H. Rept. 113-308 - 113th Congress (2013-2014)
December 27, 2013, As Reported by the Agriculture Committee

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House Report 113-308 - REPORT ON ACTIVITIES DURING THE 113TH CONGRESS FIRST SESSION (JANUARY 3, 2013 TO DECEMBER 27, 2013)




[House Report 113-308]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]


                                                 Union Calendar No. 226

113th Congress, 1st Session - - - - - - - - - - - House Report 113-308


                          REPORT ON ACTIVITIES

                       DURING THE 113TH CONGRESS

                             FIRST SESSION

                 (JANUARY 3, 2013 TO DECEMBER 27, 2013)

                               __________

                              R E P O R T

                                 of the

                        COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE

                     U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>


 December 27, 2013.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed



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                        COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE

                   FRANK D. LUCAS, Oklahoma, Chairman
BOB GOODLATTE, Virginia,             COLLIN C. PETERSON, Minnesota, 
    Vice Chairman                        Ranking Minority Member
STEVE KING, Iowa                     MIKE McINTYRE, North Carolina
RANDY NEUGEBAUER, Texas              DAVID SCOTT, Georgia
MIKE ROGERS, Alabama                 JIM COSTA, California
K. MICHAEL CONAWAY, Texas            TIMOTHY J. WALZ, Minnesota
GLENN THOMPSON, Pennsylvania         KURT SCHRADER, Oregon
BOB GIBBS, Ohio                      MARCIA L. FUDGE, Ohio
AUSTIN SCOTT, Georgia                JAMES P. McGOVERN, Massachusetts
SCOTT R. TIPTON, Colorado            SUZAN K. DelBENE, Washington
ERIC A. ``RICK'' CRAWFORD, Arkansas  GLORIA NEGRETE McLEOD, California
SCOTT DesJARLAIS, Tennessee          FILEMON VELA, Texas
CHRISTOPHER P. GIBSON, New York      MICHELLE LUJAN GRISHAM, New Mexico
VICKY HARTZLER, Missouri             ANN M. KUSTER, New Hampshire
REID J. RIBBLE, Wisconsin            RICHARD M. NOLAN, Minnesota
KRISTI L. NOEM, South Dakota         PETE P. GALLEGO, Texas
DAN BENISHEK, Michigan               WILLIAM L. ENYART, Illinois
JEFF DENHAM, California              JUAN VARGAS, California
STEPHEN LEE FINCHER, Tennessee       CHERI BUSTOS, Illinois
DOUG LaMALFA, California             SEAN PATRICK MALONEY, New York
RICHARD HUDSON, North Carolina       JOE COURTNEY, Connecticut
RODNEY DAVIS, Illinois               JOHN GARAMENDI, California
CHRIS COLLINS, New York
TED S. YOHO, Florida
VANCE M. McALLISTER, Louisiana
                                 ------                                
                      Nicole Scott, Staff Director
                     Kevin J. Kramp, Chief Counsel
                 Tamara Hinton, Communications Director
                Robert L. Larew, Minority Staff Director
                          LETTER OF SUBMITTAL

                              ----------                              

                          House of Representatives,
                                  Committee on Agriculture,
                               Washington, D.C., December 27, 2013.

    Hon. Karen L. Hass,
    Clerk of the House of Representatives,
    Washington, D.C.

    Dear Ms. Hass: Pursuant to rule XI, clause 1(d), of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives, I herewith submit to the 
House a report of the activities of the Committee on 
Agriculture during the first session of the 113th Congress.
    With best wishes, I am
            Sincerely,
                               Hon. Frank D. Lucas,
                                                  Chairman.
                             C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
I. Summary of Organization, Jurisdiction, and Oversight Plan of 
  the Committee on Agriculture...................................     1
    A. Organization..............................................     1
    B. Committee Jurisdiction....................................     3
    C. Oversight Plan............................................     7
II. Committee Activities During the First Session of the 113th 
  Congress.......................................................    18
    A. Main Legislative Activities...............................    18
    B. Statistical Summary of Activities.........................    24
    C. Digest of Bills Within the Jurisdiction of the Committee 
      on Which Action Has Been Taken.............................    25
        1. Bills Enacted into Law................................    25
        2. Bills Acted on by the House But Not the Senate........    28
        3. House Resolutions Considered in the House.............    36
        4. Bills Reported by the Committee on Agriculture But Not 
          Considered.............................................    37
        5. Bills Reported by Other Committees Within the 
          Committee on Agriculture's Jurisdiction But Not 
          Considered.............................................    37
        6. Bills Ordered Reported by the Committee on Agriculture    38
        7. Bills Ordered Reported But Not Reported by Other 
          Committees Within the Committee on Agriculture's 
          Jurisdiction...........................................    39
        8. Bills Defeated........................................    42
        9. Bills Acted on by the Committee Included in the Other 
          Laws Enacted...........................................    60
        10. Bills Vetoed.........................................    61
        11. Bills Acted on by Both Houses But Not Enacted........    61
        12. Concurrent Resolutions Approved......................    73
    D. Oversight.................................................    73
        1. Oversight Hearings....................................    74
        2. Legislative Hearings..................................    75
    E. Printed Hearings..........................................    76
    F. Meetings Not Printed......................................    77
    G. Committee Prints..........................................    77
    H. Watersheds................................................    77
III. Appendix....................................................    77
    A. Executive Communications..................................    77
    B. Statutory and Special Reports.............................    94
    C. Memorials.................................................   101
    D. Petitions.................................................   101


                                                 Union Calendar No. 226
113th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                    113-308

======================================================================



 
 REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE ON ACTIVITIES DURING THE 113TH 
                                CONGRESS

                                _______
                                

 December 27, 2013.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

 Mr. Lucas, from the Committee on Agriculture, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

    In accordance with rule XI, clause 1(d), of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the Committee on Agriculture 
reports herewith on its activities during the 113th Congress.

  I. Summary of Organization, Jurisdiction, and Oversight Plan of the 
                        Committee on Agriculture


                            a. organization

    The House of Representatives established the total 
authorized membership of the Committee on Agriculture for the 
113th Congress at 46, with a party division of 25 Republicans 
and 21 Democrats. Among the committee members were 14 
Representatives who were serving their first terms (LaMalfa, 
Hudson, Rodney Davis of IL, Collins of NY, Yoho, Negrete 
McLeod, Vela, Lujan Grisham, Kuster, Gallego, Enyart, Vargas, 
Bustos, and Maloney).
    The Committee organized on January 23, 2013, into six 
subcommittees, five of which were assigned jurisdiction over 
major agricultural commodities and one that dealt with various 
related agricultural operations. The six subcommittees were 
constituted as follows:

                        SUBCOMMITTEE ASSIGNMENTS

    (Ratio includes ex officio Members.)
    (Frank D. Lucas, Chairman, and Collin C. Peterson, Ranking 
Minority Member, are ex officio Members of all Subcommittees.)
    The Committee organized on January 25, 2011, into six 
subcommittees, five of which were assigned jurisdiction over 
major agricultural commodities and one that dealt with various 
related agricultural operations. The six subcommittees were 
constituted as follows:

           Subcommittee on Conservation, Energy, and Forestry
                        (Ratio 10-8 (Total 18))

  GLENN THOMPSON, Pennsylvania, 
             Chairman
TIMOTHY J. WALZ, Minnesota, Ranking Minority Memberlabama
GLORIA NEGRETE McLEOD, California    BOB GIBBS, Ohio
ANN M. KUSTER, New Hampshire         SCOTT R. TIPTON, Colorado
RICHARD M. NOLAN, Minnesota          ERIC A. ``RICK'' CRAWFORD, 
MIKE McINTYRE, North Carolina        Arkansas
KURT SCHRADER, Oregon                MARTHA ROBY, AlabamaV
SUZAN K. DelBENE, Washington         REID J. RIBBLE, Wisconsin
                                     KRISTI L. NOEM, South Dakota
                                     DAN BENISHEK, Michigan
                                     ----

    Jurisdiction: Soil, water, and resource conservation, small 
watershed program, energy and biobased energy production, rural 
electrification, forestry in general and forest reserves other 
than those created from the public domain.

                                 ------                                

      Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management
                        (Ratio 16-13 (Total 29))

    K. MICHAEL CONAWAY, Texas, 
             Chairman
DAVID SCOTT, Georgia, Ranking Minority MemberUGEBAUER, Texas
FILEMON VELA, Texas                  MIKE ROGERS, Alabama
PETE P. GALLEGO, Texas               BOB GIBBS, Ohio
WILLIAM L. ENYART, Illinois          AUSTIN SCOTT, Georgia
JUAN VARGAS, California              ERIC A. ``RICK'' CRAWFORD, 
CHERI BUSTOS, Illinois               Arkansas
SEAN PATRICK MALONEY, New York       MARTHA ROBY, AlabamaV
TIMOTHY J. WALZ, Minnesota           CHRISTOPHER P. GIBSON, New York
GLORIA NEGRETE McLEOD, California    VICKY HARTZLER, Missouri
JIM COSTA, California                KRISTI L. NOEM, South Dakota
JOHN GARAMENDI, Californiax          DAN BENISHEK, Michigan
----                                 DOUG LaMALFA, California
                                     RICHARD HUDSON, North Carolina
                                     RODNEY DAVIS, Illinois
                                     CHRIS COLLINS, New York
                                     ----

    Jurisdiction: Program and markets related to cotton, 
cottonseed, wheat, feed grains, soybeans, oilseeds, rice, dry 
beans, peas, lentils, the Commodity Credit Corporation, risk 
management, including crop insurance, commodity exchanges, and 
specialty crops.

                                 ------                                

  Subcommittee on Horticulture, Research, Biotechnology, and Foreign 
                   Agriculture (Ratio 9-8 (Total 17))

  AUSTIN SCOTT, Georgia, Chairman
KURT SCHRADER, Oregon, Ranking Minority MemberTHERLAND II, Floridav
SUZAN K. DelBENE, Washington         VICKY HARTZLER, Missouri
JIM COSTA, California                JEFF DENHAM, California
MARCIA L. FUDGE, Ohio                STEPHEN LEE FINCHER, TennesseeX
ANN M. KUSTER, New Hampshire         DOUG LaMALFA, California
JUAN VARGAS, California              RODNEY DAVIS, Illinois
SEAN PATRICK MALONEY, New York       CHRIS COLLINS, New York
                                     TED S. YOHO, Florida

    Jurisdiction: Fruits and vegetables, honey and bees, 
marketing and promotion orders, plant pesticides, quarantine, 
adulteration of seeds and insect pests, and organic 
agriculture, research, education and extension, biotechnology 
and foreign agriculture assistance, and trade promotion 
programs, generally.

                                 ------                                

 Subcommittee on Livestock, Rural Development, and Credit (Ratio 14-12 
                              (Total 26))

    ERIC A. ``RICK'' CRAWFORD, 
        Arkansas, Chairman
JIM COSTA, California,  Ranking Minority MemberTTE, Virginia
MIKE McINTYRE, North Carolina        STEVE KING, Iowa
DAVID SCOTT, Georgia                 RANDY NEUGEBAUER, Texas
FILEMON VELA, Texas                  MIKE ROGERS, Alabama
MICHELLE LUJAN GRISHAM, New Mexico   K. MICHAEL CONAWAY, Texas
PETE P. GALLEGO, Texas               GLENN THOMPSON, Pennsylvania
WILLIAM L. ENYART, Illinois          SCOTT DesJARLAIS, Tennessee
CHERI BUSTOS, Illinois               CHRISTOPHER P. GIBSON, New York
KURT SCHRADER, Oregon                REID J. RIBBLE, Wisconsin
RICHARD M. NOLAN, Minnesotaw         JEFF DENHAM, California
JOE COURTNEY, Connecticutw           RICHARD HUDSON, North Carolina
                                     TED S. YOHO, Florida

    Jurisdiction: Livestock, dairy, poultry, meat, seafood and 
seafood products, inspection, marketing, and promotion of such 
commodities, aquaculture, animal welfare, and grazing, rural 
development, farm security and family farming matters, and 
agricultural credit.

                                 ------                                

Subcommittee on Department Operations, Oversight, and Nutrition (Ratio 
                            7-6 (Total 13))

    STEVE KING, Iowa, Chairman
MARCIA L. FUDGE, Ohio, Ranking Minority MemberATTE, Virginia
JAMES P. McGOVERN, Massachusetts     BOB GIBBS, OHIO
MICHELLE LUJAN GRISHAM, New Mexico   AUSTIN SCOTT, Georgia
GLORIA NEGRETE McLEOD, California    STEVE SOUTHERLAND II, Floridav
----                                 MARTHA ROBY, AlabamaV
                                     STEPHEN LEE FINCHER, TennesseeX
                                     ----

    Jurisdiction: Agency oversight, review and analysis, 
special investigations, food stamps, nutrition and consumer 
programs.

                        Section Endnotes

    VDecember 11, 2013--Resigned from Committee and 
Subcommittees.
    xFebruary 26, 2013--Appointed to Subcommittee.
    vFebruary 26, 2013--Resigned from Committee and 
Subcommittees.
    XFebruary 26, 2013--Appointed to Committee and 
Subcommittees.
    wJanuary 28, 2013--Appointed to Subcommittee.

                       b. committee jurisdiction

    Under Rules adopted by the House of Representatives for the 
113th Congress, the Committee on Agriculture's (hereinafter 
also referred to as Committee) jurisdiction (See Rule X, clause 
1 of the Rules of the House of Representatives) extended to--

    (1) Adulteration of seeds, insect pests, and protection of 
        birds and animals in forest reserves.

    (2) Agriculture generally.

    (3) Agricultural and industrial chemistry.

    (4) Agricultural colleges and experiment stations.

    (5) Agricultural economics and research.

    (6) Agricultural education extension services.

    (7) Agricultural production and marketing and stabilization 
        of prices of agricultural products, and commodities 
        (not including distribution outside of the United 
        States).

    (8) Animal industry and diseases of animals.

    (9) Commodity exchanges.

    (10) Crop insurance and soil conservation.

    (11) Dairy industry.

    (12) Entomology and plant quarantine.

    (13) Extension of farm credit and farm security.

    (14) Inspection of livestock, poultry, meat products, and 
        seafood and seafood products.

    (15) Forestry in general, and forest reserves other than 
        those created from the public domain.

    (16) Human nutrition and home economics.

    (17) Plant industry, soils, and agricultural engineering.

    (18) Rural electrification.

    (19) Rural development.

    (20) Water conservation related to activities of the 
        Department of Agriculture.

    The revised edition of the Rules and Manual of the House of 
Representatives for the 107th Congress (House Document No. 106-
320) provides the following concerning the Committee on 
Agriculture:\1\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\References are to the volume and section of Hinds' (volumes I-V, 
e.g., IV, 500) and Cannon's (volumes VI-VIII, e.g., VI, 400) Precedents 
of the House of Representatives, and to the Congressional Record by 
date and page (e.g., January 3, 1953, p. 500).

          ``This Committee was established in 1820 (IV, 4149). 
        In 1880 the subject of forestry was added to its 
        jurisdiction, and the Committee was conferred authority 
        to receive estimates of and to report appropriations 
        (IV, 4149). However, on July 1, 1920, authority to 
        report appropriations for the U.S. Department of 
        Agriculture was transferred to the Committee on 
        Appropriations (VII, 1860).
          The basic form of the present jurisdictional 
        statement was made effective January 2, 1947, as a part 
        of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 (60 Stat. 
        812). Subparagraph (7) was altered by the 93d Congress, 
        effective January 3, 1975, to include jurisdiction over 
        agricultural commodities (including the Commodity 
        Credit Corporation) while transferring jurisdiction 
        over foreign distribution and non-domestic production 
        of commodities to the Committee on International 
        Relations (H. Res. 988, 93d Cong., Oct[.] 8, 1974, p. 
        34470). Nevertheless, the Committee has retained a 
        limited jurisdiction over measures to release CCC 
        stocks for such foreign distribution (Sept. 14, 1989, 
        p. 20428). Previously unstated jurisdictions over 
        commodities exchanges and rural development were 
        codified effective January 3, 1975.
          The 104th Congress consolidated the Committee's 
        jurisdiction over inspection of livestock and meat 
        products to include inspection of poultry, seafood, and 
        seafood products, and added subparagraph (20) relating 
        to water conservation (sec. 202(a), H. Res. 6, Jan. 4, 
        1995, p. 464). Clerical and stylistic changes were 
        effected when the House recodified its rules in the 
        106th Congress (H. Res. 5. Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47).
          The Committee has had jurisdiction of bills for 
        establishing and regulating the Department of 
        Agriculture (IV, 4150), for inspection of livestock and 
        meat products, regulation of animal industry, diseases 
        of animals (IV, 4154; VII, 1862), adulteration of 
        seeds, insect pests, protection of birds and animals in 
        forest reserves (IV, 4157; VII, 1870), the improvement 
        of the breed of horses, even with the cavalry service 
        in view (IV, 4158; VII, 1865), and in addition to the 
        Committee on Energy and Commerce, amending Horse 
        Protection Act to prevent the shipping, transporting, 
        moving, delivering, or receiving of horses to be 
        slaughtered for human consumption (July 13, 2006, p. 
        5270).
          The Committee, having charge of the general subject 
        of forestry, has reported bills relating to timber, and 
        forest reserves other than those created from the 
        public domain (IV, 4160). The Committee on Natural 
        Resources, and not this committee, has jurisdiction 
        over a bill to convey land that is part of a National 
        Forest created from the public domain (March 23, 2004, 
        p. 1344). It has also exercised jurisdiction of bills 
        relating to agricultural colleges and experiment 
        stations (IV, 4152), incorporation of agricultural 
        societies (IV, 4159), and establishment of a highway 
        commission (IV, 4153), to discourage fictitious and 
        gambling transactions in farm products (IV, 4161; VII, 
        1861), to regulate the transportation, sale and 
        handling of dogs and cats intended for use in research 
        and the licensing of animal research facilities (July 
        29, 1965, p. 18691); and to designate an agricultural 
        research center (May 14, 1995, p. 11070). The Committee 
        shares with the Committee on the Judiciary jurisdiction 
        over a bill comprehensively amending the Immigration 
        and Nationality Act and including food stamp 
        eligibility requirements for aliens (Sept. 19, 1995, p. 
        25533).
          The House referred the President's message dealing 
        with the refinancing of farm-mortgage indebtedness to 
        the Committee, thus conferring jurisdiction (April 4, 
        1933, p. 1209).
          The Committee has jurisdiction over a bill relating 
        solely to executive level position in the Department of 
        Agriculture (Mar. 2, 1976, p. 4958) and has 
        jurisdiction over bills to develop land and water 
        conservation programs on private and non-Federal lands 
        (June 7, 1976, p. 16768).''

    Some of the specific areas in which the Committee on 
Agriculture exercises its jurisdiction or that have been 
created for the Committee by historical reference include:

    (1) Public Law 480, Eighty-third Congress, the restoration, 
        expansion, and development of foreign markets for 
        United States agricultural products; and the effect of 
        the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (and the 
        North American Free Trade Agreement), bilateral free 
        trade agreements, the European Community, and other 
        regional economic agreements and commodity marketing 
        and pricing systems on United States agriculture.

    (2) All matters relating to the establishment and 
        development of an effective Foreign Agricultural 
        Service.

    (3) Matters relating to rural development, including rural 
        telephone companies, farm credit banks, farm rural 
        housing loans, rural water supply, rural flood control 
        and water pollution control programs, and loans for 
        rural firehouses, community facilities, and businesses.

    (4) Production and use of energy from agricultural and 
        forestry resources.

    (5) Matters relating to the development, use, and 
        administration of the National Forests, including, but 
        not limited to, development of a sound program for 
        general public use of the National Forests consistent 
        with watershed protection and sustained-yield timber 
        management, study of the forest fire prevention and 
        control policies and activities of the Forest Service 
        and their relation to coordinated activities of other 
        Federal, State, and private agencies; Forest Service 
        land exchanges; and wilderness and similar use 
        designations applied to National Forest land.

    (6) Price spreads of agricultural commodities between 
        producers and consumers.

    (7) The formulation and development of improved programs 
        for agricultural commodities; matters relating to the 
        inspection, grading, and marketing of such commodities, 
        including seafood; and food safety generally.

    (8) Matters relating to trading in futures contracts for 
        all commodities and similar instruments, including 
        commodity options and commodity leverage contracts.

    (9) The administration and operation of agricultural 
        programs through State and county committees and the 
        administrative policies and procedures relating to the 
        selection, election, and operation of such committees.

    (10) The administration and development of small watershed 
        programs under Public Law 566, Eighty-third Congress, 
        as amended, and the development of resource 
        conservation and development programs for rural areas.

    (11) Programs of food assistance or distribution supported 
        in whole or in part by funds of the Department of 
        Agriculture, including but not limited to the food 
        stamp program and the commodity distribution program.

    (12) Aquaculture programs of the Department of Agriculture.

    (13) Sugar legislation, including import control programs 
        that stabilize domestic prices.

    (14) All matters relating to pesticides, the Federal 
        Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, as 
        amended, the Federal Environmental Pesticide Control 
        Act of 1972, the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and 
        Rodenticide Act Amendments of 1988, and the Food 
        Quality Protection Act of 1996, including, but not 
        limited to, the registration, marketing, and safe use 
        of pesticides, groundwater contamination, and the 
        coordination of the pesticide program under FIFRA with 
        food safety programs.

    (15) Agricultural research programs, including, but not 
        limited to, the authorization of specific research 
        projects and agricultural biotechnology development 
        efforts.

    (16) All matters relating to the Commodity Credit 
        Corporation Charter Act.

    (17) Legislation relating to the control of the entry into 
        the United States of temporary, nonresident aliens for 
        employment in agricultural production.

    (18) Legislation relating to the general operations and the 
        Organic Act of the Department of Agriculture, the 
        Commodity Credit Corporation, Federal Crop Insurance 
        Corporation, Farm Credit Administration, Farm Credit 
        System, Federal Agricultural Mortgage Corporation, and 
        Commodity Futures Trading Commission.

    (19) Producer-funded research, promotion, and consumer and 
        industry information programs for agricultural 
        commodities.

    (20) Legislation regarding reclamation water projects where 
        the pricing of water delivered by such projects is 
        affected by whether the water will be used in the 
        production of a crop for which an acreage reduction 
        program is in effect.

    (21) Legislation regarding reclamation water projects for 
        which the Secretary of Agriculture is required to make 
        a determination regarding commodity availability prior 
        to the determination of the price to be charged for the 
        delivery of such project water.

    (22) Legislation establishing the level of fees charged by 
        the Federal Government for the grazing of livestock on 
        Federal lands.

    (23) Legislation governing the Federal regulation of 
        transactions involving swaps contracts, hybrid 
        financial instruments, and derivative securities and 
        financial products.

    (24) Legislation regarding the Federal Reserve Board with 
        respect to its authority to regulate the establishment 
        of appropriate levels of margin on stock index futures 
        contracts.

    The Committee also reviews and studies, on a continuing 
basis, the current and prospective application, administration, 
execution, and effectiveness of those laws, or parts of laws, 
the subject matter of which is within the jurisdiction of the 
Committee, and the organization and operation of the Federal 
agencies and entities having responsibilities in or for the 
administration and execution thereof. In addition, the 
Committee, along with other standing Committees of the House, 
has the function of reviewing and studying on a continuing 
basis the effect or probable effect of tax and other fiscal and 
monetary policies affecting subjects within their jurisdiction.

                           c. oversight plan

    The Committee on Agriculture met on February 13, 2013 to 
also fulfill the General Oversight Responsibility reporting 
requirements of Rule X 2(d)(1) of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives.
    The following outline was prepared in consultation with the 
Ranking Minority Member and approved by the Full Committee 
which was forwarded to the Committee on Oversight and 
Government Reform and the Committee on House Administration on 
February 13, 2013:

      Oversight Plan House Committee on Agriculture 113TH Congress

    The committee expects to exercise appropriate oversight 
activity with regard to the following issues:

2008 Farm Bill and Current Agricultural Conditions

  
 Review the current state of the U.S. farm economy;

  
 Review the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) 
        implementation of the Food, Conservation, and Energy 
        Act of 2008 (FCEA) as extended;

  
 Review policy proposals regarding farm bill 
        development;

  
 Review programs that may be inefficient, 
        duplicative, outdated or more appropriately 
        administered by State or local governments for possible 
        cuts or elimination;

  
 Review programs for waste, fraud and abuse;

  
 Review USDA's initial and subsequent implementation 
        of FCEA payment limit and adjusted gross income 
        provisions;

  
 Review the state of credit conditions and 
        availability in rural America;

  
 Review the impact of weather conditions on crop 
        production;

  
 Review USDA's activities regarding implementation of 
        the U.S. Warehouse Act;

  
 Review USDA's implementation of actively-engaged 
        rules;

  
 Review of market situation, including impact of crop 
        reports and projections;

  
 Review USDA's implementation of the U.S. Grain 
        Standards Act;

  
 Review USDA's implementation of the Fair and 
        Equitable Tobacco Reform Act of 2004;

  
 Review the impact of the potential sequestration 
        order on programs and activities authorized by the 
        Agriculture Committee;

  
 Review how Administrative Pay-Go is affecting 
        Department actions; and

  
 Review discretionary actions by USDA that are not 
        directly authorized by legislation.

Energy

  
 Assess energy programs authorized by FCEA;

  
 Review administration of the Biomass Crop Assistance 
        Program (BCAP);

  
 Review activities funded by the Biomass Research and 
        Development Act (BRDA) and input from the external BRDA 
        Advisory Board;

  
 Review availability of agriculture and forestry 
        feedstocks for renewable energy production;

  
 Review current status of research on energy crops 
        and feedstocks;

  
 Review RUS electric loan program;

  
 Review electricity reliability in rural America;

  
 Review current provisions in existing law that 
        support agriculture-based energy production and use;

  
 Review the implementation of the Renewable Fuels 
        Standard (RFS);

  
 Review programs that may be inefficient, 
        duplicative, outdated or more appropriately 
        administered by State or local governments for possible 
        cuts or elimination;

  
 Review renewable fuel programs and their impact on 
        agriculture; and

  
 Review USDA's energy infrastructure initiative.

Conservation and the Environment

  
 Review the impact of regulatory activities by the 
        EPA and its effect on agriculture productivity;

  
 Review the impact of regulatory activities carried 
        out pursuant to the Endangered Species Act (ESA), or 
        any proposed legislative changes to such Act, on 
        agricultural producers;

  
 Review the impact of the Administration's regulatory 
        activity relative to methyl bromide on production of 
        agriculture in the U.S.;

  
 Review any proposed legislation to implement the 
        Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants, 
        the Protocol on Persistent Organic Pollutants to the 
        Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution, 
        and the Rotterdam Convention on the Prior Informed 
        Consent Procedure for Certain Hazardous Chemicals and 
        Pesticides in International Trade;

  
 Review the International Treaty on Plant Genetic 
        Resources for Food and Agriculture;

  
 Review budget and program activities of the NRCS;

  
 Review implementation of all of USDA's conservation 
        programs;

  
 Review NRCS's efforts to streamline program delivery 
        and field operations;

  
 Review conservation streamlining initiatives to 
        eliminate duplicative and overlapping programs;

  
 Review programs that may be inefficient, 
        duplicative, outdated or more appropriately 
        administered by State or local governments for possible 
        cuts or elimination;

  
 Review EPA's jurisdiction under the Clean Water Act 
        (CWA) and its impact to U.S. agriculture;

  
 Review of potential impacts of EPA's Clean Air Act 
        (CAA) regulatory program on U.S. agriculture;

  
 Review ongoing discussions and potential 
        consequences for American agriculture under the United 
        Nations Climate Change Conference;

  
 Review EPA's implementation of the Food Quality 
        Protection Act (FQPA), FIFRA and Pesticide Registration 
        Improvement Renewal Act (PRIA 3);

  
 Review the impact of litigation and rulemaking 
        concerning FIFRA, ESA, CAA, CWA, the Comprehensive 
        Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act 
        (CERCLA) and the Emergency Planning and Community Right 
        to Know Act (EPCRA) and for impacts agricultural 
        operations;

  
 Review the EPA's regulatory actions in regard to 
        pesticide evaluations;

  
 Review EPA's regulation of Animal Feeding 
        Operations;

  
 Review the non-emergency haying and grazing 
        provisions of the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP); 
        and

  
 Review Total Maximum Daily Load strategies and 
        impacts on production agriculture.

Federal Crop Insurance and Risk Management

  
 Review USDA's implementation of crop insurance 
        provisions of the FCEA;

  
 Review the role and effectiveness of Federal Crop 
        Insurance;

  
 Review USDA's and the Risk Management Agency's (RMA) 
        administration and oversight of Federal Crop Insurance;

  
 Review the availability of crop insurance as a risk 
        management tool;

  
 Review of the adequacy and availability of risk 
        management tools for the livestock and dairy 
        industries;

  
 Review programs that may be inefficient, 
        duplicative, outdated or more appropriately 
        administered by State or local governments for possible 
        cuts or elimination;

  
 Review USDA's activities designed to find and reduce 
        crop insurance waste, fraud, and abuse;

  
 Review USDA's crop insurance rating methodology and 
        management of the Standard Reinsurance Agreement (SRA) 
        process;

  
 Review RMA's combination of revenue protection crop 
        insurance products; and

  
 Review RMA's progress in approving crop insurance 
        products for under-served commodities.

Implementation of Title VII of Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and 
        Consumer Protection Act

  
 In its review of rulemakings required by Title VII 
        of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer 
        Protection Act (P.L. 111-203) (Dodd-Frank Act), the 
        Committee will continue to ensure--

      (1) The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) 
            and U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) 
            rulemaking process is transparent and that 
            meaningful comment is allowed by the public;

      (2) An adequate cost-benefit analysis is performed by the 
            CFTC for each proposed or finalized rule;

      (3) The CFTC and SEC properly coordinate with both 
            domestic and international financial regulators;

      (4) Past exemptive relief orders or no action letters 
            issued by the CFTC and SEC provide the proper 
            relief for market participants;

      (5) Any final or proposed regulations have not harmed or 
            adversely impacted the U.S. economy or financial 
            markets, including the impact on jobs and 
            competitiveness; and

  
 The Committee will examine how Title VII rulemakings 
        have impacted U.S. market structure;

  
 The Committee will also examine the developing 
        impact of pending CFTC, SEC, and Prudential Regulator 
        regulations, such as the imposition of new margin and 
        capital requirements, and how they affect the ability 
        of many ``end-users'' to utilize swaps to hedge against 
        legitimate business risks;

  
 The Committee will examine the level of coordination 
        between U.S. and international regulators for potential 
        impacts on U.S. financial institutions compared to 
        their foreign counterparts; and

  
 The Committee will examine the feasibility of 
        timetables established by the Dodd-Frank Act in 
        building the data, technology and connectivity 
        necessary to meet regulatory objectives.

The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission and Oversight of the 
        Derivatives Markets

  
 Review the operations of the Commodity Futures 
        Trading Commission (CFTC);

  
 Review the growing consolidation and 
        internationalization of futures exchange trading;

  
 Review market machinations for exchange traded 
        energy and agricultural future products;

  
 Review enforcement and oversight capabilities of the 
        CFTC both domestically and internationally;

  
 The Committee will continue to examine how the 
        Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) and futures 
        industry as a whole has addressed the MF Global and 
        PFGBest bankruptcies from both an enforcement and 
        regulatory reform standpoint to ensure that proper 
        remedial action is taken to prevent future losses to 
        segregated funds of customers.

  
 In light of the Commodity Exchange Act statutory 
        authorization of the CFTC expiring at the end of FY 
        2013, the Committee will continue to examine all 
        sectors of the U.S. derivatives and futures markets, 
        including, but not limited to: exchange or swap 
        execution facility trading; the roles of dealers, 
        inter-dealer brokers, data repositories, and 
        clearinghouses; trade and price reporting; and 
        proposals aimed at protecting the segregated funds of 
        futures customers.

  
 The Committee will continue to examine the ongoing 
        investigation and enforcement action by the CFTC and 
        other Federal regulators with respect to the 
        manipulation of the London Interbank Offer Rate 
        (LIBOR).

