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113th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     113-551

======================================================================



 
     DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                       APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2015

                                _______
                                

 July 23, 2014.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

   Mr. Calvert, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                             MINORITY VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 5171]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for the Department of the Interior, the 
Environmental Protection Agency, and Related Agencies for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 2015. The bill provides 
regular annual appropriations for the Department of the 
Interior (except the Bureau of Reclamation and the Central Utah 
Project), the Environmental Protection Agency, and for other 
related agencies, including the Forest Service, the Indian 
Health Service, the Smithsonian Institution, and the National 
Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities.

                                CONTENTS

                                                            Page number

                                                            Bill Report
Title I--Department of the Interior:                            2
                                                                     10
        Bureau of Land Management..........................     2
                                                                     10
        United States Fish and Wildlife Service............     8
                                                                     14
        National Park Service..............................    18
                                                                     28
        United States Geological Survey....................    22
                                                                     36
        Bureau of Ocean Energy Management..................    24
                                                                     39
        Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement.....    25
                                                                     40
        Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and 
            Enforcement....................................    28
                                                                     41
        Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian 
            Education......................................    30
                                                                     43
        Office of the Secretary............................    39
                                                                     49
        Insular Affairs....................................    40
                                                                     50
        Office of the Solicitor............................    44
                                                                     51
        Office of Inspector General........................    44
                                                                     51
        Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians.    44
                                                                     51
Department-wide Programs:                                      46
                                                                     52
        Wildland Fire Management, Interior Department......    46
                                                                     52
        FLAME Wildfire Suppression Reserve Fund, Interior 
            Department.....................................    49
                                                                     53
        Central Hazardous Materials Fund...................    49
                                                                     54
        Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration.    50
                                                                     54
        Working Capital Fund...............................    50
                                                                     54
        General Provisions, Department of the Interior.....    52
                                                                     54
Title II--Environmental Protection Agency:                     62
                                                                     55
        Science and Technology.............................    62
                                                                     57
        Environmental Programs and Management..............    63
                                                                     59
        Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest System Fund....    64
                                                                     66
        Office of Inspector General........................    64
                                                                     66
        Buildings and Facilities...........................    64
                                                                     66
        Hazardous Substance Superfund......................    64
                                                                     67
        Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund Program    65
                                                                     68
        Inland Oil Spill Programs..........................    66
                                                                     69
        State and Tribal Assistance Grants.................    66
                                                                     69
        Administrative Provisions..........................    73
                                                                     72
Title III--Related Agencies:                                   75
                                                                     72
        Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.....    75
                                                                     72
        Wildland Fire Management, Forest Service...........    80
                                                                     82
        FLAME Wildfire Suppression Reserve Fund, Forest 
            Service........................................    84
                                                                     84
        Indian Health Service, U.S. Department of Health 
            and Human Services.............................    91
                                                                     84
        National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences    99
                                                                     88
        Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry...    99
                                                                     88
Other Related Agencies:                                       100
                                                                     89
        Council on Environmental Quality and Office of 
            Environmental Quality..........................   100
                                                                     89
        Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board.....   101
                                                                     89
        Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation........   102
                                                                     90
        Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native 
            Culture and Arts Development...................   103
                                                                     91
        Smithsonian Institution............................   103
                                                                     91
        National Gallery of Art............................   105
                                                                     93
        John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.....   106
                                                                     93
        Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars...   107
                                                                     94
        National Endowment for the Arts....................   107
                                                                     94
        National Endowment for the Humanities..............   108
                                                                     95
        Commission of Fine Arts............................   109
                                                                     96
        National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs.........   110
                                                                     96
        Advisory Council on Historic Preservation..........   110
                                                                     97
        National Capital Planning Commission...............   110
                                                                     97
        United States Holocaust Memorial Museum............   110
                                                                     97
        Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission...........   n/a
                                                                     98
Title IV--General Provisions:                                 111
                                                                     99

                              INTRODUCTION

    The Department of the Interior, Environment, and Related 
Agencies Appropriations bill for fiscal year 2015 totals 
$30,220,000,000. This amount reflects a $162,000,000 increase 
from the amount appropriated in fiscal year 2014 and a 
$408,889,000 reduction from the budget request.
    The amounts in the accompanying bill are reflected by title 
in the table below.

             BUDGET AUTHORITY RECOMMENDED IN BILL BY TITLE



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                 Committee bill
                        Activity                         Budget estimates,   Committee bill,     compared with
                                                          fiscal year 2015   fiscal year 2015   budget estimates
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Title I, Department of the Interior:
    New budget authority...............................    $10,794,136,000    $10,991,737,000      +$197,601,000
Title II, Environmental Protection Agency:
    New budget authority...............................      7,890,020,000      7,482,747,000       -407,273,000
Title III, Related Agencies:
    New budget authority...............................     11,944,733,000     11,745,516,000       -199,217,000
Title IV, General Provisions:
    New budget authority...............................                  0                  0                  0
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Grand total, New budget authority................     30,628,889,000     30,220,000,000       -408,889,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                          Committee Oversight


    Members of Congress have provided considerable input in 
fashioning this bill. In total, 333 Members submitted nearly 
3,200 programmatic requests relating to multiple agencies and 
programs.
    The Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies 
Subcommittee takes seriously its oversight responsibility and 
conducted 13 budget hearings and briefings this year (including 
six hearings involving the public and American Indians and 
Alaska Natives) to carefully review the programs and budgets 
under its jurisdiction. The Subcommittee held the following 
oversight hearings:
    Department of the Interior FY15 budget oversight hearing--
March 25, 2014
    Environmental Protection Agency FY15 budget oversight 
hearing--March 27, 2014
    U.S. Forest Service FY15 budget oversight hearing--April 2, 
2014
    National Park Service FY15 budget oversight hearing--April 
3, 2014
    Fish and Wildlife Service FY15 budget oversight hearing--
April 3, 2014
    Bureau of Land Management FY15 budget oversight hearing--
April 4, 2014
    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management/Bureau of Safety and 
Environmental Enforcement FY15 budget oversight hearing--April 
4, 2014
    American Indian/Alaska Native Public Witnesses--April 7, 
2014 (morning)
    American Indian/Alaska Native Public Witnesses--April 7, 
2014 (afternoon)
    American Indian/Alaska Native Public Witnesses--April 8, 
2014 (morning)
    American Indian/Alaska Native Public Witnesses--April 8, 
2014 (afternoon)
    Public Witnesses--April 10, 2014 (morning)
    Public Witnesses--April 10, 2014 (afternoon)
    In total, 144 individuals representing the Executive 
Branch, Congress, State, tribal, and local governments, and the 
general public testified before the Subcommittee. In addition 
to those who testified personally, over 140 individuals and 
organizations provided written testimony for the permanent 
hearing record. These hearings are contained in eight published 
volumes totaling over 10,000 pages which are publicly available 
online.

                         COST OF WILDLAND FIRE

    In eight of the last ten years, the Forest Service and the 
Department of the Interior have exceeded their wildland fire 
suppression budgets despite being fully funded at the ten-year 
suppression average for such costs. Fire seasons have grown 
longer and more destructive, putting people, communities, and 
ecosystems at greater risk. Fire borrowing has now become 
routine rather than extraordinary. Borrowing from non-fire 
accounts to pay suppression costs results in the Forest Service 
and Department of the Interior having fewer resources available 
for forest management activities, including hazardous fuels 
management and other proven efforts to improve overall forest 
health and reduce the risk of catastrophic wildland fires.
    The Committee believes the most catastrophic wildland fires 
should be treated similar to other major natural disasters such 
as floods and hurricanes and funded through the disaster cap 
adjustment established by the Budget Control Act of 2011 (P.L. 
112-25). This common sense reform would allow for a more 
responsible and stable way to budget for wildland fire costs.
    As Congress continues to debate the best approach for fire 
budgeting, the Committee has provided robust wildland fire 
funding in its fiscal year 2015 bill. The bill includes a total 
of $4.088 billion in wildland fire funding for the Department 
of the Interior and the Forest Service, $149 million above the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level. Fire suppression accounts 
(including FLAME) are again fully funded at the ten-year 
average level. Hazardous fuels funding, a critical component of 
an effective overall fire strategy, is increased by $90 million 
over the fiscal year 2014 enacted level. And, the Committee has 
provided an additional $470 million in funding to address the 
projected shortfall in suppression funding for fiscal year 
2014.

                    PAYMENTS IN LIEU OF TAXES (PILT)

    The Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) program provides 
compensation to local governments for the loss of tax revenue 
resulting from the presence of Federal land in their county or 
State. In 2014, 49 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, the 
Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands 
received PILT payments.
    Mandatory funding for PILT payments is scheduled to expire 
on September 30, 2014. The Committee has included bill language 
extending by one year the mandatory authorization for full PILT 
funding for fiscal year 2015.

                           REC FEE AUTHORITY

    Enacted in 2004, the Federal Land Recreation Enhancement 
Act (FLREA) authorized five agencies to collect and expend 
recreation fees on land they manage: the Department of the 
Interior's Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Bureau of 
Reclamation (BOR), National Park Service (NPS), and U.S. Fish 
and Wildlife Service (FWS), and the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture's Forest Service (USFS). These fees, which leverage 
other funding sources and complement appropriated funds, fund 
projects that directly benefit the visitor experience.
    The authority for FLREA is scheduled to sunset in December 
2014 which will result in agencies no longer having explicit 
recreation fee authority. This would impact the Department of 
the Interior's estimated annual collection of $200 million, of 
which the National Park Service collects nearly $180 million. 
In 2013, the rec fee program collected nearly $260 million from 
the Forest Service and the Department of the Interior combined. 
An extension of rec fee authority is necessary for land 
managers to plan for upcoming seasons including selling annual 
passes, hiring seasonal employees, planning projects, 
organizing volunteers, and accepting reservations.
    The budget request includes a legislative proposal to 
continue the existing authority. In order to prevent the 
expiration of the authority and allow authorizing committees of 
jurisdiction ample time to consider extending and perhaps 
modifying this authority, the Committee has included within 
Title IV General Provisions a one-year extension of the current 
rec fee authority.

                           COST OF LITIGATION

    The Committee continues to be concerned that many of the 
legitimate goals of the Forest Service, the Department of the 
Interior, and other agencies under the Committee's 
jurisdiction--as well as the work of this Committee--are 
undermined by litigation filed in an effort to shift land 
management decisions from the agencies to the courts, 
regardless of merit.
    Litigation is a huge unbudgeted cost for land management 
agencies. The Committee is concerned that, as budgets shrink, 
agencies are forced to settle lawsuits quickly because they 
don't have funds available to complete court-imposed work. In 
addition, the courts are not concerned whether agencies have 
funding necessary to meet court mandates. As a result, the 
courts are playing an increasing role in determining how and 
where agencies use their funding.
    Given ongoing concerns, the Department of the Interior, 
EPA, and the Forest Service are directed to provide to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations, and to make 
publicly available no later than 60 days after enactment of 
this Act, detailed Equal Access to Justice Act (EAJA) fee 
information as specified in the Consolidated Appropriations 
Act, 2014.

             WESTERN GROUSE AND THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT

    The Committee remains concerned about the recent listing of 
the lesser prairie chicken, the proposed listing of the 
Gunnison sage-grouse and the bi-State distinct population 
segment (DPS) of greater sage-grouse, and the potential 
proposed listing for greater sage-grouse range-wide and in the 
Columbia Basin DPS. These species and populations are 
collectively known as western grouse, and the aforementioned 
listing actions impact 17 western States in the lower 48 States 
from North Dakota to Texas and from Washington to California.
    Based on past experience and recent evidence, the States 
are rightfully concerned that these listings will fail at 
recovery while eliminating jobs and curtailing future job 
growth, devastating State and local economies, and undermining 
the nation's ability to develop conventional and renewable 
resources necessary for energy independence.
    In addition to sharing the States' concerns, the Committee 
is concerned that the Fish and Wildlife Service's actions on 
western grouse are being driven by litigation deadlines that 
leave the Service with no flexibility to take into 
consideration the extraordinary conservation planning efforts 
and expenditures at the Federal, State, and local levels. It is 
clear to the Committee that the conservation of western grouse 
is a commonly-shared long-term goal that should be afforded an 
opportunity to demonstrate success that extends beyond any 
arbitrary Federal regulatory deadline, so long as extinction is 
not imminent.
    Therefore, the Committee recommendation includes a general 
provision in Title I of the bill, delaying for one year any 
final rule to list the Gunnison sage-grouse or the bi-State DPS 
of greater sage-grouse, and any proposed rule to list the 
greater sage-grouse range-wide or in the Columbia Basin. The 
Committee expects all stakeholders to maintain the current pace 
of work in good faith during the fiscal year to demonstrate 
that sage-grouse conservation is working. The Committee directs 
the Bureau of Land Management not to delay the processing of 
permits due to any uncertainty surrounding the listing of 
western grouse. The Committee directs the Fish and Wildlife 
Service to include in its fiscal year 2016 budget submission an 
update on the status of all western grouse. The Committee 
intends to revisit any future legislative listing delays on an 
annual basis so as to prevent extinction.
    Furthermore, the recommendation concentrates existing 
resources on western grouse conservation in the following key 
areas:
    Wildland Fire.--The Committee continues to be concerned 
about the threat wildland fire poses to sage-grouse and directs 
the Department of the Interior to use resources made available 
under the Bureau of Land Management and the Department of the 
Interior's Wildland Fire Program to reduce and mitigate 
catastrophic fire. Further, the Committee directs the 
Department to use the additional $4,000,000 above the budget 
request for emergency stabilization and rehabilitation to 
restore areas burned by wildland fire with an emphasis on 
restoring sage-grouse habitat.
    Invasive Species.--The Committee recommendation continues 
funding for all ongoing invasive species programs at the fiscal 
year 2014 enacted level, but includes a general provision in 
Title IV of the bill to cap administrative activities at ten 
percent, in an effort to get more invasive species program 
dollars on the ground.
    Federal Lands.--The BLM is responsible for managing the 
majority of sage-grouse habitat. Congress appropriated 
$15,000,000 in both fiscal year 2013 and 2014 for the BLM to 
plan for sage-grouse conservation. The Committee recommends 
$15,000,000 again for fiscal year 2015 so that the BLM can 
implement and begin evaluating those plans.
    Private Lands.--The Partners for Fish and Wildlife program 
within the Fish and Wildlife Service is a voluntary, non-
regulatory program designed to help willing landowners conserve 
habitat on their lands. The Committee recommendation continues 
funding for this program at the fiscal year 2014 enacted level, 
and directs the program to adjust its regional funding 
allocations as necessary so that implementation of the Sage 
Grouse Initiative is the program's top priority.
    State Efforts.--States have primary management 
responsibility of most wildlife within their borders. The State 
and Tribal Wildlife Grants program within the Fish and Wildlife 
Service is designed to help States and Tribes restore imperiled 
species so that they don't have to be listed under the 
Endangered Species Act. The President proposed to cut the 
program by $8,695,000 in fiscal year 2015. The Committee 
recommendation restores the proposed cut and directs the funds 
to competitive interstate grants that specifically address 
species listed as Candidates under the ESA, such as sage-
grouse. This increase is partially offset by redirecting a 
$4,000,000 increase requested by the President for 20 new sage-
grouse ESA personnel.

                          STATE WILDLIFE DATA

    The Committee is concerned that the Department of the 
Interior, its bureaus, and the Forest Service are not 
maximizing the opportunity to save funds and leverage States' 
on-the-ground wildlife expertise. State wildlife agencies often 
have the best available science on species and retain primary 
jurisdiction over most wildlife on Federal, State, and private 
lands. The Federal government should recognize and fully 
utilize State resources, including scientific information about 
species population numbers, conservation status, and habitat 
availability, among other data. The Committee directs Federal 
agencies to cooperatively engage with State wildlife agencies 
and to use State fish and wildlife data and analyses as a 
primary source to inform Federal land use, land planning, and 
related natural resource decisions. The agencies should not 
duplicate analysis of raw data previously prepared by the 
States. Federal agencies should also provide their data to 
State wildlife managers to ensure that the most complete data 
is available to be incorporated into all decision support 
systems.

              ADDRESSING UNATTAINABLE REGULATORY STANDARDS

    In May 2014, the Administration released the latest Unified 
Regulatory Agenda which included more than 130 proposed 
regulatory actions by the EPA. The Committee has had 
longstanding concerns with respect to EPA's process for setting 
standards through the IRIS process, and reforms are ongoing. 
Similarly the Committee has had longstanding concerns about 
EPA's process for setting standards that may be technically or 
economically unachievable, and issuing new regulations while 
needed reforms have not been implemented. While the House has 
passed numerous regulatory reform efforts, the Administration 
has failed to adopt the most common sense solutions. In light 
of the Administration's failure to institute necessary reforms, 
the fiscal year 2015 Interior and Environment appropriations 
bill proposes to address several of EPA's unattainable 
regulatory standards including:
     EPA's proposed standards for new power plants 
which assume carbon capture and storage technologies that are 
not commercially available and scalable;
     EPA's proposed guidelines for existing power 
plants which cannot be met through technological or operating 
improvements at affected facilities;
     EPA's lead renovation rule which sets onerous 
standards for test kits that remain commercially unavailable; 
and
     EPA's ballast water rule which assumes compliance 
using Coast Guard certified technologies that don't exist.
    Recent Agency actions to preclude development based on 
hypothetical scenarios and to expand jurisdiction over water 
bodies prior to scientific input further demonstrates a lack of 
Agency regard for science, process, and impacts. In addition, 
EPA's failure to actively promote and implement its integrated 
planning approach framework for municipalities to address, in 
the most efficient way possible, the multiple competing 
wastewater, storm water, and drinking water regulatory 
requirements that the Agency is imposing on them, is 
unacceptably burdening many municipalities economically and 
preventing them from being able to address their most serious 
water quality issues. While the Committee has provided funds in 
the bill to protect human health and the environment by 
improving air quality, providing clean water, and remediating 
pollution, no funds have been provided in this bill for 
specific rule-makings that reflect Administration overreach.

                        REPROGRAMMING GUIDELINES

    The following are the procedures governing reprogramming 
actions for programs and activities funded in the Department of 
the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations 
Act. The Committee reminds the agencies funded in this Act that 
these reprogramming guidelines are in effect, and must be 
complied with, until such time as the Committee modifies them 
through bill or report language.
    Definitions.--``Reprogramming,'' as defined in these 
procedures, includes the reallocation of funds from one budget 
activity, budget line-item or program area, to another within 
any appropriation funded in this Act.
    For construction, land acquisition, and forest legacy 
accounts, a reprogramming constitutes the reallocation of 
funds, including unobligated balances, from one construction, 
land acquisition, or forest legacy project to another such 
project.
    A reprogramming shall also consist of any significant 
departure from the program described in the agency's budget 
justifications. This includes proposed reorganizations, 
especially those of significant national or regional 
importance, even without a change in funding. Any change to the 
organization table presented in the budget justification shall 
be subject to this requirement.
    General Guidelines for Reprogramming.--
    (a) A reprogramming should be made only when an unforeseen 
situation arises, and then only if postponement of the project 
or the activity until the next appropriation year would result 
in actual loss or damage.
    (b) Any project or activity, which may be deferred through 
reprogramming, shall not later be accomplished by means of 
further reprogramming, but instead, funds should again be 
sought for the deferred project or activity through the regular 
appropriations process.
    (c) Except under the most urgent situations, reprogramming 
should not be employed to initiate new programs or increase 
allocations specifically denied or limited by Congress, or to 
decrease allocations specifically increased by the Congress.
    (d) Reprogramming proposals submitted to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations for approval shall be 
considered approved 30 calendar days after receipt if the 
Committees have posed no objection. However, agencies will be 
expected to extend the approval deadline if specifically 
requested by either Committee.
    Criteria and Exceptions.--A reprogramming must be submitted 
to the Committees in writing prior to implementation if it 
exceeds $1,000,000 annually or results in an increase or 
decrease of more than 10 percent annually in affected programs, 
with the following exceptions:
    (a) With regard to the tribal priority allocations of the 
Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian Education, there 
is no restriction on reprogrammings among these programs. 
However, the Bureaus shall report on all reprogrammings made 
during a given fiscal year no later than 60 days after the end 
of the fiscal year.
    (b) With regard to the EPA, State and Tribal Assistance 
Grants account, the Committee does not require reprogramming 
requests associated with States and Tribes Partnership Grants.
    Assessments.--``Assessment'' as defined in these procedures 
shall refer to any charges, reserves, or holdbacks applied to a 
budget activity or budget line item for costs associated with 
general agency administrative costs, overhead costs, working 
capital expenses, or contingencies.
    (a) No assessment shall be levied against any program, 
budget activity, subactivity, budget line item, or project 
funded by the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies 
Appropriations Act unless such assessment and the basis 
therefor are presented to the Committees on Appropriations in 
the budget justifications and are subsequently approved by the 
Committees. The explanation for any assessment in the budget 
justification shall show the amount of the assessment, the 
activities assessed, and the purpose of the funds.
    (b) Proposed changes to estimated assessments, as such 
estimates were presented in annual budget justifications, shall 
be submitted through the reprogramming process and shall be 
subject to the same dollar and reporting criteria as any other 
reprogramming.
    (c) The Committee directs that each agency or bureau which 
utilizes assessments shall submit an annual report to the 
Committees which provides details on the use of all funds 
assessed from any other budget activity, line item, 
subactivity, or project.
    (d) In no case shall contingency funds or assessments be 
used to finance projects and activities disapproved or limited 
by Congress, or to finance programs or activities that could be 
foreseen and included in the normal budget review process.
    (e) New programs requested in the budget should not be 
initiated before enactment of the bill without notification to, 
and the approval of, the Committees on Appropriations. This 
restriction applies to all such actions regardless of whether a 
formal reprogramming of funds is required to begin the program.
    Quarterly Reports.--All reprogrammings between budget 
activities, budget line items, program areas, or the more 
detailed activity levels shown in this agreement, including 
those below the monetary thresholds established above, shall be 
reported to the Committees within 60 days of the end of each 
quarter and shall include cumulative totals for each budget 
activity, budget line item, or construction, land acquisition, 
or forest legacy project.
    Land Acquisitions, Easements, and Forest Legacy.--Lands 
shall not be acquired for more than the approved appraised 
value (as addressed in section 301(3) of Public Law 91-646), 
unless such acquisitions are submitted to the Committees on 
Appropriations for approval in compliance with these 
procedures.
    Land Exchanges.--Land exchanges, wherein the estimated 
value of the Federal lands to be exchanged is greater than 
$1,000,000, shall not be consummated until the Committees have 
had a 30-day period in which to examine the proposed exchange. 
In addition, the Committees shall be provided advance 
notification of exchanges valued between $500,000 and 
$1,000,000.
    Budget Structure.--The budget activity or line item 
structure for any agency appropriation account shall not be 
altered without advance approval of the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations.

                  TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR


                       Bureau of Land Management


                   MANAGEMENT OF LANDS AND RESOURCES




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................      $956,875,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................       954,085,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................       957,180,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................          +305,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        +3,095,000


    The Committee recommends $957,180,000 for Management of 
Lands and Resources, $305,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and $3,095,000 above the budget request. 
Requested increases for fixed costs are not funded. A detailed 
table of funding recommendations below the account level is 
provided at the end of this report. The Committee 
recommendation includes further details below.
    Soil, Water, and Air Management.--The Committee recommends 
$43,848,000 for soil, water, and air management, $909,000 above 
the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $1,504,000 below the 
budget request. The Colorado River Basin Salinity Program is 
funded at $1,500,000. No funds are provided for the youth in 
the great outdoors initiative.
    Rangeland Management.--The Committee recommends $80,700,000 
for rangeland management, $1,700,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and $5,772,000 above the budget request. The 
amount above the request should be used to hire the staff 
necessary to reduce the grazing permit backlog and carry out a 
systematic program of range monitoring, land health 
assessments, development and implementation of allotment 
management plans, and adaptive management. The Bureau is 
directed to investigate whether targeted grazing can help to 
conserve sage-grouse habitat. The Committee rejects the 
Bureau's proposal to impose new grazing fees.
    Acceptance of Donation of Certain Existing Permits or 
Leases.--The Committee notes with concern that legislation to 
make land available for the mitigation of impacts on wildlife 
upon the relinquishment of certain grazing permits or leases in 
the California Desert (section 122(b) of Division E of Public 
Law 112-174) has not been implemented as Congress intended. The 
purpose of the legislation is to establish a mitigation bank to 
provide: an expedited path forward for allowable development 
including renewable energy; an environmental benefit to 
wildlife; and opportunities for local governing agencies to 
plan and mitigate their growth without removing private lands 
from the tax rolls. The Committee recognizes that these goals 
are consistent with the Secretary's priorities of renewable 
energy development and landscape-level conservation, and 
therefore encourages the Secretary to oversee efforts to 
convene all parties involved, and to work openly and in good 
faith to resolve remaining issues including: quantification of 
the mitigation benefit derived from the retirement of grazing 
permits; permanence or ``durability'' of the mitigation derived 
from voluntary grazing permit relinquishments; and 
establishment of a mitigation bank to expedite approved 
development projects within the California Desert Conservation 
Area.
    Horse and Burro Management.--The Committee recommends 
$80,045,000 to implement Public Law 92-195 (16 U.S.C. 1331 et 
seq.) requiring the protection, management, and control of 
free-roaming horses and burros on public lands, $2,800,000 
above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $193,000 below the 
budget request. Within this amount, the Committee recommends 
$1,000,000 to study and test the feasibility of implementing a 
sterilization program in partnership with universities and non-
profit organizations in order to ensure that the program is 
scientifically sound and humanely implemented. The Committee 
also supports continued research to develop and refine a 
variety of fertility-control methods, including 
immunocontraceptives, which allow for self-sustaining 
populations of wild horses and burros while maintaining the 
genetic viability of the protected herds. The bill continues a 
prohibition on funds to implement Section 1333(b)(2)(C) of 
Title 16, United States Code, requiring the humane destruction 
of excess animals that are not adopted. The bill also continues 
a general provision within Title I allowing the BLM to enter 
into long-term contracts and agreements for holding facilities 
off the range.
    The horse and burro management program in its current state 
is unsustainable and the Committee cannot afford to perpetuate 
the situation for much longer. The Committee received testimony 
this year from advocates for a long-term strategy of 
sustainable, non-lethal population management, as well as 
advocates for short-term solutions to the problems caused by an 
overabundance of free-roaming horses and burros currently on 
the range. The Committee has a responsibility to see that both 
issues are addressed and invites the Bureau and bipartisan 
stakeholders to work with the Committee in preparation for the 
fiscal year 2016 budget.
    Wildlife Management.--The Committee recommends $52,338,000 
for wildlife management, equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and $251,000 below the budget request. The recommendation 
includes $15,000,000 for sage-grouse conservation, as 
requested. Sage-grouse conservation is discussed in further 
detail in the front of this report.
    Plant Conservation Program.--The Committee is supportive of 
the Bureau's existing plant conservation and native plant 
materials program and expects the Bureau to continue the 
program through resources provided under various accounts. The 
Committee is concerned that the Bureau's policy of using highly 
localized genetic varieties of native seeds may be 
unnecessarily limiting, driving up procurement costs, and 
causing delays in re-seeding areas burned by fire. The Bureau 
is directed to publish its yearly estimated seed needs by 
variety, to be more transparent with the science supporting its 
policy, and to more clearly explain the policy in the fiscal 
year 2016 budget request.
    Recreation Management.--The Committee recommends 
$63,906,000 for recreation resources management, $3,055,000 
below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $4,551,000 below 
the budget request. No funds are provided for the youth in the 
great outdoors initiative. The bill includes a general 
provision in Title IV prohibiting the use of funds to close 
areas open to recreational hunting and shooting as of January 
1, 2013.
    The Committee is concerned about the BLM's potential 
development or expansion of new public lands along a portion of 
the Red River between Texas and Oklahoma that are the subject 
of a long-standing boundary dispute. The Committee directs the 
Secretary to consult with the States and Congress before taking 
any further action.
    Energy and Minerals.--The Committee recommends $147,493,000 
for energy and minerals, $17,374,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and $44,714,000 above the budget request. The 
recommendation includes the redistribution of inspection base 
funding from Oil and Gas Management to Oil and Gas Inspection 
and Enforcement. The recommendation includes the increases 
requested to implement GAO-recommended reforms in oil and gas 
management, inspection, and enforcement, but pays for the 
increases from reductions elsewhere in the bill instead of 
through the proposed new inspection fees.
    Resource Management Planning.--The Committee recommends 
$38,125,000 for resource management planning, $1,000,000 above 
the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $4,274,000 below the 
budget request. Included is $1,000,000 to initiate the 
requested geospatial information program. The Committee 
cautions the Bureau not to duplicate existing efforts at the 
U.S. Geological Survey and in the private sector.
    Law Enforcement.--The Committee recommends $20,000,000 for 
law enforcement, $5,325,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and $5,657,000 below the budget request. The Bureau is 
directed to focus on visitor safety and archaeological resource 
protection, and to defer to the Department of Justice and the 
Department of Homeland Security for investigative and other 
non-emergency matters of Federal law not unique to Bureau lands 
or property.
    Challenge Cost Share.--The Committee recommends $3,464,000 
for the challenge cost share program, $1,051,000 above the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $115,000 below the budget 
request. The Committee directs the Bureau to focus the program 
on supporting the goals of the youth in the great outdoors 
initiative. The Committee believes those goals are best 
achieved through partnerships with the outdoor industry and the 
general public for projects focused on the maintenance and 
development of trails. Of the funds provided, $300,000 is for 
long-standing outdoor ethics education and stewardship programs 
designed to help keep America's public lands healthy, open and 
accessible for opportunities to enjoy responsible outdoor 
recreation, especially high-impact activities such as 
recreational shooting and off-highway vehicle use.
    National Landscape Conservation System.--The Committee 
recommends $30,819,000 for the national landscape conservation 
system, $1,000,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$3,181,000 below the budget request. No funds are provided for 
the youth in the great outdoors initiative. The bill includes a 
general provision in Title I prohibiting the use of funds to 
implement Secretarial Order Number 3310 pertaining to wild 
lands.
    Steens Mountain Cooperative Management and Protection Act 
of 2000.--The Committee is concerned that BLM has attempted to 
place the responsibility for fencing upon private landowners 
within the cattle free area identified by the Act, despite the 
Act's clear mandate that fencing is BLM's responsibility. The 
BLM is directed to comply with the Act.

                            LAND ACQUISITION




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $19,463,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        25,000,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................         4,816,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................       -14,647,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       -20,184,000


    The Committee recommends $4,816,000 for Land Acquisition, 
$14,647,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$20,184,000 below the budget request. The amounts recommended 
by the Committee compared with the budget estimates by activity 
are shown in the table at the end of this report.
    The Committee directs the Bureau of Land Management to 
prioritize recreational access projects that significantly 
enhance access to existing public lands that are impractical to 
access for hunting, fishing, and other recreational activities.

                   OREGON AND CALIFORNIA GRANT LANDS




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................      $114,467,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................       103,957,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................       114,467,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       +10,510,000


    The Committee recommends $114,467,000 for the Oregon and 
California grant lands, equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and $10,510,000 above the budget request. A detailed 
table of funding recommendations below the account level is 
provided at the end of this report.

                           RANGE IMPROVEMENTS

    The Committee recommends an indefinite appropriation of not 
less than $10,000,000 to be derived from public lands receipts 
and Bankhead-Jones Farm Tenant Act lands grazing receipts, as 
requested.

               SERVICE CHARGES, DEPOSITS, AND FORFEITURES

    The Committee recommends an indefinite appropriation 
estimated to be $32,465,000 for Service Charges, Deposits, and 
Forfeitures, as requested.

                       MISCELLANEOUS TRUST FUNDS

    The Committee recommends an indefinite appropriation 
estimated to be $24,000,000, as requested.

          ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS, BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT

    The Committee recommendation includes the requested 
Administrative Provisions.

                UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) 
is to conserve, protect and enhance fish and wildlife and their 
habitats for the continuing benefit of people. The Service has 
responsibility for migratory birds, threatened and endangered 
species, certain inter-jurisdictional fisheries, certain marine 
mammals, the National Fish Hatchery System, and the National 
Wildlife Refuge System.

