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113th Congress  }                                     {   Rept. 113-447
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session     }                                     {          Part 1

======================================================================
 
           STOP EXPLOITATION THROUGH TRAFFICKING ACT OF 2014

                                _______
                                

  May 13, 2014.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

   Mr. Goodlatte, from the Committee on the Judiciary, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 3610]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on the Judiciary, to whom was referred the 
bill (H.R. 3610) to stop exploitation through trafficking, 
having considered the same, reports favorably thereon with an 
amendment and recommends that the bill as amended do pass.












                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
The Amendment....................................................     1
Purpose and Summary..............................................     3
Background and Need for the Legislation..........................     3
Hearings.........................................................     4
Committee Consideration..........................................     5
Committee Votes..................................................     5
Committee Oversight Findings.....................................     5
New Budget Authority and Tax Expenditures........................     5
Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate........................     5
Duplication of Federal Programs..................................     6
Disclosure of Directed Rule Makings..............................     6
Performance Goals and Objectives.................................     6
Advisory on Earmarks.............................................     7
Section-by-Section Analysis......................................     7
Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported............     8

                             The Amendment

    The amendment is as follows:
  Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited as the ``Stop Exploitation Through Trafficking 
Act of 2014''.

SEC. 2. SAFE HARBOR INCENTIVES.

  Part Q of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act 
of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 3796dd et seq.) is amended--
          (1) in section 1701(c), by striking ``where feasible'' and 
        all that follows, and inserting the following: ``where 
        feasible, to an application--
          ``(1) for hiring and rehiring additional career law 
        enforcement officers that involves a non-Federal contribution 
        exceeding the 25 percent minimum under subsection (g); or
          ``(2) from an applicant in a State that has in effect a law 
        that--
                  ``(A) treats a minor who has engaged in, or has 
                attempted to engage in, a commercial sex act as a 
                victim of a severe form of trafficking in persons;
                  ``(B) discourages the charging or prosecution of an 
                individual described in subparagraph (A) for a 
                prostitution or sex trafficking offense, based on the 
                conduct described in subparagraph (A); or
                  ``(C) encourages the diversion of an individual 
                described in subparagraph (A) to appropriate service 
                providers, including child welfare services, victim 
                treatment programs, child advocacy centers, rape crisis 
                centers, or other social services.''; and
          (2) in section 1709, by inserting at the end the following:
          ``(5) `commercial sex act' has the meaning given the term in 
        section 103 of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence 
        Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102).
          ``(6) `minor' means an individual who has not attained the 
        age of 18 years.
          ``(7) `severe form of trafficking in persons' has the meaning 
        given the term in section 103 of the Victims of Trafficking and 
        Violence Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102).''.

SEC. 3. REPORT ON RESTITUTION PAID IN CONNECTION WITH CERTAIN 
                    TRAFFICKING OFFENSES.

  Section 105(d)(7)(Q) of the Victims of Trafficking Protection Act of 
2000 (22 U.S.C. 7103(d)(7)(Q)) is amended--
          (1) by inserting after ``1590,'' the following: ``1591,'';
          (2) by striking ``and 1594'' and inserting ``1594, 2251, 
        2251A, 2421, 2422, and 2423'';
          (3) in clause (iv), by striking ``and'' at the end;
          (4) in clause (v), by striking ``and'' at the end; and
          (5) by inserting after clause (v) the following:
                          ``(vi) the number of individuals required by 
                        a court order to pay restitution in connection 
                        with a violation of each offense under title 
                        18, United States Code, the amount of 
                        restitution required to be paid under each such 
                        order, and the amount of restitution actually 
                        paid pursuant to each such order; and
                          ``(vii) the age, gender, race, country of 
                        origin, country of citizenship, and description 
                        of the role in the offense of individuals 
                        convicted under each offense; and''.

SEC. 4. NATIONAL HUMAN TRAFFICKING HOTLINE.