  
 The Committee will review all operations of the 
        CFTC, including: a continued examination whether the 
        cost-benefit analysis required by section 15a of the 
        CEA is adequate with respect to proposed and finalized 
        rules; the efficiency of internal Commission actions; 
        and the enforcement and oversight capabilities of the 
        CFTC both domestically and internationally.

Agriculture Trade and International Food Aid

  
 Review domestic subsidies and protection currently 
        applied by agricultural product producing countries 
        around the world;

  
 Review ongoing multilateral, regional, and bilateral 
        trade negotiations (including WTO accession agreements) 
        to assess their potential impact on U.S. agriculture;

  
 Review implementation of existing trade agreements 
        and commitments as well as proposed new trade 
        agreements and commitments to determine--

      (1) whether they are consistent with current U.S. law;

      (2) whether they will promote economic development in 
            rural areas of the U.S.;

      (3) their impact or potential impact on current 
            production of import sensitive agricultural 
            commodities, and on exports of U.S. agricultural 
            products;

      (4) their impact or potential impact on the overall 
            competitiveness of the U.S. agricultural sector, 
            including the production, processing and 
            distribution of agricultural products; and

      (5) whether they provide adequate, enforceable provisions 
            to minimize non-tariff barriers to U.S. exports.

  
 Monitor existing trade agreements to ensure trading 
        partners are meeting obligations and enforcing trade 
        commitments;

  
 Review farm export programs to determine how well 
        they are promoting the interests of U.S. agriculture 
        and examine proposals to improve, modify or expand such 
        programs;

  
 Review U.S. food aid programs to determine their 
        impact or potential impact on the reduction of world 
        hunger. In particular, the committee will examine the 
        potential impact of multilateral trade negotiations on 
        the effectiveness of U.S. food aid programs;

  
 Review monitoring and evaluation activities carried 
        out by USDA and USAID; and

  
 Review sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) barriers and 
        other technical barriers to U.S. agricultural exports 
        and examine USDA efforts to eliminate such barriers.

Agricultural Research and Promotion

  
 Review implementation of biosecurity protocols at 
        USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) laboratories;

  
 Review USDA's implementation of research, education 
        and extension programs authorized in FCEA;

  
 Review the administration of the ARS research 
        stations and worksites;

  
 Review USDA's continuing ability to conduct foreign 
        animal disease research, training and diagnostic 
        programs at the National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility 
        following the transfer of the center to the Department 
        of Homeland Security;

  
 Assess Federal efforts to facilitate research and 
        development of aquacultural enterprises, specifically 
        focusing on the activities of the Joint Committee on 
        Aquaculture;

  
 Review USDA's regulation on organic standards;

  
 Review USDA's collection of organic production and 
        market data;

  
 Review administration of National Institute of Food 
        and Agriculture (NIFA);

  
 Review the administration of the Agricultural Food 
        Research Initiative;

  
 Review efforts to leverage Federal research 
        investment with state, local, and private sources of 
        funding;

  
 Review coordination between ARS, Economic Research 
        Service (ERS), NIFA and action agencies in USDA--such 
        as NRCS and FSA--in order to prevent duplicative 
        research;

  
 Review operation of the National Agricultural 
        Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory 
        Board;

  
 Review USDA's efforts to expand research and 
        development of pathogen reduction technologies;

  
 Review the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) 
        findings regarding cloned animal products;

  
 Evaluate the current mix of research funding 
        mechanisms to ensure maximum benefits from these 
        investments to producers, processors and consumers;

  
 Review administration of USDA's agricultural 
        marketing and promotion programs;

  
 Review coordination between USDA and DOE on energy 
        research programs;

  
 Review congressional appropriation process and 
        implications on research funding under ARS, ERS, NASS 
        and NIFA;

  
 Review ARS, ERS, NASS and NIFA national program 
        priorities;

  
 Oversight of research grant process to coordinate 
        and prevent overlapping research; and

  
 Review the potential for research and technology 
        transfer to address the needs of both the biofuels and 
        livestock industries.

Biotechnology

  
 Review current regulations and research regarding 
        animal and plant biotechnology;

  
 Review the FDA's regulatory activities regarding 
        genetically engineered animals;

  
 Assess USDA's efforts to develop and promote 
        benefits of biotechnology for increasing agricultural 
        productivity and combating hunger globally;

  
 Review USDA's management and controls over 
        biotechnology-derived material; and

  
 Review the impact of litigation on USDA's timeliness 
        in resolving petitions to deregulate products of 
        biotechnology.

U.S. Forest Service Administration

  
 Review U.S. Forest Service (USFS) strategy for 
        dealing with wildfire for coming years, including the 
        impact of hazardous fuels management, forest health 
        efforts and fire preparedness;

  
 Continue to monitor the effectiveness and efficiency 
        of the Forest Service fire management program;

  
 Review the impact of fire expenses on other USFS 
        program delivery;

  
 Assess the USFS strategy for timber harvesting on 
        Federal lands;

  
 Review impacts of environmental regulations on 
        National Forest land management;

  
 Review economic impacts of National Forest land 
        management on rural communities ; and

  
 Review USFS efforts to promote utilization of 
        National Forest timber for renewable energy purposes.

Dairy

  
 Review options to improve the efficiency and 
        effectiveness of dairy programs; and

  
 Review efficiency of Federal Milk Marketing Order 
        System.

Outreach and Civil Rights

  
 Review implementation of Section 14012 of the FCEA;

  
 Review the operations of the Office of Advocacy and 
        Outreach;

  
 Monitor USDA's outreach efforts to beginning, small 
        and minority farmers/ranchers;

  
 Review of the operations of the office of the 
        Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights;

  
 Review USDA's process for settling discrimination 
        claims and evaluating individual claims submitted 
        pursuant to such settlements;

  
 Review the delivery of USDA services and outreach 
        efforts on Indian reservations and tribal lands;

  
 Review implementation of Section 14003 of the FCEA;

  
 Review current status of Agricultural Census and 
        efforts to reach undercounted farmers and ranchers; and

  
 Review participation of minority farmers in FSA 
        County/Local Committees as well as outreach to increase 
        participation in County Committee elections.

USDA General Administration

  
 Review confidentiality of information provided to 
        USDA by agricultural producers;

  
 Review USDA's implementation of field office 
        consolidation for the purpose of effectively and 
        efficiently delivering commodity, conservation, energy 
        and rural development programs;

  
 Review agency appeals process and granting of 
        equitable relief as well as operation of the National 
        Appeals Division;

  
 Review USDA's efforts to modernize its Information 
        Technology (IT) systems; and

  
 Review the administrative structure of USDA for 
        effectiveness and additional efficiencies.

Farm Credit, Rural Development, and the Rural Economy

  
 Review Farm Credit Administration's (FCA) regulatory 
        program and activities regarding the Farm Credit System 
        (FCS) to assure the its safety and soundness;

  
 Review Farmer Mac activities and programs;

  
 Review FSA's direct and guaranteed loan programs and 
        graduation efforts;

  
 Review the Rural Electrification Act (REA);

  
 Review the farm economy and access to credit;

  
 Review implementation of rural development policies 
        and authorities contained in FCEA and the Consolidated 
        Farm and Rural Development Act;

  
 Review programs that may be inefficient, 
        duplicative, outdated or more appropriately 
        administered by State or local governments for possible 
        cuts or elimination;

  
 Conduct oversight of the USDA's Rural Broadband 
        Access Loan and Loan Guarantee Program;

  
 Review USDA Rural Development application processes 
        and internal controls related to both the Farm Bill and 
        P.L. 111-5 (Recovery Act) Programs;

  
 Review administration of the Rural Microentrepreneur 
        Assistance Program;

  
 Conduct oversight of the implementation of the 
        USDA's Telecommunications Programs;

  
 Review the status of the Rural Telephone Bank;

  
 Assess state of rural water systems and 
        effectiveness of Federal funding to build and upgrade 
        those systems;

  
 Assess effectiveness of USDA programs targeted 
        towards rural infrastructure;

  
 Review agriculture lending practices;

  
 Review public-private partnerships in lending 
        through guaranteed loans;

  
 Review definition of ``rural'' under rural 
        development programs; and

  
 Review rural development loan programs and default 
        rates.

USDA Food and Nutrition Programs

  
 Review food and nutrition programs including the 
        Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), fruit 
        and vegetable initiatives, the Emergency Food 
        Assistance Program (TEFAP), the Food Distribution on 
        Indian Reservations (FDPIR) and other commodity 
        distribution programs;

  
 Assess the level of participation by states in SNAP 
        and examine state options for administering SNAP;

  
 Review participant eligibility criteria for SNAP;

  
 Review the interaction between SNAP and other low-
        income assistance programs such as the Temporary 
        Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, the Low-
        Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), and 
        with provisions in the Affordable Care Act;

  
 Review SNAP work requirements and the efficiency and 
        accountability of the SNAP Employment & Training 
        program;

  
 Review efforts by USDA and the states to combat 
        waste, fraud and abuse within nutrition programs;

  
 Review buying patterns of SNAP recipients and 
        methods for encouraging balanced lifestyles;

  
 Review programs that may be inefficient, 
        duplicative, outdated or more appropriately 
        administered by State or local governments for possible 
        cuts or elimination;

  
 Review efforts by state SNAP administrators to 
        modernize and streamline their programs;

  
 Review the Community Food Project Program to ensure 
        cooperative grants are working;

  
 Review the SNAP retailer approval process; and

  
 Review the implementation of changes made to the 
        SNAP Nutrition Education Program.

Specialty Crops

  
 Review implementation of the Specialty Crop 
        Competitiveness Act;

  
 Assess operation of the Fruit and Vegetable (FAV) 
        planting prohibition pilot program;

  
 Review the Specialty Crop Block Grant program to 
        ensure that the grants awarded are enhancing the 
        specialty crop industry;

  
 Review farmers market programs;

  
 Review implementation and effectiveness of 
        cooperative plant health programs, including Plant Pest 
        and Disease Management and Disaster Prevention and the 
        Clean Plant Network; and

  
 Review the Specialty Crop Research Initiative.

Food Safety

  
 Review implementation of the FDA Food Safety 
        Modernization Act;

  
 Review implementation of the recent FDA Egg Safety 
        Rule;

  
 Review USDA's administration of meat and poultry 
        inspection laws and the FDA's food inspection 
        activities to ensure the development of scientifically 
        sound systems for food safety assurance;

  
 Review USDA's implementation of the catfish 
        inspection program;

  
 Review USDA's efforts to educate consumers regarding 
        safe food handling practices and streamline the 
        assessment and approval of food safety technologies;

  
 Review implementation of new protocols for meat, 
        poultry, eggs, or seafood safety inspection;

  
 Review USDA's enforcement of the Humane Methods of 
        Slaughter Act and humane handling regulations; and

  
 Review the mechanisms to establish scientifically 
        based international food safety standards.

Plant and Animal Health

  
 Review enforcement of the Animal Welfare Act;

  
 Assess Federal efforts to reduce threats to human, 
        animal, and plant health due to predatory and invasive 
        species;

  
 Review efforts of the Animal and Plant Health 
        Inspection Service (APHIS) to manage wildlife conflicts 
        in order to protect public health and safety;

  
 Assess USDA's Animal Disease Traceability Plan; and

  
 Review implementation of Sec. 10201--Plant pest and 
        disease management and disaster prevention.

Livestock Marketing

  
 Assess the effectiveness of the Grain Inspection, 
        Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) in 
        determining market manipulation in the livestock 
        industry;

  
 Review structural changes in agribusiness and the 
        potential cost and benefits for agricultural producers; 
        and

  
 Review the USDA's mandatory livestock price 
        reporting system.

Homeland and Agricultural Security

  
 Oversight of USDA's preparedness against terrorist 
        threats to agriculture production;

  
 Review cooperative efforts between the Department of 
        Homeland Security and USDA to prevent against foreign 
        animal disease; and

  
 Review agriculture inspection activities under the 
        Department of Homeland Security.

Miscellaneous

  
 Review the implementation and impact of The American 
        Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) on USDA 
        programs;

  
 Review the impact of transportation infrastructure 
        issues on agriculture and forestry; and

  
 Review USDA's implementation and enforcement of the 
        country of origin labeling rule including actions taken 
        by USDA to implement measures necessary to comply with 
        the recommendations and rulings of the WTO Dispute 
        Settlement Body on Certain Country of Origin Labeling 
        Requirement.

Consultation With Other Committees To Reduce Duplication

  
 With Natural Resources Committee on forestry issues, 
        ESA issues and other public land issues;

  
 With Science, Space, and Technology Committee on 
        research;

  
 With Ways and Means and Education and the Workforce 
        on nutrition programs;

  
 With Ways and Means on trade issues;

  
 With Homeland Security on importation of animal and 
        plant material and on research related to 
        agroterrorism;

  
 With the Judiciary on immigrant agricultural labor;

  
 With Energy and Commerce on food safety and biomass 
        energy programs both existing and new;

  
 With Transportation and Infrastructure on CWA 
        compliance issues;

  
 With Financial Services Committee on Dodd-Frank Act 
        issues;

  
 With Foreign Affairs on food aid and trade issues;

  
 With Small Business on addressing economic 
        opportunities for rural America; and

  
 With any other committee as appropriate.

II. Committee Activities During the First Session of the 113th Congress


                     a. main legislative activities

    The Committee on Agriculture reported or otherwise 
considered a variety of bills in the first session of the 113th 
Congress covering many of the diverse areas within its 
jurisdictional interests.
    Some of the major activities of the committee during the 
first session of 113th Congress included the following:

Agenda for the House Agriculture Committee

  
 The Agriculture Committee approached its business in 
        an open, transparent manner and maintained the strong 
        bipartisan tradition of the Committee. One of the main 
        priorities of the Committee during this Congress was to 
        provide oversight to the various Federal agencies 
        through the hearing process.

  
 The Agriculture Committee held 3 full committee 
        hearings and 5 business meetings during the first 
        session of the 113th Congress. Various subcommittees 
        held 5 hearings during the first session of the 113th 
        Congress

  
 The Committee heard testimony from Administration 
        officials on 4 occasions, including 2 testimonies from 
        U.S. Department of Agriculture representatives, and 3 
        from the Commodity Futures Trading Commission. 
        Additional testimony heard by the Committee was offered 
        by university researchers, nonprofit organizations, 
        trade groups, and farmers and ranchers from across the 
        United States and totaled 31 testimonies all together.

  
 The House Agriculture Committee successfully drafted 
        and passed out of Committee a bipartisan Farm Bill that 
        was the product of nearly three years of deliberation 
        that was done in public with input from all 
        perspectives.

  
 The House Agriculture Committee successfully passed 
        six bipartisan pieces of legislation aimed at reducing 
        the negative impacts of Title VII of the Dodd-Frank Act 
        on market participants and end-users within various 
        sectors of the economy. In addition, the Committee 
        passed a bipartisan bill that would require the CFTC to 
        prospectively quantify the cost and benefits of all 
        regulations passed by the agency.

  
 The House Agriculture Committee held four hearings 
        to examine the statutory reauthorization of the CFTC 
        within the Commodity Exchange Act. The hearings focused 
        on the CFTC's role and place in overseeing the futures 
        and swaps markets, current issues facing the 
        Commission, current issues facing end-users and market 
        participants, and recent regulatory proposals that were 
        designed to better protect futures customers from 
        unexpected market events.

The Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act (FARRM)

  
 Repealed outdated policies while reforming, 
        streaming, and consolidating over 100 government 
        programs. These reforms contribute to deficit reduction 
        of nearly $40 billion dollars, which is almost seven 
        times the amount of cuts to these programs under 
        sequestration.

  
 Eliminates direct payments, repeals the ACRE 
        program, the disaster program for crops, and the 
        counter-cyclical program. A savings of $23 billion.

  
 Creates a more market-oriented approach to policy 
        where there is no support when market prices are high. 
        Encourage responsible risk management where farmers are 
        able to plan for catastrophic events.

  
 FARRM also reforms SNAP for the first time in 
        decades by ensuring that states which administer the 
        program cannot circumvent the law and endanger the 
        integrity of the program.

  
 End the broad-based categorical eligibility loophole 
        that states use to waive the asset and income tests set 
        by Congress.

  
  FARRM eliminates the practice of advertising, 
        promoting, and recruiting for SNAP and restrict lottery 
        winners and traditional college students.

  
 The FARRM Act eliminates and consolidates 23 
        duplicative and overlapping conservation programs into 
        13, which saves nearly 7 billion.

  
 Authorize and strengthen livestock disaster 
        assistance during devastating droughts.

  
 Invests in core specialty crop initiatives like the 
        Specialty Crop Block Grants and Plant Pest and Disease 
        Management and Prevention Programs.

  
 Maintains our investment in agriculture research 
        that gives farmers and ranchers the ability to explore 
        new ways to provide our country with the safest, most 
        affordable, most reliable food supply in the world.

Legislation Reducing Burdens Associated with the Dodd-Frank Wall Street 
        Reform and Consumer Protection Act

Business Risk Mitigation and Price Stabilization Act of 2013

  
 The bill clarifies congressional intent and provides 
        an explicit exemption from margin requirements for non-
        financial end-users that qualify for the clearing 
        exception, including cooperatives that are provided a 
        clearing exemption by CFTC regulations.

  
 Over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives enable businesses 
        across the country to manage the risks associated with 
        their day-to-day operations.

  
 Consumers, in turn, benefit from companies' prudent 
        risk management activities through lower volatility in 
        the prices of day-to-day goods and services such as 
        food, electricity, and transportation.

  
 For this reason, Congress provided an explicit 
        exemption from clearing and margin for end-users in 
        Title VII of the Dodd-Frank Act. These exemptions are 
        aimed at ensuring end-users do not have to divert 
        precious working capital to margin requirements, 
        keeping those dollars at work in the economy.

  
 While the CFTC has upheld congressional intent in 
        its margin proposal by exempting non-financial end-
        users, the banking regulators have proposed to require 
        non-financial end-users to post margin when they trade 
        with swap dealers that are banks, a problem that this 
        bill addresses.

The Swap Data Repository and Clearinghouse Indemnification Correction 
        Act of 2013

  
 Swap data repositories serve as electronic 
        warehouses for data and information regarding swap 
        transactions. Historically, swap data repositories 
        (SDRs) have regularly shared information with foreign 
        regulators.

  
 Under Sections 725, 728 and 763 of the Dodd-Frank 
        Act, when a foreign regulator requests information from 
        a U.S. registered SDR or derivatives clearing 
        organization (DCO), the SDR or DCO is required to 
        receive a written agreement from the foreign regulator 
        stating that it will abide by certain confidentiality 
        requirements and will ``indemnify'' the Commissions for 
        any expenses arising from litigation relating to the 
        request for information.

    
 The concept of ``indemnification''--requiring 
            a party to contractually agree to pay for another 
            party's possible litigation expenses--is only well 
            established in U.S. tort law, and does not exist in 
            practice or in legal concept in foreign legal 
            jurisdictions.

  
 These indemnification provisions-which were not 
        included in the financial reform bill passed by the 
        House of Representatives in December 2009--threaten to 
        make data sharing arrangements with foreign regulators 
        unworkable. Foreign regulators will most likely refuse 
        to indemnify U.S. regulators for litigation expenses in 
        exchange for access to data.

    
 As a result, foreign regulators may establish 
            their own data repositories and clearing 
            organizations to ensure they have access to data 
            they need to perform their supervisory duties.

  
 This legislation strikes the indemnification 
        requirements related to both swap data gathered by swap 
        data repositories (SDRs) and data collected by the 
        Commission from clearinghouses.

  
 The bill does maintain, however, that before an SDR, 
        DCO, or the Commission can share information with other 
        regulators, they have to receive a written agreement 
        that the regulator will abide by certain 
        confidentiality agreements.

The Public Power Risk Management Act of 2013

  
 This bipartisan legislation that would allow 
        producers, utility companies, and other non-financial 
        entities to continue entering into energy swaps with 
        government-owned utilities (aka: utility special 
        entities) without requiring them to register with the 
        CFTC as a ``swap dealers'' solely because of their 
        dealings with government-owned utilities.

  
 With a utility special entity there are no 
        shareholders, so the costs imposed by this CFTC 
        regulatory decision, born from the Dodd-Frank Act, will 
        be paid for by everyday consumers and ratepayers of 
        electric power and natural gas.

  
 As a group, public power utilities deliver 
        electricity to one in every seven electricity customers 
        in the United States--over 47 million people--serving 
        some of the nation's largest cities, such as Los 
        Angeles, San Antonio, Seattle and Orlando. However, the 
        vast majority of public power companies serve 
        communities with populations of 10,000 people or less. 
        There are over 2,000 municipal, state and locally-
        owned, not-for-profit electric utilities throughout the 
        United States.

  
 This bill maintains the ability of utility special 
        entities to specifically hedge risk associated with the 
        generation of electric energy or production of natural 
        gas, but does not include an exemption for interest 
        rate, credit, equities, currency asset classes, or 
        agriculture commodities, other than crude oil or 
        gasoline fuel commodities used for electric energy 
        generation.

  
 More importantly, this bill would not provide an 
        exemption for utility special entities to enter into 
        financial swaps, such as interest rate swaps related to 
        the issuance of municipal bonds or public debt (such as 
        the type of interest rate swaps that contributed to 
        Jefferson County, Alabama, filing for bankruptcy in 
        2011, the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. 
        history).

  
 Further, to ensure transparency, the bill still 
        requires all special entity swap transactions to be 
        reported to the CFTC.

  
 The bill will place utility special entities on a 
        level playing field with everyone else in the 
        marketplace, allowing many of them to keep the same 
        swap counterparties they have used to manage risk with 
        for years.

The ``Swaps Regulatory Improvement Act''

  
 Section 716 of the Dodd-Frank Act was inserted 
        during the Dodd-Frank Conference Committee 
        deliberations in May and June of 2010 by former Senator 
        Blanche Lincoln, despite opposition from some Senate 
        Democrats and many Federal financial regulators. It is 
        important to note that Section 716 was not included in 
        the December 2009 House-passed version of the Dodd-
        Frank Act.

  
 Federal financial regulators who opposed Section 
        716's addition to the Dodd-Frank Act included: Current 
        Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, former FDIC 
        Chairwoman Sheila Bair, former Treasury Secretary Tim 
        Geithner, and former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul 
        Volcker.

  
 On its face, Section 716 prevents any financial 
        institution that trades certain types of swaps from 
        receiving any type of ``Federal assistance''--including 
        access to the Federal Reserve discount window, Federal 
        Deposit Insurance Corporation coverage, or any future 
        Federal ``bailout'' similar to what Congress approved 
        in the fall of 2008 during the financial crisis.

  
 Due to this prohibition, Section 716 has the 
        practical effect of forcing financial institutions from 
        trading in certain types of swaps, and forces banks to 
        ``push out'' or ``spin off'' their swaps business into 
        new separately incorporated and capitalized trading 
        businesses. However, Section 716 does not cover all 
        swaps trading by a bank. Banks still would not be 
        required to ``push out'' swaps used for hedging risks 
        associated with their banking activities, including 
        interest rate swaps, foreign currency swaps, and credit 
        default swaps (CDS) on investment grade names that are 
        centrally cleared.

  
 Since Dodd-Frank became law in July of 2010, no 
        equivalent provisions have been adopted in any foreign 
        jurisdictions that are working through their own 
        derivatives reforms, placing U.S. firms at a 
        competitive disadvantage with international banks.

  
 Earlier in 2013, U.S. Federal financial regulators 
        effectively delayed implementation of Section 716 for 
        both domestic banks and foreign banks doing business in 
        the United States for up to two years (until July 
        2015).

  
 This is substantially similar to an amended version 
        of H.R. 1838 from the 112th Congress that passed by 
        voice vote out of the House Financial Services 
        Committee in February of 2012. In March of 2013, the 
        House Agriculture Committee approved of the legislation 
        by a vote 31-14. In May of 2013, the House Financial 
        Services Committee approved of H.R. 992 by a vote of 
        53-6.

  
 The legislation would prevent financial institutions 
        from forcing much of the remaining derivatives business 
        outside of the bank, which is a more heavily regulated 
        and more highly capitalized entity than a stand-alone 
        affiliate.

  
 Likewise, forcing the banks to capitalize new 
        entities without equivalent risk mitigating benefits 
        will unnecessarily divert capital that could otherwise 
        be at work in the economy, and could increase risk to 
        the financial system.

  
 Notably, the bill amends Section 716 to limit the 
        swap desk push-out requirement so that it does not 
        apply to equity or commodity swaps. However, it will 
        continue to apply to structured finance swaps that are 
        based on an asset-backed security.

    
Retaining coverage of structured finance swaps 
            based on asset backed securities is intended to 
            respond to concerns that the derivatives activities 
            of AIG (which were based upon mortgage backed 
            securities) were highly risky and contributed to 
            the financial crisis. 

To Improve Consideration by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission of 
        the Costs and Benefits of Its Regulations and Orders

  
 The legislation requires the CFTC to meet the same 
        analytical standards that President Obama mandated 
        every Executive Agency to meet under Executive Order 
        13565. The Commission is currently exempt from them 
        because it is an Independent Agency.

  
 A proper, comprehensive, cost-benefit analysis will 
        foster more informed dialogue between regulators and 
        stakeholders, and in turn produce rules and regulations 
        that better meet the unique needs of derivative market 
        participants.

  
 The bill provides for analysis and evaluation that 
        is specific to the derivatives market and the structure 
        of the CFTC. Further, it is consistent with and 
        complementary to previous House-passed cost-benefit 
        legislation.

  
 Importantly, the bill is not retroactive, and would 
        not impact current rulemaking and regulatory processes 
        already underway.

The Swap Jurisdiction Certainty Act

  
 The bill requires a joint rulemaking from the CFTC 
        and SEC on cross-border transactions, and would presume 
        that the top nine (9) foreign jurisdictions by notional 
        swap volume would be recognized as having sufficient 
        regulatory supervision over their own markets unless 
        the CFTC and SEC jointly determine otherwise.

  
 The final amended version of the bill took into 
        consideration many technical comments provided since 
        the March 14, 2013, Agriculture Full Committee hearing, 
        including limiting the number of foreign jurisdictions 
        that are recognized as being sophisticated enough to 
        regulate their own markets (top nine globally) so that 
        the swaps markets do not move to jurisdictions that 
        have not implemented financial regulatory reforms.

  
 Further, the bill requires the Commissions to report 
        to Congress any determination that a foreign 
        jurisdiction is not broadly equivalent to the 
        regulations of the United States.

  
 The bill also requires that any rule jointly issued 
        by the two agencies must go through a joint rulemaking 
        process subject to the Administrative Procedures Act. 
        The CFTC and SEC have failed to do so since Dodd-Frank 
        was signed into law, leading to tremendous domestic and 
        international confusion and uncertainty.

  
 More importantly, no ``guidance'' from either 
        Commission will have the force of law.

  
 Moreover, coordination between U.S. and 
        international regulators limits regulatory arbitrage, 
        and the unintended concentration of risk to the 
        financial system.

  
 The U.S. must not be put at a competitive 
        disadvantage because it was the first to act on 
        financial regulatory reform.

  
 The legislation provides market participants 
        transparency and certainty that U.S. and foreign 
        regulators will finalize rules that effectively 
        prevents market fragmentation and destabilization.

  
 The bill would require that the CFTC and SEC 
        coordinate their rules for the swaps markets--a basic 
        premise that should have started soon after Dodd-Frank 
        was signed into law. Without domestic regulator 
        coordination, getting the global rules right will be 
        next to impossible, a dangerous possibility during 
        times of economic uncertainty.

The Inter-Affiliate Swap Clarification Act

  
 Inter-affiliate swaps are executed between entities 
        within a single corporation or corporate group to 
        allocate risk within the group. They allow for 
        centralized hedging, whereby a corporation uses inter-
        affiliate swaps to combine its positions, executing 
        most or all of its market-facing swaps through a single 
        or small number of affiliates.

  
 Proposed derivatives rules under Dodd-Frank could 
        require both inter-affiliate swaps and market-facing 
        swaps to meet the same regulatory requirements, even 
        though inter-affiliate swaps do not increase systemic 
        risk.

  
 New regulations are meant to only apply to 
        transactions that might increase systemic risk, not on 
        inter-affiliate trading.

  
 Inefficient changes to current business practices: 
        Currently companies use centralized hedging, where one 
        or a small number of affiliates act as the external-
        facing party. This allows companies to concentrate 
        trade expertise, better evaluate counterparty credit 
        risk, and secure better pricing through economies of 
        scale.

    
 Centralized hedging also eliminates 
            duplicative execution, accounting, settlement, 
            compliance, and reporting functions, and allows a 
            company to net positions held by its various 
            affiliates.

  
 This bill requires inter-affiliate swaps and 
        security-based swaps be reported to a swap data 
        repository or the CFTC and SEC pursuant to reporting 
        rules.

  
 Exempting inter-affiliate swaps would not lead to 
        abuse because Section 721(c) of Dodd-Frank gives 
        regulators explicit anti-evasion authority.

  
 Explicitly preserves regulatory authority under 
        sections 23A and 23B of the Federal Reserve Act and as 
        well as authority to protect Federal and State 
        insurance and guarantee funds.

                  b. statistical summary of activities

    (1) Statistics on bills referred to the Committee on 
        Agriculture

    Number of bills referred:





House bills................................................        181
Senate bills...............................................          0
House joint resolutions....................................          0
House concurrent resolutions...............................          1
Senate joint resolutions...................................          0
Senate concurrent resolutions..............................          0
House resolutions..........................................          9
                                                            ------------
  Total....................................................        191



    (2) Disposition of Bills Containing Items Under the 
        Jurisdiction of the Committee on Agriculture





Bills enacted into law.....................................          0
Bills acted on by the Committee included in other bills              0
 that became law...........................................
Bills vetoed...............................................          0
Bills acted on by both Houses, but not enacted.............          1
Bills acted on by the House but not the Senate.............         10
Concurrent Resolutions approved............................          0
Bills reported to the House but not considered.............          1
Bills ordered reported, but not reported...................          2
Bills defeated in the House................................          2



    (3) Statistics on hearings and markups:


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     Business        Hearings
                                                                     Meetings         Forums           Total
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Full Committee..................................................               5               3               0

Subcommittees:

  Horticulture, Research, Biotechnology, and Foreign Agriculture               0               1               0
  General Farm Commodities and Risk Management..................               0               3               0
  Conservation, Energy, and Forestry............................               0               1               0
  Department Operations, Oversight, and Nutrition...............               0               0               0
  Livestock, Rural Development, and Credit......................               0               0               0
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
    Total.......................................................               5               8               0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 c. digest of bills within the jurisdiction of the committee on which 
                         action has been taken


1. Bills Enacted into Law

    None.

