H. Rept. 113-380 - 113th Congress (2013-2014)
March 13, 2014, As Reported by the Science, Space, and Technology Committee

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House Report 113-380 - NATIONAL WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION ACT REAUTHORIZATION OF 2014

[House Report 113-380]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]


113th Congress                                            Rept. 113-380
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                      Part 1

======================================================================



 
    NATIONAL WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION ACT REAUTHORIZATION OF 2014

                                _______
                                

 March 13, 2014.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

     Mr. Smith of Texas, from the Committee on Science, Space, and 
                  Technology, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 1786]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, to whom 
was referred the bill (H.R. 1786) to reauthorize the National 
Windstorm Impact Reduction Program, and for other purposes, 
having considered the same, report favorably thereon with an 
amendment and recommend that the bill as amended do pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
   I. Amendment.......................................................2
  II. Purpose and Summary.............................................5
 III. Background and Need for the Legislation.........................5
  IV. Hearing Summary.................................................6
   V. Committee Consideration.........................................6
  VI. Committee Votes.................................................7
 VII. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill.........................9
VIII. Committee Views................................................10
  IX. Committee Oversight Findings...................................10
   X. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives..........11
  XI. New Budget Authority, Entitlement Authority, and Tax Expenditur11
 XII. Advisory on Earmarks...........................................11
XIII. Committee Cost Estimate........................................11
 XIV. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate......................11
  XV. Federal Mandates Statement.....................................13
 XVI. Compliance with House Resolution 5.............................13
XVII. Federal Advisory Committee Statement...........................13
XVIII.Applicability to Legislative Branch............................13

 XIX. Section-by-Section Analysis of the Legislation.................13
  XX. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, As Reported..........15
 XXI. Exchange of Committee Correspondence...........................22
XXII. Proceedings of the Subcommittee Markup.........................25
XXIII.Proceedings of the Full Committee Markup.......................55


                              I. Amendment

    The amendment is as follows:
  Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited as the ``National Windstorm Impact Reduction 
Act Reauthorization of 2014''.

SEC. 2. DEFINITIONS.

  (a) Director.--Section 203(1) of the National Windstorm Impact 
Reduction Act of 2004 (42 U.S.C. 15702(1)) is amended by striking 
``Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy'' and 
inserting ``Director of the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology''.
  (b) Lifelines.--Section 203 of the National Windstorm Impact 
Reduction Act of 2004 (42 U.S.C. 15702) is further amended--
          (1) by redesignating paragraphs (2) through (4) as paragraphs 
        (3) through (5), respectively; and
          (2) by inserting after paragraph (1) the following new 
        paragraph:
          ``(2) Lifelines.--The term `lifelines' means public works and 
        utilities, including transportation facilities and 
        infrastructure, oil and gas pipelines, electrical power and 
        communication facilities and infrastructure, and water supply 
        and sewage treatment facilities.''.

SEC. 3. NATIONAL WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION PROGRAM.

  Section 204 of the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act of 2004 
(42 U.S.C. 15703) is amended--
          (1) by striking subsections (a), (b), and (c) and inserting 
        the following:
  ``(a) Establishment.--There is established the National Windstorm 
Impact Reduction Program, the purpose of which is to achieve major 
measurable reductions in the losses of life and property from 
windstorms through a coordinated Federal effort, in cooperation with 
other levels of government, academia, and the private sector, aimed at 
improving the understanding of windstorms and their impacts and 
developing and encouraging the implementation of cost-effective 
mitigation measures to reduce those impacts.
  ``(b) Responsibilities of Program Agencies.--
          ``(1) Lead agency.--The National Institute of Standards and 
        Technology shall have the primary responsibility for planning 
        and coordinating the Program. In carrying out this paragraph, 
        the Director shall--
                  ``(A) ensure that the Program includes the necessary 
                components to promote the implementation of windstorm 
                risk reduction measures by Federal, State, and local 
                governments, national standards and model building code 
                organizations, architects and engineers, and others 
                with a role in planning and constructing buildings and 
                lifelines;
                  ``(B) support the development of performance-based 
                engineering tools, and work with appropriate groups to 
                promote the commercial application of such tools, 
                including through wind-related model building codes, 
                voluntary standards, and construction best practices;
                  ``(C) request the assistance of Federal agencies 
                other than the Program agencies, as necessary to assist 
                in carrying out this Act;
                  ``(D) coordinate all Federal post-windstorm 
                investigations; and
                  ``(E) when warranted by research or investigative 
                findings, issue recommendations to assist in informing 
                the development of model codes, and provide information 
                to Congress on the use of such recommendations.
          ``(2) National institute of standards and technology.--In 
        addition to the lead agency responsibilities described under 
        paragraph (1), the National Institute of Standards and 
        Technology shall be responsible for carrying out research and 
        development to improve model building codes, voluntary 
        standards, and best practices for the design, construction, and 
        retrofit of buildings, structures, and lifelines.
          ``(3) National science foundation.--The National Science 
        Foundation shall support research in--
                  ``(A) engineering and the atmospheric sciences to 
                improve the understanding of the behavior of windstorms 
                and their impact on buildings, structures, and 
                lifelines; and
                  ``(B) economic and social factors influencing 
                windstorm risk reduction measures.
          ``(4) National oceanic and atmospheric administration.--The 
        National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shall support 
        atmospheric sciences research to improve the understanding of 
        the behavior of windstorms and their impact on buildings, 
        structures, and lifelines.
          ``(5) Federal emergency management agency.--The Federal 
        Emergency Management Agency shall--
                  ``(A) support--
                          ``(i) the development of risk assessment 
                        tools and effective mitigation techniques;
                          ``(ii) windstorm-related data collection and 
                        analysis;
                          ``(iii) public outreach and information 
                        dissemination; and
                          ``(iv) promotion of the adoption of windstorm 
                        preparedness and mitigation measures, including 
                        for households, businesses, and communities, 
                        consistent with the Agency's all-hazards 
                        approach; and
                  ``(B) work closely with national standards and model 
                building code organizations, in conjunction with the 
                National Institute of Standards and Technology, to 
                promote the implementation of research results and 
                promote better building practices within the building 
                design and construction industry, including architects, 
                engineers, contractors, builders, and inspectors.'';
          (2) by redesignating subsection (d) as subsection (c), and by 
        striking subsections (e) and (f); and
          (3) by inserting after subsection (c), as so redesignated, 
        the following new subsections:
  ``(d) Budget Activities.--The Director of the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology, the Director of the National Science 
Foundation, the Director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration, and the Director of the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency shall each include in their agency's annual budget request to 
Congress a description of their agency's projected activities under the 
Program for the fiscal year covered by the budget request, along with 
an assessment of what they plan to spend on those activities for that 
fiscal year.
  ``(e) Interagency Coordinating Committee on Windstorm Impact 
Reduction.--
          ``(1) Establishment.--There is established an Interagency 
        Coordinating Committee on Windstorm Impact Reduction, chaired 
        by the Director.
          ``(2) Membership.--In addition to the chair, the Committee 
        shall be composed of--
                  ``(A) the heads of--
                          ``(i) the Federal Emergency Management 
                        Agency;
                          ``(ii) the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
                        Administration;
                          ``(iii) the National Science Foundation;
                          ``(iv) the Office of Science and Technology 
                        Policy; and
                          ``(v) the Office of Management and Budget; 
                        and
                  ``(B) the head of any other Federal agency the chair 
                considers appropriate.
          ``(3) Meetings.--The Committee shall meet not less than 2 
        times a year at the call of the Director of the National 
        Institute of Standards and Technology.
          ``(4) General purpose and duties.--The Committee shall 
        oversee the planning and coordination of the Program.
          ``(5) Strategic plan.--The Committee shall develop and submit 
        to Congress, not later than one year after the date of 
        enactment of the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act 
        Reauthorization of 2014, a Strategic Plan for the Program that 
        includes--
                  ``(A) prioritized goals for the Program that will 
                mitigate against the loss of life and property from 
                future windstorms;
                  ``(B) short-term, mid-term, and long-term research 
                objectives to achieve those goals;
                  ``(C) a description of the role of each Program 
                agency in achieving the prioritized goals;
                  ``(D) the methods by which progress towards the goals 
                will be assessed; and
                  ``(E) an explanation of how the Program will foster 
                the transfer of research results into outcomes, such as 
                improved model building codes.
          ``(6) Progress report.--Not later than 18 months after the 
        date of enactment of the National Windstorm Impact Reduction 
        Act Reauthorization of 2014, the Committee shall submit to the 
        Congress a report on the progress of the Program that 
        includes--
                  ``(A) a description of the activities funded under 
                the Program, a description of how these activities 
                align with the prioritized goals and research 
                objectives established in the Strategic Plan, and the 
                budgets, per agency, for these activities;
                  ``(B) the outcomes achieved by the Program for each 
                of the goals identified in the Strategic Plan;
                  ``(C) a description of any recommendations made to 
                change existing building codes that were the result of 
                Program activities; and
                  ``(D) a description of the extent to which the 
                Program has incorporated recommendations from the 
                Advisory Committee on Windstorm Impact Reduction.
          ``(7) Coordinated budget.--The Committee shall develop a 
        coordinated budget for the Program, which shall be submitted to 
        the Congress at the time of the President's budget submission 
        for each fiscal year.''.

SEC. 4. NATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION.

  Section 205 of the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act of 2004 
(42 U.S.C. 15704) is amended to read as follows:

``SEC. 205. NATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION.

  ``(a) In General.--The Director of the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology shall establish an Advisory Committee on 
Windstorm Impact Reduction, which shall be composed of at least 7 
members, none of whom may be employees of the Federal Government, 
including representatives of research and academic institutions, 
industry standards development organizations, emergency management 
agencies, State and local government, and business communities who are 
qualified to provide advice on windstorm impact reduction and represent 
all related scientific, architectural, and engineering disciplines. The 
recommendations of the Advisory Committee shall be considered by 
Federal agencies in implementing the Program.
  ``(b) Assessments.--The Advisory Committee on Windstorm Impact 
Reduction shall offer assessments on--
          ``(1) trends and developments in the natural, engineering, 
        and social sciences and practices of windstorm impact 
        mitigation;
          ``(2) the priorities of the Program's Strategic Plan;
          ``(3) the coordination of the Program; and
          ``(4) any revisions to the Program which may be necessary.
  ``(c) Compensation.--The members of the Advisory Committee 
established under this section shall serve without compensation.
  ``(d) Reports.--At least every 2 years, the Advisory Committee shall 
report to the Director on the assessments carried out under subsection 
(b) and its recommendations for ways to improve the Program.
  ``(e) Charter.--Notwithstanding section 14(b)(2) of the Federal 
Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App), the Advisory Committee shall not 
be required to file a charter subsequent to its initial charter, filed 
under section 9(c) of such Act, before the termination date specified 
in subsection (f) of this section.
  ``(f) Termination.--The Advisory Committee shall terminate on 
September 30, 2016.
  ``(g) Conflict of Interest.--An Advisory Committee member shall 
recuse himself from any Advisory Committee activity in which he has an 
actual pecuniary interest.''.

SEC. 5. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  Section 207 of the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act of 2004 
(42 U.S.C. 15706) is amended to read as follows:

``SEC. 207. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  ``(a) Federal Emergency Management Agency.--There are authorized to 
be appropriated to the Federal Emergency Management Agency for carrying 
out this title--
          ``(1) $5,332,000 for fiscal year 2014; and
          ``(2) $5,332,000 for fiscal year 2015.
  ``(b) National Science Foundation.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the National Science Foundation for carrying out this 
title--
          ``(1) $9,682,000 for fiscal year 2014; and
          ``(2) $9,682,000 for fiscal year 2015.
  ``(c) National Institute of Standards and Technology.--There are 
authorized to be appropriated to the National Institute of Standards 
and Technology for carrying out this title--
          ``(1) $4,120,000 for fiscal year 2014; and
          ``(2) $4,120,000 for fiscal year 2015.
  ``(d) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.--There are 
authorized to be appropriated to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration for carrying out this title--
          ``(1) $2,266,000 for fiscal year 2014; and
          ``(2) $2,266,000 for fiscal year 2015.''.

                        II. Purpose and Summary

    The purpose of H.R. 1786, the National Windstorm Impact 
Reduction Act Reauthorization of 2014, sponsored by 
Representative Neugebauer (R-TX-19), is to reauthorize the 
National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program (NWIRP) through 
Fiscal Year 2015. NWIRP is a multi-agency program that supports 
efforts to mitigate the impacts of wind hazards through 
targeted research and development to better understand and 
prepare for windstorms.