  Section 107(b)(2) of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence 
Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7105(b)(2)) is amended--
          (1) by redesignating subparagraphs (B) and (C) as 
        subparagraphs (C) and (D), respectively; and
          (2) by inserting after subparagraph (A) the following:
                  ``(B) National human trafficking hotline.--Beginning 
                in fiscal year 2017 and each fiscal year thereafter, of 
                amounts made available for grants under this paragraph, 
                the Secretary of Health and Human Services shall make 
                grants for a national communication system to assist 
                victims of severe forms of trafficking in persons in 
                communicating with service providers. The Secretary 
                shall give priority to grant applicants that have 
                experience in providing telephone services to victims 
                of severe forms of trafficking in persons.''.

SEC. 5. JOB CORPS ELIGIBILITY.

  Section 144(3) of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (29 U.S.C. 
2884(3)) is amended by adding at the end the following:
                  ``(F) A victim of a severe form of trafficking in 
                persons (as defined in section 103 of the Victims of 
                Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (22 
                U.S.C. 7102)). Notwithstanding paragraph (2), an 
                individual described in this subparagraph shall not be 
                required to demonstrate eligibility under such 
                paragraph.''.

SEC. 6. CLARIFICATION OF AUTHORITY OF THE UNITED STATES MARSHALS 
                    SERVICE.

  Section 566(e)(1) of title 28, United States Code, is amended--
          (1) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``and'' at the end;
          (2) in subparagraph (C), by striking the period at the end 
        and inserting ``; and''; and
          (3) by inserting after subparagraph (C), the following:
                  ``(D) assist State, local, and other Federal law 
                enforcement agencies, upon the request of such an 
                agency, in locating and recovering missing children.''.

                          Purpose and Summary

    H.R. 3610, as reported by the substitute amendment, is 
intended to encourage the states, by giving them preference in 
their applications for Community Oriented Police Services 
grants, to pass safe harbor statutes for victims of minor sex 
trafficking. H.R. 3610, as amended, also helps to fight the 
scourge of minor sex trafficking by requiring additional 
reporting to Congress on restitution orders in these cases, 
codifying a national human trafficking hotline to help victims 
get assistance, and making it easier for victims to leave a 
life of trafficking through the Job Corps program.