Other Laws; Legislative Matters

    Appropriations
            P.L. 113-2, (H.R. 152)
    Disaster Relief Appropriations Act, 2013
    H.R. 152 was introduced on January 4, 2013 by 
Representative Harold Rogers and referred to the Committee on 
Appropriations, and in addition to the Committee on the Budget, 
for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in 
each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within 
the committee concerned. On January 15, 2013, the bill passed 
the House under suspension of the rules by a recorded vote of 
241 yeas to 180 nays. On January 28, 2013, the bill passed the 
Senate, under the order of 1/24/13, having achieved 60 votes in 
the affirmative, without amendment by Yea-Nay Vote. 62 to 36. 
On January 29, 2013, the bill was presented to and signed by 
the President into Public Law 113-2.
    Division A of the Act makes supplemental appropriations for 
FY 2013 to specified Federal agencies and programs for the 
expenses related to the consequences of Hurricane Sandy. Title 
I makes supplemental appropriations to the Department of 
Agriculture (USDA) for the Commodity Assistance Program, for 
the emergency food assistance program. Title IX requires each 
Federal agency to submit to the Office of the Management and 
Budget, the General Accountability Office, the respective 
Inspector General, and the House and Senate Appropriations 
Committees by March 31, 2013, internal control plans for funds 
provided by this Division. The Act also requires the GAO to 
review the design of such plans. Title X makes supplemental 
appropriations to USDA for the Emergency Conservation Program 
and directs USDA's Office of Inspector General to use 
unobligated disaster assistance oversight funds provided under 
the Disaster Relief and Recovery Supplemental Appropriations 
Act, 2008 for continued oversight of USDA disaster- and 
emergency-related activities.
    Division B of the Act amends the Robert T. Stafford 
Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act to authorize the 
President, acting through the FEMA Administrator, to approve 
public assistance projects for major disasters or emergencies 
under alternative procedures with goals of (1) reducing the 
costs to the Federal Government of providing such assistance; 
(2) increasing flexibility in the administration of assistance; 
(3) expediting the provision of assistance to a state, tribal 
or local government, or owner or operator of a private 
nonprofit facility; and (4) providing financial incentives and 
disincentives for the timely and cost-effective completion of 
projects. Requires such alternative procedures, with respect to 
grants for facility repair, restoration, or replacement, to 
allow: (1) such grants to be made on the basis of fixed 
estimates if the state, tribal, or local government or the 
owner or operator of the private nonprofit facility agrees to 
be responsible for any actual costs that exceed the estimate; 
(2) a grantee to elect to receive an in-lieu contribution, 
without reduction, on the basis of estimates of the cost to 
repair, restore, reconstruct, or replace a facility and 
management expenses; (3) consolidating state, local, or tribal 
facilities as a single project; and (4) the Administrator to 
permit a grantee, when completed project costs are less than 
the estimated costs, to use excess funds for activities that 
reduce the risk of future damage, hardship, or suffering from a 
major disaster and for other activities to improve future 
public assistance operations or planning. Additionally, the Act 
requires such alternative procedures, with respect to grants 
for debris removal, to allow: (1) such grants to be made on the 
basis of fixed estimates to provide financial incentives and 
disincentives for the timely or cost-effective completion if 
the grantee agrees to be responsible for any actual costs that 
exceed the estimate; (2) use of a sliding scale for determining 
the Federal share for removal of debris and wreckage based on 
the time it takes to complete; (3) use of program income from 
recycled debris without offset to the grant amount; (4) 
reimbursement of wages for grantee employees and extra hires 
performing or administering debris and wreckage removal; (5) 
incentives to a state, local, or tribal government to have a 
debris management plan approved by the Administrator and to 
have pre-qualified contractors before the date of declaration 
of the major disaster; and (6) the Administrator to permit a 
grantee, when actual project costs are less than estimated 
costs, to use the excess funds for debris management planning, 
acquisition of debris management equipment for current or 
future use, and other activities to improve future debris 
removal operations.
            P.L. 113-6, (H.R. 933)
    Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 
2013
    H.R. 933 was introduced on March 4, 2013 by Representative 
Harold Rogers and referred to the Committee on Appropriations, 
in addition to the Committee on Budget. On March 6, 2013, the 
bill passed the House by a recorded vote of 267 yeas to 151 
nays. On March 20, 2013, the bill passed the Senate with an 
amendment to the Title by a yea to nay vote of 73 to 26. On 
March 21, 2013, the House agreed to the Senate amendments with 
a vote of 318 yeas to 109 nays. On March 22, 2013, the bill was 
presented to and signed by the President into Public Law 113-6.
    H.R. 933 appropriates FY 2013 funds for the following 
Department of Agriculture (USDA) programs and services: Office 
of the Secretary of Agriculture; Office of the Chief Economist; 
National Appeals Division; Office of the Budget and Program 
Analysis; Office of the Chief Information Officer; Officer of 
the Chief Financial Officer; Office of the Assistant Secretary 
for Civil Rights; Office of Civil Rights; agriculture buildings 
and facilities and rental payments; hazardous materials 
management; Office of the Inspector General; Office of the 
General Counsel; Office of the Under Secretary for Research, 
Education, and Economics; Economic Research Station; National 
Agricultural Statistics Service; Agricultural Research Service; 
National Institute of Food and Agriculture; Native American 
Institutions Endowment Fund; extension and integrated 
activities; Office of the Under Secretary for Marketing and 
Regulatory Programs; Animal and Plant Health Inspection 
Service; Agricultural Marketing Service; Grain Inspection, 
Packers and Stockyards Administration; Office of the Under 
Secretary for Food Safety; Food Safety and Inspection Service; 
Office of the Under Secretary for Farm and Foreign Agricultural 
Services; Farm Service Agency; Risk Management Agency; Federal 
Crop Insurance Corporation Fund; and Commodity Credit 
Corporation Fund.
    Title II: Conservation Programs--Appropriates funds for the 
following: (1) Office of the Under Secretary for Natural 
Resources and Environment, and (2) Natural Resources 
Conservation Service. Title III: Rural Development Programs--
Appropriates funds for the following: (1) Office of the Under 
Secretary for Rural Development, (2) rural development salaries 
and expenses, (3) Rural Housing Service, (4) Rural Business--
Cooperative Service, (5) Rural Economic Development Loans 
Program Account, and (6) Rural Utilities Service. Title IV: 
Domestic Food Programs--Appropriates funds for the following: 
(1) Office of the Under Secretary for Food, Nutrition and 
Consumer Services; and (2) Food and Nutrition Service. Title V: 
Foreign Assistance and Related Programs--Appropriates funds for 
the following: (1) Foreign Agricultural Service, (2) Food for 
Peace Act (P.L. 480) program title I and title II grants, (3) 
McGovern-Dole international food for education and child 
nutrition program grants, and (4) Commodity Credit Corporation 
(CCC) export loans. Title VI: Related Agency and Food and Drug 
Administration--Appropriates funds for the following: (1) Food 
and Drug Administration (FDA), and (2) Farm Credit 
Administration.
    The Act excludes from such rescission: amounts designated 
by Congress for OCO/GWOT or for disaster relief; or the amount 
made available by division F of this Act for a specified 
limitation on administrative expenses of the Social Security 
Administration for continuing disability reviews under titles 
II and XVI of the Social Security Act and for the cost 
associated with conducting eligibility redeterminations. Also 
requires the Director of the Office of Management and Budget 
(OMB) to report to the congressional appropriations committees 
within 30 days after enactment of this Act on the account and 
amount of each such rescission.
            P.L. 113-49, (H.R. 2775)
    Continuing Appropriations Act, 2014
    H.R. 2775 was introduced by Representative Diane Black on 
July 22, 2013 and referred to the Committee on Energy and 
Commerce and in addition to the Committee on Ways and Means. On 
September 12, 2013 the bill passed the House by a recorded vote 
of 235 yeas to 191 nays. On October 16, 2013 a complete 
substitute amendment converting the measure into the Continuing 
Appropriations Act was adopted by the Senate by a recorded vote 
of 81 yeas to 18 nays. On that same date the House agreed to 
the Senate amendments by a recorded vote of 285 yeas to 144 
nays. On October 17, 2013 the President signed the bill into 
Public Law 113-46.
    The Act makes continuing appropriations for FY 2014 
including the Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug 
Administration, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2013
    The Act also includes the same prohibition from the FY 2012 
(P.L. 112-55) and FY 2013 (P.L. 113-6) appropriations acts that 
prevents USDA from using appropriated funds to finalize or 
implement certain provisions of a Grain Inspection and Packers 
and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) rule.
    Continues funding through January 15, 2014, at the FY 2013 
level for entitlements and other mandatory payments whose 
budget authority was provided in FY 2013 appropriations Acts, 
as well as for activities under the Food and Nutrition Act of 
2008.
    Amends the Food for Peace Act to extend through January 15, 
2014, authority for agreements to finance sales or to provide 
other assistance.
    Continues through January 15, 2014, the authority of the 
Forest Service to enter into up to 28 contracts with private 
persons (of which Region One of the Forest Service shall have 
authority to enter into nine) to perform services to achieve 
land management goals for National Forests that meet local and 
rural community needs; and to apply the value of timber or 
other forest products removed as an offset against the cost of 
services received under a contract.

2. Bills Acted on by the House But Not the Senate

            H.R. 634, Business Risk Mitigation and Price Stabilization 
                    Act of 2013
    H.R. 634 was introduced on February 13, 2013 by 
Representative Michael G. Grimm, and referred to the Committee 
on Agriculture, and in addition to the Committee on Financial 
Services. On March 20, 2013, the Committee on Agriculture 
ordered reported the bill by a voice vote. On May 7, 2013, the 
Committee on Financial Services ordered reported the bill by a 
recorded vote of 59 yeas to 0 nays. Both Committees reported 
the bill on June 12, 2013, H. Rept. 113-105, Part 1 and 2. On 
that same date, the bill passed the House, as amended, under 
suspension of the rules by a recorded vote of 411 yeas to 12 
nays. On June 13, 2013, the measure was received by the Senate 
and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban 
Affairs.
    The Business Risk Mitigation and Price Stabilization Act of 
2013 amends section 4s(e) of the Commodity Exchange Act (CEA) 
as added by Section 731 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform 
and Consumer Protection Act (P.L. 111-203) (the Dodd-Frank Act) 
to provide an explicit exemption from margin requirements for 
swap transactions involving end-users that qualify for the 
clearing exception under 2(h)(7)(A). The bill includes 
mirroring provisions to Section 15F(e) of the Securities 
Exchange Act of 1934 with respect to security-based swap 
transactions. (Note: See also the discussion of the March 14th, 
2013: Hearing to examine legislative improvements to Title VII 
of the Dodd-Frank Act under ``D. Oversight.'')
            H.R. 742, Swap Data Repository and Clearinghouse 
                    Indemnification Correction Act of 2013
    H.R. 742 was introduced by Representative Eric A. ``Rick'' 
Crawford on February 15, 2013 and referred to the Committee on 
Agriculture, and in addition to the Committee on Financial 
Services. On June 12, 2013, the Committee on Agriculture 
reported 113-106, Part 1, which was followed by the Committee 
on Financial Service's Part 2. On June 12, 2013, the House 
agreed to pass the bill on a motion to suspend the rules with a 
vote of 420 yeas and 2 nays. On June 13, 2013, the bill was 
received in the Senate and referred to and read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and 
Forestry.
    The Swap Data Repository and Clearinghouse Indemnification 
Correction Act of 2013 strikes the indemnification requirements 
found in Sections 725, 728, and 763 of the Dodd-Frank Wall 
Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (P.L. 111-203) (the 
Dodd-Frank Act) related to swap data gathered by swap data 
repositories (SDRs) and derivatives clearing organizations 
(DCOs). The bill does maintain, however, that before an SDR, 
DCO, the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), or 
the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) shares 
information with domestic or international regulators, they 
have to receive a written agreement stating that the regulator 
will abide by certain confidentiality agreements. (Note: See 
also the discussion of the March 14th, 2013: Hearing to examine 
legislative improvements to Title VII of the Dodd-Frank Act 
under ``D. Oversight.'')
            H.R. 803, Supporting Knowledge and Investing in Lifelong 
                    Skills Act (SKILLS Act)
    H.R. 803 was introduced by Representative Virginia Foxx on 
February 25, 2013 and referred to the House Committee on 
Agriculture, and in addition to the House Committees on 
Education and the Workforce; Judiciary, Veterans' Affairs, 
Energy and Commerce, and Transportation and Infrastructure. On 
March 12, 2013, the House Committee on Agriculture discharged 
the bill. On March 15, 2013, the House voted on H.R. 803 with a 
passage of 215 yeas and 202 nays. On March 18, 2013, the 
measure was received by the Senate and read twice and referred 
to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions.
    The Supporting Knowledge and Investing in Lifelong Skills 
Act or SKILLS Act amends the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 
(WIA) to revise requirements and reauthorize appropriations 
for: (1) WIA title I, workforce investment systems for job 
training and employment services; and (2) WIA title II, adult 
education and family literacy education programs.
            H.R. 992, Swaps Regulatory Improvement Act
    H.R. 992 was introduced by Representative Randy Hultgren on 
March 6, 2013 and referred to the House Committee on 
Agriculture, and in addition to the House Committee on 
Financial Services on September 25, 2013. On October 30, 3013, 
the House voted on H.R. 992 with a passage of 292 yeas and 122 
nays. On October 31, 2013, the measure was received by the 
Senate, read twice, and referred to the Committee on Banking, 
Housing, and Urban Affairs.
    The Swaps Regulatory Improvement Act amends the Dodd-Frank 
Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act limits the 
application of Section 716 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform 
and Consumer Protection Act (P.L. 111-203) (Dodd-Frank Act) so 
that it does not apply to equity or commodity swaps traded by a 
financial institution. However, the section would continue to 
apply to certain structured finance swaps that are based on an 
asset-backed security and force those particular swaps to be 
traded in a separately capitalized entity outside of the 
banking entity. (Note: See also the discussion of the March 
14th, 2013: Hearing to examine legislative improvements to 
Title VII of the Dodd-Frank Act under ``D. Oversight.'')
            H.R. 1038, Public Power Risk Management Act of 2013
    H.R. 1038 was introduced by Representative Doug LaMalfa on 
March 11, 2013 and referred to the Committee on Agriculture. On 
March 14, 2013, Committee hearings were held and on March 20, 
2013, a mark-up session was held with a report to record the 
voice vote of passage. On June 12, 2013, H.R. 1038 was placed 
on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 76 and on that same date, 
Mr. LaMalfa moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill. It 
was passed in the House with a unanimous vote of 423 yeas to 0 
nays. On June 13, 2013, the bill was received and read in the 
Senate and then referred to the Committee on Agriculture, 
Nutrition, and Forestry. The Public Power Risk Management Act 
of 2013 would preserve the ability of government-owned 
utilities, classified in the bill as ``utility special 
entities,'' to have uninterrupted and cost-effective access to 
the customized, non-financial commodity swaps that utility 
special entities have used for years. In effect, the 
counterparties of utility special entities would now be subject 
to the much higher $8 billion de minimis swap dealer 
registration threshold. Importantly, the bill does not include 
an exemption for interest rate, credit, equities, currency 
asset classes, or agriculture commodities, other than 
commodities used for electric energy or natural gas production 
or generation. Instead, the legislation creates a new category 
of swap known as the ``utility operations-related swap'' and 
provides relief to counterparties of utility special entities 
only when those specific types of swaps are used. To ensure 
transparency, the bill still requires all special entity swap 
transactions to be reported to the U.S. Commodity Futures 
Trading Commission (CFTC). (Note: See also the discussion of 
the March 14th, 2013: Hearing to examine legislative 
improvements to Title VII of the Dodd-Frank Act under ``D. 
Oversight.'')
            H.R. 1256, Swap Jurisdiction Certainty Act
    H.R. 1256 was introduced by Representative Scott Garrett on 
March 19, 2013 and referred to the Committee on Agriculture and 
the Committee on Financial Services. On June 10, 2013, the 
Committee on Financial Services filed Part 1 of H. Rept. 113-
103, and the Committee on Agriculture reported Part 2 of H. 
Rept. 113-103. On June 12, 2013, the House voted on H.R. 1256 
with a passage of 301 yeas to 124 nays. On June 13, 2013, the 
bill was received and read in the Senate then referred to the 
Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry.
    The Swap Jurisdiction Certainty would require a joint 
rulemaking from the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) 
and the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on cross-
border swaps regulation pursuant to Section 722(d) of Title VII 
of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection 
Act (P.L. 111-203) (the Dodd-Frank Act), and would presume that 
all G20 nations would be granted substituted compliance to 
regulate institutions operating within their borders unless the 
CFTC and SEC jointly determine otherwise. (Note: See also the 
discussion of the March 14th, 2013: Hearing to examine 
legislative improvements to Title VII of the Dodd-Frank Act 
under ``D. Oversight.'')
            H.R. 1341, Financial Competitive Act of 2013
    H.R. 1341 was introduced by Representative Stephen Lee 
Fincher on March 21, 2013 and referred to the House Committee 
on Agriculture and also the Committee on Financial Services. On 
June 28, 2013, the Committee on Financial Services reported 
Part 1 of H. Rept. 113-134. On the same date, the House 
Committee on Agriculture discharged H.R. 1341. On July 8, 2013, 
the House voted on a motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays. The motion 
passed with a passage of 353 yeas and 24 nays. On July 9, 2013, 
the bill was received and read in the Senate, then referred to 
the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs.
    Financial Competitive Act of 2013 directs the Financial 
Stability Oversight Council (FSOC) to study and report to 
Congress on the likely effects that differences between the 
United States and other jurisdictions in implementing the 
derivatives credit valuation adjustment capital requirement 
would have upon: (1) U.S. financial institutions that conduct 
derivatives transactions and participate in derivatives 
markets, (2) end users of derivatives, and (3) international 
derivatives markets.
    Additionally, it requires the study to recommend steps 
Congress and the constituent agencies of the FSOC should take 
to: (1) minimize any expected negative effects on U.S. 
financial institutions, derivatives markets, and end users; (2) 
encourage greater international consistency in implementation 
of internationally agreed capital, liquidity, and other 
prudential standards; and (3) ensure that the FSOC fulfills its 
statutory mandate to identify risks and respond to emerging 
threats to financial stability.
            H.R. 1526, Restoring Healthy Forests for Healthy 
                    Communities Act
    H.R. 1526 was introduced by Representative Doc Hastings on 
April 12, 2013 and referred to the House Committee on Natural 
Resources and also the House Committee on Agriculture. On 
September 17, 2013, the Committee on Natural Resources reported 
Part 1 of H. Rept. 113-213. On September 20, 2013, the House 
voted on H.R. 1526 with a passage of 244 yeas to 173 nays. On 
September 23, 2013, the bill was referred to, received in, and 
read twice in the Senate and referred to the Committee on 
Energy and Natural Resources.
    The Restoring Healthy Forests for Healthy Communities Act 
directs the Secretary of Agriculture (USDA) to establish at 
least one Forest Reserve Revenue Area (Area) within each unit 
of the National Forest System (NFS) designated for sustainable 
forest management for the production of National Forest 
materials (the sale of trees, portions of trees, or forest 
products from NFS lands) and forest reserve revenues (to be 
derived from the sale of such materials in such an Area).
    Authorizes the Secretary of Agriculture, with respect to 
NFS land, and the Secretary of the Interior, with respect to 
public lands, to implement a hazardous fuel reduction project 
or forest health project in at-risk forests in a manner that 
focuses on surface, ladder, and canopy fuels reduction 
activities.
    Bars the Secretary of Agriculture from conducting any 
prescribed fire (except as part of wildfire suppression 
activities) in the Mark Twain National Forest in Missouri under 
the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Project until 
the following report is submitted to Congress.
    Authorizes the Secretary of Agriculture to conduct land 
exchanges involving the transferred lands, other than those 
excluded from the O&C Trust, in order to create larger 
contiguous blocks of land under the Secretary's management.
    Requires the Secretary of Agriculture to appoint an Old 
Growth Review Panel to define old growth as it applies to the 
ecologically, geographically, and climatologically unique 
Oregon and California Railroad Grant lands and O&C Region 
Public Domain lands managed by the O&C Trust or the Forest 
Service only (but not to tribal lands).
    Provides for a three-year transition period which shall 
commence after the appointment of the Board.
    Directs the Secretary of the Interior to transfer 
administrative jurisdiction over the Coos Bay Wagon Road Grant 
lands excluded from the transfer under this subtitle to the 
Secretary of Agriculture for inclusion in the NFS.
    Permits Coos County to recommend land exchanges to the 
Secretary of Agriculture and carry them out.
    Prohibits the Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary 
of Agriculture from acquiring by condemnation any land or 
interest within the boundaries of the river segments or 
wilderness designated by this subtitle.
    Directs the Secretary of Agriculture to establish the 
community forest demonstration area of a state, consisting of 
National Forest System (NFS) land, at the request of an 
advisory committee appointed by a governor to manage such land 
in that state. Conditions establishment of an area upon: (1) 
inclusion of at least 200,000 acres of NFS land; (2) a state 
forest practices law applicable to state or privately owned 
forest land, or established silvicultural best management 
practices or other regulations for forest management practices 
related to clean water, soil quality, wildlife, or forest 
health; and (3) a revenue-sharing agreement between a county 
and the state governor requiring the county, in using certain 
revenues received from the area, to continue to meet 
obligations for the use of such revenues for the benefit of 
public schools and roads.
    Directs the Secretary of Agriculture, during February 2015, 
to distribute to each beneficiary county a payment equal to the 
amount distributed to the county for FY 2010 under the Secure 
Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act of 2000.
            H.R. 3102, Nutrition Reform and Work Opportunity Act of 
                    2013
    H.R. 3102 was introduced by Chairman Lucas on September 16, 
2013. On September 19, 2013, the House voted on H.R. 3102 with 
a passage of 217 yeas and 210 nays. On September 23, 2013, the 
bill was received in the Senate.
    The Nutrition Reform and Work Opportunity Act of 2013, 
encourages and enables work participation, makes common-sense 
reforms, closes program loopholes and cracks down on waste, 
fraud and abuse in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance 
Program (SNAP) saving the American taxpayer nearly $40 billion. 
This bill strengthens program integrity and accountability 
while better targeting the Federal nutrition programs to serve 
those in need of assistance.
    Prevents States from Waiving Work Requirements on Able-
Bodied Adults Without Dependents: The bill removes the ability 
of states to get a waiver for the work requirement for able-
bodied adults without dependents. Currently, 40 states plus the 
District of Columbia and the Virgin Islands have waivers from 
the work requirement in effect. Eliminating these waivers will 
ensure that the nearly 4 million able-bodied adults with 
dependents who receive food stamps are required to engage in 
work activities. This population of food stamp recipients has 
grown dramatically in recent years from 6.6% of the recipient 
population in 2007 to 9.7% in 2010. This provision saves almost 
$20 billion over ten years.
    Allows States the Option to Impose TANF-Type Work 
Requirements on Able-Bodied Parents: Empowers states, through a 
pilot program, to engage all able-bodied individuals (except 
those responsible for the care of a child under the age of one, 
or under the age of six if no child care is available) in TANF-
type work and job training as part of receiving food stamps. 
The bill allows only those states that adopt these work 
requirements to access the 50% Federal match for state 
employment and training expenses.
    Eliminates Broad-Based Categorical Eligibility: Ensures all 
households meet the asset and income tests stated in SNAP law 
before they can receive benefits by restricting categorical 
eligibility to only those households receiving cash assistance 
from Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Temporary Assistance 
for Needy Families (TANF), or other state general assistance 
programs. Receiving a TANF-funded brochure or referral to an 
``800'' number hotline would no longer automatically make a 
household eligible for SNAP.
    Closes the ``Heat and Eat'' Loophole: Some states are 
sending $1 and $5 LIHEAP payments to low-income households, 
triggering a SNAP income deduction that results in higher SNAP 
benefits for those individuals. This legislation stops states 
from sending nominal LIHEAP payments below $20 for the sole 
purpose of increasing their SNAP benefits. (Saves $8.7 billion)
    Eliminates State Performance Bonuses: Ends the bonuses USDA 
awards to states for administering SNAP, and saves taxpayers 
nearly half a billion dollars without affecting SNAP recipients 
benefits.
    Prohibits Government-Sponsored Recruitments Activities: The 
USDA has been engaged in recruitment efforts to encourage 
participation in SNAP. This bill prevents the Department from 
advertising and promoting SNAP through television, radio, and 
billboard advertisements and prohibits USDA from entering into 
agreements with foreign governments designed to promote SNAP 
benefits.
    Ends Eligibility For Traditional College Students, Lottery 
Winners, and Illegal Immigrants: SNAP recipients with 
substantial lottery or gambling winnings will lose benefits 
immediately after receiving winnings. College students are 
restricted to those participating in technical and vocational 
education programs, trade studies, remedial course work, or 
basic adult literacy. States will be required to use an 
immigration status verification system to verify an applicant's 
immigration status.
    Denies Benefits for Illegal Drug Abusers: Allows states to 
conduct drug testing on SNAP applicants at state expense as a 
condition for receiving benefits.
    Permanently Denies Benefits for Violent Criminals: Ends 
eligibility for SNAP benefits for convicted murderers, 
pedophiles and rapists after enacted into law.
    Strengthen Program Integrity and Accountability: Requires 
participating retailers to stock more staple foods like fruits 
and vegetables. Includes provisions, and increases funding, to 
further monitor and prevent fraud in retail stores. Discourages 
fraudulent use of electronic benefit cards by requiring states 
to expunge EBT balances that are more than 60 days old. Permits 
state law enforcement officials to investigate retailer fraud 
in addition to recipient fraud.
    Three-Year Reauthorization: The Nutrition Reform and Work 
Opportunity Act is a three year bill. This will ensure that 
nutrition programs are on a different authorization schedule 
from farm programs and allow Congress to evaluate and 
potentially further reform the nutrition programs in 2017.
    Increases Assistance for Food Banks: Food banks have been 
successful in effectively utilizing government dollars and 
securing private sector donations in order to feed hungry 
Americans. Funding for TEFAP is increased by $20 million per 
year with an additional $50 million increase in FY 2014 and FY 
2015. (Increases funding for food banks by $333 million)
    Supports the Commodity Supplemental Food Program, ensures 
seniors and low-income families have access to farmers markets 
through the Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program, continues 
current funding for the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program and 
allows schools to utilize all forms including fresh, frozen, 
canned and dried produce for students, maintains current 
funding for the DOD Fresh Program, reauthorizes the Food 
Distribution Program on Indian Reservations and supports grants 
for Community Food Projects. (Note: See also the discussion of 
H.R. 2642 under ``11. Bills Acted on by Both Houses But Not 
Enacted.'')
            H.R. 3695, To provide a temporary extension of the Food, 
                    Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 and amendments 
                    made by that Act, as previously extended and 
                    amended and with certain additional modifications 
                    and exceptions, to suspend permanent price support 
                    authorities, and for other purposes.
    H.R. 3695 was introduced by Chairman Frank D. Lucas on 
December 11, 2013. On December 12, 2013 the bill passed the 
House under suspension of the rules by a voice vote.
    H.R. 3695 extends the authorities of the 2008 Farm Bill 
from September 30, 2013 until January 31, 2014. (Note: See also 
the discussion of H.R. 2642 under ``11. Bills Acted on by Both 
Houses But Not Enacted.'')

    Other Bills of Interest: Several bills acted on by other 
committees, but not acted on by the Committee on Agriculture 
contain provisions relating to matters within the Committee's 
jurisdiction. The following are abbreviated summaries of these 
bills, including some of the relevant provisions.
            H.R. 1960, National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
                    Year 2014
    H.R. 1960 was introduced by Representative Howard P. 
``Buck'' McKeon on May 14, 2013 and referred to the Committee 
on Armed Services. On June 7, 2013, the Committee on Armed 
Services reported on H. Rept. 113-2 as amended. On June 11, 
2013, the Committee on Armed Services filed Part 2 of H. Rept. 
113-102 as a supplement report. On June 14, 2013, the House 
voted on H.R. 1960 with a passage of 315 yeas to 108 nays. On 
July 8, 2013, the bill was received and read in the Senate, 
then placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar under General 
Order--Calendar No. 126.
    National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014--
Authorizes appropriations for FY 2014 for the Department of 
Defense (DOD) for procurement for the Army, Navy and Marine 
Corps, Air Force, and defense-wide activities.
    The bill provides an alternative deadline for required 
annual DOD reports on proposed budgets for activities relating 
to operational energy strategy and permits recipients of funds 
under interagency conservation cooperation agreements or under 
the Sikes Act (conservation programs on Federal lands) to use 
such funds for matching funds or cost-sharing requirements of 
conservation programs of the Departments of Agriculture or the 
Interior. Terminates the cooperative agreement authority on 
October 1, 2019, while allowing agreements entered into before 
such date to continue through their full term.
    Reauthorizes the Sikes Act through FY 2019.
    Amends the Sikes Act to authorize lump-sum payments under 
cooperative agreements for land management related to DOD 
military readiness activities. Allows such agreements to be 
used to acquire property and services for the direct benefit or 
use of the government. Provides limitations on funds used for 
conservation or rehabilitation of natural resources in an area 
that is not on a military installation. Requires the DOD 
Inspector General to annually audit each such project. 
Terminates this section on October 1, 2019, while allowing 
agreements entered into before such date to continue through 
their full term.
    Prohibits the Secretary from contracting for the planning, 
design, refurbishing, or construction of a biofuels refinery 
unless such activity is specifically authorized by law.
    Prohibits DOD funds from being used to purchase or produce 
biofuels until the earlier of the date on which: (1) the cost 
of the biofuels is equal to the cost of conventional fuels 
purchased by DOD, or (2) the Budget Control Act of 2011 and its 
sequestration are no longer in effect.
    Authorizes the Secretary of the Navy to: (1) acquire 
certain real property at Naval Base Ventura County, California, 
for the leasing of military family housing; (2) convey to such 
County the former Oxnard Air Force Base, to be used for public 
purposes; and (3) convey to the Philadelphia Regional Port 
Authority a portion of real property at the Philadelphia Naval 
Shipyard.
    Directs the Secretary of the Interior to convey to the 
state of Utah all U.S. rights and interests to certain lands 
within Camp Williams, Utah, to be used for Utah National Guard 
training purposes.
    Authorizes the Secretary of the Air Force to convey to the 
state of Utah the Air National Guard radar site on Francis 
Peak, Utah, to be used to support emergency public safety 
communications for northern Utah.
    Expresses the sense of Congress regarding the need for the 
conveyance of certain portions of the former Fort Monroe in 
Hampton, Virginia. Authorizes the Secretary of the Army to 
convey to the commonwealth of Virginia certain real property at 
the Fort.
    Authorizes the Secretary of the Army to convey to Derry 
Township, Pennsylvania, all U.S. rights and interests to the 
Mifflin County Army Reserve Center in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, 
to be used for a regional police headquarters or other public 
purposes.

3. House Resolutions Considered in the House

            H. Res. 379, Expressing the sense of the House of 
                    Representatives regarding certain provisions of the 
                    Senate amendment to H.R. 2642 relating to crop 
                    insurance.
    H. Res. 379 was introduced by Representative Paul Ryan on 
October 11, 2013 and referred to the Committee on Agriculture. 
On that same date, the resolution was considered and passed by 
the House by a voice vote.
    The resolution expresses the sense of the House of 
Representatives that the House managers of the conference on 
the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the House amendment 
to the Senate amendment to H.R. 2642, the Federal Agriculture 
Reform and Risk Management Act of 2013 should: (1) agree to 
provisions regarding a premium subsidy limitation based on 
average adjusted gross income in excess of $750,000, (2) agree 
to provisions for a crop insurance study and the impacts of an 
adjusted gross income limitation, and (3) not agree to 
provisions regarding a delayed effective date.

4. Bills Reported by the Committee on Agriculture But Not Considered

    None.

5. Bills Reported by Other Committees Within the Committee on 
        Agriculture's Jurisdiction But Not Considered

            H.R. 657, Grazing Improvement Act
    The Grazing Improvement Act was introduced by 
Representative Raul R. Labrador on February 13, 2013 and 
referred to the Committee on Natural Resources, and in addition 
to the Committee on Agriculture. On June 12, 2013 the Committee 
on Natural Resources ordered reported H.R. 657, amended, by a 
recorded vote of 27 yeas to 15 nays. On July 9, 2013 the bill 
was reported, amended, to the House by the Committee on Natural 
Resources, H. Rept. 113-145, Part 1. On that same date the 
Committee on Agriculture was discharged from further 
consideration.
    The measure amends the Federal Land Policy and Management 
Act of 1976 to double from 10 to 20 years the period of a term 
for grazing permits and leases for domestic livestock grazing 
on public lands or lands within National Forests in 16 
contiguous western states. Permits the issuance of permits and 
leases for a period shorter than 20 years (under current law, 
shorter than 10 years), including where the Secretary concerned 
determines that the initial environmental analysis under the 
National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) regarding a 
grazing allotment, permit, or lease has not been completed.
    Permits only applicants, permittees, and lessees whose 
interest in grazing livestock is directly affected by a final 
grazing decision to appeal such decision to an administrative 
law judge.
    Directs that grazing permits or leases issued by the 
Secretary of the Interior respecting lands under the 
jurisdiction of the Department of the Interior and grazing 
permits issued by the Secretary of Agriculture (USDA) 
respecting National Forest System lands that expire, are 
transferred, or are waived after this Act's enactment be 
renewed or reissued, as appropriate, under the Act, the 
Granger-Thye Act, the Bankhead-Jones Farm Tenant Act, or the 
California Desert Protection Act of 1994.
    Excludes the renewal, reissuance, or transfer of a grazing 
permit or lease by the Secretary concerned from the NEPA 
requirement to prepare an environmental analysis if: (1) such 
decision continues to renew, reissue, or transfer current 
grazing management of the allotment; (2) monitoring indicates 
that such management meets objectives contained in the land use 
and resource management plan of the allotment; or (3) the 
decision is consistent with the policy of the Department of the 
Interior or USDA regarding extraordinary circumstances.
    Gives the Secretary concerned the sole discretion to 
determine the priority and timing for completing each required 
environmental analysis regarding any grazing allotment, permit, 
or lease based on the environmental significance of such 
authorization and available funding.
    Makes NEPA inapplicable to domestic livestock crossing and 
trailing authorizations, transfers of grazing preference, and 
range improvements.