              III. Background and Need for the Legislation

    Wind hazards--which include tornados, hurricanes, and 
derechos--are a threat to all fifty states and cause injuries, 
deaths, economic disruptions, and property damage. Millions of 
Americans live in areas vulnerable to storms with damaging 
winds. The tornadic events of 2011 and 2013 show the 
devastating results of windstorms. In the United States in 
2011, windstorms caused nearly $11 billion in total direct 
property losses, injured nearly 7000 people and took nearly 700 
lives.\1\ As populations continue to grow in areas prone to 
hurricanes, tornadoes, and windstorms, vulnerability to severe 
weather will only increase. In 2005, the National Science and 
Technology Council (NSTC) stated that America's primary focus 
on disaster response is ``an impractical and inefficient 
strategy for dealing with these ongoing threats. Instead, 
communities must break the cycle of destruction and recovery by 
enhancing their disaster resilience.''
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\National Science and Technology Council. National Windstorm 
Impact Reduction Program: Biennial Report to Congress for Fiscal Years 
2011 and 2012, p. 6. http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/
microsites/ostp/NSTC/nwirp-fy11-12-biennial-report-to-congress.pdf
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    NWIRP was established in 2004 through legislation authored 
by Rep. Neugebauer. Under the program, the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology (NIST), the National Science 
Foundation (NSF), and the Federal Emergency Management 
Administration (FEMA) support activities to improve the 
understanding of windstorms and their impacts, and to develop 
and encourage the implementation of cost-effective mitigation 
measures to reduce these impacts. The program was originally 
authorized for three years through FY 2008 and has continued to 
be funded despite a lapse in authorization.
    OSTP submitted a NWIRP implementation plan in April 2006, 
which assessed programs relevant to the goals of NWIRP across 
eight federal agencies and identified important areas of 
research that were not covered by current activities. Knowledge 
gaps were identified in the three broad categories of research 
authorized in the original NWIRP Act: understanding windstorms; 
assessing the impacts of windstorms; and mitigation against the 
effects of windstorms. The implementation plan also recommended 
a continued role for the Interagency Working Group within the 
National Science and Technology Council's (NSTC) Committee on 
Environment and Natural Resources, Subcommittee on Disaster 
Reduction.
    H.R. 1786 strengthens NWIRP by transferring its leadership 
from OSTP to NIST. The bill also: assigns responsibilities to 
the agencies that make up the program; requires the Interagency 
Coordinating Committee to develop a strategic plan that 
outlines the prioritized goals of the Program, research 
objectives to attain those goals, and how research results will 
be transferred into outcomes; creates a NWIRP advisory 
committee, which sunsets in 2016; and authorizes funding for 
the programs for FY2014 and FY2015.

                          IV. Hearing Summary

    In the 113th Congress, the Subcommittees on Research and 
Technology held a hearing on June 5, 2013, examining the 
current role of research and development in mitigating the 
damaging effects of windstorms across the Nation and the 
methods of transferring the results of research into practice 
for stakeholders including building code developers, builders, 
and property owners. The hearing reviewed the activities of the 
National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program (NWIRP) and H.R. 
1786, The National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act 
Reauthorization of 2013.
    The Subcommittees heard testimony from Dr. Ernst Kiesling, 
Research Faculty, National Wind Institute, Texas Tech 
University; Ms. Debra Ballen, General Counsel and Senior Vice 
President, Public Policy, Insurance Institute for Business & 
Home Safety; and Dr. David Prevatt, Assistant Professor, 
Department of Civil and Coastal Engineering, University of 
Florida.

                       V. Committee Consideration

    On April 26, 2013, H.R. 1786 was introduced by Rep. 
Neugebauer and referred to the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology.
    On June 28, 2013, the Subcommittee on Research and 
Technology met in open markup session and adopted H.R. 1786, as 
amended, by voice vote. The Subcommittee considered three 
amendments, and approved one.
     An amendment offered by Representative Esty to add 
the definition of ``lifelines'' to the bill was agreed to by 
voice vote.
     An amendment, offered by Representative Wilson, to 
allow the head of an agency to decline to implement the 
requirements of the Act if the head of such agency determines 
that sufficient funds are not available and requires a report 
to Congress within 30 days of making such a determination, was 
not agreed to by voice vote.
     An amendment, offered by Representative Peters, to 
add two additional titles to the bill to reauthorize the 
National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program and to amend the 
fire research program, was withdrawn.
    The bill, as amended, was favorably reported to the full 
Committee by voice vote.
    On February 28, 2014 the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology met in open markup session and adopted H.R. 1786, as 
amended, by voice vote.
     An amendment offered by Representatives Neugebauer 
and Wilson, which made technical corrections to the existing 
bill; added economic and social science research to the type of 
research that NSF may conduct and the Advisory Committee should 
assess; added language requiring NIST, NSF, NOAA and FEMA 
report on planned NWIRP activities in Congressional budget 
requests; reallocated funding within program but maintains 
current overall funding level; and authorize the program 
through 2015, was agreed to by voice vote.
     An amendment offered by Representative Grayson, 
which requires an Advisory Committee member to recuse 
themselves from any Advisory Committee activity in which they 
have an actual pecuniary interest, was agreed to by voice vote.
    The bill, as amended, was favorably reported by voice vote.

                          VI. Committee Votes

    Clause 3(b) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires the Committee to list the record votes 
on the motion to report legislation and amendments thereto. A 
motion to order H.R. 1786 favorably reported to the House, as 
amended, was agreed to by voice vote.
    During Full Committee consideration of H.R.1786, the 
following amendments were considered:


              VII. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill

    H.R. 1786 includes the following provisions:
     Four agencies make up the National Windstorm 
Impact Reduction Program (NWIRP): the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology (NIST), the National Science 
Foundation (NSF), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration (NOAA), and the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency (FEMA); defines NIST as the lead program agency; and 
assigns responsibilities to the four program agencies.
           NIST is being tasked as the new lead 
        agency of the Program. In that role, NIST's activities 
        include planning and coordinating the Program; 
        supporting the development of performance-based 
        engineering tools; requesting the assistance of Federal 
        agencies, other than Program agencies, as necessary; 
        coordinating all Federal post-windstorm investigations; 
        and issuing recommendations to assist in informing 
        model codes when warranted by research or investigative 
        findings. In addition to the lead agency 
        responsibilities, NIST shall also conduct research and 
        development to improve model building codes, voluntary 
        standards, and best practices for the design, 
        construction, and retrofit of buildings, structures, 
        and lifelines.
           NSF activities include research in 
        engineering and the atmospheric sciences to improve the 
        understanding of the behavior of windstorms and the 
        impact on buildings, structures, and lifelines, and 
        research in the economic and social factors influencing 
        windstorm risk reduction measures.
           NOAA activities include the support of 
        atmospheric science research to improve the 
        understanding of the behavior of windstorms and the 
        impact on buildings, structures, and lifelines.
           FEMA activities include the development 
        of risk assessment tools and effective mitigation 
        techniques; data collection and analysis; public 
        outreach, information dissemination; and promotion of 
        the adoption of windstorm preparedness and mitigation 
        measures. FEMA is also required to work closely with 
        national standards and building code organizations, in 
        conjunction with NIST, to promote implementation of 
        research results and promote better building practices.
     Creation of an Interagency Coordinating Committee 
on Windstorm Impact Reduction. The Committee is chaired by the 
Director of NIST and is made up of the heads of FEMA, NOAA, 
NSF, OSTP, the Office of Management and the Budget (OMB), and 
the head of any other Federal agency the Chair considers 
appropriate. The Committee is to meet not less than two times a 
year and is tasked with developing and submitting to Congress a 
strategic plan, progress report, and coordinated budget for the 
Program.
     The Directors of NIST, NSF, NOAA and FEMA are 
required to include in their annual budget request to Congress 
a description of their agency's projected NWIRP activities and 
an assessment of what they plan to spend on the program for the 
fiscal year covered in the budget request.
     Updating the National Advisory Committee on 
Windstorm Impact Reduction made up of at least seven relevant 
non-Federal employee experts to offer recommendations and 
assessments on program developments, priorities, coordination, 
and revisions as necessary. This section requires the Advisory 
Committee to report to the Director of NIST on the assessment 
and its recommendations at least every two years. The Advisory 
Committee is terminated on September 30, 2016. Additionally, an 
Advisory Committee member is required to recuse himself from 
any Advisory Committee activity in which he has an actual 
pecuniary interest.
     Funding the program at $21.4 million annually, 
broken down as follows:
           For FEMA: $5,332,000 for each fiscal 
        year 2014 through 2015.
           For NSF: $9,682,000 for each fiscal year 
        2014 through 2015.
           For NIST: $4,120,000 for each fiscal 
        year 2014 through 2015.
           For NOAA: $2,266,000 for each fiscal 
        year 2014 through 2015.

                         VIII. Committee Views


              NATIONAL WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION PROGRAM

    Although the program was created in 2004, the NWIRP program 
implementation and coordination has been insufficient. NIST 
leadership will ensure agency efforts for wind-hazard 
mitigation research, development, and technology transfer are 
coordinated, transparent, and effective. Developing measures to 
cost-effectively retrofit existing structures is of high 
importance, as is developing methods to mitigate the impacts of 
windstorms on infrastructure and lifelines.

                        INTERAGENCY COORDINATION

    The Interagency Coordinating Committee for NWIRP should 
ensure the agencies' activities are well-coordinated through 
strategic planning. Federal agencies should take advantage of 
opportunities for more coordination of R&D across different 
natural hazards. An important initial step is to identify 
specific types of R&D efforts where coordination and 
collaboration across different natural hazards is possible.

                           BUDGET ACTIVITIES

    FEMA, NSF, NIST and NOAA are required to consider NWIRP 
activities and programs in their annual budget request to 
Congress. This will provide greater accountability and 
transparency for the program and its annual activities.

                             AUTHORIZATIONS

    Funding levels were established for each participating 
agency for FY 2014 and FY 2015. The bill sets overall funding 
levels below FY 2008 authorization levels.

                    IX. Committee Oversight Findings

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee held an oversight 
hearing and made findings that are reflected in the descriptive 
portions of this report.

        X. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives

    In accordance with clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives, the performance goals and 
objectives of the Committee are reflected in the descriptive 
portions of this report, including the goal to continue a 
multi-agency program that supports efforts to mitigate the 
impacts of wind hazards through targeted research and 
development.

 XI. New Budget Authority, Entitlement Authority, and Tax Expenditures

    In compliance with clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives, the Committee adopts as its 
own the estimate of new budget authority, entitlement 
authority, or tax expenditures or revenues contained in the 
cost estimate prepared by the Director of the Congressional 
Budget Office pursuant to section 402 of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974.

                       XII. Advisory on Earmarks

    In compliance with clause 9(e), 9(f), and 9(g) of rule XXI, 
the Committee finds that H.R. 1786, the ``National Windstorm 
Impact Reduction Act Reauthorization of 2014'', contains no 
earmarks.

                     XIII. Committee Cost Estimate

    The Committee adopts as its own the cost estimate prepared 
by the Director of the Congressional Budget Office pursuant to 
section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.

             XIV. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(3) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is the cost estimate 
provided by the Congressional Budget Office pursuant to section 
402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.

                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                     Washington, DC, March 6, 2014.
Hon. Lamar Smith,
Chairman, Committee on Science, Space, and Technology,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for H.R. 1786, the National 
Windstorm Impact Reduction Act Reauthorization of 2014.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Susan Willie.
            Sincerely,
                                    Douglas W. Elmendorf, Director.
    Enclosure.

H.R. 1786--National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act Reauthorization of 
        2014

    Summary: H.R. 1786 would reauthorize the National Windstorm 
Impact Reduction Program, which was created to improve the 
understanding of windstorms and their impacts and to develop 
measures to reduce the damage they cause. The bill also would 
establish new committees to coordinate the activities of 
federal agencies participating in the program and to assess 
developments in efforts to mitigate damage from windstorms.
    Assuming appropriation of the authorized amounts, CBO 
estimates that implementing H.R. 1786 would cost $21 million 
over the 2015-2019 period. Pay-as-you-go procedures do not 
apply to this legislation because it would not affect direct 
spending or revenues.
    H.R. 1786 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) 
and would not affect the budgets of state, local, or tribal 
governments.
    Estimated cost to the Federal government: The estimated 
budgetary impact of H.R. 1786 is shown in the following table. 
The costs of this legislation fall within budget functions 250 
(general science, space, and technology), 300 (natural 
resources and environment), 370 (commerce and housing credit), 
and 450 (community and regional development).