                          RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................    $1,188,339,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................     1,260,000,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................       500,842,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................      -687,497,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................      -759,158,000


    The Committee recommends $500,842,000 for Resource 
Management, $687,497,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and $759,158,000 below the budget request. Most of the 
perceived reduction represents transfers to new accounts for 
Partners for Fish and Wildlife, the National Wildlife Refuge 
System, and Fish and Aquatic Conservation, which were 
previously within the Resource Management account. A detailed 
table of funding recommendations below the account level is 
provided at the end of this report. The Committee 
recommendation includes further details below.
    Ecological Services.--The Committee recommends against the 
proposed new consolidated budget structure for Ecological 
Services. The Committee received hearing testimony this year 
from Service partners expressing concern about a decrease in 
budget transparency as a result of the proposal. The Committee 
shares this concern, in particular because habitat conservation 
plans (HCPs), recovery and delisting, and environmental 
contaminants remain funding priorities. The fate of those 
activities in particular would have been less certain under the 
proposed new structure.
    Endangered Species.--The Committee recommends $169,537,000 
for endangered species, $974,000 below the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and incomparable to the budget request because of 
the proposed budget restructuring. The Committee recommendation 
includes new bill language allowing for the transfer of funds 
from Resource Management to Fish and Aquatic Conservation for 
non-regulatory ESA activities.
    Candidate Conservation.--The Committee recommends 
$11,219,000 for the conservation of candidate species, $311,000 
below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and incomparable to 
the budget request because of the proposed budget 
restructuring. The Committee recommends against the proposed 
increase of $4,000,000 and 20 new FTE employees for sage-
grouse, and instead recommends that the funds be used to help 
restore the proposed cut to the State and Tribal Wildlife 
Grants program. Sage-grouse conservation is discussed in 
further detail in the front of this report.
    Listing and Critical Habitat.--The Committee recommends 
$17,852,000 for ESA listings and critical habitat designations, 
$2,663,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$4,927,000 below the budget request. The Committee 
recommendation continues bill language as requested, capping 
funds for ESA listings, critical habitat designations, and 
petitions in order to limit the impacts of petitions and 
lawsuits on the rest of the budget. The Committee remains 
concerned that deadlines imposed by the 2011 multispecies 
litigation settlements may be compromising the Service's 
ability to be thorough in its economic impact analyses, to 
provide fair public notice and opportunity to comment, to base 
decisions upon the best available scientific evidence, and to 
be exceptionally transparent with the information upon which 
its decisions are made. The Service is directed to re-evaluate 
its workplans in order to meet these obligations in light of 
the budget, and to request deadline extensions as necessary.
    The Committee notes that there is substantial disagreement 
regarding the sufficiency and accuracy of the science 
underpinning the Service's proposal to list the northern long-
eared bat. The Service made a prudent decision in June 2014 to 
extend a final listing decision for 6 months. If, at the end of 
the 6-month extension, the Service makes a final decision to 
list the species, the Committee encourages the Service to make 
every effort to consider including a special rule that 
addresses threats to the species while allowing activities that 
minimally affect the species to continue.
    Consultation and HCPs.--The Committee recommends 
$62,550,000 for ESA consultations and habitat conservation 
planning (HCP) activities, $1,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2014 enacted level and incomparable to the budget request 
because of the proposed budget restructuring. The increase 
above the enacted level is for additional FTE employees to work 
on HCPs. The Committee recognizes the important role of HCPs in 
both recovery of species and in providing economic certainty 
and growth to municipalities affected by listed species, and 
encourages the Service to place a priority on working with 
partners making good faith efforts to develop and implement 
responsible HCPs.
    Recovery.--The Committee recommends $77,916,000 for 
recovery, $1,000,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level 
and incomparable to the budget request because of the proposed 
budget restructuring. The Committee recommends that the 
increase above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level be used to 
increase the Service's contribution to long-standing, multi-
partner recovery programs, such as for northern aplomado 
falcons and California condors, for which non-Federal partners 
have been shouldering the large majority of the costs to 
prevent extinction.
    The Committee is concerned that the Service has failed to 
act in a timely fashion to delist the valley elderberry 
longhorn beetle, which the Service first recommended for 
delisting in 2006. The Service failed to act on its own 
recommendation until 2010 when it received a petition to do so 
that triggered deadlines required by the ESA. The Service 
issued a proposed rule to delist in 2012 but to date has not 
issued a final rule. The Committee has been made aware that the 
reason for the delay in this case is at least partly 
attributable to a scientific peer review suggesting that 
further studies are needed. Seemingly unnecessary further 
studies, along with allegations of a conflict of interest with 
one of the peer reviewers, are cause for concern. Therefore, 
the Committee has included a general provision in Title I of 
the bill to delay for at least one year any decision by the 
Service to either withdraw the proposed rule or to issue a 
final rule, and to re-open the public comment period in the 
interim. The social and economic costs of listing the valley 
elderberry longhorn beetle under the ESA are well documented 
and tragic. The Committee strongly supports its delisting as 
has been the recommendation by the Service for the past eight 
years.
    The Committee believes that proposals to delist and 
downlist species should be finalized within 12 months just as 
they are for proposals to list. Similarly, the Committee 
believes that listings come with an obligation to develop 
recovery plans and evaluate the economic impacts of 
implementing such plans within 18 months as is the policy but 
not the practice. The Federal government is as obligated to 
recover and delist species as it is to list them in the first 
place. For this reason, the Committee has included a general 
provision in Title I of the bill to require the Service to 
develop such recovery plans and economic analyses for certain 
amphibians which the Service has recently listed.
    The Committee directs the Service to include in its next 
Recovery Report to Congress an update on whether each species 
is more or less numerous, or unknown, since the species was 
listed, the recovery plan was finalized, or the latest 5-year 
status review was completed, whichever is more recent.
    The Committee encourages the Service to move forward with a 
proposal to delist the gray wolf, because the Service has 
established that the species is recovered, and because the 
current situation creates unnecessary management challenges 
along arbitrary geographic boundaries within States like 
Oregon, where wolves are currently listed under the ESA on one 
side of a highway, but delisted and under State management on 
the other side of the highway.
    In response to supportive testimony by diverse groups of 
constituents, the Committee recommends $1,000,000 from within 
funds to restore the wolf-livestock demonstration program, as 
authorized by Public Law 111-11. The Committee urges the 
Administration and interested parties to seek funding for this 
program through the Department of Agriculture in future years.
    The Committee has been made aware of the controversy 
surrounding the proposed La Purisima Conservation Bank in 
California, which would create an easement on private lands 
which could then be used to mitigate the loss of endangered 
species habitat on other lands. The Federal government's role 
in the establishment of conservation banks on split estates 
must not impact the private property rights of any surface or 
subsurface owners without their consent or fair compensation. 
The Committee directs the Service to publish in the Federal 
Register advance notice of its intent to approve any future 
phase of the La Purisima project involving a split estate, and 
invite public comment on the proposed agreement, as stated in 
the Service's May 2, 2003, policy on conservation banking.
    Habitat Conservation.--The Committee rejects the budget 
proposal to change Habitat Conservation from a subactivity to 
an activity, as explained above. The Committee recommends 
$50,941,000 for programs within this subactivity. The Partners 
for Fish and Wildlife program has been moved to a new account, 
as explained above. Coastal programs are funded at $13,684,000, 
an increase of $500,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level to accelerate technical corrections and updates of 
coastal floodplain maps.
    Migratory Bird Management.--The Committee recommends 
$45,213,000 for migratory bird management, $1,255,000 below the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $1,709,000 below the budget 
request. The Committee has been made aware that black vulture 
predation on livestock is a problem, either due to a learned 
behavior, an overabundance of black vultures, or both. The 
Committee directs the Service to institute an electronic 
application and reporting system for depredation permits, and 
to process such applications as quickly as possible. The fiscal 
year 2016 budget request should quantify average permit 
processing times and set a goal to minimize such times. The 
fiscal year 2016 budget request should also include an estimate 
of costs, FTE, and a timeline to develop and test an 
appropriate survey protocol to assess black vulture 
distribution and population size, and to determine whether and 
where the species may be overabundant.
    Law Enforcement.--The Committee recommends $66,737,000 for 
law enforcement, $2,462,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and equal to the budget request. The recommendation 
includes program increases of $1,247,000 to strengthen the only 
wildlife forensics laboratory in the nation, as requested, and 
$747,000 for three additional agents in the Service's Special 
Investigations Unit, in order to combat wildlife trafficking. 
Funding is provided to enforce Lacey Act illegal logging 
violations.
    International Affairs.--The Committee recommends 
$14,599,000 for international affairs, $1,093,000 above the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and equal to the budget request. 
The Committee remains concerned about the severity of poaching 
in Africa, particularly with respect to elephant ivory and 
rhinoceros horn, and the destabilizing effect it has on 
regional security, including by providing a significant source 
of financing for armed groups with links to transnational 
organized crime and terrorism. The Committee notes the negative 
consequences to U.S. interests in regional security, 
development, and biodiversity conservation. The Committee 
supports the Service's role in the following elements of the 
National Strategy for Combating Wildlife Trafficking: (1) site-
based law enforcement protection in Africa for the most at-risk 
populations of forest and savannah elephants; (2) development 
and implementation of regional wildlife law enforcement 
networks in Africa and Asia; and (3) training local park guards 
and other wildlife law enforcement officers. These programs 
should be carried out in coordination with other U.S. agencies 
including Department of State and USAID, local governments and 
international conservation partners. The Committee encourages 
the Secretary to work with the intelligence community to 
develop an appropriate framework for the timely sharing of 
information and intelligence that would enable FWS to more 
effectively investigate and make arrests on wildlife 
trafficking crimes.
    The Committee received testimony from a diverse array of 
concerned citizens and organizations regarding the Service's 
unilateral action to ban the trade and transport of products 
containing ivory that have legally been in the United States 
for years and in some cases generations, including expensive 
family heirlooms and rare musical instruments. Everyone 
supports saving elephants, but the Service's regulatory actions 
have gone too far by penalizing innocent U.S. citizens instead 
of focusing on the heart of the problem overseas. Therefore the 
Committee has included a general provision in Title I to 
maintain the status quo legal domestic ivory trade and 
transport policies.
    The Committee is concerned that the Service appears to have 
begun to implement a proposed rule regarding captive-bred 
wildlife (76 Fed. Reg. 58455) before such rule has been 
finalized, resulting in at least one instance of permitting 
delays for the routine and lawful transport of captive bred, 
``generic'' tigers. Until the rulemaking process has been 
completed and a final rule has been published, the Committee 
reminds the Service that all permits should be processed in 
accordance with existing regulations and past precedents so 
that permitees can reasonably plan and operate.
    Science.--The Committee recommends $5,096,000 for science, 
$12,139,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$5,096,000 above the budget request. No funds are provided in 
the proposed new science subactivity, a decrease of $31,634,000 
below the budget request.
    The Committee recognizes that scientific support from the 
U.S. Geological Survey has been insufficient in meeting the 
Service's needs, and supports re-building the Service's 
capacity for scientific research and application. However, the 
Service appears to be struggling with how to go about building 
its capacity. The fiscal year 2015 budget requests a third 
location in the budget for science in as many years. The 
Service has added a layer of science administrators nationwide, 
which seems unnecessary. The Committee notes that the National 
Fish Hatchery System has been a national leader in the science 
of fish health and fish culture for decades under the existing 
fisheries program leadership structure. The Committee 
encourages the Service to reconsider its approach and to 
propose future increases for science within the budgets of 
existing programs that need the science, such as fisheries, 
refuges, migratory birds, and endangered species, if such 
science is a priority for the programs.
    Landscape Conservation Cooperatives.--No funds are provided 
for Landscape Conservation Cooperatives due to higher 
priorities elsewhere in the Service's budget.

                     PARTNERS FOR FISH AND WILDLIFE

    It is estimated that 73 percent of the nation's land is 
privately owned and that the majority of the nation's fish and 
wildlife species occur on those lands. Thus the Fish and 
Wildlife Service cannot be successful in its mission without 
voluntary, non-regulatory partnerships with private landowners. 
The Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program began in 1987 and 
was codified by the Partners for Fish and Wildlife Act in 2006.




Appropriation enacted, 2014*..........................       $51,776,000
Budget estimate, 2015*................................        52,066,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        52,066,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................          +290,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                0

*Funding for this program was in the Resource Management account.

    The Committee recommends $52,066,000 for Partners for Fish 
and Wildlife, $290,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level 
and equal to the budget request. Whereas the budget request 
included the program under the Resource Management account, the 
Committee recommends moving the program to its own account in 
order to prevent the use of funds for activities not authorized 
by the Partners for Fish and Wildlife Act. The Committee 
directs the program to adjust its regional funding allocations 
as necessary so as to reflect the Sage Grouse Initiative as the 
program's top priority. The Committee directs the Service to 
seek reauthorization of the program.

                    NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM

    The National Wildlife Refuge System comprises approximately 
150 million acres of land and waters, with refuges in all U.S. 
States and Territories around the world. These lands and 
waters, including 54 million acres within five Marine National 
Monuments, provide habitat for thousands of species of wildlife 
and plants, sanctuary for hundreds of threatened and endangered 
species, and secure spawning areas for economically and 
recreationally important native fish. The 562 refuges range 
from a half-acre to 19.6 million acres in size. The Refuge 
System also encompasses 4.2 million acres managed under 
easement, agreement, or lease, including waterfowl production 
areas in 209 counties within 38 wetland management districts 
and 50 wildlife coordination areas. Over 45 million people 
visit the Refuge System annually.




Appropriation enacted, 2014*..........................      $472,202,000
Budget estimate, 2015*................................       476,400,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................       476,865,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................        +4,663,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................         +465,000

*Funding for this program was in the Resource Management account.

    The Committee recommends $476,865,000 for the National 
Wildlife Refuge System, $4,663,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and $465,000 above the budget request. The amount 
above the budget request is to restore the proposed transfer of 
planning funds to the Land Acquisition account. Whereas the 
budget request included funding for the Refuge System under the 
Resource Management account, the Committee recommends moving 
the Refuge System to its own account in order to prevent the 
use of funds for activities not authorized by the National 
Wildlife Refuge Administration Act and related mandates. A 
detailed table of funding recommendations below the account 
level is provided at the end of this report. The Committee 
recommendation includes further details below.
    The bill includes a provision limiting the establishment or 
boundary expansion of any refuge unless expressly authorized by 
Congress. The Service is unique in its authority to 
administratively establish a refuge, expand its boundaries, and 
to purchase lands, water rights, and mineral rights therein, 
without any further action from Congress. The Committee 
recognizes that such authority originated with the need to act 
quickly to save species from certain extinction, and urges 
Congress to act quickly (as it has before) if similar 
circumstances arise. In the meantime, the Service's use of its 
unilateral authority has become a problem for two reasons:
    (1) New refuges and an expanded Federal estate place an 
additional funding burden on a Refuge System already struggling 
to keep up with its responsibilities. According to its closest 
partners, $900 million is needed to fully fund the Refuge 
System, and without increases in operations and maintenance, 
the Refuge System cannot fulfill its obligation to the American 
public, wildlife, and 46.5 million annual visitors. Further, 
the Service reports that the Refuge System has a $1.7 billion 
maintenance backlog. The Committee will continue to do what it 
can to be supportive of the Refuge System, but higher 
bipartisan funding priorities in this bill prevent the 
Committee from keeping pace with the additional costs of 
operating and maintaining new and expanded refuges.
    (2) The Committee has been made aware of efforts by the 
Service to purchase lands and water rights without due 
consultation and cooperation with State and local officials. 
Federal lands are exempt from local taxes, but the Service 
continually proposes to zero out payments in lieu of taxes 
through the National Wildlife Refuge Fund. Economic studies 
cited by the Service to justify its actions are misleading 
because they do not account for the variability of impacts at 
local levels. Federal purchase of water rights similarly denies 
a fundamental resource to State and local officials and the 
people they are elected to govern. The Federal government must 
be more sensitive to State and local needs, particularly in 
light of a rapidly changing climate and the uncertainty it 
brings.

                     FISH AND AQUATIC CONSERVATION

    Since 1871, the Fisheries program of the U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service has been a leader in managing species, 
conserving habitat, and sustaining the biological health of 
America's aquatic resources. Its role began as the U.S. Fish 
Commission on Fish and Fisheries 140 years ago with a singular 
focus on stock assessment and propagation for subsistence and 
recreational purposes. Over time, it has taken on the added 
focus of holistically and collaboratively managing populations 
of fish and other aquatic species, conserving and restoring 
habitat, managing for threats of invasive species, and 
ultimately sustaining the biological health of America's 
aquatic resources. These resources are among the world's 
richest in abundance and diversity and provide scientific, 
aesthetic, recreational, commercial, subsistence, cultural, 
social, and economic benefits to Americans. Approximately 700 
employees in the Fish and Aquatic Conservation Program are 
located nationwide in 154 facilities, including 72 National 
Fish Hatcheries and one historic fish hatchery, 65 Fish and 
Wildlife Conservation Offices (including the Alaska 
Conservation Genetics Laboratory), nine Fish Health Centers, 
six Fish Technology Centers, and the Aquatic Animal Drug 
Approval Partnership (AADAP) Program.




Appropriation enacted, 2014*..........................      $135,319,000
Budget estimate, 2015*................................       138,919,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................       147,916,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................       +12,597,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       +8,997,000

*Funding for this program was in the Resource Management account.

    The Committee recommends $147,916,000 for Fish and Aquatic 
Conservation (herein ``Fisheries''), $12,597,000 above the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $8,997,000 above the budget 
request. Whereas the budget request included funding for 
Fisheries under the Resource Management account, the Committee 
recommends moving Fisheries to its own account in response to 
efforts by the Service since fiscal year 2012 to shift National 
Fish Hatchery System funds away from mitigation and recreation, 
and towards recovery and programs outside of Fisheries, despite 
concerns from the States, other program partners, and the 
Committee. A detailed table of funding recommendations below 
the account level is provided at the end of this report. The 
Committee recommendation includes further details below.
    Program-wide.--The bill includes new language codifying the 
fundamental activities of Fisheries already authorized by 
various statutes and Executive Orders but without a unifying 
``organic'' Act, and mandating that they continue in fiscal 
year 2015. Those activities include: conserving fish, other 
aquatic species, and their habitats at self-sustaining levels 
and furthering the science therein; fulfilling the Federal 
government's fishery mitigation responsibilities for Federal 
water development projects; fulfilling Indian tribal trust 
responsibilities; minimizing aquatic invasive species; and 
promoting youth engagement, employment, and conservation 
through demonstrated support for recreational fishing and other 
public use and enjoyment of aquatic resources.
    National Fish Hatchery System Operations.--The Committee 
recommends $52,860,000 for operations, $6,332,000 above the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $4,243,000 above the budget 
request. The increases are intended to enable Fisheries to meet 
the mandates below.
    The Service informed the Committee before its publication 
that the March, 2013, National Fish Hatchery System Strategic 
Hatchery and Workforce Planning Report would go out for 
consultation. The Committee was disappointed to learn that 
parts of the report are already being implemented before the 
consultation has been completed, despite a budget increase in 
fiscal year 2014 and despite strong concerns by the States. The 
Committee's intent for fiscal year 2015 is to maintain the 
status quo at all hatcheries and to keep all hatcheries in 
proper working condition until such time as the Service has 
properly and in good faith consulted with the States, Tribes, 
the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council, and other 
key partners, and updated the Fisheries Program Strategic Plan. 
To that end, the bill includes the following new provisions:
    (1) Capping funding for Endangered Species Act activities 
at fiscal year 2012 levels. This is to ensure that funds 
appropriated in this account for recreation are not diverted to 
recovery as has been the Service's stated intent.
    (2) Allowing for additional funding for ESA activities to 
be transferred from the Resource Management account where the 
bulk of the ESA budget currently resides. The Assistant 
Director for Ecological Services has lead responsibility for 
ESA. If he needs the help of the Fisheries program in order to 
meet high ESA priorities, he should have the flexibility to 
transfer funds to Fisheries in order to carry out the work.
    (3) Assigning the Secretary of the Interior with the lead 
for annually determining the Federal government's hatchery 
mitigation responsibilities. Where those responsibilities are 
not clearly defined in statute, and where those 
responsibilities fluctuate as part of the normal fisheries 
management process, the Secretary should consult with States, 
Tribes, and other Federal cabinet agencies.
    (4) Requiring the Secretary to annually fulfill those 
hatchery mitigation responsibilities and report to Congress on 
any responsibilities not fulfilled. Only the Secretary of the 
Interior, with responsibility for the national fish hatchery 
system and with a history of hatchery propagation for 
recreational fishing dating back 140 years, is equipped to meet 
those responsibilities.
    (5) Requiring those Federal agencies responsible for 
Federal water development projects to share up to 100 but not 
less than 50 percent of the costs to fulfill the Federal 
government's hatchery mitigation responsibilities. The intent 
is to ensure that mitigation costs are factored up front into 
the budgets of future water development projects. The Service 
is directed to include a full estimate of the costs, along with 
a cross-cut table of amounts requested, by agency, in its 
annual budget request to Congress.
    (6) Preventing the Service from terminating any current 
production programs, or repurposing, downsizing, or closing any 
hatcheries. The intent is to maintain the status quo until the 
program partners have been fully consulted and a strategic plan 
has been published. Once completed, the Committee will revisit 
this provision in future appropriations so that the Service, in 
consultation with States and Tribes, has reasonable flexibility 
to make normal adjustments.
    (7) Requiring the Service to publish an annual hatchery 
operations and maintenance plan, by facility, so that annual 
budgets and production targets are transparent to program 
partners and Congress.
    Mass Marking.--The Committee recommendation continues a 
general provision in Title I requiring the mass marking of 
salmonids. The Committee recognizes the differences of opinion 
about the policy among affected parties. The Committee 
therefore requests that the Government Accountability Office 
report to the Congress on the effect of the mass marking policy 
on the recovery of threatened and endangered salmonids.
    Aquatic Animal Drug Approval Partnership.--The Committee 
recommends not less than $237,000 for the Aquatic Animal Drug 
Approval Partnership, equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and the budget request.
    Habitat Assessment and Restoration.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $12,748,000 for the National Fish 
Passage Program, as requested. The Committee directs the 
Service to determine whether unintentional barriers to fish 
passage are being installed faster than this and other programs 
like it are removing them, and to determine whether program 
funding is more effective if focused on prevention instead of 
restoration.
    Aquatic Invasive Species.--The Committee recommends an 
increase of $4,400,000 as requested to fight the spread of 
Asian carp. The Committee is concerned about the rapid spread 
of several invasive species of Asian carp into the Upper 
Mississippi River and Ohio River basins and tributaries, which 
are threatening ecosystems and billions of dollars of economic 
activity connected to outdoor recreation in States throughout 
the Midwest. While the Committee continues to support Federal 
efforts focused on preventing the spread of Asian carp into the 
Great Lakes, there is growing recognition of the threat these 
invasive species pose to other ecosystems in the Upper 
Mississippi and Ohio River basins. The Committee directs the 
Service, in coordination with the Army Corps of Engineers, 
National Park Service, and U.S. Geological Survey, to lead a 
multi-agency effort to slow the spread of Asian carp in the 
Upper Mississippi River and Ohio River basins and tributaries 
by providing high-level technical assistance, coordination, 
best practices, and support to State and local government 
strategies to slow, and eventually eliminate, the threat posed 
by Asian carp. To the maximum extent practicable, the multi-
agency effort shall apply lessons learned and best practices 
developed under the Asian Carp Control Strategic Framework to 
efforts in the Upper Mississippi and Ohio River basins.
    The Committee remains concerned about the rapid spread of 
quagga and zebra mussels in the West. As the Aquatic Nuisance 
Species Task Force stated in its February 2010 Quagga-Zebra 
Mussel Action Plan for Western U.S. Waters, ``Without increased 
and immediate action, quagga and zebra mussels will cause 
irreparable ecological damage to western waters and long-term 
costs will be in the billions.'' The Committee therefore 
recommends not less than $3 million to implement one or more of 
the Highest Priority Actions identified in the Action Plan, and 
directs the Service to transfer funds to other Federal member 
agencies of the Task Force if necessary to implement these 
Actions. These additional funds are intended to supplement 
existing funds already budgeted by Task Force member agencies 
for fiscal year 2015.

                              CONSTRUCTION




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $15,722,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        15,687,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        14,305,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................        -1,417,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        -1,382,000


    The Committee recommends $14,305,000 for Construction, 
$1,417,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$1,382,000 below the budget request. A detailed table of 
funding recommendations below the account level is provided at 
the end of this report. No funding is provided for installation 
of photovoltaic solar arrays. The goal of moving to self-
sufficient, renewable energy is laudable, but the Committee is 
concerned that the Service's estimate of 32 years to recoup the 
costs of the project exceeds the average length of the warranty 
of photovoltaic solar arrays currently on the market, which is 
25 years. Photovoltaic technology is advancing rapidly while 
costs are coming down, and the Service is encouraged to request 
future funding for such projects when they become more 
economically viable. No funding is provided for demolition and 
removal of buildings.

                            LAND ACQUISITION




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $54,422,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        55,000,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        14,500,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................       -39,922,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       -40,500,000


    The Committee recommends $14,500,000 for Land Acquisition, 
$39,922,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$40,500,000 below the budget request. The amounts recommended 
by the Committee compared with the budget estimates by activity 
are shown in the table at the end of this report.
    In a time when budgetary constraints allow for only a 
limited number of new land acquisition projects, the Committee 
is encouraged by programs that leverage public/private 
partnerships for land conservation like the Highlands 
Conservation Act, which has a record of more than a 2 to 1 
ratio in non-Federal matching funds. Therefore, the Committee 
recommendation includes $3,500,000 for the Highlands 
Conservation Act Grants and directs the Fish and Wildlife 
Service to work with the Highlands States regarding priority 
projects for fiscal year 2015.
    The Committee understands that the Fish and Wildlife 
Service (FWS) is developing a proposal to place certain private 
rangeland in central California into permanent Federal 
conservation easements without sufficient stakeholder 
involvement in the process. The Committee is concerned that 
this program may infringe on private property rights by denying 
landowners the ability to use, develop or manage their 
property; unnecessarily increase regulatory burdens and 
restrictions on private land management; and deny local 
governments' ability to develop and zone land use and planning 
activities. Therefore, the Committee has included bill language 
prohibiting the use of funds for issuing a final environmental 
assessment, an environmental impact statement, or a categorical 
exclusion for the California Foothills Legacy Area easement 
program. The Committee directs the FWS to work with affected 
stakeholders to address their concerns.

            COOPERATIVE ENDANGERED SPECIES CONSERVATION FUND

    The Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund 
provides grants to States and territories for endangered 
species recovery actions on non-Federal lands and provides 
funds for non-Federal land acquisition to facilitate habitat 
protection.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $50,095,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        50,000,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        49,227,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................          -868,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................          -773,000


    The Committee recommends $49,227,000 for the Cooperative 
Endangered Species Conservation Fund, $868,000 below the fiscal 
year 2014 enacted level and $773,000 below the budget request. 
A detailed table of funding recommendations below the account 
level is provided at the end of this report.

                     NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE FUND

    The National Wildlife Refuge Fund makes payments in lieu of 
taxes based on their fair market value to counties in which 
Service lands are located. Payments to counties in all 50 
States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, and the U.S. 
Virgin Islands are estimated to be $68,990,000 in fiscal year 
2015, with $63,202,000 derived from this appropriation and 
$5,788,000 from the net refuge receipts estimated to be 
collected in fiscal year 2014.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $13,228,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................                 0
Recommended, 2015.....................................        38,073,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................       +24,845,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       +38,073,000


    The Committee recommends $38,073,000 for the National 
Wildlife Refuge Fund, $24,845,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and $38,073,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee notes the inconsistency with which the Administration 
proposes full funding for Payments in Lieu of Taxes (as is 
provided elsewhere in this bill) and proposes zero funding for 
the National Wildlife Refuge Fund. Both programs are designed 
to accomplish the same goal, albeit for different but similar 
lands, and should therefore be treated similarly.

               NORTH AMERICAN WETLANDS CONSERVATION FUND

    The North American Wetlands Conservation Act of 1989 
provided for grants to carry out wetlands conservation projects 
in the United States, Canada, and Mexico for the benefit of 
wetlands-associated migratory birds and other wildlife. 
Additional program funding comes from fines, penalties, and 
forfeitures collected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 
1918; from Federal fuel excise taxes on small gasoline engines, 
as directed by amendments to the Federal Aid in Sport Fish 
Restoration Act of 1950, to benefit coastal ecosystem projects; 
and from interest accrued on the fund established under the 
Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act of 1937. Authorization 
of appropriations expired in fiscal year 2012.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $34,145,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        34,145,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        34,145,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $34,145,000 for the North American 
Wetlands Conservation Fund, equal to the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and the budget request.

                NEOTROPICAL MIGRATORY BIRD CONSERVATION

    The Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act of 2000 
authorized grants for the conservation of neotropical migratory 
birds in the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean, 
with 75 percent of the amounts available to be expended on 
projects outside the United States. Authorization of 
appropriations expired in fiscal year 2010.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................        $3,660,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................         3,660,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................         3,660,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $3,660,000 for neotropical 
migratory bird conservation, equal to the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and the budget request.

                MULTINATIONAL SPECIES CONSERVATION FUND

    The Multinational Species Conservation Fund provides 
technical support and cost-sharing grant assistance to 
countries to strengthen anti-poaching activities; builds 
community support for conservation near the species' habitats; 
conducts surveys, monitoring, and applied research; and 
provides infrastructure and field equipment necessary to 
conserve habitats. These funds help to leverage work with 
partners and other collaborators to conserve and protect 
African and Asian elephants, rhinoceroses, tigers, great apes 
and marine turtles and their habitats. Authorizations of 
appropriations for the programs within this Fund have all 
expired.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................        $9,061,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................         9,061,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        10,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................          +939,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................          +939,000


    The Committee recommends $10,000,000 for the Multinational 
Species Conservation Fund, $939,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and the budget request. A detailed table of 
funding recommendations below the account level is provided at 
the end of this report. The Committee recognizes that 
international wildlife trafficking has national security 
implications and therefore supports the Service's interagency 
and international cooperative efforts. The Committee further 
urges the Service and other interested parties to seek to 
reauthorize these programs.

                    STATE AND TRIBAL WILDLIFE GRANTS

    The State and Tribal Wildlife Grants Program provides 
Federal grant funds to the States, the District of Columbia, 
the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the territories, and Tribes, 
to develop and implement programs for the benefit of fish and 
wildlife that are not under Federal jurisdiction. The intent is 
to avoid the costly and time-consuming process entered into 
through the Endangered Species Act or other regulatory actions.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $58,695,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        50,000,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        58,695,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        +8,695,000


    The Committee recommends $58,695,000 for State and Tribal 
Wildlife Grants, equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted level 
and $8,695,000 above the budget request. Tribal competitive 
grants are funded at $5,000,000, an increase of $1,000,000 
above the budget request. State formula grants are funded at 
$41,000,000 as requested. State competitive grants are funded 
at $12,695,000, an increase of $7,695,000 above the budget 
request.
    The Committee recommendation is in response to an increase 
in the Service's Endangered Species Act listing activities as a 
consequence of settlement agreements entered into by the 
Service in 2011, many of which are likely to impair the 
nation's ability to become energy independent. The Committee's 
intent with the State competitive grants is to have multiple 
States working together and with the Service to make a 
concerted push where it is reasonably possible to conserve 
species named in the settlement agreements so that listing 
becomes unnecessary. The Service is expected to consult with 
the States to determine the highest priorities, to award grants 
accordingly, and to communicate successes. States are 
encouraged to do the same with the formula grants.

                      LANDOWNER INCENTIVE PROGRAM

                               RESCISSION




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................                $0
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        -1,327,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        -2,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................        -2,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................          -673,000


    The Committee recommends a rescission of $2,000,000 from 
recovered funds and unobligated balances within the Landowner 
Incentive Program account, $2,000,000 below the fiscal year 
2014 enacted level and $673,000 below the budget request.

                       PRIVATE STEWARDSHIP GRANTS

                               RESCISSION




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................                $0
Budget estimate, 2015.................................           -24,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................           -24,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................           -24,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends a rescission of $24,000 from 
recovered funds and unobligated balances within the Private 
Stewardship Grants account, $24,000 below the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and equal to the budget request.