                Background and Need for the Legislation

    Starting with the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 
2000, Congress has legislated that juveniles who are involved 
in commercial sexual crimes are to be considered the victims of 
these crimes, rather than criminals themselves. For example, 18 
U.S.C. Sec. 1591 criminalizes the knowing sex trafficking of 
any person under the age of 18, without any need to prove that 
force, fraud, or coercion was involved.
    Despite growing recognition of the seriousness and 
pervasiveness of the crime of minor sex trafficking, a majority 
of the states still have statutes on the books that criminalize 
minor prostitution. These statutes are in conflict with the 
states' statutory rape and child abuse statutes, which support 
the idea that a minor is incapable of consenting to sex. A 
Dallas police sergeant has captured this problem: ``If a 45-
year-old man had sex with a 14-year-old girl and no money 
changed hands, she was likely to get counseling and he was 
likely to get jail time for statutory rape. . . . [But i]f the 
same man left $80 on the table after having sex with her, she 
would probably be locked up for prostitution and he would 
probably go home with a [de minimis monetary] fine as a 
john.''\1\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\Ian Urbina, Running in the Shadows: For Runaways, Sex Buys 
Survival, N.Y. Times, Oct. 27, 2009.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A number of states, however, have passed laws in recent 
years that either decriminalize minor prostitution or help to 
ensure that these victims are provided access to the services 
and support necessary to recover from their trauma. In 2008, 
New York enacted the Safe Harbor for Exploited Children Act, 
which recognized that children engaged in prostitution are not 
criminals or delinquents, but rather victims of a brutal form 
of child sex trafficking and abuse who need specialized 
services. This law has led to the passage of similar ``safe 
harbor'' bills in other states. Illinois, Massachusetts, 
Minnesota, Ohio, Vermont, North Carolina, and Washington have 
safe harbor provisions that provide either immunity or 
diversion for children engaged in prostitution and establish 
services or plans for services. Connecticut, Michigan, and 
Tennessee have passed laws that protect minors from 
prosecution. In Florida, children who have been sexually 
exploited are categorized as children in need of services. In 
addition, the Texas Supreme Court ruled in 2010 that children 
involved in prostitution are victims rather than criminals.\2\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \2\In Matter of B.W., 313 S.W.3d 818 (Texas 2010).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The states that continue to criminalize minor prostitution 
do so in a number of ways. Victims of child sexual 
exploitation--even though these children are too young to 
consent to sexual activity with adults--may at times be labeled 
as child prostitutes or juvenile delinquents and treated as 
criminals rather than being labeled and treated as victims. 
These children could then be placed in juvenile detention 
facilities with juveniles who have committed serious crimes 
instead of in environments where they can receive needed social 
and protective services.\3\ As Shared Hope International 
observes, ``while this sometimes is viewed as the only option 
available to arresting officers, it is a practice that pulls 
the victim deeper into the juvenile justice system, re-
victimizes [the young person], and hinders access to 
service.''\4\ A 2009 study conducted by Shared Hope 
International suggests that, in 9 out of 10 U.S. cities 
evaluated with respect to prostitution and other forms of 
commercial sexual exploitation of minors, these victims had 
been placed in juvenile detention centers instead of being 
directed to needed services.\5\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \3\Smith, Vardaman, and Snow, ``The National Report on Domestic 
Minor Sex Trafficking: America's Prostituted Children,'' Loyola 
University Chicago, Center for the Human Rights of Children and the 
International Organization for Adolescents (IOFA), Building Child 
Welfare Response to Child Trafficking, 2011, p. v-vi.
    \4\Heather J. Clawson et al., Study of HHS Programs Serving Human 
Trafficking Victims, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, December 
2009, p. iv.
    \5\Id.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    While a majority of the states still criminalize child 
prostitution, a number have nonetheless started adopting 
specialized courts aimed at diverting at-risk youth 
(particularly girls at risk of prostitution) from the criminal 
justice system and providing them with specialized services. 
For example, there are ``Girls Courts'' in California and 
Hawaii that use a collaborative approach focusing on treatment 
and services rather than punishment.\6\ The STOP (``Stop 
Turning Out Child Prostitutes'') program in Las Vegas, Nevada 
provides for the arrest and detention of children involved in 
minor sex trafficking for a period of time, but with the intent 
of holding a victim long enough to secure needed services while 
breaking the bond with their traffickers, which is what often 
leads these minors to return to prostitution.\7\ The safe 
harbor concept is relatively new, and thus the states are 
experimenting with the best approach to balancing 
decriminalization of minor prostitution with the need to help 
victims leave their traffickers and obtain treatment and 
services.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \6\``Courts Take a Kinder Look at Victims of Child Sex 
Trafficking,'' NPR, March 1, 2014. See also Patricia Leigh Brown, ``A 
Court's All-Hands Approach Aids Girls Most at Risk,'' The New York 
Times, January 28, 2014; State of Hawaii, Hawaii Girls Court, http://
www.girlscourt.org/.
    \7\Darren Geist, Finding Safe Harbor: Protection, Prosecution, and 
State Strategies to Address Prostituted Minors, Legislation and Policy 
Brief: Vol. 4: Iss. 2, Article 3.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                Hearings

    The Committee on the Judiciary held no hearings on H.R. 
3610.

                        Committee Consideration

    On April 30, 2014, the Committee met in open session and 
ordered the bill H.R. 3610 favorably reported, with an 
amendment, by voice vote, a quorum being present.

                            Committee Votes

    In compliance with clause 3(b) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the Committee advises that there 
were no recorded votes during the Committee's consideration of 
H.R. 3610.

                      Committee Oversight Findings

    In compliance with clause 3(c)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives, the Committee advises that the 
findings and recommendations of the Committee, based on 
oversight activities under clause 2(b)(1) of rule X of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives, are incorporated in the 
descriptive portions of this report.

               New Budget Authority and Tax Expenditures

    Clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives is inapplicable because this legislation does 
not provide new budgetary authority or increased tax 
expenditures.

               Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate

    In compliance with clause 3(c)(3) of rule XIII of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives, the Committee sets forth, with 
respect to the bill, H.R. 3610, the following estimate and 
comparison prepared by the Director of the Congressional Budget 
Office under section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 
1974:

                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                      Washington, DC, May 13, 2014.
Hon. Bob Goodlatte, Chairman,
Committee on the Judiciary,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for H.R. 3610, the ``Stop 
Exploitation Through Trafficking Act of 2014.''
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is David 
Rafferty, who can be reached at 226-2820.
            Sincerely,
                                      Douglas W. Elmendorf,
                                                  Director.