6. Bills Ordered Reported by the Committee on Agriculture

            H.R. 677, Inter-Affiliate Swap Clarification Act
    The Inter-Affiliate Swap Clarification Act was introduced 
by Representative Steve Stivers on February 13, 2013 and 
referred to the Committee on Financial Services, and in 
addition to the Committee on Agriculture. On March 20, 2013 the 
Committee on Agriculture ordered the bill reported, amended, by 
a voice vote. On May 7, 2013 the Committee on Financial 
Services ordered the bill reported by a recorded vote of 50 
yeas to 10 nays.
    Inter-affiliate swaps are swaps that are executed between 
entities that are under common corporate ownership. H.R. 677 
amends the Commodity Exchange Act to provide an exemption for 
inter-affiliate swaps from the clearing and execution 
requirements, margin and capital requirements, real time 
reporting requirements and from consideration with regard to 
whether entities are swap dealers or major swap participants 
under Title VII of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and 
Consumer Protection Act (P.L. 111-203) (the Dodd-Frank Act). 
H.R. 677 does provide, however, that inter-affiliate swaps must 
be reported to a swap data repository, and therefore be 
transparent to regulators. The bill provides mirroring 
exemptions for inter-affiliate security-based swaps under the 
Securities Exchange Act of 1934. (Note: See also the discussion 
of the March 14th, 2013: Hearing to examine legislative 
improvements to Title VII of the Dodd-Frank Act under ``D. 
Oversight.'')
            H.R. 1003, To improve consideration by the CFTC of the 
                    costs and benefits of its regulations and orders.
    H.R. 1003 was introduced by Representative K. Michael 
Conaway on March 14, 2013 and referred to the Committee on 
Agriculture. On March 20, 2013 the Committee on Agriculture 
ordered reported the bill by a voice vote.
    Using Executive Order 13563 as a guide, H.R. 1003 would 
raise the legal standard for cost-benefit analysis the U.S. 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) is required to 
perform by amending Section 15(a) of the Commodity Exchange Act 
to require the Commission to: (1) ``assess'' the costs and 
benefits, both qualitative and quantitative of Commission 
actions; (2) work through the Office of the Chief Economist in 
performing the analyses; (3) evaluate the impact on liquidity 
in the futures and swaps markets; (4) evaluate alternatives to 
direct regulation; (5) evaluate the degree and nature of the 
risks posed by various activities within the scope of its 
jurisdiction; (6) evaluate whether the regulation, consistent 
with its objectives, is tailored to impose the least burden on 
society and market participants; (7) evaluate whether the 
regulation is inconsistent, incompatible or duplicative of 
other Federal regulations; and (8) evaluate whether, in 
choosing among alternative regulatory approaches, those 
approaches maximize the net benefits (including potential 
economic, environmental, distributive impacts and equity). 
(Note: See also the discussion of the March 14th, 2013: Hearing 
to examine legislative improvements to Title VII of the Dodd-
Frank Act under ``D. Oversight.'')

7. Bills Ordered Reported But Not Reported by Other Committees Within 
        the Committee on Agriculture's Jurisdiction

            H.R. 935, Reducing Regulatory Burden Act of 2013
    The Reducing Regulatory Burden Act was introduced by 
Representative Bob Gibbs on March 4, 2013 and referred to the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, and in addition 
to the Committee on Agriculture. On March 29, 2013 the bill was 
ordered reported by a voice vote by the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure.
    The measure amends the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and 
Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and the Federal Water Pollution Control 
Act (known as the Clean Water Act [CWA]) to prohibit the 
Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or a 
state from requiring a permit under the CWA for a discharge 
from a point source into navigable waters of a pesticide 
authorized for sale, distribution, or use under FIFRA, or the 
residue of such a pesticide, resulting from the application of 
such pesticide.
    Exempts from such prohibition the following discharges 
containing a pesticide or pesticide residue: (1) a discharge 
resulting from the application of a pesticide in violation of 
FIFRA that is relevant to protecting water quality, if the 
discharge would not have occurred but for the violation or the 
amount of pesticide or pesticide residue contained in the 
discharge is greater than would have occurred without the 
violation; (2) storm water discharges regulated under the 
National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES); and 
(3) discharges regulated under NPDES of manufacturing or 
industrial effluent or treatment works effluent and discharges 
incidental to the normal operation of a vessel, including a 
discharge resulting from ballasting operations or vessel 
biofouling prevention. (Note: See also the discussion of H.R. 
1947 under ``8. Bills Defeated'', and H.R. 2642 under ``11. 
Bills Acted on by Both Houses But Not Enacted.'')
            H.R. 1825, Recreational Fishing and Hunting Heritage and 
                    Opportunities Act
    The Recreational Fishing and Hunting Heritage and 
Opportunities Act was introduced by Representative Dan Benishek 
on May 3, 2013 and referred to the Committee on Natural 
Resources, and in addition to the Committee on Agriculture. On 
June 12, 2013 the Committee on Natural Resources ordered 
reported the bill, amended, by a recorded vote of 28 yeas to 15 
nays.
    The bill requires Federal public land management officials 
to facilitate the use of, and access to, Federal public lands, 
including National Monuments, Wilderness Areas, Wilderness 
Study Areas, or lands administratively classified as wilderness 
eligible or suitable and primitive or semi-primitive areas, for 
fishing, sport hunting, and recreational shooting, except as 
limited by: (1) statutory authority that authorizes or 
withholds action for reasons of national security, public 
safety, or resource conservation; (2) any other Federal statute 
that specifically precludes recreational fishing, hunting, or 
shooting on specific Federal public lands or waters; and (3) 
discretionary limitations on recreational fishing, hunting, and 
shooting determined to be necessary and reasonable.
    Requires Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Forest Service 
lands, excluding lands on the Outer Continental Shelf, to be 
open to recreational fishing, hunting, and shooting unless the 
managing agency acts to close such lands to such activity for 
purposes of resource conservation, public safety, energy 
production, water supply facilities, or national security.
    Requires the heads of Federal agencies to use their 
authorities to: (1) lease their lands or permit use of their 
lands for shooting ranges, and (2) designate specific lands for 
recreational shooting activities.
    Sets forth requirements for a permanent or temporary 
withdrawal, change of classification, or change of management 
status that effectively closes or significantly restricts 640 
or more contiguous acres of Federal public lands for fishing or 
hunting or related activities.
            H.R. 2166, Good Samaritan Search and Recovery Act of 2013
    The Good Samaritan Search and Recovery Act of 2013 was 
introduced by Representative Joseph J. Heck on May 23, 2013 and 
referred to the Committee on Natural Resources, and in addition 
to the Committee on Agriculture. On June 12, 2013 the Committee 
on Natural Resources ordered reported the bill by unanimous 
consent.
    The measure directs the Secretary of the Interior and the 
Secretary of Agriculture (USDA) to implement a process to 
provide eligible organizations and individuals expedited access 
to Federal lands to conduct good Samaritan search-and-recovery 
missions.
    Sets forth procedures for the approval or denial of 
requests made by eligible organizations or individuals to carry 
out a good Samaritan search-and-recovery mission.
    Requires the Secretaries to develop search-and-recovery 
focused partnerships with search-and-recovery organizations to: 
(1) coordinate good Samaritan search-and-recovery missions on 
such lands, and (2) expedite and accelerate mission efforts for 
missing individuals on such lands.
            H.R. 2278, Strengthen and Fortify Enforcement Act (SAFE 
                    Act)
    The Strengthen and Fortify Enforcement Act was introduced 
by Representative Trey Gowdy on June 6, 2013 and referred to 
the Committee on the Judiciary, and in addition to the 
Committees on Homeland Security, Agriculture, and Natural 
Resources. On June 18, 2013 the Committee on Judiciary ordered 
reported by bill, amended, by a recorded vote of 20 yeas to 15 
nays.
    The measure prohibits the Secretary of the Interior or the 
Secretary of Agriculture (USDA) from prohibiting or restricting 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection efforts, on land under their 
respective jurisdictions located within 100 miles of an 
international land border, to: (1) execute search and rescue 
operations, and (2) prevent unlawful entries into the United 
States through the international land borders.
    The bill also grants the U.S. Customs and Border Protection 
access to such lands to conduct: (1) road and barrier 
construction and maintenance, (2) vehicular patrols, (3) 
surveillance equipment activities, and (4) deployment of 
temporary tactical infrastructure.
            H.R. 2798, Require annual fees for commercial filming on 
                    Federal lands for film crews.
    H.R. 2798 was introduced by Representative Robert E. Latta 
on July 23, 2013 and referred to the Committee on Natural 
Resources, and in addition to the Committee on Agriculture. On 
November 14, 2013 the Committee on Natural Resources ordered 
the bill reported by a recorded vote of 19 yeas to 15 nays.
    The measure directs the Secretary of the Interior and the 
Secretary of Agriculture (USDA) with respect to lands under the 
respective jurisdiction, for any film crew of five persons or 
fewer, to require a permit and assess an annual fee of $200 for 
commercial filming activities or similar projects on Federal 
lands and waterways administered by the Secretary. Makes such a 
permit valid for such activities or projects that occur in 
areas designated for public use during public hours on all 
Federal lands and waterways administered by the Secretary for a 
12-month period.
    Prohibits the Secretary, for persons holding such a permit, 
from assessing any additional fee for commercial filming 
activities and similar projects that occur in those areas 
during those hours.
    Bars the Secretary from prohibiting, as a motorized vehicle 
or under any other purposes, the use of cameras or related 
equipment used for commercial filming activities or similar 
projects in accordance with this Act on Federal lands and 
waterways administered by the Secretary.
    Requires the Secretary to recover (under current law, 
collect) costs incurred as a result of filming activities or 
similar projects, including but not limited to, administrative 
and personnel costs.
            H.R. 2799, Sportsmen's Heritage And Recreational 
                    Enhancement (SHARE) Act
    The Sportsmen's Heritage and Recreational Enhancement 
(SHARE) Act was introduced by Representative Robert E. Latta on 
July 23, 2013 and referred to the Committee on Natural 
Resources, and in addition to the Committee on Agriculture. On 
October 30, 2013 the Committee on Natural Resources ordered 
reported the bill, amended, by a voice vote.
    The measure amends the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act 
to establish the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation 
Council Advisory Committee to advise the Secretaries of the 
Interior and Agriculture (USDA) on wildlife and habitat 
conservation, hunting, and recreational shooting.
            H.R. 3188, Yosemite Rim Fire Emergency Salvage
    The Yosemite Rim Fire Emergency Salvage Act was introduced 
by Representative Tom McClintock on September 26, 2013 and 
referred to the Committee on Agriculture, and in addition to 
the Committee on Natural Resources. On November 14, 2013 the 
Committee on Natural Resources ordered reported the bill, 
amended, by a recorded vote of 16 yeas to 15 nays.
    The measure directs the Secretary of Agriculture (USDA), 
with respect to affected Stanislaus National Forest lands, and 
the Secretary of the Interior, with respect to affected 
Yosemite National Park and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) 
lands, as part of the restoration and rehabilitation activities 
undertaken on the lands within the Forest, Park, and the BLM 
lands adversely impacted by the 2013 Rim Fire in California, to 
promptly plan and implement salvage timber sales of dead, 
damaged, or downed timber resulting from the wildfire.
    Requires such salvage timber sales to proceed immediately 
and to completion.
    Declares that such sales shall not be subject to 
administrative or judicial review in any U.S. court.
            H.R. 3189, Water Rights Protection Act
    The Water Rights Protection Act was introduced by 
Representative Scott R. Tipton on September 26, 2013 and 
referred to the Committee on Natural Resources, and in addition 
to the Committee on Agriculture. On November 14, 2013 the 
Committee on Natural Resources ordered reported the bill, 
amended, by a recorded vote of 19 yeas to 14 nays.
    The measure prohibits the Secretary of the Interior and the 
Secretary of Agriculture (USDA) from: (1) conditioning the 
issuance, renewal, amendment, or extension of any permit, 
approval, license, lease, allotment, easement, right-of-way, or 
other land use or occupancy agreement on the transfer or 
relinquishment of any water right directly to the United 
States, in whole or in part, granted under state law, by 
Federal or state adjudication, decree, or other judgment, or 
pursuant to any interstate water compact and such Secretaries; 
and (2) requiring any water user to apply for a water right in 
the name of the United States under state law as a condition of 
such a land use or occupancy agreement.

8. Bills Defeated

            H.R. 1947, Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management 
                    Act
    H.R. 1947 was introduced by Chairman Lucas on May 13, 2013 
and referred to the Committee on Agriculture. On May 15, 2013 
the bill was ordered reported, amended, by a recorded vote of 
36 yeas to 10 nays. On May 29, 2013, the Committee on 
Agriculture reported the bill, H. Rept. 113-92, Part 1 to the 
House and the bill was sequentially referred to the Committee 
on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on the Judiciary until 
June 10, 2013. On June 10, 2013 the Committee on Foreign 
Affairs was discharged. On that same date, the Committee on the 
Judiciary reported the bill to the House, H. Rept. 113-92, Part 
2. The Committee on Agriculture filed a supplement report on 
June 12, 2013, H. Rept. 113-92, Part 3. On June 20, 2013, the 
bill failed passage by a recorded vote of 195 yeas to 234 nays.
    The Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act 
(FARRM) is the product of nearly three years of deliberations, 
including 46 House hearings and audits, a joint deficit 
reduction proposal developed between leaders of the House and 
Senate Committees on Agriculture, and, ultimately, Committee 
consideration and passage on an overwhelming and bipartisan 
basis. As measured by the length of the Committee's 
consideration and by the depth of its evaluation, having fully 
examined the purpose and effectiveness of each and every 
authority under the jurisdiction of the Committee, FARRM is the 
product of extensive analysis and research.
    If enacted into law, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) 
estimates that FARRM will yield taxpayers nearly $40 billion in 
deficit reduction. FARRM proposes to achieve these substantial 
budget savings through significant reform. FARRM repeals or 
consolidates more than 100 programs, saves $20.5 billion from 
SNAP by curbing abuse, eliminates Direct Payments and reforms 
commodity policy at a savings of more than $14 billion, saves 
another $6.9 billion by consolidating 23 conservation programs 
into 13, and brings about long overdue regulatory relief for 
farmers and ranchers. The Committee believes that if all 
committees of congress and all functions of government 
underwent the review, reform, and reductions that this 
Committee has imposed upon policies under its jurisdiction, the 
United States would be well on its way to a smaller government 
and a balanced budget.
    Highlights include:

  
 Nearly $40 billion in mandatory funds are cut from 
        farm bill spending, including the immediate ten year 
        sequestration of $6 billion.

  
 After a series of 11 audit hearings, the Committee 
        found the need to eliminate or consolidate over 100 
        programs.

  
 Billions of dollars in authorization of 
        appropriations are reduced.

  
 Direct payments that went to farmers regardless of 
        market conditions are eliminated.

  
 A new Title I safety net is designed to offer 
        producers a choice in how best to manage risk while 
        also reforming the outdated notion of paying farmers 
        even if they no longer farm.

  
 Conservation programs are consolidated from 23 
        programs to 13 programs in an effort to streamline 
        these very valuable conservation tools.

  
 The first reforms to SNAP since the welfare reforms 
        of 1996, saving more than $20 billion.

  
 Several regulatory relief measures are included to 
        help mitigate some of the most onerous regulatory 
        pressures plaguing our nation's farmers, ranchers, and 
        rural communities.

                      Title I--Commodities

            Repeals Four Current Commodity Programs

    Direct Payments, Counter-Cyclical Payments (CCPs), the 
Average Crop Revenue Election (ACRE) program, and the 
Supplemental Revenue Assistance Payments (SURE) are repealed.

            Streamlines and Reforms Commodity Policy

    U.S. agriculture is diverse and dynamic with unique perils 
and risk management needs that differ by crop and region. A 
Washington-style command-and-control, commodity policy does not 
respect the diversity of American agriculture.
    FARRM respects the private sector and offers producers a 
choice in risk management tools. It allows a one-time election 
for producers to choose between two options on a crop-by-crop 
and farm-by-farm basis. Under either option, the risk 
management tool provided is only there for producers when they 
suffer a significant loss.
    Price Loss Coverage (PLC) is a risk management tool that 
addresses deep, multiple-year price declines:

  
 PLC will complement Federal crop insurance, which is 
        not designed to cover multiple-year price declines.

  
 PLC uses modern yields and an index of below cost-
        of-production prices to establish a market-oriented, 
        price-based risk management tool for producers.

  
 PLC limits budget exposure by only addressing deep, 
        multiple-year price losses, and prevents the need for 
        costly and unbudgeted bailouts when markets collapse.

    Revenue Loss Coverage (RLC) is a risk management tool that 
addresses revenue losses:

  
 RLC requires a producer to experience at least a 15 
        percent loss, helping ensure that all risk is not 
        removed from farming and that no growers are guaranteed 
        profits.

  
 RLC offers coverage based on county-wide losses to 
        ensure that a government program is not set up to 
        duplicate, for free, what farmers should pay for under 
        crop insurance.

  
 RLC uses yield plugs and an index of below cost-of-
        production prices as a benchmark in establishing this 
        revenue-based risk management tool for producers.

    FARRM provides full planting flexibility to ensure that 
producers plant for market and agronomic conditions. FARRM's 
PLC and RLC apply to planted acres up to total base acres on a 
farm.
    Cotton producers are ineligible for PLC or RLC, but may 
purchase an area-wide, group-risk crop insurance policy, known 
generally as STAX. A transition is provided for producers while 
STAX is being implemented.

                        Marketing Loans

    Producers remain eligible for marketing loans under the 
same repayment terms except in the case of cotton. For cotton, 
loan rates may be reduced from current levels.

                             Sugar

    Sugar policy is reauthorized to operate at no cost to the 
taxpayer.

                             Dairy

    FARRM repeals outdated, ineffective dairy programs, 
including the Dairy Product Price Support Program, the Milk 
Income Loss Contract Program, the Dairy Export Incentive 
Program, and the Federal Milk Marketing Order Review 
Commission.
    FARRM offers producers new, voluntary, basic-level margin 
coverage along with the opportunity to buy supplemental 
coverage, if they choose. By participating in the Dairy 
Producer Margin Protection Program, producers agree to manage 
supply of dairy products through participation in a Dairy 
Market Stabilization Program. Revenue generated from the market 
stabilization program will be used by USDA to fund purchases of 
surplus dairy products for donation to food banks and schools 
meals.
    FARRM reauthorizes the Dairy Forward Pricing, the Dairy 
Indemnity Program, and Dairy Promotion and Research.

                           Livestock

    Supplemental Agricultural Disaster Assistance is 
reauthorized for livestock producers. Livestock Indemnity 
Program (LIP), Livestock Forage Program (LFP),
    Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honey Bees, and Farm-
raised Fish (ELAP), and the Tree Assistance Program (TAP) are 
all generally reauthorized.
    An additional month of support is provided in the Livestock 
Forage Program for those who qualify. In addition, enhanced 
support is provided for livestock producers who have been in 
exceptional drought--the highest level--for a prolonged period.

                     Title II--Conservation

    FARRM streamlines and consolidates 23 programs into 13. 
This not only saves the American taxpayer over $6 billion, but 
also improves conservation delivery by simplifying the numerous 
programs available to producers.
    In the past, Congress has taken a piecemeal approach to 
creating our conservation policies. Since 1985, Congress has 
addressed natural resource concerns by creating more than 20 
farm bill conservation programs; some with regional goals and 
many of them have overlapping functions. FARRM reverses this 
trend by looking at conservation programs in a more 
comprehensive way.
    The Conservation Title still provides farmers, ranchers, 
foresters, and landowners with voluntary, incentive-based 
financial and technical assistance for conservation practices. 
Through these programs, producers protect and restore water 
quality and quantity, air quality, wildlife habitat, and meet 
regulatory requirements while providing a safe, secure, and 
affordable food supply.

               Conservation Reserve Program (CRP)

  Improves and Focuses the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP)

    Maximum enrollment of CRP is gradually reduced to 24 
million acres allowing enrollment to focus on the most 
environmentally sensitive lands.
    Landowners will be able to better manage their enrolled 
acres with added flexibility for haying and grazing. 
Additionally, two million acres are reserved for working 
grassland contracts.
    To ensure that environmental benefits are maintained, 
expiring acres will receive priority consideration for working 
grassland contracts and Conservation Stewardship Program 
contracts, and producers will be given the ability to enter 
into contracts of working land programs before their CRP 
contracts expire.
    Beginning farmers or ranchers will be afforded greater 
access to productive land with the continuation of the 
Transition Incentives Program (TIP).

                         Working Lands

  Supports the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP)

    FARRM prioritizes the Environmental Quality Incentives 
Program (EQIP) by maintaining current funding. With the 
regulatory pressures farmers and ranchers face, it is important 
to continue this cost share program. EQIP provides cost share 
incentives to producers to meet or avoid the need for national, 
state, or local regulation. EQIP will provide additional 
incentives for wildlife by absorbing the functions of the 
Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program (WHIP). The program 
maintains the Conservation Innovation Grant (CIG) subprogram to 
promote new and innovative conservation practices.
    Additionally, EQIP will maintain priorities for beginning 
farmers or ranchers and socially disadvantaged producers while 
including for the first time a priority for veteran farmers. 
Producers under these priorities would also be eligible to 
cover up to 50 percent of up-front project costs.

             Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP)

    CSP encourages producers to adopt new conservation 
measures, while maintaining current practices to protect 
natural resources. Changes allow more flexibility for local 
identification of natural resource concerns. Enrollment is 
limited to 8.695 million acres per year.

     Voluntary Public Access and Habitat Incentive Program

    Owners and operators of private land are able to realize a 
benefit by creating wildlife habitats and opening their land to 
hunting and fishing activities. This is program is reauthorized 
for the life of the bill.

                           Easements

        Agriculture Conservation Easement Program (ACEP)

    ACEP consolidates existing easement programs into one 
program for streamlined and flexible administration. Under 
ACEP, land can be enrolled into an Agriculture Lands Easement 
to protect working grassland or farmland, or can be enrolled 
into a Wetlands Easement to protect and enhance water quality 
and wildlife habitat.

                            Regional

        Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP)

    RCPP consolidates four programs into one targeted 
initiative that leverages USDA funding and resources by 
partnering with private organizations or working directly with 
producers to address natural resource concerns. Targeted 
conservation initiatives are developed on the local level and 
selected by USDA through a competitive, merit based application 
process. Additionally, USDA may designate Critical Conservation 
Areas to target conservation programs in regions under 
significant regulatory pressure.

                             Other

             Small Watershed Rehabilitation Program

    The Small Watershed Rehabilitation Program provides 
technical and financial assistance for planning, design, and 
implementation of projects for the purposes of rehabilitate 
aging watershed dam projects (including upgrading or removing 
dams) in communities to address flood prevention as well as 
flood-related health and safety concerns.

           Grassroots Source Water Protection Program

    This program encourages each state to use technical 
assistance for the purpose of allowing State rural water 
associations to address regulatory requirements and promote 
conservation practices with the intent of protecting and 
improving the quality of the nation's drinking water.

                        Title III--Trade

    The U.S. agricultural industry is highly dependent on 
exports, with nearly a third of all cash receipts generated 
from international markets. FARRM ensures that our producers 
are able to capitalize on these opportunities by making 
strategic investments in programs designed to address foreign 
barriers to U.S. exports and ensuring USDA places a renewed 
focus on solving trade issues through the Foreign Agricultural 
Service. Increased margins for U.S. farm output translates to 
greater capital flows back to rural America, supporting farms 
and their rural communities. The bill also reauthorizes food 
aid programs with specific changes to administrative provisions 
to ensure greater transparency and accountability.

                         Trade Programs

                  Market Access Program (MAP)

    MAP is reauthorized to provide assistance on a cost-share 
basis, targeting small businesses, farmer cooperatives, and 
nonprofit trade organizations. Private contributions are 
estimated at 60% of total annual spending on trade promotion 
and market development.

            Foreign Market Development Program (FMD)

    The reauthorized FMD program partially reimburses 
participants for approved overseas trade promotion activities 
which address long-term foreign market import constraints, and 
identifying new markets or uses for U.S. commodities. 
Preference is given to nonprofit U.S. agricultural and trade 
groups that represent an entire industry.

        Technical Assistance for Specialty Crops (TASC)

    Specialty crop exports face a variety of non-tariff trade 
barriers which can close access to key markets without notice. 
The TASC program is reauthorized, and additional authority is 
provided to ensure that USDA can respond to technical barriers 
to trade with resources made available through the program.

                    Export Credits (GSM-102)

    The GSM-102 program is reauthorized and preserves USDA's 
authority to adjust the length of tenor and the fees required 
to cover the costs of the program. Export guarantees made 
available under GSM-102 assist in financing exports of U.S. 
agricultural commodities in markets where credit might not 
otherwise be available.

                     Additional Provisions

    Authority is extended for the Emerging Markets Program 
(EMP) which promotes U.S. exports establish in emerging markets 
and is limited to generic rather than branded products. Also 
extended is the Global Crop Diversity Trust which supports the 
storage of germplasm in seed banks around the world.

                       Food Aid Programs

    The U.S. contributes nearly half of all in-kind food aid in 
the world and is the single largest donor of food aid. The bill 
reauthorizes food aid and development programs, and strengthens 
monitoring and reporting requirements to ensure transparency 
and accountability. The bill also provides resources to build 
resilience in recipient communities to mitigate and prevent 
food crises and reduce the future need for emergency aid. FARRM 
reflects the current budget environment and in support of 
efforts to reduce the Federal deficit $144 million in mandatory 
spending is not reauthorized.

                         Food for Peace

    The Food for Peace Act is reauthorized to continue 
providing critical humanitarian and development assistance in 
developing countries. FARRM ensures the timely delivery of food 
aid through funding for the pre-positioning of commodities. To 
eliminate price disruptions for local farmers and markets in 
developing economies through monetization, further 
clarification on market value and price is given to USDA and 
USAID.
    In recognition of the need to balance the dual roles of 
food aid, the minimum level of development funding is 
reauthorized at $400 million. Cash assistance to support 
development programs is reduced in recognition of budget 
constraints. Funding is included for the development and 
testing of new, fortified food aid products and to ensure the 
highest standards of food aid quality.
    Specific funding for oversight, monitoring and evaluation 
of Food for Peace programs is continued at $10 million per 
fiscal year to ensure proper management of food aid and 
development programs, including $8 million for the Famine Early 
Warning System network.
    A detailed report describing all efforts taken by the 
Administrator of USAID for monitoring and evaluation is 
required for a precise accounting of these funds.
    The bill also reauthorizes the Food for Progress program, 
the Bill Emerson Humanitarian Trust, and the McGovern-Dole 
International Food for Education and Child Nutrition program.

                      Title IV--Nutrition

    FARRM makes common-sense reforms, closes program loopholes, 
and cracks down on waste, fraud, and abuse saving the American 
taxpayer over $20 billion. The legislation strengthens program 
integrity and accountability while better targeting the Federal 
nutrition programs to serve those in need of assistance.

        Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)

       Makes Common-Sense Reforms to Program Eligibility

    Ensures all households meet the asset and income tests 
stated in SNAP law before they can receive benefits. Updates 
financial resource limits to more accurately reflect low-income 
households, and restricts categorical eligibility to only those 
households receiving cash assistance from Supplemental Security 
Income (SSI), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), 
or other state general assistance programs. Receiving a TANF-
funded brochure or referral to an ``800'' number hotline would 
no longer automatically make a household eligible for SNAP.

                    Closes Program Loopholes

    Closes a loophole in SNAP related to how Low Income Home 
Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) payments interact with SNAP 
benefit calculation. Some states are sending $1 or $5 LIHEAP 
payments to low-income households, triggering a SNAP income 
deduction that results in higher SNAP benefits for those 
households. This legislation stops states from sending nominal 
LIHEAP payments below $20 for the sole purpose of increasing 
their SNAP benefits. This provision will not affect any 
households receiving traditional LIHEAP assistance or any 
household that can demonstrate a utility cost.

              Eliminates State Performance Bonuses

    Ends the bonuses USDA awards to states for administering 
SNAP, and saves taxpayers nearly half a billion dollars without 
affecting SNAP recipient benefits.

             Cracks Down on Waste, Fraud and Abuse

Ends SNAP Benefits for Lottery Winners

    SNAP recipients with substantial lottery or gambling 
winnings will lose benefits immediately after receiving 
winnings. Winners will be prevented from receiving any benefits 
if they do not meet the financial requirements of SNAP.

Prevents Traditional College Students from Receiving SNAP

    Restricts SNAP eligibility for traditional college students 
to those participating in technical and vocational education 
programs, trade studies, remedial course work, or basic adult 
literacy.

Prevents Fraudulent Benefit Payments

    Requires states to verify benefits are not being paid to 
deceased individuals and that beneficiaries are not receiving 
payments in more than one state.

Stops Fraudulent ``Dumping'' for Cash

    Prevents SNAP benefits from being used to pay for 
substantial bottle deposits. This prevents beneficiaries from 
purchasing items which require a substantial bottle deposit, 
such as $5 specialty milk bottles, dumping the milk, and 
returning the bottle for a cash refund of the deposit.

Prohibits Medical Marijuana as an Income Deduction

    Prohibits states from allowing medical marijuana to be 
treated as a medical expense for purposes of income deductions 
when calculating SNAP benefits.

Prohibits Government-Sponsored Recruitment Activities

    Prevents USDA from advertising the SNAP program. Stops 
promotion of the program through television, radio and 
billboard advertisements and prohibits USDA from entering into 
agreements with foreign governments designed to promote SNAP 
benefits.

        Strengthens Program Integrity and Accountability

Demands Outcomes from the SNAP Employment and Training Program

    Requires states to report outcomes on their respective E&T 
program to provide more accountability of how SNAP participants 
are gaining skills, training, work or experience that leads to 
employment.

Improves the Quality of Participating Retail Stores

    Requires participating retailers to stock more staple foods 
like fruits and vegetables. Includes provisions to further 
monitor and prevent fraud at retail stores. Allows more service 
options for homebound elderly or disabled SNAP recipients.

Ensures Illegal Immigrants Do Not Receive SNAP Benefits

    Requires states to use an immigration status verification 
system to verify an applicant's immigration status.

Increases Oversight of the Restaurant Meals Program

    Requires states to submit a plan to USDA if they are 
choosing to implement a Restaurant Meals Program to serve 
homeless, elderly and disabled populations. The plan must 
demonstrate a need for such a program along with effective 
control measures.

                 Additional Nutrition Programs

              Increases Assistance for Food Banks

    Food banks have been successful in effectively utilizing 
government dollars and securing private sector donations in 
order to feed hungry Americans. However, local food banks have 
been struggling to provide enough food to needy families in the 
current economic climate. Increasing funding for The Emergency 
Food Assistance Program (TEFAP) will help food banks supplement 
the diets of low-income individuals.

    Supports the Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP)

    Continues support for CSFP, and transitions the program to 
serve only senior citizen populations while allowing the small 
percentage of women and children currently enrolled in CSFP to 
continue to receive services until they have exceeded the age 
of eligibility. This better targets the program to seniors who 
utilize CSFP the most. Women and children will all continue to 
be served by the WIC program, which is more suited to their 
dietary needs.