                         NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

    The mission of the National Park Service (Service) is to 
preserve unimpaired the natural and cultural resources and 
values of the national park system for the enjoyment, 
education, and inspiration of this and future generations. 
Established in 1916, the National Park Service has stewardship 
responsibilities for the protection and preservation of the 
heritage resources of the national park system. The system, 
consisting of 401 separate and distinct units, is recognized 
globally as a leader in park management and resource 
preservation. The national park system represents much of the 
finest the Nation has to offer in terms of scenery, historical 
and archeological relics, and cultural heritage. Through its 
varied sites, the National Park Service attempts to explain 
America's history, interpret its culture, preserve examples of 
its natural ecosystems, and provide recreational and 
educational opportunities for U.S. citizens and visitors from 
all over the world. In addition, the National Park Service 
provides support to tribal, local, and State governments to 
preserve culturally significant, ecologically important, and 
public recreational lands.
    The National Park Service will be 100 years old in 2016, 
and the Service has embarked on a ten-year effort to enhance 
the national parks leading up to this historic celebration. The 
Committee supports this effort leading to a second century of 
conservation, environmental stewardship and recreation 
benefiting millions of visitors from throughout the world.

                 OPERATION OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................    $2,236,753,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................     2,283,852,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................     2,268,610,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................       +31,857,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       -15,242,000


    The Committee recommends $2,268,610,000 for Operation of 
the National Park System (ONPS), $31,857,000 above the fiscal 
year 2014 enacted level and $15,242,000 below the budget 
request. The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with 
the budget estimates by activity are shown in the table at the 
end of this report.
    Additional Guidance.--The following additional direction 
and guidance is provided with respect to funding provided 
within this account:
    Centennial of the National Park Service.--The Centennial of 
the National Park Service marks the beginning of a second 
century of stewardship, education, conservation, and recreation 
involving some of America's most treasured spaces. The 
Committee recognizes the importance of this historic national 
celebration and is committed to its success. Accordingly, the 
Committee is providing $30 million, as requested, within the 
National Park Service Operations account to support the 
Centennial Initiative and related efforts to address the 
Service's deferred maintenance backlog. The Committee 
understands that these funds will support enhanced visitor 
services in the areas of interpretation and education, law 
enforcement and protection, and facility operations; expand 
opportunities for managing and coordinating volunteers in 
parks; provide meaningful youth service and training 
opportunities to educate and train the next generation of Park 
Service leaders; and support repair and rehabilitation projects 
on high priority park assets across the entire system.
    Recognizing the scope of this effort, specifically in terms 
of funding provided and the complexity of the numerous efforts 
being undertaken, the Committee directs the Service to provide 
a report, not later than 90 days after enactment of this Act, 
detailing the distribution of funds supporting the Centennial 
Initiative and the anticipated return on investment on this 
substantial Federal investment.
    Lastly, the Committee commends the Service for its planned 
public engagement campaign to highlight the Centennial and many 
of the nation's prized park units with the American public. The 
Committee notes that this marketing effort will be funded in 
collaboration with the National Park Foundation, the Service's 
congressionally chartered nonprofit partner, and other non-
Federal partners.
    Aquatic Invasive Species.--The Committee remains concerned 
about the rapid spread of quagga and zebra mussels in the West. 
The Committee directs the Secretary of the Interior to develop 
and continue to update, using the best available science 
minimum protocols and training techniques for Federal, State, 
local, and private entities, a consistent standard of 
inspection and decontamination of recreational watercraft and 
equipment, as prescribed in the February 2010 Quagga/Zebra 
Mussel Action Plan for Western U.S. Waters.
    Further, the Committee directs the National Park Service to 
provide no less than $2,000,000 for quagga, and zebra mussel 
containment, prevention, and enforcement and prioritize the 
decontamination of watercraft and equipment leaving the 
watersheds of contaminated bodies, including Lake Powell and 
Lake Mead. Lastly, the Committee directs the Service to report 
back, no later than 90 days after enactment of this Act, on 
steps taken to address this pervasive threat to western 
watersheds.
    White-Nose Syndrome (WNS) in bats.--The Committee is 
concerned over the effects white-nose syndrome is having on the 
important roles bats perform in ecological functions in parks 
and supports the Service's efforts to address the disease. 
Specifically, the Committee supports measures detailed in the 
budget request to control the spread of the disease; protect 
and better inventory NPS bat and cave resources; expand 
research and partnerships for research on WNS management; 
monitor NPS resources for WNS; conduct public education about 
WNS; and standardize visitor WNS screening procedures across 
park units.
    Park Partnerships.--Over the past several years and most 
recently in its explanatory statement accompanying the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014, the Committee has 
expressed its support for ongoing public-private partnerships 
and strongly encouraged the Service to expand their use. These 
partnerships frequently leverage Federal dollars many times 
over and add value to our national parks by bringing wide-
ranging perspectives to the efficient management of park 
resources. The Committee believes such partnerships are 
fundamental to the long-term fiscal and administrative health 
of the Service.
    Further, the Committee believes there is merit in the 
Service partnering with qualified entities to cooperatively 
finance and manage improvements to park facilities and 
programs, including assisting in the planning and construction 
of facilities, repairing and rehabilitating facilities and 
landscapes, and providing educational and interpretive 
programs. The Committee commends the Service for efforts thus 
far made to expand partnerships but believes more can be done. 
The Department and the Service are therefore strongly 
encouraged to reassess current policies in order to encourage 
the greater use of partnerships that have historically proven 
beneficial to national parks and partners.
    Screening technology.--The Committee encourages the 
National Park Police to review and procure the latest 
technological advancements in screening equipment for high-risk 
soft targets by utilizing the SAFETY Act and other procurement 
methods beyond the Transportation Safety Laboratory as 
additional tools for reviewing designated technologies. The 
goal of the SAFETY Act is to encourage the development and 
deployment of effective anti-terrorism products and services.
    Anacostia River.--The Committee is aware of the potential 
presence of toxics such as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons 
(PAHs), Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) and other substances 
in the bottom sediments of the Anacostia River. These chemicals 
are detrimental to aquatic life and are possible human 
carcinogens. As the National Park Service has significant land 
interests adjacent to the Anacostia River, the Committee 
encourages the Service to coordinate work with the District of 
Columbia's Department of the Environment and its ongoing 
remedial investigation to characterize the nature and extent of 
toxics in the sediment, and its planned feasibility study to 
examine best remediation options.
    Historic properties.--The Committee supports innovative 
partnerships that exist between the Service and its friends 
groups to raise private funds to restore and open closed 
historic properties. The Committee urges the Service to work 
with friends groups to expand this practice wherever 
practicable and report back to the Committee on a timely basis 
on its progress and any impediments to achieving successful 
outcomes.
    Historic Leases.--The Committee believes that historic 
leases provide a cost-effective, innovative opportunity to 
attract private capital and expertise to the challenges of 
preserving park resources. The Committee applauds the efforts 
of the Service and private partners to successfully implement 
such leases, and encourages the broader use of this important 
authority to mitigate the maintenance backlog of historic 
structures.
    Sewall-Belmont House and Museum.--The Sewall-Belmont House 
and Museum is an affiliated site of the National Park System 
and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The 
Service is presently conducting a study to determine if this 
historic landmark merits inclusion in the park system as a 
standalone unit. The Committee urges the timely completion of 
the study and directs the Service to share its findings with 
the Committee. Further, the Committee urges the Service to 
engage public and private supporters of the Sewall-Belmont 
House and Museum to develop a long-term sustainability 
strategy.
    U.S. Capitol Concerts.--The Committee continues its 
longstanding support for funding for the National Capitol Area 
Performing Arts Program and directs the Service to maintain 
funding for the summer concert series staged on the U.S. 
Capitol grounds at the fiscal year 2014 enacted level.
    National Mall Restoration.--The National Mall is the most 
visited national park in the nation with 25 million annual 
visitors. The Committee continues to support the public-private 
partnership relating to the restoration of the National Mall. 
Integral to this effort is the management and operation of 
concessions and visitor services. Accordingly, the Committee 
directs the Service to prepare and submit, within 90 days of 
enactment of this Act, a multi-year plan for the management and 
operation of concessions within the National Mall and Memorial 
Parks.
    Everglades Restoration.--The Committee notes the 
substantial progress made toward restoration of the Everglades 
ecosystem and continues to support this multi-year effort to 
preserve one of the great ecological treasures of the United 
States. The Department is directed to work with the Miccosukee 
Tribe of Indians of Florida to examine the water quality of the 
L-28 canal system. Further, the Committee urges the Service to 
work in partnership with the Tribe to examine the potential 
benefits of clearing vegetation downstream of the existing 
culverts under the Tamiami Trail.
    St. Augustine Commemoration.--The Committee commends the 
Department of the Interior for appointing the Federal 
Commission to commemorate the 450th anniversary of St. 
Augustine (FL). St. Augustine has been the home to many of 
America's ``firsts'' including the first permanent European 
settlement, the first freed African-American settlement, and 
the beginning of both the African-American experience and the 
Latino-American experience in the New World. The Committee 
commends the partnership between the National Park Service and 
the National Park Foundation that has resulted in $100,000 
being provided to support the work of the Commission. The 
Committee urges the Service to work with the Commission to 
identify additional funds that can be leveraged in support of 
this important endeavor.
    Chief Standing Bear Trail Study.--The Committee urges the 
Service to study the establishment and designation of a 
nationally recognized Chief Standing Bear National Historic 
Trail spanning the Great Plains from Nebraska to Oklahoma and 
formally marking the path Chief Standing Bear traveled to bury 
his son in his tribal homeland.
    Commemorating the Lincoln Assassination.--During 2015, the 
Service and other partners will honor the life and legacy of 
Abraham Lincoln and commemorate 150 years since his 
assassination at Ford's Theatre. Programming is being developed 
to commemorate the tragic events and highlight the lasting 
legacy of Lincoln. A special exhibition will reunite artifacts 
from the night of the assassination for the first time in 150 
years. An around-the-clock vigil and special programming will 
occur on April 14 and 15, 2015 at Ford's Theatre to mark 
Lincoln's assassination, one of the pivotal moments in American 
history. The Committee directs the Service to support this 
initiative within available funds and encourages the use of 
non-Federal funds from participating partners to support this 
effort.
    U.S. Park Police aviation support.--The Committee 
understands the importance of the Washington, DC area U.S. Park 
Police aviation unit which supports law enforcement and park 
operations in the national capitol area. It has come to the 
Committee's attention that there may be a need to replace an 
aging helicopter and requests that U.S. Park Police provide, 
not later than 90 days after enactment of this Act, a report on 
progress toward replacing this helicopter. Further, the 
Committee asks the U.S. Park Police to examine historical use 
of its existing aging helicopter to ensure that the suggested 
replacement model is commensurate with proven need.
    U.S. Park Police budget presentation.--The Committee 
commends the Service for initiating changes to its annual 
budget presentation to align the U.S. Park Police budget with 
the park areas it supports. The Committee urges the Service to 
initiate this transition in the execution of the fiscal year 
2015 budget and expects future budget justifications to reflect 
these changes.
    Ozark National Scenic Riverways.--The Committee understands 
that the Service is in the process of updating the Draft 
General Management Plan for the Ozark National Scenic 
Riverways. The Committee believes it is critical for the 
Service and the Department to take into account the many 
genuine concerns raised by Federal, State, and local officials, 
including local communities and businesses, prior to 
finalizing, implementing, or enacting the new Draft General 
Management Plan. The Committee strongly urges the Service to 
develop a framework that maintains public access and reiterates 
its strong objection to any effort to administratively declare 
wilderness areas absent a congressional wilderness designation. 
The Committee directs the Service to work collaboratively with 
affected parties to ensure that any Draft Management Plan for 
the Ozark National Scenic Riverways addresses the legitimate 
concerns of affected stakeholders including, but not limited 
to, local communities and businesses.
    National Park Service Diversity.--The Committee recognizes 
the importance of diversity within the professional staff of 
the National Park Service and encourages efforts to diversify 
the Service's workforce. Further, the Committee encourages the 
Service to, within existing funds, emphasize communication and 
outreach strategy to underserved communities to alert them of 
cultural and historic programs recognizing and celebrating 
diversity. Lastly, the Committee encourages the Service to 
promote programs that will increase diversity amongst park 
service visitors.
    NPS-administered Parkways.--The National Park Service is 
directed to prepare and submit to the Committee a report on 
traffic safety involving NPS-administered parkways. The report 
shall include recommendations on improving safety through 
enhanced traffic separation barriers and other means.
    America's First Frontier.--The Committee urges the Service 
to advance interpretive efforts at existing National Park 
Service sites and in collaboration with other Federal, State, 
and local agencies to detail the start of westward expansion 
through the Northwest Territory as America's First Frontier.
    Bill Language.--The Committee has, since 2006, included 
bill language authorizing the Secretary of the Interior to 
acquire or lease property to facilitate the transportation of 
visitors to and from Ellis, Governors, and Liberty Islands, NY 
and NJ. The language was necessitated by the need to establish 
a screening process for visitors to the Statue of Liberty in 
the aftermath of the events of September 11, 2001. While the 
location of future, permanent screening facilities for the 
ferry operation to the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island is 
now uncertain, prior-year bill language is retained as the 
Service reviews the security risks of alternative sites before 
making final decisions on the future location of permanent 
security screening facilities.

                  NATIONAL RECREATION AND PRESERVATION

    The National Recreation and Preservation account provides 
for outdoor recreation planning, preservation of cultural and 
national heritage resources, technical assistance to Federal, 
State and local agencies, and administration of Historic 
Preservation Fund grants.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $60,795,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        51,998,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        60,695,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................          -100,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        +8,697,000


    The Committee recommends $60,695,000 for National 
Recreation and Preservation, $100,000 below the fiscal year 
2014 enacted level and $8,697,000 above the budget request. The 
amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the budget 
estimates by activity are shown in the table at the end of this 
report.
    Additional Guidance.--The following additional direction 
and guidance is provided with respect to funding provided 
within this account:
    Heritage Partnership Program (HPP).--The Committee 
recommends $18,289,000 for the Heritage Partnership Program 
(HPP), equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted level. These funds 
support grants to local non-profit groups in support of 
historical and cultural recognition, preservation and tourism 
activities.
    Congress has in recent years expanded from 27 to 49 the 
number of authorized heritage partnerships, creating additional 
pressure on available grant funding. The National Park Service, 
as the administrator of the program, has developed a new 
funding strategy that ensures newer areas receive enough 
federal funding to establish themselves to a level that may 
eventually become self-sustaining. Under this approach, older, 
more established, areas will continue to receive funds, but at 
a level that recognizes the decades of significant Federal 
financial support these areas have received. Heritage Areas 
were never intended to receive Federal funding in perpetuity, 
yet the Committee notes they continue to depend on annual 
appropriations.
    The Committee has in the recent past provided direction for 
the development of self-sufficiency plans, and the Committee 
fully expects pressure on HPP funding to increase in future 
years. Accordingly, the Committee directs that participating 
heritage areas move expeditiously to develop plans for long-
term self-sustainability. The Committee supports the Service's 
efforts to allocate funding in a manner that moves all 49 areas 
towards self-sustainability.
    Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation 
Grants.--The Committee supports the budget request for the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Grant 
Program.
    Japanese American Confinement Site Grants.--The Committee 
supports the budget request for the Japanese American 
Confinement Site Grant Program which leverages proportional 
funding through partnerships with local preservation groups to 
preserve Japanese American World War II confinement sites.
    American Battlefield Protection Program Assistance 
Grants.--The Committee supports the budget request for the 
American Battlefield Protection Program (ABPP) which assists in 
the preservation and protection of America's battlefields 
through site identification, documentation, planning, 
interpretation, and educational efforts.
    Bill language.--The Committee has included within Title IV 
General Provisions bill language extending by one year the 
American Battlefield Protection Program.

                       HISTORIC PRESERVATION FUND

    The Historic Preservation Fund supports the State historic 
preservation offices to perform a variety of functions. These 
include State management and administration of existing grant 
obligations; review and advice on Federal projects and actions; 
determinations and nominations to the National Register; Tax 
Act certifications; and technical preservation services. The 
States also review properties to develop data for planning use. 
Funding in this account also supports direct grants to 
qualifying organizations for individual preservation projects 
and for activities in support of heritage tourism and local 
historic preservation.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $56,410,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        56,410,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        56,410,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $56,410,000 for historic 
preservation, equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
the budget request.
    Additional Guidance.--The following guidance is provided 
with respect to funding provided within this account:
    State and Tribal Historic Preservation Offices.--The bill 
provides $47,425,000 for State Historic Preservation Offices, 
of which $500,000 is for grants to underserved communities. The 
bill also provides $8,985,000 for Tribal Historic Preservation 
Offices.

                              CONSTRUCTION




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................      $137,461,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................       138,339,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................       138,265,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................          +804,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................           -74,000


    The Committee recommends $138,265,000 for Construction, 
$804,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $74,000 
below the budget request.
    Tamiami Trail project.--The Committee was pleased to see 
the Governor of Florida pledge $90 million to support the 
completion of the Tamiami Trail 2.6 mile bridge segment. The 
Committee notes that the Administration has demonstrated its 
support in the reauthorization of the Highway bill for the 
Tamiami trail and other nationally significant federal 
transportation projects. The Committee also notes that the 
National Park Service has pledged in its fiscal year 2015 
budget, a matching of $30 million per year for three years, 
from its non-appropriated Federal Lands Transportation Program 
starting in fiscal year 2015 to cover 50 percent of the cost of 
contract payments due.
    The Committee understands that the Service recently 
released a draft boundary adjustment study of the Ocmulgee 
National Monument area, that the preferred alternative of this 
draft recommends additional protections for the important 
prehistoric settlements that lie adjacent to the existing 
National Monument, and that the Service is currently reviewing 
public comments on the draft for possible incorporation into 
the final study. The Committee looks forward to receiving the 
recommendations of the Service once the study is finalized.
    Bill Language.--The Committee has included bill language 
providing that a single procurement may be issued which 
includes the full scope of the project for any project 
initially funded in fiscal year 2015 with a future phase 
indicated in the NPS five-year Line Item Construction program. 
The solicitation and contract in such procurement shall be 
subject to availability of funds. Executing a single contract 
has the potential to increase economies of scale and reduce 
overall costs.

                    LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND

                               RESCISSION




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................      -$28,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................       -30,000,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................       -28,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................         2,000,000


    The Committee recommends the rescission of the annual 
contract authority provided by 16 U.S.C. 460l-10a. This 
authority has not been used in years and there are no plans to 
use it in fiscal year 2015. The Committee does not agree with 
the Administration's proposal to permanently cancel the 
authority.

                 LAND ACQUISITION AND STATE ASSISTANCE




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $98,100,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................       104,000,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        67,486,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................       -30,614,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       -36,514,000


    The Committee recommends $67,486,000 for Land Acquisition 
and State Assistance, $30,614,000 below the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and $36,514,000 below the budget request. In 
addition to the traditional State Conservation Grants, the 
Committee continues funding for the competitive grant program 
at the fiscal year 2014 enacted level of $3,000,000. The 
amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the budget 
estimates by activity are shown in the table at the end of this 
report.
    American Battlefield Protection Program.--Given the 
significance of the 150th Anniversary of the Civil War, the 
Committee recognizes the importance of the American Battlefield 
Protection Program which has provided land acquisition grant 
funding to protect historically significant battlefields 
outside of current NPS boundaries. Since fiscal year 1999, more 
than 19,000 acres of the most historically significant sites 
have been preserved from development. The Committee is 
encouraged by efforts of key authorizing committees to modify 
and extend the authorization of this important program. 
Accordingly, while these efforts continue, the Committee has 
included bill language extending by one year the authorization 
for American Battlefield Protection Program grants.

                          CENTENNIAL CHALLENGE




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................                $0
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        10,000,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        10,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................       +10,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee has provided $10,000,000 for the Centennial 
Challenge matching grant program, a key component of the 
Service's Centennial Initiative. The Committee understands that 
funds will be matched on at least a 1:1 basis and administered 
under existing Service partnership authorities. Funds provided 
will be dedicated to supporting signature projects and programs 
which provide critical enhancements for the parks beyond 
amounts provided for basic operations. The Committee reminds 
the Service that the amount provided for the Centennial 
Challenge is intended to supplement funding for core 
operations. The Committee expects the Service to fully fund 
day-to-day operational costs of the parks through its core 
operations accounts. The Committee directs that preference be 
given to projects that have a clear and immediate visitor 
benefit as well as a higher partner match. The Committee notes 
that the Service has a long history of working with 
philanthropic partners and fully supports the use of public-
private partnerships wherever feasible.

                    UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    The United States Geological Survey (USGS, or ``Survey'') 
was established by an Act of Congress on March 3, 1879, to 
support the mission of the Department of the Interior and its 
science requirements. The USGS also works in collaboration with 
other Federal, State, and tribal cooperators to conduct 
research and provide scientific data and information to 
describe and understand the Earth; minimize loss of life and 
property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, 
energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our 
quality of life. The USGS is the Federal government's largest 
earth-science research agency and the primary source of data on 
the Nation's surface and ground water resources. Its programs 
address increasingly complex societal issues such as the 
development of alternative and unconventional energy resources, 
management of critical ecosystems, understanding and adaptation 
to climate change, and responses to natural and human-induced 
hazards. For more than a century, the diversity of scientific 
expertise and collaborative partnerships with universities, 
research institutions, and major public and private 
laboratories has enabled USGS to carry out large-scale, multi-
disciplinary investigations and provide impartial scientific 
information to resource managers, planners, policymakers, and 
the public.

                 SURVEYS, INVESTIGATIONS, AND RESEARCH




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................    $1,032,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................     1,073,268,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................     1,035,718,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................        +3,718,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       -37,550,000


    The Committee recommends $1,035,718,000 for Surveys, 
Investigations, and Research, $3,718,000 above the fiscal year 
2014 enacted level and $37,550,000 below the budget request. 
The Committee recommendation provides a small increase to the 
Survey recognizing that its scientific work is vital to 
managers at Federal, State, and local levels to inform public 
policy decisions regarding human health, public safety, and 
national security. The Committee commends the Survey for its 
proposed programmatic reductions included in the request and 
supports those reductions throughout the bill, unless otherwise 
stated. Requested increases for fixed costs are not funded.
    Ecosystems.--The Committee recommends $153,191,000 for 
ecosystem programs, $380,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and $8,834,000 below the budget request. The Committee 
recommendation includes the requested increases for the 
California Bay Delta; the Chesapeake Bay; Wildfire Restoration 
Ecology; the Everglades; Asian carp control; and pollinators.
    Climate and Land Use Change.--The Committee recommends 
$133,428,000 for climate and land use change programs, 
$1,453,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$15,653,000 below the budget request. The Committee 
recommendation includes the requested increases for drought 
impacts and adaptive management; the Chesapeake Bay; and 
Landsat science products for climate and natural resources 
assessments.
    The Committee encourages the Department to make an effort 
to diversify the workforce at Climate Science Centers through 
outreach and recruitment programs at Historic Black Colleges 
and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, and other 
Minority Servicing Institutions.
    Energy, Minerals, and Environmental Health.--The Committee 
recommends $91,552,000 for energy, minerals, and environmental 
health, $37,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$7,521,000 below the budget request. The Committee 
recommendation includes the requested increases for the 
Chesapeake Bay Watershed.
    The Committee supports continuing the in-depth analysis of 
the extent and sources of endocrine-disrupting chemicals 
impacting fish and wildlife in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed 
including the Potomac basin.
    Natural Hazards.--The Committee recommends $133,186,000 for 
natural hazards, $4,700,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and $4,847,000 above the budget request. The Committee 
recommendation provides full funding for earthquake, volcano, 
and landslide hazards, including the requested increase for 
induced seismicity. The Committee does not agree to the 
proposed reduction for geodetic monitoring and active-source 
seismic profiling.
    The Committee recognizes that, of all natural hazards, 
earthquakes pose the greatest threat for catastrophe as over 75 
million people live in metropolitan areas with significant 
earthquake risk. The Committee urges the Survey to continue its 
investments and improvements to the Advanced National Seismic 
System, research, and outreach efforts with State and 
university partners. Furthermore, the Committee provides 
$5,000,000 from within the funds provided for Earthquake 
Hazards to transition the earthquake early warning 
demonstration project into an operational capability on the 
West Coast.
    The Committee is concerned about the lack of knowledge and 
onshore, real-time instrumentation available for the Cascadia 
subduction zone. Scientific understanding of earthquakes and 
the ocean environment will benefit from collecting offshore 
data. Therefore, the Committee encourages the Survey to plan 
for offshore monitoring of the Cascadia subduction zone in 
future budget requests to ensure maximum effectiveness of the 
earthquake early warning system.
    The Committee understands that marine geohazards 
(earthquake-induced tsunamis, landslide-induced tsunamis and 
subsea volcano eruptions) pose a threat to citizens living on 
the West Coast, as well as the submarine areas in U.S. Island 
Territories that contain rich deposits of rare earth minerals 
and other strategic minerals important to national defense. To 
better understand marine hazard risk and resource availability, 
the Committee encourages the Survey to work in partnership with 
other Federal agencies and non-governmental organizations where 
practicable to support research and assessments of marine 
hazards and critical minerals on deepwater ships of exploration 
with an active STEM Education program.
    Water Resources.--The Committee recommends $209,267,000 for 
water resources, $1,986,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and $1,119,000 below the budget request. The Committee 
recommendation includes the requested increases for the 
National Groundwater Monitoring Network; the California Bay 
Delta; the Chesapeake Bay; the National Streamflow Information 
Program; and State water use grants.
    The Committee recommendation also continues funding at the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level for the Water Resources Research 
Institutes. The Committee supports the Survey's efforts to 
focus this funding on meeting its strategic goals and 
objectives, and urges the Survey and interested parties to seek 
reauthorization of this program.
    The Committee directs that funding for the National 
Groundwater Monitoring Network shall be used to provide cost-
share grants to States in the form of cooperative agreements to 
upgrade monitoring networks to national standards and to 
incorporate wells into the network. The funding will also 
support the additional work by the USGS to manage the network 
and provide data access through an internet web portal.
    Core Science Systems.--The Committee recommends 
$106,151,000 for core science systems, $2,656,000 below the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $3,249,000 below the budget 
request. The Committee recommendation includes the requested 
increases for the Big Earth Data Initiative; Ecosystem 
Information; the 3-D Elevation Program; the Alaska mapping 
project; and the National Map Modernization effort.
    Science Support.--The Committee recommends $105,611,000 for 
science support activities, $5,093,000 below the fiscal year 
2014 enacted level and $2,656,000 below the budget request. The 
Committee agrees with the proposed reductions in administrative 
services.
    Facilities.--The Committee recommends $103,332,000 for 
facilities, $2,911,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level 
and $3,365,000 below the budget request. The Committee 
recommendation provides $2,000,000 for the USGS Cost Savings 
and Innovation Plan. The Committee supports this long-term 
effort to reduce the USGS facilities footprint and directs the 
Survey to include a summary of the completed renovations and 
analysis of savings achieved in its fiscal year 2016 budget 
request, as well as projected future savings to the bureau.
    Bill Language.--The bill provides two-year funding 
authority except for satellite operations and deferred 
maintenance and capital improvement projects, which are no-year 
authority. Provisos include a funding limitation on surveys on 
private property and a cost-share requirement on topographic 
mapping and water resources activities in cooperation with 
States and municipalities.

                   BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT

    The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management is responsible for 
the environmentally and economically sound development of the 
Nation's offshore energy and mineral resources. The Bureau's 
management of these resources helps meet the Nation's energy 
needs by providing access to--and fair return to the American 
taxpayer for--offshore energy and mineral resources through 
strategic planning and resource and economic evaluation. 
Conventional energy activities include development of the Five-
Year Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing Program; 
assessment of mineral resource potential, tracking of 
inventories of oil and gas reserves, and development of 
production projections; and economic evaluation to ensure the 
receipt of fair value through lease sales and lease terms.

                        OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $69,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        72,422,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        72,422,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................        +3,422,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $72,422,000 for Ocean Energy 
Management as requested and $3,422,000 above the fiscal year 
2014 enacted level. The estimated collection of offsetting 
rental receipts and cost recovery fees total $97,348,000. The 
Committee recommendation does not provide funding for National 
Ocean Policy Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning.
    The Committee continues to support the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2014 bill language authorizing the 
Secretary of the Interior to establish higher minimum rates of 
basic pay through fiscal year 2015 for petroleum engineers and 
petroleum engineering technicians at the Bureau of Ocean Energy 
Management and the Bureau of Safety and Environmental 
Enforcement.
    The Committee supports the development of the ePlans 
initiative, which will serve to reduce review processing time 
for exploration and development plans and facilitate the timely 
issuance of permits. Further, given the highly technical nature 
of operations on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), the 
Committee supports BOEM's continued collaboration with the 
National Academy of Sciences.
    The Committee welcomes BOEM's Programmatic Environmental 
Impact Statement (PEIS) for geological and geophysical (G&G;) 
activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) and 
encourages the timely issuance of permits for G&G; activities to 
better understand the potential resources on the Atlantic OCS 
and incorporate this information into the development process 
of the upcoming 2017-2022 Five Year Program. The Committee 
supports the $2,500,000 request to develop the PEIS required to 
move forward with the 2017-2022 Five Year Oil and Gas Leasing 
Program, and encourages the consideration of leasing for all 
areas with reasonable potential for future resource 
development, including areas of the Mid- and South-Atlantic.

             BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT

    The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement is 
responsible for oversight of exploration, development, and 
production operations for oil, gas, and other marine minerals 
on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). Leases in Federal waters 
off the shores of California, Alaska, and the Gulf of Mexico 
provide about 25 percent of the Nation's oil production and 
more than 10 percent of domestic natural gas production. The 
Bureau facilitates the safe and environmentally responsible 
development of oil and gas and the conservation of offshore 
resources. The Bureau's safety and environmental compliance 
activities include oil and gas permitting; facility 
inspections, regulations and standards development; safety and 
oil spill research; field operations; environmental compliance 
and enforcement; review of operator oil spill response plans; 
production and development; and operation of a national 
training center for inspectors and engineers.

             OFFSHORE SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $63,745,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        66,147,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        66,147,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................        +2,402,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $66,147,000 for Offshore Safety 
and Environmental Enforcement as requested, and $2,402,000 
above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level. The estimated 
collection of offsetting rental receipts, cost recovery fees 
and inspection fees totals $123,579,000.
    Environmental Enforcement Activity.--The Committee rejects 
the consolidation of the Environmental Enforcement Activity 
into the Operations, Safety and Regulation Activity because the 
proposal would reduce budget transparency.
    The Committee appreciates the Bureau's efforts to keep pace 
with new ideas and technologies, and therefore supports the 
request for Best Available and Safest Technologies (BAST). The 
Committee expects that this investment will leverage funds to 
address issues associated with technology validation, testing 
protocols and economic feasibility analysis, to ease permitting 
processes complicated by ever-emerging technologies in higher-
risk, harsh environments.
    Red Snapper Fishery.--The Committee recognizes the 
economic, cultural, and recreational importance of the red 
snapper fishery in the Gulf of Mexico. The Committee is 
concerned that the Bureau's Idle Iron policy, which requires 
removal of oil and gas platforms that go unused for a period of 
five years, is negatively impacting the red snapper fishery in 
the Gulf. Given the importance of this target species and 
recent concerns expressed by local communities, the Committee 
directs the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement to 
share with each of the Gulf State's Marine Resources 
Departments, and the Committee, its current list of idle 
platforms in the Gulf of Mexico and the schedule for removal of 
each platform. Additionally, the Committee directs the Bureau 
to work with each of the Gulf States regarding incorporating 
this abandoned infrastructure into the Rigs to Reefs program of 
each State.

                           OIL SPILL RESEARCH




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $14,899,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        14,899,000
Recommended, 2014.....................................        14,899,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $14,899,000 for Oil Spill 
Research, equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and the 
budget request. The Committee supports BSEE's emphasis on 
improving oil spill response options and pro-active evaluations 
of oil spill response capabilities for conditions unique to 
Arctic environments in anticipation of production on the Alaska 
North Slope.
    The Committee is interested in the Department's findings 
related to anticipated maintenance and/or enhancements that 
would be needed at the Ohmsett facility. Any plans or intended 
investments would be expected within a new strategic plan, 
which should be developed prior to expiration of the Bureau's 
2012-2015 plan.

          OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT

    The Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 
(OSM), through its regulation and technology account, regulates 
surface coal mining operations to ensure that the environment 
is reclaimed once mining is completed. The OSM accomplishes 
this mission by providing grants and technical assistance to 
those States that maintain their own regulatory and reclamation 
programs and by conducting oversight of State programs. 
Further, the OSM administers the regulatory programs in the 
States that do not have their own programs and on Federal and 
tribal lands. Through its Abandoned Mine Land (AML) reclamation 
program, the OSM provides funding for environmental restoration 
at abandoned coal mines based on fees collected from current 
coal production operations. In their un-reclaimed condition 
these abandoned sites endanger public health and safety, and 
prevent the beneficial use of land and water resources. 
Mandatory appropriations provide funding for the abandoned coal 
mine sites as required under the 2006 amendments to the Surface 
Mining Control and Reclamation Act.