Enclosure

cc:
        Honorable John Conyers, Jr.
        Ranking Member



         H.R. 3610--Stop Exploitation Through Trafficking Act 
                                of 2014.

      As ordered reported by the House Committee on the Judiciary 
                           on April 30, 2014.




    H.R. 3610 would make several changes to laws related to 
human trafficking:

         LSection 2 would allow the Attorney General to 
        apply preferential treatment when making some public 
        safety grants to states that have adopted certain laws 
        related to trafficking victims, but would not change 
        the funding level for those grants.

         LSection 3 would require the Interagency Task 
        Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking to expand its 
        reporting on certain trafficking-related crimes. CBO 
        expects the provision would have little effect on the 
        workload of the task force.

         LSection 4 would require the Department of 
        Health and Human Services (HHS) to provide funding for 
        a national hotline for trafficking victims. Under 
        current law, HHS already provides a multiyear grant 
        that partially funds the National Human Trafficking 
        Resource Center.

         LSection 5 would make trafficking victims 
        eligible to participate in the Job Corps if they meet 
        the age and income requirements, but would not change 
        total funding for the Job Corps program.

    CBO estimates that enacting the legislation would have no 
significant effect on discretionary spending and would not 
affect direct spending or revenues; therefore, pay-as-you-go 
procedures do not apply.
    H.R. 3610 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act and 
would impose no costs on State, local, or tribal governments.
    The CBO staff contact for this estimate is David Rafferty. 
The estimate was approved by Theresa Gullo, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

                    Duplication of Federal Programs

    No provision of H.R. 3610 establishes or reauthorizes a 
program of the Federal Government known to be duplicative of 
another Federal program, a program that was included in any 
report from the Government Accountability Office to Congress 
pursuant to section 21 of Public Law 111-139, or a program 
related to a program identified in the most recent Catalog of 
Federal Domestic Assistance.

                  Disclosure of Directed Rule Makings

    No provision of H.R. 3610 directs a specific rule making 
within the meaning of 5 U.S.C. Sec. 551.

                    Performance Goals and Objectives

    The Committee states that pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of 
rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, H.R. 
3610 aims to protect and support minors exploited through 
commercial sex trafficking by encouraging states to enact safe 
harbor legislation, establishing a ``National Human Trafficking 
Hotline,'' requiring the Justice Department to report on 
restitution in trafficking cases, and ensuring these victims 
are eligible to enroll in the Job Corps.

                          Advisory on Earmarks

    In accordance with clause 9 of rule XXI of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, H.R. 3610 does not contain any 
congressional earmarks, limited tax benefits, or limited tariff 
benefits as defined in clause 9(e), 9(f), or 9(g) of Rule XXI.

