H. Rept. 113-302 - 113th Congress (2013-2014)
December 20, 2013, As Reported by the Science, Space, and Technology Committee

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House Report 113-302 - FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITIES OF THE COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES FOR THE ONE HUNDRED THIRTEENTH CONGRESS




[House Report 113-302]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]


                                                 Union Calendar No. 220

113th Congress, 1st Session - - - - - - - - - - - - - House Report 113-302


                   FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITIES

                                 OF THE

              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY

                     U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                                FOR THE

                    ONE HUNDRED THIRTEENTH CONGRESS

                                    
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                           December 20, 2013

 December 20, 2013.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                   FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITIES




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                                                 Union Calendar No. 220

113th Congress, 1st Session - - - - - - - - - - - - House Report 113-302

                   FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITIES

                                 OF THE

              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY

                     U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                                FOR THE

                    ONE HUNDRED THIRTEENTH CONGRESS

                                   0 
<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>

                                    

                           December 20, 2013

 December 20, 2013.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed
              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY

                   HON. LAMAR S. SMITH, Texas, Chair
DANA ROHRABACHER, California         EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON, Texas
RALPH M. HALL, Texas                 ZOE LOFGREN, California
F. JAMES SENSENBRENNER, JR.,         DANIEL LIPINSKI, Illinois
    Wisconsin                        DONNA F. EDWARDS, Maryland
FRANK D. LUCAS, Oklahoma             FREDERICA S. WILSON, Florida
RANDY NEUGEBAUER, Texas              SUZANNE BONAMICI, Oregon
MICHAEL T. McCAUL, Texas             ERIC SWALWELL, California
PAUL C. BROUN, Georgia               DAN MAFFEI, New York
STEVEN M. PALAZZO, Mississippi       ALAN GRAYSON, Florida
MO BROOKS, Alabama                   JOSEPH KENNEDY III, Massachusetts
RANDY HULTGREN, Illinois             SCOTT PETERS, California
LARRY BUCSHON, Indiana               DEREK KILMER, Washington
STEVE STOCKMAN, Texas                AMI BERA, California
BILL POSEY, Florida                  ELIZABETH ESTY, Connecticut
CYNTHIA LUMMIS, Wyoming              MARC VEASEY, Texas
DAVID SCHWEIKERT, Arizona            JULIA BROWNLEY, California
THOMAS MASSIE, Kentucky              MARK TAKANO, California
KEVIN CRAMER, North Dakota           ROBIN KELLY, Illinois
JIM BRIDENSTINE, Oklahoma
RANDY WEBER, Texas
CHRIS STEWART, Utah
CHRIS COLLINS, New York
                                 ------                                

                         Subcommittee on Energy

                  HON. CYNTHIA LUMMIS, Wyoming, Chair
RALPH M. HALL, Texas, Chair          ERIC SWALWELL, California*
    Emeritus                         ALAN GRAYSON, Florida
FRANK D. LUCAS, Oklahoma             JOSEPH P. KENNEDY III, 
RANDY NEUGEBAUER, Texas                  Massachusetts
MICHAEL T. McCAUL, Texas             MARC VEASEY, Texas
RANDY HULTGREN, Illinois             MARK TAKANO, California
THOMAS MASSIE, Kentucky              ZOE LOFGREN, California
KEVIN CRAMER, North Dakota           DANIEL LIPINSKI, Illinois
RANDY WEBER, Texas**                 +EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON, Texas
+LAMAR S. SMITH, Texas
                       Subcommittee on Oversight

                   HON. PAUL C. BROUN, Georgia, Chair
F. JAMES SENSENBRENNER, JR.,         DAN MAFFEI, New York*
    Wisconsin                        ERIC SWALWELL, California
BILL POSEY, Florida                  SCOTT PETERS, California
DAVID SCHWEIKERT, Arizona            +EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON, Texas
KEVIN CRAMER, North Dakota
+LAMAR S. SMITH, Texas
                                 ------                                

                Subcommittee on Research and Technology

                   HON. LARRY BUCSHON, Indiana, Chair
STEVEN M. PALAZZO, Mississippi       DANIEL LIPINSKI, Illinois*
MO BROOKS, Alabama                   FEDERICA WILSON, Florida
RANDY HULTGREN, Illinois             ZOE LOFGREN, California
STEVE STOCKMAN, Texas                SCOTT PETERS, California
CYNTHIA LUMMIS, Wyoming              AMI BERA, California
DAVID SCHWEIKERT, Arizona            DEREK KILMER, Washington
THOMAS MASSIE, Kentucky **           ELIZABETH ESTY, Connecticut
JIM BRIDENSTINE, Oklahoma            ROBIN KELLY, Illinois
CHRIS COLLINS, NEW YORK              +EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON, Texas
+LAMAR S. SMITH, Texas
                                 ------                                

                         Subcommittee on Space

               HON. STEVEN M. PALAZZO, Mississippi, Chair
RALPH M. HALL, Texas, Chair          DONNA F. EDWARDS, Maryland*
    Emeritus                         SUZANNE BONAMICI, Oregon
DANA ROHRABACHER, California         DAN MAFFEI, New York
FRANK D. LUCAS, Oklahoma             JOSEPH P. KENNEDY III, 
MICHAEL T. McCAUL, Texas                 Massachusetts
MO BROOKS, Alabama **                DEREK KILMER, Washington
LARRY BUCSHON, Indiana               AMI BERA, California
STEVE STOCKMAN, Texas                MARC VEASEY, Texas
BILL POSEY, Florida                  JULIA BROWNLEY, California
DAVID SCHWEIKERT, Arizona            FREDERICA WILSON, Florida
JIM BRIDENSTINE, Oklahoma            +EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON, Texas
+LAMAR S. SMITH, Texas
                      Subcommittee on Environment

                          CHRIS STEWART, Utah
F. JAMES SENSENBRENNER, JR.,         SUZANNE BONAMICI, Oregon*
    Wisconsin                        JULIA BROWNLEY, California
DANA ROHRABACHER, California         DONNA F. EDWARDS, Maryland
RANDY NEUGEBAUER, Texas              MARK TAKANO, California
PAUL C. BROUN, Georgia               ALAN GRAYSON, Florida
JIM BRIDENSTINE, Oklahoma**          +EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON, Texas
RANDY WEBER, Texas
+LAMAR S. SMITH, Texas

*  LRanking Minority Member
** LVice Chair appointments/Full Committee and Subcommittee.
+ LThe Chairman and Ranking Minority Member shall serve as Ex-
officio Members of all Subcommittees and shall have the right 
to vote and be counted as part of the quorum and ratios on all 
matters before the Subcommittees.
              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY
                     113th CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION

                                 ------                                

                          Full Committee Staff

                     JENNIFER BROWN Chief of Staff
                      CHRIS SHANK Policy Director
                       HOLT LACKEY Chief Counsel
                 KATY CROOKS FLYNN Deputy Chief Counsel
           KIM SMITH Deputy Chief of Staff for Communication
        ASHLEY SMITH Administrative Director and Committee Clerk
                      ZACHARY KURZ Press Secretary
                     LANA FROST Legislative Counsel
                    SANGINA WRIGHT Committee Printer
                   JOHN ROSS Financial Administrator
                 JAMES DANFORD Editor and Speechwriter
                      ERIN HAVENER Press Assistant
                   WILLIAM HENDERSON Policy Assistant

                            Democratic Staff

                      DICK OBERMANN Chief of Staff
                       JOHN PIAZZA Chief Counsel
                  RUSSELL NORMAN Deputy Chief Counsel
 KRISTIN KOPSHEVER Administrative Director and Communications Director
           PAMITHA WEERASINGHE Deputy Communications Director
                                 ------                                

                      Subcommittee on Energy Staff

               STEPHEN SAYLE Subcommittee Staff Director
                    RACHEL JONES Professional Staff
                     MAHANTESH HIREMATH AAAS Fellow
                    TAYLOR JORDAN Research Assistant

              ADAM ROSENBERG Democratic Professional Staff
              CHRIS O'LEARY Democratic Professional Staff
                                 ------                                

                   Subcommittee on Environment Staff

               TODD JOHNSTON Subcommittee Staff Director
                     CLINT WOODS Professional Staff
                    RACHEL JONES Professional Staff
                    TAYLOR JORDAN Research Assistant

           MARCY GALLO Democratic Subcommittee Staff Director
                       Subcommittee on Oversight

              RAJESH BHARWANI Subcommittee Staff Director
              CHRIS WYDLER Senior Advisor to the Chairman
                    JERRY WHITTAKER Brookings Fellow
                        MIKE MCQUADE AAAS Fellow
                      SARAH GRADY Staff Assistant

           DAN PEARSON Democratic Subcommittee Staff Director
           DOUGLAS S. PASTERNAK Democratic Professional Staff
                                 ------                                

                Subcommittee on Research and Technology

               CLIFF SHANNON Subcommittee Staff Director
                   KIRSTEN DUNCAN Professional Staff
                   RICHARD YAMADA Professional Staff
                       BHARAT BHUSHAN AAAS Fellow
                     GABRIELLA RA'ANAN Policy Staff

          KIM MONTGOMERY Democratic Professional Staff Member
          BRYSTOL ENGLISH Democratic Professional Staff Member
                                 ------                                

                         Subcommittee on Space

                TOM HAMMOND Subcommittee Staff Director
                     JARED STOUT Professional Staff
                ALLISON ROSE-SONNESYN Professional Staff
                     GABRIELLA RA'ANAN Policy Staff

               PAM WHITNEY Democratic Professional Staff
                 ALLEN LI Democratic Professional Staff
                         LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

                              ----------                              

                          House of Representatives,
               Committee on Science, Space, and Technology,
                                 Washington, DC, December 20, 2013.
Hon. Karen L. Haas,
Clerk, House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Ms. Haas: Pursuant to Clause (1)(d)(1) of Rule XI and 
Rule X of the Rules of the House of Representatives, I hereby 
submit the Annual Report of Activities for the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology for the first session of the 
113th Congress.
    This annual report provides an overview of the legislative 
and oversight activities conducted by the Committee, as defined 
by Rule X Clause 1(p) and Clause 3(k) of the Rules of the House 
of Representatives, a summary of actions taken and 
recommendations made with respect to the Committee's oversight 
plan and a summary of hearings held, pursuant to clauses 2(n), 
(o), and (p) of Rule XI.
    This document is intended as a general reference tool and 
not as a substitute for the hearing records, reports, and other 
files.
            Sincerely,
                                            Lamar S. Smith,
                                                          Chairman.
    Enclosure.
                            C O N T E N T S

                   First Annual Report of Activities
              Committee on Science, Space, and Technology
                          113th Congress, 2013

                                                                   Page
Letter of Transmittal............................................   VII

Overview.........................................................     1

                             Full Committee

    Legislative and Administrative Activities....................     4
    Other Legislative Activities.................................    21
    Oversight, Investigation, and Other Activities...............    28

                         Subcommittee on Energy

    Oversight Investigation, and Other Activities, Including 
      Selective Legislative Activities...........................    32

                      Subcommittee on Environment

    Oversight Investigation, and Other Activities, Including 
      Selective Legislative Activities...........................    37

                         Subcommittee Oversight

    Oversight Activities.........................................    43

                        Subcommittee on Research

    Oversight, Investigation, and Other Activities, Including 
      Selective Legislative Activities...........................    46

                Subcommittee on Research and Technology

    Oversight, Investigation, and Other Activities, Including 
      Selective Legislative Activities...........................    50

                 Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics

    Oversight, Investigation, and Other Activities, Including 
      Selective Legislative Activities...........................    54

                  Subcommittee on Space and Technology

    Oversight, Investigation, and Other Activities, Including 
      Selective Legislative Activities...........................    57

                  Oversight Plan Including Appendices

    Transmittal Letter...........................................    62
    Summary of Oversight Plan, Including Accomplishments To Date.    63
    Jurisdiction.................................................    79
    Hearings Held Pursuant to Rule XI Clauses 2(n), (o), and (p).    80
    Committee Oversight Correspondence...........................    83
    Summary of GAO High Risk Topics..............................   101
    GAO Request..................................................   108

                                Appendix

    Transmittal Letter for Views and Estimates for FY 2014.......   120
    Views and Estimates of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
      Technology for FY 2014.....................................   121
    Additional Views.............................................   129
    Minority Views and Estimates for FY 2014.....................   133
    Additional Minority Views....................................   164
    History of Appointments, Committee on Science, Space, and 
      Technology.................................................   165
    Rules Governing Procedure, Committee on Science, Space, and 
      Technology for the 113th Congress..........................   168
    List of Publications of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
      Technology, 113th Congress, 1st Session....................   181


                                              Union Calendar No. 220
113th Congress                                                 Report
                   }    HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES    {
 1st Session       }                                {          113-302
======================================================================

 
  FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF ACTIVITIES--COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND 

                               TECHNOLOGY

                               __________

 December 20, 2013.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                               __________

    Mr. Smith, from the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology,

                        submitted the following


                              R E P O R T


                                Overview

    The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology met on 
January 26, 2013, for an organizational meeting and adoption of 
the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology Rules and 
Oversight Plan for the 113th Congress under the direction of 
Lamar S. Smith, Chair. The Committee Membership was 40 Members 
with 22 Republicans and 18 Democrats.
    The Committee established six subcommittees: Energy 
(Cynthia Lummis, Chair); Environment (Andy Harris, Chair); 
Oversight (Paul Broun, Chair); Research (Larry Bushon, Chair); 
Space (Steven Palazzo, Chair); and Technology (Thomas Massie, 
Chair). Representative Dana Rohrabacher appointed Full 
Committee Vice Chair.
    The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology met on June 
18, 2013 to amend the Committee Rules to reduce the number of 
subcommittees from six to five and fill vacancies in the 
roster. The five subcommittees established include: Energy 
(Cynthia Lummis, Chair); Environment (Chris Stewart, Chair); 
Oversight (Paul Broun, Chair); Research and Technology (Larry 
Bucshon, Chair); and Space and Aeronautics (Steven Palazzo, 
Chair).
    The jurisdiction of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology, as prescribed by Clauses 1(p) and 3(k) of Rule X of 
the Rules of the House of Representatives is as follows:

                              HOUSE RULE X

                 LEGISLATIVE AND OVERSIGHT JURISDICTION

                  OF THE COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE,

                             AND TECHNOLOGY

    1. There shall be in the House the following standing 
committees, each of which shall have the jurisdiction and 
related functions assigned by this clause and clauses 2, 3, and 
4. All bills, resolutions, and other matters relating to 
subjects within the jurisdiction of the standing committees 
listed in this clause shall be referred to those committees, in 
accordance with clause 2 of rule XII, as follows:

                    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

    (p) Committee on Science, Space, and Technology.
      (1) All energy research, development, and demonstration, 
and projects therefor, and all federally owned or operated 
nonmilitary energy laboratories.
      (2) Astronautical research and development, including 
resources, personnel, equipment, and facilities.
      (3) Civil aviation research and development.
      (4) Environmental research and development.
      (5) Marine research.
      (6) Commercial application of energy technology.
      (7) National Institute of Standards and Technology, 
standardization of weights and measures, and the metric system.
      (8) National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
      (9) National Space Council.
      (10) National Science Foundation.
      (11) National Weather Service.
      (12) Outer space, including exploration and control 
thereof.
      (13) Science scholarships.
      (14) Scientific research, development, and demonstration, 
and projects therefor.

                    *    *    *    *    *    *    *

                      SPECIAL OVERSIGHT FUNCTIONS

      3(k) The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology 
shall review and study on a continuing basis laws, programs, 
and Government activities relating to nonmilitary research and 
development.

                           ACTIVITIES REPORT

                      COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE,

                       AND TECHNOLOGY STATISTICS

                     113th Congress, First Session

                  January 3, 2013 -- January 2nd, 2014

                       Business Meetings Held - 3

                     Bills and Resolutions Referred

                         to the Committee - 92

                           Hearings Held - 59

             Witnesses Appeared Before the Committee - 187

                    Full Committee Markups Held - 5

                     Subcommittee Markups Held - 3

                           Reports Filed - 5

                    Legislation Passed the House - 5

                             FULL COMMITTEE

               LEGISLATIVE AND ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIVITIES

        JANUARY 23, 2013--FULL COMMITTEE ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING

    The Committee met to organize for the 113th Congress. The 
Committee adopted Committee Rules for its operations, 
established subcommittees, appointed subcommittee chairs and 
ranking members, and adopted the Oversight Plan.

                      FEBRUARY 25, 2013--H.R. 667,

               TO REDESIGNATE THE DRYDEN FLIGHT RESEARCH

            CENTER AS THE NEIL A. ARMSTRONG FLIGHT RESEARCH

           CENTER AND THE WESTERN AERONAUTICAL TEST RANGE AS

                      RANGE AS THE HUGH L. DRYDEN

                        AERONAUTICAL TEST RANGE

Background and Need
    H.R. 667 renames NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center as 
the Neil Armstrong Flight Research Center and designates the 
Western Aeronautical Test Range, located at Dryden, as the Hugh 
L. Dryden Aeronautical Test Range. The Dryden Flight Research 
Center is NASA and the Nation's premier flight research 
facility. Neil Armstrong worked at the Center for seven years 
and during the course of his career flew the X-15 seven times, 
including a flight that reached over 207,000 feet in altitude. 
Neil Armstrong died on August 25, 2012. Hugh L. Dryden earned 
his undergraduate and Ph.D. degrees in physics from Johns 
Hopkins University and became Director of Aeronautical Research 
at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, the 
predecessor of NASA. Dr. Dryden was appointed Deputy 
Administrator of NASA in 1958 and remained in that position 
until his death on December 2, 1965.
Legislative History
    Rep. Kevin McCarthy introduced H.R. 667 on February 13, 
2013. H.R. 667 was referred to the Committee on Science, Space, 
and Technology. Cosponsors of the legislation included Rep. 
Adam Schiff, Rep. Buck McKeon, Rep. Ken Calvert, Rep. Jim 
Jordan, Rep. Steven Palazzo, Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, Rep. Ralph 
Hall, and Rep. Lamar Smith. On February 25, 2013, H.R. 667 was 
considered under suspension of the rules. A motion to suspend 
the rules and pass the bill was agreed to on February 25, 2013 
by a vote of Y-394, N-0 (Roll Call No. 47). On February 26, 
2013, H.R. 667 was received in the Senate.

                MARCH 14, 2013--MARKUP HELD ON H.R. 756,

               THE CYBERSECURITY ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 2013

Background and Need
    Information technology (IT) has evolved rapidly over the 
last decade, leading to markedly increased connectivity and 
productivity. The benefits provided by these advancements have 
led to the widespread use and incorporation of information 
technologies across major sectors of the economy. This level of 
connectivity and the dependence of our critical infrastructures 
on IT have also increased the vulnerability of these systems. 
Reports of cyber criminals and nation-states accessing 
sensitive information and disrupting services have risen 
steadily over the last decade, heightening concerns over the 
adequacy of our cybersecurity measures.
    According to the Office of Management and Budget, Federal 
agencies spent $8.6 billion in FY 2010 on cybersecurity and the 
Federal government has spent more than $600 billion on 
information technology in the last decade. In addition, the 
Federal government funds nearly $400 million in cybersecurity 
research and development each year.
    In January 2008, the Bush Administration established, 
through a series of classified executive directives, the 
Comprehensive National Cybersecurity Initiative (CNCI). The 
Obama Administration has continued this initiative, with the 
goal of securing Federal systems and fostering public-private 
cooperation.
    On May 29, 2009, the Obama Administration released its 
Cyberspace Policy Review. The Review recommended an increased 
level of interagency cooperation among all departments and 
agencies, highlighted the need for information sharing 
concerning attacks and vulnerabilities, and highlighted the 
need for an exchange of research and security strategies 
essential to the efficient and effective defense of Federal 
computer systems.
    Furthermore, it stressed the importance of advancing 
cybersecurity research and development, and the need for the 
Federal Government to partner with the private sector to 
guarantee a secure and reliable infrastructure. The Review also 
called for increased public awareness, improved education and 
expansion of the number of information technology 
professionals.
    In June 2009, GAO found that the Federal agencies 
responsible for protecting the U.S. Information Technology (IT) 
infrastructure were not satisfying their responsibilities, 
leaving the Nation's IT infrastructure vulnerable to attack. In 
an effort to strengthen the work of those Federal agencies, the 
U.S. House of Representatives passed the ``Cybersecurity 
Enhancement Act of 2011'' (H.R. 2096) in the 112th Congress. 
H.R. 2096 required increased coordination and prioritization of 
Federal cybersecurity research and development activities, and 
the development and advancement of cybersecurity technical 
standards. It also strengthened cybersecurity education and 
talent development and industry partnership initiatives. The 
Senate did not act on the legislation.

Legislative History
    On March 5, 2013, H.R. 967, the ``Advancing America's 
Networking and Information Technology Research and Development 
Act of 2013'' was introduced by Rep. Cynthia Lummis, Rep. Lamar 
Smith, and Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson, and referred to the 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. The Committee 
favorably reported H.R. 967, as amended, by voice vote on March 
14, 2013. On March 16, 2013, the House agreed to suspend the 
rules and pass H.R. 967 by a vote of Y-406, N-11. The bill was 
received in the Senate on April 17, 2013.

                APRIL 11, 2013--MARKUP HELD ON H.R. 875,

            TO PROVIDE FOR A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT OF THE

                  SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL RESEARCH ON

                      THE IMPLICATIONS OF THE USE

                      OF MID-LEVEL ETHANOL BLENDS,

                        AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES.

Background and Need
    Since the 1970s, the Federal Government has supported 
numerous policies to increase efficiency of fuel use and reduce 
petroleum consumption. In 1978, EPA authorized the use of 10 
percent ethanol blended gasoline (E10), which was not used on a 
widespread basis until the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. In 
2005, Congress established the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) in 
the Energy Policy Act (EPAct). The RFS mandates that 
transportation fuels contain renewable fuels, such as biodiesel 
or corn-based ethanol, and required that 4 billion gallons of 
renewable fuels be blended into in the national fuel mix by 
2006 and 7.5 billion by 2012.
    Congress greatly expanded the RFS requirement in the Energy 
Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), and mandated the 
blending of 15.2 billion gallons of biofuels by 2012, and 36 
billion gallons by 2022. The RFS expansion, referred to as RFS 
II, also required the use of advanced biofuels and capped the 
amount of corn-based ethanol that could be used to meet the 
mandated volumes at 15 billion gallons.
    Blending fuel at concentrations greater than E10 in order 
to meet the increased production volumes required by the RFS 
presents a challenge referred to as the ``blend wall,'' or 
upper limit to the total amount of ethanol that can be blended 
into the national gasoline supply using E10. In an effort to 
avoid the blend wall, on March 6, 2009, Growth Energy and 54 
ethanol manufacturers petitioned EPA to grant a waiver to allow 
E15, a mid-level or intermediate ethanol blend, into commerce.
    In order to grant such a waiver, EPA must determine that 
E15 would not ``cause or contribute to a failure of an emission 
control device or system.'' Additionally, Section 211 (f) of 
the Clean Air Act prohibits the Administrator of the EPA from 
granting a waiver for any fuel or fuel additive that is not 
``substantially similar'' to the existing certification fuel 
(i.e. regular unleaded gasoline without added ethanol).
    EPA issued a partial waiver for E15 on October 13, 2010, 
allowing the introduction of E15 into commerce for use in model 
year 2007 and newer cars, light-duty trucks, and SUV's. On 
January 26, 2011, EPA granted another partial waiver for use of 
E15 in model year 2001 and newer vehicles. EPA did not grant a 
waiver for the use of E15 fuel in model years prior to 2001, 
non-road engines, vehicles, and equipment, motorcycles, or 
heavy-duty gasoline engines.
    The waiver decision and subsequent release of E15 fuel into 
the marketplace has raised technical and practical concerns 
regarding the impact of E15 on engines and fuel supply 
infrastructure, focused broadly on two main issues: (1) The 
potential for E15 to damage vehicle engines of all model years, 
and (2) The potential for this bifurcated fueling system to 
result in widespread misfueling.

Legislative History
    H.R. 875 was introduced by Rep. Sensenbrenner on February 
27, 2013, and referred to the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology, and in addition to the Committee on Energy and 
Commerce. The Committee favorably reported the bill, as 
amended, by a vote of Y-18, N-17, on April 11, 2013.

               APRIL 11, 2013--MARKUP HELD ON H.R. 1422,

           THE EPA SCIENCE ADVISORY BOARD REFORM ACT OF 2013

Background and Need
    EPA's Science Advisory Board (SAB) was established by 
Congress in the Environmental Research, Development, and 
Demonstration Authorization Act of 1978 (ERDDAA). Under this 
authorization, the SAB provides scientific advice as may be 
requested by the EPA Administrator and interested Congressional 
Committees.
    Since its enactment, the size and function of the SAB has 
evolved. ERDDAA established a minimum number of nine members, 
one of which is to be the designated Chair. Members are 
appointed by the EPA Administrator to serve a 3-year term and 
may be reappointed for a second 3 year term. There are 
currently 51 members of the chartered SAB. The SAB and its 
subcommittees and ad hoc subpanels provide scientific advice on 
a wide range of issues, including stream and wetland 
connectivity, hydraulic fracturing, environmental justice 
screening, and regulatory cost estimates. The Board has also 
begun providing advice on the science underpinning several 
potential, forthcoming Agency regulatory activities.
    The SAB is operated in accordance with the Federal Advisory 
Committee Act of 1972, which requires that advisory panels have 
a charter and be ``fairly balanced in terms of the points of 
view represented and the functions to be performed.'' According 
to EPA, SAB's mission includes:

    
 Lreviewing the quality and relevance of the 
scientific and technical information being used or proposed as 
the basis for Agency regulations;
    
 Lreviewing research programs and the technical 
basis of applied programs;
    
 Lreviewing generic approaches to regulatory 
science, including guidelines governing the use of scientific 
and technical information in regulatory decisions, and 
critiquing such analytic methods as mathematical modeling;
    
 Ladvising the Agency on broad scientific matters 
in science, technology, social and economic issues; and
    
 Ladvising the Agency on emergency and other short-
notice programs.

    Toward those goals, the chartered SAB conducts much of its 
work through subcommittees or subpanels focused on specific 
issues. Currently, these subcommittees include: Drinking Water 
Committee; Ecological Processes and Effects Committee; 
Environmental Economics Advisory Committee; Environmental 
Engineering Committee; Exposure and Human Health Committee; 
Radiation Advisory Committee; and the Chemical Assessment 
Advisory Committee (established January 30, 2013). Under the 
SAB's charter, these ``[c]ommittees, panels, and workgroups 
have no authority to make decisions on behalf of the SAB and 
may not report directly to the Agency.''
    EPA also receives advice from and manages 22 additional 
Federal Advisory Committees, including entities like the EPA 
Board of Scientific Counselors, the Federal Insecticide, 
Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Scientific Advisory Panel, and 
the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC). These 
bodies carry out a variety of advisory functions. For example, 
CASAC ``provides independent advice to the EPA Administrator on 
the technical bases for EPA's national ambient air quality 
standards'' and ``addresses research related to air quality, 
sources of air pollution, and the strategies to attain and 
maintain air quality standards and to prevent significant 
deterioration of air quality.'' The Chair of CASAC also sits on 
the chartered SAB.
    EPA staff and the chartered SAB allow for some public 
involvement in advisory activities through the nomination of 
experts for committees and panels and involvement in advisory 
committee meetings and report developments. In response 
numerous comments during an SAB Session on Public Involvement 
in June 2011, the SAB Staff Office announced additional steps 
to enhance public involvement in advisory activities beginning 
in FY2012.

Legislative History
    On April 9, 2013, Rep. Chris Stewart introduced H.R. 1422, 
which was referred to the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology. On April 11, 2013, the Committee ordered the bill, 
H.R. 1422 favorably reported, as amended, by a vote of Y-21, N-
16. H.R. 1422 was reported to the House on July 22, 2013.

             JUNE 18, 2013--FULL COMMITTEE BUSINESS MEETING

    The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology met on June 
18, 2013 to amend the Committee Rules to reduce the number of 
subcommittees from six to five and fill vacancies on the 
roster. The five subcommittees established include: Energy 
(Cynthia Lummis, Chair); Environment (Chris Stewart, Chair); 
Oversight (Paul Broun, Chair); Research and Technology (Larry 
Bucshon, Chair); and Space and Aeronautics (Steven Palazzo, 
Chair).