                       REGULATION AND TECHNOLOGY




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................      $122,713,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................       116,110,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................       121,713,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................        -1,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        +5,603,000


    The Committee recommends $121,713,000 for Regulation and 
Technology, $1,000,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level 
and $5,603,000 above the budget request. Since fiscal year 
2011, the Administration has proposed to reduce grants for 
State programs in order to pressure States into raising fees on 
industry. Each year the Committee has summarily rejected this 
proposal and the Committee does so again in fiscal year 2015. 
The bill funds regulatory grants at $68,590,000, equal to the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level.
    The Committee similarly rejects the proposal to increase 
inspections and enhanced Federal oversight of State regulatory 
programs. Delegation of the authority to the States is the 
cornerstone of the surface mining regulatory program, and State 
regulatory programs do not require enhanced Federal oversight 
to ensure continued implementation of a protective regulatory 
framework. Accordingly, the Committee has not provided the 
requested funding and FTE increase for those activities within 
the Regulation and Technology account.
    Further the Committee has reduced funding for the Office of 
the Director within the executive direction line by $1,000,000 
and directs OSM and the Administration to discontinue efforts 
to push States to raise fees as the bill provides the funds 
necessary for States to operate their regulatory programs.
    Within 180 days of enactment, the Congressional Research 
Service (CRS) shall conduct a study on the status of the 1974 
United Mine Workers of America Pension Plan and the 1993 
Multiemployer Health Benefit Plan in relation to the solvency 
of the private sector contributors to the plans. In particular 
the Committee asks CRS to analyze the impact to the pensioners 
and the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation in the event of 
the insolvency of the plans.

                    ABANDONED MINE RECLAMATION FUND




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $27,399,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        28,695,000
Recommended, 2015                                             27,399,000
Comparison:...........................................
    Appropriation, 2014...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        -1,296,000


    The Committee recommends $27,399,000 for the Abandoned Mine 
Reclamation Fund, equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted level 
and $1,296,000 below the budget request.

        BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS AND BUREAU OF INDIAN EDUCATION

    The Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Bureau of Indian 
Education, and the Office of the Assistant Secretary-Indian 
Affairs (together, ``Indian Affairs'') provide services 
directly or through contracts, grants, or compacts to a service 
population of more than 1.7 million American Indians and Alaska 
Natives who are enrolled members of 566 federally recognized 
Tribes in the 48 contiguous United States and Alaska. While the 
role of the organization has changed significantly in the last 
four decades in response to a greater emphasis on Indian self-
determination, Tribes still look to Indian Affairs for a broad 
spectrum of services. Programs are funded and operated in a 
highly decentralized manner, with almost 85 percent of all 
appropriations expended at the local level, and over 62 percent 
of appropriations provided directly to Tribes and tribal 
organizations through grants, contracts, and compacts.
    In preparation of the fiscal year 2015 budget, the 
Subcommittee held two days of hearings and received testimony 
from over 100 witnesses on a variety of topics pertaining to 
American Indian and Alaska Native programs. The Federal 
government has a legal and moral obligation to provide quality 
services to American Indians and Alaska Natives. On a 
bipartisan basis, the Committee has been attempting to protect 
and, where possible, strengthen the budgets of those agencies 
and programs serving Indian Country in this bill to address 
longstanding needs.

                      OPERATION OF INDIAN PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................    $2,378,763,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................     2,412,596,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................     2,434,202,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................       +55,439,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       +21,606,000


    The Committee recommends $2,434,202,000 for the operation 
of Indian programs, $55,439,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and $21,606,000 above the budget request. A 
detailed table of funding recommendations below the account 
level is provided at the end of this report. The Committee 
recommendation includes further details below.
    Contract Support Costs.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $246,000,000 as requested for full funding of 
estimated contract support costs. The Committee expects Indian 
Affairs to submit a reprogramming request to the Committee if 
the final calculated contract support costs exceed this amount 
in order to ensure that contract support costs are fully paid. 
The Committee recognizes that inconsistencies exist between the 
Bureaus and the Indian Health Service in the ways that contract 
support costs are estimated and managed, and encourages both 
the agencies and the Tribes to recommend ways that the 
Committee can be helpful in promoting consistency. Tribes that 
exercise their self-determination rights and enter into 
contracts with multiple Federal agencies shouldn't have to 
navigate inconsistent rules across different agencies.
    Road Maintenance.--The Committee recommends $26,461,000 for 
road maintenance, $2,158,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
operating plan and $2,000,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee recognizes that too many roads on Indian reservations 
are in poor condition and are a significant safety concern. 
Moreover, poor road conditions have a direct negative impact on 
school children. The amount above the budget request is 
intended to address the most urgent safety concerns, including 
the roads used as school bus routes. The Committee urges Tribes 
to work with the Bureau of Indian Affairs to inventory all 
school bus route roads in the reservation system, and to submit 
such inventory annually with the Bureau's budget request so 
that the Committee can begin to more comprehensively address 
this problem.
    Trust-Natural Resources Management.--The Committee 
recommends $180,352,000 for natural resources management 
programs that help the Federal government meet its trust 
responsibilities, $3,943,000 below the fiscal year 2014 
operating plan and $3,660,000 below the budget request. 
Cooperative landscape conservation is funded at $5,948,000, 
which is $3,999,000 below the fiscal year 2014 operating plan. 
In the Committee's opinion, the Bureau took advantage of its 
unique budget flexibility in fiscal year 2014 by increasing 
this program from $947,000 to $9,947,000. Forestry is funded at 
$47,735,000, equal to the fiscal year 2014 operating plan and 
$1,840,000 above the budget request, in recognition of the 
importance of tribal forestry management in the larger national 
effort to minimize major wildland fires through sustainable 
forestry and hazardous fuels reduction.
    Education.--The Committee recommends $822,228,000 for 
Bureau of Indian Education system operations and maintenance, 
$33,474,000 above the fiscal year 2014 operations plan and 
$27,839,000 above the budget request. Indian Education remains 
among the Committee's top priorities because it is a 
fundamental trust responsibility and because the elementary and 
secondary students in particular have fallen far behind their 
peers for reasons now well documented by the Government 
Accountability Office, the Department of Education, and others. 
Changes to the budget request and further instructions follow.
    The Committee recommends $12,592,000 for the education 
program enhancements budget line item, $502,000 above the 
fiscal year 2014 operating plan and $473,000 above the budget 
request. The Committee recommends $2,000,000 from within funds 
for matching competitive grants to tribally controlled schools 
that voluntarily choose to implement reforms recommended by the 
joint Department of the Interior--Department of Education 
American Indian Education Study Group.
    The Committee recommends $15,520,000 for early child and 
family development, $69,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
operating plan and equal to the budget request. The Committee 
strongly supports early childhood development models that 
address the achievement gap of Indian children primarily 
located on rural reservations by teaching preschool Indian 
children the skills they need to begin school and offering 
developmental opportunities for parents. The BIE is directed to 
publish its report on the 2013-14 school year internal review 
of early childhood education programs in order to improve 
program direction and transparency.
    The Committee recommends $72,019,000 to fully fund tribal 
grant support costs, $23,766,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
operating plan and the budget request. The Committee recognizes 
that fully funding these costs is consistent with the policy of 
fully funding contract support costs, and is instrumental for 
encouraging tribal control of schools.
    The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for competitive grants 
to Tribal Education Departments as authorized by section 1042 
of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (25 U.S.C. 2020).
    The Committee recommends $14,739,000 for the Johnson 
O'Malley program, $401,000 above the fiscal year 2014 operating 
plan and equal to the budget request. The BIE is directed, in 
coordination with the Department of Education including using 
existing Department methods if practicable, and in consultation 
with Tribes, to biennially update its count of students 
eligible for the Johnson-O'Malley Program, and to include a 
discussion of the application of the results in its annual 
budget request to Congress, beginning with the fiscal year 2016 
request.
    Early childhood caries (i.e. cavities) is an epidemic in 
Indian country and among other things it impacts the ability of 
children to concentrate and learn. The Committee received 
testimony again this year about an initiative to increase 
preventive dental care for children by bringing dentists and 
hygienists into elementary schools. The Committee 
recommendation includes $500,000 in the Indian Health Service 
budget to begin the initiative and directs the BIE to work with 
the Service and to consult with Tribes about piloting the 
initiative in the BIE school system.
    The Committee is supportive of standards and curricula that 
emphasize tribal history, language and culture. As alternative 
proposals are considered, language immersion should be 
carefully considered as a serious option for improved language 
development and student outcomes.
    The Committee notes with concern the BIE's implementation 
of Common Core assessments in light of shortfalls in IT 
technology at most schools. The BIE is directed to include in 
its fiscal year 2016 budget request an estimate of the IT 
readiness at each of the 183 schools in the BIE system.
    The Committee continues language limiting the expansion of 
grades and schools in the BIE system, including charter 
schools, but has revised the language to delegate waiver 
authority to the BIE Director instead of the Assistant 
Secretary. The intent of the language is to prevent already 
limited funds from being spread further to additional schools 
and grades. The intent is not to limit tribal flexibility at 
existing schools. Nothing in the bill is intended to prohibit a 
Tribe from converting a tribally-controlled school already in 
the BIE system to a charter school in accordance with State and 
Federal law.
    The Committee includes new bill language providing the BIE 
Director with the authority to approve satellite schools of 
existing BIE schools if a tribe can demonstrate that the 
establishment of such satellite schools would provide 
comparable levels of education as are being offered at such 
existing BIE schools, and would not significantly increase 
costs to the Federal Government. The intent is to provide 
tribes with additional flexibilities as to where students are 
educated without compromising how they are educated and to 
significantly reduce the hardship and expense of transporting 
students over long distances, without unduly increasing costs 
that would otherwise unfairly come at the expense of other 
schools in the BIE system.
    The Committee remains concerned that control of BIE's 
budget, procurement, hiring, and facilities maintenance and 
construction reside not within BIE but within the Bureau of 
Indian Affairs and the Deputy Assistant Secretary-Management 
(see Government Accountability Office report GAO-13-774). For 
the fiscal year 2016 budget, the Committee will consider a new 
budget structure so that the BIE can manage all funds 
appropriated for the BIE school system. The Committee believes 
this change is necessary for leadership stability and 
accountability within the BIE. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary to submit a fiscal year 2016 budget proposing these 
changes after consulting with Tribes and tribal organizations.
    Public Safety and Justice.--The Committee recommends 
$352,850,000 for public safety and justice, $2,836,000 above 
the fiscal year 2014 operating plan and $1,000,000 above the 
budget request. The amount above the budget request is to 
provide training in Indian country to carry out the new 
provisions in the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 
2013.
    For the purpose of addressing the needs of American Indian 
youth in custody at tribal detention centers operated or 
administered by the BIA, the Committee considers educational 
and health-related services to juveniles in custody to be 
allowable costs for detention/corrections program funding.
    Indian Arts and Crafts Board.--The Committee recommends 
$1,279,000 as requested to transfer the Indian Arts and Crafts 
Board from the Office of the Secretary to the Bureau of Indian 
Affairs.
    Energy.--The Committee directs the Secretary to streamline 
and better coordinate all Departmental activities relating to 
Indian energy development, and to extend the coordination with 
other Federal agencies where feasible. As part of this effort, 
the Secretary should evaluate whether fees collected by the BLM 
from applications for permits to drill on Indian lands are 
fairly invested in staff dedicated to processing Indian energy 
permits, or whether funds are redirected elsewhere. A mechanism 
is needed to streamline the Federal permitting process and 
minimize the time required to obtain the necessary approvals 
across the many Federal agency jurisdictions. The Secretary is 
encouraged to submit with the fiscal year 2016 budget request a 
proposal to transfer funds as necessary to create an Indian 
energy permitting and oversight office geographically located 
close to the center of current demand for energy development on 
Indian lands. Memoranda of understanding are encouraged if 
necessary to co-locate Department of Agriculture, Army Corps of 
Engineers, and Environmental Protection Agency personnel where 
practicable. The Secretary is encouraged to further pursue 
industry-funded employment agreements to increase permitting 
capacity on Indian lands, as recommended by the Office of 
Inspector General in June, 2014, and to carefully construct 
these agreements to avoid conflict-of-interest issues and 
minimize risks to the Federal Government.
    Federal Recognition.--The Committee understands the 
Administration's desire to improve the Federal tribal 
recognition process, including the long delay from the date of 
filing of the petition to the actual decision. The Committee 
encourages the Secretary to carefully consider the input of all 
stakeholders in the development of the final rule.

                              CONSTRUCTION

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................      $110,124,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................       109,908,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................       167,378,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................       +57,254,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       +57,470,000


    The Committee recommends $167,378,000 for Construction, 
$57,254,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$57,470,000 above the budget request. A detailed table of 
funding recommendations below the account level is provided at 
the end of this report. The Committee recommendation includes 
further details below.
    Education.--The Committee recommends $112,958,000 for 
education construction, $57,673,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and $57,425,000 above the budget request. Of the 
recommended amount, $58,622,000 is for replacement school 
construction, $3,823,000 is for employee housing repair, and 
$50,513,000 is for facilities improvement and repair, restoring 
the cut proposed in the budget request.
    The amount for replacement school construction completes 
the last three projects on the 2004 priority list. The 
Committee directs the BIE to publish a new list in time for the 
fiscal year 2016 funding cycle. The BIE is urged to work with 
Tribes to develop and publish a maintenance and improvement 
plan for the full life cycle of each of the 183 schools in the 
BIE system and to budget accordingly.
    The Committee notes the conditions of the Bug O Nay Ge Shig 
School of the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe as an example of the 
significant safety and health hazards that have not received 
due attention by this Administration. The Committee urges the 
BIE to continue to work with the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe and 
other Tribes to repair and replace their school facilities.
    Public Safety and Justice.--The Committee commends the 
Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Indian Reservation for 
their initiative in addressing law enforcement needs by 
constructing a justice center to house their adult and juvenile 
detention and rehabilitation center, tribal courts, and police 
department. The Committee also commends the Bureau of Indian 
Affairs in its efforts to assist the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes in 
ensuring that the Center continues to operate effectively. 
Knowing that work must be done in consultation with Tribes, the 
Committee continues to encourage the Bureau to consider 
establishing regional detention centers at new or existing 
facilities, such as the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes' Justice 
Center, as it works to combat the crime problem in Indian 
Country.
    The Committee urges the Office of Inspector General to 
update its 2004 report on Indian detention facilities.
    Maintenance Shortfalls.--The Committee is concerned that 
requested funding falls short of calculated amounts to properly 
operate and maintain facilities as indicated by the Bureau's 
Facilities Maintenance Information System (FMIS), and that 
improperly funding maintenance now will lead to higher 
replacement costs in future years. The Committee directs the 
Bureau to submit with its annual budget request a table showing 
differences between amounts requested and amounts calculated by 
the FMIS, facilities condition index, estimates of outyear 
costs, and a justification of any requested funding shortfalls.

 INDIAN LAND AND WATER CLAIM SETTLEMENTS AND MISCELLANEOUS PAYMENTS TO 
                                INDIANS




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $35,655,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        35,655,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        35,655,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $35,655,000 for Indian Land and 
Water Claim Settlements and Miscellaneous Payments to Indians, 
equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and the budget 
request.
    The Committee believes that the resolution of pending 
Indian water rights settlements is critically important to 
resolve outstanding legal claims against the United States and 
to provide Tribes with clean and reliable water supplies that 
are fundamental to economic growth and self-determination. They 
also benefit surrounding communities by providing water rights 
certainty. The Committee supports the Department's efforts to 
fulfill commitments relating to Indian water rights settlements 
and its participation in negotiations of the Pechanga Band of 
Luiseno Mission Indians Water Rights Settlement.

                 INDIAN GUARANTEED LOAN PROGRAM ACCOUNT




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................        $6,731,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................         6,731,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................         7,731,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................        +1,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        +1,000,000


    The Committee recommends $7,731,000 for the Indian 
Guaranteed Loan Program Account, $1,000,000 above the fiscal 
year 2014 enacted level and the budget request. Unemployment is 
a serious problem in Indian country. This program enables 
Indian Tribes and native-owned businesses to secure financing 
for development projects and for startup and expansion of 
business operations.

                          Departmental Offices


                        Office of the Secretary

    The Office of the Secretary supports a wide-range of 
Departmental business, policy, and oversight functions. In 
September 2010, Secretarial Order 3306 established the Office 
of Natural Resources Revenue as part of the reorganization of 
the former Minerals Management Service (MMS). This revenue 
collection and compliance function is now managed within the 
Office of the Secretary.

                        DEPARTMENTAL OPERATIONS




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................      $264,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................       265,272,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................       255,736,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................        -8,264,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        -9,536,000


    The Committee recommends $255,736,000 for Departmental 
Operations, $8,264,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level 
and $9,536,000 below the budget request. The Committee concurs 
with the budget request proposal to transfer the Indian Arts 
and Crafts Board from the Office of the Secretary to the Bureau 
of Indian Affairs.
    National Monument Designations.--The Department is directed 
to work collaboratively with interested parties, including but 
not limited to, the Congress, States, local communities, tribal 
governments and others prior to planning, implementing, or 
making national monument designations.
    Contracting Models.--The Department provides transaction 
services between the public and the agency that result in the 
issuance of permits and registrations, and generate fee 
payments to support many diverse programs. In support of 
operating these programs efficiently, the Committee believes 
that in some instances using transaction-based or no-cost 
contracting models for delivering or procuring goods and 
services can save resources and avoid costs. The Committee 
encourages DOI and its bureaus and offices to pursue these 
models when it is appropriate and when it will result in 
efficiencies, savings or cost avoidance. The Committee directs 
DOI to report on the use of transaction-based or no-costing 
funding models for procuring goods and services within 120 days 
of enactment of this Act.
    Technical Assistance.--The Committee understands and values 
the technical expertise and depth of knowledge that Federal 
land managers and researchers possess, and sees the potential 
value in encouraging senior employees to share their expertise 
and technical assistance to supporting national parks and 
forests in other countries. The Committee also recognizes the 
value of encouraging these individuals to volunteer their 
services, consistent with ethics laws and requirements. The 
Committee encourages the Secretary of the Interior and the 
Chief of the Forest Service to connect willing former and 
current senior employees with opportunities to assist other 
countries in building the capacity to manage natural resources 
and public lands.
    Bill Language.--The Committee has included bill language 
extending mandatory funding of the Payments in Lieu of Taxes 
(PILT) Program for fiscal year 2015.

                            Insular Affairs


                       ASSISTANCE TO TERRITORIES

    The Office of Insular Affairs (OIA) was established on 
August 4, 1995, through Secretarial Order No. 3191, which also 
abolished the former Office of Territorial and International 
Affairs. The OIA has important responsibilities to help the 
United States government fulfill its responsibilities to the 
four U.S. territories of Guam, American Samoa (AS), U.S. Virgin 
Islands (USVI) and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana 
Islands (CNMI) and also the three freely associated States: the 
Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), the Republic of the 
Marshall Islands (RMI) and the Republic of Palau. The permanent 
and trust fund payments to the territories and the compact 
nations provide substantial financial resources to these 
governments. During fiscal year 2004, financial arrangements 
for the Compacts of Free Association with the FSM and the RMI 
were implemented. These also included mandatory payments for 
certain activities previously provided in discretionary 
appropriations as well as Compact impact payments of 
$30,000,000 per year split among Guam, CNMI, AS, and Hawaii.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $85,976,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        88,927,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        85,476,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................          -500,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        -3,451,000


    The Committee recommends $85,476,000 for Assistance to 
Territories, $500,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level 
and $3,451,000 below the budget request. A detailed table of 
funding recommendations below the account level is provided at 
the end of this report.

                      COMPACT OF FREE ASSOCIATION




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $16,465,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................         3,318,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................         3,318,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................       -13,147,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $3,318,000 for Compact of Free 
Association, $13,147,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and equal to the budget request. The Committee expects 
the Compact will be renegotiated and therefore the 
discretionary stopgap funding will not be necessary in fiscal 
year 2015. A detailed table of funding recommendations below 
the account level is provided at the end of this report.

                        Office of the Solicitor


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $65,800,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        65,800,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        64,024,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................        -1,776,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        -1,776,000


    The Committee recommends $64,024,000 for salaries and 
expenses of the Office of the Solicitor, $1,776,000 below the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and the budget request.

                      Office of Inspector General


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $50,831,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        50,047,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        49,458,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................        -1,373,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................          -589,000


    The Committee recommends $49,458,000 for salaries and 
expenses of the Office of Inspector General, $1,373,000 below 
the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $589,000 below the 
budget request. The Committee urges the Office of Inspector 
General to update its 2004 report on Indian detention 
facilities.

           Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians


                         FEDERAL TRUST PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    Congress has designated the Secretary of the Interior as 
the trustee delegate with responsibility for approximately 55 
million surface acres of land, 57 million acres of subsurface 
mineral interests, and nearly $4.4 billion that is held in 
trust by the Federal Government on behalf of American Indians, 
Alaska Natives, and federally recognized Indian Tribes. The 
Office of the Special Trustee's trust management of these 
assets includes conserving, maintaining, accounting, investing, 
disbursing, and reporting to individual Indians and federally 
recognized Tribes and tribal organizations on asset 
transactions generated from sales, leasing and other commercial 
activities on these lands.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................      $139,677,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................       139,029,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................       139,029,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................          -648,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $139,029,000 for Federal trust 
programs, $648,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
equal to the budget request. A detailed table of funding 
recommendations below the account level is provided at the end 
of this report.

                        DEPARTMENT-WIDE PROGRAMS


                        Wildland Fire Management

    The Department's Wildland Fire Management and FLAME 
wildfire suppression reserve accounts support fire activities 
for the Bureau of Land Management, the National Park Service, 
the Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Bureau of Indian 
Affairs.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................      $769,482,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................       793,969,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................       804,779,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................       +35,297,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       +10,810,000


    The Committee recommends $804,779,000 for Wildland Fire 
Management at the Department of the Interior, $35,297,000 above 
the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $10,810,000 above the 
budget request. Total funding provided in fiscal year 2015 for 
Department-wide wildland fire accounts is $896,779,000. The 
detailed allocation of funding for these accounts is included 
in the table at the end of this report.
    The Committee notes that the budget request included a 
provision almost identical to legislation that has been 
developed in the House (H.R. 3992) and the Senate (S. 1875). 
The budget request proposes to allow wildland fire suppression 
costs above 70 percent of the 10-year average for fire 
suppression to be paid from within the discretionary budget cap 
adjustment established for natural disasters, recognizing that 
wildland fires are a natural disaster akin to hurricanes, 
tornadoes, and floods. As the issue of the disaster cap 
adjustment falls outside of the Committee's jurisdiction, the 
Committee's recommendation does not include the request for 
suppression funding through the disaster cap adjustment. As in 
recent years, suppression operations are fully funded at the 
10-year average level within the suppression operations account 
and the FLAME wildfire suppression reserve fund.
    The Committee is concerned that there may have been recent 
instances in which requests for information related to 
wildfires from Congressional, State and local government 
offices were not met with a full disclosure of information. The 
Committee expects the Department of the Interior to respond in 
a timely manner to such requests, so as not to impede the 
oversight responsibilities of Congressional committees, and 
State and local government offices.
    The Committee encourages the Department to consider the 
potential use of existing commercial satellite technology to 
provide early warning, mitigation and response capabilities for 
wildland fires and to determine whether such technology may 
provide a low-cost early warning capability to save lives and 
property.
    Wildfire Preparedness.--The Committee recommends 
$318,970,000 for Wildfire Preparedness, $37,042,000 above the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and equal to the budget request. 
The Department should immediately notify the Committees on 
Appropriations if it appears that funding shortfalls may limit 
needed firefighting capacity.
    Wildfire Suppression Operations.--The Committee recommends 
$291,657,000, for Wildfire Suppression Operations, $5,779,000 
above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $23,097,000 above 
the budget request. The Committee recommendation, including 
$92,000,000 in the FLAME wildfire suppression reserve fund, 
fully funds the 10-year fire suppression average expenditures.
    Fuels Management.--The Committee recommends $160,000,000 
for the Fuels Management program (formerly ``Hazardous 
Fuels''), $14,976,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level 
and $13,713,000 above the budget request. The Committee is 
encouraged that the budget request included a small increase 
over the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and recommends 
prioritizing funding for proactive hazardous fuels management 
and fire mitigation.
    The Department is directed to implement effective 
treatments in frequent fire forests that restore forest 
resiliency and reduce hazardous fuels. Treatments should be 
placed to effectively modify fire behavior and protect assets 
at risk including life and property.
    The Committee directs the Department of the Interior to 
work collaboratively with the Forest Service and other 
stakeholders in developing hazardous fuels management plans 
that take into consideration the conservation of sage-grouse 
habitat.
    The Committee encourages the administration to seek 
additional funding in fiscal year 2016 and subsequent fiscal 
years to continue this concerted effort.
    Burned Area Rehabilitation.--The Committee recommends 
$22,035,000 for the Burned Area Rehabilitation program, 
$6,000,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$4,000,000 above the budget request. The Committee directs the 
Department to use the additional $6,000,000 for emergency 
stabilization, rehabilitation and seed to restore areas burned 
by wildfire with an emphasis on restoring sage-grouse habitat 
and encourages the Department to seek additional funding in 
fiscal year 2016 and subsequent fiscal years to ensure the 
rehabilitation of the sage-grouse habitat. The Committee notes 
that funding for emergency stabilization is meant to supplement 
emergency stabilization funding provided under suppression 
(generally ten percent), not replace it. The Committee is also 
concerned by the delay of emergency stabilization and 
rehabilitation funds to State and/or regional offices and 
directs the Department to more quickly allocate these funds so 
that critical work can be completed in a timely manner. 
Finally, the Department is directed to work with the Bureau of 
Land Management on the seed procurement direction provided in 
this report.
    The Committee is concerned with the pace of planning and 
implementation of post-fire rehabilitation by the Department of 
the Interior. The slow pace of rehabilitation leaves 
communities unable to access timber resources and delays the 
regeneration of Federal forests. The Committee directs the 
Department of the Interior to prioritize and expedite planning 
and implementation of post-fire rehabilitation projects.

                FLAME Wildfire Suppression Reserve Fund


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $92,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................                 0
Recommended, 2015.....................................        92,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       +92,000,000


    The Committee recommends $92,000,000 for the FLAME Wildfire 
Suppression Reserve Fund, equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and $92,000,000 above the budget request. As discussed 
above under the Wildland Fire Management account, the Committee 
fully funds the 10-year average expenditure for wildfire 
suppression.

                    Central Hazardous Materials Fund





Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................        $9,598,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        10,010,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................         9,598,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................          -412,000


    The Committee recommends $9,598,000 for the Central 
Hazardous Materials Fund, equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and $412,000 below the budget request.

           Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration


                NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT FUND




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................        $6,263,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................         7,767,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................         6,094,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................          -169,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        -1,673,000


    The Committee recommends $6,094,000 for the Natural 
Resource Damage Assessment Fund, $169,000 below the fiscal year 
2014 enacted level and $1,673,000 below the budget request. A 
detailed table of funding recommendations below the account 
level is provided at the end of this report.

                          Working Capital Fund





Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $57,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        64,307,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        53,786,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................        -3,214,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       -10,521,000


    The Committee recommends $53,786,000 for the Working 
Capital Fund, $3,214,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and $10,521,000 below the budget request.

General Provisions, Department of the Interior (Including Transfers of 
                                 Funds)

    Section 101 continues a provision providing for emergency 
transfer authority (intra-bureau) with the approval of the 
Secretary.
    Section 102 continues a provision providing for emergency 
transfer authority (Department-wide) with the approval of the 
Secretary.
    Section 103 continues a provision providing for the use of 
appropriations for certain services.
    Section 104 continues a provision permitting the transfer 
of funds between the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of 
Indian Education, and the Office of the Special Trustee for 
American Indians.
    Section 105 continues a provision authorizing the 
acquisition of lands for the purpose of operating and 
maintaining facilities that support visitors to Ellis, 
Governors, and Liberty Islands, NJ and NY.
    Section 106 continues a provision allowing Outer 
Continental Shelf inspection fees to be collected by the 
Secretary of the Interior.
    Section 107 continues a provision authorizing the Bureau of 
Land Management to implement an oil and gas leasing Internet 
program.
    Section 108 continues a provision allowing for the 
reorganization of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, 
Regulation and Enforcement only in conformance with Committee 
reprogramming guidelines.
    Section 109 continues a provision allowing the Bureau of 
Land Management to enter into long-term cooperative agreements 
for long-term care and maintenance of excess wild horses and 
burros on private land.
    Section 110 continues a provision dealing with the U.S. 
Fish and Wildlife Service's responsibilities for mass marking 
of salmonid stocks.
    Section 111 modifies a provision addressing BLM actions 
regarding grazing on public lands.
    Section 112 continues a provision prohibiting funds to 
implement, administer or enforce Secretarial Order 3310 issued 
by the Secretary of the Interior on December 22, 2010.
    Section 113 continues a provision providing the Secretary 
of the Interior statutory authority to enter into rental or 
lease agreements that benefit Bureau of Indian Education 
operated schools.
    Section 114 continues through fiscal year 2020 forest 
ecosystem health and recovery activities.
    Section 115 maintains the status quo on regulations 
relating to the legal domestic trade and transport of products 
containing ivory.
    Section 116 suspends any further study, withdrawal or 
finalization of any rule pertaining to the valley elderberry 
longhorn beetle and re-opens the public comment period.
    Section 117 delays the issuance of further rules for sage-
grouse.
    Section 118 requires the Fish and Wildlife Service to issue 
a recovery plan and economic analysis of recovery plan actions 
for certain amphibians.

               TITLE II--ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was created by 
Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1970, which consolidated nine 
programs from five different agencies and departments. Major 
EPA programs include air and water quality, drinking water, 
hazardous waste, research, pesticides, radiation, toxic 
substances, enforcement and compliance assurance, pollution 
prevention, Inland oil spill, Superfund, Brownfields, and the 
Leaking Underground Storage Tank program. In addition, EPA 
provides Federal assistance for wastewater treatment, sewer 
overflow control, drinking water facilities, other water 
infrastructure projects, and diesel emission reduction 
projects. The Agency is responsible for conducting research and 
development, establishing environmental standards through the 
use of risk assessment and cost-benefit, monitoring pollution 
conditions, seeking compliance through enforcement actions, 
managing audits and investigations, and providing technical 
assistance and grant support to States and Tribes, which are 
delegated authority for much of the program implementation. 
Under existing statutory authority, the Agency contributes to 
specific homeland security efforts and may participate in 
international environmental activities.
    Among the statutes for which the Environmental Protection 
Agency has sole or significant oversight responsibilities are:
    National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended.
    Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, as 
amended.
    Toxic Substances Control Act, as amended.
    Clean Water Act [Federal Water Pollution Control Act], as 
amended.
    Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, as amended.
    Ocean Dumping Act [Marine Protection, Research, and 
Sanctuaries Act of 1972], as amended.
    Oil Pollution Act of 1990.
    Safe Drinking Water Act [Public Health Service Act (Title 
XIV)], as amended.
    Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource 
Conservation and Recovery Act.
    Clean Air Act, as amended.
    Great Lakes Legacy Act of 2002.
    Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002.
    Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and 
Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended.
    Small Business Liability Relief and Brownfields 
Revitalization Act of 2002 (amending CERCLA).
    Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986.
    Pollution Prevention Act of 1990.
    Pollution Prosecution Act of 1990.
    Pesticide Registration Improvement Act of 2003.
    Energy Policy Act of 2005.
    Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.
    For fiscal year 2015, the Committee recommends 
$7,482,747,000 for the Environmental Protection Agency, 
$717,253,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$407,273,000 below the budget request. Comparison to the budget 
request and 2014 enacted levels are shown by account in the 
table at the end of the report.
    Reprogramming.--The Agency is held to the reprogramming 
limitation of $1,000,000. This limitation will be applied to 
each program area in every account at the levels provided in 
the table at the end of this report. This will allow the Agency 
the flexibility to reprogram funds within a set program area. 
However, where the Committee has cited funding levels for 
certain program projects or activities within a program area, 
the reprogramming limitation continues to apply to those 
funding levels. Further, the Agency may not use any amount of 
de-obligated funds to initiate a new program, office, or 
initiative without the prior approval of the Committee. The 
other guidelines laid out in the ``Reprogramming Guidelines'' 
section of this report continue to be in effect.
    Congressional Budget Justification.--The Committee finds 
that EPA's fiscal year 2015 Congressional justification 
proposes no less than 93 realignments of personnel or 
resources, but does not include a table showing the realignment 
of resources and personnel from one program project to another. 
This violates the Committee's annual directive for the budget 
justification to include a table showing that the outgoing and 
receiving program projects offset to reflect a realignment of 
resources (restated in fifth directive below). The Committee 
directs the Agency to include in future justifications the 
following items: (1) a comprehensive index of programs and 
activities within the program projects; (2) the requested bill 
language, with changes from the enacted language highlighted, 
at the beginning of each account section; (3) a justification 
for every program/project, including those proposed for 
elimination; (4) a comprehensive, detailed explanation of all 
changes within a program project; (5) a table showing 
consolidations, realignments or other transfers of resources 
and personnel from one program project to another such that the 
outgoing and receiving program projects offset and clearly 
illustrate a transfer of resources; and, (6) a table listing 
the budgets and FTE by major office within each National 
Program Management area with pay/non-pay breakouts. Further, if 
EPA is proposing to change state allocation formulas for the 
distribution of appropriated funds, then EPA should include 
such proposals in the Congressional justification.