Ensures Seniors and Low-Income Families Have Access to Farmers 
                            Markets

    Expands the Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program to not 
only benefit senior citizen populations, but also provides low-
income families access to fruits and vegetables through coupons 
that can be exchanged for eligible foods at farmers' markets 
and community-supported agriculture programs.

       Promotes Fruits and Vegetables to School Children

    Continues current funding for the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable 
Program and helps the dollars go further by allowing elementary 
schools with a high proportion of low-income students to 
purchase fresh, frozen, canned, and dried produce to be made 
available to students throughout the day. Maintains current 
funding for the DOD Fresh Program that distributes fresh fruits 
and vegetables to schools and service institutions, and creates 
a pilot program to allow up to five states to use their 
allocation to source local produce.

       Continues Food Distribution on Indian Reservations

    Reauthorizes funding for the Food Distribution Program on 
Indian Reservations (FDPIR), which provides food assistance to 
Indian Tribal Organizations (ITOs).

                Supports Community Food Projects

    Supports grants for eligible nonprofit organizations 
seeking and developing innovative ways to improve community 
access to healthy foods.

                        Title V--Credit

    FARRM reauthorizes credit programs ensuring adequate credit 
in rural America, updating farm ownership loans, promoting 
enhanced conservation practices, and better meeting the lending 
needs of beginning farmers, ranchers, and Native Americans.

                     Promotes Family Farms

    FARRM recognizes the need to provide flexibility for farm 
operating loans in response to modern legal entities created 
for estate succession planning. This flexibility allows the 
Secretary to permit farmers to obtain farm ownership loans 
through these modern legal entities.

  Improves Credit Availability for Conservation Loan and Loan 
                       Guarantee Program

    In response to establishing enhanced conservation 
practices, FARRM provides additional access to borrowers by 
increasing the Loan Guarantee Amount from 75 percent to 90 
percent.

     Maintains Producer Competitiveness for Land Purchases

    FARRM updates the maximum loan value from $500,000 to 
$667,000 ensuring farmers and ranchers can continue to be 
competitive for land purchases in areas with high real estate 
values.

        Enhances Beginning Farmer and Rancher Provisions

    In addition to those provisions outlined above, to support 
beginning farmers and ranchers, reauthorizations along with 
enhancements to current programs include:

  
 Reauthorizes the Beginning Farmer and Rancher 
        Individual Development Accounts Pilot Program which 
        authorizes matching-funds for savings accounts to meet 
        farming-related expenses

  
 Reserves Loan Fund Set-Asides, which is a portion of 
        the guaranteed farm ownership loan and direct operating 
        loan funds, for beginning farmers and ranchers.

  
 Provides priority for joint financing participation 
        loans and down payment loans within direct farm 
        ownership loans. By providing priority to applicants 
        USDA can maximize the number of borrowers served for a 
        given level of appropriations.

  
 Removes median farm size limitation by replacing 
        ``median'' with ``average''. This clarification, allows 
        more qualified applicants to receive beginning farmer 
        ownership loans, while excluding those who already own 
        a substantial piece of land.

  
 Provides the Secretary with discretion in defining 
        the experience necessary to qualify a beginning farmer 
        or rancher for a farm ownership loan. This modification 
        ensures that qualified farmers can adequately address 
        their lending needs.

                  Title VI--Rural Development

    FARRM reauthorizes the initiatives while eliminating 
duplicative or wasteful authorities. Thirteen programs are 
eliminated and funding levels are reduced by more than $1.5 
billion over five years, a 50 percent reduction in 
authorizations. This authorized level of funding ensures that 
available appropriations can be focused on the programs that 
have the greatest impact on rural communities. In addition, 
$100 million in mandatory money is not reauthorized.
    Provisions are included to ensure USDA tracks the success 
of these investments for further streamlining and reform. FARRM 
requires USDA to develop simplified application forms for rural 
development programs to reduce administrative burdens and make 
the programs more accessible to small, rural communities.
    Rural development programs are intended to assist 
communities through loans and grants to build critical 
infrastructure and provide access to credit. Through these 
programs small, rural communities can access funds to build or 
update water systems, build broadband infrastructure, and 
finance other critical community facilities. Small businesses 
are able to access credit through loans, grants, and loan 
guarantees to finance new enterprises or expand their current 
business.

                 Water and Wastewater Programs

    Programs which assist rural communities in addressing 
critical water and wastewater needs are reauthorized, including 
assistance through loans and grants for municipal systems and 
household wells. Resources for technical assistance are 
provided to help communities focus on core needs and plan the 
appropriate remedies. Programs include the Water, Waste 
Disposal and Wastewater Facility Grants, the Circuit Rider 
Program, Imminent Community Water Assistance Grants, and grants 
to finance individual wells. The bill also requires USDA to 
maximize the use of loan guarantees in water and wastewater 
projects.

                   Business Loans and Grants

    Several key programs are reauthorized which provide either 
grants, loans, or a combination of both to small businesses. 
Two distinct relending programs are reauthorized to assist 
small businesses start or expand their operations. The 
Intermediary Relending Program provides access to credit for 
loans up to $250,000 in medium or small towns. The Rural 
Microentrepreneur Assistance Program provides small loans of 
$50,000 or less to relending organizations to assist small and 
very small businesses with fewer than 10 employees.
    Rural Cooperative Development Grants are extended to assist 
in the development of new cooperatives and improve the 
operations of existing cooperatives. Value-Added Producer 
grants are reauthorized with $50 million in mandatory funding. 
These grants benefit producers and cooperatives that process 
agricultural commodities to capture increased margins directly. 
Priority is given to beginning farmers and ranchers under this 
program.
    Funding set aside for locally and regionally produced 
agricultural food products is capped at 7% of the program, 
ensuring that other viable business ventures can compete for 
scarce funding under the Business and Industry Loan Program, 
and assistance is provided for main street businesses to allow 
certain types of collateral for USDA loans.

                    Broadband Infrastructure

    The Broadband Loan Program is reauthorized to provide 
access to broadband service in rural America. Specific 
provisions are added to increase transparency in the program to 
ensure investments focus on areas without broadband service. 
Additional emphasis is placed on projects which will serve both 
businesses and homes to maximize the economic impact of each 
project.
    The Distance Learning and Telemedicine program is also 
reauthorized to provide funding for schools and hospitals. 
These projects allow small communities to access education and 
health services which would otherwise not be available.

                      Community Facilities

    The bill reauthorizes several essential community 
facilities loans and grants which provide direct assistance to 
small, rural communities. These funds are made available to 
develop essential public facilities such as hospitals, fire 
stations, public safety services, and specific infrastructure 
projects.

                      Regional Authorities

    The Northern Great Plains and the Delta Regional 
Authorities are both reauthorized. These regional commissions 
are intended to coordinate investments across several states 
including business, infrastructure, and education ventures.

                      Rural Transportation

    The bill requires USDA to update a previous study on rural 
transportation issues to provide policy makers with current 
data on the state of transportation systems which move 
commodities and processed goods throughout rural America.

      Title VII--Research, Extension and Related Programs

    FARRM continues and enhances critical research ideas while 
leveraging public and private dollars. The legislation 
acknowledges the economic hardship facing our nation. 
Highlights include:

  
 Repeals authority for non-competitive grants under 
        numerous grant programs

  
 Extends the authorization of appropriations for 47 
        research, extension, and education programs;

  
 Repeals 76 research and extension programs and 
        reports;

  
 Lets expire 5 additional research and extension 
        programs;

  
 Reduces or eliminates authorized funding levels by 
        $500 Million; and

  
 Replaces 12 ``such sums as necessary'' authorization 
        limits and includes levels consistent with actual 
        appropriations.

    Past support for agricultural research and education has 
resulted in Americans enjoying the most abundant, safest, and 
most affordable food supply in the world.
    Although agricultural research and extension have been 
highly successful, many food and agricultural challenges 
continue to face our nation's producers, processors, and 
consumers. As the United States becomes more dependent on the 
global economy, it is imperative to address issues of 
productivity to meet increasing world demands and 
competitiveness to assure a higher percentage of market share. 
Domestically other critical social, economic and natural 
resource issues must also be solved.

                  Intramural Research Programs

    FARRM extends authority for intramural research programs 
carried out by the Agricultural Research Service; Economic 
Research Service, National Agricultural Statistics Service and 
the Forest Service.

                  Extramural Research Programs

    Authority for extramural research grants and formula funds 
programs administered by the National Institute of Food and 
Agriculture are extended

                    Land-Grant Universities

    University research for agricultural activities is 
reauthorized for 1862, 1890 and 1994 Land-Grant colleges and 
universities.

  Capacity Grants for Non-Land Grant Colleges of Agriculture 
                            (NLGCA)

    Competitive grants to NLGCA institutions are reauthorized 
in order to maintain and expand research and outreach in 
regards to agriculture, renewable resources and production 
practices.

   National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education and 
               Economics (NAREEE) Advisory Board

    The NAREEE advisory board is reauthorized while enhancing 
the involvement and consultation of other agricultural industry 
interests on agricultural priorities.

            Agriculture and Food Research Initiative

    AFRI continues critical agriculture research by providing 
competitive grants through integrated research and extension 
activities.

          Increased Transparency for Budget Submission

    Enhances accountability and transparency of USDA 
administered research, extension and education funding by 
mandating that the annual Presidential Budget Submission 
include sufficient information for the Congress to thoroughly 
evaluate and approve future spending plans. With regard to 
extramural competitive grants programs, USDA will be barred 
from obligating appropriated funds unless a comprehensive 
spending plan is submitted with the President's budget and 
approved by Congress.

            Addresses the Shortage of Veterinarians

    FARRM includes the Veterinarian Services Investment Act. 
Several similar pieces of legislation have been introduced in 
the House and Senate. This act requires an entity to develop 
programs to relieve shortages, support private practices, and 
support those practices that successfully complete a specified 
service requirement. This bill has previously passed the House 
of Representatives.

                     Specified Initiatives

    FARRM would reauthorize commodity specific research 
programs such as Specialty Crop Research Initiative, Organic 
Research and Extension Initiative, Sustainable Agriculture 
Research and Extension, the Beginning Farmer and Rancher 
Development Program, and Competitive Grants Program for 
Hispanic Agricultural Workers and Youth.

                      Title VIII--Forestry

    FARRM promotes the health of America's national, state, and 
private forests while eliminating five expired programs. The 
forestry title also places caps on the authorization levels of 
several existing programs.

            Continuing Forest Conservation Programs

    The Forest Legacy Program and the Community Open Space 
Program, which help preserve forested lands facing conversion 
to other uses, are continued with reduced authorization levels. 
The Healthy Forest Reserve Program, which helps landowners 
promote habitat for wildlife, is reauthorized.

        Combating Invasive Species and Natural Disasters

    FARRM provides authority for the Forest Service to 
accelerate its treatment of National Forests affected by pine 
bark beetle infestation and natural disasters. This authority 
streamlines the approval process for the Forest Service in 
selecting afflicted areas that need treatment within our 
National Forests.

                     Protecting Forest Jobs

    FARRM reauthorizes the Office of International Forestry, 
which is designed to help facilitate the development of foreign 
markets for domestically produced wood products. The strategic 
plan for the Forest Inventory is updated to reflect the needs 
of rural communities across America. The Rural Revitalization 
Technologies program is reauthorized in order to provide grants 
and technical assistance to forested rural communities.

                    Improving Forest Health

    The Forest Stewardship Contracting program is extended for 
an additional five years, allowing the Forest Service to engage 
in needed restoration work on our National Forests.

                        Title IX--Energy

    FARRM helps diversify our nation's energy supply and 
creates new economic opportunities in rural America by 
promoting the development of advanced biofuels and renewable 
energy.
    FARRM eliminates mandatory funding and reauthorizes 
programs at reduced discretionary funding levels that will save 
taxpayers more than $500 million. FARRM streamlines current 
programs, enhances program integrity, and eliminates four 
programs that have outlived their usefulness.

                Rural Energy for America (REAP)

    REAP provides financial assistance to farmers and ranchers 
or small rural businesses for renewable energy systems such as 
anaerobic digesters, solar or wind projects, and energy 
efficiency measures; as well as grants for energy audits.
    The title creates a tiered, streamlined, and efficient 
application process for farmers and rural businesses applying 
for smaller or less costly projects to install renewable or 
energy efficient systems. In an effort to target funding, the 
authority for feasibility studies is eliminated and a new 
definition for renewable energy systems is created to clarify 
congressional intent by eliminating funding for ethanol blender 
pumps.

             Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP)

    BCAP was created to assist landowners in the establishment 
of dedicated energy crops. The title prioritizes funding for 
the establishment of dedicated energy crops by eliminating 
controversial Collection, Harvest, Storage, and Transportation 
(CHST) payments.

              Biorefinery Assistance Program (BAP)

    BAP provides loan guarantees for the construction or 
retrofitting of biorefineries that will enable the commercial-
scale production of advanced biofuels. The provision eliminates 
grant authority for demonstration facilities.

                    Biobased Markets Program

    Amends the definition of ``biobased product'' to include a 
definition of ``forest product'' for USDA's BioPreferred 
program. This definition allows certain domestic forest 
products with mature markets to be eligible under Federal 
procurement guidelines for renewable products. Materials 
eligible under this amended definition would include items such 
as pulp, paper, and wood pellets.

                Biodiesel Fuel Education Program

    The Biodiesel Fuel Education Program provides competitive 
grants to nonprofit entities to provide information and 
outreach on the benefits of biodiesel fuel use.
    FARRM reauthorizes the Bioenergy Program for Advanced 
Biofuels, the Repowering Assistance Program, the Biomass 
Research and Development Program, the Feedstock Flexibility 
Program, and the Community Wood Energy Program;
    FARRM repeals or ends authorizations of the Biofuels 
Infrastructure Study, and the Renewable Fertilizer Study, the 
Rural Energy Self-sufficiency Initiative, and the Forest 
Biomass for Energy Programs.

                     Title X--Horticulture

    FARRM continues and improves popular and successful 
programs that recognize the diversity of U.S. specialty crops 
and organic agriculture, including fruits, vegetables, nuts, 
horticulture, and nursery crops.

          Supports Farmers Markets and Local Economies

    The Farmers Market and Local Food Promotion Program 
continues the authorization of competitive grants to improve 
direct producer-to-consumer market opportunities, including the 
development of local food system infrastructure.

        Continues the Specialty Crop Block Grant Program

    FARRM reauthorizes the Specialty Crop Block Grant Program, 
which has been successful in enhancing the competitiveness of 
specialty crops through grants awarded to states to support 
research, product quality enhancement, food safety, and other 
projects important to the specialty crop industry.

    Combats Pest and Disease By Focusing on Early Detections

    FARRM reauthorizes and consolidates two very effective 
programs, the Plant Pest and Disease Management and Disaster 
Prevention Program and the National Clean Plant Network. 
Detecting and responding to a plant pest or disease in the 
early stages of an introduction is a significant cost savings 
for taxpayers, and can help minimize the potentially 
devastating impact on agriculture.

                  Supports Organic Agriculture

    FARRM reauthorizes two important programs supporting the 
organic industry, the Organic Production and Market Data 
Initiatives Program and the National Organic Program, as well 
as enhances investigation and enforcement tools. The National 
Organic Program maintains its authorization to better support 
its regulatory functions in ensuring consumers are presented 
with consistent, uniform standards.

                       Regulatory Relief

Provides Regulatory Relief

    FARRM includes two provisions that seek to mitigate some of 
the most onerous regulatory pressures plaguing our nation's 
farmers, ranchers, and rural communities. Both of these 
measures provide no additional cost to taxpayers, but provide 
significant benefits in job creation and regulatory relief.

H.R. 935, the Reducing Regulatory Burdens Act

    FARRM includes H.R. 935, which eliminates a costly and 
duplicative permitting requirement for pesticide applications.
    Although the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has a 
comprehensive regulatory program in place under the authority 
of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act 
(FIFRA), a misguided judicial decision has resulted in the EPA 
requiring additional permits under the Clean Water Act (CWA). 
This duplicative mandate imposes significant public health 
risks and provides no quantifiable environmental benefit.
    H.R. 935 was introduced as H.R. 872 during the 112th 
Congress and passed the House of Representatives with an 
overwhelming vote of 292-130 on March 31, 2011.

Biological Opinions

    FARRM would impose a temporary stay on the EPA from 
initiating a modification or cancellation of a pesticide 
registration based on the Biological Opinions of the National 
Marine Fisheries Service or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
(hereinafter referred to as the Services') until an unbiased, 
external scientific peer review of these Biological Opinions 
can be conducted and the scientific questions challenging the 
validity of these consultations can be resolved.
    This is the result of extensive bipartisan oversight 
carried out between the Agriculture Committee, Natural 
Resources Committee and Appropriations Subcommittee on 
Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies in response to 
litigation challenging EPA registrations of pesticides wherein 
the agency had not formally consulted with the Services'. 
Courts have ordered these consultations to proceed under an 
expedited schedule that precludes scientific credibility and 
transparency. The results of these consultations to date are 
Biological Opinions of the Services' for which the EPA has 
testified are scientifically suspect. Despite the lack of 
agreement on the underlying scientific methods and data 
employed by the Services', current lawsuits are aimed at 
compelling the EPA to implement these Biological Opinions. This 
would circumvent the desire that EPA's process and final 
decision on pesticide registrations be scientifically

                    Title XI--Crop Insurance

    Crop Insurance is the cornerstone of risk management for 
most farmers. FARRM recognizes the $12 billion in cuts that 
crop insurance has already contributed toward deficit reduction 
over the past five years and the increased importance of crop 
insurance given the large reductions in the commodity title. 
FARRM makes improvements to crop insurance to better serve all 
producers of all crops in all regions.

               Supplemental Coverage Option (SCO)

    FARRM authorizes producers to purchase the Supplemental 
Coverage Option (SCO), an area-wide group-risk policy, designed 
to address a portion of losses not covered by individual crop 
insurance policies

  Enhanced Risk Management for Beginning Farmers and Ranchers

    For the initial five years of production, beginning farmers 
and ranchers will benefit from a 10 percentage point crop 
insurance premium reduction and will see improved production 
histories where natural disasters have depressed current Actual 
Production History (APH) yields.

 Expands Risk Management for Specialty Crops and under-served 
                          Commodities

    FARRM provides authority for the development of improved 
risk management tools for under-served crops and regions.

  Improved Actual Production History in the Event of Multiple 
                         Year Disasters

    FARRM addresses problems with declining APH yields due to 
multiple year disasters by providing a transitional yield that 
reflects a producer's production capability on that land.

                     Increased Flexibility

    FARRM authorizes continuation of insuring by Enterprise 
Units as provided under the 2008 Farm Bill, with improvements.

                       Program Integrity

    FARRM requires that the Farm Service Agency (FSA) and the 
Risk Management Agency (RMA) share information and encourages 
correction of errors in order to ensure accuracy of reported 
information.

                    Title XII--Miscellaneous

         Animal Health and Livestock Industry Promotion

    FARRM reauthorizes several initiatives to help promote the 
livestock industry, as well as improve animal health.

       National Sheep Industry Improvement Center (NSIIC)

    FARRM reauthorizes the NSIIC through 2018. The Center was 
created to assist our sheep and goat producers by strengthening 
and enhancing the production and marketing of sheep and goat 
products.

                Trichinae Certification Program

    FARRM reauthorizes the Trichinae Certification Program 
though 2018. The initiative is a pre-harvest pork safety 
program that uses management practices to minimize the risk of 
exposure of swine to the parasite Trichinella spiralis.

              National Aquatic Animal Health Plan

    FARRM reauthorizes the National Aquatic Animal Health Plan 
through 2018. The authority allows the Secretary to enter into 
cooperative agreements for the purposes of detecting, 
controlling, or eradicating diseases in aquaculture species.
    (Note: See also the discussion of H.R. 935 under ``7. Bill 
Ordered Reported but Not Reported by other Committees within 
the Committee on Agriculture jurisdiction'' and for further 
action, see also the discussion of H.R. 2642 under ``11. Bills 
Acted on by Both Houses But Not Enacted.'')
            H. Res. 378, Expressing the sense of the House of 
                    Representatives regarding certain provisions of the 
                    Senate amendment to H.R. 2642 relating to the 
                    Secretary of Agriculture's administration of 
                    tariff-rate quotas for raw and refined sugar.
    H. Res. 378 was introduced by Representative Joseph R. 
Pitts on October 11, 2013 and referred to the Committee on 
Agriculture, and in addition to the Committee on Ways and 
Means. On October 11, 2013 the measure was considered in the 
House as unfinished business. On October 12, 2013 the measure 
failed passage by a recorded vote of 192 yeas to 212 yeas with 
1 present.
    H. Res. 378 expresses the sense of the House of 
Representatives that the House managers of the conference on 
the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the House amendment 
to the Senate amendment to the bill H.R. 2642 (Federal 
Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act of 2013) should 
advance provisions to repeal the Administration of Tariff Rate 
Quotas language as added by the Food, Conservation, and Energy 
Act of 2008, and thus restore the authority of the Secretary of 
Agriculture (USDA) to manage sugar supplies to meet domestic 
demand at reasonable prices.

9. Bills Acted on by the Committee Included in the Other Laws Enacted

    None.

10. Bills Vetoed

    None.

11. Bills Acted on by Both Houses But Not Enacted

            H.R. 2642/S.954, FARRM ACT (2) in Conference
    The Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act of 
2013 was introduced by Chairman Frank D. Lucas on July 10, 2013 
and referred to the Committee on Agriculture. On July 11, 2013 
the bill passed the House, by a recorded vote of 216 yeas to 
208 nays. On July 18, 2013 the Senate struck all after the 
enacting clause and inserted the text of S. 954 as previously 
passed by Senate and requested a conference. On September 28, 
2013 the House agreed to the Senate amendment with an amendment 
pursuant to H. Res. 361 which included the text of H.R. 3102 as 
previously passed by the House on September 19, 2013. On 
October 1, 2013 the Senate disagreed to House amendment to the 
Senate amendment by a Unanimous Consent, requested a conference 
and appointed conferees. On October 11, 2013 the House insisted 
on its amendment and agreed to a conference with the 
appointment of conferees occurring on October 12, 2013. On 
October 30, 2013 a House-Senate Conference meeting was held to 
resolve the differences.

                  Title I--Commodity Programs

    Under both the House and Senate-passed farm bills, farm 
support for traditional program crops is restructured by 
eliminating direct payments, the counter-cyclical price (CCP) 
program, and the Average Crop Revenue Election (ACRE) program. 
Authority is continued for marketing assistance loans, which 
provide additional low-price protection at ``loan rates'' 
specified in current law with an adjustment made to the cotton 
loan rate. Direct payments account for most of current 
commodity spending and are made to producers and landowners 
based on historical production of corn, wheat, soybeans, 
cotton, rice, peanuts, and other ``covered'' crops. 
Approximately \3/4\ of the 10-year, $46 billion-$47 billion in 
savings associated with the proposed elimination of current 
farm programs would be used to offset the cost of revising farm 
programs, adding permanent disaster assistance, and enhancing 
crop insurance. The two bills provide programs for covered 
crops, except cotton, which would have its program. The Senate 
bill suspends permanent price support authority under the 
Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938 and Agricultural Adjustment 
Act of 1949 until program authority expires in 2018, while the 
House bill repeals permanent law and provides no expiration 
date for the commodity support programs authorized.
    Both bills retain a counter-cyclical price program that 
makes a farm payment when prices for covered crops decline 
below certain levels. It is renamed Adverse Market Payments or 
AMP in the Senate bill and Price Loss Coverage or PLC in House 
bill. To better protect producers in a market downturn, the 
price guarantees are called ``reference prices'' in both bills 
that determine payment levels are set in statute and increased 
relative to current parameters called ``target prices''. An 
exception applies in the Senate bill to the reference price for 
crops other than rice and peanuts, where it is calculated as 
55% of a rolling five-year average (excluding the high and low 
years).
    The Senate bill continues current policy by making payments 
on 85% of historical plantings or ``base acres'', a provision 
designed to minimize the program's effect on planting 
decisions. The House bill pays on 85% of planted acreage to 
better align payments with producer risk.
    Both bills retain a revenue-based program designed to cover 
a portion of a farmer's out-of-pocket loss referred to as 
``shallow loss''. It is renamed Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) 
in the Senate bill and Revenue Loss Coverage or (RLC) in the 
House bill. Payments are made on planted acres when actual crop 
revenue drops below a specified percentage of historical or 
``benchmark'' revenue (88% in S. 954 and 85% in H.R. 2642). In 
the Senate bill under ARC, farmers can select coverage at 
either the county or individual farm level, and any payments 
are made in addition to AMP. In the House bill, coverage under 
RLC is available at only the county level, and the program is 
not available in combination with PLC.
    Both bills retroactively reauthorize four programs covering 
livestock and tree assistance, specifically FY 2012-FY 2018 for 
the Senate bill and beginning FY 2012 and continuing without an 
expiration date for the House bill. The crop disaster program 
from the 2008 Farm Bill (Supplemental Revenue Assistance, or 
SURE) is not reauthorized in either bill, but elements of it 
are folded into the new ARC in the Senate bill by allowing 
producers to protect against farm-level revenue losses (not 
included in the House bill). S. 954 also provides disaster 
benefits to tree fruit producers who suffered crop losses in 
2012.
    Farm commodity programs have certain limits that cap 
payments (currently $105,000 per person) and set eligibility 
based on adjusted gross income (AGI, currently a maximum of 
$500,000 per person for nonfarm income and $750,000 for farm 
income). The two bills are somewhat similar and diverge from 
current law, with S. 954 reducing the farm program payment 
limit to $50,000 per person for combined AMP and ARC payments 
and adding a $75,000 limit on loan deficiency payments (LDPs). 
Under H.R. 2642, the limit for all title I payments would be 
$125,000, of which LDPs would be limited to $75,000 and other 
payments including PLC, RLC, and transitional direct payments 
to $50,000. The House bill combines peanuts into the limit with 
other commodities, while the Senate bill continues separate but 
equal limits for peanuts. Both the Senate and House bills 
change the threshold to be considered ``actively engaged'' and 
to qualify for payments, by effectively requiring personal 
labor in the farming operation. Both bills also tighten limits 
on AGI, with a combined AGI limit of $750,000 in S. 954 and 
$950,000 in H.R. 2642. The House bill caps overall farm program 
spending at $16.96 billion for FY 2014-FY 2020 for combined 
payments under Price Loss Coverage and Revenue Loss Coverage 
collectively called Farm Risk Management Election.
    Both House and Senate bills contain similar dairy policy 
with significant changes, including elimination of the dairy 
product price support program, the Milk Income Loss Contract 
(MILC) program, and export subsidies. These are replaced by a 
new program, which makes payments to participating dairy 
producers when the national margin (average farm price of milk 
minus average feed costs) falls below $4.00 per hundredweight 
(cwt.), with coverage at higher margins available for purchase. 
A provision in S. 954 makes participating producers subject to 
a separate program, which reduces incentives to produce milk 
when margins are low. This provision is not in H.R. 2642, 
however, H.R. 2642 requires USDA to adhere to standard 
rulemaking procedures and to determine the market impacts of 
the new program during the rulemaking process. Separately, 
Federal Milk Marketing Orders have permanent statutory 
authority and continue intact. However, S. 954 includes two 
additional provisions: one that requires USDA to use a 
specified pre-hearing procedure to consider alternative 
formulas for Class III milk product pricing, and a second that 
requires USDA to analyze and report on the potential effects of 
replacing end-product pricing with alternative pricing 
procedures.
    The structure of the sugar program is left unchanged in 
both bills, but the Senate bill reauthorizes the program 
through the 2018 crop year, while the House bill reauthorizes 
the program without an expiration date.

                     Title II--Conservation

    Both the House and Senate bills reduce and consolidate the 
number of conservation programs while also reducing mandatory 
funding over the 10-year baseline by $3.5 billion in S. 954 and 
$4.8 billion in H.R. 2642.
    The larger existing conservation programs, such as the 
Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), the Environmental Quality 
Incentives Program (EQIP), and the Conservation Stewardship 
Program (CSP), are reauthorized by both bills with smaller and 
similar conservation programs ``rolled'' into them. The largest 
conservation program, CRP, is reauthorized with a reduced 
acreage enrollment cap using a step-down approach from the 
current 32 million acres to 25 million by FY 2018 under S. 954 
and 24 million acres under H.R. 2642. CRP is also amended to 
include the enrollment of grassland acres similar to the 
Grasslands Reserve Program (GRP), which is repealed. These 
grassland acres are limited to 1.5 million acres in S. 954 and 
2 million acres in H.R. 2642. EQIP, a program that assists 
producers applying conservation measures on land in production, 
is reauthorized by both bills with a 5% funding carve-out for 
wildlife habitat practices (similar to the Wildlife Habitat 
Incentives Program, WHIP, which is repealed). The Senate bill 
reduces budget authority for EQIP by a total of almost $1 
billion over 10 years, while the House bill offers no reduction 
from the current $1.75 billion annually. CSP, another working 
lands program, is reauthorized at a reduced enrollment level 
under both bills: 10.348 million acres annually under S. 954 
and 8.695 million acres annually under H.R. 2642, down from 
12.769 million acres annually under current law.
    Both bills create two new conservation programs--the 
Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP) and the 
Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP)--out of 
several of the existing programs. Conservation easement 
programs, including the Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP), 
Farmland Protection Program (FPP), and GRP, are repealed and 
consolidated to create ACEP. ACEP retains most of the program 
provisions in the current easement programs by establishing two 
types of easements: wetlands easements (similar to WRP) that 
protect and restore wetlands, and agricultural land easements 
(similar to FPP and GRP) that prevent non-agricultural uses on 
productive farm or grasslands. The Agricultural Water 
Enhancement Program (AWEP), Chesapeake Bay Watershed program, 
Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative (CCPI), and 
Great Lakes Basin program are repealed by both bills and 
consolidated into the new RCPP. RCPP uses partnership 
agreements with state and local governments, Indian tribes, 
farmer cooperatives, and other conservation organizations to 
leverage Federal funding and further conservation on a regional 
or watershed scale.
    The Senate bill adds the federally funded portion of crop 
insurance premiums to the list of program benefits that could 
be lost if a producer is found to produce an agricultural 
commodity on highly erodible land without implementing an 
approved conservation plan or qualifying exemption, or converts 
a wetland to crop production. This prerequisite, referred to as 
conservation compliance, has existed since the 1985 Farm Bill 
and currently affects most USDA farm program benefits, but has 
excluded crop insurance since 1996.

                        Title III--Trade

    Title III of both the House and Senate farm bills 
reauthorize all of the international food aid programs, 
including the largest, Food for Peace Title II (emergency and 
nonemergency food aid). Both bills contain amendments to 
current food aid law that place greater emphasis on improving 
the quality of food aid products (enhancing their nutritional 
quality). The Senate bill places new restrictions on the 
practice of monetization or selling U.S. food aid commodities 
in recipient countries to raise cash to finance development 
projects. The Senate bill requires implementing partners such 
as U.S. private voluntary organizations or cooperatives to 
recover 70% of the U.S. commodity procurement and shipping 
costs. The Senate bill repeals the specified dollar amounts for 
nonemergency food aid required in current law (the ``safe 
box''). In place of the safe box, S. 954 provides that 
nonemergency food aid be not less than 20% nor more than 30% of 
funds made available to carry out the program, subject to the 
requirement that a minimum of $275 million be provided for 
nonemergency food aid. The House bill places no limits on the 
practice of monetization, other than new reporting 
requirements, and fixes the amount of ``safe box'' nonemergency 
assistance at $400 million annually.
    The Senate bill creates a new local and regional purchase 
program in place of the expired local and regional procurement 
(LRP) pilot program of the 2008 Farm Bill. The bill also 
increased the appropriation authorization for LRP to $60 
million annually for FY 2014 through FY 2018, up from $40 
million.
    Both bills reauthorize funding for the Commodity Credit 
Corporation (CCC) Export Credit Guarantee program and various 
agricultural export market promotion programs. S. 954 reduces 
the value of U.S. agricultural exports that can benefit from 
export credit guarantees from $5.5 billion to $4.5 billion 
annually. The House bill retains the $5.5 billion level of 
guarantees. Both bills authorize CCC funding of $200 million 
annually for the Market Access Program (MAP), which finances 
promotional activities for both generic and branded U.S. 
agricultural products. Authorized CCC funding for the Foreign 
Market Development Program (FMDP), a generic commodity 
promotion program, continues in both bills at $34.5 million 
annually through FY 2017.
    H.R. 2642 authorizes the Secretary of Agriculture to 
establish the position of Under Secretary of Agriculture for 
Foreign Agricultural Services. S. 954 requires the Secretary, 
in consultation with the House and Senate Agriculture 
Committees and House and Senate Appropriations Committees to 
propose a plan for reorganization of the trade functions of 
USDA, including the establishment of an Under Secretary of 
Agriculture for Trade and Foreign Agricultural Affairs. The 
Secretary is required to report on the plan 180 days after the 
farm bill's enactment. Within one year of submission of the 
report, the Secretary is required to implement the 
reorganization plan including establishment of the Under 
Secretary position.

