the Assistant Secretary to be transferred to 
agencies.
    4. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.--Authority 
is included to enable the Secretary of Agriculture to transfer 
from other appropriations or funds of the Department such sums 
as may be necessary to combat emergency outbreaks of certain 
diseases of animals, plants, and poultry.
    5. Funds for Strengthening Markets, Income, and Supply.--
The bill limits the transfer of section 32 funds to purposes 
specified in the bill.
    6. Farm Service Agency Salaries and Expenses.--The bill 
provides that funds provided to other accounts in the agency 
may be merged with the salaries and expenses account of the 
Farm Service Agency.
    7. Dairy Indemnity Program.--The bill authorizes the 
transfer of funds to the Commodity Credit Corporation, by 
reference.
    8. Commodity Credit Corporation.--The bill includes 
language allowing certain funds to be transferred to the 
Foreign Agricultural Service for information resource 
management activities.
    9. Rural Development Salaries and Expenses.--The bill 
provides that prior year balances from certain accounts shall 
be transferred to and merged with this account.
    10. Rural Community Facilities Program Account, Rural 
Business Program Account, and Rural Water and Waste Disposal 
Program Account.--The bill provides that balances from the 
Rural Community Advancement Program may be transferred to and 
merged with these accounts.
    11. Child Nutrition Programs.--The bill includes authority 
to transfer section 32 funds to these programs.
    12. Foreign Agricultural Service Salaries and Expenses.--
The bill allows for the transfer of funds from the Commodity 
Credit Corporation Export Loan Program Account.
    13. Food for Peace Title I Direct Credit and Food for 
Progress Program Account.--The bill allows funds to be 
transferred to the Farm Service Agency, Salaries and Expenses 
account. The bill also provides that funds made available for 
the cost of title I agreements and for title I ocean freight 
differential may be used interchangeably.
    14. Commodity Credit Corporation Export Loans Program.--The 
bill provides for transfer of funds to the Foreign Agricultural 
Service and to the Farm Service Agency for overhead expenses 
associated with credit reform.
    15. Food and Drug Administration, Salaries and Expenses.--
The bill allows funds to be transferred among activities.
    16. General Provisions.--The bill allows unobligated 
balances of discretionary funds to be transferred to the 
Working Capital Fund.
    17. General Provisions.--The bill allows funds to be 
transferred to recover the full cost of space and security 
expenses.
<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>