                         Science and Technology

    The Science and Technology (S&T;) account funds all 
Environmental Protection Agency research (including Superfund 
research activities paid with funds moved into this account 
from the Hazardous Substance Superfund account). This account 
includes programs carried out through grants, contracts, and 
cooperative agreements, cooperative research and development 
agreements, and interagency agreements, with other Federal 
agencies, States, universities, nonprofit organizations, and 
private business, as well as in-house research. It also funds 
personnel compensation and benefits, travel, supplies and 
operating expenses, including rent, utilities and security, for 
all Agency research. Research addresses a wide range of 
environmental and health concerns across all environmental 
media and encompasses both long-term basic and near-term 
applied research to provide the scientific knowledge and 
technologies necessary for preventing, regulating, and abating 
pollution, and to anticipate emerging environmental issues.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................      $759,156,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................       763,772,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................       716,588,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................       -42,568,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       -47,184,000


    The bill provides $716,588,000 for Science and Technology, 
$42,568,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$47,184,000 below the budget request. The Committee recommends 
that $18,850,000 be paid to this account from the Hazardous 
Substance Superfund account for ongoing research activities. 
The Committee provides the following additional detail by 
program area:
    Clean Air and Climate.--The Committee recommends 
$112,738,000 and remains supportive of efforts to accelerate 
engine certifications within base funds.
    Homeland Security.--The Committee recommends $38,257,000. 
The Committee supports the continued work on the Water Security 
Initiative and rejects the proposed realignment of funds from 
other water security activities.
    Research: Air, Climate and Energy.--The Committee 
recommends $90,282,000 and does not include funding for 
proposed additional hydraulic fracturing activities with the 
Department of Energy and the Department of the Interior.
    Research: Chemical Safety and Sustainability.--The 
Committee recommends $130,832,000. The Committee rejects the 
proposed $1,533,000 reduction for the IRIS program. EPA is 
directed to use the funds provided to accelerate the 
implementation of the Chapter 7 recommendations and contract 
with the National Academy of Sciences to review the draft 
formaldehyde assessment, when released, to ensure that the 
recommendations contained in the 2011 NAS report have been 
fully addressed. Further, the Committee rejects the proposed 
$1,198,000 reduction for the endocrine disruptor research. The 
Committee does not support proposed delays in this critical and 
innovative research and directs EPA to continue to evaluate 
real-world exposures to endocrine disrupting chemicals, 
nanomaterials and other chemicals of concern. The use of high 
throughput programs like ToxCast and Tox21 will enable the 
Agency to characterize the risk and effects resulting from 
exposures to chemicals of concern.
    Research: National Priorities.--The bill provides 
$4,234,000 which shall be used for extramural research grants, 
independent of the STAR grant program, to fund high-priority 
water quality and availability research by not-for-profit 
organizations who often partner with the Agency. Funds shall be 
awarded competitively with priority given to partners proposing 
research of national scope and who provide a 25 percent match. 
The Agency is directed to allocate funds to grantees within 180 
days of enactment of this Act.
    Research: Safe and Sustainable Water Resources.--The 
Committee recommends $102,576,000. To date Congress has 
provided $25 million to fund EPA's research to determine 
whether there is a relationship between hydraulic fracturing 
activities and drinking water. The Committee finds this amount 
to be sufficient to accomplish the requested study and provides 
no further funding in fiscal year 2015. EPA is directed to 
remain within the scope of the original 2010 request and to 
submit the study's findings following appropriate public 
comment and peer review as directed in House Report 112-151. 
Further, within the funds provided, the Committee supports 
research to reduce the costs and impacts of combined sewer 
overflows.
    Additional Guidance.--The Committee has included the 
following additional guidance with respect to funding provided 
under this account.
    Bristol Bay Assessment.--The recommendation includes no 
funds for activities related to the Bristol Bay watershed 
assessment, as requested.
    Endocrine Disruptor Research.--The Committee has 
longstanding interest in EPA's effort to determine possible 
health and environmental effects of chemicals. As part of EPA's 
overall efforts to modernize risk assessment protocols, the 
Committee encourages EPA to incorporate the various 
recommendations of the National Academy of Sciences reports as 
well as all other relevant scientific literature and 
recommendations. Further, the Committee commends EPA for 
developing new scientific methods, removing barriers, and 
fostering cooperation in implementing the toxicity testing 
agenda that the 2007 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report 
on Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century puts forth. The Agency 
is directed to submit to the Committee a report that outlines 
(1) progress to date to research, develop, validate and 
translate innovative chemical testing methods that characterize 
toxicity pathways, (2) efforts to coordinate across federal 
agencies, and (3) future plans to continue to implement the 
toxicity testing vision and strategy in the NAS report.
    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS).--In May 2014, 
the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) provided a list of high 
priority recommendations that can be carried out within EPA's 
current revisions of the program. Specifically, an emphasis on 
transparency; reliance on high quality studies; improved 
methodologies for systematic review of the literature, for 
evaluating evidence, and for integrating evidence across 
different types of scientific information; improvements in peer 
review; and improved program management in order to keep pace 
with scientific advances that need to be implemented. 
Therefore, the Committee directs the Agency to provide to the 
Committee by March 1, 2015 a report detailing how EPA will 
apply all of the NAS high priority reforms to pipeline projects 
with particular emphasis on evidence integration.
    Mobile Unit Technologies.--The Committee is concerned that 
not enough research is being done to explore mobile, innovative 
clean water producing units for post-disaster relief 
applications and operations. The Committee urges the Agency to 
explore mobile unit technology using funds provided.

                 Environmental Programs and Management

    The Environmental Programs and Management account 
encompasses a broad range of abatement, prevention, 
enforcement, and compliance activities, and personnel 
compensation, benefits, travel, and expenses for all programs 
of the Agency except Science and Technology, Hazardous 
Substance Superfund, Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust 
Fund, Inland Oil Spill Programs, and the Office of Inspector 
General.
    Abatement, prevention, and compliance activities include 
setting environmental standards, issuing permits, monitoring 
emissions and ambient conditions and providing technical and 
legal assistance toward enforcement, compliance, and oversight. 
In most cases, the States are directly responsible for actual 
operation of the various environmental programs, and the 
Agency's activities include oversight and assistance.
    In addition to program costs, this account funds 
administrative costs associated with the operating programs of 
the Agency, including support for executive direction, policy 
oversight, resources management, general office and building 
services for program operations, and direct implementation of 
Agency environmental programs for headquarters, the ten EPA 
regional offices, and all non-research field operations.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................    $2,624,149,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................     2,737,156,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................     2,508,603,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................      -115,546,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................      -228,553,000


    The bill provides $2,508,603,000 for Environmental Programs 
and Management, $115,546,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and $228,553,000 below the budget request. The Committee 
provides the following additional detail by program area:
    Brownfields.--The Committee recommends $23,680,000 and does 
not include funding for the Smart Growth program, a voluntary 
interagency partnership established in 2009 without a 
Congressional mandate.
    Clean Air and Climate.--The Committee recommends 
$266,741,000. Within this amount, the recommendation includes 
$20,036,000 for Federal Stationary Source Regulations, which is 
$6,508,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$12,878,000 below the budget request. The amount provided does 
not include funding for EPA's greenhouse gas rules for 
stationary sources. The recommendation also includes 
$117,457,000 for Federal Support for Air Quality Management. 
Within the funds provided, the Committee recommends the 
$3,000,000 increase to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness 
of both preconstruction and operating permitting programs.
    Enforcement.--The Committee recommends $226,656,000. The 
Committee remains skeptical of EPA's request for increase 
salary and benefit needs despite reductions in the FTE levels. 
None of the funds made available herein may be used to enforce 
section 2.2.3.5 of the Vessel General Permit for Discharges 
Incidental to the Normal Operation of Vessels, as in effect on 
December 19, 2013, with respect to the owner or operator of a 
vessel that has been granted an extension to the implementation 
schedule for ballast water management discharge standards 
pursuant to part 151 of title 33, Code of Federal Regulations.
    Environmental Protection: National Priorities.--The bill 
provides $12,700,000 for a competitive grant program to provide 
technical assistance for improved water quality or safe 
drinking water to rural and urban communities or individual 
private well owners. The Agency is directed to provide 
$11,000,000 for grants to qualified not-for-profit 
organizations, on a national or multi-state regional basis, for 
on-site training and technical assistance for water systems in 
rural or urban communities. The Agency is also directed to 
provide $1,700,000 for grants to qualified not-for-profit 
organizations for technical assistance for individual private 
well owners, with priority given to organizations that provide 
technical and educational assistance to individual private well 
owners. The Agency shall require each grantee to provide a 
minimum 10 percent match, including in-kind contributions. The 
Agency is directed to allocate funds to grantees within 180 
days of enactment of this Act.
    Geographic Programs.--The bill provides $406,256,000. The 
Committee has provided funding for programs that support 
restoration and protection of our nation's most important water 
bodies, as protection of these resources continues to be a 
priority. From within the amount provided, the Committee 
directs the following:
    Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.--The Committee 
recommends $300,000,000 for the Great Lakes Restoration 
Initiative (GLRI) equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted level 
and $25,000,000 above the budget request. With this funding the 
Committee has provided nearly $2 billion to restore the Great 
Lakes since 2010 and the GLRI continues to be the largest 
single recipient of funds within Geographic Programs. The 
Agency shall continue to follow the direction as provided in 
House Report 112-589.
    Chesapeake Bay.--The Committee recommends $70,000,000. From 
within the amount provided, $6,000,000 is for nutrient and 
sediment removal grants and $6,000,000 is for small watershed 
grants to control polluted runoff from urban, suburban and 
agricultural lands. Further, none of the funds made available 
herein shall be used to implement or assist in the 
implementation of a State regulation that was developed using a 
phosphorus management tool.
    Puget Sound.--The Committee recommends $20,000,000. Funds 
shall be allocated in the same manner as directed in House 
Report 112-331. The Committee directs EPA to expeditiously 
obligate funds, in a manner consistent with the authority and 
responsibilities under Section 320 and the National Estuary 
Program.
    Long Island Sound.--The Committee recommends $3,940,000 for 
the Long Island Sound equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and $1,047,000 above the budget request.
    Other Geographic Activities.--The recommendation does not 
include funding for the Northwest Forest program or for the new 
Southern New England Estuaries program. All remaining 
geographic program areas not previously mentioned are funded as 
requested.
    Information Exchange/Outreach.--The Committee recommends 
$119,010,000. From within this amount, $1,700,000 has been 
provided for the Administrator's Immediate Office. The bill 
provides $3,600,000 for the Office of Congressional and 
Intergovernmental Relations (OCIR). In Division G of the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014, the Committee directed 
OCIR to provide a quarterly status report to inform the 
workload; however, OCIR has yet to submit the requested 
information. The Committee is acutely aware that a backlog of 
responses to Congressional letters, questions for the record, 
and informal questions exists, as Member offices have requested 
the Committee's assistance to obtain answers. Further, for 
three consecutive years, EPA has failed to submit responses to 
the Committee's questions for the record in time for inclusion 
into the public record. The EPA is the only agency under the 
jurisdiction of this bill that has failed to meet these 
necessary deadlines. The pattern suggests an ongoing and 
systematic approach to hinder Congressional oversight via a 
lack of responsiveness to Congressional inquiries. Therefore 
the Committee has reduced by fifty percent funding for both the 
Administrator's Immediate Office and for the Office of 
Congressional Affairs. The Committee will not consider any 
additional funding for these offices until the Administrator of 
the Environmental Protection Agency submits to the Committee on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives (1) responses to 
all questions for the record from the Committee for fiscal year 
2015, (2) overdue quarterly reports on the status of balances 
required under section 418 of division G of the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2014 (Public Law 113-76), and (3) all 
overdue reports not submitted by the deadlines included in the 
explanatory statement relating to division G of the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014 (Public Law 113-76).
    Legal/Science/Regulatory/Economic Review.--The Committee 
recommends $89,234,000 and does not include funding for the 
Smart Growth Program. The Committee recommends $20,700,000 for 
the Office of Policy to fund salaries and expenses of existing 
FTE.
    Operations and Administration.--The Committee recommends 
$473,482,000 which is $7,000,000 below the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and $32,811,000 below the budget request. Of this 
amount, $1,475,000 has been provided for the Immediate Office 
of the Chief Financial Officer. As noted elsewhere within the 
report, EPA has failed to submit timely responses to the 
Committee's questions for the record for three consecutive 
years. The Committee will not consider any additional funding 
for the Office of the Chief Financial Officer until the 
Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency submits to 
the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
(1) responses to all questions for the record from the 
Committee for fiscal year 2015, (2) overdue quarterly reports 
on the status of balances required under section 418 of 
division G of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014 (Public 
Law 113-76), and (3) all overdue reports not submitted by the 
deadlines included in the explanatory statement relating to 
division G of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014 (Public 
Law 113-76).
    In addition, the Committee is concerned about a number of 
management issues that have surfaced over the past year. The 
lack of administrative controls for employee payroll, travel, 
bonuses, and time and attendance has fostered several instances 
of waste, fraud and abuse of appropriated funds. Further, 
significant carryover balances at the end of fiscal year 2013 
led the Committee to question the Agency's management of funds 
under sequestration. The Committee believes that sequestration 
impacts on agency personnel could have been significantly 
reduced. Additionally, the Committee is troubled by the amount 
of expired balances that continue to accumulate. The Committee 
has yet to receive information requested regarding expired 
balances, and directs the Agency to submit a report within 30 
days of the date of enactment of this Act that shows by account 
and by fiscal year the total amount of expired balances. 
Lastly, the Committee is troubled by the Agency's practice of 
transferring carryover amounts to fund current year payroll, 
fixed cost or contract needs. This practice invalidates Agency 
estimates of fiscal year needs and further calls into question 
the Agency's management of funds.
    Water: Ecosystems.--The Committee recommends $44,980,000. 
From within the amount provided, the recommendation includes 
$16,800,000 to provide $600,000 to each National Estuary 
Program (NEP) funded under Section 320 of the Clean Water Act. 
The Committee also provides $300,000 in competitive grants 
within the coastal activities and encourages EPA to work in 
consultation with the NEP directors to identify worthy projects 
and activities. In addition, the Committee recommends 
$19,882,000 for the Wetlands program. The Committee directs EPA 
to use the funds provided to accelerate the processing of 
mining permits with the Corps of Engineers. Further, the 
Committee directs EPA, in consultation with the Corps of 
Engineers, to continue to report monthly on the number of 
Section 404 permits under review according to the directive in 
Division G of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014. The 
Committee has been displeased with the lack of timely 
information contained within the two monthly reports submitted 
to date and directs EPA to improve both the quality and 
timeliness of these reports. Further, the recommendation 
includes no funds for activities related to the Bristol Bay 
watershed assessment, as requested.
    Water Quality Protection.--The Committee recommends 
$192,550,000. Within this amount the Committee recommends 
$4,400,000 for the Urban Waters program, as requested. The 
Committee supports EPA's efforts to expanding technical 
assistance for communities seeking to develop and implement an 
integrated planning approach to meeting Clean Water Act (CWA) 
requirements. To further assist the effort the recommendation 
provides $2,000,000 for grants to establish a pilot program for 
the development and implementation of the Integrated Municipal 
Stormwater and Wastewater Planning Approach Framework. EPA 
shall use these funds to provide financial and technical 
assistance in the development of integrated plans that address 
the environmental obligations of the applicant. The 
Administrator should select two to three publicly-owned 
treatment works, municipal separate storm sewer systems, or 
units of local government in each Region, ensuring geographic 
and size distribution in selection. If an inadequate number of 
viable projects exist in one Region, EPA may select additional 
projects in another Region. The Committee directs EPA to (1) 
notify Congress once pilot communities are selected, (2) submit 
a progress report to Congress within 12 months of the date of 
enactment of this Act on implementation, outlining specific 
outcomes expected to be achieved that will reduce Clean Water 
Act-related and other environmental-related compliance costs 
for these entities, and (3) submit a final report to Congress 
once all integrated plans developed under this approach are 
approved. The final report should include an assessment of 
potential regulatory and statutory reforms that can support 
greater flexibility with compliance obligations, including 
integrating and/or extending permit terms under the National 
Pollution Discharge Elimination System Program. The funds 
awarded to communities shall be on a 50 percent cost-share 
basis.
    Additional Guidance.--The Committee has included the 
following additional guidance with respect to funding provided 
under this account.
    Administrator Priorities.--The Committee notes that EPA's 
Congressional Justification does not identify funds set aside 
for Administrator priorities as directed in Division G of the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014. Therefore, no funds have 
been provided, as requested. EPA is directed to submit a report 
within 90 days of enactment of this Act that identifies how any 
fiscal year 2013 and 2014 funding was used, by account, program 
area, and program project. Each activity funded should include 
a justification for the effort and any anticipated results.
    Antimicrobial Solutions for Citrus Disease.--The Committee 
recognizes the importance of antimicrobial crop protection 
tools in combating citrus greening and encourages EPA, 
especially the Office of Pesticide Programs, to cooperate with 
the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Multi-Agency Coordination 
(MAC) Group for Huanglongbing (HLB) to expedite and support the 
development, review, and registration of antimicrobial 
compounds that may lead to a treatment and cure for infected 
trees.
    Brown Marmorated Stink Bug.--The Committee continues to 
encourage EPA's Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution 
Prevention to work collaboratively with the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture and State partners to expeditiously approve a 
control program for the brown marmorated stink bug as soon as 
the appropriate agents are evaluated for release.
    Composite Wood Products.--The Formaldehyde Standards for 
Composite-Wood Products Act directed EPA to develop a national 
standard for formaldehyde emissions that replicates the 
California regulations. The Committee urges EPA to finalize a 
rule on the national formaldehyde standard for composite wood 
products that is consistent with the California regulations for 
laminated products and consistent with the intent of the 2010 
Act.
    Conflicts of Interest.--The Committee continues to be 
concerned that clear and consistent conflict-of-interest rules 
may not be applied uniformly to the members of EPA's Science 
Advisory Boards. Further EPA's process for selecting 
independent scientific advisors may unnecessarily exclude 
state, local, private sector and tribal experts in a manner 
that does not allow for a balanced panel of experts. The 
Committee finds an update to EPA's conflict of interest policy, 
policy for committee composition and balance, and eligibility 
requirements for service on the Science Advisory Boards is 
warranted. EPA's policies should include not less than 10 
percent of membership from States and Tribes who are often 
underrepresented as noted in the May 2014 National Academy of 
Sciences review of EPA's IRIS program. EPA policies should 
include an evaluation of potential bias based on receipt of 
former and current federal grants or public statements or 
positions as well as other appropriate safeguards to ensure 
balance amongst SAB and other advisory board experts. 
Additionally, EPA shall provide the Committees on 
Appropriations and the appropriate authorizing committees with 
updated policies and procedures regarding the establishment, 
selection of members and avoidance of conflicts-of-interest of 
the Science Advisory Boards no later than one year following 
the date of enactment of this Act.
    Consent Decree.--The Committee acknowledges recent efforts 
made to reduce discharges into Lake Michigan by the S.S. Badger 
as part of a consent decree with the Federal government. The 
consent decree required the cessation of discharges by 2015. To 
ensure that all parties remain vigilant in the management of 
the consent decree, the Committee directs EPA to submit a 
report that details actions taken since the initiation of the 
consent decree and a timeline detailing future actions to 
ensure the S.S. Badger meets the discharge mandate of the 
agreement. The report is due to the Committee on Appropriations 
no later than 45 days after the date of enactment of this Act.
    Design for the Environment (DfE).--EPA shall ensure that 
the baseline for all current DfE alternatives assessments, and 
any future DfE alternatives assessments, includes a dose 
response, exposure and lifecycle impact assessment in order to 
arrive at a characterization and calculation of risk and 
environmental impact across product lifecycle. The Committee 
requires that alternative or replacement chemicals also adhere 
to the same methodology, and EPA shall also integrate these 
elements into all other DfE program operations, including the 
labeling/certification program. e-Enterprise Initiative.--The 
Committee understands that EPA and the States have established 
a joint governance structure in order to modernize and 
streamline operations over a multi-year period. The Committee 
principally supports proposals that mitigate operational costs 
for EPA, increase efficiencies for States and reduce burden for 
the regulated community. Given the scope of the proposed 
Initiative, multi-year cost estimates are necessary to inform 
decisions that will require appropriations over multiple fiscal 
years. Further, while the benefits of some proposals are well 
documented, estimates of burden reduction or other efficiencies 
for several proposed projects are largely unknown. Therefore, 
to support the fiscal year 2015 request, the Agency is directed 
to submit a multi-year plan to the Committee that includes 
outyear cost estimates for the proposals in the Initiative 
along with known, quantifiable estimates of efficiencies or 
savings. The Committee will continue to evaluate information as 
it is supplied.
    E15 outreach.--The Committee is aware of the potential for 
consumers to misfuel with E15 and higher ethanol grades of 
gasoline in engines not designed, approved, or warranted to use 
blends above 10 percent ethanol content (E10). Misfueling can 
damage engines, void product warranties, and result in undue 
economic loss to consumers. The Committee, therefore, 
encourages EPA to utilize general funds to establish and 
implement public educational outreach for proper and EPA-
approved usage of 15 percent by volume ethanol blended gasoline 
in accordance with the Misfueling Mitigation Program.
    Pending herbicide registrations.--The Committee is aware 
that EPA will soon reevaluate existing registrations for 
herbicides that may not actively degrade until long after their 
intended use. As EPA reviews the registrations for these 
products, the Committee encourages EPA to explore options for 
limiting indirect impacts on other industries, including 
strengthened labeling, disclosure, and support for additional 
education of primary users of these products.
    Social Cost of Carbon.--The Committee understands that the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) is currently reviewing 
the process the Administration used to develop estimates to 
calculate the social cost of carbon. The Committee believes 
that the Administration should not allow any regulations to be 
finalized using the Technical Support Document: Technical 
Update of the Social Cost of Carbon for Regulatory Impact 
Analysis Under Executive Order 12866, Interagency Working Group 
on Social Cost of Carbon, United States Government, May 2013 
until public comments on the document have been evaluated, the 
GAO report has been submitted and reviewed, and any necessary 
changes to the technical support document are incorporated.

            Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest System Fund

    This account supports all activities necessary for the 
development of the system established by the Hazardous Waste 
Electronic Manifest Establishment Act (P.L. 112-195).




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................        $3,674,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        10,423,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................         5,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................        +1,326,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        -5,423,000


    The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for the development of 
an electronic manifest system pursuant to P.L. 112-195. The 
Committee directs EPA to move forward expeditiously with system 
development. Further the Committee directs EPA to work with the 
appropriate Committees to extend the authorization for 
appropriations beyond fiscal year 2015, and to provide a robust 
justification for any costs that exceed the amounts 
appropriated through fiscal year 2015.

                      Office of Inspector General

    The Office of Inspector General (OIG) provides audit, 
evaluation, and investigation products and advisory services to 
improve the performance and integrity of EPA programs and 
operations. The Inspector General (IG) will continue to perform 
the function of IG for the Chemical Safety and Hazard 
Investigation Board. This account funds personnel compensation 
and benefits, travel, and expenses (excluding rent, utilities, 
and security costs) for the Office of Inspector General. In 
addition to the funds provided under this heading, this account 
receives funds from the Hazardous Substance Superfund account.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $41,849,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        46,130,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        40,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................        -1,849,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        -6,130,000


    The bill provides $40,000,000, which is $1,849,000 below 
the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $6,130,000 below the 
budget request. In addition, the Committee recommends 
$9,939,000 as a payment to this account from the Hazardous 
Substance Superfund account. The Inspector General is directed 
to prioritize funds to projects that prevent and detect fraud, 
waste and abuse at the Environmental Protection Agency.

                        Buildings and Facilities

    The Buildings and Facilities account provides for the 
design and construction of EPA-owned facilities as well as for 
the repair, extension, alteration, and improvement of 
facilities used by the Agency. The funds are used to correct 
unsafe conditions, protect health and safety of employees and 
Agency visitors, and prevent deterioration of structures and 
equipment.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $34,467,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        53,507,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        34,467,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       -19,040,000


    The bill provides $34,467,000, equal to the fiscal year 
2014 enacted level and $19,040,000 below the budget request. 
The Committee supports proposed projects that will reduce 
Agency operational and rent costs. EPA should prioritize 
projects based on anticipated cost savings and allocate funds 
accordingly. The Committee does not include requested funding 
for the design and engineering of new lab space in Las Vegas. 
EPA and Congress should review the findings of the ongoing lab 
study prior to proposing major changes to EPA's laboratory 
footprint.

                     Hazardous Substance Superfund

    The Hazardous Substance Superfund (Superfund) program was 
established in 1980 by the Comprehensive Environmental 
Response, Compensation, and Liability Act to clean up emergency 
hazardous materials, spills, and dangerous, uncontrolled, and/
or abandoned hazardous waste sites. The Superfund Amendments 
and Reauthorization Act (SARA) expanded the program 
substantially in 1986, authorizing approximately $8,500,000,000 
in revenues over five years. In 1990, the Omnibus Budget 
Reconciliation Act extended the program's authorization through 
1994 for $5,100,000,000 with taxing authority through calendar 
year 1995.
    The Superfund program is operated by EPA subject to annual 
appropriations from a dedicated trust fund and from general 
revenues. Enforcement activities are used to identify and 
induce parties responsible for hazardous waste problems to 
undertake cleanup actions and pay for EPA oversight of those 
actions. In addition, responsible parties have been required to 
cover the cost of fund-financed removal and remedial actions 
undertaken at spills and waste sites by Federal and State 
agencies. Funds are paid from this account to the Office of 
Inspector General and Science and Technology accounts for 
Superfund related activities.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................    $1,088,769,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................     1,156,603,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................     1,156,603,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................       +67,834,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The bill provides $1,156,603,000 for the Hazardous 
Substance Superfund program, $67,834,000 above the fiscal year 
2014 enacted level and equal to the budget request.
    Superfund Cleanup.--The Committee recommends $781,369,000. 
While the Committee understands this increase is insufficient 
to eliminate the backlog of 10-15 unfunded new starts 
anticipated for fiscal year 2015, the Committee expects the 
Agency to use the additional funds to initiate remediation at 
these highly contaminated, orphan sites. Further the Committee 
expects the additional funding will also support pipeline 
activities such as remedial investigations, feasibility 
studies, and remedial designs which are critical steps prior to 
construction. The Committee continues to support EPA's added 
financial and project management efforts that enable the Agency 
to de-obligate unused funds from sites and redirect those funds 
to new construction projects.
    Additional Guidance.--The Committee has included the 
following additional guidance with respect to funding provided 
under this account:
    Financial Assurance.--The Committee directs the 
Administrator to complete a thorough analysis of the capacity 
of the financial and credit markets to provide the necessary 
instruments (surety bonds, letters of credit, insurance, and 
trusts) for meeting any new financial responsibility 
requirements pursuant to section 108(b) of the Comprehensive 
Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 
(42 U.S.C. 9608(b)). The Committee provides no funds for EPA to 
develop, propose, finalize, implement, enforce, or administer 
any regulation that would establish any such new financial 
responsibility requirements until the Administrator 
demonstrates that such an analysis has been completed.
    Lead at Superfund sites.--Using the funds provided, the 
Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency shall 
contract with the National Academy of Sciences to conduct a 
study of the sources of lead in the environment at each 
designated Superfund site that is proximal to a historic 
surface lead mining district. The study shall focus on whether 
naturally occurring lead, lead-based paint, and the consumer 
use of products containing lead are significant sources of lead 
at such sites. The Administrator shall transmit to Congress a 
report containing the results of the study not later than one 
year after the date of enactment of this Act.
    Superfund Special Accounts.--The Committee is encouraged by 
the steps EPA has taken toward the effective, centralized 
management of Superfund special accounts. The Committee 
appreciates the information included as part of the 
Congressional Justification with respect to Superfund Special 
Accounts and requests that EPA continue to provide the 
information as part of the budget request.

          Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund Program

    Subtitle I of the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by 
the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act, authorized 
the establishment of a response program for cleanup of releases 
from leaking underground storage tanks. Owners and operators of 
facilities with underground tanks must demonstrate financial 
responsibility and bear initial responsibility for cleanup. The 
Federal trust fund is funded through the imposition of a motor 
fuel tax of one-tenth of a cent per gallon.
    In addition to State resources, the Leaking Underground 
Storage Tanks (LUST) Trust Fund provides funding to clean up 
sites, enforces necessary corrective actions, and recovers 
costs expended from the Fund for cleanup activities. The 
underground storage tank response program is designed to 
operate primarily through cooperative agreements with States. 
Funds are also used for grants to non-State entities, including 
Indian Tribes, under Section 8001 of the Resource Conservation 
and Recovery Act. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 expanded the 
authorized activities of the Fund to include the underground 
storage tank program. In 2006, Congress amended section 9508 of 
the Internal Revenue Code to authorize expenditures from the 
trust fund for prevention and inspection activities.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $94,566,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        97,922,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        95,647,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................        +1,081,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        -2,275,000


    The bill provides $95,647,000 for the Leaking Underground 
Storage Tank (LUST) Trust Fund Program, $1,081,000 above the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $2,275,000 below the budget 
request.

                       Inland Oil Spill Programs

    This appropriation, authorized by the Federal Water 
Pollution Control Act, as amended by the Oil Pollution Act of 
1990, provides funds to prepare for and prevent releases of oil 
and other petroleum products in navigable waterways. In 
addition, EPA is reimbursed for incident specific response 
costs through the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund managed by the 
United States Coast Guard.
    EPA is responsible for directing all cleanup and removal 
activities posing a threat to public health and the 
environment; conducting site inspections; providing a means to 
achieve cleanup activities by private parties; reviewing 
containment plans at facilities; reviewing area contingency 
plans; pursuing cost recovery of fund-financed cleanups; and 
conducting research of oil cleanup techniques. Funds for this 
appropriation are provided through the Oil Spill Liability 
Trust Fund which is composed of fees and collections made 
through provisions of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, the 
Comprehensive Oil Pollution Liability and Compensation Act, the 
Deepwater Port Act of 1974, the Outer Continental Shelf Lands 
Act Amendments of 1978, and the Federal Water Pollution Control 
Act, as amended. Pursuant to law, the Trust Fund is managed by 
the United States Coast Guard.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $18,209,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        24,133,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        17,944,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................          -265,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        -6,189,000


    The bill provides $17,944,000 for the Inland Oil Spill 
program, $265,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$6,189,000 below the budget request.