                      Section-by-Section Analysis

    The following discussion describes the bill as reported by 
the Committee.
    Section 1. Short Title. This section cites the short title 
of the bill as the ``Stop Exploitation Through Trafficking Act 
of 2014.''
    Section 2. Safe Harbor Incentives. This section provides 
the states with additional incentives to pass safe harbor laws 
by giving those with such laws additional priority for 
Community Oriented Police Services (COPS) grants, instead of 
the Byrne JAG penalty included in the bill as introduced. 
Rather than prescribing exactly what form the state safe harbor 
laws must take, this section allows flexibility by providing 
additional priority to states that treat minors engaged in 
commercial sex acts as victims, discourage the charging or 
prosecution of such minors, or encourage the diversion of such 
minors to appropriate service providers instead of prosecution.
    Section 3. Report on Restitution Paid In Connection With 
Certain Trafficking Offenses. This section amends an existing 
human trafficking report, codified at 22 U.S.C. 
Sec. 7103(d)(7), to require the Justice Department to report to 
Congress on the number and amount of restitution orders for 
convictions of specified Federal trafficking offenses, and 
expands the crimes for which other reporting is required to 
include 18 U.S.C. 1591 (sex trafficking by force, fraud, or 
coercion or with a minor); 2251 (sexual exploitation of 
children); 2251A (selling and buying of children); 2421 
(transportation with intent that the victim engage in criminal 
sexual activity); 2422 (coercion or enticement); and 2423 
(transportation of minors). This section also requires the 
Justice Department to collect and report information regarding 
the demographics of convicted defendants, including age, race, 
gender, country of origin, country of citizenship, and role in 
the offense (e.g., purchaser or trafficker).
    Section 4. National Human Trafficking Hotline. This section 
codifies a national human trafficking hotline as part of the 
Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) grant codified at 22 
U.S.C. Sec. 7105(b)(2).
    Section 5. Job Corps Eligibility. This section provides 
that victims of a severe form of trafficking, including minor 
sex trafficking victims, are eligible for participating in the 
Job Corps and do not need to establish income eligibility in 
order to participate.
    Section 6. Clarification of Authority of the United States 
Marshals Service. The National Center for Missing and Exploited 
Children has estimated that one of every seven endangered 
runaways reported to the Center are likely victims of minor sex 
trafficking.\8\ This section helps to address that problem by 
providing the U.S. Marshals Service the discretionary authority 
to support other state, local, or Federal law enforcement 
agencies that are investigating a missing child case, upon 
request, where a crime of violence has occurred or factors 
elevating risk to the child have been identified. This 
provision does not expand the Marshals Service's jurisdiction 
to investigate violations of Federal criminal law. Rather, the 
Marshals Service would be able to contribute its unique 
specialty of locating missing persons to any agency or 
department that is the lead in a missing child case, when 
requested by that agency.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \8\Oversight Hearing: The State of Efforts to Stop Human 
Trafficking, H. Subcomm. on Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related 
Agencies of the H. Comm. on Appropriations, 113th Congress (statement 
of John Ryan, CEO, National Center for Missing and Exploited Children).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

         Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

    In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italics, existing law in which no change 
is proposed is shown in roman):

           OMNIBUS CRIME CONTROL AND SAFE STREETS ACT OF 1968



           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
TITLE I--JUSTICE SYSTEM IMPROVEMENT

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


   PART Q--PUBLIC SAFETY AND COMMUNITY POLICING; ``COPS ON THE BEAT''

SEC. 1701. AUTHORITY TO MAKE PUBLIC SAFETY AND COMMUNITY POLICING 
                    GRANTS.

    (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (c) Preferential Consideration of Applications for Certain 
Grants.--In awarding grants under this part, the Attorney 
General may give preferential consideration, [where feasible, 
to applications for hiring and rehiring additional career law 
enforcement officers that involve a non-Federal contribution 
exceeding the 25 percent minimum under subsection (g).] where 
feasible, to an application--
            (1) for hiring and rehiring additional career law 
        enforcement officers that involves a non-Federal 
        contribution exceeding the 25 percent minimum under 
        subsection (g); or
            (2) from an applicant in a State that has in effect 
        a law that--
                    (A) treats a minor who has engaged in, or 
                has attempted to engage in, a commercial sex 
                act as a victim of a severe form of trafficking 
                in persons;
                    (B) discourages the charging or prosecution 
                of an individual described in subparagraph (A) 
                for a prostitution or sex trafficking offense, 
                based on the conduct described in subparagraph 
                (A); or
                    (C) encourages the diversion of an 
                individual described in subparagraph (A) to 
                appropriate service providers, including child 
                welfare services, victim treatment programs, 
                child advocacy centers, rape crisis centers, or 
                other social services.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 1709. DEFINITIONS.

     In this part--
            (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (5) ``commercial sex act'' has the meaning given 
        the term in section 103 of the Victims of Trafficking 
        and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102).
            (6) ``minor'' means an individual who has not 
        attained the age of 18 years.
            (7) ``severe form of trafficking in persons'' has 
        the meaning given the term in section 103 of the 
        Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 
        2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


       VICTIMS OF TRAFFICKING AND VIOLENCE PROTECTION ACT OF 2000



           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
DIVISION A--TRAFFICKING VICTIMS PROTECTION ACT OF 2000

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 105. INTERAGENCY TASK FORCE TO MONITOR AND COMBAT TRAFFICKING.