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            By fiscal year, in millions of dollars--
                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------
                                                   2015       2016       2017       2018       2019    2015-2019
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  CHANGES IN SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION

Authorization Level...........................         21          0          0          0          0         21
Estimated Outlays.............................         10          8          2          1          0         21
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Basis of estimate: For this estimate, CBO assumes that H.R. 
1786 will be enacted near the end of fiscal year 2014 and that 
the authorized amount will be appropriated in 2015. Estimated 
outlays are based on historical spending patterns for this 
program.
    For fiscal year 2015, H.R. 1786 would authorize 
appropriations of $5 million for the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency, $10 million for the National Science 
Foundation, $4 million for the National Institute of Standards 
and Technology, and $2 million for the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration to carry out the National Windstorm 
Impact Reduction Program. Assuming appropriation of those 
amounts, CBO estimates that implementing the bill would cost 
$21 million over the 2015-2019 period.
    Pay-As-You-Go considerations: None.
    Intergovernmental and private-sector impact: H.R. 1786 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in UMRA and would not affect the budgets of state, 
local, or tribal governments.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal Costs: Susan Willie; Impact 
on State, Local, and Tribal Governments: J'nell Blanco; Impact 
on the Private Sector: Amy Petz.
    Estimate approved by: Theresa Gullo, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

                     XV. Federal Mandates Statement

    The Committee adopts as its own the estimate of Federal 
mandates prepared by the Director of the Congressional Budget 
Office pursuant to section 423 of the Unfunded Mandates Reform 
Act.

                     XVI. Compliance with H. Res. 5

    A. Directed Rule Making. The bill does not direct any 
executive branch official to conduct any specific rule-making 
proceedings.
    B. Duplication of Existing Programs. This bill does not 
establish or reauthorize a program of the federal government 
known to be duplicative of another program. Such program was 
not included in any report from the Government Accountability 
Office to Congress pursuant to section 21 of Public Law 111-139 
or identified in the most recent Catalog of Federal Domestic 
Assistance published pursuant to the Federal Program 
Information Act (Public Law 95-220, as amended by Public Law 
98-169) as relating to other programs.

               XVII. Federal Advisory Committee Statement

    No new advisory committees within the meaning of section 
5(b) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act were created by the 
legislation. H.R. 1786 reauthorized the National Advisory 
Committee on Windstorm Impact Reduction, which terminates on 
September 30, 2016.

               XVIII. Applicability to Legislative Branch

    The Committee finds that the legislation does not relate to 
the terms and conditions of employment or access to public 
services or accommodations within the meaning of section 
102(b)(3) of the Congressional Accountability Act.

                    XIX. Section-by-Section Analysis


Section 1. Short title

    This section establishes the short title as the ``National 
Windstorm Impact Reduction Reauthorization Act of 2014.''

Section 2. Definitions

    This section amends the National Windstorm Impact Reduction 
Act of 2004 to define the ``Director'' of the Program as the 
Director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology 
(NIST) rather than the Director of the White House Office of 
Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). This section also defines 
``Lifelines'' to mean the public works and utilities, oil and 
gas pipelines, electrical power and communication facilities 
and infrastructure, and water supply and sewage treatment 
facilities.

Section 3. National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program

    This section identifies the four agencies that make up the 
National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program (NWIRP): NIST, the 
National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency (FEMA); defines NIST as the lead program 
agency; and assigns responsibilities to the four program 
agencies.
    As the new lead agency, NIST's activities include planning 
and coordinating the Program; supporting the development of 
performance-based engineering tools; requesting the assistance 
of Federal agencies other than Program agencies as necessary; 
coordinating all Federal post-windstorm investigations; and 
issuing recommendations to assist in informing model codes when 
warranted by research or investigative findings. In addition to 
the lead agency responsibilities, NIST shall also conduct 
research and development to improve model building codes, 
voluntary standards, and best practices for the design, 
construction, and retrofit of buildings, structures, and 
lifelines.
    NSF activities include research in engineering and the 
atmospheric sciences to improve the understanding of the 
behavior of windstorms and their impact on buildings, 
structures, and lifelines, and research in the economic and 
social factors influencing windstorm risk reduction measures.
    NOAA activities include the support of atmospheric science 
research to improve the understanding of the behavior of 
windstorms and their impact on buildings, structures, and 
lifelines.
    FEMA activities include the development of risk assessment 
tools and effective mitigation techniques; data collection and 
analysis; public outreach, information dissemination; and 
promotion of the adoption of windstorm preparedness and 
mitigation measures. FEMA is also required to work closely with 
national standards and building code organizations, in 
conjunction with NIST, to promote implementation of research 
results and promote better building practices.
    The Directors of NIST, NSF, NOAA and FEMA are required to 
include in their annual budget request to Congress a 
description of their agency's projected NWIRP activities and an 
assessment of what they plan to spend on the program for the 
fiscal year covered in the budget request.
    Additionally, this section creates an Interagency 
Coordinating Committee on Windstorm Impact Reduction. The 
Committee is chaired by the Director of NIST and is made up of 
the heads of FEMA, NOAA, NSF, OSTP, the Office of Management 
and the Budget (OMB), and the head of any other Federal agency 
the Chair considers appropriate. The Committee is to meet not 
less than 2 times a year and is tasked with developing and 
submitting to Congress a strategic plan, progress report, and 
coordinated budget for the Program.

Section 4. National Advisory Committee on Windstorm Impact Reduction

    This section amends the National Windstorm Impact Reduction 
Act of 2004 to reauthorize and update an existing Advisory 
Committee for NWIRP of at least 7 relevant non-Federal employee 
experts to offer recommendations and assessments on program 
developments, priorities, coordination, and revisions as 
necessary. This section requires the Advisory Committee to 
report to the Director of NIST on the assessment and its 
recommendations at least every two years. The authority for the 
Advisory Committee terminates on September 30, 2016. An 
Advisory Committee member is required to recues himself from 
any Advisory Committee activity in which he has an actual 
pecuniary interest.

Section 5. Authorization of appropriations

    This section provides authorizations of appropriations as 
follows:
    For FEMA: $5,332,000 for each fiscal year 2014 through 
2015.
    For NSF: $9,682,000 for each fiscal year 2014 through 2015.
    For NIST: $4,120,000 for each fiscal year 2014 through 
2015.
    For NOAA: $2,266,000 for each fiscal year 2014 through 
2015.

         Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

  In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

NATIONAL WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION ACT OF 2004

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



TITLE II--WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 203. DEFINITIONS.

  In this title:
          (1) Director.--The term ``Director'' means the 
        [Director of the Office of Science and Technology 
        Policy] Director of the National Institute of Standards 
        and Technology.
          (2) Lifelines.--The term ``lifelines'' means public 
        works and utilities, including transportation 
        facilities and infrastructure, oil and gas pipelines, 
        electrical power and communication facilities and 
        infrastructure, and water supply and sewage treatment 
        facilities.
          [(2)] (3) Program.--The term ``Program'' means the 
        National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program established 
        by section 204(a).
          [(3)] (4) State.--The term ``State'' means each of 
        the States of the United States, the District of 
        Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the United 
        States Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the 
        Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and any 
        other territory or possession of the United States.
          [(4)] (5) Windstorm.--The term ``windstorm'' means 
        any storm with a damaging or destructive wind 
        component, such as a hurricane, tropical storm, 
        tornado, or thunderstorm.

SEC. 204. NATIONAL WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION PROGRAM.

  [(a) Establishment.--There is established the National 
Windstorm Impact Reduction Program.
  [(b) Objective.--The objective of the Program is the 
achievement of major measurable reductions in losses of life 
and property from windstorms. The objective is to be achieved 
through a coordinated Federal effort, in cooperation with other 
levels of government, academia, and the private sector, aimed 
at improving the understanding of windstorms and their impacts 
and developing and encouraging implementation of cost-effective 
mitigation measures to reduce those impacts.
  [(c) Interagency Working Group.--Not later than 90 days after 
the date of enactment of this Act, the Director shall establish 
an Interagency Working Group consisting of representatives of 
the National Science Foundation, the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration, the National Institute of Standards 
and Technology, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and 
other Federal agencies as appropriate. The Director shall 
designate an agency to serve as Chair of the Working Group and 
be responsible for the planning, management, and coordination 
of the Program, including budget coordination. Specific agency 
roles and responsibilities under the Program shall be defined 
in the implementation plan required under subsection (e). 
General agency responsibilities shall include the following:
          [(1) The National Institute of Standards and 
        Technology shall support research and development to 
        improve building codes and standards and practices for 
        design and construction of buildings, structures, and 
        lifelines.
          [(2) The National Science Foundation shall support 
        research in engineering and the atmospheric sciences to 
        improve the understanding of the behavior of windstorms 
        and their impact on buildings, structures, and 
        lifelines.
          [(3) The National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
        Administration shall support atmospheric sciences 
        research to improve the understanding of the behavior 
        of windstorms and their impact on buildings, 
        structures, and lifelines.
          [(4) The Federal Emergency Management Agency shall 
        support the development of risk assessment tools and 
        effective mitigation techniques, windstorm-related data 
        collection and analysis, public outreach, information 
        dissemination, and implementation of mitigation 
        measures consistent with the Agency's all-hazards 
        approach.]
  (a) Establishment.--There is established the National 
Windstorm Impact Reduction Program, the purpose of which is to 
achieve major measurable reductions in the losses of life and 
property from windstorms through a coordinated Federal effort, 
in cooperation with other levels of government, academia, and 
the private sector, aimed at improving the understanding of 
windstorms and their impacts and developing and encouraging the 
implementation of cost-effective mitigation measures to reduce 
those impacts.
  (b) Responsibilities of Program Agencies.--
          (1) Lead agency.--The National Institute of Standards 
        and Technology shall have the primary responsibility 
        for planning and coordinating the Program. In carrying 
        out this paragraph, the Director shall--
                  (A) ensure that the Program includes the 
                necessary components to promote the 
                implementation of windstorm risk reduction 
                measures by Federal, State, and local 
                governments, national standards and model 
                building code organizations, architects and 
                engineers, and others with a role in planning 
                and constructing buildings and lifelines;
                  (B) support the development of performance-
                based engineering tools, and work with 
                appropriate groups to promote the commercial 
                application of such tools, including through 
                wind-related model building codes, voluntary 
                standards, and construction best practices;
                  (C) request the assistance of Federal 
                agencies other than the Program agencies, as 
                necessary to assist in carrying out this Act;
                  (D) coordinate all Federal post-windstorm 
                investigations; and
                  (E) when warranted by research or 
                investigative findings, issue recommendations 
                to assist in informing the development of model 
                codes, and provide information to Congress on 
                the use of such recommendations.
          (2) National institute of standards and technology.--
        In addition to the lead agency responsibilities 
        described under paragraph (1), the National Institute 
        of Standards and Technology shall be responsible for 
        carrying out research and development to improve model 
        building codes, voluntary standards, and best practices 
        for the design, construction, and retrofit of 
        buildings, structures, and lifelines.
          (3) National science foundation.--The National 
        Science Foundation shall support research in--
                  (A) engineering and the atmospheric sciences 
                to improve the understanding of the behavior of 
                windstorms and their impact on buildings, 
                structures, and lifelines; and
                  (B) economic and social factors influencing 
                windstorm risk reduction measures.
          (4) National oceanic and atmospheric 
        administration.--The National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
        Administration shall support atmospheric sciences 
        research to improve the understanding of the behavior 
        of windstorms and their impact on buildings, 
        structures, and lifelines.
          (5) Federal emergency management agency.--The Federal 
        Emergency Management Agency shall--
                  (A) support--
                          (i) the development of risk 
                        assessment tools and effective 
                        mitigation techniques;
                          (ii) windstorm-related data 
                        collection and analysis;
                          (iii) public outreach and information 
                        dissemination; and
                          (iv) promotion of the adoption of 
                        windstorm preparedness and mitigation 
                        measures, including for households, 
                        businesses, and communities, consistent 
                        with the Agency's all-hazards approach; 
                        and
                  (B) work closely with national standards and 
                model building code organizations, in 
                conjunction with the National Institute of 
                Standards and Technology, to promote the 
                implementation of research results and promote 
                better building practices within the building 
                design and construction industry, including 
                architects, engineers, contractors, builders, 
                and inspectors.
  [(d)] (c) Program Components.--
          (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  [(e) Implementation Plan.--Not later than 1 year after date 
of enactment of this title, the Interagency Working Group shall 
develop and transmit to the Congress an implementation plan for 
achieving the objectives of the Program. The plan shall 
include--
          [(1) an assessment of past and current public and 
        private efforts to reduce windstorm impacts, including 
        a comprehensive review and analysis of windstorm 
        mitigation activities supported by the Federal 
        Government;
          [(2) a description of plans for technology transfer 
        and coordination with natural hazard mitigation 
        activities supported by the Federal Government;
          [(3) a statement of strategic goals and priorities 
        for each Program component area;
          [(4) a description of how the Program will achieve 
        such goals, including detailed responsibilities for 
        each agency; and
          [(5) a description of plans for cooperation and 
        coordination with interested public and private sector 
        entities in each program component area.
  [(f) Biennial Report.--The Interagency Working Group shall, 
on a biennial basis, and not later than 180 days after the end 
of the preceding 2 fiscal years, transmit a report to the 
Congress describing the status of the windstorm impact 
reduction program, including progress achieved during the 
preceding two fiscal years. Each such report shall include any 
recommendations for legislative and other action the 
Interagency Working Group considers necessary and appropriate. 
In developing the biennial report, the Interagency Working 
Group shall consider the recommendations of the Advisory 
Committee established under section 205.]
  (d) Budget Activities.--The Director of the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology, the Director of the 
National Science Foundation, the Director of the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the Director of the 
Federal Emergency Management Agency shall each include in their 
agency's annual budget request to Congress a description of 
their agency's projected activities under the Program for the 
fiscal year covered by the budget request, along with an 
assessment of what they plan to spend on those activities for 
that fiscal year.
  (e) Interagency Coordinating Committee on Windstorm Impact 
Reduction.--
          (1) Establishment.--There is established an 
        Interagency Coordinating Committee on Windstorm Impact 
        Reduction, chaired by the Director.
          (2) Membership.--In addition to the chair, the 
        Committee shall be composed of--
                  (A) the heads of--
                          (i) the Federal Emergency Management 
                        Agency;
                          (ii) the National Oceanic and 
                        Atmospheric Administration;
                          (iii) the National Science 
                        Foundation;
                          (iv) the Office of Science and 
                        Technology Policy; and
                          (v) the Office of Management and 
                        Budget; and
                  (B) the head of any other Federal agency the 
                chair considers appropriate.
          (3) Meetings.--The Committee shall meet not less than 
        2 times a year at the call of the Director of the 
        National Institute of Standards and Technology.
          (4) General purpose and duties.--The Committee shall 
        oversee the planning and coordination of the Program.
          (5) Strategic plan.--The Committee shall develop and 
        submit to Congress, not later than one year after the 
        date of enactment of the National Windstorm Impact 
        Reduction Act Reauthorization of 2014, a Strategic Plan 
        for the Program that includes--
                  (A) prioritized goals for the Program that 
                will mitigate against the loss of life and 
                property from future windstorms;
                  (B) short-term, mid-term, and long-term 
                research objectives to achieve those goals;
                  (C) a description of the role of each Program 
                agency in achieving the prioritized goals;
                  (D) the methods by which progress towards the 
                goals will be assessed; and
                  (E) an explanation of how the Program will 
                foster the transfer of research results into 
                outcomes, such as improved model building 
                codes.
          (6) Progress report.--Not later than 18 months after 
        the date of enactment of the National Windstorm Impact 
        Reduction Act Reauthorization of 2014, the Committee 
        shall submit to the Congress a report on the progress 
        of the Program that includes--
                  (A) a description of the activities funded 
                under the Program, a description of how these 
                activities align with the prioritized goals and 
                research objectives established in the 
                Strategic Plan, and the budgets, per agency, 
                for these activities;
                  (B) the outcomes achieved by the Program for 
                each of the goals identified in the Strategic 
                Plan;
                  (C) a description of any recommendations made 
                to change existing building codes that were the 
                result of Program activities; and
                  (D) a description of the extent to which the 
                Program has incorporated recommendations from 
                the Advisory Committee on Windstorm Impact 
                Reduction.
          (7) Coordinated budget.--The Committee shall develop 
        a coordinated budget for the Program, which shall be 
        submitted to the Congress at the time of the 
        President's budget submission for each fiscal year.