                   State and Tribal Assistance Grants

    The State and Tribal Assistance Grants (STAG) account 
provides grant funds for programs operated primarily by State, 
local, tribal and other governmental partners. The account 
includes two broad types of funds: (1) Infrastructure 
Assistance, which is used primarily by local governments for 
projects supporting environmental protection; and, (2) 
Categorical Grants, which assist State and tribal governments 
and other environmental partners with the operation of 
environmental programs. The account also includes specific 
program grants such as competitive Brownfields grants and 
diesel emissions reduction grants.
    In the STAG account, EPA provides funding for 
infrastructure projects through two State Revolving Funds 
(Clean Water and Drinking Water), geographic specific projects 
in Alaskan Native Villages and on the United States-Mexico 
Border, Brownfields revitalization projects, diesel emission 
reduction grants, and other targeted infrastructure projects.
    The State Revolving Funds (SRFs) provide Federal financial 
assistance to protect the Nation's water resources. The Clean 
Water SRF helps eliminate municipal discharge of untreated or 
inadequately treated pollutants and thereby helps maintain or 
restore the country's water to a swimmable and/or fishable 
quality. The Clean Water SRF provides resources for municipal, 
inter-municipal, State, and interstate agencies and tribal 
governments to plan, design, and construct wastewater 
facilities and other projects, including non-point source, 
estuary, stormwater, and sewer overflow projects. The Safe 
Drinking Water SRF finances improvements to community water 
systems so that they can achieve compliance with the mandates 
of the Safe Drinking Water Act and continue to protect public 
health.
    Many of the major Federal environmental statutes include 
provisions that allow the Federal government, through EPA, to 
delegate to the States and Tribes the day-to-day management of 
environmental programs or to approve State and Tribal 
environmental programs. The Federal statutes were designed to 
recognize the States as partners and co-regulators, allowing 
the States to issue and enforce permits, carry out inspections 
and monitoring, and collect data. To assist the States in this 
task, the statutes also authorized EPA to provide grants to the 
States and Tribes. These grants, which cover every major aspect 
of environmental protection, include those programs authorized 
by sections 319 and 106 of the Clean Water Act (Federal Water 
Pollution Control Act, as amended) (for non-point source 
pollution and the water quality permits programs), sections 105 
and 103 of the Clean Air Act (for State and Local air quality 
management programs), section 128 of CERCLA (for State and 
tribal response programs), section 1443(a) of the Safe Drinking 
Water Act (for public water system supervision), and section 
3011 of RCRA (for the implementation of State hazardous waste 
programs).




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................    $3,535,161,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................     3,005,374,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................     2,951,895,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................      -583,266,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       -53,479,000


    The bill provides $2,951,895,000 for the State and Tribal 
Assistance Grants account, $583,266,000 below the fiscal year 
2014 enacted level and $53,479,000 below the budget request. 
The Committee provides the following additional detail by 
program area:
    Infrastructure Assistance.--The bill provides 
$1,905,000,000, which is $575,783,000 below the fiscal year 
2014 enacted level and $30,000,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee has appropriated nearly $22 billion for water 
and wastewater infrastructure assistance since 2009. The 
Committee notes that $6 billion is available for drinking water 
and wastewater infrastructure projects in fiscal year 2014 from 
appropriated funds, state match contributions, loan repayments 
and interest. Nevertheless, little progress has been made to 
reduce the known water infrastructure gap. The Committee 
believes that EPA and the States must aggressively allocate 
existing funds to projects in order to address the pressing 
infrastructure needs facing the country. In addition, the 
Committee continues to encourage EPA and water infrastructure 
stakeholders to promote alternate financing mechanisms for 
water infrastructure at local, State and Federal levels as it 
is widely accepted that Federal financing through the State 
Revolving Funds remains an important yet insufficient tool to 
address the Nation's water needs. Public-private partnerships, 
greater access to financing from private activity bonds and 
improved asset management are just a few of the mechanisms that 
the Committee believes could serve to increase investment in a 
complementary way to Federal appropriations and reduce costs.
    In addition, the Water Resources Reform and Development Act 
of 2014 (WRRDA) provides EPA with new and updated authorities 
including the Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act 
of 2014 (WIFIA). The Committee recognizes that these new 
authorities will require resources prior to implementation, and 
EPA is directed to submit to the Committee a detailed plan for 
how full funding of the WIFIA provisions would be implemented. 
This plan shall discuss all aspects of implementation, 
including Agency personnel and expertise needs; types of 
eligible projects; criteria for selecting specific projects for 
financing; the steps and general schedule of a potential 
application process; and expected administrative costs. The 
Committee appreciates that EPA has initiated discussions with 
other programs with similar authorities, and EPA should consult 
with the Government Accountability Office and other federal 
agencies in order to build upon the experience from other 
federal loan and loan guarantee programs.
    The Committee continues bill language to allow EPA and the 
States to provide additional forms of subsidy to those 
communities which cannot afford the below market rates provided 
by an SRF loan.
    The Committee has a history of including a provision 
affording a procurement preference for iron and steel products 
produced in the United States in projects receiving funds from 
the State revolving fund or, now, the Water Infrastructure 
Finance and Innovation Act. The Committee emphasizes that the 
key consideration in determining eligibility for the preference 
is the location of the melting and casting of the iron and 
steel products and the iron and steel components of such 
products, which must occur in the United States. Any processes, 
including vulcanization processes, that merely append rubber 
elements to iron and steel components of such iron and steel 
products, which occurs outside the United States, should not 
render such products ineligible for the procurement preference 
provided that all such iron and steel components of iron and 
steel products were melted and cast in the United States and 
final assembly of the products occurs in the United States.
    Diesel Emissions Reductions Grants (DERA).--The bill 
provides $30,000,000 for DERA grants. The Committee notes that 
the DERA program is the only EPA air program that has been 
reauthorized by Congress, and at least 10 million older heavily 
polluting diesel engines remain in use that have yet to be 
retrofitted, repowered or replaced. Further, according to the 
Second Report to Congress, approximately 70 percent of 
competitive projects have occurred in areas of non-attainment 
for particulate matter and ozone. For fiscal year 2015, the 
Committee directs EPA to continue to make at least 70 percent 
of DERA grants available to improve air quality in non-
attainment areas.
    Targeted Airshed Grants.--The bill provides $10,000,000 for 
targeted airshed grants to reduce air pollution in non-
attainment areas. These grants shall be distributed on a 
competitive basis to non-attainment areas that EPA determines 
are ranked as the top five most polluted areas relative to 
annual ozone or particulate matter 2.5 standards. To determine 
these areas, the Agency shall use the most recent design values 
calculated from validated air quality data. The Committee notes 
that these funds are available for emission reduction 
activities deemed necessary for compliance with national 
ambient air quality standards and included in a State 
Implementation Plan submitted to EPA.
    Categorical Grants.--For categorical grants to States and 
other environmental partners for the implementation of 
delegated programs, the bill provides $1,046,895,000. The 
Committee continues to reject the proposed elimination of the 
radon grants and, as such, funds are provided at the fiscal 
year 2014 enacted level.

                       Administrative Provisions


              (INCLUDING TRANSFER AND RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

    The Committee continues the language, carried in prior 
years, concerning Tribal Cooperative Authority, the collection 
and obligation of pesticides fees, and additional transfer 
authorities for the purposes of implementing the Great Lakes 
Restoration Initiative.
    The Committee rescinds $45,000,000 of unobligated grant 
balances. The Agency is not to include unobligated balances 
from prior year special project infrastructure grants as part 
of the rescission.
    The Committee has included bill language authorizing up to 
$150,000 to be spent for facility repairs at any one time.
    The Committee has included bill language extending special 
pay authority.

                      TITLE III--RELATED AGENCIES


                       Department of Agriculture


                             FOREST SERVICE

    The U.S. Forest Service manages 193 million acres of 
National Forests, Grasslands, and a Tallgrass Prairie, 
including lands in 44 States and the Commonwealth of Puerto 
Rico, and cooperates with States, other Federal agencies, 
Tribes and private landowners to sustain the Nation's forests 
and grasslands. The Forest Service administers a wide variety 
of programs, including forest and rangeland research, State and 
private forestry assistance, cooperative forest health 
programs, an international program, National Forest System, and 
wildland fire management. The National Forest System (NFS) 
includes 155 national forests, 20 National grasslands, 20 
National recreation areas, a National Tallgrass prairie, six 
National monuments, and six land utilization projects. The NFS 
is managed for multiple uses, beginning with wood, water and 
forage, and expanded under the Multiple Use Sustained Yield Act 
to include recreation, grazing, fish and wildlife habitat 
management. The Forest Service celebrated its centennial in 
2005.

                     FOREST AND RANGELAND RESEARCH




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................      $292,805,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................       275,315,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................       297,500,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................        +4,695,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       +22,185,000


    The Committee recommends $297,500,000 for Forest and 
Rangeland Research, $4,695,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and $22,185,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee understands the importance of the strategic program 
and priority research areas funded through Forest and Rangeland 
Research in order to improve the health, management, and use of 
the 193 million acres of national forests and rangelands. The 
Committee believes the Forest Service must make significant 
investments in research and development in order to inform best 
management practices for public and private land managers and 
encourages the agency to continue robust funding for these 
activities in future budget requests.
    Forest Inventory and Analysis.--The Committee recommends 
$70,000,000 for the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) 
program, $3,195,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level 
and the budget request. The Committee finds that State forestry 
agencies and their cooperators are often able to accomplish 
critical FIA work with equal quality at lower costs than the 
Forest Service. The Forest Service is directed to work with 
State foresters to identify ways to more efficiently deliver 
the program in all States, including timely inventory updates, 
and should explore opportunities to work with additional State 
forestry agencies and their cooperators who can accomplish 
necessary field work at lower cost.
    Invasive Species.--The Committee is concerned about the 
threat of invasive forest pests and understands that millions 
of acres of our nation's forests are at risk of being overtaken 
by these pests. The Forest Service is in a unique position to 
mitigate this threat. The Committee therefore directs the 
Forest Service to provide the Committees on Appropriations with 
a report, detailing its work to eradicate and/or mitigate this 
threat.
    Forest Products Laboratory.--The Committee remains 
concerned about the increasing costs of forest management, 
hazardous fuels reduction, and forest restoration, and 
encourages a high priority focus on strategies to grow markets 
to offset or alleviate this additional cost. The Committee 
believes green building markets are a growing opportunity for 
American-grown wood, and urges the Forest Service to work 
further, through science and technology in the Forest Products 
Laboratory, to position wood as a green building material and 
improve the performance and affordability of wood framed 
construction.
    The Committee encourages the Forest Service to broaden its 
scope of research to include improvement in forest products 
evaluation standards and valuation techniques; forester 
products conversation and manufacturing efficiency, 
productivity, and profitability over the long term; lumber 
quality and value based on forest management techniques; non-
timber forest products; and exploring the unique properties of 
wood on the nanoscale.
    Urban Forest Research.--The Committee urges the Forest 
Service to provide strong support for urban forest research 
initiatives, related social and socio-economic research, and 
cooperative activities that help cities monitor and care for 
their urban forests. As the United States faces increasing 
urbanization over the next 50 years and urban ecosystems face a 
multitude of threats, it is imperative that urban forestry 
research remains a high priority of the Forest Service and 
continues to help our cities, towns and metropolitan areas 
become more livable and sustainable. The Committee directs the 
Forest Service to provide critical information and tools, 
including inventories of urban forests, to help cities, towns, 
and metropolitan areas systematically assess the health and 
changing conditions of their urban forests and to plan 
strategic actions to sustainably maintain these forests.
    Bighorn Sheep Research.--The Committee directs the Forest 
Service to work diligently with the Agricultural Research 
Service (ARS) in the development of scientifically defensible 
analyses, specifically on the probability of sufficient contact 
for pathogen transmission and, if there is transmission, the 
probability of disease and spread of the disease to the herd in 
the wild. The Committee is not convinced that this important 
step was thoroughly addressed in the Payette National Forest's 
Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision 
announced on July 28, 2010, and further directs the Forest 
Service to cooperate fully with the ARS in a review of the risk 
analysis and assessment portions in that decision, with the 
objective of assuring a more defensible and sound basis for 
future decisions in other parts of the West where there are 
bighorn and domestic sheep conflicts. The Committee directs the 
Forest Service to brief the Committee on its progress every six 
months.

                       STATE AND PRIVATE FORESTRY




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................      $229,980,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................       229,485,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................       209,815,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................       -20,165,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       -19,670,000


    The Committee recommends $209,815,000 for State and Private 
Forestry, $20,165,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level 
and $19,670,000 below the budget request.
    Landscape Scale Restoration.--The Committee recommends 
continuation of this line item that was established in fiscal 
year 2014 at the enacted level of $14,000,000. The Committee 
supports continuing to use the majority of these resources for 
inter-state competitive processes. The Committee recommends 
these competitive projects address national priorities of 
concern and encourages application in priority landscapes as 
identified in State Forest Action Plans, producing measurable 
economic, ecological and social benefits. The Department is 
directed to report back to the Committee within 90 days of 
enactment of this Act on the progress made during the first 
year of implementation and projections for the coming year.
    Forest Health Management.--The Committee recommends 
$104,577,000 for Forest Health Management, equal to the fiscal 
year 2014 enacted level and the budget request.
    The Committee is aware of the concern over invasive winter 
moth outbreaks and the damaging hardwood tree defoliation that 
can occur as a result. The Committee commends the Forest 
Service for its partnership with the Animal Plant Health 
Inspection Service in addressing winter moth and the research 
being done to address these outbreaks, in addition to its 
cooperation with State and local partners in affected 
communities.
    Forest Stewardship Program.--The Committee recommends 
$29,000,000 for the Forest Stewardship Program, $6,602,000 
above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $5,964,000 above 
the budget request.
    The Tribal Forest Protection Act (Public Law 108-278) 
authorizes the Secretaries of Agriculture and the Interior to 
give special consideration to tribally-proposed Stewardship 
Contracting or other projects on Forest Service or Bureau of 
Land Management (BLM) land bordering or adjacent to Indian 
trust land in order to protect Indian trust resources from 
fire, disease, or other threats coming off of Forest Service or 
BLM land. These stewardship agreements are an important tool 
for fighting the ever-growing threat of wildfires in the West. 
The Committee encourages both the Department of Agriculture and 
the Department of the Interior to make wider use of these 
agreements.
    The Committee supports efforts of the Forest Stewardship 
Program to engage woodland owners, especially those that have 
not previously been engaged in active forest management and 
conservation. The Committee believes the program could have a 
more demonstrated impact and that State forest agencies could 
more efficiently deliver the program with the use of new tools 
and approaches to engaging woodland owners and tracking 
progress and impact over time. The Committee also believes that 
Forest Action Plans provide an important framework for focusing 
work with landowners, given the limited resources available. 
The Committee urges the Forest Service to report on improved 
delivery of this program, applying new tools and approaches 
that improve efficiency, as part of the fiscal year 2016 budget 
justification.
    The Committee understands that in the wake of the third-
largest wildfire in California history, the Forest Service has 
identified 30,000 acres of land within the Stanislaus National 
Forest that can be salvaged. Proceeds from salvage sales can 
then be directed toward rehabilitation and restoration of the 
affected lands; however, such salvage operations are only 
economically beneficial if conducted in the immediate future, 
as the value of the dead timber declines rapidly as time 
passes. Therefore, the Committee urges the Forest Service to 
move as expeditiously as possible through the process in order 
to protect the salvage operations. Within 60 days of enactment 
of this Act, the Committee expects a report from the Forest 
Service on the progress being made with regard to salvage and 
rehabilitation operations on the Stanislaus National Forest.
    Forest Legacy.--The Committee recommends $24,198,000 for 
Forest Legacy, $26,767,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and $28,802,000 below the budget request, in order to 
provide critical funding for higher priority human health, 
public safety, and treaty obligations and responsibilities 
throughout the bill. The amounts recommended by the Committee 
compared with the budget estimates by activity are shown in the 
table at the end of this report.
    Community Forest and Open Space Conservation.--The 
Committee recommends $2,000,000 for Community Forest and Open 
Space Conservation, equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted level 
and $317,000 above the budget request.
    Urban and Community Forestry.--The Committee recommends 
$28,040,000 for Urban and Community, equal to the fiscal year 
2014 enacted level and $4,364,000 above the budget request.
    International Forestry.--The Committee recommends 
$8,000,000 for International Forestry, equal to the fiscal year 
2014 enacted level and $8,000,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee is supportive of the International Program 
and recognizes its successful work to advance international 
trade for U.S. timber producers and forestry interests at 
international policy deliberations, to protect the United 
States from invasive species that threaten our forests, and to 
recover U.S. migratory waterfowl in decline. International 
Forestry enables experts from the Federal government to 
participate in negotiations for trade agreements and assist 
with forestry work abroad. This program plays a large role in 
protecting the U.S. forest products industry by improving the 
sustainability and legality of timber management overseas 
thereby reducing the amount of underpriced and illegally 
harvested timber on the world market. Much of the funding for 
these activities is provided by other departments or agencies, 
including the Department of State, the United States Trade 
Representative, and the U.S. Agency for International 
Development.

                         NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................    $1,496,330,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................     1,640,484,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................     1,496,526,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................          +196,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................      -143,958,000


    The Committee recommends $1,496,526,000 for the National 
Forest System, $196,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and $143,958,000 below the budget request.
    Integrated Resource Restoration.--The Committee notes that 
similar to fiscal years 2014, 2013, 2012 and 2011, the budget 
request includes a major restructuring in which several 
programs are combined to form the Integrated Resource 
Restoration (IRR) budget line. The fiscal year 2014 enacted 
bill continued the proof of concept pilot established in the 
fiscal year 2012 Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies 
conference report, and directed the Forest Service to brief the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
and the Senate on its IRR plan for fiscal year 2014. As a 
result of that briefing, the Committee supports the 
continuation of the pilot project. The Committee must see 
demonstrable results from the program, including true 
management efficiencies, tangible accomplishments, and 
accountability prior to the consideration of expanding IRR 
nationwide. Therefore, the Committee rejects the proposed 
restructuring and continues funding for the individual budget 
line items as in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014.
    Land Management Planning, Inventory and Monitoring.--The 
Committee recommends $37,754,000 for Land Management Planning 
and $151,019,000 for Inventory and Monitoring equal to the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted levels. The Committee does not accept 
the proposed merging of the Land Management Planning and 
Inventory and Monitoring line items.
    The Committee urges the Forest Service, Region V to 
complete Invasive Species Management National Environmental 
Policy Act analysis and to implement integrated pest management 
methods to control invasive weeds in all national forests in 
Region V.
    The Committee is concerned about travel management plans on 
some national forests, though it notes that many national 
forests have completed plans with few problems. The Committee 
has been informed by several communities that travel management 
plans did not properly include public and community input and 
needs. Where communities are dissatisfied with travel 
management plans, the Committee directs the Forest Service to 
revise these plans in consultation with, and to include more 
input from, the communities. The Committee also directs the 
Forest Service to conduct studies on the social, cultural and 
economic impact of travel management planning on the local 
community, and get local county approval of the analysis prior 
to moving forward with travel management plans.
    The Committee retains language in Title IV General 
Provisions, Section 408, allowing forest management plans to 
expire if the Service has made a good faith effort to update 
plans commensurate with appropriated funds.
    Recreation, Heritage and Wilderness.--The Committee 
recommends $263,915,000 for Recreation, Heritage and 
Wilderness, $2,196,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level 
and $4,825,000 above the budget request. Of the funds available 
to Manage Recreation Operations, $500,000 shall be for the 
maintenance of rural airstrips. The Committee urges the Service 
to consult with Congress, State and local officials, and 
affected stakeholders, prior to making a determination to close 
or terminate the use of any rural airstrips. The bill includes 
a general provision in Title IV prohibiting the use of funds to 
close areas open to recreational hunting and shooting as of 
January 1, 2013.
    Grazing Management.--The Committee recommends $55,356,000 
for Grazing Management, equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and $5,756,000 above the budget request. The Committee 
rejects the proposed fee of $1 per animal unit month.
    The Committee includes bill language addressing range 
management in Title IV General Provisions (applying to both the 
Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service) including 
Section 412 which makes permanent the grazing permit renewal 
general provision carried each year allowing permits to be 
renewed under the same terms and conditions if NEPA review has 
not yet been completed; Section 428 allowing the maximum term 
of a grazing permit to be 20 years; Section 437 making vacant 
allotments available for permittees adversely impacted by 
wildland fire or drought; and, Section 438 prohibiting the 
Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management from requiring 
relinquishment of all or a portion of water rights as a 
condition for permit renewals (this includes all permits issued 
by the Bureau and the Forest Service and is not limited to 
grazing permits).
    The Committee encourages the Forest Service to improve its 
monitoring of grazing permits in allotments where riparian 
streamside health is a concern for listed or threatened 
species. The Committee also requests each Forest Service region 
increase transparency and reporting on how the limited 
monitoring resources are used on the ground whether to satisfy 
the monitoring requirements or for other purposes.
    Forest Products.--The Committee recommends $339,130,000 for 
Forest Products, equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted level. 
The Committee rejects the proposal to consolidate this budget 
line into the Integrated Resource Restoration program.
    The Forest Service is currently removing less than ten 
percent of the annual net growth on national forests. This, 
combined with fire suppression policies, has resulted in 
overcrowded, unhealthy forests susceptible to insects, disease 
and catastrophic wildfire. To accomplish the monumental amount 
of work necessary to improve the health of national forests and 
protect communities from catastrophic wildfires, forest 
products mills and logging infrastructure, where it still 
exists, must be maintained. These businesses provide 
significant living-wage jobs, many of which operate in rural 
areas with higher levels of unemployment. Further, without this 
infrastructure, the cost of treating national forests increases 
dramatically and greatly reduces the amount of acres feasibly 
treated with appropriated dollars.
    The Committee believes improving implementation and 
efficiency of timber sales is a vital component to forest 
health. The budget request assumes 3.1 billion board feet of 
timber volume will be sold in 2015. The Committee supports 
targeting a higher board feet volume and encourages the Forest 
Service to implement larger projects and reduce unit costs.
    The Committee notes that over the last ten years the timber 
supply in Region 10 has been constrained to less than ten 
percent of the allowable sale quantity in the current land 
management plan. As a result, numerous mills have closed. In an 
effort to restore confidence in the timber supply and foster 
and allow investment in new facilities, the Forest Service 
pledged to prepare and offer four 10-year timber sales each 
with a volume of 150-200 million board feet. The agency 
recently converted the first two timber sales to smaller 
stewardship projects. These projects will neither restore 
confidence, nor will they allow investment in new facilities. 
The Committee directs the Forest Service to prepare and offer, 
within two years, the four 10-year timber sales as promised.
    Vegetation and Watershed Management.--The Committee 
recommends $184,716,000 for Vegetation and Watershed 
Management, equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted level. The 
Committee rejects the proposal to consolidate this budget line 
into the Integrated Resource Restoration program.
    Wildlife and Fisheries Habitat Management.--The Committee 
recommends $140,466,000 for Wildlife and Fisheries Habitat 
Management, equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted level. The 
Committee rejects the proposal to consolidate this budget line 
into the Integrated Resource Restoration program.
    Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Fund.--The 
Committee recommends $40,000,000, for the Collaborative Forest 
Landscape Restoration Fund (CFLR), equal to the fiscal year 
2014 enacted level and $20,000,000 below the budget request. 
The Committee directs the Forest Service to report to the 
Committee within 90 days of enactment of this Act on the 
implementation of CFLR-funded projects and the outcomes of 
those projects to date. The report should include performance 
measures as described in the CFLR 2011 Annual Report 
accomplishment form available on the Forest Service's website.
    The Committee understands that there has been an observed 
problem with red-oak decline in the Mark Twain National Forest, 
that there has been controversy surrounding the use of 
prescribed fires in this project area, and that some 
commercially marketable timber may have been inadvertently 
destroyed, or cut down and then set on fire.
    As such, the Committee recommends that no funds shall be 
used for prescribed fires under the Missouri Pine-Oak Woodlands 
portion of the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration 
project until such time as the aforementioned controversy is 
resolved, and that funds used for timber sale contracts, 
stewardship contracts, and understory thinning contracts 
awarded under this program should be leveraged with combating 
red-oak decline in mind.
    Minerals and Geology Management.--The Committee recommends 
$76,423,000 for Minerals and Geology Management, equal to the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $5,857,000 above the budget 
request.
    Landownership Management.--The Committee recommends 
$77,730,000 for Landownership Management, equal to the fiscal 
year 2014 enacted level and $6,290,000 above the budget 
request.
    Law Enforcement Operations.--The Committee recommends 
$126,653,000 for Law Enforcement Operations, equal to the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $793,000 above the budget 
request.
    The Committee is concerned with the growing incidence of 
illegal marijuana cultivation on public lands and the 
corresponding impacts it has on the environment, forest 
restoration and habitat, employee and public safety, tourism 
and gateway communities. The Committee believes Forest Service 
Law Enforcement and Investigations should be included as an 
integral participant in the annual forest planning process as a 
means to ensure stronger collaboration among all partners and 
focused enforcement strategies aimed at safety, interdiction 
and mitigation. No later than 90 days after enactment of this 
Act, the Forest Service shall report to the Committee on steps 
taken to include Law Enforcement and Investigations' in the 
forest planning process as it relates to resources and 
collaboration with partners, including local law enforcement.
    Valles Caldera National Preserve.--The Committee recommends 
$3,364,000 for management of the Valles Caldera National 
Preserve and does not support the proposed elimination of this 
program.
    Bill Language.--The Committee includes additional language 
in Title IV General Provisions including Section 425 extending 
the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act for one year and 
Section 431 prohibiting the use of appropriated funds to close 
areas open to recreational hunting and shooting as of January 
1, 2013.

                  CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT AND MAINTENANCE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................      $350,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................       306,280,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................       373,252,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................       +23,252,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       +66,972,000


    The Committee recommends $373,252,000 for Capital 
Improvement and Maintenance, $23,252,000 above the fiscal year 
2014 enacted level and $66,972,000 above the budget request.
    Facilities Maintenance and Construction.--The Committee 
recommends $75,231,000 for Facilities Maintenance and 
Construction, $4,231,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and $3,631,000 above the budget request. Specifically, 
the Committee recommends $59,000,000 for facilities maintenance 
and $16,231,000 for facilities construction.
    Road Maintenance and Construction.--The Committee 
recommends $168,094,000 for Road Maintenance and Construction, 
$2,094,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$14,094,000 above the budget request. Specifically, the 
Committee recommends $143,454,000 for road maintenance and 
$24,640,000 for road construction.
    Should the Forest Service find it necessary within the 
Gifford Pinchot National Forest, or any National Forest within 
the State of Washington, to either reduce the roads to 
maintenance level 1 or to decommission, the Forest Service 
should give precedence to the reduction of the road to 
Maintenance Level 1. Decommissioning should only be done after 
final plantation restoration work in Late Successional Reserve 
habitat development, or on a portion of road where resource 
protection cannot be adequately met by closing and stabilizing.
    Trails Maintenance and Construction.--The Committee 
recommends $86,777,000 for Trails Maintenance and Construction, 
$11,777,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$9,247,000 above the budget request. Specifically, the 
Committee recommends $69,777,000 for trail maintenance and 
$17,000,000 for trail construction.
    Deferred Maintenance and Infrastructure Improvement.--The 
Committee recommends $3,150,000 for Deferred Maintenance and 
Infrastructure Improvement, $150,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and equal to the budget request.
    Legacy Roads and Trails.--The Committee recommends 
$40,000,000 for Legacy Roads and Trails, $5,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level. The Committee rejects the 
proposal to consolidate this budget line into the Integrated 
Resource Restoration program.

                            LAND ACQUISITION




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $43,525,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        51,000,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................         8,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................       -35,525,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       -43,000,000


    The Committee recommends $8,000,000 for Land Acquisition, 
$35,525,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$43,000,000 below the budget request in order to provide 
critical funding for higher priority human health, public 
safety, and treaty obligations and responsibilities throughout 
the bill. The amounts recommended by the Committee compared 
with the budget estimates by activity are shown in the table at 
the end of this report.
    The Committee directs the Forest Service to prioritize 
recreational access projects that significantly enhance access 
to existing public lands that are impractical to access for 
hunting, fishing, and other recreational activities.

         ACQUISITION OF LANDS FOR NATIONAL FORESTS SPECIAL ACTS




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................          $912,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................           950,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................           950,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................           +38,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $950,000 for Acquisition of Lands 
for National Forests Special Acts, $38,000 above the fiscal 
year 2014 enacted level and equal to the budget request.

            ACQUISITION OF LANDS TO COMPLETE LAND EXCHANGES




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................          $217,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................           216,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................           216,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................            -1,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $216,000 for Acquisition of Lands 
to Complete Land Exchanges under the Act of December 4, 1967 
(16 U.S.C. 484a), $1,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and equal to the budget request.

                         RANGE BETTERMENT FUND




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................        $3,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................         2,320,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................         2,320,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................          -680,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $2,320,000, for the Range 
Betterment Fund, $680,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and equal to the budget request, to be derived from 
grazing receipts from national forests (Public Law 94-579) and 
to be used for range rehabilitation, protection, and 
improvements including seeding, reseeding, fence construction, 
weed control, water development, and fish and wildlife habitat 
enhancement in 16 western States.

    GIFTS, DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS FOR FOREST AND RANGELAND RESEARCH




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................           $40,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................            45,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................            45,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................            +5,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $45,000 for Gifts, Donations and 
Bequests for Forest and Rangeland Research, $5,000 above the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and equal to the budget request.

        MANAGEMENT OF NATIONAL FOREST LANDS FOR SUBSISTENCE USES




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................        $2,500,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................                 0
Recommended, 2015.....................................         2,500,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        +2,500,000


    The Committee recommends $2,500,000 for the Management of 
National Forest Lands for Subsistence Uses in Alaska and does 
not support the proposed elimination of this program.

                        WILDLAND FIRE MANAGEMENT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................    $2,762,302,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................     2,265,113,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................     2,888,124,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................      +125,822,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................      +623,011,000


    The Committee recommends $2,888,124,000 for Wildland Fire 
Management, $125,822,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and $623,011,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee's funding recommendation for fire suppression, 
combined with $303,060,000 recommended in the FLAME wildfire 
suppression reserve account, fully funds the 10-year fire 
suppression average expenditures for fire suppression. An 
additional $470,000,000 in fire suppression funding is provided 
to address projected suppression shortfalls during the 2014 
fire season. Total funding provided in fiscal year 2015 for 
Forest Service wildland fire accounts is $3,191,184,000.
    The Committee notes that the budget request included a 
provision almost identical to legislation that has been 
developed in the House (H.R. 3992) and the Senate (S. 1875). 
The budget request proposes to allow wildland fire suppression 
costs above 70 percent of the 10-year average for fire 
suppression to be paid from within the discretionary budget cap 
adjustment established for natural disasters, recognizing that 
wildland fires are a natural disaster akin to hurricanes, 
tornadoes, and floods. As the issue of the disaster cap 
adjustment falls outside the Committee's jurisdiction, this 
Committee's recommendation does not include the request for 
suppression funding through the disaster cap adjustment. As in 
recent years, suppression operations are fully funded at the 
10-year average level within the suppression operations account 
and the FLAME wildfire suppression reserve fund.
    The Committee is concerned that there may have been recent 
instances in which requests for information related to 
wildfires from Congressional, State and local government 
offices were not met with a full disclosure of information. The 
Committee expects the Forest Service to respond in a timely 
manner to such requests, so as not to impede the oversight 
responsibilities of Congressional committees, and State and 
local government offices.
    The Committee encourages the Forest Service to consider the 
potential use of existing commercial satellite technology to 
provide early warning, mitigation and response capabilities for 
wildland fires and to determine whether such technology may 
provide a low-cost early warning capability to save lives and 
property.
    Wildfire Preparedness.--The Committee recommends 
$1,210,840,000 for Wildfire Preparedness, $153,260,000 above 
the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $130,000,000 above the 
budget request. The Committee has provided an additional 
$130,000,000 to the Forest Service for the acquisition of two 
next generation platforms to safely and efficiently fight 
wildfires.
    Wildfire Suppression Operations.--The Committee recommends 
$1,178,000,000 for Wildfire Suppression Operations, 
$102,000,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$470,000,000 above the budget request. The Committee 
recommendation fully meets the 10-year average expenditure on 
all suppression activities and includes an additional 
$470,000,000 for projected shortfalls in suppression funding 
for fiscal year 2014.
    Hazardous Fuels.--The Committee recommends $381,575,000 for 
hazardous fuels reduction, $75,075,000 above the fiscal year 
2014 enacted level and $23,011,000 above the budget request, 
and includes $5,000,000 for biomass utilization grants. The 
Committee recommends prioritizing funding for proactive 
hazardous fuels management and fire mitigation.
    The Department is directed to implement effective 
treatments in frequent fire forests that restore forest 
resiliency and reduce hazardous fuels. Treatments should be 
placed to effectively modify fire behavior and protect assets 
at risk including life and property.
    The Committee is concerned with the pace of planning and 
implementation of post-fire rehabilitation by the Forest 
Service. The slow pace of rehabilitation leaves communities 
unable to access timber resources and delays the regeneration 
of Federal forests. The Committee directs the Forest Service to 
prioritize and expedite planning and implementation of post-
fire rehabilitation projects.
    The Committee directs the Forest Service to work 
collaboratively with the Department of the Interior and other 
stakeholders in developing hazardous fuels management plans 
that take into consideration the conservation of sage-grouse 
habitat and encourages the administration to seek additional 
funding in fiscal year 2016 and subsequent fiscal years to 
continue this concerted effort.
    Fire Plan Research and Development.--The Committee 
recommends $19,795,000 for Fire Plan Research and Development, 
equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and the budget 
request. The Committee urges the Forest Service to further its 
research into current wildland fire fighting operations and the 
safety and health impacts of such operations on wildland fire 
fighters.
    Joint Fire Science Program.--The Committee recommends 
$6,914,000 for the Joint Fire Science Program, equal to the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and the budget request.
    State Fire Assistance.--The Committee recommends 
$78,000,000 for State Fire Assistance, equal to the fiscal year 
2014 enacted level and the budget request.
    Volunteer Fire Assistance.--The Committee recommends 
$13,000,000 for Volunteer Fire Assistance, $25,000 below the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and equal to the budget request.