               CHANGES IN THE APPLICATION OF EXISTING LAW

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1)(A) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the following statements are 
submitted describing the effect of provisions in the 
accompanying bill that directly or indirectly change the 
application of existing law.
    The bill includes a number of provisions which place 
limitations on the use of funds in the bill or change existing 
limitations and which might, under some circumstances, be 
construed as changing the application of existing law:
    1. Office of the Secretary.--Language is included to limit 
the amount of funds for official reception and representation 
expenses, as determined by the Secretary.
    2. Departmental Administration.--Language is included to 
reimburse the agency for travel expenses incident to the 
holding of hearings.
    3. Agricultural Research Service.--Language is included 
that allows the Agricultural Research Service to grant 
easements at the Beltsville, MD, agricultural research center 
and to grant easements at any facility for the construction of 
a research facility for use by the agency.
    4. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.--A provision 
carried in the bill since fiscal year 1973 regarding state 
matching funds has been continued to assure more effective 
operation of the brucellosis control program through state cost 
sharing, with resulting savings to the Federal budget.
    Language is included to allow APHIS to recoup expenses 
incurred from providing technical assistance goods, or services 
to non-APHIS personnel, and to allow transfers of funds for 
agricultural emergencies.
    Language is included to limit the amount of funds for 
representational allowances.
    5. Agricultural Marketing Service, Limitation on 
Administrative Expenses.--The bill includes language to allow 
AMS to exceed the limitation on administrative expenses by 10 
percent with notification to the Appropriations Committees. 
This allows flexibility in case crop size is understated and/or 
other uncontrollable events occur.
    6. Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration, 
Inspection and Weighing Services.--The bill includes authority 
to exceed the limitation on inspection and weighing services by 
10 percent with notification to the Appropriations Committees. 
This allows for flexibility if export activities require 
additional supervision and oversight, or other uncontrollable 
factors occur.
    7. Dairy Indemnity Program.--Language is included by 
reference that allows the Secretary to utilize the services of 
the Commodity Credit Corporation for the purpose of making 
dairy indemnity payments.
    8. Agricultural Credit Insurance Fund Program Account.--
Language is included that deems the pink bollworm a boll weevil 
for the purposes of administering the boll weevil loan program.
    9. Risk Management Agency.--Language is included to limit 
the amount of funds for official reception and representation 
expenses.
    10. Commodity Credit Corporation Fund.--Language is 
included to provide for the reimbursement appropriation. 
Language is also included to allow certain funds transferred 
from the Commodity Credit Corporation to be used for 
information resource management. In addition, language is 
included which limits the amount of funds that can be spent on 
operation and maintenance costs of CCC hazardous waste sites.
    11. Natural Resources Conservation Service--Conservation 
Operations.--Language which has been included in the bill since 
1938 prohibits construction of buildings on land not owned by 
the government, although construction on land owned by States 
and counties is permitted as authorized by law.
    12. Rural Development Salaries and Expenses.--Language is 
included to allow funds to be used for advertising and 
promotional activities and to limit the amount of funds to 
provide modest nonmonetary awards to non-USDA employees.
    13. Rental Assistance Program.--Language is included which 
provides that agreements entered into during the current fiscal 
year be funded for a one-year period.
    14. Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, 
Infants, and Children (WIC).--Language is included to purchase 
infant formula except in accordance with law and pay for 
activities that are not fully reimbursed by other departments 
or agencies unless authorized by law.
    15. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.--Language is 
included on funds availability for Employment and Training, the 
Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Grant Program, and 
to enter into contracts and employ staff to conduct studies, 
evaluations, or to conduct activities related to program 
integrity.
    16. Foreign Agricultural Service.--Language carried since 
1979 enables this agency to use funds received by an advance or 
by reimbursement to carry out its activities involving 
international development and technical cooperation. Language 
is included to limit the amount of funds for official reception 
and representation expenses.
    17. Commodity Futures Trading Commission.--Language is 
included to limit the amount of funds for official reception 
and representation expenses.
    18. Farm Credit Administration.--The bill includes 
authority to exceed the limitation on assessments by 10 percent 