                      Title IV--Nutrition

    Title IV of the House and Senate bills both propose to 
reduce spending for the nutrition programs. For the Nutrition 
title of each bill, CBO estimates total 10-year budget savings 
of $3.9 billion in the Senate bill and $39.0 billion in the 
House bill.
    SNAP provisions in both bills propose changes to the 
requirements for retailers who apply for authorization to 
accept SNAP and changes to some of the rules that govern 
participants' and retailers' redemption of SNAP benefits. Both 
bills would provide additional mandatory funding for reducing 
SNAP trafficking (the sale of SNAP benefits for cash or 
ineligible goods). In terms of eligibility for SNAP and the 
calculation of monthly benefit amounts, both bills would change 
how a household's receipt of Low-Income Home Energy Assistance 
Program (LIHEAP) benefits affects the household's SNAP benefit 
calculation; S. 954 would set a $10 threshold and the House 
bill would set a $20 threshold. In addition, the House bill 
would (1) restrict categorical eligibility, (2) repeal state 
performance bonuses, and (3) reduce funding for the Nutrition 
Education and Obesity Prevention Grant Program. The House bill 
also would make changes to the nutrition assistance provided to 
the Northern Mariana Islands and Puerto Rico and authorize new 
pilot projects in the areas of Employment and Training programs 
and retailer fraud.
    The Senate bill would allow certain delivery services that 
serve the elderly and disabled to redeem SNAP, and would bar 
additional categories of ex-offenders from receiving SNAP 
benefits.
    The House bill would expand states' drug testing for SNAP 
applicants, to establish a state option program that would 
change work-related requirements and incentives for states, and 
to bar additional categories of ex-offenders from receiving 
benefits.
    The House bill provides increased funding incentives for 
states to opt into a broader work requirement; gives no labor-
market waivers for able-bodies adults without dependents 
(ABAWDs) who are working less than 20 hours per week; reduces 
exemptions under the ABAWDs rule.
    The House bill would also increase resources for Community 
Food Projects (by $10 million each year, with a carveout of $5 
million of these grants for projects that incentivize low-
income households to purchase fruits and vegetables). Both 
bills increase mandatory funding for the Emergency Food 
Assistance Program (TEFAP)--the Senate bill by $54 million over 
10 years, and the House bill by $333 million over 10 years 
(according to CBO). Both measures would limit eligibility for 
the Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP). Both bills 
would add discretionary authority for a Healthy Food Financing 
Initiative, a financing mechanism to sustain and create food 
retail opportunities in communities that lack access to healthy 
food. The Senate bill provides $100 million (over five years) 
in mandatory funding for Hunger-Free Communities Incentive 
Grants, which would fund incentives for SNAP participants' 
purchase of fruits and vegetables.

                        Title V--Credit

    The House and Senate bills give USDA discretion to 
recognize (1) alternative legal entities to qualify for farm 
loans and (2) alternatives to meet a three-year farming 
experience requirement; and both bills increase the maximum 
size of down-payment loans and facilitate loans for the 
purchase of highly fractionated land in Indian reservations.
    The Senate bill also updates and modernizes the 
Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act (known as the 
ConAct). The Senate bill also updates the ConAct's statutory 
language and organizes the various programs into separate 
subtitles.
    The House bill does not restructure the ConAct nor change 
any term limit provisions. However, it does create a new 
microloan program that is similar to a microloan program that 
USDA created administratively in the past year. It also 
increases the percentage of a conservation loan that can be 
guaranteed, and adds another lending priority for beginning 
farmers, among other changes.

                  Title VI--Rural Development

    The Rural Development title in the Senate bill makes 
additional changes to the ConAct, which provides permanent 
authority for USDA to carry out its portfolio of rural 
development programs. The Rural Development title in the House-
passed bill makes funding authorization amendments to many 
existing rural development programs. The House bill amends the 
water and waste water direct and guaranteed loan program to 
encourage financing by private or cooperative lenders to the 
maximum extent possible. The House bill also provides a 3-7% 
carve-out of the Community Facilities appropriation for 
technical assistance, and encourages loan guarantees. It also 
includes a new provision directing the Secretary of Agriculture 
to begin collecting data on the economic effects of the 
projects that USDA Rural Development funds, and directs the 
Secretary to develop simplified applications for funding.
    The Senate bill consolidates various rural water and 
wastewater assistance programs and the Community Facilities 
loan and grant program into a new Rural Community Program 
category, and establishes criteria for which rural communities 
will receive priority in making loan and grant awards. The 
restructuring of the ConAct also eliminates several business 
programs, but consolidates many of their objectives into a 
broad program of Business and Cooperative Development grants. 
The Senate bill provides a total of $228 million in new 
mandatory rural development funding over 10 years, including 
funds for the Value-Added Producer Grant Program ($12.5 million 
annually for FY 2014-FY 2018) and the Rural Microentrepreneur 
Assistance Program ($3 million annually for FY 2014-FY 2018), 
and $150 million in mandatory spending for pending rural 
development loans and grants. The House bill increases 
mandatory spending by $96 million over 10 years including $50 
million more for the Value-Added Producer Grant program over 10 
years, and an additional $46 million for Rural Economic 
Development Loans and Grants.
    The Senate bill retains the definition of ``rural'' and 
``rural area'' for purposes of program eligibility and makes it 
the basis for all rural development programs. The definition of 
``rural area'' for electric and telephone programs is 
eliminated by Senate bill and the definition becomes the same 
as for other rural programs. The bill retains the 2008 Farm 
Bill provision permitting communities that might otherwise be 
ineligible for USDA Rural Development funding to petition USDA 
to designate their communities as ``rural in character,'' 
thereby making them eligible for program support. The measure 
also eliminates the existing statutory definition of ``rural'' 
and ``rural areas'' for water and waste water programs and 
community facilities, but permits areas currently deemed as 
rural to remain eligible for these programs, unless USDA 
determines that they are no longer ``rural in character.'' The 
Senate bill also amends the definition of rural area in the 
1949 Housing Act so that areas deemed rural between 2000 and 
2010 would retain that designation until USDA receives data 
from the 2020 decennial census. The provision also raises the 
population threshold for eligibility from 25,000 to 35,000.
    Both the House and Senate bills provide reauthorization of 
funding for programs under the Rural Electrification Act of 
1936, including the Access to Broadband Telecommunications 
Services in Rural Areas Program and the Distance Learning and 
Telemedicine Program. The Senate bill also establishes a new 
grant program for the Access to Broadband Telecommunications 
Services in Rural Areas Program in addition to its current loan 
guarantee program. The Senate bill creates a new pilot program 
for ``ultra-high speed'' broadband connectivity. The Delta 
Regional Authority and the Northern Great Plains Regional 
Authority are reauthorized by both bills, but the Senate bill 
makes various technical changes to the organizational structure 
and operation of the two authorities.

      Title VII--Research, Extension and Related Programs

    Both the House and Senate bills reauthorize funding for 
various agricultural research laws through FY 2018, subject to 
annual appropriations, and amend authority so that only 
competitive grants can be awarded under certain programs.
    In both bills, mandatory funding is increased for the 
Specialty Crop Research Initiative ($416 million over 10 years 
in the Senate bill and $555 million in the House bill) and the 
Organic Agricultural Research and Extension Initiative ($80 
million over 10 years in the Senate bill and $100 million in 
the House bill). Also, mandatory funding is continued for the 
Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program in both the 
Senate bill ($85 million) and House bill ($100 million).
    The Senate bill provides new mandatory funding of $200 
million to establish the Foundation for Food and Agriculture 
Research, a nonprofit corporation designed to supplement USDA's 
basic and applied research activities. It will solicit and 
accept private donations to award grants for collaborative 
public and private partnerships with scientists at USDA and in 
academia, nonprofits, and the private sector.

                      Title VIII--Forestry

    The House and Senate bills, both repeal, reauthorize, and 
modify existing programs and provisions under two main 
authorities: the Cooperative Forestry Assistance Act (CFAA), as 
amended, and the Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003 
(HFRA), as amended.
    The House bill amends several forestry assistance programs 
by replacing their permanent authority to receive annual 
appropriations of such sums as necessary with a set level of 
appropriations through FY 2018. The Senate bill limits 
permanent authority for one program. Both bills repeal programs 
that have expired or have never received appropriations.
    Both bills also include provisions that address the 
management of the National Forest System. And both bills 
include provisions reauthorizing stewardship contracting, 
requiring revised strategic plans for forest inventory and 
analysis, and adding alternatives for addressing insect 
infestations and disease. The House bill also includes 
provisions to modify the existing public notice, comment, and 
appeals process for land and resource management plans and 
projects.

                        Title IX--Energy

    The House and Senate bills extend most of the renewable 
energy provisions of the 2008 Farm Bill, with the exception of 
the Rural Energy Self-Sufficiency Initiative, the Forest 
Biomass for Energy Program, the Biofuels Infrastructure Study, 
and the Renewable Fertilizer Study which are either omitted or 
repealed by both bills. In addition, the Senate bill omits the 
Repowering Assistance Program, while House bill adds a new 
reporting requirement on energy use and efficiency at USDA 
facilities. The primary difference between the House and Senate 
bills is in the source of funding. Over their five-year 
reauthorization period (FY 2014-FY 2018), the Senate bill 
contains a total of $880 million in new mandatory funding and 
authorizes $1.140 billion to be appropriated for the various 
farm bill renewable energy programs. The House bill contains no 
mandatory funding for these programs, while authorizing $1.405 
billion over the five years, subject to annual appropriations.

                     Title X--Horticulture

    The House and Senate bills reauthorize many of the existing 
farm bill provisions supporting farming operations in the 
specialty crop and certified organic sectors. CBO estimates a 
total increase in mandatory spending of $197 million (FY 2014-
FY 2018) for Title X in the Senate bill and $279 million in the 
House bill. Many Title X provisions fall into the categories of 
marketing and promotion; organic certification; data and 
information collection; pest and disease control; food safety 
and quality standards; and local foods. The House bill also 
includes provisions that would provide exemptions from certain 
regulatory requirements under some laws, such as the Federal 
Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, the Clean Water 
Act, and the Endangered Species Act.
    Both the House and Senate bills provide increased funding 
for several key programs benefitting specialty crop producers, 
including the Specialty Crop Block Grant Program, plant pest 
and disease programs, USDA's Market News for specialty crops, 
the Specialty Crop Research Initiative (SCRI), and also the 
Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (Snack Program) and Section 
32 purchases for fruits and vegetables under the Nutrition 
title. Both bills also reauthorize most programs benefitting 
certified organic agriculture producers, including continued 
support for USDA's National Organic Program (NOP) and 
development of crop insurance mechanisms for organic producers, 
Organic Production and Market Data Initiatives (ODI), and 
research programs such as the Organic Agriculture Research and 
Extension Initiative (OREI) and the Organic Transitions Program 
(ORG) under the Integrated Research, Education, and Extension 
Competitive Grants Program. Both bills would give USDA 
authority to consider an application for a research and 
promotion order (or ``checkoff'' program) by the organic 
sector.
    Programs in other farm bill titles benefitting specialty 
crop and certified organic producers also include the Value-
Added Producer Grant Program, Technical Assistance for 
Specialty Crops (TASC), the Market Access Program (MAP), and 
most conservation programs (including assistance specifically 
for organic producers), among other programs, within the crop 
insurance, credit, and miscellaneous titles. Horticulture and 
other titles in both the House and Senate bills also include 
provisions that would expand opportunities for local food 
systems and also beginning farmers and ranchers

                    Title XI--Crop Insurance

    The House and Senate bills increase funding for crop 
insurance relative to baseline levels by an additional $5.0 
billion over 10 years in the Senate bill and $8.9 billion in 
the House bill. The crop insurance title modifies the existing 
Federal crop insurance program, which is permanently authorized 
by the Federal Crop Insurance Act. The Federal crop insurance 
program makes available subsidized crop insurance to producers 
who purchase a policy to protect against individual farm losses 
in yield, crop revenue, or whole farm revenue. More than 100 
crops are insurable.
    With cotton not covered by the counter-cyclical price or 
revenue programs established in Title I of both bills, a new 
crop insurance policy called Stacked Income Protection Plan 
(STAX) is made available in both bills for cotton producers. 
The STAX policy indemnifies losses in county revenue of greater 
than 10% of expected revenue but not more than the deductible 
level (25%) selected by the producer for the underlying 
individual policy (or not more than 30% if used as stand-alone 
policy). For other crops, both bills make available an 
additional policy called the Supplemental Coverage Option 
(SCO), based on expected county yields or revenue, to cover 
part of the deductible under the producer's underlying policy 
(referred to as a farmer's out-of-pocket loss or ``shallow 
loss''). The farmer subsidy as a share of the policy premium is 
set at 80% for STAX and 65% for SCO.
    Both bills are designed to expand or improve crop insurance 
for other commodities, including specialty crops. Provisions in 
both bills revise the value of crop insurance for organic crops 
to reflect prices of organic crops. Both bills require USDA to 
conduct more research on whole farm revenue insurance with 
higher coverage levels than currently available. Studies are 
also required on insuring (1) specialty crop producers for food 
safety and contamination-related losses, (2) swine producers 
for a catastrophic disease event, (3) producers of catfish 
against reduction in the margin between the market prices and 
production costs, (4) commercial poultry production against 
business disruptions caused by integrator bankruptcy, (5) 
poultry producers for a catastrophic event, and (6) producers 
of biomass sorghum or sweet sorghum grown as feedstock for 
renewable energy. The Senate bill requires a study for alfalfa 
insurance and a peanut revenue insurance product also is 
mandated. A provision in the Senate bill makes payments 
available to producers who purchase private-sector index 
weather insurance, which insures against specific weather 
events and not actual loss.
    The Senate bill reduces crop insurance subsidies and 
noninsured crop disaster assistance for the first four years of 
planting on native sod acreage. The same provision in the House 
bill would apply only to the Prairie Pothole National Priority 
Area (portions of Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, and 
South Dakota). The Senate bill provides that crop insurance 
premium subsidies are available only if producers are in 
compliance with wetland conservation requirements and 
conservation requirements for highly erodible land.
    The House bill requires the U.S. Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) to conduct a study regarding fraudulent claims 
filed, and benefits provided under the crop insurance program.

                    Title XII--Miscellaneous

    The House and Senate bills extend authority for outreach 
and technical assistance programs for socially disadvantaged 
farmer and ranchers, and create a research center to develop 
policy recommendations for socially disadvantaged farmers and 
ranchers. They also add military veteran farmers and ranchers 
as a qualifying group. Both bills reauthorize funding for the 
USDA Office of Advocacy and Outreach, which assists socially 
disadvantaged and veteran farmers and ranchers. The House bill 
includes a provision to amend a transparency and accountability 
law to automatically provide receipts for service or denial of 
service to socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers.
    The livestock provisions of both bills renew the trichinae 
certification and aquatic animal health programs that were 
established in the 2008 Farm Bill; establish an animal health 
laboratory network; and require USDA to continue to administer 
the avian influenza surveillance program through the National 
Poultry Improvement Plan.
    The Senate bill establishes a grant program for research on 
brucellosis, bovine tuberculosis, and other priority animal 
diseases; sets up a grant program to study the eradication of 
feral swine; and establishes a competitive grant program to 
improve the sheep industry. The House bill does not contain 
these provisions, and repeals the National Sheep Industry 
Improvement Center.
    The House bill includes provisions to repeal regulations on 
livestock and poultry practices that USDA finalized in December 
2011, and prevents USDA from finalizing or implementing similar 
rules; and repeals the 2008 Farm Bill provision that 
transferred the inspection of catfish to USDA from the Food and 
Drug Administration. The bill also requires that USDA submit 
three livestock-related reports to Congress. The first is an 
economic analysis of the impact of the country-of-origin 
labeling (COOL) law and the rule that USDA proposed in March 
2013 to bring the United States into compliance with World 
Trade Organization rules; the second, an economic analysis of 
the economic impact of fraud and mislabeling on wild and farm 
raised seafood; and last, a report on bovine tuberculosis in 
Texas.
    The other miscellaneous provisions House and Senate bill 
make available higher coverage levels under the Noninsured Crop 
Assistance Programs, prohibit attendance at animal-fighting 
events, include clarifications of conditions for releasing data 
gathered by USDA to state or local government agencies, include 
an increase in administrative expenses for three regional 
development commissions that were established by the 2008 Farm 
Bill, and include grants to promote the U.S. maple syrup 
industry and for technological training for farm workers. Both 
bills establish a military veterans agricultural liaison within 
USDA to advocate for and to provide information to veterans, 
and establish an Office of Tribal Relations to coordinate USDA 
activities with Native American tribes.
    The Senate bill includes the establishment of a Pima Cotton 
Trust Fund and an Agriculture Wool Apparel Manufacturers Trust 
Fund for users of pima cotton and wool, and a Citrus Disease 
Research and Development Trust Fund for research on citrus 
disease.
    The House bill provides for a High Plains Water Study, 
which preserves 2013 Farm Bill benefits for participants in the 
study; flood protection for the Missouri River basin; flood 
protection for agricultural interests in the Wallkill River and 
Black Dirt region; prohibitions on closing Farm Service Agency 
(FSA) offices with high workloads; and a prohibition on FSA 
employees keeping GSA-leased cars overnight. The bill also 
includes an interstate commerce provision that prohibits states 
from imposing production standards on agricultural products 
from other states, a provision to ensure high standards for 
agencies' use of scientific information, and a provision that 
sunsets all discretionary programs when the farm bill expires.
    The House bill requires a regulatory review and economic 
impact statement from USDA on EPA proposals that significantly 
impact agricultural entities; amends EPA's spill prevention, 
control, and countermeasure rule; prohibits EPA from disclosing 
producer information; and provides EPA permit exemptions for 
certain silviculture activities.
    The House bill includes provisions to protect honey bees 
and other pollinators, promote urban agriculture, improve 
consideration of the impact of regulations on small businesses, 
and provide technical assistance on produce misidentified as 
grown in the United States. There are two senses of Congress 
provisions: one is on increased opportunities for black 
farmers, women, minorities, and small businesses, and the other 
on the importance of chemicals in production agriculture.
    The House bill also requires that three reports be 
submitted to Congress. The Secretary of State is to submit a 
report on water sharing between the United States and Mexico; 
the Secretary of Health and Human Services is required to 
submit a scientific and economic analysis of the Food Safety 
Modernization Act; and the Inspector General of USDA is to 
submit a report on the activities and resources expended on 
ocean policy.
    The House bill also includes a provision that requires OMB 
to prepare and report to Congress an interagency cross-cut 
budget on Federal and state activities on restoring the 
Chesapeake Bay. The provision also directs EPA to develop a 
plan to provide technical and financial assistance to 
Chesapeake Bay states in carrying out watershed restoration

    Other Bills of Interest: Several bills acted on by other 
committees, but not acted on by the Committee on Agriculture 
contain provisions relating to matters within the Committee's 
jurisdiction. The following are abbreviated summaries of these 
bills, including some of the relevant provisions.
            H. Con. Res. 25/S. Con. Res. 8, Establishing the budget for 
                    the United States Government for fiscal year 2014 
                    and setting forth appropriate budgetary levels for 
                    fiscal years 2015 through 2023.
    H. Con. Res. 25 was introduced by Representative Paul Ryan 
on March 15, 2013 and referred to the House Committee on The 
Budget. On March 21, 2013, the House voted on H. Con. Res 25 
with a passage of 221 yeas and 207 nays. On October 16, 2013, 
the Senate agreed to the resolution with an amendment by 
Unanimous Consent. On the same day, the Senate insisted on its 
amendment and requested a conference on S. Con. Res. 8.
    The resolutions lists recommended budgetary levels and 
amounts for FY 2013-FY 2023 with respect to: (1) Federal 
revenues, (2) new budget authority, (3) budget outlays, (4) 
deficits, (5) public debt, and (6) debt held by the public. 
Additionally, the resolution lists the appropriate levels of 
new budget authority, outlays, and administrative expenses for 
the Social Security Administration (SSA), including the Federal 
Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Trust Fund and the Federal 
Disability Insurance Trust Fund, U.S. Postal Service 
discretionary administrative expenses, and specified major 
functional categories for FY 2013-FY 2023 and sets forth 
reconciliation instructions for the Senate Committee on 
Finance. (Note: See also the discussion of H.J. Res. 59 under 
the ``11. Bills Act on by Both Houses But Not Enacted.'')
            H.J. Res. 59, Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013
    H.J. Res. 59 was introduced by Representative Harold Rogers 
on September 10, 2013 and referred to the Committee on 
Appropriations, and in addition to the Committee on the Budget. 
On September 20, 2013 the resolution passed the passed the 
House by a recorded vote of 230 yeas to 189 nays. On September 
27, 2013 the resolution passed the Senate, amended, by a 
recorded vote of 54 yeas to 44 nays. On September 29, 2013 the 
House agreed to the Senate amendment with two amendments. Both 
passed by a recorded vote of 248 yeas to 174 nays and the other 
231 yeas to 192 nays. On September 30, 2013, pursuant to H. 
Res. 367, the House receded from the House amendments previous 
passed and concurred in the Senate amendment with an amendment 
by a recorded vote of 228 yeas to 201 nays. On September 30, 
2013, the Senate tabled the House amendments to the Senate 
amendment by a recorded vote of 54 yeas to 46 nays and sent the 
message to the House. On October 1, 2013 the House appointed 
conferees pursuant H. Res. 368; Cantor, Camp, Ryan (WI) and 
Graves (GA). On that same date the Senate agreed to table the 
message from the House by a recorded vote of 54 yeas to 46 nays 
and sent the Message to the House. On December 12, 2012 the 
resolution passed the House, amended, as the Bipartisan Budget 
Act by a recorded vote of 332 yeas to 94 nays. On December 18, 
2013 the Senate agreed to the House amendment to the Senate 
amendment by a recorded vote of 64 yeas to 36 nays.
    The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013 establishes discretionary 
spending levels for FYs 2014 and 2015, identifies deficit 
saving proposals, including mandatory savings and non-tax 
revenue; and reduces the deficit.
    Included in the Act is a provision that allows the Natural 
Resources Conservation Service to charge a fee for providing 
technical and financial assistance on the development of 
individualized, site-specific conservation plans.

12. Concurrent Resolutions Approved

    None.

                              d. oversight

    The Committee on Agriculture and its Subcommittees were 
active in their oversight functions, holding a number of 
oversight hearings and activities during the first session of 
the 113th Congress. The hearings related to the application, 
administration, and effectiveness of laws that lie within the 
Committee's jurisdiction as well as the organization and 
operation of the Department of Agriculture and other Federal 
agencies having responsibility for the administration of such 
laws. The hearings often result in recommendations for 
improvements in the administration of the laws, regulations and 
policies in effect in the Executive Branch as they relate to 
the Committee's jurisdiction. Information gathered at these 
hearings was useful in preparing legislation for consideration 
in the House of Representatives.
    As part of its hearings, the Committee and its 
Subcommittees reviewed the way the particular Federal agency or 
department (usually the Department of Agriculture) administered 
existing laws related to the subject matter of the legislation 
before, or to be considered by, the Committee. In some cases, 
legislation favorably reported to the House carries a 
termination date (a ``sunset'') to ensure that in the future 
Congress will again review the effectiveness and the methods 
with which the Executive Branch of Government has carried out 
the letter and the spirit of that statute.
    In keeping with the objective of the Oversight Plan as 
submitted to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform 
and House Administration, and Rule XI, clause 2 of the House of 
Representatives, the Committee and its subcommittees conducted 
the following chronological oversight hearings during the first 
session of the 113th Congress (Note: To see a copy of the 
Oversight Plan as submitted, see ``I. Summary of Organization, 
Jurisdiction, and Oversight Plan of the Committee on 
Agriculture.''):

1. Oversight Hearings

    March 5, 2013: Hearing To Review the State of the Rural 
Economy. Full Committee. Hearing Serial No. 113-1.
    The purpose of this public hearing was to review the state 
of the rural economy with the U.S. Department of Agriculture 
Secretary (USDA) Thomas J. Vilsack. In light of the March 1 
effective date for the sequester, the primary topic of 
discussion was how USDA planned to implement the across-the-
board spending cuts and what impact they would have on the 
agriculture sector. Members of the Committee asked the 
Secretary about his recent remarks that the sequester would 
cause meat inspector furloughs. Chairman Lucas also questioned 
if USDA, in preparation for the impact on food production and 
inspections, had made any requests to the House Appropriations 
Committee for flexibility or additional funds as it develops a 
Continuing Resolution for the remainder of FY 2013.
    March 13, 2013: Hearing to Examine the National Forest 
Management and its Impacts on Rural Economies and Communities. 
Subcommittee on Conservation, Energy, and Forestry. Hearing 
Serial No. 113-2.
    The purpose of this hearing, held by the Subcommittee on 
Conservation, Energy, and Forestry, was to examine how the U.S. 
Forest Service is managing the National Forest System (NFS) and 
how this management impacts rural communities. The NFS spans 
193 million acres in 712 counties across 41 states. One issue 
discussed was the harvest timber decline in recent years. The 
harvests reached an all time low of 1.7 billion board feet in 
2002. It was noted that a recent USDA report highlighted 
increasing annual timber harvests and other restoration 
activities as one of the agency's goals. Members asked Tom 
Tidwell, the Forest Service Chief, how the agency's efforts 
were faring and how sequestration could affect those goals. 
Members also examined other issues that impact the NFS such as 
fire threats, invasive species, and the possible closure of 
recreation sites as a result of sequestration. Witnesses on the 
second panel highlighted that more aggressive management 
practices are necessary to improve forest management and rural 
job creation.
    April 24, 2013: Hearing to Review Horticulture Priorities 
for the 2013 Farm Bill. Subcommittee on Horticulture, Research, 
Biotechnology, and Foreign Agriculture. Hearing Serial No. 113-
4.
    The purpose of this hearing was to examine specialty crop 
priorities for the 2013 Farm Bill. The Subcommittee heard from 
growers and representatives of the specialty crop community on 
the effectiveness of the current programs within the 
Subcommittee's jurisdiction.
    May 21, 2013: The Future of the CFTC: Market Perspectives. 
Full Committee. Hearing Serial No. 113-5.
    This hearing was the first in a series of hearings being 
held in advance of writing legislation to reauthorize the 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC). The agency's 
statutory authorization expires at the end of the fiscal year. 
Members of the Committee heard perspectives from the futures 
and swaps market, including the two largest derivatives 
exchanges, a futures commission merchant whose customers are 
farmers and ranchers, and industry trade associations who 
represent hundreds of companies. The purpose of the hearing was 
to begin to allow members to develop a greater understanding of 
the regulatory challenges faced by individuals involved in the 
derivative marketplace.
    July 23, 2013: The Future of the CFTC: Commission 
Perspectives. Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk 
Management. Hearing Serial No. 113-6.
    The purpose of this hearing was to continue the process of 
gathering information and perspectives on the future of the 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission in advance of writing 
legislation to reauthorize the regulatory agency. The statutory 
authorization expires at the end of fiscal year 2013. This was 
the second hearing on the future of the CFTC.
    July 24, 2013: The Future of the CFTC: End-User 
Perspectives. Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk 
Management. Hearing Serial No. 113-7.
    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the impact of 
the Commodity Futures Trading Commission's actions on end-
users. These are businesses that provide our daily goods and 
services, and rely upon derivatives contracts to manage the 
risks associated with their operations. Since the passage of 
the Dodd-Frank Act, end-users have shared consistent concerns 
that the CFTC is overreaching in its rulemaking and cautioned 
it would ultimately lead to higher costs for consumers. This is 
the third hearing in a series of hearings on the CFTC.
    October 2, 2013: The Future of the CFTC: Perspectives on 
Customer Protections. Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities 
and Risk Management. Hearing Serial No. 113-8.
    The purpose of this hearing was to explore ways to improve 
customer protections and understand how best to avoid or 
prevent the collapse of another futures commission merchant 
that disproportionately impacts farmers and ranchers in light 
of the failures at MF Global and PFGBest in advance to writing 
legislation that would reauthorize the CFTC. This was the final 
hearing in the series on the future of the CFTC.

2. Legislative Hearings

    March 14, 2013: Examining Legislative Improvements to Title 
VII of the Dodd-Frank Act. Full Committee. Hearing Serial No. 
112-03.
    The purpose of this hearing was to review seven legislative 
proposals amending Title VII of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street 
Reform and Consumer Protection Act. The proposals are the 
culmination of the committee's oversight efforts of the 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) as it writes rules 
for Dodd-Frank, and the committee examined these proposals to 
ensure that Dodd-Frank is implemented in a way that does not 
disrupt markets or harm the economy.
    All of the following are bills reviewed during the hearing: 
(1) H.R. 634, the Business Risk Mitigation and Price 
Stabilization Act, ensures that end-users can continue to use 
derivatives to manage business risks without being subject to 
costly margin requirements; (2) H.R. 677, the Inter-Affiliate 
Swap Clarification Act, ensures that transactions between 
affiliates within a single corporate group are not regulated as 
swaps; (3) H.R. 742, the Swap Data Repository and Clearinghouse 
Indemnification Correction Act of 2013, would allow data 
sharing between U.S. and international regulators and swap data 
repositories without adding an unnecessary layer of legal 
bureaucracy; (4) H.R. 992, the Swaps Regulatory Improvement 
Act, amends Section 716 of the Dodd-Frank Act to limit the swap 
desk push-out requirement so that it does not apply to equity 
or commodity swaps; (5) H.R. 1003 would require the CFTC to 
assess the costs and benefits of its actions; and (6) H.R. 
1038, the Public Power Risk Management Act, would allow 
producers, utility companies, and other non-financial entities 
to continue entering into energy swaps with government-owned 
utilities without danger of being required to register with the 
CFTC as a swap dealer.
    Additionally, the Committee also examined one draft 
proposal, the Swap Jurisdiction Certainty Act, which would 
direct the CFTC and the Securities and Exchange Commission to 
adopt a joint rule on how they will regulate cross-border swaps 
transactions as part of the new requirements created in the 
Dodd-Frank Act. (Note: See also the discussion of H.R. 634, 
H.R. 742, H.R. 992, H.R. 1038 and H.R. 1256 under ``2. Bills 
Acted on by the House but not the Senate''; and the discussion 
of H.R. 677 and H.R. 1003 under ``6. Bills Ordered Reported by 
the Committee on Agriculture.'')

                          e. printed hearings





     113-1   Hearing To Review the State of the Rural Economy--Full
              Committee, March 5, 2013.
     113-2   National Forest Management and its Impacts on Rural
              Economies and Communities--Subcommittee on Conservation,
              Energy, and Forestry, March 13, 2013.
     113-3   Examining Legislative Improvements to Title VII of the Dodd-
              Frank Act--Full Committee, March 14, 2013.
     113-4   Hearing To Review Horticulture Priorities for the 2013 Farm
              Bill--Subcommittee on Horticulture, Research,
              Biotechnology, and Foreign Agriculture, April 24, 2013.
     113-5   The Future of the CFTC: Market Perspectives--Full
              Committee, May 21, 2013.
     113-6   The Future of the CFTC: Commission Perspectives--
              Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk
              Management, July 23, 2013.
     113-7   The Future of the CFTC: End-User Perspectives--Subcommittee
              on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management, July 24,
              2013.
     113-8   The Future of the CFTC: Perspectives on Customer
              Protections--Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and
              Risk Management, October 2, 2013.


                        f. meetings not printed

    January 23, 2013--ull Committee open business meeting. 
Organizational meeting for the 113th Congress. Approval by 
voice vote of the Committee Rules.
    February 13, 2013--Full Committee open business meeting. 
Approval by voice vote of the Oversight Plan for the 113th 
Congress and other organizational matters.
    February 26, 2013--Full Committee open business meeting. 
Approval by voice vote of the Budget Views and Estimates Letter 
for FY 2014, offering budget recommendations of the Committee 
on Agriculture for the agencies and programs under its 
jurisdiction.
    March 20, 2013--Full Committee open business meeting. To 
consider H.R. 634, H.R. 677, H.R. 742, H.R. 992, H.R. 1003, 
H.R. 1038, and H.R. 1256.
    May 15, 2013--Full Committee open business meeting. 
Approval of H.R. 1947, the Federal Agricultural Reform and Risk 
Management Act, by a recorded vote of 35 yeas to 10 nays.
    October 30, 2013--House-Senate Conference Meeting on H.R. 
2642, Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act of 
2013. Open conference committee meeting to resolve the 
differences.

                          g. committee prints

    Committee on Agriculture Rules. Print. No. 113-1.

                             h. watersheds

    None.

                             III. Appendix


                      a. executive communications

    E.C. 6--Jan. 14, 2013:. A letter from the Board Chair and 
Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's final rule--Federal 
Agricultural Mortgage Corporation Funding and Fiscal Affairs; 
Farmer Mac Capital Planning (RIN: 3052-AC80) received January 
3, 2013.
    E.C. 74--Jan. 22, 2013: A letter from the Senior Counsel 
for Regulatory Affairs, Department of the Treasury, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Determination of 
Foreign Exchange Swaps and Foreign Exchange Forwards Under the 
Commodity Exchange Act received January 9, 2013.
    E.C. 75--Jan. 22, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Fluroxypyr; 
Pesticide Tolerances [EPA-HQ-OPP-2011-0962; FRL-9371-1] 
received January 9, 2013.
    E.C. 97--Jan. 23, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Spiromesifen; 
Pesticide Tolerances [EPA-HQ-OPP-2012-0038; FRL-9374-3] 
received January 10, 2013.
    E.C. 179--Feb. 4, 2013: A letter from the Director, Policy 
Issuances Division, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Uniform Compliance Date for Food 
Labeling Regulations [Doc. No.: FSIS-2012-0039] (RIN: 0583-
AD05) received January 22, 2013.
    E.C. 180--Feb. 4, 2013: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Approved Tests for Bovine Tuberculosis 
in Cervids [Doc. No.: APHIS-2012-0087] received January 22, 
2013.
    E.C. 181--Feb. 4, 2013: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Golden Nematode; Removal of Regulated 
Areas in Livingston and Steuben Counties, NY [Doc. No.: APHIS-
2012-0079] received January 22, 2013.
    E.C. 182--Feb. 4, 2013: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Traceability for Livestock Moving 
Interstate [Doc. No.: APHIS-2009-0091] (RIN: 0579-AD24) (RIN: 
0579-AD24) received January 22, 2013.
    E.C. 197--Feb. 5, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Epoxy Polymer; 
Exemption from the Requirement of a Tolerance [EPA-HQ-OPP-2012-
0615; FRL-9369-7] received January 18, 2013.
    E.C. 198--Feb. 5, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Labeling of 
Pesticide Products and Devices for Export; Clarification of 
Requirements [EPA-HQ-OPP-2009-0607; FRL-9360-8] (RIN: 2070-
AJ59) received January 18, 2013.
    E.C. 199--Feb. 5, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Approval and 
Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Missouri; 
Control of Sulfur Emissions from Stationary Boilers [EPA-R07-
OAR-2012-0763; FRL-9772-6] received January 18, 2013.
    E.C. 267--Feb. 14, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Alpha-
Cypermethrin; Pesticide Tolerances [EPA-HQ-OPP-2010-0234; FRL-
9376-1A] received January 30, 2013.
    E.C. 268--Feb. 14, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Styrene-2-
Ethylhexyl Acrylate Copolymer; Tolerance Exemption [EPA-HQ-OPP-
2012-0456; FRL-9367-2] received January 30, 2013.
    E.C. 301--Feb. 15, 2013: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Importation of Fresh Bananas From the 
Philippines into the Continental United States [Doc. No.: 
APHIS-2011-0028] (RIN: 0579-AD61) received February 7, 2013.
    E.C. 302--Feb. 15, 2013: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Texas (Splenetic) Fever in Cattle 
[Doc. No.: APHIS-2012-0069] received February 7, 2013.
    E.C. 303--Feb. 15, 2013: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Importation of Horses From Contagious 
Equine Metritis-Affected Countries [Doc. No.: APHIS-2008-0112] 
(RIN: 0579-AD31) received February 12, 2013.
    E.C. 304--Feb. 15, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Soybean Promotion and Research: Amend the Order To Adjust 
Representation on the United Soybean Board [Doc. No.: AMS-LS-
12-0022] received February 14, 2013.
    E.C. 305--Feb. 15, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Irish Potatoes Grown in Colorado; Modification of the 
Handling Regulation for Area No. 2 [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0043; 
FV12-948-1 IR] received February 14, 2013.
    E.C. 306--Feb. 15, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Pears Grown in Oregon and Washington; Assessment Rate 
Decrease for Processed Pears [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0031; FV12-
927-2 IR] received February 14, 2013.
    E.C. 307--Feb. 15, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Apricots Grown in Designated Counties in Washington; 
Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0027; FV12-922-1 
IR] received February 14, 2013.
    E.C. 308--Feb. 15, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Grapes Grown in Designated Area of Southeastern 
California; Increased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-11-
0090; FV12-925-1 FR] received February 14, 2013.
    E.C. 309--Feb. 15, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Avocados Grown in South Florida; Decreased Assessment 
Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-11-0094; FV12-915-1 FIR] received 
February 14, 2013.
    E.C. 310--Feb. 15, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Sweet Cherries Grown in Designated Countries in 
Washington; Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-
0026; FV12-923-1 IR] received February 14, 2013.
    E.C. 311--Feb. 15, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Marketing Order Regulating the Handling of Spearmint Oil 
Produced in the Far West; Revision of the Salable Quantity and 
Allotment Percentage for Class 1 (Scotch) and Class 3 (Native) 
Spearmint Oil for the 2012-2013 Marketing Year [Doc. No.: AMS-
FV-11-0088; FV12-985-1A IR] received February 14, 2013.
    E.C. 312--Feb. 15, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--National Organic Program; Periodic Residue Testing [Doc. 
No.: AMS-NOP-10-0102; NOP-10-10FR] (RIN: 0581-AD10) received 
February 14, 2013.
    E.C. 313--Feb. 15, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Domestic Dates Produced or Packed in Riverside County, 
CA; Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0035; FV12-
987-1 IR] received February 14, 2013.
    E.C. 314--Feb. 15, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Apricots Grown in Designated Counties in Washington; 
Temporary Suspension of Handling Regulations [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-
12-0028; FV12-922-2 IR] received February 14, 2013.
    E.C. 315--Feb. 15, 2013: A letter from the Program Analyst, 
Department of Transportation, transmitting the Department's 
final rule--Rural Broadband Access Loans and Loan Guarantees 
(RIN: 0572-AC06) received February 12, 2013.
    E.C. 316--Feb. 15, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Glycine max 
Herbicide-resistant Acetolactate Synthase; Exemption from the 
Requirement of a Tolerance [EPA-HQ-OPP-2012-0795; FRL-9376-4] 
received February 5, 2013.
    E.C. 317--Feb. 15, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Hexythiazox; 
Pesticide Tolerances [EPA-HQ-OPP-2010-0916; FRL-9376-9] 
received February 5, 2013.
    E.C. 318--Feb. 15, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Thiacloprid; 
Pesticide Tolerances [EPA-HQ-OPP-2010-0311; FRL-9374-9] 
received February 5, 2013.
    E.C. 319--Feb. 15, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Protections for 
Subjects in Human Research Involving Pesticides [EPA-HQ-OPP-
2010-0785; FRL-9353-4] (RIN: 2070-AJ76) received February 12, 
2013.
    E.C. 320--Feb. 15, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--3-decen-2-one; 
Exemption from the Requirement of a Tolerance [EPA-HQ-OPP-2010-
0065; FRL-9378-1] received February 14, 2013.
    E.C. 558--Feb. 28, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Tomatoes Grown in Florida; Decreased Assessment Rate 
[Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0051; FV12-966-1 IR] received February 22, 
2013.
    E.C. 606--Mar. 6, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Marketing Order Regulating the Handling of Spearmint Oil 
Produced in the Far West; Change to Administrative Rules 
Regarding the Transfer and Storage of Excess Spearmint Oil 
[Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0014; FV12-985-2 FR] received February 22, 
2013.
    E.C. 771--Mar. 20, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Declaration of 
Prion as a Pest Under FIFRA; Related Amendments; and 
Availability of Final Test Guidelines [EPA-HQ-OPP-2010-0427; 
FRL-9372-7] (RIN: 2070-AJ26) received February 27, 2013.
    E.C. 772--Mar. 20, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Acetochlor; 
Pesticide Tolerances [EPA-HQ-OPP-2012-0302; FRL-9377-6] 
received February 27, 2013.
    E.C. 773--Mar. 20, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Fenpyrazamine; 
Pesticide Tolerances [EPA-HQ-OPP-2011-0357; FRL-9373-9] 
received February 27, 2013.
    E.C. 774--Mar. 20, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Pyraflufen-ethyl; 
Pesticide Tolerances [EPA-HQ-OPP-2011-1002; FRL-9379-6] 
received February 27, 2013.
    E.C. 775--Mar. 20, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Pyroxasulfone; 
Pesticide Tolerances [EPA-HQ-OPP-2012-0308; FRL-9379-9] 
received February 27, 2013.
    E.C. 776--Mar. 20, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--
Tetrachlorvinphos; Extension of Time-Limited Interim Pesticide 
Tolerances [EPA-HQ-OPP-2011-0360; FRL-9380-9] (RIN: 2070-AZ16) 
received March 13, 2013.
    E.C. 862--Mar. 23, 2013: A letter from the PRAB Branch 
Chief, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
final rule--Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP): 
Updated Trafficking Definition and Supplemental Nutrition 
Assistance Program--Food Distribution Program on Indian 
Reservations Duel Participation [FNS-2009-0019] (RIN: 0584-
AD97) received March 18, 2013.
    E.C. 863--Mar. 23, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Review Group, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Maximum Interest 
Rates on Guaranteed Farm Loans (RIN: 0560-AH66) received March 
18, 2013.
    E.C. 864--Mar. 23, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Review Group, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Selection and 
Functions of Farm Service Agency State and Country Committees 
(RIN: 0560-AG90) received March 18, 2013.
    E.C. 865--Mar. 23, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Amitraz; 
Pesticide Tolerances [EPA-HQ-OPP-2010-0051; FRL-9381-1] 
received March 19, 2013.
    E.C. 866--Mar. 23, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Administration's final rule--Banda de 
Lupinus albus doce (BLAD); Exemption from the Requirement of a 
Tolerance [EPA-HQ-OPP-2011-1026; FRL-9380-6] received March 22, 
2013.
    E.C. 867--Mar. 23, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Administration's final rule--Emamectin 
Benzoate; Pesticide Tolerance [EPA-HQ-OPP-2011-0665; FRL-9381-
4] received March 22, 2013.
    E.C. 868--Mar. 23, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Administration's final rule--
Abamectin; Pesticide Tolerances [EPA-HQ-OPP-2012-0418; FRL-
9379-1] received March 22, 2013.
    E.C. 869--Mar. 23, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Administration's final rule--
Thiamethoxam; Pesticide Tolerances [EPA-HQ-OPP-2012-0488; FRL-
9377-3] received March 22, 2013.
    E.C. 999--Apr. 10, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Castor Oil, 
Polymer with Adipic Acid, Linoleic Acid, Oleic Acid and 
Ricinoleic Acid Tolerance Exemption [EPA-HQ-OPP-2013-0057; FRL-
9381-2] received April 2, 2013.
    E.C. 1029--Apr. 11, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Clothianidin; 
Pesticide Tolerances [EPA-HQ-OPP-2011-0860; FRL-9378-6] 
received March 26, 2013.
    E.C. 1099--Apr. 15, 2013: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Importation of Live Birds and Poultry, 
Poultry Meat, and Poultry Products From a Region in the 
European Union [Doc. No: APHIS-2009-0094] (RIN: 0579-AD45) 
received April 2, 2013.
    E.C. 1100--Apr. 15, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Styrene-Ethylene-
Propylene Block Copolymer; Tolerance Exemption [EPA-HQ-OPP-
2013-0043; FRL-9380-5] received April 5, 2013.
    E.C. 1222--Apr. 24, 2013: A letter from the Management 
Analyst, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Fees for Official Inspection and 
Official Weighing Services Under the United States Grain 
Standards Act (USGSA) (RIN: 0580-AB13) received April 16, 2013.
    E.C. 1223--Apr. 24, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Review Group, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Noninsured Crop 
Disaster Assistance Program (RIN: 0560-AI06) received April 15, 
2013.
    E.C. 1262--Apr. 25, 2013: A letter from the Management and 
Program Analyst, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Project-Level Predecisional 
Administrative Review Process (RIN: 0596-AD07) received April 
8, 2013.
    E.C. 1263--Apr. 25, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Policy Issuances Division, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Food Ingredients and 
Sources of Radiation Listed and Approved for Use in the 
Production of Meat and Poultry Products [Doc. No.: FSIS-2011-
0018] (RIN: 0583-AD47) received April 8, 2013.
    E.C. 1264--Apr. 25, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Flumioxazin; 
Pesticide Tolerances [EPA-HQ-OPP-2012-0139; FRL-9381-7] 
received April 5, 2013.
    E.C. 1310--Apr. 26, 2013: A letter from the Board Chair and 
CEO, Farm Credit Administration, transmitting the 
Administration's final rule--Funding and Fiscal Affairs, Loan 
Policies and Operations, and Funding Operations; Accounting and 
Reporting Requirements; Federal Agricultural Mortgage 
Corporation Funding and Fiscal Affairs; GAAP References and 
other Conforming Amendments (RIN: 3052-AC75) received April 17, 
2013.
    E.C. 1356--Apr. 30, 2013: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--Identity Theft Red Flags Rules 
[Release Nos.: 34-69359, IA-3582, IC-30456; File No. S7-02-12] 
(RIN: 3235-AL26) received April 25, 2013.
    E.C. 1391--May 7, 2013: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Controlled Import Permits [Doc. No.: 
APHIS-2008-0055] (RIN: 0579-AD53) received May 2, 2013.
    E.C. 1465--May 14, 2013: A letter from the Management 
Analyst, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--United States Standards for Wheat 
(RIN: 0580-AB12] received May 1, 2013.
    E.C. 1466--May 14, 2013: A letter from the Acting 
Congressional Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Updates to the List 
of Plant Inspection Stations [Doc. No.: APHIS-2012-0099] 
received April 29, 2013.
    E.C. 1467--May 14, 2013: A letter from the Acting 
Congressional Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Gypsy Moth Generally 
Infested Areas; Additions in Wisconsin [Doc. No.: APHIS-2012-
0075] received April 29, 2013.
    E.C. 1468--May 14, 2013: A letter from the Administrator 
Rural Housing Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting 
the Department's final rule--Community Programs Guaranteed 
Loans (RIN: 0575-AC92) received May 7, 2013.
    E.C. 1469--May 14, 2013: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Recordkeeping for Approved Livestock 
Facilities and Slaughtering and Rendering Establishments [Doc. 
No.: APHIS-2007-0039] (RIN: 0579-AC61) received May 9, 2013.
    E.C. 1470--May 14, 2013: A letter from the Chairman and 
Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's final rule--Funding and 
Fiscal Affairs, Loan Policies and Operations, and Funding 
Operations; Liquidity and Funding (RIN: 3052-AC54) received May 
1, 2013.
    E.C. 1534--May 20, 2013: A letter from the PRAB Branch 
Chief, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
final rule--Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program: 
Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Grant Program (RIN: 
0584-AE07) received April 24, 2013.
    E.C. 1596--May 23, 2013: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Horse Protection Act; Requiring Horse 
Industry Organizations to Assess and Enforce Minimum Penalties 
for Violations; Correction [Doc. No.: APHIS-2011-0030] (RIN: 
0579-AD43) received May 9, 2013.
    E.C. 1691--Jun. 4, 2013: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's ``Major'' final rule--Core Principles and Other 
Requirements for Swap Execution Facilities (RIN Number: 3038-
AD18) received June 3, 2013.
    E.C. 1692--Jun. 4, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Pears Grown in Oregon and Washington; Committee 
Membership Reapportionment for Processed Pears [Doc. No.: AMS-
FV-12-0032; FV12-927-3 FR] received May 8, 2013.
    E.C. 1693--Jun. 4, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Milk in the Northeast and Other Marketing Areas; Order 
Amending the Orders [Doc. No.: AMS-DA-07-0026; AO-14-A77, et 
al.; DA-07-02] received May 28, 2013.
    E.C. 1694--Jun. 4, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Lamb Promotion, Research, and Information Order; 
Amendment to the Order To Raise the Assessment Rate [No.: AMS-
LS-11-0038] received May 28, 2013.
    E.C. 1695--Jun. 4, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Irish Potatoes Grown in Colorado; Reestablishment of 
Membership on the Colorado Potato Administrative Committee, 
Area No. 2 [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0044; FV12-948-2 FR] received 
May 8, 2013.
    E.C. 1701--Jun. 5, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Oranges, Grapefruit, Tangerines, and Tangelos Grown in 
Florida; Relaxing Size and Grade Requirements on Valencia and 
Other Late Type Oranges [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-13-0009; FV13-905-2 
IR] received May 28, 2013.
    E.C. 1702--Jun. 5, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Sweet Cherries Grown in Designated Counties in 
Washington; Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-
0026; FV12-923-1 FIR] received May 28, 2013.
    E.C. 1703--Jun. 5, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Tomatoes Grown in Florida; Decreased Assessment Rate 
[Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0051; FV12-966-1 FIR] received May 28, 
2013.
    E.C. 1704--Jun. 5, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Apricots Grown in Designated Counties in Washington; 
Decreases Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0027; FV12-922-1 
FIR] received May 28, 2013.
    E.C. 1705--Jun. 5, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Oranges, Grapefruit, Tangerines, and Tangelos Grown in 
Florida; Increased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0045; 
FV12-905-1 FR] received May 28, 2013.
    E.C. 1711--Jun. 6, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Vidalia Onions Grown in Georgia; Change in Reporting and 
Assessment Requirements [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0071; FV13-955-1 
IR] received May 28, 2013.
    E.C. 1712--Jun. 6, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Pork Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information 
Program; Section 610 Review [Doc. No.: AMS-LS-07-0143] received 
May 28, 2013.
    E.C. 1713--Jun. 6, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Marketing Order Regulating the Handling of Spearmint Oil 
Produced in the Far West; Revision of the Salable Quantity and 
Allotment Percentage for Class 1 (Scotch) and Class 3 (Native) 
Spearmint Oil for the 2012-2013 Marketing Year [Doc. Nos.: AMS-
FV-11-0088; FV12-958-1A FIR] received May 28, 2013.
    E.C. 1714--Jun. 6, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Apricots Grown in Designated Counties in Washington; 
Temporary Suspension of Handling Regulations [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-
12-0028; FV12-922-2 FIR] received May 28, 2013.
    E.C. 1715--Jun. 6, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
``Major'' final rule--Mandatory Country of Origin Labeling of 
Beef, Pork, Lamb, Chicken, Goat Meat, Wild and Farm-Raised Fish 
and Shellfish, Perishable Agricultural Commodities, Peanuts, 
Pecans, Ginseng, and Macadamia Nuts [Doc. No.: AMS-LS-13-0004] 
(RIN: 0581-AD29) received May 28, 2013.
    E.C. 1718--Jun. 10, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Olives Grown in California; Decreased Assessment Rate 
[Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0076; FV13-932-1 IR] received May 28, 
2013.
    E.C. 1803--Jun. 12, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Milk in the Northeast and Other Marketing Areas; 
Termination of Proceeding on Proposed Amendments to Tentative 
Marketing Agreements and Orders [Doc. No.: AMS-DA-13-0016; AO-
14-A74, et al.; DA-06-01] received May 28, 2013.
    E.C. 1804--Jun. 12, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, Rhode 
Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, 
Minnesota, Oregon, Washington, and Long Island in the State of 
New York; Changing Reporting Requirements [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-
0002; FV12-929-1 FIR] received May 28, 2013.
    E.C. 1805--Jun. 12, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--United States Standards for Grades of Almonds in the 
Shell [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-11-0046] received May 28, 2013.
    E.C. 1806--Jun. 12, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Oranges, Grapefruit, Tangerines, and Tangelos Grown in 
Florida; Redistricting and Reapportionment of Grower Members, 
and Changing the Qualifications for Grower Membership on the 
Citrus Administrative Committee [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-11-0076; 
FV11-905-1 FR] received May 28, 2013.
    E.C. 1807--Jun. 12, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Pears Grown in Oregon and Washington; Assessment Rate 
Decrease for Processed Pears [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0031; FV12-
927-2 FIR] received May 28, 2013.
    E.C. 1808--Jun. 12, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Revision of Regulations Defining Bona Fide Cotton Spot 
Markets [Doc. No.: AMS-CN-12-0024] (RIN: 0581-AD26) received 
May 28, 2013.
    E.C. 1809--Jun. 12, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Onions Grown in South Texas; Increased Assessment Rate 
[Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0039; FV12-959-1 FR] received May 28, 
2013.
    E.C. 1810--Jun. 12, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Pears Grown in Oregon and Washington; Modification of the 
Assessment Rate for Fresh Pears [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0030; 
FV12-927-1 FR] received May 28, 2013.
    E.C. 1811--Jun. 12, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Domestic Dates Produced or Packed in Riverside County, 
California; Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-
0035; FV12-987-1 FIR] received May 28, 2013.
    E.C. 1812--Jun. 12, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Irish Potatoes Grown in Washington; Decreased Assessment 
Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-13-0010; FV13-946-1 IR] received May 28, 
2013.
    E.C. 1813--Jun. 12, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Irish Potatoes Grown in Colorado; Modification of the 
Handling Regulation for Area No. 2 [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0043; 
FV12-948-1 FIR] received May 28, 2013.
    E.C. 1814--Jun. 12, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Oranges and Grapefruit Grown in Lower Rio Grande Valley 
in Texas; Increased Assessments Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0038; 
FV12-906-1 FR] received May 28, 2013.
    E.C. 1864--Jun. 14, 2013: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--Procedures to Establish Appropriate 
Minimum Block Sizes for Large Notional Off-Facility Swaps and 
Block Trades (RIN: 3038-AD08) received June 3, 2013.
    E.C. 1865--Jun. 14, 2013: A letter from the Chairman and 
Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's final rule--Unincorporated 
Business Entities (RIN: 3052-AC65) received June 7, 2013.
    E.C. 1876--Jun. 17, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Program Development and Regulatory Analysis, Rural Development 
Utilities Programs, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Community Connect Broadband Grant 
Program (RIN: 0572-AC30) received June 4, 2013.
    E.C. 1893--Jun. 18, 2013: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--Dual and Multiple Associations of 
Persons Associated With Swap Dealers, Major Swap Participants 
and Other Commission Registrants (RIN: 3038-AD66) received June 
3, 2013.
    E.C. 1894--Jun. 18, 2013: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--Process for a Designated Contract 
Market or Swap Execution Facility to Make a Swap Available to 
Trade under Section 2(h)(8) of the Commodity Exchange Act; Swap 
Transaction Compliance and Implementation Schedule; Trade 
Execution Requirement under Section 2(h) of the CEA (RIN: 3038-
AD18) received June 12, 2013.
    E.C. 1895--Jun. 18, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--National Organic Program (NOP); 
Amendments to the National List of Allowed and Prohibited 
Substances (Crops and Processing) [Doc. No.: AMS-NOP-12-0016; 
NOP-12-07FR] (RIN: 0581-AD27) received June 10, 2013.
    E.C. 1896--Jun. 18, 2013: A letter from the Management 
Analyst, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Postdecisional Administrative Review 
Process for Occupancy or Use of National Forest System Lands 
and Resources (RIN: 0596-AB45) received June 7, 2013.
    E.C. 2035--Jun. 28, 2013: A letter from the Manager, 
BioPreferred Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting 
the Department's final rule--Designation of Product Categories 
for Federal Procurement (RIN: 0599-AA16) received June 24, 
2013.
    E.C. 2186--Jun. 28, 2013: A letter from the Assistant 
Secretary, Department of Defense, transmitting proposed 
legislation, titled ``National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2014''; jointly to the Committees on Armed 
Services, Foreign Affairs, Agriculture, and Natural Resources.
    E.C. 2235--Jul. 15, 2013: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Lacey Act Implementation Plan: 
Definitions for Exempt and Regulated Articles [Doc. No.: APHIS-
2009-0018] (RIN: 0579-AD11) received July 9, 2013
    E.C. 2362--Jul. 26, 2013: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Importation of Fresh Citrus Fruit From 
Uruguay, Including Citrus Hybrids and Fortunella spp., Into the 
Continental United States [Doc. No.: APHIS-2011-0060] (RIN: 
0579-AD59) received July 11, 2013.
    E.C. 2450--Aug. 1, 2013: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Handling of Animals; Contingency 
Plans; Stay of Regulations [Doc. No.: APHIS-2006-0159] (RIN: 
0579-AC69) received July 31, 2013.
    E.C. 2451--Aug. 1, 2013: A letter from the Chairman and 
Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's final rule--Releasing 
Information; General Provisions; Accounting and Reporting 
Requirements; Reports of Accounts and Exposures (RIN: 3052-
AC76) received July 30, 2013.
    E.C. 2551--Aug. 2, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--National 
Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Regulation Revision: 
Removal of the Pesticide Discharge Permitting Exemption in 
Response to Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals Decision [EPA-HQ-OW-
2003-0063; FRL-9829-2] received June 26, 2013.
    E.C. 2552--Aug. 2, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Streptomycin; 
Pesticide Tolerances for Emergency Exemptions [EPA-HQ-OPP-2011-
0852; FRL-9385-3] received May 15, 2013.
    E.C. 2553--Aug. 2, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Dinotefuran; 
Pesticide Tolerances for Emergency Exemptions; Technical 
Amendment [EPA-HQ-OPP-2012-0755; FRL-9384-9] received August 2, 
2013.
    E.C. 2554--Aug. 2, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Data Requirements 
for Antimicrobial Pesticides [EPA-HQ-OPP-2008-0110; FRL-8886-5] 
(RIN: 2070-AD30) received May 1, 2013.
    E.C. 2555--Aug. 2, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Imidacloprid; 
Pesticide Tolerances [EPA-HQ-QPP-2012-0204; FRL-9387-9] 
received June 4, 2013.
    E.C. 2831--Sep. 12, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Grapes Grown in Designated Area of 
Southeastern California; Increased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: 
AMS-FV-13-0005; FV13-925-1 FR] received August 5, 2013.
    E.C. 2832--Sep. 12, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Increase in Fees for Voluntary Federal 
Dairy Grading and Inspection Services [Doc. No.: AMS-DA-10-
0002] (RIN: 0581-AD25) received August 5, 2013.
    E.C. 2833--Sep. 12, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Kiwifruit Grown in California and 
Imported Kiwifruit; Relaxation of Minimum Grade Requirement 
[Doc. No.: AMS-FV-13-0032; FV13-920-1 IR] received August 5, 
2013.
    E.C. 2834--Sep. 12, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Olives Grown in California; Decreased 
Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0076; FV13-932-1 FIR] 
received August 5, 2013.
    E.C. 2835--Sep. 12, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Mango Promotion, Research, and 
Information Order; Nominations of Foreign Producers and 
Election of Officers [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0041] received August 
5, 2013.
    E.C. 2836--Sep. 12, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Oranges, Grapefruit, Tangerines, and 
Tangelos Grown in Florida; Revising Reporting Requirements and 
New Information Collection [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0052; FV12-905-
2 FR] received August 5, 2013.
    E.C. 2837--Sep. 12, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Marketing Order Regulating the 
Handling of Spearmint Oil Produced in the Far West; Salable 
Quantities and Allotment Percentages for the 2013-2014 
Marketing Year [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0064; FV13-985-1 FR] 
received August 5, 2013.
    E.C. 2838--Sep. 12, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Irish Potatoes Grown in Colorado; 
Modification of the General Cull and Handling Regulation for 
Area No. 2 [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-13-0001; FV13-948-1 FR] received 
August 5, 2013.
    E.C. 2839--Sep. 12, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--User Fees for 2013 Crop Cotton 
Classification Services to Growers [AMS-CN-12-0074] (RIN: 0581-
AD30) received August 5, 2013.
    E.C. 2840--Sep. 12, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, Rhode 
Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, 
Minnesota, Oregon, Washington, and Long Island in the State of 
New York; Changing Reporting Requirements [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-
0002; FV12-929-1 FIR] received August 5, 2013.
    E.C. 2841--Sep. 12, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Cotton Board Rules and Regulations: 
Adjusting Supplemental Assessment on Imports (2013 Amendment) 
[Doc. No.: AMS-CN-12-0065] received August 5, 2013.
    E.C. 2861--Sep. 16, 2013: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--Enhanced Risk Management Standards for 
Systemically Important Derivatives Clearing Organizations (RIN: 
3038-AC98) received August 22, 2013.
    E.C. 2862--Sep. 16, 2013: A letter from the Management 
Analyst, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Inspection and Weighing of Grain in 
Combined and Single Lots (RIN: 580-AB15) received August 29, 
2013.
    E.C. 2863--Sep. 16, 2013: A letter from the Management 
Analyst, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Weighing, Feed, and Swine Contractors 
(RIN: 0580-AA99) received August 29, 2013.
    E.C. 2864--Sep. 16, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Review Group, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Sugar Program; 
Feedstock Flexibility Program for Bioenergy Producers (RIN: 
0560-AH86) received August 22, 2013.
    E.C. 2865--Sep. 16, 2013: A letter from the Management 
Analyst, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Definition of a Ski Area (RIN: 0596-
AD12) received August 9, 2013.
    E.C. 2965--Sep. 17, 2013: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--Harmonization of Compliance 
Obligations for Registered Investment Companies Required to 
Register as Commodity Pool Operators (RIN: 3038-AD75) received 
September 3, 2013.
    E.C. 2966--Sep. 17, 2013: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--Clearing Exemption for Certain Swaps 
Entered into by Cooperatives (RIN: 3038-AD47) received 
September 3, 2013.
    E.C. 3060--Sep. 23, 2013: A letter from the Chief, Planning 
& Regulatory Affairs Office, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Supplemental 
Nutrition Assistance Program: Trafficking Controls and Fraud 
Investigations (RIN: 0584-AE26) received September 5, 2013.
    E.C. 3143--Sep. 30, 2013: A letter from the PRAO Branch 
Chief, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
final rule--Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Privacy 
Protections of Information From Applicant Households [FNS-2009-
0024] (RIN: 0584-AD91) received September 11, 2013.
    E.C. 3144--Sep. 30, 2013: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Interstate Movement of Sharwil 
Avocados From Hawaii [Docket No.: APHIS-2012-0008] (RIN: 0579-
AD70) received September 17, 2013.
    E.C. 3236--Oct. 5, 2013: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Importation of Litchi Fruit From 
Australia [Doc. No.: APHIS-2009-0084] (RIN: 0579-AD56) received 
September 25, 2013.
    E.C. 3352--Oct. 23, 2013: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Animal Welfare; Retail Pet Stores and 
Licensing Exemptions [Doc. No.: APHIS-2011-0003] (RIN: 0579-
AD57) received September 19, 2013.
    E.C. 3353--Oct. 23, 2013: A letter from the Management 
Analyst, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--National Environmental Policy Act: 
Categorical Exclusions for Soil and Water Restoration 
Activities (RIN: 0596-AD01) received September 19, 2013.
    E.C. 3354--Oct. 23, 2013: A letter from the Chief, Planning 
and Regulatory Affairs Branch, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Food Distribution 
Program on Indian Reservations; Income Deductions and Resource 
Eligibility [FNS-2011-0036] (RIN: 0584-AE05) received September 
24, 2013.
    E.C. 3399--Oct. 28, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Methyl Parathion; 
Removal of Expired Tolerances [EPA-HQ-OPP-2009-0332; FRL-9401-
3] received September 25, 2013.
    E.C. 3438--Oct. 30, 2013: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Gypsy Moth Generally Infested Areas; 
Additions in Wisconsin [Doc. No.: APHIS-2012-0075] received 
October 23, 2013.
    E.C. 3439--Oct. 30, 2013: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Cold Treatment for Fresh Fruits and 
Vegetables; MidAmerica St. Louis Airport, Mascoutah, IL [Doc. 
No.: APHIS-2012-0089] received October 23, 2013.
    E.C. 3440--Oct. 30, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Avocados Grown in South Florida; 
Change in Minimum Grade Requirements [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0067; 
FV13-915-1 FR] received October 23, 2013.
    E.C. 3441--Oct. 30, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Irish Potatoes Grown in Washington; 
Temporary Change to the Handling Regulations and Reporting 
Requirements for Yellow Fleshed and White Types of Potatoes 
[Doc. No.: AMS-FV-13-0067; FV13-946-2 IR] received October 23, 
2013.
    E.C. 3442--Oct. 30, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Apricots Grown in Designated Counties 
in Washington; Increased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-13-
0041; FV13-922-2 FR] received October 23, 2013.
    E.C. 3443--Oct. 30, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Kiwifruit Grown in California; 
Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-13-0071; FV13-920-2 
IR] received October 23, 2013.
    E.C. 3444--Oct. 30, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Apricots Grown in Designated Counties 
in Washington; Suspension of Handling Regulations [Doc. No.: 
AMS-FV-13-0040; FV13-922-1 IR] received October 23, 2013.
    E.C. 3445--Oct. 30, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Sweet Cherries Grown in Designated 
Counties in Washington; Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: 
AMS-FV-13-0055; FV13-932-1 IR] received October 23, 2013.
    E.C. 3446--Oct. 30, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Tart Cherries Grown in the States of 
Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and 
Wisconsin; Revising Handler Reporting and Grower Diversion 
Requirements [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-13-0030; FV13-930-2 IR] received 
October 23, 2013.
    E.C. 3447--Oct. 30, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--National Organic Program (NOP); Sunset 
Review (2013) [Doc. No.: AMS-NOP-11-0003; NOP-10-13FR] (RIN: 
0581-AD13) received October 23, 2013.
    E.C. 3448--Oct. 30, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--United States Standards for Condition 
of Food Containers [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-08-0027; FV-05-332] (RIN: 
0581-AC52) received October 23, 2013.
    E.C. 3449--Oct. 30, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Paper and Paper-Based Packaging 
Promotion, Research and Information Order; Referendum 
Procedures [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-11-0069; FR-B] received October 
23, 2013.
    E.C. 3450--Oct. 30, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Oranges, Grapefruit, Tangerines, and 
Tangelos Grown in Florida; Relaxing Size and Grade Requirements 
on Valencia and Other Late Type Oranges [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-13-
0009; FV13-905-2 FIR] received October 23, 2013.
    E.C. 3451--Oct. 30, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Potato Research and Promotion Plan; 
Amend the Administrative Committee Structure and Delete the 
Board's Mailing Address [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-13-0027] received 
October 23, 2013.
    E.C. 3452--Oct. 30, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Domestic Dates Produced or Packed in 
Riverside County, California; Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. 
No.: AMS-FV-13-0053; FV13-987-1 IR] received October 23, 2013.
    E.C. 3453--Oct. 30, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Vidalia Onions Grown in Georgia; 
Change in Reporting and Assessment [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0071; 
FV13-955-1 FIR] received October 23, 2013.
    E.C. 3454--Oct. 30, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Blueberry Promotion, Research and 
Information Order: Assessment Rate Increase [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-
12-0062] received October 23, 2013.
    E.C. 3455--Oct. 30, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Cranberries Grown in States of 
Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, 
Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota, Oregon, Washington, and Long 
Island in the State of New York; Revising Determination of 
Sales History [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-12-0042; FV12-929-2 FR] 
received October 23, 2013.
    E.C. 3456--Oct. 30, 2013: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Citrus Canker, Citrus Greening, and 
Asian Citrus Psyllid; Interstate Movement of Regulated Nursery 
Stock [Doc. No.: APHIS-2010-0048] (RIN: 0579-AD29) received 
October 23, 2013.
    E.C. 3727--Nov. 19, 2013: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's ``Major'' final rule--Enhancing Protections 
Afforded Customers and Customer Funds Held by Futures 
Commission Merchants and Derivatives Clearing Organizations 
(RIN: 3038-AD88) received November 18, 2013.
    E.C. 3728--Nov. 19, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Review Group, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Farm Loan Programs; 
Clarification and Improvement (RIN: 0560-AI14) received 
November 12, 2013.
    E.C. 3729--Nov. 19, 2013: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Irish Potatoes Grown in Washington; 
Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-13-0010; FV13-946-1 
FIR] received November 14, 2013.
    E.C. 3730--Nov. 19, 2013: A letter from the Chairman and 
Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's final rule--Federal 
Agricultural Mortgage Corporation Funding and Fiscal Affairs; 
Farmer Mac Capital Planning (RIN: 3052-AC80) received November 
12, 2013.
    E.C. 3767--Nov. 19, 2013: A letter from the Fiscal 
Assistant Secretary, Department of the Treasury, transmitting 
the annual reports that appear on pages 119-146 of the June 
2013 ``Treasury Bulletin'', pursuant to 26 U.S.C. 9602(a); 
jointly to the Committees on Ways and Means, Transportation and 
Infrastructure, Natural Resources, Agriculture, Education and 
the Workforce, and Energy and Commerce.
    E.C. 3783--Nov. 21, 2013: A letter from the Deputy 
Secretary, Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting 
the Commission's final rule--Swap Dealers and Major Swap 
Participants; Clerical or Ministerial Employees (RIN: 3038-
AE00) received November 15, 2013.
    E.C. 3784--Nov. 21, 2013: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--Protection of Collateral of 
Counterparties to Uncleared Swaps; Treatment of Securities in a 
Portfolio Margining Account in a Commodity Broker Bankruptcy 
(RIN: 3038-AD28) received November 15, 2013.
    E.C. 3785--Nov. 21, 2013: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--Ownership and Control Reports, Forms 
102/102S, and 71 (RIN: 3038-AD31) received November 19, 2013.
    E.C. 3786--Nov. 21, 2013: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Importation of Ovine Meat From Uruguay 
[Doc. No.: APHIS-2008-0085] (RIN: 0579-AD17) received November 
18, 2013.
    E.C. 3787--Nov. 21, 2013: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Importation of Fresh Beans, Shelled or 
in Pods, From Jordan Into the Continental United States [Doc. 
No.: APHIS-2012-0042] (RIN: 0579-AD69) received November 19, 
2013.
    E.C. 3994--Dec. 5, 2013: A letter from the Ambassador, 
Embassy of the Republic of Indonesia, transmitting a letter 
regarding the Farm Bill of 2013, received December 2, 2013.
    E.C. 4020--Dec. 9, 2013: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; 
Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products [Doc. No.: APHIS-
2008-0010] (RIN: 0579-AC68) received December 4, 2013.
    E.C. 4038--Dec. 10, 2013: A letter from the Director, 
Regulations Policy and Management Staff, Department of Health 
and Human Services, transmitting the Department's final rule--
Food Additive Regulations; Incorporation by Reference of the 
Food chemicals Codex, 7th Edition [Doc. No.: FDA-2010-F-0320] 
received December 3, 2013.
    E.C. 4062--Dec. 11, 2013: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--Derivatives Clearing Organizations and 
International Standards (RIN: 3038-AE06) received November 22, 
2013.
    E.C. 4134--Dec. 12, 2013: A letter from the Administrator, 
Rural Utilities Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule)--Energy Efficiency 
and Conservation Loan Program (RIN: 0572-AC19) received 
December 9, 2013.

                    b. statutory and special reports

    USDA: Report on Healthy Incentives Pilot (HIP) 2012 Summary 
Report as required by Section 4141 of the Food, Energy, and 
Conservation, Act of 2008 (FECA). Submitted by USDA, December 
20, 2012.
    USDA: Risk Management Agency National Appeals Division 
Determinations Implementation Report as required by Section 
14009(b) of the Food, Energy, and Conservation Act of 2008. 
Submitted by USDA, January 3, 2013.
    Committee on Oversight and Government Reform: Letter from 
Chairman Darrell E. Issa, Committee on Oversight and Government 
Reform regarding Congressionally-mandated plans and reports 
considered outdated or duplicative as required to publish by 
the Government Performance and Results Modernization Act of 
2010 (P.L. 111-352). Submitted January 15, 2013.
    DOT: Quarterly report for the period July 1 thru September 
30, 2012, as required by section 906(b) of the Trade Sanctions 
Reform and Export Enhancement Act of 2000. Submitted by the 
U.S. Department of the Treasury, January 22, 2013.
    USDC: Report on the export licensing actions taken by the 
Department of Commerce's Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) 
relating to exports of agricultural commodities to Cuba from 
October through December 2012 as required by section 906(b) of 
the Trade Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement Act of 2000. 
Submitted by the Department of Commerce, January 25, 2013.
    USDA: Department of Agriculture 2012 Equitable Relief 
Report as required by section 1613 of the Farm Security and 
Rural Investment Act. Submitted by USDA, February 4, 2013.
    Farm Credit Administration: Report on Fiscal Year 2014 
Proposed Budget and Performance Plan. Submitted by the Farm 
Credit Administration, February 7, 2013.
    USDA: Annual Report on USDA's Federal Grain Inspection 
Service (FGIS) pursuant to section 87 of the U.S. Grain 
Standards Act. Submitted by USDA, February 6, 2013.
    USDA: Copies of recently approved Federal Advisory 
Committee Charters as required by the Federal Advisory 
Committee Act: Grain Inspection Advisory Committee; National 
Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods; 
Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and 21st Century 
Agriculture; Land Variety Protection Advisory Board; Advisory 
Committee on Beginning Farmers and Ranchers. Submitted by USDA, 
February 14, 2013.
    USDA: Report on the status and disposition of cases 
returned to the agency by the National Appeals Division (NAD) 
as required by section 14009 of the Food, Conservation, and 
Energy Act of 2008. Submitted by USDA, February 13, 2013.
    USDA: Proposed Bye Real Estate and Development land 
exchange referred to as Submission No. 02/01-13 located on the 
Hoosier National Forest within Crawford and Orange counties, 
State of Indiana. Submitted by USDA, February 21, 2013.
    USDA: Report by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Farm 
Service Agency: Biomass Crop Assistance Program, Energy 
Feedstocks From Farmers and Foresters. Submitted by USDA, 
February 2013.
    USDA: Proposed Simplot-Dairy Syncline Land Exchange 
referred to as Submission No. 03/02-25, located on the Caribou-
Targhee National Forest within Caribou County, State of Idaho. 
Submitted by USDA, March 5, 2013.
    USDI: Submission of the Federal Land Assistance, Management 
and Enhancement (FLAME) Act Suppression Expenditures for 
Interior and Agriculture Agencies: March 2013 Forecasts for 
Fiscal Year 2013. Submitted by the U.S. Department of the 
Interior, March 6, 2013.
    USDA: Report on the Global Effort to Reduce Child Hunger 
and Increase School Attendance as required by section 3107 of 
the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002. Submitted 
by USDA, March 13, 2013.
    USDA: Proposed Backbone Ridge purchase located in the 
Grandfather District of the Pisgah National Forest. Submitted 
by USDA, March 18, 2013.
    USDA: In compliance with P.L. 92-463, the Federal Advisory 
Committee Act, enclosed is a copy of a recently approved 
Federal Advisory Committee Charter: Secure Rural Schools Act 
Resource Advisory Committee. Submitted by USDA, March 19, 2013.
    USDA: Letter from the Secretary of Agriculture notifying 
the Committee of the Secretary's intent to utilize the 
interchange authority under 7 U.S.C. 2257 to transfer $155,584 
million from the direct payment program administered by the 
Farm Service Agency to several FSA administered programs. 
Submitted by USDA, March 19, 2013.
    FCA: 2012 Annual Report as required under the Notification 
and Federal Employee Antidiscrimination and Retaliation Act of 
2002 (No FEAR Act). Submitted by FCA, March 27, 2013.
    FCSIC: Farm Credit System Insurance Corporation 2012 Annual 
Report as required under the Notification and Federal Employee 
Antidiscrimination and Retaliation Act of 2002 (No FEAR Act). 
Submitted by FCSIC, March 27, 2013.
    USDHHS: Twelfth Report to Congress on Indicators of Welfare 
Dependence as required by the Welfare Indicators Act of 1994. 
Submitted by the Department of Health and Human Services, March 
29, 2013.
    FCA: Final Rule adopted by the Farm Credit Administration 
Board under provisions of the Farm Credit Act of 1971, as 
amended, as required under 5. U.S.C. 801(a)(1). Submitted by 
Farm Credit Administration, April 3, 2013.
    USDA: 2012 Annual Report on the Packers and Stockyards 
Program as required by the Packers and Stockyards Act, 1921. 
Submitted by USDA, April 3, 2013.
    USDA: 2012 Annual Report of the Farmland Protection Policy 
Act pursuant to section 1546 of FPPA, 7 U.S.C. 4207. Submitted 
by USDA, April 3, 2013
    EPA: 2012 Annual Report pursuant to the Notification and 
Federal Employee Antidiscrimination and Retaliation Act of 
2002. Submitted by EPA, April 8, 2013.
    USDA: Letter from U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food 
Safety and Inspection Service's outlining its' intention to 
implement a reorganization that would enable the Agency to 
enhance its efficiency, effectiveness, and economy. Submitted 
by USDA, April 12, 2012.
    GAO: Report on major rule promulgated by USDA, Food and 
Nutrition Service, entitled ``Supplemental Nutrition Assistance 
Program: Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Grant 
Program'' (RIN: 0585-AE07).
    Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs: Investigative Report ``JPMorgan Chase Whale Trades: A 
Case History of Derivatives Risks and Abuses''. Submitted by 
the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs, April 15, 2013.
    USTR: Report on proposed modification to current U.S. 
country of origin labeling (COOL) regulations to implement 
recommendations and rulings of the World Trade Organization 
(WTO) Dispute Settlement Body (DSB). Submitted by the Office of 
the U.S. Trade Representative, April 18, 2013.
    USDA: Letter from the Secretary of Agriculture notifying 
the Committee of intent to use the interchange authority under 
7 U.S.C. 2257 to transfer $5.4 million in Natural Resources 
Conservation Service (NRCS) funding from the Farm and Ranch 
Lands Protection Program to the Conservation Security Program. 
Submitted by the USDA, April 23, 2013.
    USDA: Letter from the Secretary of Agriculture notifying 
the Committee of intent to use the interchange authority under 
7 U.S.C. 2257 to transfer $15 million in Rural Development 
funding from various RD program accounts into Salaries and 
Expenses. Submitted by the USDA, April 23, 2013.
    FCA: Final Rule adopted by the Farm Credit Administration 
Board under the provisions of the Farm Credit Act of 1971, as 
amended. The purpose of the final rule is to strengthen 
liquidity risk management at Farm Credit Systems banks. 
Submitted by the Farm Credit Administration, April 8, 2013.
    USDA: Federal Advisory Committee Charter: Agricultural Air 
Quality Task Force as required by P.L. 92-463, The Federal 
Advisory Committee Charter. Submitted by USDA, April 15, 2013.
    USDC: Quarterly Report to Congress on Activities Undertaken 
by the Department of Commerce pursuant to section 906(b) of the 
Trade Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement Act of 2000. 
Submitted by U.S. Department of Commerce, April 16, 2013.
    EPA: Annual Report to Congress pursuant to the Notification 
and Federal Employee Antidiscrimination and Retaliation Act of 
2002. Submitted by EPA, April 23, 2013.
    State of North Dakota: The 63rd Legislative Assembly for 
the State of North Dakota Concurrent Resolution No 3017 urging 
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service USDA's Natural Resources 
Conservation to fairly administer water management laws and 
regulations. Submitted by Secretary of State, State of North 
Dakota, April 24, 2013.
    FCA: The final rule adopted by the Farm Credit 
Administration Board under the provisions of the Farm Credit 
Act of 1971 which amends Title 12, Chapter VI of the Code of 
Federal Regulations. Submitted by the Farm Credit 
Administration, April 19, 2013.
    USDA: Letter from David R. Shipman, Administrator, USDA, 
informing the Committee and Chairman that the Agricultural 
Marketing Service (AMS) intends to release a copy of the 
current list of all individual growers, farmers and processors 
eligible to vote on the current Federal pistachio marketing 
order. Submitted by USDA, April 26, 2013.
    USDA: The annual Administrative Expenses of Research and 
Promotion Boards Supervised by Agriculture Marketing Service 
report. Submitted by Secretary Thomas J. Vilsack, USDA, May 2, 
2013.
    USDA: The Federal Advisory Committee Charters: Forestry 
Research Advisory Council and the Recreation Resource Advisory 
Committees. Submitted by USDA, May 3, 2013.
    GAO: Report on the major rule promulgated by the Commodity 
Futures Trading Commission, entitled ``Clearing Exemption for 
Swaps Between Certain Affiliated Entities.'' Pursuant to 
section 801(a)(2)(A) of title 5, United States Code. Submitted 
by the United States Government Accountability Office on May 6, 
2013.
    EPA: Letter from the Arthur A. Elkins, Jr., EPA, requesting 
input in an effort to achieve its mission of preventing and 
detecting fraud, waste and abuse in EPA programs and 
operations. Submitted by the United States Environmental 
Protection Agency, May 8, 2013.
    DOT: Quarterly report discussing the activities taken by 
the Department of Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control 
in the administration of the licensing regime set forth with 
respect to the exportation of agricultural commodities, 
medicine, and medical devices to Iran and Sudan. Submitted by 
the United States Department of the Treasury, May 9, 2013.
    USDA: The annual USDA AMS National Organic Cost-Share 
Programs Report to Congress. Submitted by Secretary Thomas J. 
Vilsack, USDA, May 10, 2013.
    DOE: The Charter establishing the Biomass R&D Technical 
Advisory Committee. Submitted by the United States Department 
of Energy, May 13, 2013.
    USDA: Letter from the Secretary of Agriculture expressing 
the USDA's views on H.R. 818, the Healthy Forest Management and 
Wildlife Prevention Act. Submitted by USDA, May 14, 2013.
    USDA: The U.S. International Food Assistance Report 2011 as 
required by section 407 of the Food for Peace Act. Submitted by 
USDA and USAID, May 17, 2013.
    USDA: The report on the implementation of the 2008 
amendments to the Lacey Act, as required by Congress by the 
Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008. Submitted by Thomas 
J. Vilsack, USDA, May 21, 2013.
    CBO: The prepared cost estimate for H.R. 1947, the 
Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act of 2013, as ordered 
reported by the House Committee on Agriculture on May 15, 2013. 
Submitted by the Congressional Budget Office on May 23, 2013.
    DOJ: A response to the issue of dispensing controlled 
substances by veterinarians at a location other than the 
registered location. Submitted by Eric J. Akers, Deputy Chief, 
Congressional and Public Affairs, May 9, 2013.
    FCA: Final rule adopted by the Farm Credit Administration 
Board under the provisions of the Farm Credit Act of 1971 as 
amended. Amends Title 12, Chapter VI of the Code of Federal 
Regulations. Submitted by Jill Long Thompson, Chairman and CEO, 
Farm Credit Administration, May 21, 2013.
    USDA: The annual report on the No FEAR Act of 2002 for 
Fiscal Year 2012. Submitted by Joe Leonard, Jr., Assistant 
Secretary for Civil Rights, USDA, May 22, 2013.
    DOI: Estimate of anticipated wildfire suppression costs for 
Fiscal Year 2013. Submitted by Sally Jewell, DOI, May 23, 2013.
    USDA: Semiannual Report to Congress published by the Office 
of Inspector General at the USDA highlighting the 
accomplishments from October 1, 2012 through March 20, 2013. 
Submitted by Phyllis K. Fong, Inspector General, USDA, May 31, 
2013.
    USTelecom: Letter of thanks for supporting the industry 
with the Federal Communications Commission's finalization of 
its rules. Submitted by Walter B. McCormick, Jr., USTELECOM, 
May 31, 2013.
    GAO: Accepting the request to work within the scope of its 
authority to review the Federal Communications Commission 
reforms. Submitted by Katherine Siggerud, Managing Director, 
Government Accountability Office, June 6, 2013.
    GAO: Report on the major rule promulgated by the Department 
of Agriculture, Agriculture Marketing Service, entitled 
``Mandatory Country of Origin Labeling of Beef, Pork, Lamb, 
Chicken, Goat Meat, Wild and Farm-Raised Fish and Shellfish, 
Perishable Agricultural Commodities, Peanuts, Pecans, Ginseng, 
and Macadamia Nuts''. Submitted by Robert J. Cramer, GAO, June 
10, 2013.
    USDA: Informing the Committee on Agriculture of the 
Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation 
Service Soil Science Division Realignment and Regionalization 
Plan. Submitted by Thomas J. Vilsack, Secretary of Agriculture, 
USDA, June 13, 2013.
    GAO: Report on a major rule promulgated by the CFTC 
entitled ``Core Principles and Other Requirements for Swap 
Execution Facilities''. Submitted by Robert J. Cramer, GAO, 
June 17, 2013.
    Natural Energy Resources Company: Enclosed PowerPoint 
presentation providing a summary of how Central Colorado's 
Project innovative high altitude, multi-basin, pumped water and 
energy productivity multiplier concept could quickly serve as 
Colorado's primary State Water Plan. Submitted by Dave Miller, 
President, NERC, June 24, 2013.
    USDA: Copies of two recently approved Federal Advisory 
Committee Charters: Forest Resource Coordinating Committee and 
Lake Tahoe Basin Federal Advisory Committee. Submitted by 
Ashlee N. Johnson, USDA, June 24, 2013.
    DOI: Public Review and Comment on the Draft Environmental 
Impact Statement for Shasta Lake Water Resources Investigation. 
Submitted by David G. Murillo, Regional Director, DOI, June 25, 
2013.
    USDA: Report on the implementation of concluded appeals to 
the National Appeals Division from the Risk Management Agency. 
Submitted by Brandon Willis, USDA, July 1, 2013.
    USDA: Letter recommending to move forward with the proposed 
TNC A960 purchase, a 1,190 parcel of land located in Florida. 
Submitted by Robert Bonnie, USDA, June 14, 2013.
    Farm Credit Administration: Proposed amendments to title 
12, chapter VI of the Code of Federal Regulations as 
promulgated by the Farm Credit Administration (FCA). Submitted 
by Jill Long Thompson, FCA, July 9, 2013.
    USDA: Letter recommending to move forward with the proposed 
Kimball phase II purchase, a tract of land located in Orange 
County, Indiana. Submitted by Gregory Smith, USDA, July 11, 
2013.
    USDA: Letter recommending to move forward with the proposed 
TNC Carter tract purchase, a 90.35 acre piece of land located 
in Brown County, Indiana. Submitted by Gregory Smith, USDA, 
July 11, 2013.
    USDA: Letter recommending to move forward with the proposed 
Ozarks purchase, a 120 acre piece of land located in Oregon 
County, Missouri. Submitted by Gregory Smith, USDA, July 11, 
2013.
    CFTC: Letter regarding the upcoming reauthorization of the 
CFTC. Submitted by Bart Chilton, U.S. CFTC, July 19, 2013.
    EPA: Draft proposed rule revising and updating the 
agricultural Worker Protection Standard, as outlined in Section 
25(a)(3) of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide 
Act requiring the EPA to send such report. Submitted by James 
J. Jones, EPA, July 24, 2013.
    USDA: Copy of the Federal Advisory Committee Charter 
regarding Fruit and Vegetable Industry Advisory Committee, in 
compliance with P.L. 92-463. Submitted by Ashlee N. Johnson, 
USDA, July 29, 2013.
    Secretary of the Interior: Official notification that only 
60 days worth of funds remain in the FLAME Fund administered by 
the secretary, under Title V of Division A of P.L. 111-88. 
Submitted by Sally Jewell, DOI, July 31, 2013.
    Embassy of Brazil: Letter regarding the Farm Bill and its 
impacts on the Brazil-U.S. Cotton dispute in the World Trade 
Organization. Submitted by Mauro Vieira, Ambassador, Embassy of 
Brazil, August 9, 2013.
    Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association: Letter 
opposing veterinary strong opposition to the King Amendment No. 
71 regarding the blocking of state laws prohibiting health and 
welfare of farm animals. Submitted by Barry Kellogg, HSVMA, 
August 7, 2013.
    Promedica: Letter expressing concerns regarding SNAP and 
supporting the funding the SNAP in the 2013 Farm Bill. 
Submitted by Randy Oostra, Promedica, August 12, 2013.
    Farm Credit Administration: Interim rule under the 
provisions of the Farm Credit Act of 1971 amending Title 12, 
chapter VI of the Code of Federal Regulations. Submitted by 
Jill Long Thompson, FCA, August 14, 2013.
    USAID: U.S. Agency for International Development's report 
to Congress titled Multilateral Development Banks' Assistance 
Proposals Likely to Have Adverse Impacts on the Environment, 
Natural Resources, Public Health and Indigenous Peoples 
covering August 2012 to march 2013. Submitted by Charles 
Cooper, USAID, August 19, 2013.
    USDA: Office of Inspector General's management challenges 
report for 2013 as required by the Reports Consolidation Act of 
2000. Submitted by Phyllis K. Fong, USDA, August 19, 2013.
    USDA: Federal Information Security Management Act Report 
for fiscal year 2012. Submitted by Secretary Thomas J. Vilsack, 
USDA, September 3, 2013.
    USDA: Foreign Holdings of U.S. Agricultural Land through 
December 31, 2011 Report reflecting data and according to the 
Agricultural Foreign Investment Disclosure Act of 1978. 
Submitted by Juan M. Garcia, USDA, September 4, 2013.
    CFTC: Letter supporting the language related to targeted 
transaction fees being imposed upon traders of futures and 
swaps. Submitted by Bart Chilton, U.S. CFTC, September 12, 
2012.
    USDA: Report that outlines the USDA Forest Service estimate 
of anticipated wildland fire suppression costs for fiscal year 
2013 as required by the FLAME Act of 2009. Submitted by 
Secretary Thomas J. Vilsack, USDA, September 12, 2013.
    EPA: Draft rules pursuant to Section 25(a)(3) of the 
Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act. Submitted 
by James J. Jones, U.S. EPA, September 13, 2013.
    EPA: Letter in support of the charter renewal of the 
Children's Health Protection Advisory Committee in accordance 
with the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 
U.S.C. App 2. Submitted by Gina McCarthy, U.S. EPA, September 
13, 2013.
    Commonwealth of Puerto Rico: Letter urging against Section 
4024 of H.R. 1947 and Nutrition Assistance Programs. Submitted 
by Juan E. Hernandez, Executive Director, September 16, 2013.
    USDA: Report responding to the requirement of section 4405 
of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008. Submitted by 
Secretary Thomas J. Vilsack, USDA, September 23, 2013.
    CFTC: Letter urging the consideration of innovative 
legislation permitting continued full funding of the CFTC 
through a potential government shutdown and or continuing 
resolution. Submitted by Bart Chilton, U.S. CFTC, September 24, 
2013.
    Congress: Letter to CFTC Chairman Gensler and Commissioners 
Chilton, O'Malia, and Wetjen regarding concerns of the November 
14, 2012 proposed rule to improve protections for futures 
customers. Submitted by Hon. Frank D. Lucas, Hon. Debbie 
Stabenow, Hon. Collin C. Peterson, Hon. Thad Cochran, September 
25, 2013.
    Farm Credit Administration: Proposed amendments to title 
12, chapter VI of the Code of Federal Regulations as 
promulgated by the Farm Credit Administration. Submitted by 
Jill Long Thompson, FCA, October 15, 2013.
    USDA: Request for a copy of the 2012/2013 Independent 
Raisin Grower List from the Raisin Administrative Committee as 
requested by the Agricultural Marketing Service under the 
Freedom of Information Act. Submitted by Rex A. Barnes, USDA, 
October 22, 2013.
    Farm Credit Administration: Final rule adopted by the Farm 
Credit Administration Board amending Title 12, Chapter VI of 
the Code of Federal Regulations. Submitted by Jill Long 
Thompson, FCA, October 25, 2013.
    DOI: Forecast of fire suppression expenditures for Fiscal 
Year 2014 pursuant to the Federal Land Assistance Management 
Act of 2009. Submitted by Sally Jewell, DOI, October 28, 2013.
    USDA: Annual FLAME Report for fiscal year 2012 pursuant to 
the requirements outlined in Title V--FLAME Act of 2009. 
Submitted by Secretary Thomas J. Vilsack, USDA, October 28, 
2013.
    EPA: Letter expressing support for the charter renewal of 
the EPA Science Advisory Board in accordance with the 
provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act. Submitted by 
Gina McCarthy, EPA, November 1, 2013.
    DOC: Export Licensing Actions Report taken by the 
Department of Commerce's Bureau of Industry and Security 
relating to exports of agricultural commodities to Cuba from 
July 1 through September 30, 2013. Submitted by Eric L. 
Hirschhorn, United States Department of Commerce, Under 
Secretary for Industry and Security, November 6, 2013.
    USDA: Recommendation to move forward with the proposed 
North Carolina Mountain Land Conservancy Purchase regarding 
77.988 acres located in Henderson County, North Carolina. 
Submitted by Robert Bonnie, USDA, November 7, 2013.
    USDA: Letter notifying the Agriculture Committee of their 
intention to terminate Federal Marketing Order No. 947 which 
regulates the handling of Irish potatoes grown in Modoc and 
Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all counties in Oregon 
except for Malheur County. Submitted by Annie L. Alonzo, USDA, 
November 12, 2013.
    USDA: Special Nutrition Programs Report No. CN-13-DC 
pursuant to section 4301 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy 
Act of 2008. Submitted by Secretary Thomas J. Vilsack, USDA, 
November 14, 2013.
    USDA: Activities of the Foreign Market Development 
Cooperator Program Report as required by Section 702 of the 
Agricultural Trade Act of 1978, as amended. Submitted by 
Secretary Thomas J. Vilsack, USDA, November 21, 2013.
    Farm Credit Administration: Semiannual report prepared by 
the Inspector General of the Farm Credit Administration for the 
period of April 1, 2013 through September 30, 2013, pursuant to 
the Inspector General Act of 1978. Submitted by Jill Long 
Thompson, FCA, November 22, 2013.
    EPA: Initial evaluation of the U.S. Environmental 
Protection Agency's classified information program as required 
by the Reducing Over-Classification Act. Submitted by Arthur A. 
Elkins, Jr., EPA, November 22, 2013.
    GAO: Enhancing Protections Afforded Customers and Customer 
Funds Held by Futures Commission Merchants and Derivatives 
Clearing Organizations report promulgated by the Commodity 
Futures Trading Commission. Submitted by Robert J. Cramer, GAO, 
November 27, 2013.

                              c. memorials

    Memorial No. 31 of the House of Representatives of the 
State of Hawaii, relative to House Resolution No. 149 requiring 
the Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug 
Administration to come up with a nation-wide system for 
monitoring, labeling, and enforcing the labeling of all whole 
and processed genetically engineered foods. Submitted May 22, 
2013.
    Memorial No. 140 of the Legislature of the Territory of 
Virgin Islands, relative to Resolution No. 1794 urging the 
Congress adopt H.R. 92. Submitted October 10, 2013.

                              d. petitions

    Petition No. 21 of the Legislature of Rockland County, New 
York relative to Resolution No. 186 urging the House of 
Representatives to pass H.R. 712. Submitted May 23, 2013.