                JULY 18, 2013--MARKUP HELD ON H.R. 2687,

THE NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION AUTHORIZATION ACT OF 
                                  2013

Background and Need
    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) 
was created in 1958 with by President Dwight Eisenhower and 
Congress through the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 
(Public Law 85-568). Since the year 2000, NASA has been 
reauthorized by Congress four times including in 2000, 2005, 
2008, and 2010.
    While the length of the authorizations varies, recent bills 
have included short periods to increase congressional oversight 
and accountability for the agency. The 2008 and 2010 bills were 
two and three year authorizations respectively. The 2010 Act 
expires on December 31, 2013; therefore, NASA must be 
reauthorized by that time.
    The National Research Council's report NASA's Strategic 
Direction and the Need for a National Consensus issued in 
December 2012 provides context and summarizes the need for the 
reauthorization as follows:
    ``Despite NASA's broad portfolio that spans human 
spaceflight, space and Earth science, and aeronautics research, 
in the public mind the agency is most closely associated with 
human spaceflight. In 2004, after many years of uncertainty 
about the futures of the space shuttle and the ISS, President 
George W. Bush announced a `Vision for Space Exploration' that 
called for astronauts to return to the Moon by 2020 and someday 
to go to Mars. Similar goals had been expressed by President 
George H.W. Bush in 1989, but they did not receive bipartisan 
support, and the President's proposed budgets for achieving 
these goals were rejected. By 1992, the goals were essentially 
abandoned.
    The 2004 Vision announcement followed by almost exactly a 
year the space shuttle Columbia tragedy that cost the lives of 
seven astronauts. The Columbia Accident Investigation Board 
noted in its report that if astronauts lives were to be at risk 
through space exploration, the rationale and goals needed to be 
better defined.
    President George W. Bush did not propose adding significant 
funding to NASA's budget to accomplish the new goals, however. 
Instead, his plan was to terminate the space shuttle program in 
2010 after completing construction of the ISS and to end U.S. 
involvement in the ISS in the 2015-2016 timeframe. The space 
shuttle and ISS funds would be redirected to achieving the 
Moon/Mars goals.
    In 2005, a Republican-controlled Congress passed the 2005 
NASA Authorization Act, which supported President Bush's Moon/
Mars program while also stressing the need for adequate 
utilization of the ISS and holding open the possibility of 
continuing the space shuttle program beyond 2010. Three years 
later, a Democratic-controlled Congress passed the 2008 NASA 
Authorization Act that was similar to the 2005 act. At that 
point in time, Congress and the White House, Democrats and 
Republicans, were all in general agreement about the future of 
the human spaceflight program. NASA pursued the presidential 
and congressional policies by initiating the Constellation 
program to build capabilities to send people back to the Moon 
and to Mars, including new launch vehicles and spacecraft.
    In January 2009, President Barack Obama convened a special 
committee to look at the human spaceflight program and offer 
options. Chaired by Norman Augustine, the committee concluded 
that there were ``technical and budgetary issues'' in major 
components of the Constellation program (e.g., Ares I, Orion) 
that were creating considerable schedule delays. Independent 
analyses showed that ``the length of the gap in U.S. ability to 
launch astronauts into space [would] be at least seven years.'' 
The Augustine committee concluded further that in order for 
NASA to pursue a mission of sending humans beyond low Earth 
orbit (LEO), NASA required additional funding of $3 billion 
more per year. [The NRC report did not note, however, that the 
Administration also slashed funding for Exploration Systems in 
the FY10 budget request]
    In February 2010, as part of the fiscal year (FY) 2011 
budget request, the White House proposed terminating the 
Constellation program and replacing it with a NASA effort to 
develop technologies for human exploration beyond LEO. No 
decision on what kind of vehicles to build would be made until 
at least 2015, and no specific destination or timeframe for 
human expeditions beyond LEO was included.
    Meanwhile, the President decided that instead of NASA 
developing a replacement capability for the space shuttle to 
ferry astronauts to and from the ISS, NASA would build on its 
Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) partnership 
agreements with U.S. industry, initiated in 2006. This approach 
would enable them to contract for the development of 
``commercial crew'' space transportation systems, where NASA 
would help pay companies to develop their own space 
transportation systems, and the companies would invest 
significant amounts of their own money toward development with 
the expectation of the emergence of a private human spaceflight 
market.
    Congress also wanted a destination and a timetable for 
sending astronauts beyond LEO. In April 2010, the President 
announced his goals of sending astronauts to an asteroid by 
2025 and to orbit Mars in the 2030s. These goals were 
officially expressed in the 2010 National Space Policy issued 
by the White House two months later.
    The totality of the decisions to proceed with President 
Bush's plan to terminate the space shuttle, but to also end the 
Constellation program that was developing a replacement U.S. 
crew transportation capability, resulted in programmatic 
disruptions. These decisions also resulted in an indefinite 
extension of the number of years the United States would need 
to depend on Russia to take NASA astronauts to and from the 
ISS. In addition, the decisions to rely on the commercial 
sector to build a new U.S. crew space transportation system, 
when some were skeptical that the companies were technically 
ready to take on such a responsibility, and the decision to 
replace the Moon with an unspecified asteroid as the next 
destination for human spaceflight, made without prior 
consultation and contravening two existing laws, were met with 
Congressional skepticism.
    A number of influential members of Congress insisted that 
the government--NASA--build a new crew transportation system 
regardless of any commercial crew aspirations. Congress wanted 
a new large rocket reminiscent of the Saturn V used for the 
Apollo program to enable trips beyond LEO, whatever the 
destination, and to accelerate, as much as possible, restoring 
U.S. ability to launch people into space rather than relying on 
Russia for transport.
    In October 2010, Congress and the White House reached a 
compromise in the 2010 NASA Authorization Act. In essence, the 
agreement was for NASA to do both what the White House and 
Congress wanted. NASA would proceed with the White House plan 
for commercial crew transport as well as Congress's plan for a 
NASA-developed Space Launch System (SLS), based heavily upon 
legacy systems such as those developed for the space shuttle 
program, and an Orion spacecraft that would take humans beyond 
LEO and serve as a backup in case the commercial systems did 
not materialize.
    The budget outlook for NASA, meanwhile, worsened. The 
President had planned to add $6 billion to NASA's budget over 5 
years when he announced his new plan in the FY2011 budget 
request. A year later, with Republicans regaining control of 
the House and deficit-reduction becoming the dominant political 
theme, NASA was hoping for level funding at best. Today, the 
same NASA that was deemed by the Augustine committee to be 
unable to afford the Constellation program now must fund 
Constellation's replacement SLS/Orion and also fund commercial 
crew transport. NASA still must find funds for a habitation and 
support module to enable long duration trips beyond LEO.
    Some in Congress remain wary of the administration's plans, 
stating that budget requests since the 2010 NASA Authorization 
Act have favored spending on commercial crew rather than SLS/
Orion. NASA also took longer than expected to choose an SLS 
design, prompting congressional criticism that the agency was 
delaying making a decision. All the while, support for the idea 
of sending astronauts to an asteroid failed to gain widespread 
support, and NASA has not undertaken any visible steps required 
to make such a mission possible. These issues, in part, led 
Congress to commission the current study to examine NASA's 
strategic direction.
    The one piece of common ground is that sending humans to 
Mars remains the long-term goal for everyone involved in this 
debate. As shown in Box 1.1 [excluded], that has been the 
driving force in presidential policies and speeches for 
decades. The debate is about the steps between the ISS and Mars 
and when we will get there, dictated largely by budget 
constraints.''
    In addition to the background outlined by the National 
Research Council report, the Budget Control Act of 2011 also 
provides important context for this year's NASA authorization. 
This Act required across the board rescissions and spending 
caps in the event that an agreement on deficit reduction was 
not reached. The Budget Control Act of 2011 passed the House 
and Senate with broad bipartisan support (including many senior 
members of the Science, Space, and Technology Committee) and 
was signed by the President. Unfortunately, an agreement was 
never met on mandatory spending, necessitating reductions in 
funding levels for discretionary spending. The Authorization 
bill before the Committee reflects funding levels commensurate 
with that Act.

Legislative History
    On July 10, 2013, the Subcommittee on Space met to consider 
the ``National Aeronautics and Space Administration 
Authorization Act of 2013.'' The Committee Print was favorably 
reported to the full Committee. The Committee Print was 
introduced by Rep. Steven Palazzo as H.R. 2687 on July 15, 
2013. On July 18, 2013, the full Committee favorably reported 
the bill, as amended, by a vote of Y-22, N- 17.

AUGUST 1, 2013--BUSINESS MEETING TO AUTHORIZE THE ISSUANCE OF SUBPOENAS

Background and Need
    The resolution authorizes the Chairman of the Committee to 
issue subpoenas duces tecum to the Environmental Protection 
Agency and other custodians to obtain data, information, 
documents, and other records relating to the Harvard Six Cities 
Study, the Cancer Prevention Study II, and analyses and re-
analyses of the data from either study.
    The Chairman's request for authority to issue subpoenas 
came after repeated attempts to obtain the data from EPA. On 
September 15, 2011, then-Assistant Administrator of EPA's 
Office of Air and Radiation Gina McCarthy promised the data to 
the Science Committee. Despite multiple requests since that 
time, EPA has failed to follow through on that commitment. 
Specifically, since the initial McCarthy commitment to provide 
the data nearly two years ago, the Committee made the following 
efforts to obtain the data:

    
 LSeptember 22, 2011, letter from Andy Harris, 
Chairman, Energy and Environment Subcommittee, to Gina 
McCarthy, Assistant Administrator, Office of Air and Radiation, 
Environmental Protection Agency;
    
 LNovember 15, 2011, letter from Andy Harris, 
Chairman, Energy and Environment Subcommittee, and Paul Broun, 
Chairman Investigations and Oversight Subcommittee, to Cass 
Sunstein, Administrator, Office of Information and Regulatory 
Affairs, Office of Management and Budget;
    
 LDecember 12, 2011, letter from Ralph Hall, 
Chairman, Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, Andy 
Harris, Chairman, Energy and Environment Subcommittee, and Paul 
Broun, Chairman Investigations and Oversight Subcommittee, to 
Cass Sunstein, Administrator, Office of Information and 
Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget;
    
 LObtained commitments, in hearings held on 
February 17, 2012, and June 20, 2012, John Holdren, Director, 
Office of Science and Technology Policy, to help gain access to 
data;
    
 LDecember 13, 2012, letter from Ralph Hall, 
Chairman, Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, Lamar 
Smith, Committee member, and Andy Harris, Chairman, Energy and 
Environment Subcommittee, to Lisa Jackson, Administrator, 
Environmental Protection Agency, John Holdren, Director, Office 
of Science and Technology Policy, and Boris Bershteyn, Acting 
Administrator, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, 
Office of Management and Budget;
    
 LMarch 4, 2013, letter from David Vitter, Ranking 
Member, Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, and 
Lamar Smith, Chairman, Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology, to Gina McCarthy, Assistant Administrator, Office 
of Air and Radiation, Environmental Protection Agency;
    
 LJune 12, 2013, letter from Lamar Smith, Chairman, 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, and Chris Stewart, 
Chairman, Environment Subcommittee, to Bob Perciasepe, Acting 
Administrator, Environmental Protection Agency;
    
 LJuly 22, 2013, letter from Lamar Smith, Chairman, 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, and Chris Stewart, 
Chairman, Environment Subcommittee, to Gina McCarthy, 
Administrator, Environmental Protection Agency.

    Despite all of these efforts to obtain the data from EPA 
voluntarily, EPA has failed to make the data available in a 
form adequate for re-analysis. Accordingly, the Chairman sought 
the Committee's authorization to issue subpoenas.

Procedural History
    On August 1, 2013, the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology met to consider authorizing the Chairman to issue 
subpoenas duces tecum. The Committee considered two amendments 
offered by Rep. Grayson. The first Amendment was defeated by a 
vote of Y-19, N-20. The second amendment was defeated by voice 
vote. The Comsmittee agreed to authorize the Chairman to issue 
subpoenas duces tecum by a vote of Y-20, N-18.

               AUGUST 1, 2013--MARKUP HELD ON H.R. 2850,

                      THE EPA HYDRAULIC FRACTURING

                         STUDY IMPROVEMENT ACT

Background and Need
    Pursuant to Congressional direction, the EPA is undertaking 
a multi-year Study of the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic 
Fracturing on Drinking Water Resources to be conducted by EPA's 
Office of Research and Development (ORD). The study results are 
widely anticipated to have significant public policy 
implications. Committee correspondence and discussion at 
hearings since the inception of the report have emphasized the 
importance of assuring the study be conducted in the most 
scientifically sound manner possible, adhere to all appropriate 
EPA peer review requirements, and present its conclusions in 
relevant context.
    In February of 2011, EPA released a draft study plan for 
public comment and review by its Science Advisory Board (SAB), 
and a final study plan was released in November 2011. The 
purpose of the study, as outlined in the final study plan, is 
to ``elucidate the relationship, if any, between hydraulic 
fracturing and drinking water resources'' and ``assess the 
potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water 
resources and to identify the driving factors that affect the 
severity and frequency of any impacts.''
    On December 21, 2012, EPA released a Progress Report'' to 
this ongoing study which provided information on current work 
being done by the Agency, including the status of research 
projects that are anticipated to inform the final study. The 
progress report did not include conclusions regarding the 
relationship between hydraulic fracturing and drinking water 
resources. The final report, which has been classified by the 
Agency as a Highly Influential Scientific Assessment, is 
anticipated to be released in draft form in late 2014 for peer 
review and public comment. However, recent testimony before the 
Committee indicated the peer review process will continue into 
2015, suggesting that a final report will not be released until 
that year or later.
    Prior to the release of the Progress Report, the EPA Office 
of Research and Development requested the Scientific Advisory 
Board to conduct a ``consultation'' review of the research that 
would be found in that report. To this end, the ad hoc SAB 
panel, known as the Hydraulic Fracturing Research Advisory 
Board Panel, participated in a consultation with the full SAB 
in May of this year. In this meeting, the ad hoc SAB panel 
responded to charge questions from the Agency and provided 
input and comments on the Progress Report. The written comments 
submitted by the panelists were compiled into a report, which 
was released on June 25.
    Throughout this process stakeholders have expressed 
concerns that the study had the potential to produce results 
that lacked context and were based on what were possible 
outcomes rather than likely or probable outcomes, as well as 
concerns with the peer review process. Several issues with the 
report were identified in an independent review of the EPA's 
study plan conducted by Battelle, which included 
recommendations for strengthening the study. Other issues and 
questions have been raised by the SAB or addressed in 
recommendations it has provided to the Administrator.
    In its 2011 review of the draft study plan, the Science 
Advisory Board recommended to the Administrator that ``EPA 
consider the four steps of the risk assessment paradigm (i.e. 
hazard identification, exposure assessment, dose-response 
assessment, and risk characterization) to assess and prioritize 
research activities.'' In the more recent consultation 
conducted by the SAB Hydraulic Fracturing Research Advisory 
Panel on the Progress Report, several reviewers also commented 
on the absence of a risk assessment. One reviewer noted ``There 
is no quantitative risk assessment included in EPA's research 
effort. Thus, the reader has no sense of how risky any 
operations may be in ultimately impacting drinking water. This 
is also a significant limitation of the work.'' Another 
reviewer noted that ``To simply discount the regulatory network 
in place and model ``what if'' and ``worse case'' scenarios 
will not produce realistic results.''
    Another concern expressed by stakeholders was EPA's past 
failure to designate the study as a Highly Influential 
Scientific Assessment, or HISA. According to a review of the 
study plan conducted by Battelle, ``Such designation triggers 
more rigorous standards for peer review, and thus study design, 
data quality, and transparency.'' Battelle also noted that 
``Even in the absence of such a formal designation, there is no 
direct evidence documented in the study plan or in associated 
documents that EPA followed its quality policy in framing the 
study objectives and developing the study design.'' While EPA 
has since designated the final study as a HISA, there is still 
a need to ensure that the requisite policies and procedures 
governing such scientific undertakings are followed.
    Committee concerns with EPA's overall study design and 
implementation, as well as specific aforementioned issues such 
as risk assessment and peer review were detailed in numerous 
letters to the agency in 2011 and 2012.

Legislative History
    Committee Chairman Lamar Smith introduced H.R. 2850, the 
``EPA Hydraulic Fracturing Study Improvement Act,'' on July 30, 
2013. On August 1, 2013, the Committee ordered H.R. 2850, as 
amended, favorably reported by voice vote. The Committee 
reported the bill to the House on October 23, 2013. The text of 
H.R. 2850 as reported by the Committee was included in H.R. 
2728, the ``Protecting States' Rights to Promote American 
Energy Security Act.'' H.R. 2728 was considered under the 
provisions of rule H. Res. 419 on November 20, 2013. H. Res. 
419 allocated one hour of debate time with 20 minutes of such 
time equally divided between the Chair and the Ranking Member 
being allocated to the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology. On November 20, 2013, the House passed H.R. 2728 by 
a vote of Y-235, N-187. The bill was received in the Senate on 
November 21, 2013.

                      DECEMBER 2, 2013--H.R. 3547,

                       THE SPACE LAUNCH LIABILITY

                     INDEMNIFICATION EXTENSION ACT

Background and Need
    The FAA's Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST) 
manages a federally-sponsored liability risk-sharing regime 
(commonly referred to as ``indemnification'') for third party 
loss (injury or property damage to the uninvolved public) 
during launch and reentry of a licensed commercial launch 
system. The current authorization for indemnification expires 
December 31, 2013.
    In 1988, Congress passed the Commercial Space Launch Act 
Amendments (P.L. 100-657), which established the current 
insurance requirements and tiered liability risk-sharing regime 
for FAA-licensed commercial space launches. The liability and 
insurance regime was originally modeled on the Price-Anderson 
Act that governs liability risk-sharing under the nuclear power 
industry.
    The indemnification regime is comprised of a three tiered 
risk-sharing arrangement wherein both the U.S. government and 
the private sector would cover third party claims. However, the 
FAA calculates that the chance of loss exceeding the required 
insurance and thus resulting in potential United States 
government liability is lower than 1 in 10 million.
    Since passage in 1988, the provision for the liability 
risk-sharing regime has been extended by Congress in 1999, 
2000, 2004, 2009, and 2012. To date no federal payments have 
been required.

Legislative History
    H.R. 3547 was introduced on November 20, 2013, and was 
sponsored by Rep. Lamar Smith, Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson, Rep. 
Steven Palazzo, and Rep. Donna Edwards. On December 2, 2013, 
the House agreed to suspend the rules and pass the bill by a 
vote of Y-376, N-55. H.R. 3547 passed the Senate with an 
amendment on December 12, 2013, by unanimous consent.

              DECEMBER 5, 2013--MARKUP HELD ON H.R. 2413,

            THE WEATHER FORECASTING IMPROVEMENT ACT OF 2013

Background and Need
    Recent severe weather events in the United States have 
underscored the need for timely, accurate, and reliable weather 
forecasts. Within NOAA, the National Weather Service (NWS), the 
Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR), and the 
National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service 
(NESDIS) play important roles in developing and deploying U.S. 
weather forecasting capabilities. NOAA is joined in this effort 
by an ever-evolving private sector weather enterprise. The 
National Academy of Sciences recently emphasized the importance 
of this partnership, noting that ``[p]rivate sector and other 
organizations provide sensor data, weather forecasts, and end-
user services to a broad set of customers.''
    Rapid technological advances in computing and other areas 
such as remote sensing and advanced radar hold great promise to 
improve severe weather prediction, but have yet to be fully 
exploited. In a 2012 report on the NWS, the National Academy of 
Sciences stated that ``[a]s an outgrowth of public and private 
sector investment in weather, climate, and hydrological 
research, new observational, data assimilation, prediction, and 
other technology advancements are exceeding the capacity of the 
NWS to optimally acquire, integrate, and communicate critical 
forecast and warning information based on these technological 
achievements.''
    The ``Weather Forecasting Improvement Act of 2013'' (H.R. 
2413) introduced by Environment Subcommittee Vice Chairman Jim 
Bridenstine will prioritize the mission of NOAA to include the 
protection of lives and property, and make funds available to 
improve weather-related research, operations, and computing 
resources. The bill directs NOAA to undertake quantitative, 
cost-benefit assessments to determine the best combination of 
systems for obtaining data for forecasts. It also directs NOAA 
to prepare a report outlining the options of commercial 
opportunities for obtaining space-based weather observations.

Legislative History
    H.R. 2413 was introduced on June 18, 2013 by Representative 
Jim Bridenstine and referred to the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology.
    The Subcommittee on Environment met to consider H.R. 2413 
on July 9, 2013. The Subcommittee considered eight amendments, 
four were withdrawn and three were agreed to by voice vote. The 
bill, as amended, was agreed to by voice vote, and was 
favorably reported to the full Committee.
    On December 5, 2013, the full Committee favorably reported 
H.R. 2413, as amended, by voice vote.

              DECEMBER 5, 2013--MARKUP HELD ON H.R. 2431,

THE NATIONAL INTEGRATED DROUGHT INFORMATION SYSTEM REAUTHORIZATION ACT 
                                OF 2013

Background and Need
    Drought has afflicted portions of North America for 
thousands of years, and continues to impact substantial 
portions of the United States. As of November 26, 2013, more 
than 30 percent of the contiguous U.S. is experiencing moderate 
to exceptional drought conditions. For significant periods in 
2012 and 2013, more than half of the country was in a drought. 
Consequently, the coordination of resources to effectively 
manage drought is critical. In a 2013 report by the 
Congressional Research Service, drought's impact on North 
America is described:
    Drought often results in agricultural losses, which can 
have local, regional, and national effects. It also can affect 
other industries and services, including power and energy 
resource production, navigation, recreation, municipal water 
supplies, and natural resources such as fisheries, aquatic 
species, and water quality. How to address these impacts is an 
often recurring issue for Congress. Addressing drought on an 
emergency basis is costly to individuals, communities, and 
businesses. Additionally, millions and sometimes billions of 
dollars in federal assistance can be expended in response to 
drought's social consequences. Thus, another recurrent policy 
issue is how to prepare and mitigate future drought impacts and 
how to do so efficiently across the many federal agencies with 
various and sometimes overlapping drought responsibilities.
    The NIDIS program is housed within the Office of Oceanic 
and Atmospheric Research at the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The goal of NIDIS is to 
``improve the nation's capacity to proactively manage drought-
related risks, by providing those affected with the best 
available information and tools to assess the potential impacts 
of drought, and to better prepare for and mitigate the effects 
of drought.'' In support of these goals, NOAA conducted 
workshops with federal, state, and local agencies, academic 
researchers, and other stakeholders to solicit input on how to 
develop a path forward. This culminated in the 2007 NIDIS 
Implementation Plan, which outlined the governance structure, 
priorities, and operational requirements needed to meet the 
Program's objectives.
    In support of the overall program goals, the NIDIS Program 
is engaged in the collection, consolidation, and dissemination 
of drought-related data and information on an ongoing basis. 
The Program develops ``a suite of usable drought decision 
support tools focused on critical management indicators, 
thresholds and triggers, and engages and enables proactive 
planning by those affected by drought.'' In this function, 
NIDIS acts as a data clearinghouse, and works to develop and 
actively support a collaborative framework between researchers 
and managers. The Program also conducts knowledge assessments 
to ``determine where major drought-information gaps occur and 
where research improvements are needed'' as well as to 
``coordinate capabilities among those conducting research and 
research activities.''
    The NIDIS Program developed and currently operates the U.S. 
Drought Portal, a website that features a range of services 
related to drought, including historical data on past droughts, 
current data from climate observations, early warnings about 
emerging and potential droughts, decision support services for 
managing droughts, and a forum for stakeholders to discuss 
drought-related issues.
    In 1998, Congress passed the National Drought Policy Act, 
establishing the National Drought Policy Commission to provide 
recommendations on the creation of a Federal policy designed to 
prepare for, and respond to, serious drought emergencies. A 
series of reports ultimately led to H.R. 5136, the National 
Integrated Drought Information System Act of 2006, introduced 
by Congressmen Ralph Hall and Mark Udall in April of 2006. On 
December 20, 2006, President George W. Bush signed the bill 
into law (Public Law 109-460). The bill authorized 
appropriations for the program from fiscal year 2007 through 
fiscal year 2012.

Legislative History
    H.R. 2431 was introduced on June 19, 2013, by 
Representative Ralph Hall and referred to the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology. On December 5, 2013, the 
Committee favorably reported H.R. 2431, as amended, by voice 
vote.

              DECEMBER 5, 2013--MARKUP HELD ON H.R. 2981,

                THE TECHNOLOGY AND RESEARCH ACCELERATING

                      NATIONAL SECURITY AND FUTURE

                    ECONOMIC RESILIENCY ACT OF 2013

Background and Need
    In fiscal year 2012, the Federal Government funded more 
than $131 billion in research and development (R&D) activities. 
Colleges and universities conduct the majority of basic 
research in the United States, and cumulatively receive more 
than half of their total research funding from federal 
agencies. Because of the large amount of funding expended by 
the Federal Government on basic research by nonprofit 
institutions like universities, research institutes, and 
national laboratories, efforts to improve the transfer of 
federally-funded research are of interest to both the Federal 
Government and stakeholders across the nation.
    HR 2981, the Technology and Research Accelerating National 
Security and Future Economic Resiliency Act of 2013, or the 
TRANSFER Act of 2013, establishes a grant program at Federal 
Agencies that participate in the Small Business Technology 
Transfer program to support innovative approaches to technology 
transfer at institutions of higher education, nonprofit 
research institutions and Federal laboratories to accelerate 
the commercialization of federally funded research and 
technology by small business concerns, including new 
businesses.

Legislative History
    H.R. 2981 was introduced by Representative Collins on 
August 2, 2013, and was referred to the Committee on Small 
Business and, in addition, to the Committee on Science, Space, 
and Technology. Original sponsors of the bill include Rep. 
Smith, Rep. Johnson, Rep. Bucshon, Rep. Lipinski, and Rep. 
Kilmer. On December 5, 2013, the Committee reported favorably 
H.R. 2981, as amended, by voice vote.

              DECEMBER 11, 2013--MARKUP HELD ON H.R. 3625,

             TO PROVIDE FOR TERMINATION LIABILITY COSTS FOR

                 CERTAIN NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE

            ADMINISTRATION PROJECTS, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES

Background and Need
    In 2010 the President proposed the cancellation of the 
Constellation Program after NASA Administrator Charles Bolden 
informed Congress that work on the Constellation Program must 
slow to ensure NASA would not run afoul of the Anti-Deficiency 
Act due to an inaccurate accounting of potential termination 
liability.
    Potential termination liability refers to an estimate of 
possible costs that a contractor would incur if it stopped work 
on a contract prior to completing performance in the event that 
the Government terminated the contract for convenience. The 
Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) permit government 
agencies to manage potential termination liability on 
incrementally-funded, multiple year, cost-reimbursable 
contracts in at least two ways: the agency may require a 
contractor to track and account for their own potential 
termination liability costs under the limitations of funds 
clause; or, the agency may use a special termination costs 
clause which allows the contractor to ignore possible 
termination liability when calculating its contract funding 
request.
    Under the special termination costs clause, ``NASA informs 
the contractor that it need not include potential termination 
liability in its contract funding request calculations under 
the limitation of funds clause, and that NASA will still pay 
the contractor for allowable termination costs in addition to 
incurred costs in the event of a contract termination, usually 
up to an agreed-upon ceiling amount.'' On most NASA contracts, 
the vendor is ultimately responsible for tracking their 
termination liability to ensure there are enough funds provided 
on a contract to cover any potential loss as a result of 
cancellation for convenience. However, it is not unheard of for 
NASA to use a special termination costs clause, and it used 
them on three contracts during the Constellation Program. In 
the past, NASA contractors have reported, and the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) has cited, inconsistent practices 
with regard to tracking and funding termination liability 
properly.
    Following the cancellation of the Constellation Program, 
GAO reviewed NASA's management of potential termination 
liability and found, ``The Agency has not issued detailed 
instructions or provided guidance to direct contracting 
officers and others on how to monitor or track termination 
liability and to supplement the reliance on the relevant FAR 
provisions. As a result, resource analysts and financial 
managers inconsistently monitor and fund potential termination 
liability across the projects we reviewed,'' and that ``In some 
cases, NASA contractors said they did not view insufficient 
potential termination liability funding as a risk because 
NASA's past practice on contract terminations was to provide 
additional funding to the contract to cover the agreed upon 
termination settlement costs and they assumed this would be the 
continuing NASA practice.''
    As of the beginning of calendar year 2013, contractors for 
the Space Launch System and Orion crew capsule carried 
approximately $462 million in potential termination liability 
costs as a result of NASA's inconsistent use of the limitation 
of funds clause and management of termination liability. This 
bill will provide contractors consistency and allow them to 
apply reserved funds to contract work.

Legislative History
    H.R. 3625 was introduced on December 2, 2013, by 
Representative Mo Brooks. The bill was noticed for a markup on 
December 5, 2013; however, the Committee recessed prior to 
consideration of H.R. 3625. The Committee reconvened to 
consider the bill on December 11, 2013. On December 11, 2013, 
the Committee reported favorably H.R. 2981, as amended, by 
voice vote.

              FULL COMMITTEE OTHER LEGISLATIVE ACTIVITIES

                H.R. 933 (P.L. 113-6), CONSOLIDATED AND

              FURTHER CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2013

Background and Summary
    H.R. 933 appropriated funds for the remainder of FY 2013 to 
the for continuing operations, projects, or activities which 
were conducted in 2012 and for which appropriations, funds or 
other authority were made available in the FY 2012 
appropriations acts for the various departments and agencies of 
the Federal government. The law appropriated resources to 
programs within the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology's jurisdiction, including the National Science 
Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration (NASA), the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology (NIST), the Department of Energy (DOE), the 
Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of 
Transportation, (DOT), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration (NOAA), and the Environmental Protection Agency 
(EPA).
    Key programs within the jurisdiction of the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology funded by H.R. 933 include, for 
example, at the DOE: Office of Science, APRA-E, Energy 
Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Nuclear Energy, Fossil Energy, 
and Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. In addition to 
funding for DOE research and technology programs, the 
legislation also funded research activities at EPA and NOAA and 
provided funding for the activities of the National Institute 
of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Department of 
Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate.

Legislative History
    On March 4, 2013, Rep. Harold Rogers (R-KY), Chairman of 
the Committee on Appropriations, introduced H.R. 933, which was 
referred to the Committees on Appropriations and the Committee 
on Budget. On March 6, 2013, H.R. 933 was considered by the 
House and passed by: Y-267, N-151 (Roll Call No. 62). H.R. 933 
was received in the Senate on March 7, 2013. It was considered 
by the Senate and, passed with an amendment, Y- 73, N-26 
(Record Vote No. 44). On March 21, 2013, the House agreed to 
the Senate amendment by a vote of Y-318, N-109 (Roll Call No. 
89). It was signed into law by the President on March 26, 2013 
and became Public Law No. 113-6.

           H. CON. RES. 25, ``ESTABLISHING THE BUDGET FOR THE

             UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2014

                AND SETTING FORTH APPROPRIATE BUDGETARY

              LEVELS FOR FISCAL YEARS 2015 THROUGH 2023.''

Background and Summary of Legislation
    H. Con. Res. 25 establishes the budget for the United 
States Government for fiscal year 2014 and sets forth 
appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2015 through 
2023. The bill would set spending limits for FY2015-FY2023. The 
resolution also provides funding for general Science, Space, 
and Technology activities as well as energy and environment 
activities for each fiscal year. The resolution also makes 
findings addressing areas of duplication identified by the 
General Accountability Office (GAO), including duplication in 
Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics'' (``STEM'') 
education. The GAO identified programs in 13 different Federal 
agencies at a cost of $3 billion annually.
    In the report accompanying the resolution by the Committee 
on Budget, the Committee outlined the allocation of funding 
identifying the largest component of this funding--about half 
of total spending--for space-flight, research, and supporting 
activities of the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration. The funding also provides for general science 
activities, including the budgets for the National Science 
Foundation and the Department of Energy's Office of Science.
    The resolution calls for $27.7 billion in budget authority 
and $27.8 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2014. Of that 
total, discretionary spending in fiscal year 2014 totals $27.6 
billion in budget authority and $27.7 billion in outlays. 
Mandatory spending in 2014 is $100 million in budget authority 
and $105 million in outlays.
    The resolution also identifies ten-year totals for budget 
authority and outlays are $307.7 billion and $303.5 billion, 
respectively. It is designed to reduce excess and unnecessary 
spending, while supporting core government responsibilities. 
The resolution preserves basic research, providing stable 
funding for NSF to conduct its authorized activities in 
science, space and technology basic research, development, and 
STEM education. The budget provides continued support for NASA 
and recognizes the vital strategic importance of the United 
States' remaining the pre-eminent space-faring nation.
    This budget aligns funding in accordance with the NASA 
authorization and its specified spending limits to support 
robust space capability, to allow for exploration beyond low 
Earth orbit, and to support our scientific as well as 
educational base.
    The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology is expected 
to identify policies to align with the spending levels in the 
resolution and develop proposals that can help meet the 
budget's fiscal guidelines. Specifically the resolution 
supports preserving the Office of Science's original role as a 
venue for groundbreaking scientific discoveries and a driver of 
innovation and economic growth, while responsibly paring back 
applied and commercial research and development.
    The committee also recommended reductions in management and 
administrative expenses for the Department of Homeland 
Security's Directorate of Science and Technology, while 
shifting funding resources to frontline missions and 
capabilities.

Legislative History
    On March 15, 2013, the House Committee on the Budget 
reported an original measure, H. Con. Res. 25 in H. Rept. 113-
17. On March 19, 2013, the House considered the resolution 
under the provisions of rule H. Res. 122. On March 21, 2013, 
the House agreed to the resolution Y-221, N-207 (Roll Call No. 
88). On March 22, 2013, the bill was received in the Senate. On 
October 16, 2013, the resolution was agreed to in the Senate 
with an amendment by Unanimous Consent. The Senate insisted on 
its amendment and requested a conference.