with notification to the Appropriations Committees.
    19. General Provisions.--
    Section 704: This provision provides that none of the funds 
in this Act may be made available to pay indirect costs charged 
against competitive agricultural research, education, or 
extension grants awarded by the National Institute of Food and 
Agriculture in excess of 10 percent of total direct costs.
    Section 705: This provision allows funds made available in 
the current fiscal year for the Rural Development Loan Fund 
program account; the Rural Electrification and 
Telecommunications Loans program account; and the Rural Housing 
Insurance Fund program account to remain available until 
expended to disburse obligations.
    Section 706: Language is included that requires approval of 
the Chief Information Officer and the concurrence of the 
Executive Information Technology Investment Review Board for 
acquisition of new information technology systems or 
significant upgrades, and that prohibits the transfer of funds 
to the Office of the Chief Information Officer without the 
notification of the Committees on Appropriations of both Houses 
of Congress.
    Section 707: Language is included regarding the 
availability of funds for certain conservation programs.
    Section 708: Language is included regarding certain Rural 
Utilities Service Programs.
    Section 709: Language is included regarding indirect costs 
to grants made under section 412 of the Agricultural Research, 
Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998.
    Section 710: Language is included that allows unobligated 
balances of the Farm Service Agency and Rural Development 
mission areas to be used for information technology purposes.
    Section 711: Language is included regarding reconstituted 
liquid concentrate infant formula issuance to WIC participants.
    Section 712: Language is included regarding the prohibition 
of first-class travel by the employees of agencies funded in 
this Act.
    Section 713: Language is included regarding the use of 
authorities of the Commodity Credit Corporation.
    Section 715: Language is included that limits the amount of 
spending for USDA Advisory Committees.
    Section 716: Language is included modifying matching 
requirements for certain research grants.
    Section 717: Language is included regarding the Food and 
Nutrition Act of 2008.
    Section 718: Language regarding certain limitations.
    Section 719: Language regarding certain limitations.
    Section 720: Language is included that prohibits funds from 
being used to prepare a budget submission to Congress that 
assumes reductions from the previous year's budget due to user 
fee proposals unless the submission also identifies spending 
reductions which should occur if the user fees are not enacted.
    Section 721: Language is included that requires certain 
reprogramming procedures of funds provided in Appropriations 
Acts.
    Section 722: Language is included regarding fees for the 
business and industry guaranteed loan program.
    Section 723: This provision prohibits the Department of 
Agriculture or the Food and Drug Administration from 
transmitting or making available to any non-Department of 
Agriculture or non-Department of Health and Human Services 
employee questions or responses to questions that are a result 
of information requested for the appropriations hearing 
process.
    Section 724: Language regarding prepackaged news stories.
    Section 725: This provision prohibits any employee of the 
Department of Agriculture from being detailed or assigned to 
any other agency or office of the Department for more than 30 
days unless the individual's employing agency or office is 
fully reimbursed by the receiving agency or office for the 
salary and expenses of the employee for the period of 
assignment.
    Section 726: Language is included regarding the mohair 
program.
    Section 727: Rescission of certain unobligated balances.
    Section 729: Rescission of certain unobligated balances.
    Section 731: Language is included regarding the use of 
funds for humanitarian food assistance programs.
    Section 732: Language is included regarding USDA agency 
rental payments.
    Section 733: Rescission of certain unobligated balances.
    Section 734: Rescission of certain unobligated balances.
    Section 735: Language regarding the Single Family Housing 
Direct Loan Program.
    Section 736: Language regarding certain limitations.
    Section 737: Rescission of certain unobligated balances.
    Section 738: Rescission of certain unobligated balances.
    Section 739: Language regarding USDA loan programs.
    Section 740: This provision establishes a National 
Commission on Hunger.
    Section 741: Language is included regarding reprogramming 
of funds.
    Section 742: Language is included regarding regulations 
under the Packers and Stockyards Act.
    Section 743: Language is included regarding WIC.
    Section 744: Language is included regarding improper 
payments.
    Section 745: Language is included regarding nutrition 
programs.
    Section 746: Sense of Congress regarding hunger.
    Section 747: Language is included regarding rural housing.
    Section 748: Language is included regarding CFTC.
    Section 749: Language on horse slaughter.
    Section 750: Language is included for the Spending 
Reduction Account.