[SEC. 205. NATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION.

  [(a) Establishment.--The Director shall establish a National 
Advisory Committee on Windstorm Impact Reduction, consisting of 
not less than 11 and not more than 15 non-Federal members 
representing a broad cross section of interests such as the 
research, technology transfer, design and construction, and 
financial communities; materials and systems suppliers; State, 
county, and local governments; the insurance industry; and 
other representatives as designated by the Director.
  [(b) Assessment.--The Advisory Committee shall assess--
          [(1) trends and developments in the science and 
        engineering of windstorm impact reduction;
          [(2) the effectiveness of the Program in carrying out 
        the activities under section 204(d);
          [(3) the need to revise the Program; and
          [(4) the management, coordination, implementation, 
        and activities of the Program.
  [(c) Biennial Report.--At least once every two years, the 
Advisory Committee shall report to Congress and the Interagency 
Working Group on the assessment carried out under subsection 
(b).
  [(d) Sunset Exemption.--Section 14 of the Federal Advisory 
Committee Act shall not apply to the Advisory Committee 
established under this section.]

SEC. 205. NATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION.

  (a) In General.--The Director of the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology shall establish an Advisory Committee 
on Windstorm Impact Reduction, which shall be composed of at 
least 7 members, none of whom may be employees of the Federal 
Government, including representatives of research and academic 
institutions, industry standards development organizations, 
emergency management agencies, State and local government, and 
business communities who are qualified to provide advice on 
windstorm impact reduction and represent all related 
scientific, architectural, and engineering disciplines. The 
recommendations of the Advisory Committee shall be considered 
by Federal agencies in implementing the Program.
  (b) Assessments.--The Advisory Committee on Windstorm Impact 
Reduction shall offer assessments on--
          (1) trends and developments in the natural, 
        engineering, and social sciences and practices of 
        windstorm impact mitigation;
          (2) the priorities of the Program's Strategic Plan;
          (3) the coordination of the Program; and
          (4) any revisions to the Program which may be 
        necessary.
  (c) Compensation.--The members of the Advisory Committee 
established under this section shall serve without 
compensation.
  (d) Reports.--At least every 2 years, the Advisory Committee 
shall report to the Director on the assessments carried out 
under subsection (b) and its recommendations for ways to 
improve the Program.
  (e) Charter.--Notwithstanding section 14(b)(2) of the Federal 
Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App), the Advisory Committee 
shall not be required to file a charter subsequent to its 
initial charter, filed under section 9(c) of such Act, before 
the termination date specified in subsection (f) of this 
section.
  (f) Termination.--The Advisory Committee shall terminate on 
September 30, 2016.
  (g) Conflict of interest.--An Advisory Committee member shall 
recuse himself from any Advisory Committee activity in which he 
has an actual pecuniary interest.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


[SEC. 207. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  [(a) Federal Emergency Management Agency.--There are 
authorized to be appropriated to the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency for carrying out this title--
          [(1) $8,700,000 for fiscal year 2006;
          [(2) $9,400,000 for fiscal year 2007; and
          [(3) $9,400,000 for fiscal year 2008.
  [(b) National Science Foundation.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the National Science Foundation for carrying 
out this title--
          [(1) $8,700,000 for fiscal year 2006;
          [(2) $9,400,000 for fiscal year 2007; and
          [(3) $9,400,000 for fiscal year 2008.
  [(c) National Institute of Standards and Technology.--There 
are authorized to be appropriated to the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology for carrying out this title--
          [(1) $3,000,000 for fiscal year 2006;
          [(2) $4,000,000 for fiscal year 2007; and
          [(3) $4,000,000 for fiscal year 2008.
  [(d) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.--There 
are authorized to be appropriated to the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration for carrying out this title--
          [(1) $2,100,000 for fiscal year 2006;
          [(2) $2,200,000 for fiscal year 2007; and
          [(3) $2,200,000 for fiscal year 2008.]

SEC. 207. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  (a) Federal Emergency Management Agency.--There are 
authorized to be appropriated to the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency for carrying out this title--
          (1) $5,332,000 for fiscal year 2014; and
          (2) $5,332,000 for fiscal year 2015.
  (b) National Science Foundation.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the National Science Foundation for carrying 
out this title--
          (1) $9,682,000 for fiscal year 2014; and
          (2) $9,682,000 for fiscal year 2015.
  (c) National Institute of Standards and Technology.--There 
are authorized to be appropriated to the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology for carrying out this title--
          (1) $4,120,000 for fiscal year 2014; and
          (2) $4,120,000 for fiscal year 2015.
  (d) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.--There 
are authorized to be appropriated to the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration for carrying out this title--
          (1) $2,266,000 for fiscal year 2014; and
          (2) $2,266,000 for fiscal year 2015.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *





                XXII. PROCEEDINGS OF THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON
                        RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY
                          MARKUP ON H.R.1786,
                     THE NATIONAL WINDSTORM IMPACT
                 REDUCTION ACT REAUTHORIZATION OF 2013

                              ----------                              


                         FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

                  House of Representatives,
                    Subcommittee on Research and Technology
                Committee on Science, Space, and Technology
                                                   Washington, D.C.

    The Subcommittee met, pursuant to call, at 9:05 a.m., in 
Room 2318 of the Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Larry 
Bucshon [Chairman of the Subcommittee] presiding.
    Chairman Bucshon. The Research and Technology Subcommittee 
of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology will come to 
order. Without objection, the Chair is authorized to declare 
recesses of the Subcommittee at any time. We have votes around 
10 o'clock, so we are hopeful to get through this markup before 
then. If we don't, we will have to recess for a period of time 
and then come back and finish.
    I now recognize myself for an opening statement.
    I am pleased to call the markup this morning for 
consideration of H.R. 1786, the National Windstorm Impact 
Reduction Act Reauthorization of 2013, introduced by our 
colleague, Congressman Randy Neugebauer.
    As we have tragically witnessed this year, windstorms take 
American lives, destroy homes and businesses, and cause 
billions of dollars of damage around the United States. The 
effects of these disasters can reverberate for years.
    Millions of Americans live in areas vulnerable to damaging 
hurricanes, tornadoes, and other windstorms. As populations 
continue to grow in these areas, our vulnerability will only 
increase.
    The legislation we are marking up today will reauthorize 
the activities of the National Windstorm Impact Reduction 
Program--I don't know how to say that--NWIRP. NWIRP focuses on 
mitigating damage from wind-related hazards through research 
designed to help us better understand their behavior and 
impacts.
    Earlier this month, our Subcommittee held a hearing 
examining how the National Science Foundation, the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology, the Federal Emergency 
Management Administration, and the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration conduct important research and 
development activities aimed to reduce the risk and impact of 
severe windstorms under the auspices of NWIRP.
    This R&D improves model building codes, voluntary 
standards, and construction practices for buildings and 
lifelines; fundamental research on the impact of severe 
windstorms on buildings and infrastructure; atmospheric science 
research and data collection; and risk assessment tools and 
mitigation techniques.
    The original authorization of NWIRP expired in 2008. 
Although some work in these agencies has continued, it is 
difficult to determine the total spending on current wind-
hazard reduction measures across these agencies. H.R. 1786 
improves public transparency for how much money is being spent 
on windstorm research, establishes NIST as the lead agency for 
the program, and improves coordination and planning of agency 
activities in a fiscally responsible manner.
    I want to thank Randy Neugebauer for his focus on this 
valuable research area, and I look forward to moving forward on 
this legislation.
    I now yield to the Ranking Member of the Subcommittee, Ms. 
Wilson, for her comments.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Bucshon follows:]

       Prepared Statement of Subcommittee Chairman Larry Bucshon

    Chairman Bucshon. I am pleased to call the markup this morning for 
consideration of H.R. 1786, the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act 
Reauthorization of 2013, introduced by our colleague, Congressman Randy 
Neugebauer.
    As we have tragically witnessed this year, windstorms take American 
lives, destroy homes and businesses, and cause billions of dollars of 
damage around the United States. The effects of these disasters can 
reverberate for years.
    Millions of Americans live in areas vulnerable to damaging 
hurricanes, tornadoes, and other windstorms. As populations continue to 
grow in these areas, our vulnerability will only increase.
    The legislation we are marking up today will reauthorize the 
activities of the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program (or 
NWIRP, ``N-whirp''). NWIRP focuses on mitigating damage from wind-
related hazards through research designed to help us better understand 
their behavior and impacts.
    Earlier this month, our Subcommittee held a hearing examining how 
the National Science Foundation, the National Institute of Standards 
and Technology, the Federal Emergency Management Administration, and 
the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration conduct important 
research and development activities aimed to reduce the risk and impact 
of severe windstorms under the auspices of the NWIRP program.
    This R&D improves model building codes, voluntary standards, and 
construction practices for buildings and lifelines; fundamental 
research on the impact of severe windstorms on buildings and 
infrastructure; atmospheric science research and data collection; and 
risk assessment tools and mitigation techniques.
    The original authorization for NWIRP expired in 2008. Although some 
work in these agencies has continued, it is difficult to determine the 
total spending on current wind-hazard reduction measures across these 
agencies. H.R. 1786 improves public transparency for how much money is 
being spent on windstorm research, establishes NIST as the lead agency 
for the program, and improves coordination and planning of agency 
activities in a fiscally responsible manner.I want to thank Randy 
Neugebauer for his focus on this valuable research area, and I look 
forward to moving forward on this legislation.