                    H.R. 527, THE RESPONSIBLE HELIUM

                     ADMINISTRATION AND STEWARDSHIP

Background and Summary of Legislation
    The purpose of H.R. 527 is to amend the Helium Act to 
complete the privatization of the Federal helium reserve in a 
competitive market fashion that ensures stability in the helium 
markets while protecting the interests of American taxpayers. 
The bill is intended to address the impending closure of the 
Federal Helium program in 2013 by allowing the Federal Reserve 
to continue supplying helium while also reforming our nation's 
helium policy.
    The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology has a 
specific interest in Sections 3, 4, and 5 of H.R. 527. Section 
3 of H.R. 527 amends the ``Helium Act'' to allow the Secretary 
of Interior to sell and auction off crude helium to Federal 
agencies and holders of Federal research grants for Federal, 
medical, scientific and commercial uses. Because the Committee 
has jurisdiction over civilian Federal ``Scientific research, 
development, and demonstration and projects therefor'' [House 
Rule X 1(p) (14)], this section would fall under the 
jurisdiction of the Committee. Holders of all Federal research 
grants and the scientific research that they seek helium for 
will be affected by any modifications to the current system for 
obtaining helium.
    Section 4 and Section 5 of the legislation include 
provisions outside the scope of the Helium Act. Section 4 
includes transparency requirements to facilitate market and 
supply chain information. Section 5 (a) of HR 527 would require 
the Secretary to perform national and global helium 
assessments. Section 5(a) further requires the Secretary, in 
consultation with the Department of Energy to perform an 
inventory and forecast of domestic demand for helium for 
scientific and medical research, commercial, manufacturing, 
space technologies, cryogenics, and defense.
    Section 5(b) requires the Secretary of Interior to 
``cooperate'' with the Secretary of Energy on any assessment 
(which presumably includes the assessment required by Section 
5(a)) or research related to He-3 extraction and refining from 
crude helium. Since the term ``cooperation'' implies a back and 
forth commitment from both parties, this provision requires the 
Secretary of Energy to actively participate with the Department 
of the Interior in research and assessments relating to the 
extraction and refinement of Helium-3.

Legislative History
    H.R. 527 was introduced on February 6, 2013, and referred 
to the House Committee on Natural Resources. On March 20, 2013, 
H.R. 527 was ordered to be Reported (Amended) by Voice Vote. In 
correspondence between Chairman Hastings of the Committee on 
Natural Resources and Chairman Smith of the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology, Chairman Hastings acknowledged 
the jurisdiction of the Committee over H.R. 527 and Chairman 
Smith agreed to waive referral of the bill.
    On April 25, 2013, the House considered H.R. 527 under the 
provisions of rule H. Res. 178. On April 26, 2013, the House 
passed H.R. 527 by a vote of Y-394, N-1 (Roll Call No. 128). On 
May 6, 2013, H.R. 527 was received in the Senate. On September 
19, 2013, the bill passed the Senate with an amendment by a 
vote of Y-97, N-2 (Record Vote No.: 203). On September 25, 
2013, the House agreed to Senate amendment with an amendment 
pursuant to H. Res. 354. On September 26, 2013, the Senate 
agreed to the House amendment to the Senate amendment by 
Unanimous Consent. On October 2, 2013, H.R. 527 was signed by 
the President and became P.L. 113-40.

   H.R.1163, THE FEDERAL INFORMATION SECURITY AMENDMENTS ACT OF 2013

Background and Summary of Legislation
    The Federal Information Security Amendments Act of 2013 
(H.R. 1163) enhances the Federal Information Security 
Management Act (FISMA) of 2002 by improving the framework for 
securing federal information technology systems. H.R. 1163 
updates and amends the activities required to secure federal 
information systems. It establishes a mechanism for improved 
oversight of federal agency information security programs and 
systems through a focus on automated and continuous monitoring 
of agency information systems, when possible, and through 
conducting regular threat assessments. The Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology has a jurisdictional interest in 
H.R. 1163 due to the involvement of the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology (NIST) in developing and proposing 
both standards and guidelines for Federal government agencies 
to follow to ensure that the networks and information 
maintained by the Federal government agencies were secure. The 
language of H.R. 1163 seeks to amend the law in a number of 
different ways, all of which affect the role of NIST in the 
promulgation of standards and guidelines for information 
security within Federal agencies.

Legislative History
    On March 14, 2013, Representative Issa introduced H.R. 
1163. On March 20, 2013, the Committee on Oversight and 
Government Reform ordered H.R. 1163 to be reported, as amended. 
On April 12, 2013, Chairman Smith of the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology and Chairman Issa of the Committee on 
Oversight and Government Reform exchanged correspondence. 
Chairman Issa acknowledged the jurisdictional interest of the 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology in the bill, H.R. 
1163, as amended, and Chairman Smith agreed to waive a referral 
of the bill. The exchange was included in the report on the 
bill, H. Rept. 113-40 and in the Congressional Record. On April 
16, 2013, Mr. Issa moved to suspend the rules and pass H.R. 
1163, as amended, which was agreed to by voice vote.
    The bill was received in the Senate on April 17, 2013.

 H.R. 1960, THE NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2014

Background and Summary of Legislation
    The purpose of H.R. 1960 is to authorize appropriations for 
the Department of Defense for fiscal year 2014. The Committee 
on Science, Space, and Technology has a jurisdictional interest 
in certain provisions of the bill dealing with the integration 
of unmanned aerial vehicles into the national airspace system, 
a proof of concept commercialization pilot program, extension 
of the authority of the Secretary of Energy to enter in 
transactions to carry out certain research projects, and 
Federal information technology acquisition reform. The Senate 
amendment to H.R. 1960 proposed a number of provisions that the 
Committee has a jurisdictional interest in including: transfer 
of the administration of the ocean research advisory panel from 
the Navy to NOAA, and exascale computing plans.

Legislative History
    H.R. 1960 was introduced and referred to the Committee on 
Armed Services on May 14, 2013. The Committee on Armed Services 
ordered the bill reported on June 6, 2013 by a vote of 59-2. A 
report on the bill was filed on June 7, 2013 (H. Rept. 113-
102). A supplemental report was filed on June 11, 2013 (H. 
Rept. 113-102, Part II). On June 12, 2013, H.R. 1960 was 
considered under the provisions of H. Res. 256. Consideration 
was continued on June 13, 2013, under the provisions of H. Res. 
260. On June 14, 2013, the House passed H.R. 1960, as amended, 
by a vote of Y-315, N-108 (Roll Call No. 244). On July 8, 2013, 
H.R. 1960 was received in the Senate. Provisions of H.R. 1960 
were included by amendments to H.R. 3304. H. Res. 441 provided 
for the concurrence by the House in the Senate amendments to 
H.R. 3304, with an amendment which included provisions of H.R. 
1960. H. Res. 441 passed the House on December 12, 2013, by a 
vote of Y-350, N-69 (Roll Call No. 641)

 H.R. 1947, THE FEDERAL AGRICULTURAL REFORM AND RISK MANAGEMENT ACT OF 
                                  2013

Background and Summary of Legislation
    H.R. 1947 includes several provisions in the jurisdictional 
interest of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. 
Section 1502 establishes a National Drought Council to address 
the natural disaster caused by a deficiency in precipitation. 
The Council is required to develop a strategic plan to 
delineate responsibility for activities of Federal agencies 
related to drought preparedness, mitigation, research, risk 
management, training, and emergency relief.
    Several provisions in Title VI of the House bill repeal or 
amend programs in the jurisdiction of the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology including Section 6404 (Repeals the 
Carbon Cycle Research Program) and Section 6518 (the Sun Grant 
Program). Section 7202, the Office of International Forestry 
amends the Global Climate Change Prevention Act of 1990, which 
the Committee has jurisdiction over based on its jurisdiction 
over environmental research.
    Section 7401 requires the Secretary of Agriculture to 
revise the strategic plan for forest inventory and analysis 
utilizing the expertise of, among others, the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the NOAA, to 
integrate remote sensing, spatial analysis techniques, and 
other new technologies to research and develop an annualized 
inventory of trees and forests as well as information on 
renewable biomass supplies and carbon stocks. Similarly, Title 
VIII-Energy is within the Committee's jurisdiction over energy 
research and development
    Section 11307 instructs the Director of the Office of 
Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) to require each agency to 
develop guidelines to maximize the quality, objectivity, 
utility, and integrity of scientific information used by 
Federal agencies. This section requires the Director of OSTP to 
fulfill this responsibility by coordinating guidelines across 
the Federal government. The organization of this office and its 
duties are within the jurisdiction of the Science Committee.
    Section 11326 requires a report on how the National Ocean 
Policy is being implemented. The National Ocean Council, which 
is led by the Council on Environmental Quality and OSTP, is 
required to implement the National Ocean Policy. Title XI, 
Subtitle D is the Chesapeake Bay Accountability and Recovery 
Act. This subtitle requires the Administrator of the EPA to 
develop a plan to provide technical and financial assistance to 
Chesapeake Bay States to employ adaptive management in carrying 
out restoration activities in the Chesapeake Bay. The 
restoration activities required to be carried out under this 
section include physical restoration, planning, feasibility 
studies, scientific research, and monitoring.

Legislative History
    H.R. 1947 was introduced on May 13, 2013 by Representative 
Lucas and referred to the Committee on Agriculture. On May 21, 
2013, Chairman Smith of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology and Chairman Lucas of the Committee on Agriculture 
exchanged correspondence. Chairman Lucas acknowledged the 
jurisdictional interest of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology in the bill, H.R. 1947, as amended, and Chairman 
Smith agreed to waive a referral of the bill. The exchange was 
to be included in the report on the bill as well as the 
Congressional Record. On June 18, 2013, H.R. 1947 was 
considered under the provisions of H. Res. 266. On June 20, 
2013, H.R. 1947 failed by a vote of Y-195, N-234.

 H.R. 2642, THE FEDERAL AGRICULTURE REFORM AND RISK MANAGEMENT ACT OF 
                                  2013

Background and Summary
    H.R. 2642 as introduced includes provisions from H.R. 1947 
that are of jurisdictional interest to the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology.

Legislative History
    H.R. 2642 was introduced on July 10, 2013. On July 11, 
2013, the bill was considered under the provisions of H. Res. 
295. The bill passed the House by a vote of Y-216, N-208. On 
July 16, 2013, H.R. 2642 was received in the Senate. The Senate 
passed the bill with an amendment on July 18, 2013 by unanimous 
consent and requested a conference. House agreed to Senate 
amendment with an amendment on September 28, 2013. On October 
12, 2013 the Speaker appointed conferees. On October 30, 2013, 
a conference was held.

    H.R. 2775 (P.L. 113-46), THE CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2014

Background and Summary
    H.R. 2775 makes continuing appropriations for the 
operations of the Federal government until January 14, 2014. 
The law appropriated funds for certain Federal government 
agencies for fiscal year 2014, including agencies within the 
jurisdiction of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology. The law includes appropriations for fiscal year 
2014 for the National Institute of Standards and Technology 
(NIST), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 
(NOAA), the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), the 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the 
National Science Foundation (NSF), the Department of 
Transportation (DOT), and made continuing appropriations for 
the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of 
Energy (DOE), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Legislative History
    On July 22, 2013, H.R. 2775 was introduced and referred to 
the Committee on Energy and Commerce and, in addition, to the 
Committee on Ways and Means. On September 12, 2013, the bill 
was considered under the provisions of H. Res. 339. H.R. 2775 
passed the House on September 12, 2013, by a vote of Y-235, N-
191 (Roll Call No. 458). On September 16, 2013, the bill was 
received in the Senate. On October 16, 2013, H.R. 2775 was 
passed by the Senate with an amendment by a vote of Y-81, N-18 
(Record Vote No. 219). On October 16, 2013, the House agreed to 
the Senate amendments by a vote of Y-285, N-144 (Roll Call No. 
550). On October 17, 2013, H.R. 2775 was signed by the 
President and became P.L. 113-46.

     FULL COMMITTEE OVERSIGHT, INVESTIGATION, AND OTHER ACTIVITIES

               February 6, 2013_American Competitiveness:

                  The Role of Research and Development

                       (Hearing Volume No. 113-1)

    On Wednesday, February 6, 2013, the House Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology held a hearing to examine the 
status of and outlook for America's science and technology 
enterprise, examining the impact of research and development 
(R&D) on the lives of the American people and looking ahead to 
potential breakthrough innovations for the future. Witnesses 
discussed the historical context for American R&D, how it is 
divided between public and private investments, where the U.S. 
ranks globally on innovation and investment, and what the 
future may hold for American innovation.
    The Committee heard testimony from Mr. Richard Templeton, 
President and CEO, Texas Instruments; Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson, 
President, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; and Dr. Charles 
Vest, President, National Academy of Engineering.

                   March 19, 2013_Threats from Space:

                 A Review of U.S. Government Efforts to

               Track and Mitigate Asteroids and Meteors,

                   Part 1 (Hearing Volume No. 113-14)

    At 10:00 am on March 19, 2013, the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology held a hearing titled ``Threats from 
Space: A Review of U.S. Government Efforts to Track and 
Mitigate Asteroids and Meteors, Part 1.'' This was the first in 
a series of hearings examining the tracking, characterization 
and mitigation of Near Earth Objects. The hearing provided 
Members of the Committee the opportunity to receive testimony 
regarding the ongoing work, planned efforts, and coordination 
procedures within the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration, the Office of Science and Technology Policy, 
and the U.S. Air Force Space Command.
    The Committee heard testimony from The Honorable John P. 
Holdren, Director of the Office of Science and Technology 
Policy for the Executive Office of the President, Gen. William 
L. Shelton, Commander of the U.S. Air Force Space Command, and 
The Honorable Charles F. Bolden, Jr., Administrator of the 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

              April 10, 2013-Threats from Space, Part II:

                 A Review of Private Sector Efforts to

                Track and Mitigate Asteroids and Meteors

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-17)

    At 2:00 p.m. on April 10, 2013, the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology held a hearing titled Threats from Space, 
Part II: A Review of Private Sector Efforts to Track and 
Mitigate Asteroids and Meteors. This was the second hearing 
this Congress where the Committee examined the tracking, 
characterization and mitigation of Near Earth Objects. The 
hearing focused on the most viable near-term initiatives within 
the private sector and the international coordination needed to 
identify and characterize potentially hazardous near Earth 
objects.

               April 17, 2013_A Review of the President's

              FY 2014 Budget Request for Science Agencies

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-19)

    On Wednesday, April 17, 2013, the House Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology held a hearing to review 
President Obama's proposed fiscal year 2014 (FY14) budget 
request for programs and science agencies under the Committee's 
jurisdiction.
    The Committee heard testimony from Dr. John P. Holdren, 
Assistant to the President for Science and Technology and 
Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). 
He reviewed the proposed budget in the context of the 
President's overall priorities in science, space, and 
technology and described how the Administration determined 
priorities for funding across scientific disciplines and 
agencies.

                      June 4, 2013_STEM Education:

             The Administration's Proposed Re-Organization

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-33)

    On Tuesday, June 4, 2013, the House Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology held a hearing to review the 
Administration's proposed consolidation and re-organization of 
federal science, technology, engineering, and mathematics 
(STEM) programs. With an eye toward COMPETES Act (P.L. 111-358) 
reauthorization of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and a 
review of the effectiveness and efficiency of interagency STEM 
education programs the hearing provided an opportunity to 
evaluate the Administration's proposal and how it would affect 
federal STEM efforts across the Nation.
    The Administration's FY14 budget request includes $3.1 
billion across the federal government for STEM education, a 6.7 
percent increase over FY12 enacted levels. The request proposes 
a re-organization of STEM education programs into four key 
areas: K-12 instruction; undergraduate education; graduate 
fellowships; and education activities that typically take place 
outside the classroom, all with a focus on increasing 
participation and opportunities for individuals from groups 
historically underrepresented in STEM fields. Additionally, the 
proposal decreases the number of federal STEM programs from 226 
to 112, with 114 programs either eliminated or consolidated 
into existing programs. The budget request grows the number of 
agencies with federal STEM programs from 13 to 14, to include 
the Smithsonian Institution.
    The Committee heard testimony from The Honorable John 
Holdren, Director, Office of Science and Technology Policy 
(OSTP), Executive Office of the President; Dr. Joan Ferrini-
Mundy, Assistant Director, Directorate for Education and Human 
Resources, National Science Foundation (NSF); and Mr. Leland D. 
Melvin, Associate Administrator for Education, National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

               June 18, 2013_Department of Energy Science

                        & Technology Priorities

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-36)

    On Tuesday, June 18, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. in Room 2318 of the 
Rayburn House Office Building, the Committee on Science, Space, 
and Technology held a hearing entitled Department of Energy 
Science and Technology Priorities. The purpose of the hearing 
was to examine the Department of Energy's (DOE) science and 
technology priorities and related management and policy 
challenges, with an emphasis on how these factors influence 
research, development, and demonstration and commercialization 
activities within the overall mission of the Department. The 
Committee received testimony from newly confirmed U.S. Energy 
Secretary, Dr. Ernest Moniz.

            November 14, 2013_Strengthening Transparency and

                       Accountability within the

                    Environmental Protection Agency

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-54)

    On Thursday, November 14, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. the House 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology held a hearing 
entitled, Strengthening Transparency and Accountability within 
the Environmental Protection Agency. The purpose of this 
hearing was to review science and technology activities at the 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) including: agency-wide 
policies and practices related to the development and use of 
science in regulatory decisions; the role of independent 
scientific advisory bodies such as the EPA Science Advisory 
Board and the EPA Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee; and 
the importance of transparency and integrity in the Agency's 
science activities. The Committee received testimony from The 
Honorable Gina McCarthy, Administrator, U.S. Environmental 
Protection Agency.

                    November 19, 2013_Is My Data on

                         Healthcare.gov Secure?

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-55)

    On Tuesday, November 19, 2013, the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology held a hearing to explore the threat of 
identity theft posed to Americans if hackers gained personal 
information through the Healthcare.gov website, to assess the 
security controls in place and its vulnerabilities, and to 
determine what specific security standards and technical 
measures should be in place to protect Americans' privacy and 
personal information on Healthcare.gov.
    The Subcommittees heard testimony from Mr. Morgan Wright, 
Chief Executive Officer, Crowd Sourced Investigations, LLC; Dr. 
Fred Chang, Bobby B. Lyle Centennial Distinguished Chair in 
Cyber Security, Southern Methodist University; Dr. Avi Rubin, 
Director, Health and Medical Security Laboratory Technical 
Director, Information Security Institute, Johns Hopkins 
University (JHU); and Mr. David Kennedy, Chief Executive 
Officer, TrustedSEC, LLC.

               December 4, 2013_Astrobiology: Search for

              Biosignatures in our Solar System and Beyond

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-57)

    On December 4, 2013, the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology held a hearing to examine astrobiology research and 
the search for biosignatures in our Solar System and beyond. 
The hearing included a general assessment of the multi- and 
interdisciplinary nature of astrobiology research, including 
the role astrobiology plays in formulating NASA space missions. 
It also examined the techniques and capabilities necessary to 
determine the potential for the existence of biosignatures 
within our Solar System. In light of the discovery of potential 
Earth-like planets outside of our Solar System, the hearing 
will investigated what methods are being used to determine if 
any of these planets may harbor life. The hearing discussed 
existing and planned astrobiology research strategies and 
roadmaps.
    The Committee heard from three witnesses: Dr. Mary Voytek, 
Senior Scientist for Astrobiology in the Science Mission 
Directorate at NASA headquarters; Dr. Sara Seager, Professor of 
Physics and of Planetary Science at M.I.T. and 2013 recipient 
of a MacArthur Foundation ``Genius Grant'' for her work in 
exoplanet research; and Dr. Steven J. Dick, Baruch S. Blumberg 
Chair of Astrobiology, John W. Kluge Center, Library of 
Congress.

                         SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY

  Oversight, Investigation, and Other Activities, Including Selective 
                         Legislative Activities

               February 13, 2013_American Energy Outlook:

                 Technology, Market, and Policy Drivers

                       (Hearing Volume No. 113-2)

    On Wednesday, February 13, at 10:00 a.m. in Room 2318 of 
the Rayburn House Office Building, the Subcommittee on Energy 
held a hearing titled, American Energy Outlook: Technology, 
Market and Policy Drivers. The Subcommittee received testimony 
regarding the current state of the U.S. energy markets, 
projected trends, and the impact of technology development on 
the U.S energy sector. The hearing examined the impact of 
technology and policy on energy markets. The Subcommittee 
received testimony from The Honorable Adam Sieminski, 
Administrator, Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. 
Department of Energy, Mr. Robert McNally, President, The 
Rapidan Group, and Ms. Lisa Jacobson, President, Business 
Council for Sustainable Energy.

              March 13, 2013 Federal Financial Support for

           Energy Technologies: Assessing Costs and Benefits

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-12)

    On Wednesday, March 13, at 3:00 p.m. in Room 2318 of the 
Rayburn House Office Building, the Subcommittee on Energy held 
a hearing titled, Federal Financial Support for Energy 
Technologies: Assessing Costs and Benefits. The Subcommittee 
received testimony regarding various forms of Federal financial 
support for the development and production of fuels and energy 
technologies, including tax incentives, loan guarantees, and 
direct spending on research, development, demonstration and 
commercialization activities. The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Dr. Terry Dinan, Senior Analyst, Congressional 
Budget Office, Ms. Mary Hutzler, Distinguished Senior Fellow, 
Institute for Energy Research, and Mr. Malcolm Woolf, Senior 
Vice President Policy & Government Affairs, Advanced Energy 
Economy.

              April 16, 2013-Assessing the Efficiency and

                Effectiveness of Wind Energy Incentives

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-18)

    On April 16, 2013, the Subcommittee on Oversight and the 
Subcommittee on Energy held a hearing titled ``Assessing the 
Efficiency and Effectiveness of Wind Energy Incentives.'' This 
hearing built upon an earlier hearing held by the Energy and 
Environment and Investigations and Oversight Subcommittees that 
reviewed the impact of tax policies on the commercialization of 
energy technology, as well as a recent hearing held by the 
Energy Subcommittee that reviewed federal financial support for 
all energy technologies. While those hearings addressed a broad 
range of energy technologies, this hearing focused specifically 
on the efficiency and effectiveness of federal incentives for 
onshore and offshore wind technology.

                   April 26, 2013_A Review of Federal

                Hydraulic Fracturing Research Activities

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-25)

    On Friday, April 26, 2013 at 9:30 a.m. in Room 2318 of the 
Rayburn House Office Building, the Subcommittee on Energy and 
the Subcommittee on Environment of the Committee on Science, 
Space and Technology held a joint hearing entitled Review of 
Federal Hydraulic Fracturing Research Activities. The purpose 
of this hearing was to review agencies' hydraulic fracturing-
related efforts, with a primary focus on examining progress 
under Executive Order 13605 and the associated interagency 
Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) and steering committee. The 
Subcommittees received testimony from Dr. Kevin Teichman, 
Senior Science Advisor, Office of Research and Development, 
Environmental Protection Agency; Mr. Guido DeHoratiis, Acting 
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oil and Gas, Office of Fossil 
Energy, Department of Energy; Dr. David Russ, Regional 
Executive, Northeast Area, U.S. Geological Survey; and Dr. 
Robin Ikeda, Acting Director, Agency for Toxic Substances and 
Disease Registry, Department of Health and Human Services.

                   May 7, 2013_Keystone XL Pipeline:

           Examination of Scientific and Environmental Issues

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-26)

    The Subcommittee on Environment and the Subcommittee on 
Energy held a joint hearing entitled Keystone XL Pipeline: 
Examining Scientific and Environmental Issues on Tuesday, May 7 
at 10:00 a.m. in Room 2318 of the Rayburn House Office 
Building. The purpose of this hearing was to examine the 
scientific and environmental aspects of the Keystone XL 
Pipeline, with a focus on the State Department's recently 
released Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement. The 
Subcommittees received testimony from Mr. Lynn Helms, Director, 
Department of Mineral Resources, North Dakota Industrial 
Commission, Mr. Brigham A. McCown, Principal and Managing 
Director, United Transportation Advisors LLC, Mr. Anthony 
Swift, Attorney, International Program, Natural Resources 
Defense Council, and Mr. Paul ``Chip'' Knappenberger, Assistant 
Director, Center for the Study of Science, Cato Institute.

         May 22, 2013_America's Next Generation Supercomputer:

                         The Exascale Challenge

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-31)

    The Subcommittee on Energy held a hearing entitled 
America's Next Generation Supercomputer: The Exascale Challenge 
on Wednesday, May 22, at 10:00 a.m. in Room 2318 of the Rayburn 
House Office Building. The purpose of the hearing was to 
examine high performance computing research and development 
challenges and opportunities, specifically as they relate to 
exascale computing. The hearing also explored advanced 
scientific computing research. The hearing additionally 
examined draft legislation directing the Department of Energy 
(DOE) to develop an exascale computing system. The Subcommittee 
received testimony from Dr. Roscoe Giles, Chairman, Advanced 
Scientific Computing Advisory Committee, Professor, Boston 
University, Dr. Rick Stevens, Associate Laboratory Director, 
Computing, Environment and Life Sciences, Argonne National 
Laboratory, Ms. Dona Crawford, Associate Director for 
Computation, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Dr. 
Daniel Reed, Vice President for Research and Economic 
Development, University of Iowa.

             June 27, 2013_Green Buildings-An Evaluation of

                  Energy Savings Performance Contracts

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-39)

    On Thursday, June 27, 2013, the Subcommittees on Oversight 
and Energy held a hearing to evaluate the benefits and 
shortfalls of Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs). 
Federal agencies, such as the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration (NASA) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), 
engage in ESPCs with energy service companies (ESCOs) in order 
to achieve energy efficiency improvements at government-owned 
facilities. The hearing also explored how frequently labs, 
centers and other facilities in the Committee's jurisdiction 
use these contracts, to better understand their advantages and 
limitations. The Subcommittee heard testimony from Dr. Kathleen 
Hogan, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency, U.S. 
Department of Energy; Dr. Woodrow Whitlow, Jr., Associate 
Administrator, Mission Support Directorate, National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration; Ms. Jennifer Schafer, 
Executive Director, Federal Performance Contracting Coalition; 
Mr. Ron King, President Advisor, National Insulation 
Association.

     July 11, 2013_Oversight and Management of Department of Energy

              National Laboratories and Science Activities

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-41)

    On Thursday, July 11, 2013 at 9:30 a.m. in Room 2318 of the 
Rayburn House Office Building, the Subcommittee on Energy held 
a hearing entitled Oversight and Management of Department of 
Energy National Laboratories and Science Activities. The 
purpose of the hearing was to examine the Department of 
Energy's (DOE) oversight and management of science and 
technology activities, particularly as they relate to enhancing 
the efficiency and effectiveness of the National Laboratory 
System. The hearing also considered ideas and recommendations 
regarding how best to enhance DOE support of science and 
innovation through reforms in areas related to management, 
performance, technology transfer, and laboratory authorities 
and regulations. The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. 
Matthew Stepp, Senior Policy Analyst, Information Technology 
and Innovation Foundation; Mr. Jack Spencer, Senior Research 
Fellow, The Heritage Foundation; Dr. Thom Mason, Director, Oak 
Ridge National Laboratory; and Dr. Dan Arvizu, Director, 
National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

                     July 24, 2013_Lessons Learned:

              EPA's Investigations of Hydraulic Fracturing

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-42)

    On Wednesday, July 24th, at 10:00 a.m. in Room 2318 of the 
Rayburn House Office Building, the Subcommittee on Environment 
and the Subcommittee on Energy held a joint hearing entitled 
Lessons Learned: EPA's Investigations of Hydraulic Fracturing. 
The purpose of the hearing was to examine the EPA's conduct of 
its investigation into the relationship between hydraulic 
fracturing and groundwater, with an emphasis on adherence to 
protocols, procedures, and other policies governing these 
research activities. A particular focus of the hearing was to 
examine the EPA's investigations in Parker County, Texas; 
Pavillion, Wyoming; and Dimock, Pennsylvania, and ascertain any 
lessons that might be learned from these experiences and used 
to inform and improve the EPA's ongoing study of the potential 
impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources. 
The Subcommittees received testimony from Dr. Fred Hauchman, 
Director, Office of Science Policy, Office of Research and 
Development, Environmental Protection Agency; Dr. David A. 
Dzombak, Chair, Environmental Protection Agency Science 
Advisory Board, Hydraulic Fracturing Research Advisory Panel; 
Mr. John Rogers, Associate Director, Oil and Gas, Division of 
Oil, Gas, and Mining, Utah Department of Natural Resources; and 
Dr. Brian Rahm, Post-Doctoral Associate, New York State Water 
Resources Institute, Cornell University.

                   July 25, 2013_The Future of Coal:

             Utilizing America's Abundant Energy Resources

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-44)

    On Thursday, July 25, 2013 at 9:30 a.m. in Room 2318 of the 
Rayburn House Office Building, the Subcommittee on Energy held 
a hearing entitled The Future of Coal: Utilizing America's 
Abundant Energy Resources. The purpose of the hearing was to 
examine coal-related technology challenges and opportunities, 
with an emphasis on enhancing the effectiveness and impact of 
Department of Energy research and development (R&D) activities 
including DOE's R&D priorities as well as Federal government 
and private industry investments. The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Mr. Chris Smith, Acting Assistant Secretary for 
Fossil Energy, Department of Energy; Mr. Ben Yamagata, 
Executive Director, Coal Utilization Research Council; Mr. Don 
Collins, Chief Executive Officer, Western Research Institute; 
and Ms. Judi Greenwald, Vice President, Center for Climate and 
Energy Solutions.

             October 29, 2013_EPA Power Plant Regulations:

                        Is the Technology Ready?

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-51)

    On Tuesday, October 29th, at 10:00 a.m. in Room 2318 of the 
Rayburn House Office Building, the Subcommittees on Environment 
and Energy held a joint hearing entitled EPA Power Plant 
Regulations: Is the Technology Ready? The hearing covered what 
considerations the EPA relied in making its selection of best 
system of emissions reductions in the proposed New Source 
Performance Standards (NSPS) for electric generating units 
(EGUs). The hearing also explored the technological basis for 
concluding that carbon capture and storage (CCS) is adequately 
demonstrated as a technology for controlling carbon dioxide 
emissions in full-scale commercial power plants. Further, the 
hearing examined whether the rule promotes or deters 
technological development and American leadership in energy 
technologies. The Subcommittees received testimony from The 
Honorable Charles McConnell, Executive Director, Energy & 
Environment Initiative, Rice University; Dr. Richard Bajura, 
Director, National Research Center for Coal and Energy, West 
Virginia University; Mr. Kurt Waltzer, Managing Director, The 
Clean Air Task Force; and Mr. Roger Martella, Partner, 
Environmental Practice Group, Sidley Austin LLP.

                October 30, 2013_Providing the Tools for

            Scientific Discovery and Basic Energy Research:

                The Department of Energy Science Mission

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-52)

    On Wednesday, October 30, at 9:30 a.m. in Room 2318 of the 
Rayburn House Office Building, the Subcommittee on Energy held 
a hearing entitled, Providing the Tools for Scientific 
Discovery and Basic Energy Research: The Department of Energy 
Science Mission. The hearing examined challenges and 
opportunities in setting priorities for the DOE's basic 
research mission as well as well as the execution of these 
fundamental science programs and activities within the Office 
of Science (SC). Additionally, the hearing examined draft 
legislation Enabling Innovation for Science, Technology, and 
Energy in America Act (or EINSTEIN America Act) of 2013 to 
provide authorization and direction to the DOE Office of 
Science. The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. Patricia 
Dehmer, Deputy Director for Science Programs, Office of 
Science, Department of Energy; Dr. Horst Simon, Deputy 
Director, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab; and Dr. John 
Hemminger, Chairman, Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, 
Department of Energy.

                      SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENVIRONMENT

  Oversight, Investigation, and Other Activities, Including Selective 
                         Legislative Activities

            February 14, 2013_The State of the Environment:

                   Evaluating Progress and Priorities

                       (Hearing Volume No. 113-3)

    On Thursday, February 14, 2013, the Subcommittee on 
Environment held a hearing to assess broad environmental trends 
and indicators, including an examination of factors such as air 
and water quality, chemical exposure, environmental and human 
health, and climate change. Witnesses were asked to provide 
their perspective on progress and challenges on these 
environmental trends as they relate to research and 
development, regulation, technological innovation, energy use 
and Americans' changing standard of living. The Subcommittee 
received testimony from The Honorable Kathleen Hartnett White, 
Distinguished Fellow-in-Residence & Director, Armstrong Center 
for Energy & the Environment, Texas Public Policy Foundation, 
Mr. Richard Trzupek, Principal Consultant, Trinity Consulting, 
and Dr. Bernard Goldstein, Professor and Dean Emeritus, 
University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.

              February 26, 2013_Mid-Level Ethanol Blends:

                 Consumer and Technical Research Needs

                       (Hearing Volume No. 113-7)

    On Tuesday, February 26 at 2:00 p.m. in Room 2318 of the 
Rayburn House Office Building, the Science, Space, and 
Technology Subcommittee on Environment held a hearing titled, 
Mid-Level Ethanol Blends: Consumer and Technical Research 
Needs. The purpose of the hearing was to examine the 
scientific, technical, and consumer impacts of the 
Environmental Protection Agency's decision to allow the 
introduction of mid-level ethanol blends (E15) into the 
marketplace. Additionally, the hearing examined the impact of 
E15 on engines and fuel supply infrastructure, and identified 
research gaps or areas in which policymakers and the public 
could benefit from more information on the fuel. The 
subcommittee also received testimony on related draft 
legislation. The subcommittee received testimony from Mr. 
Robert L. Darbelnet, President and CEO, American Automobile 
Association (AAA), The Honorable Wayne Allard, Vice President, 
Government Relations, American Motorcyclist Association (AMA), 
and Mr. Mike Leister, Member, Board of Directors, Coordinating 
Research Council (CRC).

                     March 20, 2013_Improving EPA's

                     Scientific Advisory Processes

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-15)

    The Subcommittee on Environment of the Committee on 
Science, Space and Technology held a hearing entitled Improving 
EPA's Scientific Advisory Processes on Wednesday, March 20, 
2013, at 10:00 a.m. in Room 2318 of the Rayburn House Office 
Building. The purpose of this hearing was to examine the 
Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) process for receiving 
independent scientific advice and to received testimony on 
draft legislation to strengthen public participation, improve 
the process for selecting expert advisors, expand transparency 
requirements, and limit non-scientific policy advice among 
advisory bodies. The subcommittee received testimony from Dr. 
Michael Honeycutt, Chief Toxicologist, Texas Commission on 
Environmental Quality, Dr. Roger McClellan, Advisor, Toxicology 
and Human Health Risk Analysis, Dr. Francesca Grifo, Senior 
Scientist and Science Policy Fellow, Union of Concerned 
Scientists.

        April 25, 2013_Policy Relevant Climate Issues in Context

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-24)

    On Thursday, April 25, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. in Room 2318 of 
the Rayburn House Office Building, the Subcommittee on 
Environment held a hearing titled, Policy Relevant Climate 
Issues in Context. The purpose of the hearing was to provide 
Members a high level overview of the most important scientific, 
technical, and economic factors that should guide climate-
related decision-making this Congress. Specifically, this 
hearing examined the current understanding of key areas of 
climate science necessary to inform decision-making on 
potential mitigation options. The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Dr. Judith Curry, Professor, School of Earth and 
Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology; Dr. 
William Chameides, Dean and Professor, Nicholas School of the 
Environment, Duke University; and Dr. Bjorn Lomborg, President, 
Copenhagen Consensus Center.

        April 26, 2013_A Review of Federal Hydraulic Fracturing 
                          Research Activities

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-25)

    On Friday, April 26, 2013 at 9:30 a.m. in Room 2318 of the 
Rayburn House Office Building, the Subcommittee on Energy and 
the Subcommittee on Environment of the Committee on Science, 
Space and Technology held a joint hearing entitled Review of 
Federal Hydraulic Fracturing Research Activities. The purpose 
of this hearing was to review agencies' hydraulic fracturing-
related efforts, with a primary focus on examining progress 
under Executive Order 13605 and the associated interagency 
Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) and steering committee. The 
Subcommittees received testimony from Dr. Kevin Teichman, 
Senior Science Advisor, Office of Research and Development, 
Environmental Protection Agency; Mr. Guido DeHoratiis, Acting 
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oil and Gas, Office of Fossil 
Energy, Department of Energy; Dr. David Russ, Regional 
Executive, Northeast Area, U.S. Geological Survey; and Dr. 
Robin Ikeda, Acting Director, Agency for Toxic Substances and 
Disease Registry, Department of Health and Human Services.

                   May 7, 2013_Keystone XL Pipeline:

           Examination of Scientific and Environmental Issues

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-26)

    The Subcommittee on Environment and the Subcommittee on 
Energy held a joint hearing entitled Keystone XL Pipeline: 
Examining Scientific and Environmental Issues on Tuesday, May 7 
at 10:00 a.m. in Room 2318 of the Rayburn House Office 
Building. The purpose of this hearing was to examine the 
scientific and environmental aspects of the Keystone XL 
Pipeline, with a focus on the State Department's recently 
released Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement. The 
Subcommittees received testimony from Mr. Lynn Helms, Director, 
Department of Mineral Resources, North Dakota Industrial 
Commission, Mr. Brigham A. McCown, Principal and Managing 
Director, United Transportation Advisors LLC, Mr. Anthony 
Swift, Attorney, International Program, Natural Resources 
Defense Council, and Mr. Paul ``Chip'' Knappenberger, Assistant 
Director, Center for the Study of Science, Cato Institute.

                 May 23, 2013_Restoring U.S. Leadership

                         in Weather Forecasting

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-32)

    The Subcommittee on Environment held a hearing entitled 
Restoring U.S. Leadership in Weather Forecasting on Thursday, 
May 23, 2013, at 9:30 a.m. in Room 2318 of the Rayburn House 
Office Building. The purpose of the hearing was to examine ways 
to improve the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 
(NOAA) weather forecasting, and to receive testimony on draft 
legislation to prioritize weather-related research. The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Barry Myers, Chief 
Executive Officer, AccuWeather, Inc., and Mr. Jon Kirchner, 
President, GeoOptics, Inc.

                    June 12, 2013_Background Check:

                  Achievability of New Ozone Standards

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-35)

    On Wednesday, June 12, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. in Room 2318 of 
the Rayburn House Office Building, the Subcommittee on 
Environment held a hearing entitled Background Check: 
Achievability of New Ozone Standards. The purpose of the 
hearing was to highlight the science behind the Environmental 
Protection Agency's (EPA) forthcoming National Ambient Air 
Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ground level ozone including 
EPA's estimation of background (naturally occurring/
uncontrollable) ozone and its implications on, the 
achievability of, and compliance with, the NAAQS. The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Ms. Amanda Smith, 
Executive Director, Utah Department of Environmental Quality; 
Mr. Samuel Oltmans, Senior Research Associate, Cooperative 
Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences, 
University of Colorado, and Earth System Research Laboratory 
Global Monitoring Division; Dr. Russell Dickerson, Professor, 
Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, University of 
Maryland; Mr. Jeffrey Holmstead, Partner, Bracewell & Giuliani 
LLP; and Dr. Kenneth Olden, Director, National Center for 
Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

    June 26, 2013_Restoring U.S. Leadership in Weather Forecasting, 
                                 Part 2

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-38)

    On Wednesday, June 26, 2013 in Room 2318 of the Rayburn 
House Office Building, the Subcommittee on Environment held a 
second hearing on weather forecasting entitled Restoring U.S. 
Leadership in Weather Forecasting. The purpose of the hearing 
was to examine ways to improve the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) weather forecasting, and to 
receive testimony on legislation to prioritize weather-related 
research. The first hearing was held May 23rd. The Subcommittee 
received testimony from The Honorable Kathryn Sullivan, Acting 
Administrator, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; 
Dr. Kelvin Droegemeier, Vice President for Research, Regents' 
Professor for Meteorology, Weathernews Chair Emeritus, 
University of Oklahoma; Dr. William Gail, Chief Technology 
Officer, Global Weather Corporation, President-Elect, American 
Meteorological Society; and Dr. Shuyi Chen, Professor, 
Meteorology and Physical Oceanography, Rosentiel School of 
Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Miami.

              July 9, 2013_Subcommittee Markup, H.R. 2413,

             The Weather Forecasting Improvement Act of 2013

    On Tuesday, July 9, 2013, the Subcommittee met to consider 
H.R. 2413, The Weather Forecasting Improvement Act of 2013. The 
Subcommittee ordered H.R. 2413 be favorably reported to the 
Full Committee, as amended, by voice vote.

                  July 24, 2013_Lessons Learned: EPA's

                 Investigations of Hydraulic Fracturing

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-42)

    On Wednesday, July 24th, at 10:00 a.m. in Room 2318 of the 
Rayburn House Office Building, the Subcommittee on Environment 
and the Subcommittee on Energy held a joint hearing entitled 
Lessons Learned: EPA's Investigations of Hydraulic Fracturing. 
The purpose of the hearing was to examine the EPA's conduct of 
its investigation into the relationship between hydraulic 
fracturing and groundwater, with an emphasis on adherence to 
protocols, procedures, and other policies governing these 
research activities. A particular focus of the hearing was to 
examine the EPA's investigations in Parker County, Texas; 
Pavillion, Wyoming; and Dimock, Pennsylvania, and ascertain any 
lessons that might be learned from these experiences and used 
to inform and improve the EPA's ongoing study of the potential 
impacts of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water resources. 
The Subcommittees received testimony from Dr. Fred Hauchman, 
Director, Office of Science Policy, Office of Research and 
Development, Environmental Protection Agency; Dr. David A. 
Dzombak, Chair, Environmental Protection Agency Science 
Advisory Board, Hydraulic Fracturing Research Advisory Panel; 
Mr. John Rogers, Associate Director, Oil and Gas, Division of 
Oil, Gas, and Mining, Utah Department of Natural Resources; and 
Dr. Brian Rahm, Post-Doctoral Associate, New York State Water 
Resources Institute, Cornell University.

      September 19, 2013_Dysfunction in Management of Weather and 
                           Climate Satellites

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-49)

    On Thursday, September 19, 2013, the Subcommittees on 
Oversight and Environment held a hearing to conduct on-going 
oversight of the nation's weather and climate satellite 
programs. The U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) has 
identified a high probability in degraded weather satellite 
coverage starting as early as next year, and has designated 
this data gap as a new high-risk area in a report earlier this 
year. Given this potential gap in weather satellite coverage, 
the hearing addressed questions about the Administration's 
priorities in funding weather satellites and research as 
compared to climate change-monitoring satellites and research.
    The Subcommittees heard testimony from Mr. David Powner, 
Director, Information Technology Management Issues, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office; Ms. Mary Kicza, Assistant 
Administrator, Satellite and Information Services, National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); and Mr. Marcus 
Watkins, Director, Joint Agency Satellite Division, National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

             October 29, 2013_EPA Power Plant Regulations:

                        Is the Technology Ready?

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-51)

    On Tuesday, October 29th, at 10:00 a.m. in Room 2318 of the 
Rayburn House Office Building, the Subcommittees on Environment 
and Energy held a joint hearing entitled EPA Power Plant 
Regulations: Is the Technology Ready? The hearing covered what 
considerations the EPA relied in making its selection of best 
system of emissions reductions in the proposed New Source 
Performance Standards (NSPS) for electric generating units 
(EGUs). The hearing also explored the technological basis for 
concluding that carbon capture and storage (CCS) is adequately 
demonstrated as a technology for controlling carbon dioxide 
emissions in full-scale commercial power plants. Further, the 
hearing examined whether the rule promotes or deters 
technological development and American leadership in energy 
technologies. The Subcommittees received testimony from The 
Honorable Charles McConnell, Executive Director, Energy & 
Environment Initiative, Rice University; Dr. Richard Bajura, 
Director, National Research Center for Coal and Energy, West 
Virginia University; Mr. Kurt Waltzer, Managing Director, The 
Clean Air Task Force; and Mr. Roger Martella, Partner, 
Environmental Practice Group, Sidley Austin LLP.

                  December 11, 2013_A Factual Look at

              the Relationship Between Climate and Weather

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-58)

    On Wednesday, December 11, at 10:00 a.m. in Room 2318 of 
the Rayburn House Office Building, the Subcommittee on 
Environment held a hearing entitled, A Factual Look at the 
Relationship Between Climate and Weather. The purpose of the 
hearing was to examine the links between climate change and 
extreme weather events such as hurricanes, tornadoes, droughts, 
and floods. The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. John 
Christy, Professor and State Climatologist, University of 
Alabama in Huntsville; Dr. David Titley, Director, Center for 
Solutions to Weather and Climate Risk, Pennsylvania State 
University; and Dr. Roger Pielke Jr., Professor, Center for 
Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Colorado.

                  SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT ACTIVITIES

             February 15, 2013_Operating Unmanned Aircraft

                Systems in the National Airspace System:

                   Assessing Research and Development

                        Efforts to Ensure Safety

                       (Hearing Volume No. 112-5)

    On February 15, 2013, the Subcommittee on Oversight held a 
hearing titled ``Operating Unmanned Aircraft Systems in the 
National Airspace System: Assessing Research and Development 
Efforts to Ensure Safety.'' The hearing examined challenges to 
integrating Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) safely into the 
National Airspace System (NAS) and federal research and 
development (R&D) efforts to ensure the safe operation of UAS 
in the NAS.
    The Subcommittee heard testimony from Dr. Karlin Toner, 
Director of the Joint Planning and Development Office at the 
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA); Dr. Edgar Waggoner, 
Director of the Integrated Systems Research Program Office at 
the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA); and 
Dr. Gerald Dillingham the Director of Civil Aviation Issues at 
the Government Accountability Office (GAO).

                  February 28, 2013_Top Challenges For

                     Science Agencies: Reports from

                     the Inspectors General-Part 1

                       (Hearing Volume No. 112-9)

    At 10:00 a.m. on February 28, 2013, the Subcommittee on 
Oversight held a hearing titled ``Top Challenges for Science 
Agencies: Reports from the Inspectors General-Part 1.'' This 
was the first of two such hearings planned prior to the 
Committee's review of the Administration's FY 2014 budget 
requests of these agencies. The hearing provided Members of the 
Subcommittee the opportunity to receive testimony on the most 
serious performance and Management challenges facing the 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the 
National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Department of 
Commerce (DOC) from the perspective of the Inspectors General 
of the respective agency.

                   March 14, 2013_Top Challenges for

                   Science Agencies: Reports from the

                       Inspectors General-Part 2

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-13)

    At 12:30 p.m. on March 14, 2013, the Subcommittee on 
Oversight held a hearing titled ``Top Challenges for Science 
Agencies: Reports from the Inspectors General - Part 2.'' This 
was the second of two such hearings planned prior to the 
Committee's review of the Administration's FY 2014 budget 
requests of these agencies. Part 1 of this series was held on 
February 28, 2013. This hearing provided Members of the 
Subcommittee the opportunity to receive testimony on the most 
serious performance and management challenges facing the U.S. 
Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection 
Agency (EPA), and the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), 
from the perspective of the Inspectors General of each agency.

              April 16, 2013_Assessing the Efficiency and

                Effectiveness of Wind Energy Incentives

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-18)

    On April 16, 2013, the Subcommittee on Oversight and the 
Subcommittee on Energy held a hearing titled ``Assessing the 
Efficiency and Effectiveness of Wind Energy Incentives.'' This 
hearing built upon an earlier hearing held by the Energy and 
Environment and Investigations and Oversight Subcommittees that 
reviewed the impact of tax policies on the commercialization of 
energy technology, as well as a recent hearing held by the 
Energy Subcommittee that reviewed federal financial support for 
all energy technologies. While those hearings addressed a broad 
range of energy technologies, this hearing focused specifically 
on the efficiency and effectiveness of federal incentives for 
onshore and offshore wind technology.

               May 16, 2013_Espionage Threats at Federal

             Laboratories: Balancing Scientific Cooperation

                 while Protecting Critical Information

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-28)

    On Thursday, May 16, 2013, the Subcommittee on Oversight 
held a hearing to understand how federally-owned-or -operated 
laboratories balance scientific openness and international 
cooperation with the need to protect sensitive information from 
espionage, specifically focusing on identifying potential 
deficiencies, best practices, and to ensure sensible federal 
policies.
    The Subcommittee heard testimony from Dr. Charles M. Vest, 
President of the National Academy of Engineering; Dr. Larry 
Wortzel, Commissioner of the U.S.-China Economic and Security 
Review Commission; Hon. Michelle Van Cleave, Senior Fellow at 
the Homeland Security Policy Institute at the George Washington 
University; and Mr. David G. Major, Founder and President of 
The Centre for Counterintelligence and Security Studies.

              June 27, 2013_Green Buildings-An Evaluation

                of Energy Savings Performance Contracts

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-39)

    On Thursday, June 27, 2013, the Subcommittees on Oversight 
and Energy held a hearing to evaluate the benefits and 
shortfalls of Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs). 
Federal agencies, such as the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration (NASA) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), 
engage in ESPCs with energy service companies (ESCOs) in order 
to achieve energy efficiency improvements at government-owned 
facilities. The hearing also explored how frequently labs, 
centers and other facilities in the Committee's jurisdiction 
use these contracts, to better understand their advantages and 
limitations.
    The Subcommittee heard testimony from Dr. Kathleen Hogan, 
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency, U.S. 
Department of Energy; Dr. Woodrow Whitlow, Jr., Associate 
Administrator, Mission Support Directorate, National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration; Ms. Jennifer Schafer, 
Executive Director, Federal Performance Contracting Coalition; 
Mr. Ron King, President Advisor, National Insulation 
Association.

               August 1, 2013_EPA's Bristol Bay Watershed

                    Assessment- A Factual Review of

                        a Hypothetical Scenario

                      (Hearing Volume No. 112-46)

    On Thursday, August 1, 2013, the Subcommittee on Oversight 
held a hearing to review the U.S. Environmental Protection 
Agency's (EPA) draft Bristol Bay watershed assessment (BBWA) 
titled, ``An Assessment of Potential Mining Impacts on Salmon 
Ecosystems of Bristol Bay, Alaska.'' According to the EPA, its 
focus relative to this document is on a ``timely completion of 
a robust and technically sound scientific Assessment.'' The 
Committee will review the EPA's timing and rationale for 
conducting the draft watershed assessment.
    The Subcommittee heard testimony from Mr. Lowell 
Rothschild, Senior Counsel, Bracewell & Giuliani LLP; Dr. 
Michael Kavanaugh, Senior Principal, Geosyntec Consultants, and 
Member, National Academy of Engineering; Mr. Wayne Nastri, Co-
president, E4 Strategic Solutions, and Former Regional 
Administrator, USEPA Region 9; and Mr. Daniel McGroarty, 
President, American Resources Policy Network.

              September 19, 2013_Dysfunction in Management

                   of Weather and Climate Satellites

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-49)

    On Thursday, September 19, 2013, the Subcommittees on 
Oversight and Environment held a hearing to conduct on-going 
oversight of the nation's weather and climate satellite 
programs. The U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) has 
identified a high probability in degraded weather satellite 
coverage starting as early as next year, and has designated 
this data gap as a new high-risk area in a report earlier this 
year. Given this potential gap in weather satellite coverage, 
the hearing addressed questions about the Administration's 
priorities in funding weather satellites and research as 
compared to climate change-monitoring satellites and research.
    The Subcommittees heard testimony from Mr. David Powner, 
Director, Information Technology Management Issues, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office; Ms. Mary Kicza, Assistant 
Administrator, Satellite and Information Services, National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); and Mr. Marcus 
Watkins, Director, Joint Agency Satellite Division, National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

                        SUBCOMMITTEE ON RESEARCH

  Oversight, Investigation, and Other Activities, Including Selective 
                         Legislative Activities

             February 14, 2013_Applications for Information

                   Technology Research & Development

                       (Hearing Volume No. 113-4)

    On Thursday, February 14, 2013, the Subcommittee on 
Research held a hearing showing the practical applications and 
benefits of the Networking and Information Technology Research 
and Development (NITRD) program and its significance to U.S. 
competitiveness.
    Federal support for research and development (R&D) in NIT 
originally stemmed from an interest in and the challenge of 
developing computers capable of addressing complex problems, 
primarily those focused on national security and hi-end 
applications. Over the past decades, however, federal spending 
for NIT R&D has encompassed a broad array of technologies, from 
digital libraries to cloud computing. Additionally, R&D in NIT 
provides a greater understanding of how to protect essential 
systems and networks that support fundamental sectors of our 
economy, from emergency communications and power grids to air-
traffic control networks and national defense systems. NIT R&D 
works to prevent or minimize disruptions to critical 
information infrastructure, to protect public and private 
services, to detect and respond to threats while mitigating the 
severity of and assisting in the recovery from those threats, 
in an effort to support a more stable and secure nation.
    The Subcommittee heard testimony from Dr. Kelly Gaither, 
Director, Visualization Lab, Texas Advanced Computing Center, 
University of Texas, Austin; Dr. Kathryn McKinley, Principal 
Researcher, Microsoft; and Dr. Ed Lazowska, Bill and Melinda 
Gates Chair in Computer Science and Engineering, University of 
Washington.

              February 26, 2013_Cybersecurity Research and

                 Development: Challenges and Solutions

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                       (Hearing Volume No. 113-6)

    On Tuesday, February 26, 2013, the Subcommittee on 
Technology and Subcommittee on Research held a joint hearing 
examining cybersecurity research and development activities, 
including standards development and education and workforce 
training, and how they align with current and emerging threats. 
The hearing also reviewed the Cybersecurity Enhancement Act of 
2013 (H.R. 756) which reauthorizes cybersecurity programs at 
the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and 
the National Science Foundation (NSF).
    The Subcommittees heard testimony from Mr. Michael Barrett, 
Chief Information Security Officer, PayPal Inc.; Dr. Fred 
Chang, President and Chief Operating Officer, 21CT; Ms. Terry 
Benzel, Deputy Director, Cyber Networks and Cyber Security, 
University of Southern California Information Sciences 
Institute.

          March 5, 2013_Scientific Integrity and Transparency

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-10)

    At 10 a.m. on Tuesday, March 5, 2013, the Subcommittee on 
Research held a hearing titled Scientific Integrity and 
Transparency. This hearing provided Members an opportunity to 
understand the problem of access to underlying data from 
published research funded by the federal government, and why 
access to this underlying data is vital to scientific integrity 
and transparency for peer reviewed research. On March 29th, 
2012 the Investigation and Oversight Subcommittee held a 
hearing entitled Federally Funded Research: Examining Public 
Access and Scholarly Publication Interests. The focus of this 
past hearing was on open access to publications, whereas the 
focus of this hearing was on open access to data used in 
federal research
    The Subcommittee heard testimony from Prof. Bruce Alberts, 
Professor of Biochemistry, University of California San 
Francisco; Prof. Victoria Stodden, Assistant Professor of 
Statistics, Columbia University; Dr. Stanley Young, Assistant 
Director for Bioinformatics, National Institute of Statistical 
Sciences; and Mr. Sayeed Choudhury, Associate Dean for Research 
Data Management at Johns Hopkins University and Hodson Director 
of the Digital Research and Curation Center.

                     March 13, 2013_STEM Education:

                 Industry and Philanthropic Initiatives

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-11)

    On Wednesday, March 13, 2013, the Subcommittee on Research 
held a hearing on industry and non-profit philanthropic 
science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) 
education initiatives. With an eye to COMPETES Act 
reauthorization of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and 
STEM education programs across federal research agencies, this 
hearing reviewed industry and philanthropic STEM education 
initiatives to ensure there is no duplication of efforts and 
proper leveraging with federal, industry, and philanthropic 
STEM education initiatives.
    The Members of the Subcommittee heard testimony from Ms. 
Shelly Esque, President, Intel Foundation, Vice President, 
Legal and Corporate Affairs, and Director, Corporate Affairs 
Group, Intel Corporation; Dr. Bob Smith, Vice President and 
Chief Technology Officer, Engineering and Technology, Honeywell 
Aerospace; Dr. Vince Bertram, President and Chief Executive 
Officer, Project Lead the Way; and Ms. Andrea Ingram, Vice 
President of Education and Guest Services, Museum of Science 
and Industry

           April 17, 2013_An Overview of the National Science

                 Foundation Budget for Fiscal Year 2014

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-20)

    On Wednesday, April 17, 2013, the Subcommittee on Research 
reviewed the Administration's fiscal year 2014 (FY14) budget 
request for the National Science Foundation. This hearing 
discussed how the Administration set funding priorities for NSF 
research in its FY 2014 budget request and the proposal to 
consolidate more Science, Technology, Engineering, and 
Mathematics (STEM) education within NSF, the Department of 
Education, and the Smithsonian Institute from other federal 
science agencies.
    The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent 
federal agency created by Congress in 1950 ``to promote the 
progress of science; to advance the national health, 
prosperity, and welfare; to secure the national defense.'' With 
a budget request of $7.626 billion for FY 2014, 8.4% or $593 
million over FY 2012 enacted, the NSF is the funding source for 
over 20 percent of all federally-supported basic research 
conducted at almost 1,900 American colleges, universities, and 
other research institutions. The NSF has supported the research 
of over 200 Nobel Laureates, including ten Nobel prize winners 
named in 2012. For over 60 years, NSF investments in 
fundamental research have fueled scientific, technological, and 
engineering innovations that directly affect the everyday lives 
of Americans.
    The Subcommittee heard testimony from The Honorable Dr. 
Cora Marrett, Acting Director, National Science Foundation and 
the Honorable Dr. Dan Arvizu, Chairman, National Science Board.

                April 24, 2013_Next Generation Computing

                         and Big Data Analytics

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-22)

    On Wednesday, April 24, 2013, the House Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology's Research and Technology 
Subcommittees examined how advancements in information 
technology and data analytics enable private and public sector 
organizations to utilize mass volumes of data to provide 
greater value to their customers and citizens, spurring new 
product and service innovations. The hearing focused on 
innovative data analytics capabilities, research and 
development efforts, management challenges, and workforce 
development issues associated with the ``Big Data'' phenomenon.
    The Subcommittees heard testimony from Dr. David McQueeney, 
Vice President, Technical Strategy and Worldwide Operations, 
IBM Research; Dr. Michael Rappa, Executive Director of the 
Institute for Advanced Analytics, Distinguished University 
Professor, North Carolina State University; and Dr. Farnam 
Jahanian, Assistant Director for the Computer and Information 
Science and Engineering (CISE) Directorate, National Science 
Foundation (NSF).

                   May 9, 2013_Exoplanet Discoveries:

                      Have We Found Other Earths?

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-27)

    On Thursday, May 9, the Subcommittees on Space and Research 
held a joint hearing titled ``Exoplanet Discoveries: Have We 
Found Other Earths?'' The purpose of the hearing was to review 
the recent discovery of three super-Earth sized planets by the 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Kepler 
space telescope. The hearing also assessed the state of 
exoplanet surveying, characterization, and research; NASA's 
Exoplanet Exploration Program; National Science Foundation's 
(NSF) Division of Astronomical Science; as well as coordination 
within the government and with external partners. NASA and NSF 
both contribute to the search for exoplanets. NASA provides 
space-based telescopes to identify potential planets, while NSF 
builds ground-based telescopes. Both agencies fund research 
that assists in categorizing and characterizing candidate 
planets.

            May 21, 2013_The Current and Future Applications

                       of Biometric Technologies

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-29)

    On Tuesday, May 21, 2013, the Subcommittees on Research and 
Technology held a hearing examining the potential benefits 
biometric technologies can provide the American people, while 
also considering the potential policy implications of biometric 
implementation. Specifically, the hearing will explore the 
current state of biometric technologies and future applications 
that may transform the lives of Americans-while determining the 
challenges of implementing biometric technologies. The 
Subcommittees heard testimony from Dr. Charles H. Romine, 
Director, Information Technology Laboratory, National Institute 
of Standards and Technology; Mr. John Mears, Board Member, 
International Biometrics and Identification Association; and 
Dr. Stephanie Schuckers, Director, Center for Identification 
Technology Research.

                 June 5, 2013_Federal Efforts to Reduce

                       the Impacts of Windstorms

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-34)

    On Wednesday, June 5, 2013, the Subcommittees on Research 
and Technology held a hearing examining the current role of 
research and development in mitigating the damaging effects of 
windstorms across the Nation and the methods of transferring 
the results of research into practice for stakeholders 
including building code developers, builders, and property 
owners. The hearing reviewed the activities of the National 
Windstorm Impact Reduction Program (NWIRP), a multi-agency 
program between the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology (NIST), the Federal Emergency Management Agency 
(FEMA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 
(NOAA), and the National Science Foundation (NSF). The hearing 
also reviewed a bill to re-authorize this program-H.R. 1786, 
The National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act Reauthorization of 
2013, sponsored by Rep. Randy Neugebauer.
    The Subcommittees heard testimony from Dr. Ernst Kiesling, 
Research Faculty, National Wind Institute, Texas Tech 
University; Ms. Debra Ballen, General Counsel and Senior Vice 
President, Public Policy, Insurance Institute for Business & 
Home Safety; and Dr. David Prevatt, Assistant Professor, 
Department of Civil and Coastal Engineering, University of 
Florida.

                SUBCOMMITTEE ON RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY

  Oversight, Investigation, and Other Activities, Including Selective 
                         Legislative Activities

             June 28, 2013_Subcommittee Markup, H.R. 1786,

     the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act Authorization of 
                                  2013

    On Friday, June 28, 2013, the Subcommittee met to consider 
H.R. 1786, the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act 
Authorization of 2013. The Subcommittee ordered H.R. 1786 
favorably reported to the Full Committee, as amended, by voice 
vote.

                  July 10, 2013_Strategic Planning for

                 Federal Manufacturing Competitiveness

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-40)

    On Wednesday, July 10, the Subcommittee on Research and 
Technology will held a legislative hearing on the need for 
strategic planning for national manufacturing competitiveness. 
The hearing focused specifically on H.R. 2447, the ``American 
Manufacturing Competitiveness Act,'' sponsored by Rep. Dan 
Lipinski. The legislation modifies an existing report required 
by the America COMPETES Reauthorization of 2010 by directing 
the National Science and Technology Council's Committee on 
Technology to lead other agencies and stakeholders in 
developing a national manufacturing competitiveness strategy 
every four years. The strategy would aim to advance policies, 
such as streamlining certain government regulations and 
assisting with the transfer of federally-funded research and 
development into new products and jobs. It would require the 
NSTC to include a strategic plan to improve government 
coordination and provide long-term guidance for Federal 
programs and activities in support of manufacturing 
competitiveness, including advanced manufacturing research and 
development. The witnesses were asked to provide comments and 
recommendations on H.R. 2447--allowing Committee Members to 
assess the potential benefits and challenges of a national 
manufacturing competitiveness strategy as outlined in the 
legislation.
    The Subcommittee heard testimony from Dr. Jonathan Rich, 
Chairman and CEO, Berry Plastics, Inc.; Ms. Deborah Wince-
Smith, President and CEO, Council on Competitiveness; and Mr. 
Zach Mottl, Chief Alignment Officer, Atlas Tool and Die Works, 
Inc.

                   July 24, 2013_Improving Technology

                   Transfer at Universities, Research

                  Institutes and National Laboratories

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-43)

    On Wednesday, July 24, the Subcommittee on Research and 
Technology held a legislative hearing on innovative approaches 
to technology transfer at universities, research institutes, 
and national laboratories, and on potential improvements to the 
Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program. The hearing 
focused specifically on a discussion draft of legislation, 
titled the ``Innovative Approaches to Technology Transfer Act 
of 2013.'' The legislation would dedicate a portion of STTR 
funding to establish a program that awards grants for 
innovative technology transfer programs at universities, 
research institutes, and national laboratories with the goal of 
improving technology transfer.
    The Subcommittee heard testimony from Dr. Brian Wamhoff, 
Vice President of Research & Development and Co-founder, 
HemoShear, LLC; Dr. Elizabeth Hart-Wells, Assistant Vice 
President for Research and Associate Director of the Burton D. 
Morgan Center for Entrepreneurship, Purdue University; and Dr. 
Erik Lium, Assistant Vice Chancellor, Office of Innovation, 
Technology & Alliances, University of California, San 
Francisco.

                     July 31, 2013_The Frontiers of

                          Human Brain Research

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-45)

    On Wednesday, July 31, 2013, the Subcommittee on Research 
and Technology held a hearing to understand the frontiers and 
challenges of brain science research, including its potential 
and limitations for curing brain diseases and rehabilitating 
those with brain-related injuries and disorders. The hearing 
also aimed to understand any policy implications from this 
research, including any implications for the America COMPETES 
reauthorization.
    The Subcommittee heard testimony from Dr. Story Landis, 
Director, National Institute for Neurological Disorders and 
Stroke (NINDS), National Institutes of Health (NIH); Michael 
McLouglin, Deputy Business Area Executive Research and 
Exploratory Development, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns 
Hopkins University; Dr. Marcus Raichle, Professor of Radiology, 
Neurology, Neurobiology and Biomedical Engineering, Washington 
University in St Louis; and Dr. Gene Robinson, Professor in 
Entomology and Neuroscience and Director of the Institute for 
Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 
Additionally, U.S. Air Force Master Sergeant Joseph Deslauriers 
Jr. provided personal commentary on how the technologies 
developed at Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics 
Laboratory have impacted his life. He has been fitted with 
neuro-prosthetic that allows him to control his arm, hands and 
legs with just his own thoughts and provided a demonstration of 
the technology.

                  September 10, 2013_Examining Federal

                    Advanced Manufacturing Programs

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-47)

    On Tuesday, September 10, the Subcommittee on Research and 
Technology held a hearing to examine federal advanced 
manufacturing programs, with a focus on research and 
development programs at the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology, and reviewing H.R. 1421, the ``Advancing Innovative 
Manufacturing Act of 2013'' sponsored by Committee Ranking 
Member Eddie Bernice Johnson.

             September 18, 2013_Methamphetamine Addiction:

                   Using Science to Explore Solutions

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-48)

    On Wednesday, September 18th, the Research and Technology 
Subcommittee held a hearing to understand the methamphetamine 
(commonly known as ``meth'') addiction problem, and how science 
can inform and provide possible solutions. Witnesses gave a 
general background to this growing problem, and then discussed 
the latest research on meth addiction including prospective 
technologies to prevent large-scale unauthorized purchases of 
pseudoephedrine (PSE). They also discussed the latest social 
science research to inform both prevention and treatment for 
meth addiction. The Science, Space, and Technology Committee 
has a legislative and hearing record over several Congresses on 
this problem, resulting in the Methamphetamine Remediation 
Research Act of 2007 (P.L. 110-143).

                November 13, 2013_Keeping America FIRST:

                    Federal Investments in Research,

                 Science, and Technology at NSF, NIST,

                   OSTP and Interagency STEM Programs

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-53)

    On November 13, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., the Research and 
Technology Subcommittee held a hearing to examine the 
fundamental science and research activities at the National 
Science Foundation (NSF), National Institutes for Standards and 
Technology (NIST), and the Office of Science and Technology 
Policy (OSTP). The coordination of Science, Technology, 
Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education programs across 
several federal agencies was also examined during this hearing. 
Witnesses were asked to testify on their perspectives about a 
discussion draft of legislation entitled the Frontiers in 
Innovative Research, Science, and Technology (or FIRST) Act.
    The Subcommittee heard testimony from: Dr. Richard Buckius, 
Vice President for Research at Purdue University; Dr. Daniel 
Sarewitz, Co-Director of the Consortium for Science, Policy & 
Outcomes and Professor of Science and Society at Arizona State 
University; Dr. Timothy Killeen, President of The Research 
Foundation for SUNY and Vice Chancellor for Research at SUNY 
System Administration; and Mr. James Brown, Executive Director 
of the STEM Education Coalition.

                     December 12, 2013_Network for

                    Manufacturing Innovation Program

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-59)

    On Thursday, December 12, the Subcommittee on Research and 
Technology held a hearing to examine the need for a 
manufacturing innovation network and to review H.R. 2996, the 
"Revitalize American Manufacturing and Innovation Act of 2013," 
sponsored by Representatives Tom Reed (R-NY) and Joe Kennedy 
(D-MA). The Subcommittee heard testimony from two witness 
panels. In the first panel, Rep. Reed and Rep. Kennedy 
discussed their intentions in sponsoring H.R. 2996. The second 
panel consisted of four witnesses: Mr. Jonathan Davis, Global 
Vice President of Advocacy, SEMI; Dr. Richard A. Aubrecht, Vice 
Chairman of the Board, Vice President, Strategy & Technology, 
Moog Inc.; Dr. Stephan Biller, Chief Scientist Manufacturing 
Technology, GE Global Research; Dr. Stan A. Veuger, Resident 
Scholar, American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy 
Research. The witnesses discussed Federal support for American 
manufacturing, and in particular the anticipated impact of H.R. 
2996 on American manufacturing.

                 SUBCOMMITTEE ON SPACE AND AERONAUTICS

  Oversight, Investigation, and Other Activities, Including Selected 
                         Legislative Activities

    February 27, 2013_A Review of The Space Leadership Preservation 
                                  Act

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-008)

    At 10:00 a.m. on February 28, 2013, the Subcommittee on 
Space held a hearing titled ``A Review of the Space Leadership 
Preservation Act'' to receive testimony on legislation (H.R. 
6491) first introduced in the last Congress and re-introduced 
for the 113th Congress. This hearing informed the Science, 
Space, and Technology Committee's consideration of the 
policies, organization, programs, and budget in re-authorizing 
the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in this 
Congress.
    The Subcommittee heard testimony from The Honorable Frank 
R. Wolf, Chairman of the Commerce-Justice-Science Subcommittee, 
The Honorable John Culberson, Mr. A Thomas Young, Chair of the 
Board for SAIC (testifying on his own behalf), and Mr. Elliot 
Pulham, Chief Executive Officer of The Space Foundation.

               April 24, 2013_An Overview of the National

                  Aeronautics and Space Administration

                       Budget for Fiscal Year 2014

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-023)

    On April 24, 2014, the Subcommittee on Space held a hearing 
with NASA Administrator Charles Bolden to review the 
Administration's FY 2014 budget request for the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration and examine its priorities 
and challenges.

                   May 9, 2013_Exoplanet Discoveries:

                      Have We Found Other Earths?

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-27)

    On Thursday, May 9, the Subcommittees on Space and Research 
held a joint hearing titled ``Exoplanet Discoveries: Have We 
Found Other Earths?'' The purpose of the hearing was to review 
the recent discovery of three super-Earth sized planets by the 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Kepler 
space telescope. The hearing also assessed the state of 
exoplanet surveying, characterization, and research; NASA's 
Exoplanet Exploration Program; National Science Foundation's 
(NSF) Division of Astronomical Science; as well as coordination 
within the government and with external partners. NASA and NSF 
both contribute to the search for exoplanets. NASA provides 
space-based telescopes to identify potential planets, while NSF 
builds ground-based telescopes. Both agencies fund research 
that assists in categorizing and characterizing candidate 
planets.

                       May 21, 2013_Next Steps in

                  Human Exploration to Mars and Beyond

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-30)

    On May 21, 2013, the Subcommittee on Space held a hearing 
titled, ``Next Steps in Human Exploration to Mars and Beyond.'' 
The purpose of this hearing was to examine possible options for 
the next steps in human space flight and how these options move 
the United States closer to a human mission to Mars and beyond. 
In particular, the Committee explored whether the 
Administration's proposed asteroid rendezvous mission is a 
better precursor for an eventual manned mission to Mars 
compared to Apollo-like follow-on missions to return to the 
Moon.

              June 19, 2013_NASA Authorization Act of 2013

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-37)

    On June 19, 2013, the Subcommittee on Space held a hearing 
titled, ``NASA Authorization Act of 2013.'' The purpose of the 
hearing was to review a discussion draft of the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Authorization Act 
of 2013. The most recent NASA Authorization Act, passed in 
2010, authorized NASA for three years. As the expiration of 
that authorization nears, the Committee will consider the 
priorities, funding levels, and authorities granted to NASA 
contained in the draft legislation.

          July 10, 2013_Subcommittee Markup, Committee Print,

               H.R. , The National Aeronautics and Space

                Administration Authorization Act of 2013

    On Wednesday, July 10, 2013, the Subcommittee met to 
consider the Committee Print to The National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration Authorization Act of 2013. The 
Subcommittee ordered the Committee Print be favorably reported 
to the Full Committee by a vote of Y-11, N-9.

                September 20, 2013_NASA Infrastructure:

               Enabling Discovery and Ensuring Capability

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-50)

    On Friday, September 20th, the Space Subcommittee held a 
hearing to review NASA's efforts to manage its facilities and 
infrastructure, the agency's current legislated authorities, 
and its proposed legislation to provide greater flexibility to 
the agency. NASA is the ninth largest Federal Government real 
property holder; however, nearly 80 percent of the agency's 
facilities are 40 or more years old. A 2012 study by NASA 
estimated that NASA may have as many as 865 unneeded 
facilities, with maintenance costs of over $24 million a year. 
Similarly, NASA has a backlog of over $2.19 billion in deferred 
maintenance. The NASA Office of the Inspector General (OIG), 
the Government Accountability Office (GAO), the National 
Academies, and Congress have repeatedly highlighted the need to 
address NASA's aging infrastructure. During this hearing, 
NASA's Associate Deputy Administrator and Inspector General 
discussed infrastructure maintenance across the agency as a 
whole, as well as site-specific infrastructure issues that are 
currently facing NASA.

                   November 20, 2013_Commercial Space

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-56)

    At 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, November 20, 2013, the 
Subcommittee on Space held a hearing titled ``Commercial 
Space.'' The hearing examined ways in which companies are 
utilizing federal support and government policies to grow their 
commercial businesses in space launch, communications, GPS, 
remote sensing, weather monitoring, suborbital tourism and 
science experimentation, and human spaceflight. The witnesses 
also addressed what government policies would be helpful to 
U.S. commercial space industry. Witnesses also addressed the 
policies contained in H.R. 3038, the Suborbital and Orbital 
Advancement and Regulatory Streamlining (SOARS) Act.
    The first witness panel consisted of the Honorable Kevin 
McCarthy, Majority Whip of the U.S. House of Representatives. 
The second panel consisted of: Ms. Patricia Cooper, President 
of the Satellite Industry Association; Mr. Stuart Witt, CEO and 
General Manager of the Mojave Air and Space Port; and Dennis 
Tito, Chairman of the Inspiration Mars Foundation.

                       SUBCOMMITTEE ON TECHNOLOGY

  Oversight, Investigation, and Other Activities, Including Selective 
                         Legislative Activities

                February 26, 2013_Cybersecurity Research

               and Development: Challenges and Solutions

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                       (Hearing Volume No. 113-6)

    On Tuesday, February 26, 2013, the Subcommittee on 
Technology and Subcommittee on Research held a joint hearing 
examining cybersecurity research and development activities, 
including standards development and education and workforce 
training, and how they align with current and emerging threats. 
The hearing also reviewed the Cybersecurity Enhancement Act of 
2013 (H.R. 756) which reauthorizes cybersecurity programs at 
the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and 
the National Science Foundation (NSF).

                      March 20, 2013_Examining the

                   Effectiveness of NIST Laboratories

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-16)

    On Wednesday, March 20, 2013, the Subcommittee on 
Technology held a hearing examining how the work conducted at 
National Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST) 
laboratories is aligned with the promotion of American 
innovation and industrial competitiveness. The work of the 
laboratories supports industries such as healthcare, 
information technology, manufacturing, and construction. In 
addition, witnesses have been asked to address how the NIST 
labs: prioritize project decisions; measure success and set 
metrics; and work with industry and academic customers. The 
hearing also solicited recommendations on improving laboratory 
effectiveness as the Committee considers reauthorizing NIST and 
its labs.
    Members heard testimony from Dr. Willie E. May, Associate 
Director for Laboratory Programs, National Institute of 
Standards and Technology and Dr. Ross B. Corotis, Denver 
Business Challenge Professor, University of Colorado at 
Boulder; Member, Laboratory Assessments Board, National 
Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences.

           April 18, 2013_An Overview of the Fiscal Year 2014

              Budget Proposal at the National Institute of

                    Standards and Technology (NIST)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-21)

    On Thursday, April 18, 2013, the Subcommittee on Technology 
held a hearing examining the Administration's proposed fiscal 
year 2014 (FY14) budget request for the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology (NIST). NIST is a non-regulatory 
agency within the Department of Commerce. Originally founded in 
1901 as the National Bureau of Standards, NIST's mission is to 
promote U.S. innovation and industrial competitiveness by 
advancing measurement science, standards, and technology in 
ways that enhance economic security and improve our quality of 
life. By working closely alongside industry, NIST has become 
recognized as a provider of high-quality information utilized 
by the private sector.
    The Subcommittee heard testimony from Dr. Patrick 
Gallagher, Under Secretary of Commerce for Standards and 
Technology and Director, National Institute of Standards and 
Technology.
<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>


                April 24, 2013_Next Generation Computing

                         and Big Data Analytics

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-22)

    On Wednesday, April 24, 2013, the House Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology's Research and Technology 
Subcommittees examined how advancements in information 
technology and data analytics enable private and public sector 
organizations to utilize mass volumes of data to provide 
greater value to their customers and citizens, spurring new 
product and service innovations. The hearing focused on 
innovative data analytics capabilities, research and 
development efforts, management challenges, and workforce 
development issues associated with the ``Big Data'' phenomenon.
    The Subcommittees heard testimony from Dr. David McQueeney, 
Vice President, Technical Strategy and Worldwide Operations, 
IBM Research; Dr. Michael Rappa, Executive Director of the 
Institute for Advanced Analytics, Distinguished University 
Professor, North Carolina State University; and Dr. Farnam 
Jahanian, Assistant Director for the Computer and Information 
Science and Engineering (CISE) Directorate, National Science 
Foundation (NSF).

            May 21, 2013_The Current and Future Applications

                       of Biometric Technologies

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-29)

    On Tuesday, May 21, 2013, the Subcommittees on Research and 
Technology held a hearing examining the potential benefits 
biometric technologies can provide the American people, while 
also considering the potential policy implications of biometric 
implementation. Specifically, the hearing will explore the 
current state of biometric technologies and future applications 
that may transform the lives of Americans-while determining the 
challenges of implementing biometric technologies. The 
Subcommittees heard testimony from Dr. Charles H. Romine, 
Director, Information Technology Laboratory, National Institute 
of Standards and Technology; Mr. John Mears, Board Member, 
International Biometrics and Identification Association; and 
Dr. Stephanie Schuckers, Director, Center for Identification 
Technology Research.

         June 5, 2013_Federal Efforts to Reduce the Impacts of 
                               Windstorms

                      (JOINT SUBCOMMITTEE HEARING)

                      (Hearing Volume No. 113-34)

    On Wednesday, June 5, 2013, the Subcommittees on Research 
and Technology held a hearing examining the current role of 
research and development in mitigating the damaging effects of 
windstorms across the Nation and the methods of transferring 
the results of research into practice for stakeholders 
including building code developers, builders, and property 
owners. The hearing reviewed the activities of the National 
Windstorm Impact Reduction Program (NWIRP), a multi-agency 
program between the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology (NIST), the Federal Emergency Management Agency 
(FEMA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 
(NOAA), and the National Science Foundation (NSF). The hearing 
also reviewed a bill to re-authorize this program-H.R. 1786, 
The National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act Reauthorization of 
2013, sponsored by Rep. Randy Neugebauer.
    The Subcommittees heard testimony from Dr. Ernst Kiesling, 
Research Faculty, National Wind Institute, Texas Tech 
University; Ms. Debra Ballen, General Counsel and Senior Vice 
President, Public Policy, Insurance Institute for Business & 
Home Safety; and Dr. David Prevatt, Assistant Professor, 
Department of Civil and Coastal Engineering, University of 
Florida.
                             Oversight Plan

                              ----------                              





<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>

                     U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY

                 OVERSIGHT PLAN FOR THE 113th CONGRESS

                    (INCLUDING ACCOMPLISHMENTS AS OF

                           DECEMBER 15, 2013)

    House Rule X sets the Committee's legislative jurisdiction while 
also assigning broad general oversight responsibilities (Appendix A). 
Rule X also assigns the Committee special oversight responsibility for 
``reviewing and studying, on a continuing basis, all laws, programs, 
and Government activities dealing with or involving non-military 
research and development.'' The Committee appreciates the special 
function entrusted to it and will continue to tackle troubled programs 
and search for waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement in non-military 
research and development programs regardless of where they may be 
found.
    Much of the oversight work of the Committee is carried out by and 
through the Oversight Subcommittee. However, oversight is conducted by 
every Subcommittee and the full Committee. All components of the 
Committee take their oversight charge seriously, and those components 
have worked cooperatively in the past, as they will in the future, to 
meet our oversight responsibilities.
    The Committee also routinely works with the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) and the Inspectors General (IG) of our 
agencies to maintain detailed awareness of the work of those offices. 
The Committee currently has numerous outstanding requests with the GAO 
and more will be developed in the coming weeks and months. Many of 
these requests are bipartisan, having been signed by both the Chairmen 
and Ranking Members of our Committee and Subcommittees, or include 
multiple Committee Chairmen where there are shared interests. The 
Committee also works collaboratively with the National Academies of 
Science, the Congressional Research Service, the Office of Government 
Ethics, and the Office of Special Counsel, as well as various other 
independent investigative and oversight entities.
    Oversight is commonly driven by emerging events. The Committee will 
address burgeoning issues and topics as they transpire. Nevertheless, 
the Committee feels that the work contained in this plan reflects an 
accurate portrayal of its oversight intentions as of January, 2013.

                                 Space


National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) human spaceflight

program

    The Committee will continue to provide oversight of NASA's human 
spaceflight program as it undergoes a period of uncertainty and 
transition following various Administration proposals. Specific 
attention will be paid to the feasibility of NASA's plans and 
priorities relative to their resources and requirements.

          Space Subcommittee Hearing
          An Overview of the National Aeronautics and
          Space Administration Budget for Fiscal Year 2014
          April 24, 2013

          Space Subcommittee Hearing
          Next Steps in Human Exploration to Mars and Beyond
          May 21, 2013

          Space Subcommittee Hearing
          NASA Authorization Act of 2013
          June 19, 2013

          Space Subcommittee Hearing
          A Review of The Space Leadership Preservation Act
          February 27, 2013

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Commercial Space Transportation

    FAA's Office of Commercial Space Transportation (OCST) licenses 
commercial launch vehicles. An area of increasing interest is the 
emergence of a number of fledgling commercial human suborbital space 
flight ventures. In addition to its oversight of the FAA's OCST, the 
Committee will examine the progress of the emerging personal space 
flight industry, as well as the challenges it faces.

          Space Subcommittee Hearing
          A Review of The Space Leadership Preservation Act
          February 27, 2013

          Space Subcommittee Hearing
          Commercial Space
          November 20, 2013

NASA Space Science

    The Committee will monitor NASA's efforts to prioritize, plan, 
launch, and operate space science missions within cost and schedule. 
Particular attention will be paid to programs that exceed cost 
estimates to ensure they do not adversely impact the development and 
launch of other missions.

          Space Subcommittee Hearing
          An Overview of the National Aeronautics and Space 
        Administration Budget for Fiscal Year 2014
          April 24, 2013

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Space & Research
          Exoplanet Discoveries: Have We Found Other Earths?
          May 9, 2013

          Space Subcommittee Hearing
          Next Steps in Human Exploration to Mars and Beyond
          May 21, 2013

          Space Subcommittee Hearing
          NASA Infrastructure: Enabling Discovery and Ensuring 
        Capability
          September 20, 2013

          Full Committee Hearing
          Astrobiology: Search for Biosignatures in our Solar System 
        and Beyond
          December 4. 2013

FAA Research and Development (R&D) activities

    The Committee will oversee the R&D activities at the FAA to ensure 
that they lead to improvements in FAA mission performance. The 
Committee has a particular interest in the performance of the Joint 
Planning and Development Office (JPDO), and FAA's management of its 
Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) program.

          Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          Operating Unmanned Aircraft Systems in the National Airspace 
        System:
          Assessing Research and Development Efforts to Ensure Safety
          February 15, 2013

          Space Subcommittee Hearing
          Commercial Space
          November 20, 2013

Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS)

    The Committee will evaluate the ability, cost, safety, and 
reliability of commercial providers to meet NASA requirements to 
deliver cargo and crew to the ISS.

          Space Subcommittee Hearing
          A Review of The Space Leadership Preservation Act
          February 27, 2013

          Space Subcommittee Hearing
          An Overview of the National Aeronautics and
          Space Administration Budget for Fiscal Year 2014
          April 24, 2013

          Space Subcommittee Hearing
          NASA Infrastructure: Enabling Discovery and Ensuring 
        Capability
          September 20, 2013

          Space Subcommittee Hearing
          Commercial Space
          November 20, 2013

International Space Station (ISS) utilization and operation

    The plans for operation and utilization of the ISS will continue to 
draw the Committee's attention as NASA attempts to fully utilize the 
unique research opportunities that the facility offers, while 
exclusively relying on logistical services from commercial and foreign 
providers. Given the significant national investment to date in the 
facility, Congress has directed that NASA maintain a strong research 
and technology program to take advantage of ISS's unique capabilities.

          Space Subcommittee Hearing
          A Review of The Space Leadership Preservation Act
          February 27, 2013

          Space Subcommittee Hearing
          An Overview of the National Aeronautics and Space 
        Administration Budget for Fiscal Year 2014
          April 24, 2013

          Space Subcommittee Hearing
          NASA Infrastructure: Enabling Discovery and Ensuring 
        Capability
          September 20, 2013

          Space Subcommittee Hearing
          Commercial Space
          November 20, 2013

Aeronautics Research

    An important area for oversight will be NASA's aeronautics research 
and development program. The Committee plans to examine NASA's ability 
to support the interagency effort to modernize the nation's air traffic 
management system, as well as its ability to undertake important long-
term R&D on aircraft safety, emissions, noise, and energy consumption - 
R&D that will have a significant impact on the quality of life and U.S. 
competitiveness in aviation.

          Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          Operating Unmanned Aircraft Systems in the National Airspace 
        System:
          Assessing Research and Development Efforts to Ensure Safety
          February 15, 2013

          Space Subcommittee Hearing
          NASA Infrastructure: Enabling Discovery and Ensuring 
        Capability
          September 20, 2013

NASA contract and financial management

    A perennial topic on GAO's high risk series, NASA financial 
management will continue to receive attention from the Committee. The 
Committee will also monitor NASA's contract management to ensure 
acquisitions are handled appropriately.

          Space Subcommittee Hearing
          An Overview of the National Aeronautics and
          Space Administration Budget for Fiscal Year 2014
          April 24, 2013

Near Earth Objects

    Congress provided guidance to NASA relating to Near Earth Objects 
in its last two authorization bills. The Committee will continue to 
monitor NASA's compliance with that direction, as well as determine 
whether additional oversight is necessary.
    Within the Space and Aeronautics Subcommittee's jurisdiction, 
activities warranting further review include costs associated with 
cancellation of the Constellation program, NASA's approach to develop 
and fund a successor to the Space Shuttle, and investment in NASA 
launch infrastructure. NASA has not clearly articulated what types of 
future human space flight missions it wishes to pursue, or their 
rationale.

          Full Committee Hearing
          Threats from Space: A Review of U.S. Government Efforts
          to Track and Mitigate Asteroids and Meteors, Part 1
          March 19, 2013

          Full Committee Hearing
          Threats from Space, Part II: A Review of Private Sector 
        Efforts
          to Track and Mitigate Asteroids and Meteors
          April 10, 2013
                                 Energy

Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science

    DOE plays a leading role in supporting basic research in the 
physical sciences and driving long-term innovation and economic growth. 
The Committee will conduct oversight of Office of Science programs to 
review prioritization across, and management within, its major program 
areas. Special attention will also be given to the cost, operation, and 
maintenance of DOE's existing and planned major facilities.

          Energy Subcommittee Hearing
          America's Next Generation Supercomputer: The Exascale 
        Challenge
          May 22, 2013

          Full Committee Hearing
          Department of Energy Science & Technology Priorities
          June 18, 2013

          Energy Subcommittee Hearing
          Oversight and Management of Department of Energy National
          Laboratories and Science Activities
          July 11, 2013

          Energy Subcommittee Hearing
          Providing the Tools for Scientific Discovery and Basic Energy 
        Research:
          The Department of Energy Science Mission
          October 30, 2013

DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Committee will undertake efforts to improve focus, 
prioritization, and transparency of EERE programs, and provide close 
oversight to ensure that programs are managed efficiently, duplication 
is limited, and funding is allocated appropriately and effectively.

Fossil Energy R&D

    Fossil energy will remain a crucial aspect of America's energy 
portfolio for the foreseeable future. In the 113th Congress, the 
Committee will continue to ensure that fossil fuel R&D programs are 
appropriately focused and managed efficiently. Expected areas of 
oversight include coal R&D prioritization and program management and 
oil and gas R&D efforts.

          Energy Subcommittee Hearing
          American Energy Outlook: Technology, Market, and Policy 
        Drivers
          February 13, 2013

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Energy & Environment
          A Review of Federal Hydraulic Fracturing Research Activities
          April 26, 2013

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Energy & Environment
          Keystone XL Pipeline: Examination of Scientific
          and Environmental Issues
          May 7, 2013

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Environment & Energy
          Lessons Learned: EPA's Investigations of Hydraulic Fracturing
          June 24, 2013

          Energy Subcommittee Hearing
          The Future of Coal: Utilizing America's Abundant Energy 
        Resources
          July 25, 2013

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Environment & Energy
          EPA Power Plant Regulations: Is the Technology Ready?
          October 29, 2013

DOE loan guarantees

    Recent program management problems associated with DOE loan 
guarantees necessarily call for greater attention by the Committee. 
Ensuring the program minimizes risk to taxpayers and addresses 
previously identified problems will be a priority in the 113th 
Congress.
          Energy Subcommittee Hearing
          Federal Financial Support for Energy Technologies:
          Assessing Costs and Benefits
          March 13, 2013

Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E)

    The Committee will undertake oversight of ARPA-E program funding 
and management in the 113th Congress, examining the appropriate role 
for and focus of ARPA-E in the context of DOE's numerous other clean 
energy-focused programs and activities.

DOE Contract Management

    DOE programs have come under frequent scrutiny for contract 
management practices. GAO designated DOE's contract management as high-
risk in 1990 and continues to identify areas of potential waste, fraud, 
and abuse.

Nuclear R&D

    The Committee will provide oversight of the nation's nuclear R&D 
activities with the goal of unleashing the potential of emissions-free 
energy. DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and industry 
stakeholders are working to advance reactor construction of new nuclear 
reactors. The Committee will examine how DOE R&D can best contribute to 
this goal through the advancement of various nuclear energy 
technologies.

          Energy Subcommittee Hearing
          American Energy Outlook: Technology, Market, and Policy 
        Drivers
          February 13, 2013
                              Environment

          Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          The State of the Environment: Evaluating Progress and 
        Priorities
          February 14, 2013

Science and R&D at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

    The Committee will continue to provide oversight of EPA's 
management of science and its use of science in the decision making 
process, including lab management, regulatory science, transparency, 
and risk assessment. In particular, the Committee will examine how to 
better integrate science into the Administration's regulatory decision-
making process.
          Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          Mid-Level Ethanol Blends: Consumer and Technical Research 
        Needs
          February 26, 2013

          Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          Improving EPA's Scientific Advisory Processes
          March 20, 2013

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Energy & Environment
          Keystone XL Pipeline: Examination of Scientific and 
        Environmental Issues
          May 7, 2013

          Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          Background Check: Achievability of New Ozone Standards
          June 12, 2013

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Environment & Energy
          Lessons Learned: EPA's Investigations of Hydraulic Fracturing
          June 24, 2013

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Environment & Energy
          EPA Power Plant Regulations: Is the Technology Ready?
          October 29, 2013

          Full Committee Hearing
          Strengthening Transparency and Accountability within
          the Environmental Protection Agency
          November 14, 2013

Federal climate research activities

    The Committee will continue to monitor programs to address climate 
change issues across the Federal government to ensure that existing 
programs are necessary, appropriately focused, effectively coordinated, 
and properly organized to prevent duplication of efforts and waste 
taxpayer resources.

          Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          Policy Relevant Climate Issues in Context
          April 25, 2013

          Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          Background Check: Achievability of New Ozone Standards
          June 12, 2013

          Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          A Factual Look at the Relationship Between Climate and 
        Weather
          December 11, 2013

Federal ocean research activities

    The Committee will evaluate the President's National Policy for the 
Stewardship of the Ocean, Coasts, and Great Lakes, which adopted the 
Interagency Ocean Policy Task Force recommendations aimed at addressing 
the future of our oceans. The Committee will monitor the implementation 
of this plan, as well as Federal oceanic R&D policy generally.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather 
                    Forecasting

    The Committee will examine funding prioritization and program 
management challenges related to the NOAA's mission to understand and 
predict changes in weather, particularly as they relate to severe 
weather events that threaten life and property.

          Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          Restoring U.S. Leadership in Weather Forecasting
          May 25, 2013

          Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          Restoring U.S. Leadership in Weather Forecasting, Part 2
          June 26, 2013

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Oversight & Environment
          Dysfunction in Management of Weather and Climate Satellites
          September 19, 2013

          Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          A Factual Look at the Relationship Between Climate and 
        Weather
          December 11, 2013

NASA Earth Science

    The Committee will monitor NASA's efforts to prioritize, plan, and 
implement Earth science missions within cost and schedule. Particular 
attention will be paid to programs that exceed cost estimates to ensure 
they do not adversely impact the development and launch of other NASA 
priorities. The Committee will also examine the impact of large 
increases in funding for the Earth Science Directorate relative to 
funding requested for other science disciplines.

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Oversight & Environment
          Dysfunction in Management of Weather and Climate Satellites
          September 19, 2013

          Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          A Factual Look at the Relationship Between Climate and 
        Weather
          December 11, 2013
                               Technology

Cybersecurity

    The Committee has continuously stressed the protection of the 
nation's cyber-infrastructure, which underpins much private and public 
activity. The Committee will continue to provide critical oversight of 
how NIST and DHS address this important topic and will be particularly 
interested in how federal agencies balance security mandates with the 
ability to allow technological development through innovation.

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Technology & Research
          Cyber R&D Challenges and Solutions
          February 26, 2013

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

    The Committee will conduct program oversight for NIST, and other 
programs in the Department of Commerce, paying special attention to the 
evaluation of their alignment with and impact on industry. NIST manages 
a number of multi-agency manufacturing initiatives. The Committee will 
scrutinize these initiatives to ensure they are operating effectively 
and efficiently, and to ensure that they are not encroaching on areas 
better served by the private sector. In another area of NIST, the 
Committee is aware that America's competitive position can be 
dramatically improved, or weakened, depending on how standards for 
different products and processes are developed. NIST is the only 
federal agency with long-term expertise in this arena, and the 
Committee is concerned that the cooperation on standards development 
across agencies is less than optimal. Furthermore, the Committee 
intends to review the six laboratory units of the agency to ensure they 
are operating effectively in preparation for reauthorizing these 
activities.

          Technology Subcommittee Hearing
          Examining the Effectiveness of NIST Laboratories
          March 20, 2013

          Technology Subcommittee Hearing
          An Overview of the Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Proposal at the
          National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
          April 18, 2013

          Research & Technology Subcommittee Hearing
          Keeping America FIRST: Federal Investments in Research, 
        Science,
          and Technology at NSF, NIST, OSTP and Interagency STEM 
        Programs
          November 13, 2013

Advanced Technologies

    The Committee will examine R&D programs to ensure that they are 
focused in areas that support the most promising new areas of 
technology, including bio, nano, energy and health sectors. Real 
improvements in the cost and accuracy of health care can be achieved 
through effective integration of information technology within the 
health care industry. NIST has a critical role to play in helping to 
develop standards and conformance testing processes that will protect 
patient privacy and minimize private sector waste. The Committee will 
also examine NIST's role in the development of the smart grid, the 
management of cross-agency information technology (NITRD) and 
nanotechnology (NNI) research programs, and measurement science 
underpinning the biotechnology industry.

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Technology & Research
          Next Generation Computing and Big Data Analytics
          April 24, 2013

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Research & Technology
          The Current and Future Applications of Biometric Technologies
          May 21, 2013

          Energy Subcommittee Hearing
          America's Next Generation Supercomputer: The Exascale 
        Challenge
          May 22, 2013

          Research & Technology Subcommittee Hearing
          The Frontiers of Human Brain Research
          July 31, 2013

Department of Transportation (DOT) R&D programs

    The Committee will conduct oversight with regard to implementation 
of MAP-21 and related surface transportation R&D programs within the 
federal government, with a particular focus on strategic planning, 
performance measurements, effectiveness and preventing redundancy.

Economic Competitiveness and Job Creation

    America must maintain its economic and technological preeminence. 
The Committee will evaluate federal policies that enhance domestic and 
international competitiveness for U.S. companies, conduct oversight of 
federal policies that present barriers to innovation, and support 
policies that encourage job creation in innovative, growing economic 
sectors. The Committee must also increase oversight of the new policies 
recently enacted by the Small Business Innovation Research Program 
(SBIR) and ensure that it is focused on the most promising innovations.

          Full Committee Hearing
          American Competitiveness: The Role of Research and 
        Development
          February 6, 2013

          Research & Technology Subcommittee Hearing
          Strategic Planning for Federal Manufacturing R&D
          July 10, 2013

          Research & Technology Subcommittee Hearing
          Examining Federal Advanced Manufacturing Programs
          September 10, 2013

          Research & Technology Subcommittee Hearing
          Network for Manufacturing Innovation Program
          December 12, 2013


Technology Transfer

    The Committee will seek recommendations for continued improvements 
in the technology transfer incentives built into law by the Bayh-Dole 
and Stevenson-Wydler Acts and the SBIR program to improve America's 
competitiveness and innovative capacity.

          Research & Technology Subcommittee Hearing
          Improving Technology Transfer at Universities, Research 
        Institutes and National Laboratories
          July 24, 2013

United States Fire Administration (USFA)

    The USFA is responsible for training and education of career and 
volunteer firefighters and first responders across America. They also 
support management of several grant programs that provide equipment and 
support staffing for firefighters. The Committee will closely monitor 
the direction of these program and the continued efforts of the USFA to 
ensure first responders have the necessary support and training.

Natural Hazards

    The Committee has supported interagency research programs to 
mitigate the damage caused by natural disasters such as earthquakes, 
windstorms, and fires by developing early warning systems and improved 
building and infrastructure design. The Committee will continue to 
evaluate programs to protect Americans from these and other hazards.

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Research & Technology
          Federal Efforts to Reduce the Impacts of Windstorms
          June 5, 2013

Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology

    The Committee will continue to monitor the maturation of DHS, 
particularly the effectiveness and organization of the Science and 
Technology Directorate, and the research and technology programs 
associated with the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office.
                                Research

          Research Subcommittee Hearing
          Scientific Integrity & Transparency
          March 5, 2013

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Space & Research
          Exoplanet Discoveries: Have We Found Other Earths?
          May 9, 2013

          Research & Technology Subcommittee Hearing
          Methamphetamine Addiction: Using Science to Explore Solutions
          September 18, 2013

National Science Foundation (NSF)

    The Committee will continue to oversee the NSF. With the recent 
reauthorization of the America Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully 
Promote Excellence in Technology, Education, and Science (COMPETES) 
Act, special attention will be paid to the implementation, execution 
and effectiveness of these new programs.
    Further, the Committee will look for ways to trim duplicative and 
unused programs in an effort to maximize available resources. The 
innovative work of the National Science Foundation is important to the 
economic prosperity and competitiveness of the United States. However, 
there are various activities within the Foundation that may go beyond 
the mission of the agency and require more scrutiny and potential cuts 
in order to ensure that federal investments in basic science remain 
primarily focused on research that actually benefits the Nation.

          Research Subcommittee Hearing
          An Overview of the National Science Foundation Budget for 
        Fiscal Year 2014
          April 17, 2013

          Research & Technology Subcommittee Hearing
          Keeping America FIRST: Federal Investments in Research, 
        Science,
          and Technology at NSF, NIST, OSTP and Interagency STEM 
        Programs
          November 13, 2013

Science, Technology, Education and Mathematics (STEM) K-12 oversight

    STEM education is vital to the 21st Century economy. Members of the 
Committee have expressed interests in improving STEM education 
activities from pre-K through graduate and continuing education in 
order to cultivate a top-notch future scientific and technical 
workforce, including well-qualified teachers in STEM fields. 
Determining the appropriate forms of federal support for these outcomes 
is important to the Committee.
    While STEM education is critical to maintaining the scientific and 
technical workforce essential to our competitiveness, many duplicative, 
wasteful, or simply unused programs exist across a number of federal 
agencies and must be more closely examined and, where warranted, cut.

          Research Subcommittee Hearing
          STEM Education: Industry and Philanthropic Initiatives
          March 13, 2013

          Full Committee Hearing
          STEM Education: The Administration's Proposed Re-Organization
          June 4, 2013

          Research & Technology Subcommittee Hearing
          Keeping America FIRST: Federal Investments in Research, 
        Science, and Technology at NSF, NIST, OSTP and Interagency STEM 
        Programs
          November 13, 2013

Academic/Industry Partnerships

    The Committee will review the effectiveness and consequences of 
academic/industry partnerships. Agencies and universities are again 
debating the level of scrutiny and control that should be applied to 
research in light of the possible use by our adversaries of American 
discoveries and inventions. At the same time, industry questions the 
value of controls on technology sales and argues that such controls 
disproportionately limit American firms in competition for global 
sales. How to balance these competing interests remains a perennial 
subject for Committee oversight.

          Research & Technology Subcommittee Hearing
          Improving Technology Transfer at Universities,
          Research Institutes and National Laboratories
          July 24, 2013

          Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          Espionage Threats at Federal Laboratories: Balancing 
        Scientific
          Cooperation while Protecting Critical Information
          May 16, 2013


U.S. Antarctic and Arctic Programs

    The U.S. has conducted operations on the Antarctic continent under 
the terms of the Antarctic Treaty System since 1959, and U.S. research 
activities in the Arctic predate that. The NSF serves as the steward 
for U.S. interests in Antarctica. Research in these extreme regions is 
a fundamental component to understanding the Earth and its systems. The 
future of the icebreaker fleet that provides vital logistical support 
for NSF activities in the harsh polar environments continues to be of 
concern.

NSF Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction (MREFC) 
                    program

    The Committee will continue to monitor and oversee NSF's MREFC 
program, including how priorities for projects are developed, long-term 
budgeting for such priorities, and decision-making with regards to 
ever-changing scientific community needs.

Government-wide R&D initiatives in emerging fields

    The Committee will continue to oversee the collaboration and 
interagency process associated with emerging fields such as networking 
and information technology, biotechnology, cybersecurity, and 
nanotechnology.

          Research Subcommittee Hearing
          Applications for Information Technology Research & 
        Development
          February 14, 2013

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Technology & Research
          Cyber R&D Challenges and Solutions
          February 26, 2013

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Technology & Research
          Next Generation Computing and Big Data Analytics
          April 24, 2013

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Research & Technology
          The Current and Future Applications of Biometric Technologies
          May 21, 2013

          Research & Technology Subcommittee Hearing
          Strategic Planning for Federal Manufacturing R&D
          July 10, 2013

          Research & Technology Subcommittee Hearing
          The Frontiers of Human Brain Research
          July 31, 2013

          Research & Technology Subcommittee Hearing
          Examining Federal Advanced Manufacturing Programs
          September 10, 2013

          Research & Technology Subcommittee Hearing
          Keeping America FIRST: Federal Investments in Research, 
        Science, and Technology at NSF, NIST, OSTP and Interagency STEM 
        Programs
          November 13, 2013
                               Oversight

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Oversight & Energy
          Green Buildings - An Evaluation of Energy Savings Performance 
        Contracts
          June 27, 2013

Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository closure decision

    The Committee will continue to evaluate DOE's decision to close the 
Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository.

NOAA satellite modernization

    The Committee will continue its close monitoring of satellite 
modernization at NOAA. The restructured Joint Polar Satellite System 
(JPSS) will continue to draw the Committee's attention, as will the 
Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites and the broader 
issues of research-to-operations planning and data continuity.

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Oversight & Environment
          Dysfunction in Management of Weather and Climate Satellites
          September 19, 2013

Critical minerals, materials, and isotopes

    The Committee will provide oversight of materials, minerals, and 
isotopes that are critical to U.S. national interests. Recent shortages 
and supply concerns associated with helium-3, rare earth elements, 
californium-251, and plutonium-238 highlight the need to be ever 
vigilant in our monitoring of critical materials, minerals and 
isotopes.

Agency Information Technology Security

    The Committee will continue to conduct oversight of agency efforts 
to protect information technology systems. Threats and intrusions 
increase as GAO and IG recommendations go unaddressed. The Committee 
will ensure that agencies comply with existing statutes and address 
outside recommendations in a timely manner.

          Full Committee Hearing
          Is My Data on Healthcare.gov Secure?
          November 19, 2013

Risk assessment

    As the number and complexity of regulations increases throughout 
federal and state governments, the risk assessments that inform those 
decisions are garnering more attention. The Committee will continue to 
oversee how risk assessments are developed and how they are used in the 
regulatory process to ensure that policies are based on the best 
science available.

          Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          Improving EPA's Scientific Advisory Processes
          March 20, 2013

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Energy & Environment
          Keystone XL Pipeline: Examination of Scientific and 
        Environmental Issues
          May 7, 2013

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Environment & Energy
          Lessons Learned: EPA's Investigations of Hydraulic Fracturing
          June 24, 2013

          Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          EPA's Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment-
          A Factual Review of a Hypothetical Scenario
          August 1, 2013

Scientific integrity

    The Committee will continue to collect and examine allegations of 
intimidation of science specialists in federal agencies, suppression or 
revisions of scientific finding, and mischaracterization of scientific 
findings because of political or other pressures. The Committee's 
oversight will also involve the development and implementation of 
scientific integrity principles within the executive branch.

          Environment Subcommittee Hearing
          Improving EPA's Scientific Advisory Processes
          March 20, 2013

          Research Subcommittee Hearing
          Scientific Integrity & Transparency
          March 5, 2013

          Full Committee Hearing
          Strengthening Transparency and Accountability within
          the Environmental Protection Agency
          November 14, 2013

Additional Science Activities

    Pursuant to House Rule X, the Committee will review and study on a 
continuing basis laws, programs and Government activities throughout 
the government relating to non-military research and development.

          Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          Top Challenges For Science Agencies: Reports from the 
        Inspectors General - Part 1
          February 28, 2013

          Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          Top Challenges For Science Agencies: Reports from the 
        Inspectors General - Part 2
          March 14, 2013

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Oversight & Energy
          Assessing the Efficiency and Effectiveness of Wind Energy 
        Incentives
          April 16, 2013

          Full Committee Hearing
          A Review of President's FY 2014 Budget Request for Science 
        Agencies
          April 17, 2013

          Research & Technology Subcommittee Hearing
          Methamphetamine Addiction: Using Science to Explore Solutions
          September 18, 2013

Agency compliance with Congressional directives and requests

    The Committee will be vigilant in its oversight to ensure that 
recent authorization acts, appropriation acts, and other congressional 
directions are complied with appropriately.

          Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          Operating Unmanned Aircraft Systems in the National Airspace 
        System:
          Assessing Research and Development Efforts to Ensure Safety
          February 15, 2013


Emerging Issues

    The Committee will conduct oversight of additional matters as the 
need arises and as provided for under House Rule X, clause 3(k).

          Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          Espionage Threats at Federal Laboratories: Balancing 
        Scientific
          Cooperation while Protecting Critical Information
          May 16, 2013

                             Collaboration
    The Committee maintains a rich relationship with its Inspectors 
General, the Government Accountability Office (GAO), the National 
Academies of Science, the Congressional Research Service, the Office of 
Government Ethics, and the Office of Special Counsel, as well as 
various other independent investigative and oversight entities. The 
Committee will continue to work with those offices, relying on them to 
identify major mismanagement issues, using their reports in hearings, 
and working with the High Risk Series published by GAO to guide 
hearings and inquiries. The Committee already has several outstanding 
requests, many of which are bipartisan or cross-Committee, reflecting 
the collaborative nature of much of the Committee's oversight work.
    The Committee also welcomes input from the public and 
whistleblowers. The Committee has developed many relationships with 
whistleblowers in agencies. The Committee has taken positive steps to 
try to protect them from retaliation and has been reasonably successful 
in that role. Most of the whistleblowers who come to the Committee 
remain anonymous--sometimes even from the Committee.
    The Committee will retain its open-door policy regarding 
whistleblowers, whether they are contractors or government employees, 
and they should rest assured that we will never betray a confidence. 
Even if the information offered turns out not to be useful, as 
sometimes happens, the Committee will remain a haven for such figures 
and we understand the absolute necessity for citizens to feel safe in 
their communications with Congress.

                               Appendix A

                              HOUSE RULE X

                       GOVERNING JURISDICTION OF

              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY

                     U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                FOR THE ONE HUNDRED THIRTEENTH CONGRESS

COMMITTEES AND THEIR LEGISLATIVE JURISDICTIONS

    1. There shall be in the House the following standing committees, 
each of which shall have the jurisdiction and related functions 
assigned by this clause and clauses 2, 3, and 4. All bills, 
resolutions, and other matters relating to subjects within the 
jurisdiction of the standing committees listed in this clause shall be 
referred to those committees, in accordance with clause 2 of rule XII, 
as follows:

    (p) Committee on Science, Space, and Technology.

    (1) All energy research, development, and demonstration, and 
projects therefor, and all federally owned or operated nonmilitary 
energy laboratories.

    (2) Astronautical research and development, including resources, 
personnel, equipment, and facilities.

    (3) Civil aviation research and development.

    (4) Environmental research and development.

    (5) Marine research.

    (6) Commercial application of energy technology.

    (7) National Institute of Standards and Technology, standardization 
of weights and measures, and the metric system.

    (8) National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

    (9) National Space Council.

    (10) National Science Foundation.

    (11) National Weather Service.

    (12) Outer space, including exploration and control thereof.

    (13) Science scholarships.

    (14) Scientific research, development, and demonstration, and 
projects therefor.

SPECIAL OVERSIGHT FUNCTIONS

    3(k) The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology shall review 
and study on a continuing basis laws, programs, and Government 
activities relating to nonmilitary research and development.

                               Appendix B

     HEARINGS HELD PURSUANT TO CLAUSES 2(n), (o), OR (p) OF RULE XI

    2(n) Each standing committee, or subcommittee thereof, shall hold 
at least one hearing during each 120 day period following the 
establishment of the Committee on the topic of waste, fraud, abuse or 
mismanagement in Government programs which that Committee may 
authorize. The hearing shall focus on the most egregious instances of 
waste, fraud, abuse or mismanagement as documented by any report the 
Committee has received from a Federal Office of the Inspector General 
or the Comptroller General of the United States.

          Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          Top Challenges for Science Agencies: Reports from the 
        Inspectors General - Part 1
          February 28, 2013

    At 10:00 a.m. on February 28, 2013, the Subcommittee on Oversight 
held a hearing titled ``Top Challenges for Science Agencies: Reports 
from the Inspectors General - Part 1.'' This was the first of two such 
hearings planned prior to the Committee's review of the 
Administration's FY 2014 budget requests of these agencies.
    The witnesses discussed the most serious performance and management 
challenges facing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration 
(NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Department of 
Commerce (DOC) from the perspective of the Inspectors General of the 
respective agency.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from: Mr. Paul K. Martin, 
Inspector General, NASA; Ms. Allison C. Lerner, Inspector General, NSF; 
Mr. David Smith, Deputy Inspector General, DOC.

          Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          Top Challenges for Science Agencies: Reports from the 
        Inspectors General - Part 2
          March 14, 2013

    At 12:30 p.m. on March 14, 2013, the Subcommittee on Oversight held 
a hearing titled ``Top Challenges for Science Agencies: Reports from 
the Inspectors General - Part 2.'' This was the second of two such 
hearings prior to the Committee's review of the Administration's FY 
2014 budget requests of these agencies.
    This hearing provided Members of the Subcommittee the opportunity 
to receive testimony on the most serious performance and management 
challenges facing the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the U.S. Department of the 
Interior (DOI), from the perspective of the Inspectors General of each 
agency.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from: Mr. Gregory H. Friedman, 
Inspector General, DOE; Mr. Arthur A. Elkins, Jr., Inspector General, 
EPA; Ms. Mary L. Kendall, Deputy Inspector General, DOI.

          Energy Subcommittee Hearing
          Oversight and Management of Department of Energy National 
        Laboratories and Science Activities
          July 11, 2013

    The Subcommittee on Energy held a hearing entitled Oversight and 
Management of Department of Energy National Laboratories and Science 
Activities on Thursday, July 11, at 9:30 a.m. in Room 2318 of the 
Rayburn House Office Building.
    The purpose of the hearing was to examine the Department of 
Energy's (DOE) oversight and management of science and technology 
activities, particularly as they relate to enhancing the efficiency and 
effectiveness of the National Laboratory System. Witnesses discussed 
ideas and recommendations regarding how best to enhance DOE support of 
science and innovation through reforms in areas related to management, 
performance, technology transfer, and laboratory authorities and 
regulations.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from: Mr. Matthew Stepp, Senior 
Policy Analyst, Information Technology and Innovation Foundation; Mr. 
Jack Spencer, Senior Research Fellow, The Heritage Foundation; Dr. Thom 
Mason, Director, Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Dr. Dan Arvizu, 
Director, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

          Oversight Subcommittee Hearing
          EPA's Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment - A Factual Review of 
        a Hypothetical Scenario
          August 1, 2013

    On August 1, 2013, the Subcommittee on Oversight held a hearing 
titled, ``EPA's Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment - A Factual Review of 
a Hypothetical Scenario.''
    The purpose of the hearing was to review the U.S. Environmental 
Protection Agency's (EPA) draft Bristol Bay watershed assessment (BBWA) 
titled, ``An Assessment of Potential Mining Impacts on Salmon 
Ecosystems of Bristol Bay, Alaska.'' According to the EPA, its focus 
relative to this document was on a ``timely completion of a robust and 
technically sound scientific Assessment.'' The Committee reviewed the 
EPA's timing and rationale for conducting the draft watershed 
assessment.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from: Mr. Lowell Rothschild, 
Senior Counsel, Bracewell & Giuliani LLP; Dr. Michael Kavanaugh, Senior 
Principal, Geosyntec Consultants, and Member, National Academy of 
Engineering; Mr. Wayne Nastri, Co-president, E4 Strategic Solutions, 
and Former Regional Administrator, USEPA Region 9; Mr. Daniel 
McGroarty, President, American Resources Policy Network.

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Oversight & Environment
          Dysfunction in Management of Weather and Climate Satellites
          September 19, 2013

    On Thursday, September 19th, the Subcommittees on Oversight and 
Environment held a joint hearing to conduct on-going oversight of the 
nation's weather and climate satellite programs. The U.S. Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) identified a high probability in degraded 
weather satellite coverage starting as early as next year, and 
designated this data gap as a new high-risk area in a report earlier 
this year. Given this potential gap in weather satellite coverage, the 
hearing addressed questions about the Administration's priorities in 
funding weather satellites and research as compared to climate change-
monitoring satellites and research.
    Over the last decade, the Committee has closely monitored the 
development of the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) and its 
predecessor program, which provide vital data to weather forecasters. 
However, extreme weather events in the United States during the past 
year, have raised questions about whether America's weather monitoring 
and forecasting ability is as reliable as compared to other countries. 
Witnesses confirmed today that without better prioritization of 
funding, costly delays make it more likely that the new satellites 
won't be ready before the existing satellites reach the end of their 
projected operational life.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from: Mr. David Powner, 
Director, Information Technology Management Issues, GAO; Ms. Mary 
Kicza, Assistant Administrator, Satellite and Information Services, 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); Mr. Marcus 
Watkins, Director, Joint Agency Satellite Division, National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

          Full Committee Hearing
          Is My Data on Healthcare.gov Secure?
          November 19, 2013

    At 10:00 a.m. on November 19, 2013, the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology held a hearing titled ``Is Your Data on the 
Healthcare.gov Site Secure?'' The data passing through the 
Healthcare.gov website is one of the largest collections of personal 
information ever assembled, linking information from seven different 
federal agencies along with state agencies and government contractors. 
In order to gain information on potential healthcare coverage through 
the website, users must input personal contact information, birth and 
social security numbers for all family members, as well as household 
salary and debt information. Users may also be asked to verify home 
mortgage and credit card information, place of employment, previous 
addresses, and whether the person has any physical and mental 
disabilities.
    This hearing explored the threat posed by identity theft to 
Americans if hackers gained such information through the Healthcare.gov 
website, an assessment of the security controls in place and its 
vulnerabilities by cybersecurity experts not involved with the website, 
and what specific security standards and technical measures should be 
in place to protect Americans' privacy and personal information on 
Healthcare.gov.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from: Mr. Morgan Wright, Chief 
Executive Officer, Crowd Sourced Investigations, LLC; Dr. Fred Chang, 
Bobby B. Lyle Centennial Distinguished Chair in Cyber Security, 
Southern Methodist University; Dr. Avi Rubin, Director, Health and 
Medical Security Laboratory Technical Director, Information Security 
Institute, Johns Hopkins University (JHU); Mr. David Kennedy, Chief 
Executive Officer, TrustedSEC, LLC.

    2(o) Each standing committee, or subcommittee thereof, shall hold 
at least one hearing in any session in which the Committee has received 
disclaimers of agency financial statements from auditors of any Federal 
agency that the Committee may authorize to hear testimony on such 
disclaimers from representatives of such agency.

    2(p) Each standing committee, or subcommittee thereof, shall hold 
at least one hearing on issues raised by reports issued by the 
Comptroller General of the United States indicating that federal 
programs or operations that the Committee may authorize are at high 
risk for waste, fraud, and mismanagement, known as the ``high risk 
list'' or the ``high risk series.''

          Joint Subcommittee Hearing
          Oversight & Environment
          Dysfunction in Management of Weather and Climate Satellites
          September 19, 2013

    On Thursday, September 19th, the Subcommittees on Oversight and 
Environment held a joint hearing to conduct on-going oversight of the 
nation's weather and climate satellite programs. The U.S. Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) identified a high probability in degraded 
weather satellite coverage starting as early as next year, and 
designated this data gap as a new high-risk area in a report earlier 
this year. Given this potential gap in weather satellite coverage, the 
hearing addressed questions about the Administration's priorities in 
funding weather satellites and research as compared to climate change-
monitoring satellites and research.
    Over the last decade, the Committee has closely monitored the 
development of the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) and its 
predecessor program, which provide vital data to weather forecasters. 
However, extreme weather events in the United States during the past 
year, have raised questions about whether America's weather monitoring 
and forecasting ability is as reliable as compared to other countries. 
Witnesses confirmed today that without better prioritization of 
funding, costly delays make it more likely that the new satellites 
won't be ready before the existing satellites reach the end of their 
projected operational life.
    The Subcommittee received testimony from: Mr. David Powner, 
Director, Information Technology Management Issues, GAO; Ms. Mary 
Kicza, Assistant Administrator, Satellite and Information Services, 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); Mr. Marcus 
Watkins, Director, Joint Agency Satellite Division, National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

                               Appendix C

                    OVERSIGHT CORRESPONDENCE THROUGH

                             DECEMBER 2013
<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>

                               Appendix D
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                               Appendix E
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                                Appendix

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                          VIEWS AND ESTIMATES
              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY
                            FISCAL YEAR 2014
    President Obama has yet to transmit his budget request for Fiscal 
Year 2014 (FY14) to Congress. The following Views and Estimates of the 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology are based on the 
President's last budget proposal over one year ago and vigorous 
oversight of the agencies and programs under the Committee's 
jurisdiction since that time.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is our nation's 
primary civilian space and aeronautics research and development agency. 
The agency plans and executes missions that increase our understanding 
of Earth, the solar system, and the universe. NASA operates the 
International Space Station (ISS), a fleet of satellites throughout our 
solar system, Mars rovers, and a small number of research aircraft. 
NASA undertakes activities in technology development and transfer, and 
education and outreach. The agency also participates in a number of 
interagency activities such as the Next Generation Air Transportation 
System with the Federal Aviation Administration, information technology 
development, and climate change research. With the retirement of the 
Space Shuttle, America currently has no domestic capability to 
transport our astronauts to and from the International Space Station-a 
strategic national capability. NASA currently pays the Russians $63 
million per seat for each of our astronauts to hitch a ride.
    Leadership in space exploration is a worthy goal, and by 
comparison, our nation spent as much on the so-called stimulus bill in 
2009 as the entire NASA budget for the past 54 years. The Committee 
supported NASA's budget request of $17.7 billion in FY13, which is $58 
million less (0.3 percent reduction) than appropriated amounts for 
FY12. For FY13, NASA is authorized to receive $19.9 billion, and the 
Committee plans to re-authorize NASA for FY2014 in the coming months. 
Within that topline budget, however, the Committee remains concerned 
with the Administration's budget priorities for certain programs and 
the lack of leadership in space exploration, both human and robotic. 
The Administration is ceding America's leadership in space exploration 
and instead funding more environmental-monitoring satellites and 
studies.
    NASA's Earth Science budget request of $1.785 billion in FY2013 is 
over $300 million more per year than the agency spent prior to the 
Obama Administration taking office. The Administration's budget request 
cut NASA's Planetary Science budget request by $300 million in FY 2013. 
This prompted a senior NASA scientist and program manager with almost 
33 years of experience to quit and speak out publicly against the 
Administration's budget proposal.
    The Committee supports NASA's re-plan for the James Webb Space 
Telescope with a targeted launch date of fall 2018. The Administration 
failed to address known budget and schedule problems for several years 
due to the technical complexity of the project, which remains the top 
priority of the astronomy and astrophysics scientific community. The 
Committee will continue to closely oversee this program to ensure it 
remains on schedule and within budget.
    The FY13 budget also includes increased funding for Space 
Technology development. The FY13 request seeks $699 million, an 
increase of $125.3 million or 21.8 percent above FY12 levels. The 
Committee generally supports technology development, but these funds 
are better spent in bringing NASA astronaut crew transport systems 
online operationally as soon as possible. American astronauts should be 
launched into space onboard American rockets, not Russian.
    With regard to human space flight, the NASA Authorization Act of 
2010 directed the Agency to prioritize development of the Space Launch 
System (SLS) and Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) to replace the Space 
Shuttle, which was retired in 2011. The Act also authorized NASA to 
continue activities related to development of a commercial crew launch 
system, but emphasized Congressional intent that NASA develop the SLS 
and MPCV as soon as possible to ensure U.S. backup access to the ISS in 
case commercial crew or cargo capabilities fail to materialize. NASA's 
budget proposes to reverse the priorities established by Congress in 
both authorization and appropriation legislation. NASA seeks to reduce 
funding for the SLS and Orion MPCV. Under this budget proposal, the 
SLS/MPCV system would not be operational until 2021.
    The Committee finds it unacceptable for the U.S. to rely on the 
Russian Soyuz system. NASA needs to develop a vehicle to transport 
American astronauts to the International Space Station as soon as 
possible. While we must keep an eye on safety and strategically balance 
the next steps of human exploration (e.g., the Moon, near-Earth 
asteroids, and Mars), all other priorities are secondary to this 
immediate goal of space transport.
    While NASA's Commercial Crew program could be the primary means of 
transporting American astronauts, we cannot be solely reliant on this 
program. The Orion MPCV, Space Launch System, and Commercial Crew 
programs require a program track with a sufficient budget to support 
the Space Station as soon as possible in preparation for the next steps 
of human exploration beyond Low Earth Orbit and ensure American 
preeminence in space. Due to a constrained budget environment, other 
goals-such as maintaining 2.5 commercial teams or demonstration flights 
beyond low-Earth orbit-need to be secondary to the goal of developing a 
vehicle to safely transport American astronauts to the International 
Space Station.

National Science Foundation (NSF)

    The National Science Foundation provides over 20 percent of federal 
support for all basic research at U.S. colleges and universities and is 
second only to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in support for 
all academic research. It is the primary source of federal funding for 
non-medical basic research. NSF provides approximately 40 percent of 
all federal support, and serves as a catalyst for science, technology, 
engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education improvement at all levels 
of education. It supports the fundamental investigations that 
ultimately serve as the foundation for progress in nationally 
significant areas such as national security (especially cybersecurity), 
technology-driven economic growth, energy independence, health care, 
nanotechnology, and networking and information technology. The 
Committee plans to re-authorize NSF for FY2014 in the coming months.
    The FY13 budget request for NSF is $7.4 billion, a 4.8 percent 
increase over the FY12 level. The Committee recognizes the importance 
of making appropriate investments in science and technology, basic 
research and development, and STEM education in order for the United 
States to remain a world leader in competitiveness and innovation. 
However, while we support a healthy budget for NSF, the Committee 
remains concerned that the Administration is diverting research and 
development (R&D) funds to its extreme environmental priorities rather 
than the merits cited earlier. For example, the NSF's contribution to 
the interagency US Global Change Research Program (with over $2.5 
billion requested in various agencies) has increased to $333 million in 
FY 2013 from $205 million in FY 2008, prior to this Administration 
taking office. Further, NSF's Science, Engineering, and Education for 
Sustainability (SEES) budget increases to $203 million in FY 2013, and 
the Committee is concerned that NSF R&D on the SEES program to develop 
renewable energy technologies and conduct climate change research is 
duplicative of work at other agencies. Also, the House voted against 
funding the $10 million request for the NSF's Climate Change Education 
Program in FY13.
    Further, the NSF budget request for Social, Behavioral, and 
Economic Sciences (SBE) is over $259 million in FY 2013, with 
significant, preceding annual increases. The Committee is concerned 
that the Administration has lost sight of the NSF's core mission in 
support of the physical sciences when so much funding is provided for 
SBE. Several recent studies conducted using the NSF's SBE funding have 
been of questionable value, and something our nation can ill-afford. 
These SBE funds are better spent on higher priority scientific 
endeavors that have demonstrated return on investment for the American 
taxpayer.

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

    As a non-regulatory science agency that supports American commerce, 
NIST conducts high-quality research and develops technical standards 
that keep our industries globally competitive and benefit all 
Americans. In FY13, the Administration requested a funding level of 
$857 million or a 14.1 percent increase from FY12 funding for NIST, and 
the House voted for a $830 million appropriation for the agency.
    The Committee recognizes the need for strengthening our nation's 
manufacturing sector and the need for ways to improve the transfer of 
federally-funded manufacturing research at universities and government 
laboratories to the private sector. The House approved $128 million for 
NIST's Manufacturing Extension Partnership and $21 million for the 
Advanced Manufacturing Technology program. However, as identified 
during Committee hearings in the last Congress, the Administration has 
not been forthcoming with basic information about its proposal of $1 
billion in mandatory spending for the National Network for 
Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI) to be managed by NIST. The 
Administration needs to be more forthcoming and transparent when 
proposing such costly initiatives. The Committee plans to re-authorize 
NIST for FY2014 in the coming months.

Department of Energy (DOE)

    The Department of Energy funds a wide range of research, 
development, demonstration and commercial application (RDD&CA) 
activities. The overall FY13 budget request for DOE is $27.2 billion, 
which represents an $856 million increase over FY12 levels. Over $8.3 
billion of this amount is within the Committee's jurisdiction. In 
response to the President's emphasis on the promotion of green energy 
as a domestic policy priority, the balance of DOE RDD&CA activities 
within the Committee's jurisdiction has shifted significantly toward 
late-stage demonstration and deployment efforts. While the Committee 
supports an "all of the above" approach to reduce the cost of all 
energy sources, the Department's top RDD&CA priority should be basic 
research and foundational science centered on domestic energy 
resources. Basic research serves as a long-term economic driver and 
provides the foundation for sustainable growth, rather than short-term, 
potentially expensive commercialization activities that result in the 
government picking winners and losers in the energy technology 
marketplace. Additionally, the Committee is concerned that the 
Administration has created multiple, duplicative RDD&CA efforts 
throughout DOE and other research agencies to promote the 
Administration's preferred "green" energy technologies.
    The Committee recognizes the unique role the Office of Science 
performs in the federal government's research enterprise. The Office of 
Science has an established record of making crucial scientific 
discoveries and serves as a long-term driver of innovation and economic 
growth through stewardship of world-class scientific facilities that 
deliver revolutionary scientific breakthroughs in numerous scientific 
disciplines. Accordingly, the Committee believes the Office of Science 
should be the highest priority for DOE RDD&CA programs. However, the 
Committee is concerned that the Atmospheric System Research and the 
Climate and Earth Systems Modeling programs are duplicative of research 
programs at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 
and the National Science Foundation (NSF). Additionally, although the 
Committee supports Fusion Energy Sciences within the Office of Science, 
the program is an area of concern due to high-risk program management 
associated with large-scale international projects.
    In addition to receiving nearly $17 billion in the 2009 stimulus 
bill, the budget for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable 
Energy (EERE) has grown significantly in recent years. The 
Administration's FY13 budget request of $2.3 billion for EERE 
represents a 29.1 percent ($527.4 million) increase from the FY12 
level. The Committee has held several hearings raising concerns about 
the DOE's unnecessary and inappropriate involvement in competitive 
private markets. This involvement often results in the government 
picking winners and losers among competing companies and technologies 
rather than letting the market decide. The Committee has also held 
hearings about the lack of transparency associated with EERE 
activities. The Committee has found several examples of wasteful 
spending of taxpayer funds.
    The Committee has expressed its longstanding concerns regarding the 
focus and implementation of DOE's loan guarantee program. No funds 
should be provided for new loan guarantees, and the Committee 
recommends that $170 million in unobligated funds appropriated in FY11 
be rescinded.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

    NOAA's FY13 budget request is $5.1 billion, an increase of $153.9 
million or 3.1 percent above the FY12 level. Within that amount, over 
$2 billion is for the National Environmental Satellite, Data and 
Information Service (NESDIS), a $163.6 million or 8.7 percent increase 
over FY12 levels. The NESDIS budget primarily funds the Joint Polar 
Satellite System (JPSS) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental 
Satellites (GOES) program.
    The Committee's top priority for NOAA is rebalancing the agency's 
research portfolio to better predict severe weather to protect American 
lives and property. The Committee supports a strong research enterprise 
at NOAA; however, the Administration continues to direct NOAA research 
funding increases almost exclusively to climate rather than weather. 
The Administration's most recent budget request would only exacerbate 
the imbalance between these priorities, resulting in a climate research 
budget three times larger than that for weather research ($210 million 
vs. $70 million, respectively). This portfolio is not in sync with the 
needs of the American public and should be rebalanced.
    The Committee is gravely concerned with the cost, potential 
forthcoming gap in weather satellite data, and NOAA's mismanagement of 
the JPSS (currently estimated total cost for JPSS weather satellites is 
$12.9 billion through 2028). For years, this program and its 
predecessor have been plagued with cost over-runs, poor management, 
agency infighting, technical problems and contractor mistakes. A recent 
review found NOAA's management still to be "dysfunctional" and 
elucidated on various management problems and recommended solutions. 
The Committee supports full-funding for the JPSS and GOES-R weather 
satellites, because they are too important to fail the American public. 
However, the Administration needs to practice greater transparency with 
independent cost estimates for these programs and encourage more 
proactive management within NOAA and the Department of Commerce. The 
Committee has been conducting on-going oversight of these programs.
    The Committee generally supports the overall National Weather 
Service (NWS) budget request of $972.2 million in FY13, a modest 
decrease from FY12. However, the Committee is concerned about the 
Administration's proposal to eliminate the NOAA Profiler Network, which 
monitors for tornados and other weather phenomena. This small but 
important program should be restored using funds designated for climate 
research. Within the climate research program, the Committee supports 
the National Integrated Drought Information System, a vital research 
program for communicating drought information to the states.

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

    The Science and Technology (S&T) account at EPA is $807.3 million 
in FY 2013 (a 17 percent increase) and $576.6 million covers research 
and development activities at the Agency's Office of Research and 
Development.
    The Administration's ambitious regulatory agenda is dependent on 
objective, transparent scientific and technical information. 
Unfortunately, Committee oversight efforts have identified numerous 
instances in which such information was distorted, withheld from peer 
review scientific scrutiny, and selectively used to advance a pre-
determined agenda. As a result of EPA's advocacy-driven scientific 
activities and the lack of transparency in major environmental research 
funded by the Agency, the Committee sees fundamental reforms and 
adherence to the Administration's Scientific Integrity Policy as a 
prerequisite to funding this research.
    Numerous problems with the Agency's Integrated Risk Information 
System (IRIS) have been highlighted by the National Academy of 
Sciences, the Government Accountability Office, and in testimony before 
the Committee. In light of these problems, the Committee recommends 
that resources be directed to ensure that all ongoing assessments 
adhere to more rigorous peer review, the requirements outlined in the 
conference report of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2012, and 
the recommendations in chapter seven of the National Academy of 
Sciences' Review of EPA's Draft IRIS Assessment of Formaldehyde.

Department of Homeland Security (DHS)

    The FY13 budget request for the Department of Homeland Security 
Science and Technology Directorate (DHS S&T) is $831.5 million, an 
increase of $163.5 million or 24.5 percent from the FY12 level. The 
FY13 budget for the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) is $328 
million, a $38 million or 11.6 percent increase from the FY12 level.
    The Committee recognizes the important role that research and 
development plays in supporting DHS's mission, and believes that the 
S&T Directorate should be provided with the resources it needs to keep 
our nation safe and our borders secure. However, in a constrained 
fiscal environment, it is essential that DHS gets the most out of each 
and every scarce dollar by providing tangible results that further the 
Department's mission, and coordinating with other agencies to maximize 
efficiencies.

Department of Transportation

    Office of the Assistant Secretary for Research and Technology

    The FY 2013 budget request for the research activities currently 
managed by the Research and Technology Administration (RITA) is $13.7 
million. The Committee remains concerned that RITA and other DOT 
research is overly focused on ambiguous research topics at the expense 
of technical improvements to highway safety, infrastructure, and 
congestion.

    Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) - Research, Development and 
Technology

    The Administration's FY13 budget request provides a total of $354 
million for Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) research and 
development activities, a 16 percent decrease compared to the FY12 
request. The Committee recognizes the importance of the FAA's practical 
research program for aviation safety.

    Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST)

    The FY13 budget request for the Office of Commercial Space 
Transportation (AST) (operations) is $16.7 million. AST is responsible 
for licensing and regulating commercial space launches and reentries to 
ensure compliance with standards designed to protect public safety. The 
Committee intends to conduct necessary and appropriate oversight of AST 
in re-authorizing its activities.
<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>

                        HISTORY OF APPOINTMENTS

              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY

                     U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                 FOR THE ONE HUNDRED THIRTEEN CONGRESS

January 3, 2013--H. Res. 6

Lamar S. Smith, Texas,named Chairman of the Science, Space, and 
Technology Committee.

January 3, 2013--H. Res. 7

Eddie Bernice Johnson, Texas, named Ranking Member of the Science, 
Space, and Technology Committee.

January 4, 2013--H. Res. 17

Republican Members appointed to the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology

Dana Rohrabacher, Ralph M. Hall, F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr., Frank D. 
Lucas, Randy Neugebauer, Michael T. McCaul, Paul C. Broun, Steven M. 
Palazzo, Mo Brooks, Andy Harris, Randy Hultgren, Larry Bucshon, Steve 
Stockman, Bill Posey, Cynthia Lummis, David Schweikert, Thomas Massie, 
Kevin Cramer, Jim Bridenstein, Randy Weber, Chris Stewart.

January 14, 2011--H. Res. 22

Democratic Members assigned to the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology: Zoe Lofgren, Daniel Lipinski, Donna F. Edwards, Frederica 
S. Wilson, Suzanne Bonamici, Eric Swalwell, Dan Maffei, Alan Grayson, 
Joseph Kennedy III, Scott Peters, Derek Kilmer, Ami Bera, Elizabeth 
Esty, Marc Veasey, Julia Brownley, Mark Takano.

February 25, 2013

Mr. Harris resigned from the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology.

April 16, 2013--H. Res. 163

Ms. Kelly appointed to the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology.

June 12, 2013--H. Res. 257

Mr. Collins, New York, appointed to the Committee on Science, Space, 
and Technology.

December 11, 2013

Mr. Stewart, Utah, resigned from the Committee on Science, Space and 
Technology.

                         Subcommittee Selection

January 23, 2013--Republican Subcommittee Assignments

                                Energy:

Cynthia Lummis (Chair), Ralph M. Hall, Frank D. Lucas, Randy 
Neugebauer, Michael T. McCaul, Randy Hultgren, Thomas Massie, Kevin 
Cramer, Randy Weber, Lamar S. Smith (Ex Officio)

                              Environment:

Andy Harris (Chair), F. James Sensenbrenner, Dana Rohrabacher, Randy 
Neugebauer, Paul C. Broun, Randy Weber, Chris Stewart, Lamar S. Smith 
(Ex Officio)

                               Oversight:

Paul C. Broun (Chair), F. James Sensenbrenner, Bill Posey, David 
Schweikert, Kevin Cramer, Lamar S. Smith (Ex Officio)

                               Research:

Larry Bushon (Research), Steven M. Palazzo, Mo Brooks, Steve Stockman, 
Cynthia Lummis, Jim Bridenstine, Lamar S. Smith (Ex Officio)

                                 Space:

Steven M. Palazzo (Chair), Ralph M. Hall, Dana Rohrabacher, Frank D. 
Lucas, Michael T. Mccaul, Mo Brooks, Larry Bushon, Steve Stockman, Bill 
Posey, David Schweikert, Jim Bridenstine, Chris Stewart, Lamar S. Smith 
(Ex Officio)

                              Technology:

Thomas Massie (Chair), Andy Harris, Randy Hultgren, David Schweikert, 
Jim Bridenstine, Lamar S. Smith (Ex Officio)

January 23, 2013--Democrat Subcommittee Assignments

                                Energy:

Eric Swalwell (Ranking Member), Alan Grayson, Joseph P. Kennedy III, 
Marc Veasey, Mark Takano, Zoe Lofgren, Daniel Lipinski, Eddie Bernice 
Johnson (Ex Officio)Environment

Suzanne Bonamici (Ranking Member), Julia Brownley, Donna F. Edwards, 
Mark Takano, Alan Grayson, Eddie Bernice Johnson (Ex Officio)

                               Oversight:

Dan Maffei (Ranking Member), Eric Swalwell, Scott Peters, Eddie Bernice 
Johnson (Ex Officio)

                               Research:

Daniel Lipinski (Ranking Member), Zoe Lofgren, Ami Bera, Elizabeth 
Esty, Eddie Bernice Johnson (Ex Officio)

                                 Space:

Donna F. Edwards (Ranking Member), Suzanne Bonamici, Dan Maffei, Joseph 
P. Kennedy III, Derek Kilmer, Ami Bera, Marc Veasey, Julia Brownley, 
Frederica Wilson, Eddie Bernice Johnson (Ex Officio)

                              Technology:

Frederica Wilson (Ranking Member), Scott Peters, Derek Kilmer, Eddie 
Bernice Johnson (Ex Officio)

                             March 5, 2013:

Mr. Stewart named Chairman of Subcommittee on Environment.

                             June 18, 2013:

Committee Rule 6(b) was amended to merge Subcommittee on Research and 
Subcommittee on Technology. Amended Republican subcommittee roster 
approved. Mr. Bridenstine was assigned to the Subcommittee on 
Environment. Mr. Bucshon (Chairman), Mr. Palazzo, Mr. Brooks, Mr. 
Hultgren, Mr. Stockman, Ms. Lummis, Mr. Schweikert, Mr. Massie, Mr. 
Bridenstine, Mr. Collins, Mr. Smith (Ex Officio) were assigned to 
Subcommittee on Research and Technology. Amended Democrat subcommittee 
roster approved. Mr. Lipinski (Ranking Member), Ms. Wilson, Ms. 
Lofgren, Mr. Peters, Mr. Bera, Mr. Kilmer, Ms. Esty, Ms. Kelly, Ms. 
Johnson (Ex Officio) were assigned to Subcommittee on Research and 
Technology.

                  RULES GOVERNING PROCEDURE, COMMITTEE

                   ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY

                         FOR THE 113th CONGRESS

RULE I. GENERAL

        (a)  RULES OF THE HOUSE.--The Rules of the House of 
        Representatives are the rules of the Committee on Science, 
        Space, and Technology and its Subcommittees with the specific 
        additions thereto contained in these rules.

        (b)  MOTION TO RECESS.--A motion to recess from day to day, or 
        a motion to recess subject to the call of the chair (within 24 
        hours), or a motion to dispense with the first reading (in 
        full) of a bill or resolution, if printed copies are available, 
        is a non-debatable motion of privilege in the Committee.

        (c)  PROPOSED REPORTS.--A proposed investigative or oversight 
        report shall be considered as read if it has been available to 
        the members of the Committee for at least 24 hours (excluding 
        Saturdays, Sundays, or legal holidays except when the House is 
        in session on such days).

        (d)  SUBCOMMITTEES.--Each Subcommittee is a part of the 
        Committee and is subject to the authority and direction of the 
        Committee and its rules so far as applicable. Written rules 
        adopted by the Committee, not inconsistent with the Rules of 
        the House, shall be binding on each Subcommittee of the 
        Committee. [See House Rule XI 1(a)].

        (e)  COMMITTEE RULES.--The Committee's rules shall be publicly 
        available in electronic form and published in the Congressional 
        Record not later than 30 days after the Chairman of the 
        Committee (hereafter in these rules referred to as the 
        ``Chairman'') is elected in each oddnumbered year. [See House 
        Rule XI 2 (a)(2)].

        (f)  OTHER PROCEDURES.--The Chairman, after consultation with 
        the Ranking Member of the Committee, may establish such other 
        procedures and take such actions as may be necessary to carry 
        out these rules or to facilitate the effective operation of the 
        Committee.

        (g)  USE OF HEARING ROOMS.--In consultation with the Ranking 
        Member, the Chair of the Committee shall establish guidelines 
        for the use of Committee hearing rooms.

Rule II. REGULAR, ADDITIONAL, AND SPECIAL MEETINGS

        (a)  REGULAR MEETINGS.--The regular meeting day of the 
        Committee for the conduct of its business shall be on the first 
        Thursday of each month, if the House is in session. If the 
        House is not in session on that day, then the Committee shall 
        meet on the next Thursday of such month on which the House is 
        in session, or at another practicable time as determined by the 
        Chairman.

                (1)  A regular meeting of the Committee may be 
                dispensed with if, in the judgment of the Chairman, 
                there is no need for the meeting.

                (2)  The Chairman may call and convene, as he considers 
                necessary and in accordance with the notice 
                requirements contained in these rules, additional 
                meetings of the Committee for the consideration of any 
                bill or resolution pending before the Committee or for 
                the conduct of other Committee business. [See House 
                Rule XI 2(c)(1)]

        (b)  BILLS AND SUBJECTS TO BE CONSIDERED.--At least 3 days 
        (excluding Saturdays, Sundays and legal holidays when the House 
        is not in session) before each scheduled Committee or 
        Subcommittee meeting, each Member of the Committee or 
        Subcommittee shall be furnished a list of the bills and 
        subjects to be considered and/or acted upon at the meeting. 
        Bills or subjects not listed shall be subject to a point of 
        order unless their consideration is agreed to by a two-thirds 
        vote of the Committee or Subcommittee.

                (1)  In an emergency that does not reasonably allow for 
                3 days' notice, the Chairman of the Committee or 
                Chairperson of a Subcommittee (hereafter in these rules 
                the term ``Chair'' shall refer to both the Chairman of 
                the Full Committee and each Subcommittee Chairperson) 
                may waive the 3-day notice requirement with the 
                concurrence of the Ranking Member.

        (c)  TEXT OF LEGISLATION, AMENDMENTS, AND MOTIONS.--

                (1)  At least 48 hours prior to the commencement of a 
                Committee or Subcommittee meeting for the markup of 
                legislation, excluding Saturdays, Sundays and legal 
                holidays, the text of such legislation shall be made 
                publicly available in electronic form.

                (2)  To the maximum extent practicable, amendments to a 
                measure or matter shall be submitted in writing or 
                electronically to the designee of both the Chair and 
                Ranking Member at least 24 hours prior to the 
                consideration of the measure or matter. The Chair may 
                exercise discretion to give priority to amendments 
                submitted in advance.

                (3)  Every motion made to the Committee or Subcommittee 
                and entertained by the Chair shall be reduced to 
                writing upon demand of any Member, and a copy made 
                available to each Member present.

        (d)  OPEN MEETINGS.--Committee and Subcommittee meetings shall 
        be open to the public except when the Committee or Subcommittee 
        determines by majority vote to close the meeting because 
        disclosure of matters to be considered would endanger national 
        security, would compromise sensitive law enforcement 
        information, or would tend to defame, degrade or incriminate 
        any person or otherwise would violate any law or rule of the 
        House.

        (e)  QUORUM FOR TAKING ACTION.--For purposes of taking any 
        action at a meeting of the Committee or any Subcommittee 
        thereof, a quorum shall be constituted by the presence of not 
        less than one-third of the Members of the Committee or 
        Subcommittee, except that a full majority of the Members of the 
        Committee or Subcommittee shall constitute a quorum for 
        purposes of reporting a measure or recommendation from the 
        Committee or Subcommittee, closing a meeting to the public, or 
        authorizing the issuance of a subpoena.

        (f)  POSTPONEMENT OF PROCEEDINGS.--

                (1)  The Chair may postpone further proceedings when a 
                record vote is ordered on the question of approving a 
                measure or matter or on adopting an amendment. The 
                Chair may resume proceedings on a postponed request at 
                any time after reasonable notice.

                (2)  When proceedings resume on a postponed question, 
                notwithstanding any intervening order for the previous 
                question, an underlying proposition shall remain 
                subject to further debate or amendment to the same 
                extent as when the question was postponed.

        (g)  TIME FOR STATEMENTS AND DEBATE.--

                (1)  Insofar as is practicable, the Chair, after 
                consultation with the Ranking Member, shall limit the 
                total time of opening statements by Members at a 
                Committee or Subcommittee meeting to no more than ten 
                minutes, the time to be divided equally between the 
                Chair and Ranking Member.

                (2)  The time any one Member may address the Committee 
                or Subcommittee on any bill, motion, or other matter 
                under consideration by the Committee or Subcommittee 
                will be limited to five minutes, and then only when the 
                Member has been recognized by the Chair. This time 
                limit may be waived by the Chair pursuant to unanimous 
                consent.

        (h)  REQUESTS FOR RECORDED VOTE.--A record vote of the Members 
        may be had at the request of three or more Members or, in the 
        apparent absence of a quorum, by any one Member.

        (i)  TRANSCRIPTS.--Transcripts of markups shall be recorded and 
        may be published in the same manner as hearings before the 
        Committee. Transcripts shall be included as part of the 
        legislative report unless waived by the Chairman of the 
        Committee.

        (j)  MOTION TO GO TO CONFERENCE.--Without further action of the 
        Committee, the Chairman is directed to offer a motion under 
        clause 1 of rule XXII of the Rules of the House of 
        Representatives whenever the Chairman considers it appropriate.

        (k)  PRIVATE BILLS.--No private bill will be scheduled by the 
        Chair if there are two or more Members who object to its 
        consideration.

Rule III. HEARINGS

        (a)  NOTICE OF HEARINGS.--

                (1)  The Chair shall publicly announce the date, place, 
                and subject matter of any hearing to be conducted by a 
                Committee or Subcommittee on any measure or matter at 
                least one week before the commencement of that hearing. 
                If the Chair, with the concurrence of the Ranking 
                Member, determines there is good cause to begin the 
                hearing sooner, or if the Committee or Subcommittee so 
                determines by majority vote, a quorum being present for 
                the transaction of business, the Chair shall make the 
                announcement at the earliest possible date.

                (2)  The Chair shall publicly announce a list of 
                witnesses to testify at a hearing as soon as a complete 
                list of witnesses, including those to be called by the 
                minority, is compiled. When practicable, the Chair and 
                the Ranking Member will seek to have a complete list of 
                witnesses compiled at or as soon as practicable after 
                the time that the hearing is publicly announced.

        (b)  OPENING STATEMENTS.--Insofar as is practicable, the Chair, 
        after consultation with the Ranking Member, shall limit the 
        total time of opening statements by Members to no more than ten 
        minutes, the time to be divided equally between the Chair and 
        Ranking Member.

        (c)  WITNESSES.--

                (1)  Insofar as is practicable, no later than 48 hours 
                in advance of his or her appearance, each witness who 
                is to appear before the Committee or any Subcommittee 
                shall file in printed copy and in electronic form a 
                written statement of his or her proposed testimony and 
                a curriculum vitae.

                (2)  Each witness shall limit his or her presentation 
                to a five minute summary, provided that additional time 
                may be granted by the Chair when appropriate.

                (3)  The Chair, or any Member of the Committee or 
                Subcommittee designated by the Chair, may administer 
                oaths to witnesses before the Committee. [See House 
                Rule XI 2(m)(2)]

                (4)  Whenever any hearing is conducted by the Committee 
                or Subcommittee on any measure or matter, the minority 
                Members of the Committee or Subcommittee shall be 
                entitled, upon request to the Chair by a majority of 
                them before the completion of the hearing, to call 
                witnesses selected by the minority to testify with 
                respect to the measure or matter during at least one 
                day of hearing thereon. [See House Rule XI 2(j)(1)]

                (5)  In the case of a witness appearing in a 
                nongovernmental capacity, a written statement of 
                proposed testimony shall include a disclosure of the 
                amount and source (by agency and program) of each 
                Federal grant (or subgrant thereof) or contract (or 
                subcontract thereof) received during the current fiscal 
                year or either of the two previous fiscal years by the 
                witness or by an entity represented by the witness. 
                Such statements, with appropriate redactions to protect 
                the privacy of the witness, shall be made publicly 
                available in electronic form not later than one day 
                after the witness appears.

        (d)  OPEN HEARINGS.--Committee and Subcommittee hearings shall 
        be open to the public except when the Committee or Subcommittee 
        determines by majority vote to close the meeting because 
        disclosure of matters to be considered would endanger national 
        security, would compromise sensitive law enforcement 
        information, or would tend to defame, degrade or incriminate 
        any person or otherwise would violate any law or rule of the 
        House.

        (e)  QUORUM FOR HEARINGS.--For purposes of taking testimony and 
        receiving evidence before the Committee or any Subcommittee, a 
        quorum shall be constituted by the presence of two Members, 
        which shall consist of one Member of the majority and one 
        Member of the minority party unless no Member of the minority 
        party is in attendance 15 minutes after the starting time 
        listed on the notice of hearing, at which time two members of 
        the majority party may constitute a quorum.

        (f)  QUESTIONING OF WITNESSES.--

                (1)  The right to interrogate a witness before the 
                Committee and Subcommittees shall alternate between 
                Majority and Minority Members of the Committee or 
                Subcommittee. Each Member shall be limited to five 
                minutes in the interrogation of witnesses until such 
                time as each Member present who wishes to be recognized 
                has been recognized once for that purpose. No Member 
                may be recognized for a second period of interrogation 
                until each Member present has been recognized at least 
                once.

                (2)  Notwithstanding clause 1, upon a motion the Chair, 
                in consultation with the Ranking Member, may:

                        (ii)  Designate an equal number of Members of 
                        the Committee or Subcommittee from each party 
                        to question a witness for a period of time 
                        equally divided between the majority party and 
                        the minority party, not to exceed one hour in 
                        the aggregate; or

                        (ii)  Designate staff from each party to 
                        question a witness for equal specific periods 
                        that do not exceed one hour in the aggregate.

                        (iii)  Members of the Committee or Subcommittee 
                        have two weeks from the date of a hearing to 
                        submit additional questions in writing for the 
                        record to be answered by witnesses who have 
                        appeared in person. The letters of transmittal 
                        and any responses thereto shall be printed in 
                        the hearing record.

        (g)  PUBLICATION OF TRANSCRIPTS.--The transcripts of those 
        hearings conducted by the Committee and Subcommittees, when it 
        is decided they will be printed, shall be published in 
        substantially verbatim form, with the material requested for 
        the record inserted at that place requested, or at the end of 
        the record, as appropriate. Individuals, including Members of 
        Congress, whose comments are to be published as part of a 
        Committee document shall be given the opportunity to verify the 
        accuracy of the transcription in advance of publication. Any 
        requests by those Members, staff or witnesses to correct any 
        errors other than errors in the transcript, or disputed errors 
        in transcription, shall be appended to the record, and the 
        appropriate place where the change is requested will be 
        footnoted. Prior to approval by the Chairman of hearings 
        conducted jointly with another congressional Committee, a 
        memorandum of understanding shall be prepared which 
        incorporates an agreement for the publication of the 
        transcript.

Rule IV. REPORTS AND PUBLICATIONS

        (a)  FILING OF REPORT.--

                (1)  It shall be the duty of the Chairman to report or 
                cause to be reported promptly to the House any measure 
                approved by the Committee and to take or cause to be 
                taken the necessary steps to bring the matter to a 
                vote. To the maximum extent practicable, the written 
                report of the Committee on such measures shall be made 
                available to the Committee membership for review at 
                least 24 hours in advance of filing. [House Rule XIII 
                2(b)(1)].

                (2)  The report of the Committee on a measure which has 
                been approved by the Committee shall be filed within 
                seven calendar days (exclusive of days on which the 
                House is not in session) after the day on which there 
                has been filed with the Clerk of the Committee a 
                written request, signed by the majority of the Members 
                of the Committee, for the reporting of that measure. 
                Upon the filing of any such request, the Clerk of the 
                Committee shall transmit immediately to the Chairman 
                notice of the filing of that request. [House Rule XIII 
                2(b)(2)].

        (b)  CONTENTS OF REPORT.--

                (1)  The report of the Committee on a measure or matter 
                that has been approved by the Committee shall include 
                the matters required by clauses 2(c) and 3 of rule XIII 
                of the Rules of the House.

                (2)  Clause 2(I) of House Rule XI pertaining to 
                supplemental, minority, and additional views is hereby 
                incorporated by reference.

        (c)  IMMEDIATE PRINTING AND SUPPLEMENTAL REPORTS. THIS RULE 
        DOES NOT PRECLUDE.--

                (1)  The immediate filing or printing of a Committee 
                report unless a timely request for the opportunity to 
                file supplemental, minority, or additional views has 
                been made as provided by this Rule; or

                (2)  The filing by the Committee of any supplemental 
                report upon any measure or matter which may be required 
                for the correction of any technical error in a previous 
                report made by the Committee upon that measure or 
                matter.

        (d)  REPORT LANGUAGE ON USE OF FEDERAL RESOURCES.--No 
        legislative report filed by the Committee on any measure or 
        matter reported by the Committee shall contain language which 
        has the effect of specifying the use of federal resources more 
        explicitly (inclusively or exclusively) than that specified in 
        the measure or matter as ordered reported, unless such language 
        has been approved by the Committee during a meeting or 
        otherwise in writing by a majority of the Members.

        (e)  OTHER COMMITTEE PUBLICATIONS.--

                (1)  House Reports.

                        (i)  Any document published by the Committee as 
                        a House Report, other than a report of the 
                        Committee on a measure which has been approved 
                        by the Committee, shall be approved by the 
                        Committee at a meeting, and Members shall have 
                        the same opportunity to submit views as 
                        provided for in Rule IV(b).

                        (ii)  Not later than January 2nd of each year, 
                        the Committee shall submit to the House an 
                        annual report on the activities of the 
                        Committee.

                        (iii)  After an adjournment sine die of a 
                        regular session of a Congress or after December 
                        15th, whichever occurs first, the Chairman may 
                        file the annual Activity Report for that 
                        Congress with the Clerk of the House at any 
                        time and without the approval of the Committee, 
                        provided that a copy of the report has been 
                        available to each Member of the Committee for 
                        at least seven calendar days and that the 
                        report includes any supplemental, minority, or 
                        additional views submitted by a Member of the 
                        Committee. [See House Rule XI 1(d)]

                (2)  Other Documents.

                        (i)  Subject to paragraphs (ii) and (iii), the 
                        Chairman may approve the publication of any 
                        document as a Committee print which in the 
                        Chairman's discretion he determines to be 
                        useful for the information of the Committee.

                        (ii)  Any document to be published as a 
                        Committee print that purports to express the 
                        views, findings, conclusions, or 
                        recommendations of the Committee or any of its 
                        Subcommittees, other than a report of the 
                        Committee on a measure that has been approved 
                        by the Committee, must be approved by the 
                        Committee or its Subcommittees, as applicable, 
                        in a meeting or otherwise in writing by a 
                        majority of the Members, and such Members shall 
                        have the right to submit supplemental, 
                        minority, or additional views for inclusion in 
                        the print within at least 48 hours after such 
                        approval.

                        (iii)  Any document to be published as a 
                        Committee print, other than a document 
                        described in subsection (ii) of this Rule, 
                        shall:

                                (a)  include on its cover the following 
                                statement: ``This document has been 
                                printed for informational purposes only 
                                and does not represent either findings 
                                or recommendations adopted by this 
                                Committee;'' and

                                (b)  not be published following the 
                                sine die adjournment of a Congress, 
                                unless approved by the Chairman after 
                                consultation with the Ranking Member of 
                                the Committee.

                        (iv)  A report of an investigation or study 
                        conducted jointly by the Committee and one or 
                        more other Committees may be filed jointly, 
                        provided that each of the Committees complies 
                        independently with all requirements for 
                        approval and filing of the report. [House Rule 
                        XI 1(b)(2)].

                        (v)  After an adjournment of the last regular 
                        session of a Congress sine die, an 
                        investigative or oversight report approved by 
                        the Committee may be filed with the Clerk at 
                        any time, provided that if a Member gives 
                        notice at the time of approval of intention to 
                        file supplemental, minority, or additional 
                        views, that Member shall be entitled to not 
                        less than seven calendar days in which to 
                        submit such views for inclusion with the 
                        report. [House Rule XI 1(b)(4)]

Rule V. BROADCASTING

        (a)  Whenever a hearing or meeting conducted by the Committee 
        is open to the public, the proceedings shall be open to 
        coverage by audio and visual means, except as provided in Rule 
        XI4(f)(2) of the House of Representatives.

        (b)  To the maximum extent practicable the audio and video 
        coverage shall be in a manner that allows the public to easily 
        listen to and view the proceedings.

        (c)  Operation and use of any Committee internet broadcast 
        system shall be fair and nonpartisan and in accordance with all 
        other applicable rules of the Committee and the House.

        (d)  To the maximum extent practicable, the Committee shall 
        maintain the recordings of the coverage of such hearings or 
        meetings in a manner easily accessible to the public.

        (e)  The Chair may not limit the number of television or still 
        cameras to fewer than two representatives from each medium 
        (except for legitimate space or safety considerations, in which 
        case pool coverage shall be authorized).

        (f)  Radio and television tapes, television films, and internet 
        recordings of any Committee hearings or meetings that are open 
        to the public may not be used, or made available for use, as 
        partisan political campaign material to promote or oppose the 
        candidacy of any person for elective public office.

        (g)  It is, further, the intent of this rule that the general 
        conduct of each meeting or hearing covered under authority of 
        this rule by audio or visual means, and the personal behavior 
        of the Committee Members and staff, other government officials 
        and personnel, witnesses, television, radio, and press media 
        personnel, and the general public at the meeting or hearing, 
        shall be in strict conformity with and observance of the 
        acceptable standards of dignity, propriety, courtesy, and 
        decorum traditionally observed by the House in its operations, 
        and may not be such as to:

                (1)  distort the objects and purposes of the meeting or 
                hearing or the activities of Committee Members in 
                connection with that meeting or hearing or in 
                connection with the general work of the Committee or of 
                the House; or

                (2)  cast discredit or dishonor on the House, the 
                Committee, or a Member, Delegate, or Resident 
                Commissioner or bring the House, the Committee, or a 
                Member, Delegate, or Resident Commissioner into 
                disrepute.

        (h)  The coverage of Committee meetings and hearings by audio 
        and visual means shall be permitted and conducted only in 
        strict conformity with the purposes, provisions, and 
        requirements of this rule.

                (1)  The following shall apply to coverage of Committee 
                meetings or hearings by audio or visual means:

                        (i)  If audio or visual coverage of the hearing 
                        or meeting is to be presented to the public as 
                        live coverage, that coverage shall be conducted 
                        and presented without commercial sponsorship.

                        (ii)  The allocation among the television media 
                        of the positions or the number of television 
                        cameras permitted by the Chair in a hearing or 
                        meeting room shall be in accordance with fair 
                        and equitable procedures devised by the 
                        Executive Committee of the Radio and Television 
                        Correspondents' Galleries.

                        (iii)  Television cameras shall be placed so as 
                        not to obstruct in any way the space between a 
                        witness giving evidence or testimony and any 
                        member of the Committee or the visibility of 
                        that witness and that member to each other.

                        (iv)  Television cameras shall operate from 
                        fixed positions but may not be placed in 
                        positions that obstruct unnecessarily the 
                        coverage of the hearing or meeting by the other 
                        media.

                        (v)  Equipment necessary for coverage by the 
                        television and radio media may not be installed 
                        in, or removed from, the hearing or meeting 
                        room while the Committee is in session.

                        (vi)  Floodlights, spotlights, strobe lights, 
                        and flashguns may not be used in providing any 
                        method of coverage of the hearing or meeting, 
                        except that approved television media may 
                        install additional lighting in a hearing or 
                        meeting room, without cost to the Government, 
                        in order to raise the ambient lighting level in 
                        a hearing or meeting room to the lowest level 
                        necessary to provide adequate television 
                        coverage of a hearing or meeting at the current 
                        state of the art of television coverage.

                        (vii)  If requests are made by more of the 
                        media than will be permitted by the Chair for 
                        coverage of a hearing or meeting by still 
                        photography, that coverage shall be permitted 
                        on the basis of a fair and equitable pool 
                        arrangement devised by the Standing Committee 
                        of Press Photographers.

                        (viii)  Photographers may not position 
                        themselves between the witness table and the 
                        members of the Committee at any time during the 
                        course of a hearing or meeting.

                        (ix)  Photographers may not place themselves in 
                        positions that obstruct unnecessarily the 
                        coverage of the hearing by the other media.

                        (x)  Personnel providing coverage by the 
                        television and radio media shall be currently 
                        accredited to the Radio and Television 
                        Correspondents' Galleries.

                        (xi)  Personnel providing coverage by still 
                        photography shall be currently accredited to 
                        the Press Photographers' Gallery.

                        (xii)  Personnel providing coverage by the 
                        television and radio media and by still 
                        photography shall conduct themselves and their 
                        coverage activities in an orderly and 
                        unobtrusive manner. [House Rule XI(4)]

Rule VI. SUBCOMMITTEES

        (a)  FULL COMMITTEE JURISDICTION.--The full Committee shall 
        have jurisdiction over such matters as determined by the 
        Chairman.

        (b)  SUBCOMMITTEES AND JURISDICTION.--There shall be six 
        standing Subcommittees of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
        Technology, with jurisdictions as follows:

                  The Subcommittee on Energy shall have jurisdiction 
                over the following subject matters: all matters 
                relating to energy research, development, and 
                demonstration projects therefor; commercial application 
                of energy technology; Department of Energy research, 
                development, and demonstration programs; Department of 
                Energy laboratories; Department of Energy science 
                activities; energy supply activities; nuclear, solar, 
                and renewable energy, and other advanced energy 
                technologies; uranium supply and enrichment, and 
                Department of Energy waste management; fossil energy 
                research and development; clean coal technology; energy 
                conservation research and development, including 
                building performance, alternate fuels, distributed 
                power systems, and industrial process improvements; 
                pipeline research, development, and demonstration 
                projects; energy standards; other appropriate matters 
                as referred by the Chairman; and relevant oversight.

                  The Subcommittee on Environment shall have 
                jurisdiction over the following subject matters: all 
                matters relating to environmental research; 
                Environmental Protection Agency research and 
                development; environmental standards; climate change 
                research and development; the National Oceanic and 
                Atmospheric Administration, including all activities 
                related to weather, weather services, climate, the 
                atmosphere, marine fisheries, and oceanic research; 
                risk assessment activities; scientific issues related 
                to environmental policy, including climate change; 
                remote sensing data related to climate change at the 
                National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA); 
                earth science activities conducted by the NASA; other 
                appropriate matters as referred by the Chairman; and 
                relevant oversight.

                  The Subcommittee on Research and Technology shall 
                have jurisdiction over the following subject matters: 
                all matters relating to science policy and science 
                education; the Office of Science and Technology Policy; 
                all scientific research, and scientific and engineering 
                resources (including human resources); all matters 
                relating to science, technology, engineering and 
                mathematics education; intergovernmental mechanisms for 
                research, development, and demonstration and cross-
                cutting programs; international scientific cooperation; 
                National Science Foundation; university research 
                policy, including infrastructure and overhead; 
                university research partnerships, including those with 
                industry; science scholarships; computing, 
                communications, networking, and information technology; 
                research and development relating to health, 
                biomedical, and nutritional programs; research, 
                development, and demonstration relating to nanoscience, 
                nanoengineering, and nanotechnology; agricultural, 
                geological, biological and life sciences research; 
                materials research, development, demonstration, and 
                policy;; all matters relating to competitiveness, 
                technology, standards, and innovation; standardization 
                of weights and measures, including technical standards, 
                standardization, and conformity assessment; 
                measurement, including the metric system of 
                measurement; the Technology Administration of the 
                Department of Commerce; the National Institute of 
                Standards and Technology; the National Technical 
                Information Service; competitiveness, including small 
                business competitiveness; tax, antitrust, regulatory 
                and other legal and governmental policies related to 
                technological development and commercialization; 
                technology transfer, including civilian use of defense 
                technologies; patent and intellectual property policy; 
                international technology trade; research, development, 
                and demonstration activities of the Department of 
                Transportation; surface and water transportation 
                research, development, and demonstration programs; 
                earthquake programs and fire research programs, 
                including those related to wildfire proliferation 
                research and prevention; biotechnology policy; 
                research, development, demonstration, and standards-
                related activities of the Department of Homeland 
                Security; Small Business Innovation Research and 
                Technology Transfer; voting technologies and standards; 
                other appropriate matters as referred by the Chairman; 
                and relevant oversight.

                  The Subcommittee on Space shall have jurisdiction 
                over the following subject matters: all matters 
                relating to astronautical and aeronautical research and 
                development; national space policy, including access to 
                space; suborbital access and applications; National 
                Aeronautics and Space Administration and its contractor 
                and governmentoperated labs; space commercialization, 
                including commercial space activities relating to the 
                Department of Transportation and the Department of 
                Commerce; exploration and use of outer space; 
                international space cooperation; the National Space 
                Council; space applications, space communications and 
                related matters; Earth remote sensing policy; civil 
                aviation research, development, and demonstration; 
                research, development, and demonstration programs of 
                the Federal Aviation Administration; space law; other 
                appropriate matters as referred by the Chairman; and 
                relevant oversight.

                  The Subcommittee on Oversight shall have general and 
                special investigative authority on all matters within 
                the jurisdiction of the Committee on Science, Space, 
                and Technology.

        (c)  COMPOSITION OF SUBCOMMITTEES.--

                (1)  A majority of the majority Members of the 
                Committee shall determine an appropriate ratio of 
                majority to minority Members of each Subcommittee and 
                shall authorize the Chairman to negotiate that ratio 
                with the minority party; provided, however, that the 
                ratio of majority Members to minority Members on each 
                Subcommittee (including any exofficio Members who 
                participate as voting members of the Subcommittee) 
                shall be no less favorable to the majority party than 
                the ratio for the Committee.

                (2)  The Chairman of the Committee and Ranking Member 
                thereof shall be ex officio Membersof each Subcommittee 
                to which such Chairman or Ranking Member has not been 
                assigned by resolution of the Committee. Ex officio 
                Members shall make an election within three weeks of 
                the organizational meeting of the Committee as to 
                whether they will serve as voting or non-voting members 
                of each Subcommittee. A non-voting ex officio member 
                shall not be counted as present for purposes of 
                constituting a quorum at any hearing or meeting of such 
                Subcommittee, and shall not be counted for purposes of 
                calculating the ratio of majority Members to minority 
                Members on the Subcommittee.

        (d)  REFERRAL TO SUBCOMMITTEES.--The Chairman shall refer all 
        legislation and other matters referred to the Committee to the 
        Subcommittee or Subcommittees of appropriate primary and 
        secondary jurisdiction within two weeks of the matters being 
        referred to the Committee, unless the Chairman deems 
        consideration is to be by the full Committee. Subcommittee 
        Chairs may make requests for referral of specific matters to 
        their Subcommittee within the two week period if they believe 
        Subcommittee jurisdictions so warrant.

        (e)  SUBCOMMITTEE PROCEDURES AND REPORTS.--

                (1)  No Subcommittee shall meet to consider for markup 
                or approval any measure or matter when the Committee or 
                any other Subcommittee of the Committee is meeting to 
                consider any measure or matter for markup or approval.

                (2)  Each Subcommittee is authorized to meet, hold 
                hearings, receive testimony or evidence, mark up 
                legislation, and report to the Committee on all matters 
                referred to it. For matters within its jurisdiction, 
                each Subcommittee is authorized to conduct legislative, 
                investigative, forecasting, and general oversight 
                hearings; to conduct inquiries into the future; and to 
                undertake budget impact studies.

                (3)  Subcommittee Chairs shall set meeting dates after 
                consultation with the Chairman and other Subcommittee 
                Chairs with a view toward avoiding simultaneous 
                scheduling of Committee and Subcommittee meetings or 
                hearings wherever possible.

                (4)  During consideration of any measure or matter for 
                markup or approval in a Subcommittee proceeding, a 
                record vote may be had at the request of one or more 
                Members of that Subcommittee.

                (5)  Each Subcommittee of the Committee shall provide 
                the full Committee with copies of such records of votes 
                taken in the Subcommittee and such other records with 
                respect to the Subcommittee as the Chairman deems 
                necessary for the Committee to comply with the rules 
                and regulations of the House.

                (6)  After ordering a measure or matter reported, a 
                Subcommittee shall issue a Subcommittee report in such 
                form as the Chairman shall specify. To the maximum 
                extent practicable, reports and recommendations of a 
                Subcommittee shall not be considered by the Committee 
                until after the intervention of 48 hours, excluding 
                Saturdays, Sundays and legal holidays, from the time 
                the report is submitted and made available to the 
                Members of the Committee and printed hearings thereon 
                shall be made available, if feasible, to the Members of 
                the Committee, except that this Rule may be waived at 
                the discretion of the Chairman after consultation with 
                the Ranking Member of the Committee.

Rule VII. SUBPOENAS AND DOCUMENTS

        (a)  A subpoena may be authorized and issued in the conduct of 
        any investigation or series of investigations or activities to 
        require the attendance and testimony of such witnesses and the 
        production of such books, records, correspondence, memoranda, 
        papers and documents as deemed necessary when authorized by 
        majority vote of the Committee or Subcommittee (as the case may 
        be), a majority of the Committee or Subcommittee being present. 
        Authorized subpoenas shall be signed only by the Chairman, or 
        by any Member designated by the Chairman. [House Rule XI 
        2(m)(3)(A)]

        (b)  During any period in which the House has adjourned for a 
        period longer than three days, the Chairman, after consultation 
        with the Ranking Member of the Committee, or, if the Ranking 
        Member cannot be reached, the Ranking Member of the relevant 
        Subcommittee, may authorize and issue subpoenas to require the 
        attendance and testimony of such witnesses and the production 
        of such books, records, correspondence, memoranda, papers, and 
        documents as the Chairman considers necessary.

        (c)  Unless otherwise determined by the Committee or 
        Subcommittee, certain information received by the Committee or 
        Subcommittee pursuant to a subpoena or request for documents or 
        information not made part of the record at an open hearing 
        shall be deemed to have been received in Executive Session when 
        the Chairman, in his judgment and after consultation with the 
        Ranking Member of the Committee, deems that in view of all of 
        the circumstances, such as the sensitivity of the information 
        or the confidential nature of the information, such action is 
        appropriate.

        (d)  All national security information bearing a classification 
        of secret or higher which has been received by the Committee or 
        a Subcommittee shall be deemed to have been received in 
        Executive Session and shall be given appropriate safekeeping. 
        The Chair of the Committee may establish such regulations and 
        procedures as in the Chair's judgment are necessary to 
        safeguard classified information under the control of the 
        Committee. Such procedures shall, however, ensure access to 
        this information by any Member of the Committee or any other 
        Member of the House of Representatives who has requested the 
        opportunity to review such material.

Rule VIII. VICE CHAIRS

        (a)  The Chairman of the Committee shall designate a member of 
        the majority party to serve as Vice Chair of the Committee, and 
        shall designate a majority member of each Subcommittee to serve 
        as Vice Chair of the Subcommittee. Vice Chairs of the Committee 
        and each Subcommittee serve at the pleasure of the Chairman, 
        who may at any time terminate his designation of a member as 
        Vice Chair and designate a different member of the majority 
        party to serve as Vice Chair of the Committee or relevant 
        Subcommittee.

        (b)  The Chairman may, consistent with these rules and the 
        rules of the House of Representatives, from time to time assign 
        duties, privileges, and responsibilities to the Vice Chairs of 
        the Committee or of the various Subcommittees.

Rule IX. OVERSIGHT AND INVESTIGATIONS

        (a)  The Committee shall review and study, on a continuing 
        basis, the application, administration, execution, and 
        effectiveness of those laws, or parts of laws, the subject 
        matter of which is within its jurisdiction, including all laws, 
        programs, and Government activities relating to nonmilitary 
        research and development, in accordance with House Rule X.

        (b)  Not later than February 15th of the first session of the 
        113th Congress, the Committee shall meet in open session, with 
        a quorum present, to adopt its oversight plan for submission to 
        the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform and the 
        Committee on House Administration, in accordance with the 
        provisions of clause 2(d) of Rule X of the House of 
        Representatives.

        (c)  The Chairman may undertake any formal investigation in the 
        name of the Committee after consultation with the Ranking 
        Member of the Committee.

        (d)  The Chair of any Subcommittee shall not undertake any 
        formal investigation in the name of the Committee or 
        Subcommittee without formal approval by the Chairman of the 
        Committee, in consultation with other appropriate Subcommittee 
        Chairs, and after consultation with the Ranking Member of the 
        Committee. The Chair of any Subcommittee shall also consult 
        with the Ranking Member of the Subcommittee before undertaking 
        any investigation in the name of the Subcommittee. Nothing in 
        this subsection shall be interpreted to infringe on a 
        Subcommittee's authority to conduct general oversight of 
        matters within its jurisdiction, short of undertaking a formal 
        investigation.

Rule X. COMMITTEE RECORDS

          The records of the Committee at the National Archives and 
        Records Administration shall be made available for public use 
        in accordance with Rule VII of the Rules of the House of 
        Representatives. The Chairman shall notify the Ranking Member 
        of the Committee of any decision, pursuant to Rule VII 3(b)(3) 
        or clause 4(b) of the Rules of the House of Representatives, to 
        withhold a record otherwise available, and the matter shall be 
        presented to the Committee for a determination on the written 
        request of any Member of the Committee. [House Rule XI 2(e)(3)]

Rule XI. OFFICIAL COMMITTEE WEBSITE

          The Chairman shall maintain an official Committee website for 
        the purpose of furthering the Committee's legislative and 
        oversight responsibilities, including communicating information 
        about the Committee's activities to Committee Members and other 
        Members of the House. The Ranking Member of the Committee may 
        maintain a similar website for the same purpose, including 
        communicating information about the activities of the minority 
        to Committee Members and other Members of the House.

Rule XII. AMENDMENTS TO COMMITTEE RULES.

          The rules of the Committee may be modified, amended or 
        repealed, in the same manner and method as prescribed for the 
        adoption of committee rules in clause 2 of rule XI of the Rules 
        of the House, but only if written notice of the proposed change 
        has been provided to each such Member at least 72 hours before 
        the time of the meeting at which the vote on the change occurs. 
        Any such change in the rules of the Committee shall be 
        published in the Congressional Record within 30 calendar days 
        after their approval.
   Amendment to Committee Rule VI (b) Offered by Chairman Lamar Smith

Rule VI (b) of the Rules of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
                    Technology is amended to read as follows:

        (b)  Subcommittees and Jurisdiction. There shall be five 
        standing Subcommittees of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
        Technology, with jurisdictions as follows:

          The Subcommittee on Energy shall have jurisdiction over the 
        following subject matters: all matters relating to energy 
        research, development, and demonstration projects therefor; 
        commercial application of energy technology; Department of 
        Energy research, development, and demonstration programs; 
        Department of Energy laboratories; Department of Energy science 
        activities; energy supply activities; nuclear, solar, and 
        renewable energy, and other advanced energy technologies; 
        uranium supply and enrichment, and Department of Energy waste 
        management; fossil energy research and development; clean coal 
        technology; energy conservation research and development, 
        including building performance, alternate fuels, distributed 
        power systems, and industrial process improvements; pipeline 
        research, development, and demonstration projects; energy 
        standards; other appropriate matters as referred by the 
        Chairman; and relevant oversight.

          The Subcommittee on Environment shall have jurisdiction over 
        the following subject matters: all matters relating to 
        environmental research; Environmental Protection Agency 
        research and development; environmental standards; climate 
        change research and development; the National Oceanic and 
        Atmospheric Administration, including all activities related to 
        weather, weather services, climate, the atmosphere, marine 
        fisheries, and oceanic research; risk assessment activities; 
        scientific issues related to environmental policy, including 
        climate change; remote sensing data related to climate change 
        at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA); 
        earth science activities conducted by the NASA; other 
        appropriate matters as referred by the Chairman; and relevant 
        oversight.

          The Subcommittee on Research and Technology shall have 
        jurisdiction over the following subject matters: all matters 
        relating to science policy and science education; the Office of 
        Science and Technology Policy; all scientific research, and 
        scientific and engineering resources (including human 
        resources); all matters relating to science, technology, 
        engineering and mathematics education; intergovernmental 
        mechanisms for research, development, and demonstration and 
        cross-cutting programs; international scientific cooperation; 
        National Science Foundation, university research policy, 
        including infrastructure and overhead; university research 
        partnerships, including those with industry; science 
        scholarships; computing, communications, networking, and 
        information technology; research and development relating to 
        health, biomedical, and nutritional programs; research, 
        development, and demonstration relating to nanoscience, 
        nanoengineering, and nanotechnology; agricultural, geological, 
        biological and life sciences research; materials research, 
        development, demonstration, and policy; all matters relating to 
        competitiveness, technology, standards, and innovation; 
        standardization of weights and measures, including technical 
        standards, standardization, and conformity assessment; 
        measurement, including the metric system of measurement; the 
        Technology Administration of the Department of Commerce; the 
        National Institute of Standards and Technology; the National 
        Technical Information Service; competitiveness, including small 
        business competitiveness; tax, antitrust, regulatory and other 
        legal and governmental policies related to technological 
        development and commercialization; technology transfer, 
        including civilian use of defense technologies; patent and 
        intellectual property policy; international technology trade; 
        research, development, and demonstration activities of the 
        Department of Transportation; surface and water transportation 
        research, development, and demonstration programs; earthquake 
        programs and fire research programs, including those related to 
        wildfire proliferation research and prevention; biotechnology 
        policy; research, development, demonstration, and standards-
        related activities of the Department of Homeland Security; 
        Small Business Innovation Research and Technology Transfer; 
        voting technologies and standards; other appropriate matters as 
        referred by the Chairman; and relevant oversight.

          The Subcommittee on Space shall have jurisdiction over the 
        following subject matters: all matters relating to 
        astronautical and aeronautical research and development; 
        national space policy, including access to space; sub-orbital 
        access and applications; National Aeronautics and Space 
        Administration and its contractor and government-operated labs; 
        space commercialization, including commercial space activities 
        relating to the Department of Transportation and the Department 
        of Commerce; exploration and use of outer space; international 
        space cooperation; the National Space Council; space 
        applications, space communications and related matters; Earth 
        remote sensing policy; civil aviation research, development, 
        and demonstration; research, development, and demonstration 
        programs of the Federal Aviation Administration; space law; 
        other appropriate matters as referred by the Chairman; and 
        relevant oversight.

          TThe Subcommittee on Oversight shall have general and special 
        investigative authority on all matters within the jurisdiction 
        of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology.

 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 113th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
January 26, 2013               Organizational Meeting of the Committee on Science,     Business Meeting-1
                                Space, and Technology
                               ......................................................
                               (Meeting held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
February 6, 2013               American Competitiveness: The Role of Research and      113-1*
                                Development
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
February 13, 2013              American Energy Outlook: Technology, Market, and        113-2*
                                Policy Drivers
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Energy)
February 14, 2013              The State of the Environment: Evaluating Progress and   113-3*
                                Priorities
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
February 14, 2013              Applications for Information Technology Research &      113-4*
                                Development
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
February 15, 2013              Operating Unmanned Aircraft Systems in the National     113-5*
                                Airspace System: Assessing Research and Development
                                Efforts to Ensure Safety
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Oversight)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
February 26, 2013              Cyber R&D Challenges and Solutions                      113-6*
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Technology and
                                the Subcommittee on Research)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
February 26, 2013              Mid-Level Ethanol Blends: Consumer and Technical        113-7*
                                Research Needs
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 113th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
February 27, 2013              A Review of The Space Leadership Preservation Act       113-8*
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Space)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
February 28, 2013              Top Challenges For Science Agencies: Reports from the   113-9*
                                Inspectors General-Part 1
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Oversight)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
March 5, 2013                  Scientific Integrity & Transparency                     113-10*
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
March 13, 2013                 STEM Education: Industry and Philanthropic Initiatives  113-11*
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
March 13, 2013                 Federal Financial Support for Energy Technologies:      113-12*
                                Assessing Costs and Benefits
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Energy)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
March 14, 2013                 H.R. 756, Cybersecurity Enhancement Act of 2013         H. Rept. 113-33**
                               (Markup held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
March 14, 2013                 H.R. 967, Advancing America's Networking and            H. Rept.113-34**
                                Information Technology Research and Development Act
                                of 2013
                               (Markup held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
March 14, 2013                 Top Challenges for Science Agencies: Reports from the   113-13*
                                Inspectors General-Part 2
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Oversight)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
March 19, 2013                 Threats from Space: A Review of U.S. Government         113-14*
                                Efforts to Track and Mitigate Asteroids and Meteors,
                                Part 1
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 113th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
March 20, 2013                 Improving EPA's Scientific Advisory Processes           113-15*
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
March 20, 2013                 Examining the Effectiveness of NIST Laboratories        113-16*
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
April 10, 2013                 Threats from Space, Part II: A Review of Private        113-17*
                                Sector Efforts to Track and Mitigate Asteroids and
                                Meteors
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
April 11, 2013                 H.R. 875, to provide for a comprehensive assessment of  .........................
                                the scientific and technical research on the
                                implications of the use of mid-level ethanol blends,
                                and for other purposes
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
April 11, 2013                 H.R. 1422, EPA Science Advisory Board Reform Act of     H. Rept. 113-165**
                                2013
                               (Markup held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
April 16, 2013                 Assessing the Efficiency and Effectiveness of Wind      113-18*
                                Energy Incentives
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Oversight and the
                                Subcommittee on Energy)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
April 17, 2013                 A Review of President's FY 2014 Budget Request for      113-19*
                                Science Agencies
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
April 17, 2013                 An Overview of the National Science Foundation Budget   113-20*
                                for Fiscal Year 2014
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 113th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
April 18, 2013                 An Overview of the Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Proposal at  113-21*
                                the National Institute of Standards and Technology
                                (NIST)
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Technology)
April 24, 2013                 Next Generation Computing and Big Data Analytics        113-22*
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Technology and
                                the Subcommittee on Research)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
April 24, 2013                 An Overview of the National Aeronautics and Space       113-23
                                Administration Budget for Fiscal Year 2014
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Space)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
April 25, 2013                 Policy Relevant Climate Issues in Context               113-24*
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
April 26, 2013                 A Review of Federal Hydraulic Fracturing Research       113-25*
                                Activities
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Energy and the
                                Subcommittee on Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
May 7, 2013                    Keystone XL Pipeline: Examination of Scientific and     113-26*
                                Environmental Issues
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Energy and the
                                Subcommittee on Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
May 16, 2013                   Espionage Threats at Federal Laboratories: Balancing    113-28*
                                Scientific Cooperation while Protecting Critical
                                Information
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Oversight)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
May 9, 2013                    Exoplanet Discoveries: Have We Found Other Earths?      113-27*
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Space and the
                                Subcommittee on Research)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 113th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
May 21, 2013                   The Current and Future Applications of Biometric        113-29*
                                Technologies
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research and the
                                Subcommittee on Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
May 21, 2013                   Next Steps in Human Exploration to Mars and Beyond      113-30*
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Space)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
May 22, 2013                   America's Next Generation Supercomputer: The Exascale   113-31*
                                Challenge
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Energy)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
May 23, 2013                   Restoring U.S. Leadership in Weather Forecasting        113-32*
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 4, 2013                   STEM Education: The Administration's Proposed Re-       113-33
                                Organization
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 5, 2015                   Federal Efforts to Reduce the Impacts of Windstorms     113-34*
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research and the
                                Subcommittee on Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 12, 2013                  Background Check: Achievability of New Ozone Standards  113-35
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 18, 2013                  Business Meeting to amend Committee rules and approve   Business Meeting-2
                                Republican and Democrat subcommittee rosters
                               (Meeting held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 113th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 18, 2013                  Department of Energy Science & Technology Priorities    113-36
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 19, 2013                  NASA Authorization Act of 2013                          113-37
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Space)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 26, 2013                  Restoring U.S. Leadership in Weather Forecasting, Part  113-38
                                2
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 27, 2013                  Green Buildings - An Evaluation of Energy Savings       113-39*
                                Performance Contracts
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Oversight and the
                                Subcommittee on Energy)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
June 28, 2013                  H.R. 1786, National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act      .........................
                                Reauthorization of 2013
                               (Markup held by the Subcommittee on Research and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 9, 2013                   H.R. 2413, Weather Forecasting Improvement Act of 2013  .........................
                               (Markup held by the Subcommittee on Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 10, 2013                  Committee Print, H.R. --------, NASA Authorization Act  .........................
                                of 2013
                               (Markup held by the Subcommittee on Space)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 10, 2013                  Strategic Planning for Federal Manufacturing            113-40*
                                Competitiveness
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 113th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 11, 2013                  Oversight and Management of Department of Energy        113-41
                                National Laboratories and Science Activities
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Energy)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 18, 2013                  H.R. 2687, the ``National Aeronautics and Space         .........................
                                Administration Authorization Act of 2013''
                               (Markup held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 24, 2013                  Lessons Learned: EPA's Investigations of Hydraulic
                                Fracturing
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Environment and    113-42
                                the Subcommittee on Energy)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 24, 2013                  Improving Technology Transfer at Universities,          113-43*
                                Research Institutes and National Laboratories
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 25, 2013                  The Future of Coal: Utilizing America's Abundant        113-44
                                Energy Resources
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Energy)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
July 31, 2013                  The Frontiers of Human Brain Research                   113-45
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
August 1, 2013                 Business meeting to issue EPA subpoena and markup H.R.  H. Rept. 113-252**
                                2850, the EPA Hydraulic Fracturing Study Improvement
                                Act
                               (Meeting held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
August 1, 2013                 EPA's Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment - A Factual      113-46
                                Review of a Hypothetical Scenario
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Oversight)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 113th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
September 10, 2013             Examining Federal Advanced Manufacturing Programs       113-47
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
September 18, 2013             Methamphetamine Addiction: Using Science to Explore     113-48
                                Solutions
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
September 19, 2013             Dysfunction in Management of Weather and Climate        113-049
                                Satellites
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Oversight and
                                Subcommittee on Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
September 20, 2013             NASA Infrastructure: Enabling Discovery and Ensuring    113-050
                                Capability
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Space)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
October 29, 2013               EPA Power Plant Regulations: Is the Technology Ready?   113-051
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Environment and
                                the Subcommittee on Energy)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
November 14, 2013              Strengthening Transparency and Accountability within    113-054
                                the Environmental Protection Agency
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
November 19, 2013              Is My Data on Healthcare.gov Secure?                    113-055
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Committee on Science and Technology List of Hearings
               Date               with Publication Numbers plus List of Legislative          Publication Number
                                         Reports filed in the 113th Congress
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
November 20, 2013              Commercial Space                                        113-056
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Space)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
December 4, 2013               Astrobiology: Search for Biosignatures in our Solar     113-057
                                System and Beyond
                               (Hearing held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
December 5, 2013               H.R. 2413, the Weather Forecasting Improvement Act of   .........................
                                2013
                               (Markup held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
December 5, 2013               H.R. 2431, the National Integrated Drought Information  .........................
                                System Reauthorization Act of 2013
                               (Markup held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
December 5, 2013               H.R. 2981, the Technology and Research Accelerating     .........................
                                National Security and Future Economic Resiliency Act
                                of 2013
                               (Markup held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
December 5, 2013               H.R. 3625, To provide for termination liability costs   .........................
                                for certain National Aeronautics and Space
                                Administration projects, and for other purposes
                               (Markup held by the Committee on Science, Space, and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
December 11, 2013              A Factual Look at the Relationship Between Climate and  113-058
                                Weather
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Environment)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
December 12, 2013              Building a Network for Manufacturing Innovation         113-059
                               (Hearing held by the Subcommittee on Research and
                                Technology)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

*LHearings that have been printed.
**LReports that have been printed.