   DISCLOSURE OF EARMARKS AND CONGRESSIONALLY DIRECTED SPENDING ITEMS

    Neither the bill nor the report contains any Congressional 
earmarks, limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as 
defined in clause 9 of rule XXI.

         STATEMENT OF GENERAL PERFORMANCE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is a statement of 
general performance goals and objectives for which this measure 
authorizes funding:
    The Committee on Appropriations considers program 
performance, including a program's success in developing and 
attaining outcome-related goals and objectives, in developing 
funding recommendations.

                          PROGRAM DUPLICATION

    No provision of this bill establishes or reauthorizes a 
program of the Federal Government known to be duplicative of 
another Federal program, a program that was included in any 
report from the Government Accountability Office to Congress 
pursuant to section 21 of Public Law 111-139, or a program 
related to a program identified in the most recent Catalog of 
Federal Domestic Assistance.

                          DIRECTED RULE MAKING

    The bill does not direct any rule making.

          COMPLIANCE WITH RULE XIII, CL. 3(E) (RAMSEYER RULE)

    In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

      CONSOLIDATED AND FURTHER CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2012


(Public Law 112-55)

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


       DIVISION A--AGRICULTURE, RURAL DEVELOPMENT, FOOD AND DRUG 
ADMINISTRATION, AND RELATED AGENCIES

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                               TITLE VII


                           GENERAL PROVISIONS


(INCLUDING RESCISSIONS AND TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


  Sec. 732. (a) * * *
  (b) Conveyance Authority.--With respect to an Agricultural 
Research Service facility to be closed pursuant to subsection 
(a), the Secretary of Agriculture may convey, with or without 
consideration, all right, title, and interest of the United 
States in and to any real property, including improvements and 
equipment thereon, of the facility to an eligible entity 
specified in subsection (c). If the Agricultural Research 
Service facility consists of more than one parcel of real 
property, the Secretary may convey each parcel separately and 
to different eligible entities. The conveyance authority 
provided by this subsection expires September 30, 2013, and all 
conveyances under this subsection must be completed by that 
date. The conveyance authority provided by this subsection 
expires September 30, 2014, and all conveyances under this 
subsection must be completed by that date.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


                     FOOD AND NUTRITION ACT OF 2008




           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
            ADMINISTRATIVE COST-SHARING AND QUALITY CONTROL

  Sec. 16. (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (h) Funding of Employment and Training Programs.--
          (1) In general.--
                  (A) Amounts.--To carry out employment and 
                training programs, the Secretary shall reserve 
                for allocation to State agencies, to remain 
                available for 15 months, from funds made 
                available for each fiscal year under section 
                18(a)(1), $90,000,000 for each fiscal year, 
                except that for fiscal year 2013 and fiscal 
                year 2014, the amount shall be $79,000,000.
                  (B) Allocation.--Funds made available under 
                subparagraph (A) shall be made available to and 
                reallocated among State agencies under a 
                reasonable formula that--
                          (i) is determined and adjusted by the 
                        Secretary; and
                          (ii) takes into account the number of 
                        individuals who are not exempt from the 
                        work requirement under section 6(o).
                  (C) Reallocation.--If a State agency will not 
                expend all of the funds allocated to the State 
                agency for a fiscal year under subparagraph 
                (B), the Secretary shall reallocate the 
                unexpended funds to other States (during the 
                fiscal year or the subsequent fiscal year) as 
                the Secretary considers appropriate and 
                equitable.
                  (D) Minimum allocation.--Notwithstanding 
                subparagraph (B), the Secretary shall ensure 
                that each State agency operating an employment 
                and training program shall receive not less 
                than $50,000 for each fiscal year.
                  (E) Additional allocations for states that 
                ensure availability of work opportunities.--
                          (i) In general.--In addition to the 
                        allocations under subparagraph (A), 
                        from funds made available under section 
                        18(a)(1), the Secretary shall allocate 
                        not more than $20,000,000 for each 
                        fiscal year to reimburse a State agency 
                        that is eligible under clause (ii) for 
                        the costs incurred in serving members 
                        of households receiving supplemental 
                        nutrition assistance program benefits 
                        who--
                                  (I) are not eligible for an 
                                exception under section 
                                6(o)(3); and
                                  (II) are placed in and comply 
                                with a program described in 
                                subparagraph (B) or (C) of 
                                section 6(o)(2).
                          (ii) Eligibility.--To be eligible for 
                        an additional allocation under clause 
                        (i), a State agency shall make and 
                        comply with a commitment to offer a 
                        position in a program described in 
                        subparagraph (B) or (C) of section 
                        6(o)(2) to each applicant or recipient 
                        who--
                                  (I) is in the last month of 
                                the 3-month period described in 
                                section 6(o)(2);
                                  (II) is not eligible for an 
                                exception under section 
                                6(o)(3);
                                  (III) is not eligible for a 
                                waiver under section 6(o)(4); 
                                and
                                  (IV) is not exempt under 
                                section 6(o)(6).
  (2) If, in carrying out such program during such fiscal year, 
a State agency incurs costs that exceed the amount allocated to 
the State agency under paragraph (1), the Secretary shall pay 
such State agency an amount equal to 50 per centum of such 
additional costs, subject to the first limitation in paragraph 
(3), including the costs for case management and casework to 
facilitate the transition from economic dependency to self-
sufficiency through work.
  (3) The Secretary shall also reimburse each State agency in 
an amount equal to 50 per centum of the total amount of 
payments made or costs incurred by the State agency in 
connection with transportation costs and other expenses 
reasonably necessary and directly related to participation in 
an employment and training program under section 6(d)(4), 
except that the amount of the reimbursement for dependent care 
expenses shall not exceed an amount equal to the payment made 
under section 6(d)(4)(I)(i)(II) but not more than the 
applicable local market rate, and such reimbursement shall not 
be made out of funds allocated under paragraph (1).
  (4) Funds provided to a State agency under this subsection 
may be used only for operating an employment and training 
program under section 6(d)(4), and may not be used for carrying 
out other provisions of this Act.
  (5) The Secretary shall monitor the employment and training 
programs carried out by State agencies under section 6(d)(4) to 
measure their effectiveness in terms of the increase in the 
numbers of household members who obtain employment and the 
numbers of such members who retain such employment as a result 
of their participation in such employment and training 
programs.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                  APPROPRIATIONS NOT AUTHORIZED BY LAW