    Ms. Wilson. Thank you, Mr. Chairman----
    Chairman Bucshon. You are welcome.
    Ms. Wilson [continuing]. For holding this markup to 
reauthorize the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program, 
known as NWIRP. The reauthorization of this program is timely 
after the deadly destruction we have seen in places like Texas 
and Oklahoma. Every year, severe winds from hurricanes, 
tornadoes, and thunderstorms damage or destroy thousands of 
homes and businesses, harm vital infrastructure, and most 
importantly, threaten human life. NWIRP has the potential to 
lessen the loss of life and economic damage by translating 
research and development on the understanding of windstorms and 
their impacts and to improve building codes and emergency 
planning.
    While it is apparent that the need for this program is 
great, it is regrettable that the Majority has decided to mark 
up this legislation without a detailed examination of the 
program.
    The Subcommittee held one hearing on this program. During 
that hearing, which included only outside stakeholders, all the 
witnesses expressed their concern that the NWIRP program was 
significantly underfunded. After hearing the concern that the 
program is underfunded, the Subcommittee should have held a 
hearing with witnesses from NWIRP Federal agencies. That 
hearing would have given Subcommittee Members the opportunity 
to ask NWIRP agencies about how they are implementing the 
program, what activities are being prioritized, and what 
activities are not being addressed, and what level of resource 
that the agencies need to fully implement the program. Without 
that hearing, we do not have the information we need to 
reauthorize this program.
    A single NWIRP agency has informally told us that in 2012, 
they spent more money than this bill authorizes for all four 
NWIRP agencies combined. It is regrettable that my colleagues 
up on the other side of the aisle would make significant cuts 
to the program without hearing from the federal agencies. In 
fact, the Committee has not heard from a federal witness about 
NWIRP program for five years. I would like to point out that 
during these five years, over 1,000 Americans have lost lives 
due to windstorms, and the Federal Government has spent over 
$136 billion on disaster relief and recovery. If this 
Subcommittee had held additional hearings with federal 
witnesses, it might have been possible for the Subcommittees to 
work on a bipartisan bill to reauthorize the program with any 
necessary programmatic changes needed, and with proper 
authorization levels.
    Further, it is not clear to me that the Majority has worked 
with other House Committees that share jurisdiction over the 
agencies in this bill. This is especially troubling for FEMA. 
In Mr. Neugebauer's bill--2004 bill, FEMA was authorized at 
$8.7 million. In the bill we are marking up today, FEMA is 
authorized at just $2 million.
    In a time when destruction and windstorms are becoming more 
frequent, I would think FEMA, the NWIRP agency tasked with 
taking the research conducted at the other agencies and 
developing mitigation techniques and public outreach, would 
need additional, rather than reduced, authorization levels.
    Finally, I am not sure if the Majority has talked or worked 
with their Senate counterparts on this bill. If the goal is to 
enact this legislation so that the program can be reauthorized, 
it would be helpful to work with the other body of Congress.
    I would like to end by saying that in the past, this 
Committee has taken a more comprehensive approach to hazards by 
marking up NWIRP, along with the National Earthquake Hazards 
Reduction Program. It makes sense to move these interagency 
programs together, which is why I introduced the National 
Hazards Risk Reduction Act of 2013 that would reauthorize both 
the NWIRP and the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction 
Programs.
    While severe weather has dominated the headlines recently, 
we should not overlook the significant risks associated with 
earthquakes. I will be supporting my colleague's amendment that 
addresses this issue.
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman, and I yield back that balance of 
my time.
    [The prepared statement of Ms. Wilson follows:]

 Prepared Statement of Subcommittee Ranking Member Frederica S. Wilson

    Thank you, Mr. Chairman for holding today's markup to reauthorize 
the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program, or NWIRP.
    The reauthorization of this program is timely after the deadly 
destruction we have seen in places like Texas and Oklahoma. Every year, 
severe winds from hurricanes, tornadoes, and thunderstorms damage or 
destroy thousands of homes and businesses, harm vital infrastructure, 
and, most importantly, threaten human life.
    NWIRP has the potential to lessen the loss of life and economic 
damage by translating research and development on the understanding of 
windstorms and their impacts into improved building codes and emergency 
planning.
    While it is apparent that the need for this program is great, it is 
regrettable that the Majority has decided to mark up this legislation 
without a detailed examination of the program.
    The Subcommittee held one hearing on this program. During that 
hearing--which included only outside stakeholders--all the witnesses 
expressed their concern that the NWIRP program was significantly 
underfunded.
    After hearing the concerns that the program is underfunded, the 
Subcommittee should have held a hearing with witnesses from the NWIRP 
federal agencies. That hearing would have given Subcommittee Members 
the opportunity to ask NWIRP agencies about how they are implementing 
the program, what activities are being prioritized, what activities are 
not being addressed, and what level of resources the agencies need to 
fully implement the program.
    Without that hearing, we do not have the information we need to 
reauthorize this program. A single NWIRP agency has informally told us 
that in 2012 they spent more money than this bill authorizes for all 
four NWIRP agencies combined. It is regrettable that my colleagues on 
the other side of the aisle would make significant cuts to the program 
without hearing from the federal agencies first.
    In fact, the Committee has not heard from a federal witness about 
the NWIRP program for five years. I would like to point out that during 
those five years, over a thousand Americans have lost their lives due 
to windstorms and the Federal Government has spent over $136 billion in 
disaster relief and recovery.
    If the Subcommittee had held additional hearings with federal 
witnesses, it might have been possible for the Subcommittee to work on 
a bipartisan bill to reauthorize the NWIRP program with any necessary 
programmatic changes needed and with proper authorization levels.
    But that is not what the Majority decided to do. Instead, we are 
holding a markup this morning without hearing from the federal agencies 
involved in the program. That means that we are marking up this bill 
without a clear understanding of how the NWIRP program is working and 
what the appropriate authorization levels are for the federal agencies 
involved.
    Further, it is not clear to me that the Majority has worked with 
the other House Committees that share jurisdiction over the agencies in 
this bill. This is especially troubling for FEMA. In Mr. Neugebauer's 
2004 bill, FEMA was authorized at $8.7 million for their NWIRP 
activities. In the bill we are marking up today, FEMA is authorized at 
just $2 million.
    In a time where destructive windstorms are becoming more frequent, 
I would think FEMA--the NWIRP agency tasked with taking the research 
conducted at the other agencies and developing mitigation techniques 
and public outreach--would need additional, rather than reduced, 
authorization levels.
    Finally, I am not sure if the Majority has talked or worked with 
their Senate counterparts on this bill. If the goal is to enact this 
legislation so the NWIRP program can be reauthorized, it would be 
helpful to work with the other body of Congress.
    It is unfortunate that the Majority decided to move this bill to a 
markup before holding the hearings that would have provided the 
Committee Members with the information needed to properly mark up this 
legislation.
    I would like to end by saying that in the past this Committee has 
taken a more comprehensive approach to hazards by marking up NWIRP 
along with the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program or NEHRP 
program. It makes sense to move these interagency programs together, 
which is why I introduced the Natural Hazards Risk Reduction Act of 
2013 that would reauthorize both the NWIRP and NEHRP programs. While 
severe weather has dominated the headlines recently, we should not 
overlook the significant risk associated with earthquakes. I will be 
supporting my colleague's amendment that addresses this issue.