                FLAME Wildfire Suppression Reserve Fund


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................      $315,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................                 0
Recommended, 2015.....................................       303,060,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................       -11,940,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................      +303,060,000


    The Committee recommends $303,060,000 for the FLAME 
Wildfire Suppression Reserve Fund, $11,940,000 below the fiscal 
year 2014 enacted level and $303,060,000 above the budget 
request. As discussed above under Wildland Fire Management, the 
Committee fully funds the 10-year average expenditure for 
wildfire suppression.

               ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS, FOREST SERVICE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    The Committee has included administrative provisions as 
requested, unless otherwise stated below.
    The Committee continues the administrative provision 
regarding Wildland Fire Management and the FLAME Wildfire 
Suppression Reserve Fund as included in the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2014.
    The Committee retains the administrative provision 
regarding reprogramming authority.

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES


                         Indian Health Service

    The provision of Federal health services to Indians is 
based on a relationship between Indian Tribes and the U.S. 
Government first set forth in the 1830s by the U.S. Supreme 
Court under Chief Justice John Marshall. Numerous treaties, 
statutes, constitutional provisions, and international laws 
have reconfirmed this relationship. Principal among these is 
the Snyder Act of 1921, which provides the basic authority for 
most Indian health services provided by the Federal Government 
to American Indians and Alaska Natives. The Indian Health 
Service (IHS) provides direct health care services in 28 
hospitals, 61 health centers, three school health centers, and 
34 health stations. Tribes and tribal groups, through contracts 
and compacts with the IHS, operate 17 hospitals, 249 health 
centers, six school health centers, and 70 health stations 
(including 164 Alaska Native village clinics).

                         INDIAN HEALTH SERVICES




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................    $3,982,842,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................     4,172,182,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................     4,180,386,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................      +197,544,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        +8,204,000


    The Committee recommends $4,180,386,000 for Indian Health 
Services, $197,544,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level 
and $8,204,000 above the budget request. A detailed table of 
funding recommendations below the account level is provided at 
the end of this report. The Committee recommendation includes 
further details below.
    Current Services and New Tribes.--The Committee recommends 
$136,135,000 to maintain current levels of service, as 
requested, of which $10,000,000 is to make up for cuts made in 
fiscal year 2014 to fully fund contract support costs; 
$61,239,000 is for medical inflationary costs due in part to an 
increasing and aging population; $2,572,000 is to maintain 
competitive salaries and benefits for healthcare professionals; 
and $62,324,000 is for staffing new facilities as described in 
further detail below. The Committee recommends $7,948,000 to 
begin providing services to Tribes recently receiving Federal 
recognition by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, as requested. The 
breakout of current services and new Tribes increases by 
program is consistent with Page CJ-10 of the budget request.
    Staffing costs for new and expanded health care 
facilities.--The Committee recommends $70,818,000 for staffing 
costs for new and expanded health care facilities, of which 
$62,324,000 is provided in this account as requested. Funds are 
limited to facilities funded through the Health Care Facilities 
Construction Priority System or the Joint Venture Construction 
Program that are newly opened in fiscal year 2014 or that open 
in fiscal year 2015. None of the funds may be allocated to a 
facility until such facility has achieved beneficial occupancy 
status.
    Dental Services.--The Committee recommends $176,154,000 for 
dental health services, $10,864,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
operating plan and $500,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee received testimony this year about an 
initiative to increase preventive dental care for children by 
bringing dentists and hygienists into elementary schools. The 
Committee recommendation includes $500,000 to begin the 
initiative and directs the Service to work with the Bureau of 
Indian Education (BIE) and to consult with Tribes about 
piloting the initiative in the BIE school system.
    Several national health organizations recognize that the 
Service needs additional health care providers and that the 
Service has established volunteer programs to deliver needed 
medical, dental and mental health care. Many more volunteers 
could be recruited if the credentialing process were simplified 
and centralized similar to the processes used by the 
Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs. Such a system 
would assure Tribes that the volunteers are in compliance with 
State licensure and accreditation laws. Because IHS faces a 
health care provider shortage of 1,500 professionals, the 
Committee directs the Service to expeditiously convene a 
meeting of interested Tribes and health care organizations to 
design a pilot program to address credentialing problems and 
report the results to the Committee within 180 days of the 
enactment of this Act.
    The Committee directs the Service to work towards 
completion of electronic dental records (EDR) at the remaining 
80 of 230 Federal and tribal dental sites. The Committee 
recognizes that EDR will significantly improve the gathering of 
data to analyze the early childhood caries program and 
therefore result in cost savings.
    Purchased/Referred Care (formerly Contract Health 
Services).--The Committee recommends $929,041,000 for 
Purchased/Referred Care as requested, $50,466,000 above the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level, of which $35,038,000 is to 
maintain current levels of service and for newly recognized 
Tribes, as discussed above.
    The Committee recognizes that the Service and Tribes are 
forced to prioritize care by Levels I-V and to ration funding 
in this program because the needs outweigh available funds. The 
Committee encourages the Service and Tribes to measure the 
impacts of funding increases on the ability to provide care at 
each level. Currently the program's only measurable goal stated 
in the fiscal year 2015 budget request is, ``Average Days 
between Service End and Purchase Order Issued,'' which is by 
itself an insufficient program goal.
    The Committee urges the Service, Tribes, and the 
congressional authorizing committees to make reasonable and 
expeditious progress to address the concerns and 
recommendations made by the Government Accountability Office 
(GAO), most notably with regard to unfair allocations, third-
party overbilling, and under-enrollment in other qualifying 
Federal programs.
    The Committee urges the Service to work aggressively with 
the relevant congressional authorizing committees to enact 
authorization for the Service to cap payment rates for non-
hospital services, as recommended by the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO-13-272). Failure to do so costs the 
program an estimated $30 million annually that could be used to 
purchase more services.
    Eligibility.--The Committee recognizes the Federal 
government's trust responsibility for providing healthcare for 
American Indians and Alaska Natives. The Committee is aware 
that the definition of who is an ``Indian'' is inconsistent 
across various Federal health programs, which has led to 
confusion, increased paperwork and even differing 
determinations of health benefits within Indian families 
themselves. The Committee therefore directs the Department of 
Health and Human Services, the Indian Health Service, and the 
Department of the Treasury to work together to establish a 
consistent definition of an ``Indian'' for purposes of 
providing health benefits.
    Urban Indian Health.--The Committee recommends $44,250,000 
for the urban Indian health program, $3,521,000 above the 
fiscal year 2014 operating plan and $2,875,000 above the budget 
request. The Committee continues to support funding for urban 
Indian health in light of the disparity in health funding for 
urban Indians, as the Committee heard in testimony during the 
fiscal year 2015 budget development process.
    Indian Health Professions.--The Committee recommends 
$48,342,000 for Indian Health Professions, $14,876,000 above 
the fiscal year 2014 operating plan and $9,876,000 above the 
budget request.
    Within this amount, $30,023,000 is for the loan repayment 
program which includes a $5,000,000 program increase above the 
request and a $4,876,000 permanent transfer of loan repayment 
base funding from Hospitals and Health Clinics so that loan 
repayment funds are consolidated under one line item. Bill 
language has been modified to reflect the total amount 
appropriated for loan repayment, as opposed to previous 
language allowing for ``up to $36,000,000'' which was 
inconsistent with accompanying report language and thus a 
flexibility that IHS never used.
    Recruitment and retention of health care professionals is a 
serious problem in the IHS system which the loan repayment 
program helps to alleviate. In fiscal year 2013, IHS turned 
away over 500 applicants for loan repayment due to limited 
funds. While the recommended increases for fiscal year 2015 
will help reduce vacancies, the Committee notes with concern 
that unfair Federal tax liabilities consume 25 percent of the 
funds. The Committee encourages efforts to extend fair tax 
treatment of Federal scholarship and loan repayment programs to 
IHS-funded programs so that appropriated funds can help more 
applicants and further reduce vacancies. To that end, the 
Committee notes that IHS collected $85.3 million from private 
insurers in fiscal year 2013, which suggests that increased 
costs to the government to hire more IHS professionals by 
fairly adjusting the tax code are at least partially offset by 
private collections as a result of services provided by those 
newly-hired professionals. The Committee encourages IHS to re-
submit its legislative proposal with the fiscal year 2016 
budget and to include defensible estimates of offsets via third 
party collections.
    Contract Support Costs.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $617,205,000 as requested for full funding of 
estimated contract support costs. The Committee expects IHS to 
submit a reprogramming request to the Committee if the final 
calculated contract support costs exceed this amount, in order 
to ensure that contract support costs are fully paid. The 
Committee recognizes that inconsistencies exist between Indian 
Affairs and IHS in the ways that contract support costs are 
estimated and managed, and encourages both the agencies and the 
Tribes to recommend ways that the Committee can be helpful in 
promoting consistency. Tribes that exercise their self-
determination rights and enter into contracts with multiple 
Federal agencies shouldn't have to navigate inconsistent rules 
across different agencies.

                        INDIAN HEALTH FACILITIES




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................      $451,673,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................       461,995,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................       461,995,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................       +10,322,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $461,995,000 for Indian Health 
Facilities, $10,322,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and equal to the budget request. A detailed table of 
funding recommendations below the account level is provided at 
the end of this report. The Committee recommendation includes 
further details below.
    Current Services and New Tribes.--The Committee recommends 
$10,255,000 to maintain current levels of service, as 
requested, of which $1,761,000 is for medical inflationary 
costs due in part to an increasing and aging population, and 
$8,494,000 is for staffing new facilities as described in 
further detail below. The Committee recommends $67,000 to begin 
providing services to Tribes recently receiving Federal 
recognition by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, as requested. The 
breakout of current services and new Tribes increases by 
program is consistent with Page CJ-10 of the budget request.
    Staffing costs for new and expanded health care 
facilities.--The Committee recommends $70,818,000 for staffing 
costs for new and expanded health care facilities, of which 
$8,494,000 is provided in this account as requested. The 
stipulations included in the `Indian Health Services' account 
regarding the allocation of funds for the staffing of new 
facilities pertain to the funds in this account as well.

                     National Institutes of Health


          NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, an 
agency within the National Institutes of Health, was authorized 
in section 311(a) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 and in section 126(g) 
of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 to 
conduct certain research and worker training activities 
associated with the nation's Hazardous Substance Superfund 
program.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $77,349,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        77,349,000
Recommended, 2015                                             77,349,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $77,349,000 for the National 
Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, as requested. The 
Committee urges the Institute to consider additional sources of 
funding to recoup administrative costs associated with the 
worker training program.

            Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry


            TOXIC SUBSTANCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry 
(ATSDR), an agency in the Department of Health and Human 
Services, was created in section 104(i) of the Comprehensive 
Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act 
(CERCLA) of 1980. The Agency's mission is to serve the public 
through responsive public health actions to promote healthy and 
safe environments and prevent harmful toxic exposures. ATSDR 
assesses hazardous exposures in communities near toxic waste 
sites and advises the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and 
other government agencies, community groups and industry 
partners on actions needed to protect people's health. In 
addition, ATSDR conducts toxicological and applied research to 
support environmental assessments, supports health surveillance 
systems and registries, develops and disseminates information 
on hazardous substances, provides education and training on 
hazardous exposures, and responds to environmental emergencies. 
Through a national network of scientists and public health 
practitioners in State health departments, regional EPA offices 
and headquarters, ATSDR helps to protect people from acute 
toxic exposures that occur from hazardous leaks and spills, 
environment-related poisonings, and natural and terrorism-
related disasters.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $74,691,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        74,691,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        74,691,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $74,691,000 for the Agency for 
Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), as requested. 
The recommendation supports the ongoing epidemiological studies 
of health conditions caused by exposures to uranium released 
from mining and milling operations in the Navajo Nation.

                         OTHER RELATED AGENCIES


                   Executive Office of the President


  COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

    The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) was established 
by Congress under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 
(NEPA). The Office of Environmental Quality (OEQ), which 
provides professional and administrative staff for the Council, 
was established in the Environmental Quality Improvement Act of 
1970. The Council on Environmental Quality has statutory 
responsibility for overseeing Federal agency implementation of 
the requirements of NEPA. CEQ also assists in coordinating 
environmental programs among the Federal agencies in the 
Executive Branch.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................        $3,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................         3,009,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................         3,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................            -9,000


    The Committee recommends $3,000,000 for the Council on 
Environmental Quality and Office of Environmental Quality, 
equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $9,000 below 
the budget request.

             Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB) is 
an independent Federal agency charged with investigating 
industrial chemical accidents. The board members are appointed 
by the President and confirmed by the Senate. The CSB conducts 
root-cause investigations of chemical accidents at fixed 
industrial facilities. Root causes are usually deficiencies in 
safety management systems, but can be any factor that would 
have prevented the accident if that factor had not occurred. 
Other accident causes often involve equipment failures, human 
errors, unforeseen chemical reactions or other hazards. CSB 
does not issue fines or citations, but does make 
recommendations to plants, regulatory agencies such as the 
Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the 
Environmental Protection Agency, industry organizations, and 
labor groups. Congress designed the CSB to be non-regulatory 
and independent of other agencies so that its investigations 
might, where appropriate, review the effectiveness of 
regulations and regulatory enforcement.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $11,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        12,253,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        11,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        -1,253,000


    The Committee recommends $11,000,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses of the Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board, 
equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $1,253,000 
below the budget request.
    The Committee is deeply concerned by the findings of the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) and two congressional 
committees that identify critical management deficiencies, an 
abusive and hostile work environment, and a significant backlog 
of investigations within the Chemical Safety Board (CSB). The 
GAO and Congressional committees have determined that these 
failures are due in large part to the poor leadership and 
mismanagement of the Chairman of the Board and other high-
ranking officials. While the Committee supports the critical 
work of the CSB, the Committee believes that the CSB's overall 
effectiveness is undermined by its present leadership and urges 
the Administration to takes steps to address these failures as 
expeditiously as possible.

              Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation was 
established by Public Law 93-531 to plan and conduct relocation 
activities associated with the settlement of a land dispute 
between the Navajo Nation and the Hopi Tribe.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................        $7,341,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................         8,499,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................         7,143,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................          -198,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        -1,356,000


    The Committee recommends $7,143,000 for the Office of 
Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation, $198,000 below the fiscal 
year 2014 enacted level and $1,356,000 below the budget 
request. Of this amount, $200,000 shall be transferred to the 
Department of the Interior Office of Inspector General to 
continue auditing the program. The priority of the remaining 
funds shall be to build homes for those approved and awaiting 
them.

    Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and Arts 
                              Development


                        PAYMENT TO THE INSTITUTE




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................        $9,369,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        11,469,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................         9,469,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................          +100,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        -2,000,000


    The Committee recommends $9,469,000 in direct 
appropriations for the Institute of American Indian and Alaska 
Native Culture and Arts Development, $100,000 above the fiscal 
year 2014 enacted level and $2,000,000 below the budget 
request.

                        SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION

    The Smithsonian Institution is the world's largest museum 
and research complex, with 19 museums and galleries, numerous 
research centers, libraries, archives, and the National 
Zoological Park. Funded by both private and Federal sources, 
the Smithsonian is unique in the Federal establishment. Created 
by an Act of Congress in 1846 to carry out the trust included 
in James Smithson's will, it has been engaged for 168 years in 
the ``increase and diffusion of knowledge.'' Last year, the 
Smithsonian attracted over 30 million visits to its museums, 
galleries, and zoological park. Additional millions also view 
Smithsonian traveling exhibitions and participate in the annual 
Folklife Festival on the National Mall. As custodian of the 
National Collections, the Smithsonian is responsible for more 
than 137 million art objects, natural history specimens, and 
artifacts. These scientific and cultural collections are a 
vital resource for global research and conservation efforts. 
The collections are displayed for the enjoyment and education 
of visitors and are available for research by the staff of the 
Institution and by thousands of visiting students, scientists, 
and historians each year.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................      $647,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................       700,800,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................       674,297,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................       +27,297,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       -26,503,000


    The Committee recommends $674,297,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses of the Smithsonian Institution, $27,297,000 above the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $26,503,000 below the budget 
request.
    Additional Guidance.--The following additional direction 
and guidance is provided with respect to funding provided 
within this account:
    Collections Care.--The Committee maintains its longstanding 
commitment to the preservation of priceless, irreplaceable 
Smithsonian Institution collections and has provided funds, as 
requested, for improving the stewardship of national 
collections. The Committee directs the Smithsonian to provide 
the Committee, within 90 days of enactment of this Act, a 
progress report on the multi-year effort to improve the 
stewardship of national collections, including the Armed Forces 
History Collection, at the National Museum of American History.
    Exhibit Maintenance.--The Committee has provided funding, 
as requested, for exhibit maintenance and critical collections 
needs at the National Air and Space Museum, the National Museum 
of Natural History, the National Zoological Park, and the 
National Museum of American History which remain among the most 
highly visited Smithsonian sites.
    National Museum of African American History and Culture.--
The Committee maintains its support for the National Museum of 
African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) and recognizes 
the need to address a number of funding priorities in advance 
of the museum's opening in 2015.
    Latino Programs, Exhibitions, Collections and Public 
Outreach.--The Committee supports the Smithsonian Latino 
Center's goal of promoting the inclusion of Latino 
contributions in Smithsonian Institution programs, exhibitions, 
collections and public outreach. The Committee urges 
collaboration among interested parties to advance these goals 
more fully by utilizing existing Smithsonian Institution museum 
locations for the expansion of the Smithsonian Latino Center's 
programming, exhibition and collection space.
    Ocean Education and Research.--The Smithsonian is 
encouraged to work with Executive Branch agencies, including 
NOAA, and other relevant organizations to further education 
related to America's oceans and to advance research in marine 
science.
    Science Education.--STEM education (Science, Technology, 
Engineering, and Mathematics) is critical to our country's 
capacity to innovate and better prepare our Nation's young 
people for the high technology jobs of tomorrow. The Committee 
concurs with concerns over the proliferation of Federal STEM 
investments and programs across government. The need exists to 
consolidate programs and significantly improve the level of 
coordination and communication of STEM activities, budgets, and 
achievements across the entire Federal government. The 
Committee has not included additional requested funding for 
STEM engagement believing funds should be directed to higher 
priority needs within the Institution.

                           FACILITIES CAPITAL




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................      $158,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................       150,100,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................       139,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................       -19,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       -11,100,000


    The Committee recommends $139,000,000 for Facilities 
Capital, $19,000,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level 
and $11,100,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee supports revitalization of Smithsonian 
Institution facilities and the planning and design of future 
projects. The Committee also supports and remains committed to 
the construction of the congressionally authorized National 
Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). 
Accordingly, the Committee recommends $24,010,000 to complete 
construction of the NMAAHC. Federal funds provided for the 
construction of the NMAAHC are being matched with private 
funding on a one-to-one basis.

                        National Gallery of Art

    The National Gallery of Art is one of the world's great 
galleries. Its magnificent works of art, displayed for the 
benefit of millions of visitors annually, and its two iconic 
buildings and sculpture garden, serve as an example of a 
successful cooperative endeavor between private individuals and 
institutions and the Federal Government. With the special 
exhibitions shown in the Gallery, and through the many 
exhibitions which travel across the country, the Gallery brings 
great art treasures to Washington, DC, and to the Nation. 
Through its educational and teacher training programs and its 
website, the Gallery provides art history materials, rich 
online educational materials, direct loans, and broadcast 
programs to millions of Americans in every State.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................      $118,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................       121,000,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................       118,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        -3,000,000


    The Committee recommends $118,000,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses of the National Gallery of Art, equal to the fiscal 
year 2014 enacted level and $3,000,000 below the budget 
request.
    Bill Language.--The Committee has included bill language, 
as requested, specifying the amount provided for Special 
Exhibitions.

            REPAIR, RESTORATION AND RENOVATION OF BUILDINGS




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $15,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        19,000,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        19,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................        +4,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $19,000,000 for Repair, 
Restoration and Renovation of buildings at the National Gallery 
of Art, $4,000,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
equal to the budget request. The Committee supports the 
requested increase for the Master Facilities Plan which 
includes critical fire and public safety improvements.
    Bill Language.--The Committee has included bill language, 
as requested, relating to lease agreements of no more than 10 
years that addresses space needs created by ongoing renovations 
in the Master Facilities Plan.

             John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

    The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts is a 
living memorial to the late President Kennedy and is the 
National Center for the Performing Arts. The Center houses nine 
stages and seven theaters which have a total of more than 7,300 
seats. The Center consists of over 1.5 million square feet of 
usable floor space with visitation averaging 8,000 on a daily 
basis. The support systems in the building often operate at 
capacity 18 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.

                       OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $22,193,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        22,000,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        22,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................          -193,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $22,000,000 for Operations and 
Maintenance, as requested.

                     CAPITAL REPAIR AND RESTORATION




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $12,205,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        10,800,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        10,800,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................        -1,405,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $10,800,000 for Capital Repair and 
Restoration, as requested.

            Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars 
promotes policy-relevant research and dialogue to increase 
understanding and enhance the capabilities and knowledge of 
leaders, citizens, and institutions worldwide. The Center hosts 
scholars and policy makers to do their own advanced study, 
research and writing and facilitates debate and discussions 
among scholars, public officials, journalists and business 
leaders from across the country on relevant, major long-term 
issues facing this Nation and the world.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $10,500,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................         9,975,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................         9,975,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................          -525,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $9,975,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for 
Scholars, $525,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
equal to the budget request.

           National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities


                    National Endowment for the Arts


                       GRANTS AND ADMINISTRATION




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................      $146,021,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................       146,021,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................       146,021,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $146,021,000 for the National 
Endowment for the Arts (NEA), equal to the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and the budget request.
    The Committee values greatly the longstanding collaborative 
relationship between the NEA and the States. State Arts 
Agencies support the arts for communities at the grassroots 
level regardless of their geographic location, providing much 
of their funding to smaller organizations, community groups, 
and schools rather than well-established arts organizations.
    The Committee remains committed to supporting proven 
national initiatives with broad geographic reach. The Big Read, 
Challenge America, and Shakespeare in American Communities are 
among the cost-effective grant programs with broad, bipartisan 
Congressional support that meet these criteria, supporting the 
NEA's goal of extending the arts to underserved populations in 
both urban and rural communities across the United States.
    The Committee commends the NEA for its collaboration with 
the Walter Reed National Military Center in creating the NEA/
Walter Reed Healing Arts Partnership. Since 2011, this unique 
partnership has supported creative and innovative arts 
therapies for service members returning from Afghanistan and 
Iraq. This collaborative relationship has also resulted in 
clinical research to evaluate the potential health benefits of 
creative arts therapy interventions for troops including 
service members with Traumatic Brain Injury and Post Traumatic 
Stress.
    Bill Language.--Each year, the Committee provides in bill 
language specific guidelines under which the Endowment is 
directed to distribute taxpayer dollars in support of the arts. 
With the exception of established honorific programs, grant 
funding to individual artists is strictly prohibited. The 
Committee directs that priority be given to providing services 
or grant funding for projects, productions, or programs that 
encourage public knowledge, education, understanding, and 
appreciation of the arts. Any reduction in support to the 
States for arts education should be no more than proportional 
to other funding decreases taken in other NEA programs.
    Reforms originally instituted by the Committee in P.L. 108-
447 relating to grant guidelines and program priorities are 
fully restated in Sections 415 and 416 of the bill. The 
Committee expects the NEA to adhere to them fully. These 
reforms maintain broad bipartisan support and continue to serve 
well both the NEA and the public interest. The Committee has 
also included bill language addressing grant award matching 
requirements and waiver procedures contained in the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014.
    The Committee has, similar to previous years, included bill 
language raising caps for the Federal insurance program for 
loaned domestic and foreign works under the Arts and Artifacts 
Indemnity Act.

                 National Endowment for the Humanities


         GRANTS AND ADMINISTRATION (INCLUDING MATCHING GRANTS)




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................      $146,021,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................       146,021,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................       146,021,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends a total of $146,021,000 for the 
National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), equal to the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and the budget request.
    The Committee commends the NEH for its support of grant 
programs to benefit Wounded Warriors and to ensure educational 
opportunities for American heroes transitioning to civilian 
life.
    The Committee commends the NEH Federal/State Partnership 
for its ongoing, successful collaboration with State humanities 
councils in each of the 50 states as well as Washington, D.C., 
the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, 
the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and American 
Samoa. Every NEH dollar received by a council is matched by a 
local contribution. In recent years, the proportion of NEH 
program funds supporting the work of State humanities councils 
has grown to nearly 40 percent. The Committee urges the NEH to 
provide program funding to support the work of State humanities 
councils consistent with the guidance provided in the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014.

                        Commission of Fine Arts

    The Commission of Fine Arts was established in 1910 to 
advise the government on matters pertaining to the design of 
national symbols, and particularly to guide the architectural 
development of Washington, D.C. The Commission's work includes 
advice on designs for parks, public buildings, public art, as 
well as the design of national monuments, coins and medals, and 
overseas American military cemeteries. In addition, the 
Commission conducts design reviews of semipublic and private 
structures within the Old Georgetown Historic District and 
within certain areas of the National Capital that are adjacent 
to areas of Federal interest. The Commission reviews more than 
600 projects annually. The Commission also administers the 
National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs program.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................        $2,396,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................         2,524,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................         2,524,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................          +128,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $2,524,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses of the Commission of Fine Arts, $128,000 above the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and equal to the budget request.

               National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs





Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................        $2,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................                 0
Recommended, 2015.....................................         1,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................        -1,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        +1,000,000


    The National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs program was 
established in Public Law 99-190 to support organizations that 
perform, exhibit, and/or present the arts in the Nation's 
Capital. The Committee recommends $1,000,000, which is 
$1,000,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$1,000,000 above the budget request.

               Advisory Council on Historic Preservation


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 established 
the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP). The ACHP 
was granted permanent authorization as part of the National 
Historic Preservation Act Amendments of 2006 (Public Law 109-
453). The ACHP promotes the preservation, enhancement, and 
productive use of our nation's historic resources and advises 
the President and Congress on national historic preservation 
policy.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................        $6,531,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................         6,204,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................         6,204,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................          -327,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $6,204,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses of the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation 
(ACHP), $327,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
equal to the budget request.

                  National Capital Planning Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The National Capital Planning Act of 1952 designated the 
National Capital Planning Commission as the central planning 
agency for the Federal government in the National Capital 
Region. The three major functions of the Commission are to 
prepare and adopt the Federal elements of the National Capital 
Comprehensive Plan; prepare an annual report on a five-year 
projection of the Federal Capital Improvement Program; and 
review plans and proposals submitted to the Commission.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................        $8,084,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................         7,948,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................         7,948,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................          -136,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $7,948,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses of the National Capital Planning Commission, $136,000 
below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and equal to the 
budget request.

                United States Holocaust Memorial Museum


                       HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL MUSEUM

    In 1980, Congress passed legislation creating a 65-member 
Holocaust Memorial Council with the mandate to create and 
oversee a living memorial/museum to victims of the Holocaust. 
The museum opened in April 1993. Construction costs for the 
museum came solely from donated funds raised by the U.S. 
Holocaust Memorial Museum Campaign, and appropriated funds were 
used for planning and development of programmatic components, 
overall administrative support, and annual commemorative 
observances. Since the opening of the museum, appropriated 
funds have been provided to pay for the ongoing operating costs 
of the museum as authorized by Public Law 102-529 and Public 
Law 106-292. Private funds support educational outreach 
throughout the United States.




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................       $52,385,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        52,385,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................        52,385,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $52,385,000 for the Holocaust 
Memorial Museum, equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted level 
and the budget request.

                Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission

    The Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission was created by 
Congress in 1999 through Public Law 106-79 for the purpose of 
establishing a permanent national memorial to Dwight D. 
Eisenhower, Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces in Europe in 
World War II and 34th President of the United States. The 
Commission consists of 12 members, four members of the House of 
Representatives, four Senators, and four private citizens 
appointed by the President.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................        $1,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015.................................         2,000,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................                 0
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................        -1,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................        -2,000,000


    The bill does not include funding for the Salaries and 
Expenses account. The Committee notes that in April, 2014 the 
National Capital Planning Commission voted to reject the 
memorial design even after modifications had been proposed by 
the Eisenhower Commission. The lack of consensus on the 
memorial design is troubling. The Committee urges the 
authorizers of jurisdiction to work expeditiously on 
legislation to authorize an open, public, and transparent 
redesign process that is collaborative and involves the various 
constituencies as partners including, but not limited to, the 
Congress, the Eisenhower family, the Eisenhower Commission, the 
National Park Service, the Commission on Fine Arts, and the 
National Capitol Planning Commission.
    In the interim, the Committee directs the Commission to 
cease all expenditures relating to the current memorial design. 
The Committee further directs that future monthly expenditures 
by the Commission are limited to payroll, rent, utilities and 
other fixed costs associated with essential daily operations of 
the Commission only. Lastly, the Committee directs the 
Commission to submit to the Committees on Appropriations a 
monthly report on all expenditures from amounts previously 
appropriated.

                          CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION




Appropriation enacted, 2014...........................                $0
Budget estimate, 2015.................................        19,300,000
Recommended, 2015.....................................                 0
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2014...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2015.............................       -19,300,000


    The bill does not include funding for the Capital 
Construction account.