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1)(B) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the following table lists the 
appropriations in the accompanying bill which are not 
authorized by law for the period concerned:

                                            (In thousands of dollars)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               Appropriations in
                Agency/Program                   Last year of   Authorization     last year of    Appropriations
                                                 authorization      level        authorization     in this bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Farm Service Agency:
    Dairy Indemnity Program...................       9/30/2013      Such sums          Such sums       Such sums
Food and Nutrition Service:
    Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.       9/30/2013      Such sums         77,290,160      76,332,112
    Commodity Supplemental Food Program.......       9/30/2013     Prior year            182,237         202,682
                                                                     caseload
    The Emergency Food Assistance Program.....       9/30/2013        100,000             48,160          45,592
Foreign Agricultural Service:
    McGovern-Dole International Food for             9/30/2013      Such sums            183,816         180,320
     Education Program........................
National Institute of Food and Agriculture:
    Grants to upgrade facilities at 1890             9/30/2013         25,000             18,850          19,336
     institutions.............................
    Education Grants for Hispanic-serving            9/30/2013         40,000              8,087           9,219
     institutions.............................
    Extension Service.........................       9/30/2013      Such sums            463,896         459,011
    Integrated research, education, and              9/30/2013      Such sums             20,942          31,137
     extension grants.........................
    1994 institution research grants..........       9/30/2013      Such sums              1,756           1,801
    Grants for insular areas..................       9/30/2013      Such sums              1,609           1,800
    Agriculture and Food Research Initiative..       9/30/2013        700.000            290,468         290,657
Rural Business-Cooperative Service:
    Value-added Agricultural Product Market          9/30/2013         40,000             14,623          15,000
     Development Grants.......................
    Appropriate Technology Transfer for Rural        9/30/2013          5,000              2,193           2,250
     Areas....................................
    Rural Energy for America Program..........       9/30/2013         25,000              3,315           3,000
Rural Housing Service:
    Tribal College and University essential          9/30/2013         10,000              3,284           3,284
     community facilities.....................
    Multi-family Housing Revitalization              9/30/2013         13,000             27,084          27,084
     Program..................................
Rural Utilities Service:
    Distance Learning and Telemedicine........       9/30/2013        100,000             24,323          24,323
    Broadband telecommunications services.....       9/30/2013         25,000              3,899           5,500
    Broadband telecommunications grants.......       9/30/2013         10,372             10,372          10,111
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                              RESCISSIONS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following lists the rescissions 
of unexpended balances included in the accompanying bill:
    The bill proposes rescissions of $180,000,000 of funds 
derived from interest on the cushion of credit payments under 
the Rural Economic Development Loans Program Account; 
$206,000,000 from Section 32 funds; $30,000,000 from 
Agriculture Buildings and Facilities and Rental Payments; 
$2,017,000 from the Natural Resources Conservation Service; 
$1,314,000 from the Rural Housing Service; $41,000,000 from the 
bioenergy program; $40,694,000 from the biorefinery program; 
and $15,000,000 from the value-added grant program.

                 COMPARISON WITH THE BUDGET RESOLUTION

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives and section 308(a)(1)(A) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the following table compares 
the levels of new budget authority provided in the bill with 
the appropriate allocation under section 302(b) of the Budget 
Act:

                                            (In millions of dollars)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     302(b) Allocation           This bill
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
                                                                    Budget                  Budget
                                                                   authority    Outlays    authority    Outlays
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discretionary...................................................      19,450      22,451      19,450   \1\21,294
Mandatory.......................................................      42,981      30,298      42,981   \1\30,298
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

                      FIVE-YEAR OUTLAY PROJECTIONS

    Pursuant to section 308(a)(1)(B) of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974, the following table contains five-year 
projections prepared by the Congressional Budget Office of 
outlays associated with the budget authority provided in the 
accompanying bill:
Projection of outlays associated with the recommendation:ons of dollars)
    2014......................................................\1\117,128
    2015......................................................     4,029
    2016......................................................       755
    2017......................................................        16
    2018 and future years.....................................    -1,768
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

               ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS

    Pursuant to section 308(a)(1)(C) of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974, the amounts of financial assistance to 
State and local governments is as follows:
                                                (In millions of dollars)
Budget Authority..............................................    37,974
Outlays....................................................... \1\36,142
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>


 MINORITY VIEWS OF THE HONORABLE NITA LOWEY AND THE HONORABLE SAM FARR

    We are dismayed by the House Republican leadership's 
refusal to go to conference to forge a bipartisan agreement on 
the budget resolution that addresses sequestration and provides 
workable 302(b) allocations for Appropriations bills. This 
imperils this year's process, making it impossible to move all 
12 bills. Sequestration was intended to be a mechanism to force 
the parties to come together to address our long-term fiscal 
challenges. It was never meant to be, in itself, a tool for 
deficit reduction, and it was certainly never meant to be the 
basis for the discretionary spending cap in a budget 
resolution.
    If the current 302(a) allocation stays in place, the House 
will likely pass only a few bills with reasonable allocations, 
while the remaining bills will be given inadequate funding and 
may not go to the House floor. With the Ryan budget as the 
basis for discretionary spending, there will undoubtedly be one 
or more continuing resolutions needed to keep the government 
open and running.
    As a result of the Committee's inadequate overall 
allocation, the Agriculture subcommittee received an 
unacceptably low 302(b) allocation of $19.450 billion. This is 
$520 million (2.6%) below the CBO estimate of the President's 
request for the bill. However, the President's 2014 budget 
moved the Food for Peace program to the State, Foreign 
Operations bill. The 2014 Agriculture bill allocation, which 
assumes Food for Peace is funded in this bill, is $1.3 billion 
(6.2%) lower than the original 2013 conference agreement last 
fall, which also included Food for Peace funding.
    The impact of this allocation is evident in the inadequate 
funding provided for many important accounts in the bill.
    For example, we estimate that some 214,000 eligible 
applicants would be denied participation in WIC at the funding 
level in the bill. Compared to the President's request, we 
estimate there would be 454,000 unserved, eligible applicants. 
These estimates assume, as required in the bill, that no funds 
are used for breastfeeding counselors or for helping states 
convert from paper benefit vouchers to electronic benefit 
cards, an important and needed management reform. The bill 
could not even cover participation for all eligible individuals 
with use of the entire contingency fund.
    While the report suggests the President's budget estimates 
of participation in the program ``have been inflated,'' it does 
not explain why the majority believes the funding level in the 
bill is sufficient to serve all eligible applicants. In fact, 
the President's budget request for fiscal year 2012 was far 
closer to the actual spending level for that year than the 
funding bill enacted by Congress. In 2012, despite pleas from 
House Democrats, Congress underfunded WIC so severely that USDA 
had to transfer $400 million from SNAP to WIC on an emergency 
basis.
    Another critical program, Food for Peace, is also severely 
under-funded. While there may be debate about the 
administration's proposed reforms to the U.S. food aid program, 
there is no doubt that failing to adequately fund it is a 
tragic mistake. The bill cuts the program by $284 million 
(19.8%) below 2013 and $275 million (19.3%) below the 2014 
request. Based on the average cost per person served in 2012, 
we believe more than 7.4 million people would not receive food 
assistance from the United States as a result of the House 
funding level.
    Shockingly, the Republican majority also continues its 
efforts to prevent the Commodity Futures Trading Commission 
from doing its vital work to provide greater transparency and 
competition in markets, more certainty for the farmers, 
ranchers, and small businesses that use these markets, and 
protection of taxpayers from having to pay for future bailouts. 
This bill funds the agency at $194.555 million, which is $10.7 
million (5.2%) below the 2013 base the Republican bills use and 
$120 million (38%) below the 2014 request. The Republican 
majority must drop the pretense that Dodd-Frank is going to be 
repealed and provide the agency the resources it needs to write 
and enforce the law.
    We are troubled by language in the bill blocking a 
regulation by the Farm Credit Administration that provides for 
non-binding, advisory votes by shareholders on the compensation 
of the presidents and senior executives of member banks.
    In addition to these concerns, we note that several 
troublesome riders were adopted in full committee.
    We are concerned by the adoption of language requiring that 
white potatoes be added to the list of eligible foods in the 
WIC program. This rider was opposed by the American Academy of 
Pediatrics, the American Public Health Association and the 
March of Dimes, among others, because it violates the long-
standing tradition of not interfering in science-based 
decisions about WIC foods. The current food package is based on 
extensive study, including recommendations by the Institute of 
Medicine. Political interference with that process will 
undermine the program and threaten its proven record of 
contributing to the health of mothers, infants and children.
    The Committee adopted a rider that bars a state from 
receiving any funds in the bill unless the state is in ``full 
compliance'' with certain eligibility requirements of the SNAP 
program. This amendment would have vast, negative consequences 
on states, their economies and on participants in a wide 
variety of USDA programs if it became law. While compliance 
with eligibility is a goal we all share, the most recent data 
shows the program already has an extremely low total error 
rate--the lowest in its history--3.8%, and overpayment errors 
are less than 3%.
    In Texas, for example, the total error rate for SNAP was 
below the national level, at 3.48%. Despite that commendable 
record, a single error in eligibility under the law cited in 
the amendment apparently would cause Texas to lose all the 
funding it receives in this bill. Had this been law in 2012, 
Texas would have lost, for example: $1,709,395,000 for 569 
million lunches and 304 million breakfasts at more than 8100 
schools and $561,000,000 that served an average of 970,000 
women, infants and children a month in the WIC program.
    We do not see why the bill should carry language related to 
Dodd-Frank that should be considered in an authorization bill 
and that, in fact, is in an authorization bill, H.R. 1256, that 
passed the House just two days before the full Committee 
considered this bill. This unnecessary provision will only 
complicate consideration of the bill as it goes forward.
    We also see no reason for carrying language that was 
enacted in 2012 that blocks certain protections for small 
livestock producers, since USDA promulgated a final rule in 
2011 fully consistent with that rider. We believe if there are 
any lingering concerns about this issue, they should be 
addressed in the pending farm bill. We hope that this rider 
will be dropped.
    While we will do our best to address the many shortcomings 
of this bill as the process moves forward, we do not support 
the bill in its current form.

                                   Nita M. Lowey.
                                   Sam Farr.

 Additional Views on International Food Aid of the Honorable Nita Lowey

    The United States is a generous nation and since the 1950s 
has fed billions of people around the world through the Food 
for Peace program. When originally designed, it served two 
goals--to help U.S. farmers by dealing with surplus commodities 
in a way that would boost prices and to meet a humanitarian 
imperative by feeding people in crisis.
    However, nearly sixty years later, the world has changed 
and the program needs to respond. The United States does not 
have the surpluses it did decades ago and it is now forced to 
purchase food on the commercial markets. Near record-high farm 
prices have meant our food aid dollars do not go as far. 
According to independent analyses, the number of direct 
recipients of our food aid has dropped from 74 million in 2006 
to an average of 30 million more recently.
    The Green Revolution of the 1970s increased agricultural 
production worldwide, breaking the cycle of famine in many 
developing countries. Research has shown that famine and hunger 
are not necessarily caused by the lack of food, but frequently 
by lack of access to available food, often driven by conflict. 
According to a 2009 report by GAO, this locally-available food 
is a quarter to a third less expensive than in-kind food aid. 
In addition to being cheaper, buying food locally often means 
more culturally appropriate and nutritious options.
    The current Food for Peace program also includes a 
requirement that half of American food aid must be transported 
on U.S.-flagged ships. Not only is this more costly, but in 
emergencies where delay can have deadly consequences, various 
studies have shown that it will take 70-100 days longer than 
purchasing the food regionally. In many conflicts, importing 
and transporting large quantities of commodity food is 
dangerous, or even logistically impossible. Taken with the lack 
of existing surpluses in the United States and the opportunity 
in many cases to support developing country farmers in the 
region, the current cargo transport requirement no longer makes 
sense.
    Given these factors, I welcomed the Administration's 
proposal to reform the food aid program as part of the FY 2014 
budget request. The country's current fiscal crisis demands 
that all policymakers take a critical and judicious look at 
each program the government funds to determine whether it is 
efficient and effective in reaching its objective. With the 
lack of agricultural surpluses in our country, the sole 
remaining objective of our food aid programs should be to serve 
the maximum number of people in need in the most cost effective 
way possible.
    Therefore, I am disappointed that the FY 2014 Agriculture 
Appropriations bill not only rejects the Administration's 
proposal for reform but does nothing to improve the 
effectiveness of food aid programs in any way. This is despite 
the clearly documented deficiencies of the current program. The 
Administration's proposal would shift the food aid program to 
the State, Foreign Operations bill into three separate 
accounts: International Disaster Assistance, Development 
Assistance, and a new Emergency Food Assistance Contingency 
Fund. The proposal guarantees that more than half of the 
emergency assistance would still be procured domestically and 
that development programs would continue as a critical element 
of U.S. response to global hunger and resilience. Monetization 
would be replaced with direct funding for programs, cutting out 
middlemen and reducing leakage. Emergency food aid would be 
supplemented with more flexible tools such as vouchers and 
purchases from local suppliers extending the reach of our 
support. With the same amount of resources and these careful 
reforms, the Administration estimates that their proposal could 
feed 2 to 4 million additional people. The Center for Global 
Development's recent analysis shows that the proposal could 
help as many as 10 million additional people.
    While these programs are funded through this bill, the 
United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has 
been implementing Food for Peace for many years. Both 
transparency and oversight would be improved by consolidating 
the funding and the implementing agency in one bill. For both 
emergency and non-emergency programs, these programs can gain 
efficiencies by seamless planning, implementation, and 
evaluation with other USAID humanitarian and food security 
programs.
    The crisis in the Horn of Africa, the current devastation 
of the communities in Syria, and the fragile nature of 
chronically hungry places like the Sahel region of Africa call 
us to be responsible stewards of resources, both for United 
States taxpayers and the people around the world who depend on 
our assistance. These reforms are proven--monetization programs 
in the Democratic Republic of the Congo are only earning $0.51 
for every dollar of commodities provided. I hope the many 
stakeholders and congressional committees involved in these 
programs can work together to ensure that United States food 
aid programs remain an effective expression of U.S. generosity 
to the world's most vulnerable people.

                                   Nita M. Lowey.

               Additional Views of the Honorable Sam Farr

    Though the appropriation to the FDA overall is slightly 
more than last year, it bears noting that FDA resources are 
artificially constrained due to the sequestration of user fees. 
Just as sequestration has artificially driven allocations to 
the committee to new lows, it also has the unintended 
consequence of denying the FDA access to user fees paid by 
industry to the agency to help cover costs associated with 
testing, review and approval of new drugs, medical devices and 
health treatments. For example, more than 2700 generic drug 
applications are backlogged and have little chance of moving 
expeditiously through the approval process because of the 
restriction on resources--in this case, $85 million paid in 
FY13 that cannot be spent. Granted, the matter of sequestration 
is larger than its single impact on the FDA, nonetheless the 
impact is real and had sequestration not occurred the FDA would 
have significantly more resources available to it--resources 
paid directly by industry, not taxpayers--than can be 
appropriated under this bill. We do a disservice to the public 
if we do not try to address this matter.

                                   Sam Farr.