    Chairman Bucshon. Thank you, Ms. Wilson.
    Pursuant to Committee Rule 2(f) and House Rule XI 2(h)(4), 
the Chair announces that he may postpone role call votes on 
matters in which the yeas and nays were ordered.
    Pursuant to notice, I now call up H.R. 1786 for markup. The 
clerk will report the bill.
    The Clerk. H.R. 1786, to authorize the National Windstorm 
Impact Reduction Program, and for other purposes. Be it enacted 
by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States 
of America and Congress assembled----
    [H.R. 1786 appears in Appendix I]
    Chairman Bucshon. Without objection, the bill is considered 
as read.
    I recognize myself for a short period.
    As I said in my opening statement, I think this is 
important to reauthorize this piece of legislation as it 
relates to wind damage across the country.
    Is there any further discussion of the bill? Seeing none, 
without objection I ask unanimous consent that the bill is 
considered as read and open to amendment at any point, and that 
Members proceed with amendments in the order listed on the 
roster. So ordered.
    The first amendment on the roster is an amendment offered 
by the gentlelady from Connecticut, Ms. Esty. The clerk shall 
report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 1786 offered by Ms. Esty of 
Connecticut. Page 1, line----
    [The amendment of Ms. Esty appears in Appendix I]
    Chairman Bucshon. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading. Without objection, so ordered.
    I now recognize Ms. Esty for five minutes to explain the 
amendment.
    Ms. Esty. Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman, and I would 
like to thank the Ranking Member as well for their holding of 
the Subcommittee markup.
    My amendment is very simple. It would define lifelines, 
which is a term that is used four times in this bill. The 
definition I am offering is not controversial. It is focused on 
infrastructure and has even passed previously in Earthquakes 
Hazards Reduction Program.
    During the hearing on this bill at the beginning of June, I 
asked the witnesses to explain the importance of infrastructure 
resiliency in mitigating the effects of storms. Dr. David 
Prevatt highlighted the importance of lifelines and told this 
Subcommittee that resilience and sustainability are hallmarks 
of what is being done in civil engineering. He explained that 
we need to understand the structural properties of the 
buildings, the infrastructure, and the utilities in order to 
mitigate the damage of these storms.
    Adding this definition will improve the bill and provide 
the interagency Coordinating Committee on Windstorm Impact 
Reduction specific directions on the most important research 
topics. This amendment will help that Committee and the 
involved agencies work effectively and efficiently toward the 
goal of reducing the impact of storms on our infrastructure.
    In particular, I can speak about the damage that we 
sustained in Connecticut, not from tornadoes, but from 
Hurricane Irene and Super Storm Sandy. In our case, the 
extensive damage really was to utilities and that severely 
impacted the resiliency of our communities, including at one 
point we have had lines down for 10 days or two weeks. This is 
dangerous for our citizens and extremely important that we 
pursue this important research.
    I urge you to support my amendment, and I reserve the 
balance of my time.
    Chairman Bucshon. I thank the gentlelady for her amendment. 
I agree that it is appropriate to add the definition of 
lifelines to the bill, and I believe this amendment strengthens 
the bill. I urge my colleagues to support the amendment.
    Is there any further discussion on the amendment?
    Ms. Wilson. Mr. Chair.
    Chairman Bucshon. Recognize Ms. Wilson.
    Ms. Wilson. I would just like to thank the gentlewoman from 
Connecticut for her clarifying amendment, and urge my 
colleagues to support this bill.
    My colleague's amendment would assure that this bill 
includes a comprehensive definition of lifelines. This is a 
common-sense amendment, and we should all support its adoption.
    Thank you, Mr. Chair.
    Chairman Bucshon. Is there any further discussion on the 
amendment? Hearing none, the vote occurs on the Esty amendment. 
All those in favor, say aye. Those opposed, say no. The ayes 
have it and the amendment is agreed to.
    The next amendment on the roster is an amendment offered by 
the gentlelady from Florida, Ms. Wilson. The clerk shall report 
the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 1786 offered by Ms. Wilson of 
Florida.
    Chairman Bucshon. I ask the unanimous consent to dispense 
with the reading. Without objection, so ordered.
    Chair recognizes Ms. Wilson for five minutes to explain her 
amendment.
    Ms. Wilson. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    This amendment I am offering today simply states that if 
sufficient funds are not given to NWIRP agencies to implement 
the program, then the NWIRP agencies won't be forced to fulfill 
all the requirements of the Act.
    At the only hearing the Subcommittee held on NWIRP, all the 
outside experts expressed concern that the program was 
significantly underfunded. Instead of marking up a bill today 
that would provide the agencies with the funding necessary to 
undertake all the activities and responsibilities assigned by 
Congress, we are marking up a bill that cuts the authorization 
for NWIRP. I cannot support a bill that cuts the program. My 
Republican colleagues are moving a bill that would cut the 
authorization levels by 14.5 percent below the levels they put 
in place for FY 2008. It is not as if we are facing fewer wind-
related disasters. Our Nation is still recovering from a deadly 
and incredibly destructive tornado season. We are bracing for a 
hurricane season that NOAA predicts will be active or extremely 
active. As a Floridian who survived Hurricane Andrew, I am 
worried about an active hurricane season that could wreak havoc 
across my home State.
    In a time of increased windstorms, I would think we would 
be marking up a bill that would give the agencies the resources 
they need to fully implement the program so that they can 
achieve the goal of improving our understanding of windstorms 
and lessen the impacts of these events. It is not just that the 
bill we are marking up this morning cuts the agencies, but it 
does so without cutting any of the agencies' responsibilities. 
Between our budgetary situation and the sequestration cuts, it 
is unrealistic to expect the agencies to implement this program 
without providing them with the necessary resources. My 
colleagues have to accept that they cannot have it both ways. 
We cannot continue to cut and cut an agency's budget and still 
expect them to fulfill all of the responsibilities we have 
given them. What this bill and that philosophy does is set up 
our agencies to fail, and we do not want them to fail. We must 
provide our agencies with the appropriate level of resources to 
conduct the activities that we ask them to do.
    I wish that the Subcommittee would have held additional 
hearings with federal witnesses so that the Members could have 
had the opportunity to ask questions about the elements of the 
program and how they are being implemented. What are the 
priority areas and what level of resources the agencies need to 
fully implement the program? Without having that information, I 
cannot, in good conscience, support a bill that cuts funding 
without providing the agencies with the flexibility on 
implementing the requirements of the Act if they do not have 
the appropriate resources. I would have preferred to offer an 
amendment this morning that would provide the agencies in the 
program with the right authorization level, but without having 
the opportunity to hear from federal witnesses, I am instead 
offering an amendment that simply gives them flexibility.
    I urge the adoption of this simple amendment, and yield 
back the balance of my time.
    Chairman Bucshon. Thank you. I thank the gentlelady for her 
amendment.
    This amendment would allow the agencies of NWIRP to 
determine if they have enough resources to conduct the 
Congressionally mandated activities of the program. It is the 
responsibility of Congress to determine the funding adequate 
with agencies' delegated responsibilities, and while these are 
tight budget times, it is still up to Congress to set 
priorities for how the American taxpayer dollars are spent by 
federal agencies. The NWIRP program was discussed during our 
hearing with the Director of NIST, and we did discuss funding, 
and this staff said the authorization amounts were adequate.
    The bill before us reauthorizes the agencies' activities 
that they have been performing for some time, but in a more 
efficient and transparent manner. H.R. 1786 makes certain that 
these agencies continue to conduct the important research and 
development necessary to ensure that our communities are as 
prepared as possible for wind-related hazards. I oppose the 
gentlelady's amendment and urge my colleagues to oppose it as 
well.
    Is there further discussion on the amendment? Hearing none, 
the vote occurs on the Wilson amendment. All those in favor, 
say aye. Those opposed, say no. In the opinion of the Chair, 
the nos have it and the amendment is not agreed to.
    The next amendment on the roster is an amendment offered by 
the gentleman from California, Mr. Peters. The clerk shall 
report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 1786 offered by Mr. Peters of 
California. At the end of the bill, add the following----
    Chairman Bucshon. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading. Without objection, so ordered.
    The Chair recognizes Mr. Peters for five minutes to explain 
his amendment.
    Mr. Peters. Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman.
    The amendment I am offering today authorizes the National 
Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program by adding Title 1 of Ms. 
Wilson's National Risk Reduction Act of 2013 to the bill under 
consideration this morning. The amendment also updates the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology's, or NIST's, 
statute to ensure that the agency conducts research 
specifically on fires occurring in the wildland-urban 
interface.
    Although infrequent, earthquakes are unique among natural 
hazards in that they strike without warning. While areas like 
my State of California, in addition to Oregon, Washington, and 
Alaska, are the most well-known areas for earthquakes, 
earthquakes are not a hazard that is confined to the West 
Coast. In fact, it is estimated that 75 million Americans in 39 
States, and I note in the District of Columbia, where we 
enjoyed an earthquake recently, are exposed to significant 
seismic risk, with nearly all States in the U.S. having some 
level of risk.
    Additionally, the severity of the U.S. fire problem has 
grown, and the amount of damage caused by fires at the 
wildland-urban interface has risen. In fact, last year we saw 
more than 9.3 million acres burn across the United States, an 
area larger than the States of Delaware, Rhode Island, and 
Connecticut combined. In my State of California, there have 
been more than 3,000 wildfires this year alone. As my 
colleagues are aware, fire season has started early this year 
and unfortunately, the number of destructive fires, the costs 
to contain them, and the damage caused will grow. Several years 
ago, the Cedar fire and Witch Creek fire devastated the 
northern communities of the City of San Diego and Poway, 
Scripps Ranch and Rancho Bernardo, as well as Tierrasanta. As a 
San Diego City Council member at the time, I remember firsthand 
the destructive impact of these fires on people's lives. 
Together, these fires destroyed thousands of homes, personal 
belongings and memories, and recovery costs were in the 
billions of dollars.
    We need to adopt better preparedness measures. We can't 
prevent natural disasters, but we can do more to lessen the 
cost to human life and property.
    Over the last two years, the Federal Government has spent 
more than $136 billion on relief for hurricanes, tornadoes, 
droughts, wildfires, and other extreme weather events. It is 
time that the government stops working in a reactive way to 
natural disasters and instead gets to work efficiently helping 
States and localities find the best steps to prepare for, plan 
for, and more quickly recover from these events.
    We know that for every dollar we spend now on resiliency we 
can avoid at least $4 in future losses. It makes more sense to 
approach this by thinking how we can make the U.S. better 
prepared and not just--United States better prepared, and not 
just certain areas. Natural disasters affect every State and 
region of the United States, and some places experience more 
than one type of hazard. So if we are focused on reducing 
spending, let's do it in a way that saves us more money in the 
long run, and that is a comprehensive approach.
    One of the witnesses at the Subcommittee hearing on risk 
reduction, Dr. Prevatt, stated in his testimony that it is 
important to consider the broader area of hazards mitigation. 
He went on to urge the Science Committee to not only 
reauthorize Windstorm Risk Reduction Program, but also to 
include the reauthorization of Earthquake Risk Reduction and 
other programs as part of a broader hazards bill. My amendment 
implements the doctor's recommendation by ensuring the 
legislation is focused on multiple hazards.
    As my colleagues may know, the reauthorization of these 
risk reduction programs is long overdue. The authorization for 
this important program expired in 2009. These are interagency 
programs that improve our understanding of earthquake phenomena 
and the potential impacts of earthquakes on our communities and 
turns that knowledge into mitigation and outreach activities 
that will save lives and reduce economic damages.
    Mr. Chairman, it is also important to note that when 
Congress first legislated a Windstorm Risk Reduction Program in 
2004, it did so by combining the program with legislation that 
was amending the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977. This 
demonstrates a long history that Congress has had in moving 
these important programs together, and in fact, over the last 
two Congresses, the Committee has moved these programs in a 
single bill.
    The types of hazards and risks that a community is exposed 
to depends on where the community is located. For my 
constituents, earthquakes and fires pose a greater threat. Mr. 
Chairman, my goal is the same as the author of this bill, to 
decrease the vulnerability of communities in my district. I am 
hopeful that we can adopt the amendment and broaden the scope 
of hazards covered in this bill. It would be unfortunate if the 
Committee prioritized one type of hazard over another, because 
at the end of the day, all of these programs will lead to a 
more resilient America, saving lives, property, and taxpayer 
money.
    I am focused on lowering spending, and we can do it in a 
pragmatic way that lessens the cost to human life and property. 
I urge adoption of this common-sense amendment. Thank you for 
my colleagues' attention, and I yield the balance of my time.
    Chairman Bucshon. I appreciate the gentleman's amendment. 
This amendment would add two additional hazards to the bill by 
reauthorizing the National Earthquake Hazards Program and 
amending the Fire Research Program. We can recognize that the 
Committee has previously marked up the Windstorm Program as 
part of a combined multi-hazard bill. However, these are 
distinct hazards, and windstorms are a Committee priority, 
given the multitude of wind hazard-related tragedies this year. 
Wind hazard mitigation research and development has not 
received the focus and dedicated funding it should, and this 
bill will work to get the program's activities back on track to 
achieve meaningful results.
    However, I also recognize the importance of earthquake 
hazards and the need for fire hazard research, and we intend to 
address these programs in this Congress. Would the gentleman 
consider withdrawing his amendment and agree to work with other 
Members on an earthquakes and fire hazards measure separately?
    Mr. Peters. Mr. Chairman, with your commitment that we will 
do that important work in the future, I would be willing to do 
so.
    Chairman Bucshon. Thank you, Mr. Peters. I look forward to 
working with you and other Committee Members on this very 
important issue.
    Are there any further amendments? Hearing none--okay, 
hearing none and reporting quorum being present, the question 
is on the bill H.R. 1786 as amended. Those in favor, say aye. 
Opposed, no. The ayes have it and the bill is agreed to.
    Without objection, the Motion to Reconsider is laid upon 
the table. I move that the bill H.R. 1786, as amended, be 
favorably reported to the Full Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology and the staff be authorized to make any necessary 
technical and conforming changes. Without objection, so 
ordered.
    If there is no further discussion, that completes our 
business. This concludes the Subcommittee markup. The 
Subcommittee on Research and Technology stands adjourned.
    [Whereupon, at 9:31 a.m., the Subcommittee was adjourned.]
                               Appendix I

                              ----------                              


 H.R. 1786, NATIONAL WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION ACT REAUTHORIZATION OF 
                                  2013

          Memorandum, Section-by-Section Analysis, Amendments

                            Amendment Roster






                               Memorandum



                     Section-by-Section Analysis of

 H.R. 1786, NATIONAL WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION ACT REAUTHORIZATION OF 
                                  2013

Section 1. Short Title

    This section establishes the short title as the ``National 
Windstorm Impact Reduction Reauthorization Act of 2013.''

Section 2. Definitions

    This section amends the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act of 
2004 to define the ``Director'' of the Program as the Director of the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) rather than the 
Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy 
(OSTP).

Section 3. National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program

    This section identifies the four agencies that make up the National 
Windstorm Impact Reduction Program (NWIRP): NIST, the National Science 
Foundation (NSF), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 
(NOAA), and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA); defines 
NIST as the lead program agency; and assigns responsibilities to the 
four program agencies.
    As the new lead agency, NIST's activities include planning and 
coordinating the Program; supporting the development of performance-
based engineering tools; requesting the assistance of Federal agencies 
other than Program agencies as necessary; coordinating all Federal 
post-windstorm investigations; and issuing recommendations to assist in 
informing model codes when warranted by research or investigative 
findings. In addition to the lead agency responsibilities, NIST shall 
also conduct research and development to improve model building codes, 
voluntary standards, and best practices for the design, construction, 
and retrofit of buildings, structures, and lifelines.
    NSF activities include research in engineering and the atmospheric 
sciences to improve the understanding of the behavior of windstorms and 
their impact on buildings, structures, and lifelines.
    NOAA activities include the support of atmospheric science research 
to improve the understanding of the behavior of windstorms and their 
impact on buildings, structures, and lifelines.
    FEMA activities include the development of risk assessment tools 
and effective mitigation techniques; data collection and analysis; and 
public outreach, information dissemination, and implementation of 
mitigation measures.
    Additionally, this section creates an Interagency Coordinating 
Committee on Windstorm Impact Reduction. The Committee is chaired by 
the Director of NIST and is made up of the heads of FEMA, NOAA, NSF, 
OSTP, the Office of Management and the Budget (OMB), and the head of 
any other Federal agency the Chair considers appropriate. The Committee 
is to meet not less than two times a year and is tasked with developing 
and submitting to Congress a strategic plan, progress report, and 
coordinated budget for the Program.

Section 4. National Advisory Committee on Windstorm Impact Reduction

    This section amends the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act of 
2004 to reauthorize and update an existing Advisory Committee for NWIRP 
of at least 7 relevant non-Federal employee experts to offer 
recommendations and assessments on program developments, priorities, 
coordination, and revisions as necessary. This section requires the 
Advisory Committee to report to the Director of NIST on the assessment 
and its recommendations at least every two years. The authority for the 
Advisory Committee terminates on September 30, 2016.

Section 5. Authorization of Appropriations

        This section provides authorizations of appropriations as 
        follows:

      For FEMA: $2,000,000 for each fiscal year 2014 through 
2016.
      For NSF: $11,400,000 for each fiscal year 2014 through 
2016.
      For NIST: $5,500,000 for each fiscal year 2014 through 
2016.
      For NOAA: $2,500,000 for each fiscal year 2014 through 
2016.
                               Amendments



                            Amendment Roster



                              Appendix II

                              ----------                              


                   Additional Material for the Record




  Submitted statement of Full Committee Ranking Member Eddie Bernice 
                                Johnson

    Thank you, Mr. Chairman. This morning, we are considering 
legislation to reauthorize the National Windstorm Impact Reduction 
Program, or NWIRP. This is an important program that can reduce the 
vulnerability of our communities to natural disasters.
    As we've seen over the last few years, the need is great. 2011 was 
the deadliest and most destructive tornado season in U.S. history. 
Hurricane Sandy caused over $65 billion dollars in damages in 2012. And 
this year, massive tornadoes in Oklahoma and in my state of Texas have 
resulted in the deaths of more than 30 people.
    We should be building stronger and safer communities before a 
disaster occurs, not after. However, all of the witnesses testifying 
before this Subcommittee stated that NWIRP is underfunded and that we 
are missing opportunities to implement low-cost mitigation measures.
    That's why I am concerned about the authorization levels in H.R. 
1786. They just don't make sense. The bill cuts the program by 14 
percent from the levels included in Mr. Neugebauer's 2004 bill that 
created the programnearly a decade ago. It also cuts the program below 
current spending.
    I don't understand what my colleagues are trying to accomplish 
here. They talk about how the program can help protect lives, reduce 
property losses, and save the taxpayers money, but then they go and cut 
the program. I don't believe the need for the program has lessened. I 
actually believe it has grown, and so do the witnesses who have 
testified before our Committee.
    I understand that the budgetary situation has changed, but 
shouldn't that make it even more important to invest in mitigation 
activities? According to a study by FEMA, for every dollar we invest in 
pre-disaster mitigation, we save four dollars in disaster recovery.
    The concern is not just that my Republican colleagues are cutting 
the program, but that they are doing so without cutting any of the 
responsibilities assigned by Congress. This just sets the NWIRP 
agencies up to fail.
    Mr. Chairman, we haven't had a hearing since 2008 that included any 
of the federal agencies involved in this program. That was five years 
ago. We don't know how sequestration has impacted the NWIRP-related 
activities of these agencies. We don't know what activities the 
agencies are prioritizing and what areas of the program they are not 
implementing.
    We also do not have a good sense of the amount of money each of the 
agencies needs to fulfill its role in the program.
    I suggest that we take a step back and seek input from the NWIRP 
agencies before we move forward with this bill. I believe this 
Committee has an important role to play in minimizing the number of 
Americans who are harmed or killed by natural disasters or who have to 
face the challenge of rebuilding their homes, businesses, and 
communities. I'm sure that the sponsors of this legislation are well 
intentioned; we need to make sure we get it right--the stakes are too 
high to do otherwise.


                XXIII. PROCEEDINGS OF THE FULL COMMITTEE
                          MARKUP ON H.R. 1786,
                NATIONAL WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION ACT
                        REAUTHORIZATION OF 2013

                              ----------                              


                       FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2014

                  House of Representatives,
        Committee on Science, Space, and Technology
                                           Washington, D.C.


    The Committee met, pursuant to call, at 10:06 a.m., in Room 
2318 of the Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Lamar Smith 
[Chairman of the Committee] presiding.
    Chairman Smith. The Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology will come to order. Without objection, the Chair is 
authorized to declare recesses of the Committee at any time, 
and pursuant to Committee Rule 2(f) and House Rule XI 2(h)(4), 
the Chair announces that he may postpone roll call votes, but I 
hope that is not necessary.
    Today, we consider H.R. 1786, the National Windstorm Impact 
Reduction Act Reauthorization of 2013. I am going to, without 
objection, put my opening statement into the record because we 
are expecting votes at 10:40 today and I would like to complete 
the markup by that time.
    Before recognizing the ranking member for her opening 
statement, I do want to thank the gentleman from Texas, Mr. 
Neugebauer, for his long and hard work on this particular piece 
of legislation, and he has gotten a great assist from the 
gentlewoman from Florida, Ms. Wilson, as well. So we appreciate 
their efforts. This is a very good product and a great piece of 
legislation that is going to help a lot of people.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Smith follows:]
               Prepared Statement of Chairman Lamar Smith

    Today we consider H.R. 1786, the National Windstorm Impact 
Reduction Act Reauthorization of 2013, introduced by my Texas 
colleague, Congressman Randy Neugebauer.
    I thank Mr. Neugebauer and the gentlewoman from Florida, Ms. 
Frederica Wilson, for their work to draft a bipartisan amendment that 
strengthens this bill.
    H.R. 1786 reauthorizes the activities of the National Windstorm 
Impact Reduction Program (NWIRP). This important program supports 
federal research and development efforts to help mitigate the loss of 
life and property due to wind related hazards.
    Millions of Americans live in areas vulnerable to hurricanes, 
tornadoes and other windstorms.
    In Texas, we are all too familiar with the harm that wind can 
cause. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration's storm prediction center, 179 tornadoes and 1,586 
windstorms were reported in Texas in the last two years.
    Windstorms take American lives, destroy homes and businesses, and 
cause billions of dollars of damage around the United States. The 
effects of these disasters can be felt for years.
    Since 2004, the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program has 
supported activities to improve our understanding of windstorms and 
their impacts. It also has helped develop and encourage the 
implementation of cost-effective mitigation measures.
    H.R. 1786 improves public transparency for how much money is being 
spent on windstorm research, establishes the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology as the lead agency for the program and 
improves coordination and planning of agency activities in a fiscally 
responsible manner.
    This bill and the Manager's Amendment also address some of the 
funding uncertainty we have faced as we worked through the legislative 
process.
    The bill requires each NWIRP [N-werp] agency to add details about 
NWIRP [N-werp] programs and spending to its annual budget requests to 
Congress. It also requires the Interagency Coordinating Committee to 
develop a budget.
    These changes will provide us with a better representation and 
understanding of the real work that goes into this program in time for 
the next reauthorization.
    I want to thank Representative Neugebauer for his continued efforts 
in support of NWIRP [N-werp]. I am happy we are able to come together 
in a bipartisan manner today to support this important program.

    Chairman Smith. With that, I will recognize the Ranking 
Member, Ms. Johnson, the gentlewoman from Texas.
    Ms. Johnson. Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman, and I want 
you to make a record of this: I am a copycat. I am going to 
move to put my opening statement in the record so we can get to 
business.
    [The prepared statement of Ms. Johnson follows:]
       Prepared Statement of Ranking Member Eddie Bernice Johnson

    Thank you, Chairman Smith. This morning we are considering 
legislation to reauthorize the National Windstorm Impact Reduction 
Program--or NWIRP.
    The last few years have been devastating years for natural 
disasters across the country. According to the National Weather 
Service, severe weather has caused an average of 278 fatalities and 
over 24 billion dollars of property damage per year, over the last 10 
years. Hurricane Ike, which made landfall in my state of Texas in 2008, 
was responsible for over a hundred deaths and tens of billions of 
dollars in damages. Last year, there were massive tornadoes across the 
Midwest, including in Moore, Oklahoma, that resulted in loss of life 
and significant economic losses. And, Hurricane Irene in 2011 and 
Superstorm Sandy in 2012 caused widespread destruction and death along 
the Eastern seaboard.
    NWIRP is an important program that can reduce the vulnerability of 
our communities to natural disasters. This program can help us build 
stronger and safer communities before a disaster occurs rather than 
after. When we discussed this bill at the Subcommittee, the Members on 
my side of the aisle raised some concerns about the bill. I shared 
those concerns. I think it is important that we authorize the NWIRP 
agencies adequately, allow room for the program to grow, and include 
social science research in the program.
    I am pleased that the process of getting from Subcommittee to Full 
Committee today was a fair, productive and bipartisan process and I 
want to thank Chairman Smith and Mr. Neugebauer for working with us to 
address some of our concerns with the legislation. The manager's 
amendment addresses many of our concerns. It includes an increase to 
the FEMA authorization level. FEMA is the NWIRP agency tasked with 
taking the research conducted at other agencies and developing 
mitigation techniques and public outreach. It is important to ensure 
that they have the resources they need to be effective.
    The manager's amendment also ensures that social science research 
plays an important role in windstorm preparation and mitigation. Often 
in a compromise, like this one, you do not get everything you would 
like. I would have liked to see increases in the authorization levels 
across the board. This bill includes a lower total authorization level 
than what was authorized for this program in Fiscal Year 2008.
    When the last few years have been devastating years for 
windstorms--including Superstorm Sandy and the tornado outbreak last 
May that struck parts of Texas and Oklahoma--it is difficult to 
understand why we would cut the total authorization level for this 
important program. I also would have liked to see room for the program 
to grow. Unfortunately, this bill includes flat authorization levels. 
At the legislative hearing we held on this bill back in June, more than 
one witness expressed concern about NWIRP being underfunded.
    However, this Committee has an important role to play in making 
sure agencies and communities have the resources and tools to minimize 
the loss of life and property by windstorms or to face the challenge of 
rebuilding their homes, businesses, and communities after a major 
windstorm. And reauthorizing NWIRP helps us do that.
    I want to thank my fellow Texans--Chairman Smith and Mr. 
Neugebauer--for working across the aisle on this bill. This process 
reminds me of how this Committee used to work on a regular basis. It is 
good to see Members coming together, working out their differences, 
compromising, and ending up with a bill with bipartisan support. I hope 
we can continue in this vein as we take up other, significant 
legislation in the coming months, including reauthorizing the National 
Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program.
    Finally, I want to thank Majority and Minority Committee staff, and 
personal office staff who have worked on this agreement. Mr. Chairman, 
I support the manager's amendment and the underlying bill as amended 
and I urge my colleagues to do the same.
    Thank you, and I yield back the balance of my time.

    Chairman Smith. Thank you very much for that. Without 
objection, the Ranking Member's--oh, you get spontaneous 
applause out of that one--statement is entered.
    Chairman Smith. Pursuant to notice, I now call up H.R. 
1786, the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act 
Reauthorization of 2013, which was introduced by Representative 
Neugebauer and amended by the Subcommittee on Research and 
Technology, and the clerk will report the bill.
    The Clerk. H.R. 1786, as amended by the Subcommittee on 
Research and Technology on June 28, 2013. Section 1----
    Chairman Smith. Without objection, the bill will be 
considered as read.
    [H.R. 1786 appears in Appendix I]
    Chairman Smith. The gentleman from Texas, Mr. Neugebauer, 
is recognized for his comments on the bill.
    Mr. Neugebauer. Thank you, Mr. Chairman, for holding this 
markup today on H.R. 1786, the National Windstorm Impact 
Reduction Act Reauthorization.
    You know, one of the things that I learned firsthand in 
1970 is the devastation that can be caused by tornadoes. The 
apartment complex that I lived in in Lubbock, Texas, was 
destroyed by a fairly massive tornado we had then, and what 
that experience taught me was the tremendous damage that can be 
caused by these windstorms and tornadoes, but also the loss of 
life.
    And so one of the things that I am proud that this 
particular piece of legislation does is that it begins to 
prioritize, you know, how we begin to research the impacts, 
some of the things we can do to do mitigation from loss of life 
and property damage, and making sure that all of the agencies 
that have some jurisdiction in this work together.
    So in the interest of time, Mr. Chairman, I will be brief, 
and I think we have a Manager's Amendment as well.
    Chairman Smith. Thank you, Mr. Neugebauer.
    Are there other Members who wish to comment on the bill at 
this point?
    If not, we will go to the Manager's Amendment. Okay. We are 
going to the Manager's Amendment and then Members can comment 
on that if they want to.
    The first amendment to consider is a Manager's Amendment 
that is going to be offered by Mr. Neugebauer and Ms. Wilson, 
and the clerk will report the Manager's Amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 1786 offered by Mr. Neugebauer 
of Texas and Ms. Wilson of Florida. Page 1, line 3----
    [The amendment of Mr. Neugebauer and Ms. Wilson appears in 
Appendix I]
    Chairman Smith. Without objection, the amendment will be 
considered as read, and the gentleman from Texas and the 
gentlewoman from Florida will be recognized to comment on this 
bipartisan amendment.
    Mr. Neugebauer. Thank you, Mr. Chairman, and I want to 
particularly thank the Minority and Ms. Wilson for their 
cooperation on finding some common ground on this bill. This 
truly makes this a bipartisan bill, and I am pleased to have 
Ms. Wilson to be a cosponsor of this amendment.
    This amendment makes some corrections including adjustments 
to the authorization levels of the bill while maintaining the 
top-line authorization in the original bill.
    The other issue is that it brings some much-needed 
transparency in making sure that the agencies disclose the 
activities that they are actually requesting funding for. I 
think that gives us a better accountability and trackability of 
how these monies are being used, and so I look forward to 
working with my colleagues as we move this bill to the Floor.
    Again, I want to thank Ms. Wilson for the cooperation of 
her and her staff.
    Chairman Smith. Thank you, Mr. Neugebauer.
    The gentlewoman from Florida, Ms. Wilson, is recognized.
    Ms. Wilson. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I want to thank you 
for holding today's markup to reauthorize the National 
Windstorm Impact Reduction Program. I am pleased to join my 
colleague, Mr. Neugebauer, for introducing this Manager's 
Amendment and I urge my colleagues to support it.
    As a Floridian and survivor of Hurricane Andrew, I know 
firsthand that natural hazards are a leading threat to American 
lives and the economy. This Committee has an important role to 
play in helping Americans prepare for and recover from natural 
hazards. While we cannot stop a hurricane or a tornado from 
happening, we should do all that we can to make sure our 
communities have the tools they need to respond to and recover 
from such events.
    NWIRP has the potential to lessen the loss of life and 
economic damage by carrying out research on windstorms and 
their impacts and translating that research into development of 
improved building codes and emergency planning. NWIRP needs 
investment to reach that potential. We as a Nation must invest 
in preparedness and resilience. Studies of FEMA's pre-disaster 
mitigation program have shown that every dollar we invest, we 
save $3 to $4 in recovery costs.
    I am pleased to see an increase in the FEMA authorization 
level in the Manager's Amendment. FEMA is the NWIRP agency 
tasked with taking research conducted at other agencies in 
developing mitigation techniques and public outreach.
    I want to thank you, Mr. Chair, Representative Neugebauer 
and Committee staff for working to include a higher FEMA 
authorization level in the bill. I want to reiterate that it 
would have been helpful to have a hearing with witnesses from 
the NWIRP Federal agencies before moving the bill to a full 
Committee markup. That hearing would have given Members the 
opportunity to ask NWIRP agencies about program implementation 
and activities and what level of resources the agencies need. 
Nevertheless, I understand the need to reauthorize an important 
program that can minimize the number of Americans who are 
harmed or killed by windstorm disasters and reduce costs 
associated with the disaster recovery. That is why I am 
supporting this bipartisan Manager's Amendment and the 
underlying bill. I urge my colleagues to do the same.
    Finally, I want to thank Chairman Smith and Mr. Neugebauer 
for working with me across the aisle on this Manager's 
Amendment. This was a smooth and productive process, what I 
hope to see more of on this Committee.
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman, Ms. Ranking Member, and I yield 
back the balance of my time.
    Chairman Smith. Thank you, Ms. Wilson. We too hope for more 
smooth and productive pieces of legislation to be moved by the 
Committee.
    I do want to say that votes have now been moved up to as 
soon as 10:20, but are there any other Members who wish to be 
recognized on this Manager's Amendment?
    The gentleman from California, Mr. Peters, is recognized.
    Mr. Peters. Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the last word.
    I wanted to just confirm that we have an understanding that 
we will move forward to schedule a hearing on the National 
Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program in the Research and 
Technology Subcommittee after we have completed Committee 
consideration of the First Act, and that following the hearing 
we will work toward a bill to reauthorize that program.
    Coming from California where earthquakes have and will 
continue to be a significant threat to human life and 
infrastructure, I want to ensure that the Federal Government 
program to help mitigate loss from earthquakes is as strong as 
it can be and makes the most efficient use of resources. I know 
that we have Members on both sides of the aisle in our 
Committee who care about this program as well.
    I thank the chairman for a very good bipartisan process on 
the bill before us today, and I look forward to working with 
the chairman and my colleague from New York, Mr. Collins, on a 
similarly productive process to reauthorize----
    Chairman Smith. Will the gentleman yield?
    Mr. Peters. I will yield to the Chair.
    Chairman Smith. Thank you, Mr. Peters.
    I want to thank the gentleman from California for his 
interest in reauthorizing this bill. It is an important program 
that deserves this Committee's attention, and my intention is 
to schedule a hearing following the Committee's consideration 
of the First Act and I look forward to working with the 
gentleman from California on a bill to reauthorize NEHRP. I 
appreciate his comments.
    Are there any other Members who wish be heard on the 
Manager's Amendment? The gentleman from Illinois, Mr. Lipinski, 
is recognized.
    Mr. Lipinski. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I move to strike the 
last word.
    Chairman Smith. The gentleman is recognized for five 
minutes.
    Mr. Lipinski. I want to thank you and Mr. Neugebauer for 
working with us, especially Ms. Wilson, to continue to improve 
upon this bill to reauthorize NWIRP.
    There is still disagreement on the funding levels provided 
in the underlying text but I join Ranking Member Johnson in 
supporting the compromise arrived at in the Manager's 
Amendment. It is a good start, ensuring that FEMA has 
sufficient resources enabling us to revisit the adequacy of 
funding levels for this important program a bit sooner.
    I especially want to thank Mr. Neugebauer for working with 
us to ensure that this reauthorization of NWIRP addresses the 
important role that social science research plays in windstorm 
preparation and mitigation. Many of the fatalities and much of 
the damage in these storms could be prevented with more 
resilient structures, but strengthening our physical 
infrastructure is not sufficient to save lives. We need to make 
sure that people in the path of severe weather have accurate 
and easily understandable information about what is coming and 
how best to protect themselves and their families and that 
decision makers have both the information and the tools to make 
the best possible decisions.
    It may sound like a no-brainer that people in the path of a 
destructive windstorm will take appropriate shelter but decades 
of social science research tells us otherwise. A recent survey 
by the National Center for Disaster Preparedness found that 
most Americans are unprepared for a major disaster in that they 
have a false sense of security about what will happen if a 
major disaster occurs. More than half the families surveyed had 
no emergency plan in place for a hurricane or earthquake, and 
those who had such a plan lacked essential items to implement 
their plan.
    The Manager's Amendment ensures that people are a central 
part of our mitigation response and recovery activities by 
making certain that social science research is a part of the 
NWIRP program and that the results of such research are 
incorporated into outreach and implementation efforts. We can 
and must do more to increase the disaster resiliency of our 
communities. The social scientists have an essential role in 
those efforts, and I urge my colleagues to adopt this 
amendment.
    Thank you, Chairman, and I yield back the balance of my 
time.
    Chairman Smith. Thank you, Mr. Lipinski.
    Are there others who wish to be heard? The gentlewoman from 
Connecticut, Ms. Esty, is recognized.
    Ms. Esty. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I move to strike the 
last word.
    Mr. Chairman, I would like to thank you and Ranking Member 
Johnson for the leadership you have shown in moving this 
legislation forward in a bipartisan manner.
    This bill is particularly important because windstorms 
affect all 50 States. In Connecticut, we are still recovering 
from the devastating effects of Hurricane Sandy, which 
shattered communities and killed 285 people in the Northeast. 
Now more than ever, it is crucial that we do everything in our 
power to prevent these storms from taking more lives and 
wreaking more havoc. That is why I appreciate Subcommittee 
Chair Bucshon agreeing to accept my amendment, which would 
define the term ``lifelines'' and have added it to the bill.
    As we discussed in Subcommittee, adding this definition 
will improve the bill and provide the interagency Coordinating 
Committee on Windstorm Impact Reduction specific direction on 
the most important research topics. This addition will help 
improve--will help the involved agencies work effectively and 
efficiently towards the goal of reducing the impact of 
windstorms on our infrastructure.
    I thank the chairman for including my amendment in the 
version of the bill under consideration today, and I yield back 
my time, and it is under one minute.
    Chairman Smith. Thank you, Ms. Esty. I appreciate those 
comments.
    The gentlewoman from Oregon, Ms. Bonamici, is recognized.
    Ms. Bonamici. Thank you. I move to strike the last word.
    Chairman Smith. The gentlewoman is recognized for five 
minutes.
    Ms. Bonamici. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    Mr. Chairman, I would like to thank the Committee, the 
leadership on both sides of the aisle for bringing this piece 
of legislation forward.
    I just want to join in the comments made by Mr. Peters 
about the importance of also working on the National Earthquake 
Hazards Reduction Program, and I thank you, Mr. Chairman, for 
your commitment to do so later this session.
    So thank you again for your work, and I look forward to 
working as well on legislation that will affect the earthquake 
hazards. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Smith. Thank you, Ms. Bonamici.
    Are there any other Members who wish to be heard on the 
Manager's Amendment? If not, the question is on the Manager's 
Amendment by Mr. Neugebauer and Ms. Wilson.
    All in favor, say aye.
    Opposed, nay.
    The ayes have it, and the Manager's Amendment is agreed to.
    The gentleman from Florida, Mr. Grayson, is recognized for 
the purpose of offering an amendment.
    Mr. Grayson. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
    Chairman Smith. The clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment H.R. 1786 offered by Mr. Grayson of 
Florida, amendment number 002. Page----
    [The amendment of Mr. Grayson appears in Appendix I]
    Chairman Smith. Without objection, the amendment will be 
considered as read, and the gentleman from Florida, Mr. 
Grayson, is recognized to explain his amendment.
    Mr. Grayson. Mr. Chairman, the purpose of this amendment is 
to prevent conflicts of interest on the advisory committee by 
requiring recusal.
    I yield the balance of my time.
    Chairman Smith. Thank you, Mr. Grayson. I will be longer 
than you will in agreeing to your amendment.
    The gentleman's amendment will require members of the 
National Windstorm Advisory Committee to recuse themselves from 
a committee activity in which they have a financial interest, I 
support this amendment, but would like to continue to work with 
the gentleman between now and the House Floor on possible 
additional improvements.
    So I appreciate the gentleman offering the amendment.
    Is there further discussion on this amendment? If not, the 
vote is on the amendment.
    All in favor, say aye.
    Opposed, nay.
    The ayes have it, and the amendment is agreed to.
    Are there any other amendments? And if not, a reporting 
quorum being present, the question is on the bill H.R. 1786, as 
amended.
    Those in favor, say aye.
    Opposed, nay.
    The ayes have it, and the bill as amended is ordered 
reportedly favorably.
    Pursuant to Committee Rule 2(f) and House Rule XI 2(h)(4), 
without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid upon the 
table. I move that the bill, H.R. 1786, as amended, be 
favorably reported to the House and the staff be authorized to 
make any necessary technical and conforming changes. Without 
objection, so ordered.
    There being no further business, we stand adjourned. I want 
to thank all the Members for this great turnout for this 
markup, and appreciate your attention before votes.
    We stand adjourned.
    [Whereupon, at 10:22 a.m., the Committee was adjourned.]
                               Appendix I

                              ----------                              


 H.R. 1786, NATIONAL WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION ACT REAUTHORIZATION OF 
                                  2013

                Section-by-Section Analysis, Amendments

                            Amendment Roster





                     Section-by-Section Analysis of

 H.R. 1786, NATIONAL WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION ACT REAUTHORIZATION OF 
                                  2013

Section 1. Short Title

    This section establishes the short title as the ``National 
Windstorm Impact Reduction Reauthorization Act of 2013.''

Section 2. Definitions

    This section amends the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act of 
2004 to define the ``Director'' of the Program as the Director of the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) rather than the 
Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy 
(OSTP). This section also defines ``Lifelines'' to mean the public 
works and utilities, oil and gas pipelines, electrical power and 
communication facilities and infrastructure, and water supply and 
sewage treatment facilities.

Section 3. National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program

    This section identifies the four agencies that make up the National 
Windstorm Impact Reduction Program (NWIRP): NIST, the National Science 
Foundation (NSF), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 
(NOAA), and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA); defines 
NIST as the lead program agency; and assigns responsibilities to the 
four program agencies.
    As the new lead agency, NIST's activities include planning and 
coordinating the Program; supporting the development of performance-
based engineering tools; requesting the assistance of Federal agencies 
other than Program agencies as necessary; coordinating all Federal 
post-windstorm investigations; and issuing recommendations to assist in 
informing model codes when warranted by research or investigative 
findings. In addition to the lead agency responsibilities, NIST shall 
also conduct research and development to improve model building codes, 
voluntary standards, and best practices for the design, construction, 
and retrofit of buildings, structures, and lifelines.
    NSF activities include research in engineering and the atmospheric 
sciences to improve the understanding of the behavior of windstorms and 
their impact on buildings, structures, and lifelines.
    NOAA activities include the support of atmospheric science research 
to improve the understanding of the behavior of windstorms and their 
impact on buildings, structures, and lifelines.
    FEMA activities include the development of risk assessment tools 
and effective mitigation techniques; data collection and analysis; and 
public outreach, information dissemination, and implementation of 
mitigation measures.
    Additionally, this section creates an Interagency Coordinating 
Committee on Windstorm Impact Reduction. The Committee is chaired by 
the Director of NIST and is made up of the heads of FEMA, NOAA, NSF, 
OSTP, the Office of Management and the Budget (OMB), and the head of 
any other Federal agency the Chair considers appropriate. The Committee 
is to meet not less than two times a year and is tasked with developing 
and submitting to Congress a strategic plan, progress report, and 
coordinated budget for the Program.

Section 4. National Advisory Committee on Windstorm Impact Reduction

    This section amends the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act of 
2004 to reauthorize and update an existing Advisory Committee for NWIRP 
of at least seven relevant non-Federal employee experts to offer 
recommendations and assessments on program developments, priorities, 
coordination, and revisions as necessary. This section requires the 
Advisory Committee to report to the Director of NIST on the assessment 
and its recommendations at least every two years. The authority for the 
Advisory Committee terminates on September 30, 2016.

Section 5. Authorization of Appropriations

        This section provides authorizations of appropriations as 
        follows:

      For FEMA: $2,000,000 for each fiscal year 2014 through 
2016.
      For NSF: $11,400,000 for each fiscal year 2014 through 
2016.
      For NIST: $5,500,000 for each fiscal year 2014 through 
2016.
      For NOAA: $2,500,000 for each fiscal year 2014 through 
2016.
                               Amendments



                            Amendment Roster