    (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (d) Activities of the Task Force.--The Task Force shall 
carry out the following activities:
            (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (7) Not later than May 1, 2004, and annually 
        thereafter, the Attorney General shall submit to the 
        Committee on Ways and Means, the Committee on Foreign 
        Affairs, and the Committee on the Judiciary of the 
        House of Representatives and the Committee on Finance, 
        the Committee on Foreign Relations, and the Committee 
        on the Judiciary of the Senate, a report on Federal 
        agencies that are implementing any provision of this 
        division, or any amendment made by this division, which 
        shall include, at a minimum, information on--
                    (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                    (Q) the activities undertaken by Federal 
                agencies in cooperation with State, tribal, and 
                local law enforcement officials to identify, 
                investigate, and prosecute offenses under 
                sections 1581, 1583, 1584, 1589, 1590, 1591, 
                1592, [and 1594] 1594, 2251, 2251A, 2421, 2422, 
                and 2423 of title 18, United States Code, or 
                equivalent State offenses, including, in each 
                fiscal year--
                            (i) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                            (iv) the number of victims granted 
                        continued presence in the United States 
                        under section 107(c)(3); [and]
                            (v) the number of victims granted a 
                        visa or otherwise provided status under 
                        subparagraph (T)(i) or (U)(i) of 
                        section 101(a)(15) of the Immigration 
                        and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 
                        1101(a)(15)); [and]
                            (vi) the number of individuals 
                        required by a court order to pay 
                        restitution in connection with a 
                        violation of each offense under title 
                        18, United States Code, the amount of 
                        restitution required to be paid under 
                        each such order, and the amount of 
                        restitution actually paid pursuant to 
                        each such order; and
                            (vii) the age, gender, race, 
                        country of origin, country of 
                        citizenship, and description of the 
                        role in the offense of individuals 
                        convicted under each offense; and

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 107. PROTECTION AND ASSISTANCE FOR VICTIMS OF TRAFFICKING.

    (a) * * *
    (b) Victims in the United States.--
            (1) * * *
            (2) Grants.--
                    (A) * * *
                    (B) National human trafficking hotline.--
                Beginning in fiscal year 2017 and each fiscal 
                year thereafter, of amounts made available for 
                grants under this paragraph, the Secretary of 
                Health and Human Services shall make grants for 
                a national communication system to assist 
                victims of severe forms of trafficking in 
                persons in communicating with service 
                providers. The Secretary shall give priority to 
                grant applicants that have experience in 
                providing telephone services to victims of 
                severe forms of trafficking in persons.
                    [(B)] (C) Allocation of grant funds.--Of 
                amounts made available for grants under this 
                paragraph, there shall be set aside--
                            (i) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                    [(C)] (D) Limitation on federal share.--The 
                Federal share of a grant made under this 
                paragraph may not exceed 75 percent of the 
                total costs of the projects described in the 
                application submitted.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


          SECTION 144 OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998

SEC. 144. INDIVIDUALS ELIGIBLE FOR THE JOB CORPS.

     To be eligible to become an enrollee, an individual shall 
be--
            (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (3) an individual who is one or more of the 
        following:
                    (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                    (F) A victim of a severe form of 
                trafficking in persons (as defined in section 
                103 of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence 
                Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102)). 
                Notwithstanding paragraph (2), an individual 
                described in this subparagraph shall not be 
                required to demonstrate eligibility under such 
                paragraph.
                              ----------                              


              SECTION 566 OF TITLE 28, UNITED STATES CODE

Sec. 566. Powers and duties

    (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (e)(1) The United States Marshals Service is authorized 
to--
                    (A) * * *
                    (B) investigate such fugitive matters, both 
                within and outside the United States, as 
                directed by the Attorney General; [and]
                    (C) issue administrative subpoenas in 
                accordance with section 3486 of title 18, 
                solely for the purpose of investigating 
                unregistered sex offenders (as defined in such 
                section 3486)[.]; and
                    (D) assist State, local, and other Federal 
                law enforcement agencies, upon the request of 
                such an agency, in locating and recovering 
                missing children.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *