H. Rept. 113-401 - 113th Congress (2013-2014)
April 04, 2014, As Reported by the Natural Resources Committee

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House Report 113-401 - TO REDESIGNATE MAMMOTH PEAK IN YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK AS ``MOUNT JESSIE BENTON FREMONT''

[House Report 113-401]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]


113th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     113-401

======================================================================



 
TO REDESIGNATE MAMMOTH PEAK IN YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK AS ``MOUNT JESSIE 
                            BENTON FREMONT''

                                _______
                                

   April 4, 2014.--Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be 
                                printed

                                _______
                                

 Mr. Hastings of Washington, from the Committee on Natural Resources, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 1192]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Natural Resources, to whom was referred 
the bill (H.R. 1192) to redesignate Mammoth Peak in Yosemite 
National Park as ``Mount Jessie Benton Fremont'', having 
considered the same, report favorably thereon without amendment 
and recommend that the bill do pass.

                          PURPOSE OF THE BILL

    The purpose of H.R. 1192 is to redesignate Mammoth Peak in 
Yosemite National Park as ``Mount Jessie Benton Fremont''.

                  BACKGROUND AND NEED FOR LEGISLATION

    H.R. 1192 would redesignate ``Mammoth Peak'' in Yosemite 
National Park as ``Mount Jessie Benton Fremont''. The peak is 
located at the northern end of the Kuna Crest, close to 
California State Route 120.
    Born on May 31, 1824, Jessie Benton Fremont was the 
daughter of U.S. Senator Thomas Hart Benton who was a leading 
proponent of the nation's westward expansion. In 1941, she 
married John C. Fremont, an American military officer, explorer 
and later, politician.
    Jessie Benton Fremont was a gifted writer and used her 
skill to transform her husband's travel and exploration 
descriptions into popular narratives that were used by pioneers 
to guide their route west. In 1849, she traveled to California 
to join her husband at their Mariposa ranch, later returning to 
the East Coast to actively support her husband's unsuccessful 
1856 presidential campaign.
    Mrs. Fremont returned to California in 1858, where she 
became more familiar with the Sierra Nevada and recognized a 
need to conserve certain areas. She, along with others 
including Thomas Starr King and Frederick Law Olmsted, sought 
support to federally protect Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa 
Grove of Giant Sequoias.
    This advocacy eventually led to the ``Yosemite Grant,'' 
President Abraham Lincoln's landmark legislation that set aside 
Yosemite Valley and Mariposa Grove as a protected area. The 
Yosemite Grant eventually led to the establishment of Yosemite 
National Park on Oct 1, 1890. H.R. 1192 recognizes Benton 
Frmont's contribution to this accomplishment.
    Under the legislation, the National Park Service will 
continue to manage the proposed ``Mount Jessie Benton Fremont'' 
within Yosemite National Park.

                            COMMITTEE ACTION

    H.R. 1192 was introduced on March 14, 2013, by Congressman 
Tom McClintock (R-CA). The bill was referred to the Committee 
on Natural Resources, and within the Committee to the 
Subcommittee on Public Lands and Environmental Regulation. On 
February 26, 2014, the Subcommittee held a hearing on the bill. 
On March 13, 2014, the Natural Resources Committee met to 
consider the bill. The Subcommittee on Public Lands and 
Environmental Regulation was discharged by unanimous consent. 
The bill was adopted and ordered favorably reported to the 
House of Representatives by unanimous consent.

            COMMITTEE OVERSIGHT FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    Regarding clause 2(b)(1) of rule X and clause 3(c)(1) of 
rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, the 
Committee on Natural Resources' oversight findings and 
recommendations are reflected in the body of this report.

                    COMPLIANCE WITH HOUSE RULE XIII

    1. Cost of Legislation. Clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives requires an estimate and 
a comparison by the Committee of the costs which would be 
incurred in carrying out this bill. However, clause 3(d)(2)(B) 
of that rule provides that this requirement does not apply when 
the Committee has included in its report a timely submitted 
cost estimate of the bill prepared by the Director of the 
Congressional Budget Office under section 402 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974. Under clause 3(c)(3) of rule 
XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives and section 
403 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the Committee has 
received the following cost estimate for this bill from the 
Director of the Congressional Budget Office:

H.R. 1192--A bill to redesignate Mammoth Peak in Yosemite National Park 
        as ``Mount Jessie Benton Fremont''

    H.R. 1192 would rename Mammoth Peak in Yosemite National 
Park in California as Mount Jessie Benton Fremont. CBO 
estimates that implementing H.R. 1192 would have no significant 
effect on the federal budget. Enacting H.R. 1192 would not 
affect direct spending or revenues; therefore, pay-as-you-go 
procedures do not apply.
    H.R. 1192 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act and 
would not affect the budgets of state local, or tribal 
governments.
    The CBO staff contact for this estimate is Martin von 
Gnechten. The estimate was approved by Theresa Gullo, Deputy 
Assistant Director for Budget Analysis.
    2. Section 308(a) of Congressional Budget Act. As required 
by clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives and section 308(a) of the Congressional Budget 
Act of 1974, this bill does not contain any new budget 
authority, spending authority, credit authority, or an increase 
or decrease in revenues or tax expenditures. CBO estimates that 
implementing H.R. 1192 would have no significant effect on the 
federal budget.
    3. General Performance Goals and Objectives. As required by 
clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII, the general performance goal or 
objective of this bill is to redesignate Mammoth Peak in 
Yosemite National Park as ``Mount Jessie Benton Fremont''.

                           EARMARK STATEMENT

    This bill does not contain any Congressional earmarks, 
limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as defined 
under clause 9(e), 9(f), and 9(g) of rule XXI of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives.

                    COMPLIANCE WITH PUBLIC LAW 104-4

    This bill contains no unfunded mandates.

                       COMPLIANCE WITH H. RES. 5

    Directed Rule Making. The Chairman does not believe that 
this bill directs any executive branch official to conduct any 
specific rule-making proceedings.
    Duplication of Existing Programs. This bill does not 
establish or reauthorize a program of the federal government 
known to be duplicative of another program. Such program was 
not included in any report from the Government Accountability 
Office to Congress pursuant to section 21 of Public Law 111-139 
or identified in the most recent Catalog of Federal Domestic 
Assistance published pursuant to the Federal Program 
Information Act (Public Law 95-220, as amended by Public Law 
98-169) as relating to other programs.

                PREEMPTION OF STATE, LOCAL OR TRIBAL LAW

    This bill is not intended to preempt any State, local or 
tribal law.

                        CHANGES IN EXISTING LAW

    If enacted, this bill would make no changes in existing 
law.