                      TITLE IV--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Section 401 continues a provision prohibiting activities to 
promote public support or opposition to legislative proposals.
    Section 402 continues a provision providing for annual 
appropriations unless expressly provided otherwise in this Act.
    Section 403 continues a provision providing restrictions on 
departmental assessments unless approved by the Committees on 
Appropriations.
    Section 404 continues a limitation on accepting and 
processing applications for patents and on the patenting of 
Federal lands; permits processing of grandfathered 
applications; and permits third-party contractors to process 
grandfathered applications.
    Section 405 continues a provision regarding the payment of 
contract support costs for fiscal year 2013 and prior years.
    Section 406 addresses the payment of contract support costs 
for fiscal year 2014.
    Section 407 addresses the payment of contract support costs 
for fiscal year 2015.
    Section 408 continues a provision allowing Forest Service 
land management plans to be more than 15 years old if the 
Secretary is acting in good faith to update such plans and 
prohibiting the use of funds to implement new wilderness 
directives under the planning rule.
    Section 409 continues a provision limiting preleasing, 
leasing, and related activities within the boundaries of 
National Monuments.
    Section 410 continues a provision which restricts funding 
for acquisition of land from being used for declarations of 
taking or complaints in condemnation.
    Section 411 continues a provision addressing timber sales 
involving Alaskan western red cedar.
    Section 412 modifies a provision continuing certain 
authorities to renew grazing permits or leases administered by 
the Forest Service or Department of the Interior.
    Section 413 continues a provision which prohibits no-bid 
contracts and grants except under certain circumstances.
    Section 414 continues a provision which requires public 
disclosure of certain reports.
    Section 415 continues a provision which delineates the 
grant guidelines for the National Endowment for the Arts.
    Section 416 continues a provision which delineates the 
program priorities for the programs managed by the National 
Endowment for the Arts.
    Section 417 modifies existing insurance caps for loaned 
domestic and foreign works under the Arts and Artifacts 
Indemnity Act.
    Section 418 continues a provision requiring the Department 
of the Interior, the EPA, the Forest Service, and the Indian 
Health Service to provide the Committees on Appropriations a 
quarterly report on the status of balances of appropriations.
    Section 419 requires the President to submit a report to 
the Committees on Appropriations no later than 120 days after 
the fiscal year 2016 budget is submitted to Congress describing 
in detail all Federal agency obligations and expenditures for 
climate change programs and activities in fiscal years 2014 and 
2015.
    Section 420 continues a provision prohibiting the use of 
funds to promulgate or implement any regulation requiring the 
issuance of permits under title V of the Clean Air Act for 
carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, water vapor, or methane 
emissions.
    Section 421 continues a provision prohibiting the use of 
funds to implement any provision in a rule if that provision 
requires mandatory reporting of greenhouse gas emissions from 
manure management systems.
    Section 422 continues a provision limiting the use of funds 
to enter into a contract, memorandum of understanding, or 
cooperative agreement with, make a grant to, or provide a loan 
or loan guarantee to, corporations convicted of a felony 
criminal violation of Federal law within the preceding 24 
months. Agencies shall provide an annual report to the 
Committee, due within 30 days of the end of each fiscal year, 
detailing its implementation of this provision, including a 
list of affected corporations and a justification for any cases 
in which the Department has determined that the limitation 
should not apply.
    Section 423 continues a provision limiting the use of funds 
to enter into a contract, memorandum of understanding, or 
cooperative agreement with, make a grant to, or provide a loan 
or loan guarantee to, corporations with certain unpaid Federal 
tax liabilities. Agencies shall provide an annual report to the 
Committee, due within 30 days of the end of each fiscal year, 
detailing its implementation of this provision, including a 
list of affected corporations and a justification for any cases 
in which the Department has determined that the limitation 
should not apply.
    Section 424 extends by one year the authorization for 
American Battlefield Protection program grants.
    Section 425 provides a one-year extension of the current 
rec fee authority.
    Section 426 prohibits the use of funds to regulate the lead 
content of ammunition or fishing tackle.
    Section 427 continues a provision from the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2014 modifying authorities relating to the 
Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission.
    Section 428 extends the maximum authorized term for grazing 
permits and leases.
    Section 429 prohibits the use of funds to develop, adopt, 
implement, administer, or enforce a change or supplement to a 
rule or guidance documents pertaining to the definition of 
waters under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.
    Section 430 prohibits the use of funds to develop, carry 
out, implement, or enforce proposed regulations published on 
June 18, 2010.
    Section 431 prohibits the use of funds to limit 
recreational shooting and hunting on Federal and public lands 
except for public safety.
    Section 432 prohibits the use of funds to develop, propose, 
finalize, administer, or implement the National Ocean Policy 
under Executive Order 13547; requires a report identifying all 
Federal expenditures for the development, administration, or 
implementation of such Policy since fiscal year 2011; and 
requires that the President's budget submission for fiscal year 
2016 identify funding proposed for the implementation of such 
Policy. The Committee is including the general provision in 
order to ascertain the potentially far-reaching impacts of this 
policy established in 2010 without Congressional input.
    Section 433 prohibits EPA from using funds to implement, 
administer, or enforce the lead renovation rule until EPA has 
approved a commercially available lead test kit.
    Section 434 prohibits EPA from using funds to develop, 
propose, finalize, implement, enforce, or administer any 
regulation that would establish new financial responsibility 
requirements under CERCLA.
    Section 435 prohibits EPA from using funds to develop, 
issue, implement, or enforce any greenhouse gas New Source 
Performance Standards on any new or existing source that is an 
electric utility generating unit.
    Section 436 prohibits the use of funds to compile or 
disclose personal information of dairy or livestock owners, 
operators, and employees unless the information was voluntarily 
offered or aggregated at the local level.
    Section 437 makes available vacant allotments for 
permittees impacted by drought or wildland fire.
    Section 438 clarifies the protection of water rights with 
regard to Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management permits.
    Section 439 prohibits the use of funds from making any 
change to the regulations in effect on October 1, 2012, 
pertaining to the definitions of the terms ``fill material'' or 
``discharge of fill material''.
    Section 440 places a limitation on administrative costs for 
programs addressing invasive species.
    Section 441 maintains the long-standing exemption under the 
definition of solid waste for legitimate scrap metal recyclers.
    Section 442 designates February 22, George Washington's 
actual birthday, as a national holiday.
    Section 443 prohibits EPA from finalizing a rule to allow 
the Agency to collect fines and penalties via administratively 
garnishing wages.
    Section 444 applies Buy American requirements to the 
Drinking Water State Revolving Fund.
    Section 445 establishes a Spending Reduction Account in the 
bill.

                    Bill-Wide Reporting Requirements

    The following items are included in accordance with various 
requirements of the Rules of the House of Representatives:

                          FULL COMMITTEE VOTES

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(b) of rule XIII of 
the Rules of the House of Representatives, the results of each 
roll call vote on an amendment or on the motion to report, 
together with the names of those voting for and those voting 
against, are printed below:


         STATEMENT OF GENERAL PERFORMANCE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is a statement of 
general performance goals and objectives for which this measure 
authorizes funding:
    The Committee on Appropriations considers program 
performance, including a program's success in developing and 
attaining outcome-related goals and objectives, in developing 
funding recommendations.

                          RESCISSION OF FUNDS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the rescission recommended in the accompanying bill:
    Department and activity:
    Amounts recommended for rescission:
    Department of the Interior: Landowner Incentive Program 
$2,000,000.
    Department of the Interior: Private Stewardship Grants 
$24,000.
    Department of the Interior: Land and Water Conservation 
Fund (contract authority) $28,000,000.
    Environmental Protection Agency: STAG $45,000,000.

                           TRANSFERS OF FUNDS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the transfer of funds in the accompanying bill.


   DISCLOSURE OF EARMARKS AND CONGRESSIONALLY DIRECTED SPENDING ITEMS

    Neither the bill nor the report contains any Congressional 
earmarks, limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as 
defined by clause 9 of rule XXI.

         COMPLIANCE WITH RULE XIII, CLAUSE 3(E) (RAMSEYER RULE)

    In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, and existing law in which no 
change is proposed is shown in roman):

                      TITLE 31, UNITED STATES CODE




           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
SUBTITLE V--GENERAL ASSISTANCE ADMINISTRATION

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                CHAPTER 69--PAYMENT FOR ENTITLEMENT LAND




           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
Sec. 6906. Funding

   For each of fiscal years 2008 through [2014] 2015--
          (1) each county or other eligible unit of local 
        government shall be entitled to payment under this 
        chapter; and
          (2) sums shall be made available to the Secretary of 
        the Interior for obligation or expenditure in 
        accordance with this chapter.

        

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
                              ----------                              


                 CONSOLIDATED APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2012

                          (Public Law 112-74)



           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
   DIVISION E--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED 
                   AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2012

TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT ACTIONS REGARDING GRAZING ON PUBLIC LANDS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


  Sec. 115. (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (d) Provisions of this section shall apply to fiscal years 
2012 through [2014] 2017.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  Sec. 122. (a) Exhaustion of Administrative Review Required.--
          (1) For [fiscal years 2012 through 2015] fiscal year 
        2012 and each fiscal year thereafter, a person may 
        bring a civil action challenging a decision of the 
        Bureau of Land Management concerning grazing on public 
        lands (as defined in section 103(e) of the Federal Land 
        Policy and Management Act of 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1702(e))) 
        in a Federal district court only if the person has 
        exhausted the administrative hearings and appeals 
        procedures established by the Department of the 
        Interior, including having filed a timely appeal and a 
        request for stay.
          (2) An issue may be considered in the judicial review 
        of a decision referred to in paragraph (1) only if the 
        issue was raised in the administrative review process 
        described in such paragraph.
          (3) An exception to the requirement of exhausting the 
        administrative review process before seeking judicial 
        review shall be available if a Federal court finds that 
        the agency failed or was unable to make information 
        timely available during the administrative review 
        process for issues of material fact. For the purposes 
        of this paragraph, the term ``timely'' means within 120 
        calendar days after the date that the challenge to the 
        agency action or amendment at issue is received for 
        administrative review.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


TITLE IV--GENERAL PROVISIONS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                      EXTENSION OF GRAZING PERMITS

  Sec. 415. The terms and conditions of section 325 of Public 
Law 108-108 (117 Stat. 1307), regarding grazing permits at the 
Department of the Interior and the Forest Service, shall remain 
in effect for [fiscal years 2012 through 2015] fiscal year 2012 
and each fiscal year thereafter. A grazing permit or lease 
issued by the Secretary of the Interior for lands administered 
by the Bureau of Land Management that is the subject of a 
request for a grazing preference transfer shall be issued, 
without further processing, for the remaining time period in 
the existing permit or lease using the same mandatory terms and 
conditions. If the authorized officer determines a change in 
the mandatory terms and conditions is required, the new permit 
must be processed as directed in section 325 of Public Law 108-
108.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


     DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED AGENCIES 
APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2010

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


   DIVISION A--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED 
                   AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2010

  The following sums are appropriated, out of any money in the 
Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the Department of the 
Interior, environment, and related agencies for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2010, and for other purposes, namely:

TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


               FOREST ECOSYSTEM HEALTH AND RECOVERY FUND

                   (REVOLVING FUND, SPECIAL ACCOUNT)

  In addition to the purposes authorized in Public Law 102-381, 
funds made available in the Forest Ecosystem Health and 
Recovery Fund can be used through fiscal year [2015] 2020 for 
the purpose of planning, preparing, implementing and monitoring 
salvage timber sales and forest ecosystem health and recovery 
activities, such as release from competing vegetation and 
density control treatments. The Federal share of receipts 
(defined as the portion of salvage timber receipts not paid to 
the counties under 43 U.S.C. 1181f and 43 U.S.C. 1181f-1 et 
seq., and Public Law 106-393) derived from treatments funded by 
this account shall be deposited through fiscal year [2015] 2020 
into the Forest Ecosystem Health and Recovery Fund.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


     DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                        APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2006

                          (Public Law 109-54)

   AN ACT Making appropriations for the Department of the Interior, 
environment, and related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 
                   30, 2006, and for other purposes.

 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the 
following sums are appropriated, out of any money in the 
Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the Department of the 
Interior, environment, and related agencies for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2006, and for other purposes, namely:

TITLE II--ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                       administrative provisions

  For fiscal year 2006, notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 6303(1) and 
6305(1), the Administrator of the Environmental Protection 
Agency, in carrying out the Agency's function to implement 
directly Federal environmental programs required or authorized 
by law in the absence of an acceptable tribal program, may 
award cooperative agreements to federally-recognized Indian 
Tribes or Intertribal consortia, if authorized by their member 
Tribes, to assist the Administrator in implementing Federal 
environmental programs for Indian Tribes required or authorized 
by law, except that no such cooperative agreements may be 
awarded from funds designated for State financial assistance 
agreements.
  The Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency is 
authorized to collect and obligate pesticide registration 
service fees in accordance with section 33 of the Federal 
Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (as added by 
subsection (f)(2) of the Pesticide Registration Improvement Act 
of 2003), as amended.
  Notwithstanding CERCLA 104(k)(4)(B)(i)(IV), appropriated 
funds for fiscal year 2006 may be used to award grants or loans 
under section 104(k) of CERCLA to eligible entities that 
satisfy all of the elements set forth in CERCLA section 101(40) 
to qualify as a bona fide prospective purchaser except that the 
date of acquisition of the property was prior to the date of 
enactment of the Small Business Liability Relief and Brownfield 
Revitalization Act of 2001.
  For fiscal years 2006 through [2015] 2020., the Administrator 
may, after consultation with the Office of Personnel 
Management, employ up to fifty persons at any one time in the 
Office of Research and Development under the authority provided 
in 42 U.S.C. 209.
  Beginning in fiscal year 2006 and thereafter, and 
notwithstanding section 306 of the Toxic Substances Control 
Act, the Federal share of the cost of radon program activities 
implemented with Federal assistance under section 306 shall not 
exceed 60 percent in the third and subsequent grant years.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


ARTS AND ARTIFACTS INDEMNITY ACT

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                            federal council

  Sec. 2. (a) * * *
  (b)(1) For purposes of this Act, the Council shall be an 
``agency'' within the meaning of the appropriate definitions of 
such term in title 5, United States Code.
  (2) For purposes of this Act, the Secretary of the 
Smithsonian Institution, the Director of the National Gallery 
of Art, the member designated by the Chairman of the Senate 
Commission [of Art] on Art and Antiquities and the member 
designated by the Speaker of the House of Representatives shall 
not serve as members of the Council.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                          indemnity agreement

  Sec. 5. (a) * * *
  (b) The aggregate of loss or damage covered by indemnity 
agreements made under this Act shall not exceed 
[$10,000,000,000] $15,000,000,000, at any one time for 
international exhibitions, and [$5,000,000,000] $7,500,000,000 
at any one time for domestic exhibitions.
  (c) No indemnity agreement for a single exhibition shall 
cover loss or damage in excess of [$1,200,000,000] 
$1,800,000,000 for international exhibitions, or [$750,000,000] 
$1,000,000,000 for domestic exhibitions.
  (d) If the estimated value of the items covered by an 
indemnity agreement for a single exhibition is--
          (1) $2,000,000 or less, then coverage under this Act 
        shall extend only to loss or damage in excess of the 
        first $15,000 of loss or damage to items covered;
          (2) more than $2,000,000 but less than $10,000,000, 
        then coverage under this Act shall extend only to loss 
        or damage in excess of the first $25,000 of loss or 
        damage to items covered;
          (3) not less than $10,000,000 but less than 
        $125,000,000, then coverage under this Act shall extend 
        to loss or damage in excess of the first $50,000 of 
        loss or damage to items covered;
          (4) not less than $125,000,000 but less than 
        $200,000, then coverage under this Act shall extend to 
        loss or damage in excess of the first $100,000 of loss 
        or damage to items covered;
          (5) not less than $200,000,000 but less than 
        $300,000,000, then coverage under the Act shall extend 
        only to loss or damage in excess of the first $200,000, 
        of loss or damage to items covered;
          (6) not less than $300,000,000 but less than 
        $400,000,000, then coverage under this chapter shall 
        extend only to loss or damage in excess of the first 
        $300,000 of loss or damage to items covered;
          (7) not less than $400,000,000 but less than 
        $500,000,000, then coverage under this chapter shall 
        extend only to loss or damage in excess of the first 
        $400,000 of loss or damage to items covered; or
          (8) $500,000,000 or more, then coverage under this 
        [chapter] Act shall extend only to loss or damage in 
        excess of the first $500,000 of loss or damage to items 
        covered.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


                         ACT OF MARCH 30, 2009

                          (Public Law 111-11)

    AN ACT To designate certain land as components of the National 
   Wilderness Preservation System, to authorize certain programs and 
  activities in the Department of the Interior and the Department of 
Agriculture, and for other purposes.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


TITLE VII--NATIONAL PARK SERVICE AUTHORIZATIONS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                   Subtitle D--Program Authorizations

SEC. 7301. AMERICAN BATTLEFIELD PROTECTION PROGRAM.

  (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (c) Battlefield Acquisition Grant Program.--
          (1) Definitions.--In this subsection:
                  (A) Battlefield report.--The term 
                ``Battlefield Report'' means the document 
                entitled ``Report on the Nation's Civil War 
                Battlefields'', prepared by the Civil War Sites 
                Advisory Commission, and dated July 1993.
                  (B) Eligible entity.--The term ``eligible 
                entity'' means a State or local government.
                  (C) Eligible site.--The term ``eligible 
                site'' means a site--
                          (i) that is not within the exterior 
                        boundaries of a unit of the National 
                        Park System; and
                          (ii) that is identified in the 
                        Battlefield Report.
                  (D) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means 
                the Secretary of the Interior, acting through 
                the American Battlefield Protection Program.
          (2) Establishment.--The Secretary shall establish a 
        battlefield acquisition grant program under which the 
        Secretary may provide grants to eligible entities to 
        pay the Federal share of the cost of acquiring 
        interests in eligible sites for the preservation and 
        protection of those eligible sites.
          (3) Nonprofit partners.--An eligible entity may 
        acquire an interest in an eligible site using a grant 
        under this subsection in partnership with a nonprofit 
        organization.
          (4) Non-federal share.--The non-Federal share of the 
        total cost of acquiring an interest in an eligible site 
        under this subsection shall be not less than 50 
        percent.
          (5) Limitation on land use.--An interest in an 
        eligible site acquired under this subsection shall be 
        subject to section 6(f)(3) of the Land and Water 
        Conservation Fund Act of 1965 (16 U.S.C. 460l-8(f)(3)).
          (6) Authorization of appropriations.--There is 
        authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary to 
        provide grants under this subsection $10,000,000 for 
        each of fiscal years 2009 through [2014] 2015.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


FEDERAL LANDS RECREATION ENHANCEMENT ACT

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


DIVISION J--OTHER MATTERS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


TITLE VIII--FEDERAL LANDS RECREATION ENHANCEMENT ACT

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 810. SUNSET PROVISION.

  The authority of the Secretary to carry out this Act shall 
terminate [10 years] 12 years after the date of the enactment 
of this Act.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2000

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


TITLE VIII--GENERAL PROVISIONS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


  Sec. 8162. Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial. (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (m) Authority to Establish Memorial.--
          (1) In general.--The Commission may establish a 
        permanent memorial to Dwight D. Eisenhower on land 
        under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Interior 
        in the District of Columbia or its environs.
          (2) Compliance with standards for commemorative 
        works.--The establishment of the memorial shall be in 
        accordance with the Commemorative Works Act (40 U.S.C. 
        1001 et seq.).
          (3) Expiration.--Any reference in section 8903(e) of 
        title 40, U.S.C. to the expiration at the end of, or 
        extension beyond, a 7-year period shall be considered 
        to be a reference to an expiration on, or extension 
        beyond, [September 30, 2014] September 30, 2015.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


FEDERAL LAND POLICY AND MANAGEMENT ACT OF 1976

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


TITLE IV--RANGE MANAGEMENT

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                       grazing leases and permits

  Sec. 402. (a) Except as provided in subsection (b) of this 
section, permits and leases for domestic livestock grazing on 
public lands issued by the Secretary under the Act of June 28, 
1934 (48 Stat. 1269, as amended; 43 U.S.C. 315 et. seq.) or the 
Act of August 28, 1937 (50 Stat. 874, as amended; 43 U.S.C. 
1181a-1181j), or by the Secretary of Agriculture, with respect 
to lands within National Forests in the sixteen contiguous 
Western States, shall be for a term of [ten years] 20 years 
subject to such terms and conditions the Secretary concerned 
deems appropriate and consistent with the governing law, 
including, but not limited to, the authority of the Secretary 
concerned to cancel, suspend, or modify a grazing permit or 
lease, in whole or in part, pursuant to the terms and 
conditions thereof, or to cancel or suspend a grazing permit or 
lease for any violation of a grazing regulation or of any term 
or condition of such grazing permit or lease.
  (b) Permits or leases may be issued by the Secretary 
concerned for a period shorter than [ten years] 20 years where 
the Secretary concerned determines that--
          (1) the land is pending disposal; or
          (2) the land will be devoted to a public purpose 
        prior to the end of [ten years] 20 years; or
          (3) it will be in the best interest of sound land 
        management to specify a shorter term: Provided, That 
        the absence from an allotment management plan of 
        details the Secretary concerned would like to include 
        but which are undeveloped shall not be the basis for 
        establishing a term shorter than [ten years] 20 years: 
        Provided further, That the absence of completed land 
        use plans or court ordered environmental statements 
        shall not be the sole basis for establishing a term 
        shorter than [ten years] 20 years unless the Secretary 
        determines on a case-by-case basis that the information 
        to be contained in such land use plan or court ordered 
        environmental impact statement is necessary to 
        determine whether a shorter term should be established 
        for any of the reasons set forth in items (1) through 
        (3) of this subsection.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


TITLE 5, UNITED STATES CODE

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


PART III--EMPLOYEES

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SUBPART E--ATTENDANCE AND LEAVE

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                       CHAPTER 61--HOURS OF WORK

SUBCHAPTER I--GENERAL PROVISIONS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Sec. 6103. Holidays

  (a) The following are legal public holidays:
          New Year's Day, January 1.
          Birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr., the third Monday 
        in January.
          [Washington's Birthday, the third Monday in 
        February.]
          Washington's Birthday, February 22.
          Memorial Day, the last Monday in May.
          Independence Day, July 4.
          Labor Day, the first Monday in September.
          Columbus Day, the second Monday in October.
          Veterans Day, November 11.
          Thanksgiving Day, the fourth Thursday in November.
          Christmas Day, December 25.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                 CHANGES IN APPLICATION OF EXISTING LAW

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1)(A) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the following statements are 
submitted describing the effect of provisions in the 
accompanying bill, which directly or indirectly change the 
application of existing law. In most instances these provisions 
have been included in prior appropriations Acts.
    The bill includes the following changes in application of 
existing law:

                              OVERALL BILL

    Providing that certain appropriations remain available 
until expended or extends the availability of funds beyond the 
fiscal year where programs or projects are continuing but for 
which legislation does not specifically authorize such extended 
availability. This authority tends to result in savings by 
preventing the practice of committing funds on low priority 
projects at the end of the fiscal year to avoid losing the 
funds.
    Limiting, in certain instances, the obligation of funds for 
particular functions or programs. These limitations include 
restrictions on the obligation of funds for administrative 
expenses, travel expenses, the use of consultants, and 
programmatic areas within the overall jurisdiction of a 
particular agency.
    Limiting official entertainment or reception and 
representation expenses for selected agencies in the bill.
    Continuing ongoing activities of those Federal agencies, 
which require annual authorization or additional legislation, 
which has not been enacted.

                  TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

                       Bureau of Land Management

                   MANAGEMENT OF LANDS AND RESOURCES

    Providing funds to the Bureau for the management of lands 
and resources.
    Providing funds to the National Fish and Wildlife 
Foundation under certain conditions.
    Permitting the use of fees for processing applications for 
permit to drill.
    Permitting the use of mining fee collections for program 
operations.
    Permitting the use of fees from communication site rentals.

                            LAND ACQUISITION

    Requiring that funding for the program is derived from the 
Land and Water Conservation Fund.

                   OREGON AND CALIFORNIA GRANT LANDS

    Providing funds for the Oregon and California Grant Lands.
    Authorizing the transfer of certain collections from the 
Oregon and California Land Grants Fund to the Treasury.

                           RANGE IMPROVEMENTS

    Allowing certain funds to be transferred to the Department 
of the Interior for range improvements.

               SERVICE CHARGES, DEPOSITS, AND FORFEITURES

    Allowing the use of certain collected funds for certain 
administrative costs and operation of termination of certain 
facilities.
    Allowing the use of funds on any damaged public lands.
    Authorizing the Secretary to use monies from forfeitures, 
compromises or settlements for improvement, protection and 
rehabilitation of public lands under certain conditions.

                       MISCELLANEOUS TRUST FUNDS

    Allowing certain contributed funds to be advanced for 
administrative costs and other activities of the Bureau.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Permitting the Bureau to enter into agreements with public 
and private entities, including States.
    Permitting the Bureau to manage improvements to which the 
United States has title.
    Permitting the payment of rewards for information on 
violations of law on Bureau lands.
    Providing for cost-sharing arrangements for printing 
services.
    Permitting the Bureau to conduct certain projects for State 
governments on a reimbursable basis.
    Prohibiting the use of funds for the destruction of wild 
horses and burros.

                United States Fish and Wildlife Service

                          RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

    Limiting funds for certain Endangered Species Act programs.
    Limiting funds for Landscape Conservation Cooperatives.

                    NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM

    Limiting funds for establishing new refuges or expanding 
the boundaries of existing refuges unless expressly authorized 
by the Congress.

                     FISH AND AQUATIC CONSERVATION

    Specifically authorizing conservation, mitigation, Indian 
trust, and recreational fishing activities.
    Requiring the Secretary to annually determine and report on 
the Federal government's hatchery mitigation responsibilities, 
and to fulfill them.
    Requiring the Secretary to be reimbursed by other Federal 
agencies for fulfilling hatchery mitigation responsibilities.
    Limiting funds for termination or closure of mitigation 
fish hatcheries and programs.
    Requiring the publication of an annual operations and 
maintenance plan.

            COOPERATIVE ENDANGERED SPECIES CONSERVATION FUND

    Providing that a portion of the appropriation may be 
derived from the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

                    STATE AND TRIBAL WILDLIFE GRANTS

    Providing for a State and Tribal wildlife grants program.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Providing that programs may be carried out by direct 
expenditure, contracts, grants, cooperative agreements and 
reimbursable agreements with public and private entities.
    Providing for repair of damage to public roads.
    Providing options for the purchase of land not to exceed 
$1.
    Permitting cost-shared arrangements for printing services.
    Permitting the acceptance of donated aircraft.

                         National Park Service


                 OPERATION OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM

    Designating funds for Everglades restoration.
    Providing for repair, rehabilitation and maintenance of 
National Park Service assets.

                  NATIONAL RECREATION AND PRESERVATION

    Providing for expenses not otherwise provided for.

                         HISTORIC PRESERVATION

    Providing for expenses derived from the Historic 
Preservation Fund.

                              CONSTRUCTION

    Providing funds for construction, improvements, repair or 
replacement of physical facilities including modified water 
deliveries to Everglades National Park with certain 
restrictions.
    Providing that a single procurement may be issued for any 
project funded in fiscal year 2015 with a future phase 
indicated in the National Park Service 5-year Line Item 
Construction Plan.

                    LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND

    Rescinding Land and Water Conservation Fund contract 
authority.

                 LAND ACQUISITION AND STATE ASSISTANCE

    Requiring that funding for the program is derived from the 
Land and Water Conservation Fund.

                          CENTENNIAL CHALLENGE

    Providing funds for Centennial Challenge projects with no 
less than 50 percent of the cost of each project derived from 
non-Federal sources.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Allowing certain franchise fees to be available for 
expenditure without further appropriation to extinguish or 
reduce liability for certain possessory interests.
    Providing for the retention of administrative costs under 
certain Land and Water Conservation Fund programs.
    Allowing National Park Service funds to be transferred to 
the Federal Highway Administration for purposes authorized 
under 23 U.S.C. 204 for reasonable administrative support 
costs.

                    United States Geological Survey


                 SURVEYS, INVESTIGATIONS, AND RESEARCH

    Providing funds to classify lands as to their mineral and 
water resources.
    Providing funds to give engineering supervision to power 
permittees and Federal Energy Regulatory Commission licensees.
    Limiting funds for the conduct of new surveys on private 
property without permission.
    Limiting funds for cooperative topographic mapping or water 
resource data collection and investigations.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Allowing funds to be used for certain contracting, 
technical services, construction, maintenance, acquisition, and 
representation expenses.
    Permitting the use of certain contracts, grants, and 
cooperative agreements.
    Recognizing students and recent graduates as Federal 
employees for the purposes of travel and work injury 
compensation.

                   Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

    Permitting funds for mineral leasing and environmental 
study; enforcing laws and contracts; and for matching grants.
    Providing that funds may be used which shall be derived 
from non-refundable cost recovery fees collected in 2014.
    Permitting the use of certain excess receipts from Outer 
Continental Shelf leasing activities.
    Providing for reasonable expenses related to volunteer 
beach and marine cleanup activities.
    Prohibiting the use of funds for regulating non-lease 
holders.

             BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT

    Permitting funds for mineral leasing and environmental 
study; enforcing laws and contracts; and for matching grants.
    Providing that funds may be used which shall be derived 
from non-refundable cost recovery fees collected in 2014.
    Permitting the use of certain excess receipts from Outer 
Continental Shelf leasing activities.
    Permitting the use of funds derived from non-refundable 
inspection fees collecting in 2014.
    Requiring that not less than 50 percent of inspection fees 
expended be used on personnel, expanding capacity and reviewing 
applications for permit to drill.

                           OIL SPILL RESEARCH

    Providing that funds shall be derived from the Oil Spill 
Liability Trust Fund.

          Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement


                       REGULATION AND TECHNOLOGY

    Permitting payment to State and tribal personnel for travel 
and per diem expenses for training.
    Permitting the use of certain offsetting collections from 
permit fees.

                    ABANDONED MINE RECLAMATION FUND

    Allowing the use of debt recovery to pay for debt 
collection.
    Allowing that certain funds made available under title IV 
of Public Law 95-87 may be used for any required non-Federal 
share of the cost of certain projects.
    Allowing funds to be used for travel expenses of State and 
tribal personnel while attending certain OSM training.

        Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian Education


                      Operation of Indian Programs

    Limiting funds for official reception and representation 
expenses.
    Limiting funds for welfare assistance payments, except for 
disaster relief.
    Allowing tribal priority allocation funds to be used for 
unmet welfare assistance costs.
    Limiting funds for school operations of Bureau-funded 
schools and other education programs.
    Permitting the use of tribal priority allocations for 
general assistance payments to individuals and school 
operations costs.
    Limiting funds for administrative cost grants under certain 
circumstances.
    Allowing the transfer of certain forestry funds.
    Allowing the use of funds to purchase uniforms or other 
identifying articles of clothing for personnel.

                              CONSTRUCTION

    Providing for the transfer of Navajo irrigation project 
funds to the Bureau of Reclamation.
    Providing that six percent of Federal Highway Trust Fund 
contract authority may be used for construction management 
costs.
    Providing Safety of Dams funds on a non-reimbursable basis.
    Requiring the use of administrative and cost accounting 
principles for certain school construction projects and 
exempting such projects from certain requirements.
    Requiring conformance with building codes and health and 
safety standards.
    Specifying the procedure for dispute resolution.
    Limiting the control of construction projects when certain 
time frames have not been met.
    Allowing reimbursement of construction costs from the 
Office of Special Trustee.

                 INDIAN GUARANTEED LOAN PROGRAM ACCOUNT

    Limiting funds for administrative expenses and for 
subsidizing total loan principal.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Allowing the use of funds for direct expenditure, 
contracts, cooperative agreements, compacts, and grants.
    Allowing contracting for the San Carlos Irrigation Project.
    Limiting the use of funds for certain contracts, grants and 
cooperative agreements.
    Allowing Tribes to return appropriated funds.
    Prohibiting funding of Alaska schools.
    Limiting the number of schools and the expansion of grade 
levels in individual schools.
    Specifying distribution of indirect and administrative 
costs for certain Tribes.

                          Departmental Offices


             OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    Allowing the use of certain funds for official reception 
and representation expenses.
    Permitting payments to former Bureau of Mines workers.
    Designating funds for mineral revenue management 
activities.
    Designating funds for consolidated appraisal services to be 
derived from the Land and Water Conservation Fund.
    Designating funds for mineral revenue management 
activities.
    Allowing certain refunds of overpayments in connection with 
certain Indian leases.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Allowing certain payments authorized for the Payments in 
Lieu of Taxes Program to be retained for administrative 
expenses.
    Providing that no Payments in Lieu of Taxes Program payment 
be made to otherwise eligible units of local government if the 
computed amount of the payment is less than $100.
    Providing that a payment made to a unit of general local 
government for fiscal year 2015 may be reduced by the Secretary 
to correct overpayments, and increased by the Secretary to 
correct underpayments, to such unit of local government for the 
previous fiscal year.
    Extending mandatory funding for Payment in Lieu of Taxes.

                            Insular Affairs


                       ASSISTANCE TO TERRITORIES

    Designating funds for various programs and for salaries and 
expenses of the Office of Insular Affairs.
    Allowing audits of the financial transactions of the 
Territorial and Insular governments by the GAO.
    Providing grant funding under certain terms of the 
Agreement of the Special Representatives on Future United 
States Financial Assistance for the Northern Mariana Islands.
    Providing for capital infrastructure in various 
Territories.
    Allowing appropriations for disaster assistance to be used 
as non-Federal matching funds for hazard mitigation grants.

                      COMPACT OF FREE ASSOCIATION

    Providing grants to Palau, the Marshall Islands, and 
Micronesia.

               ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS, INSULAR AFFAIRS

    Allowing, at the request of the Governor of Guam, for 
certain discretionary or mandatory funds to be used to assist 
securing certain rural electrification loans through the U.S. 
Department of Agriculture.

             Office of Special Trustee for American Indians


                         FEDERAL TRUST PROGRAMS

    Limiting the amount of funding available for the historical 
accounting of Indian trust fund accounts.
    Allowing transfers to other Department of the Interior 
accounts.
    Providing no-year funding for certain Indian Self-
Determination Act grants.
    Exempting quarterly statements for Indian trust accounts 
$15 or less.
    Requiring annual statements and records maintenance for 
Indian trust accounts.
    Limiting use of funds to correct administrative errors in 
Indian trust accounts.
    Permitting the use of recoveries from erroneous payments 
pursuant to Indian trust accounts.

                        DEPARTMENT-WIDE PROGRAMS


                        Wildland Fire Management

    Providing funds for wildland fire management.
    Designating funds for renovation or construction of fire 
facilities and designating funds for Wildfire suppression 
operations.
    Permitting the repayments of funds transferred from other 
accounts for firefighting.
    Designating funds for hazardous fuels and burned area 
rehabilitation.
    Permitting the use of funds for lodging and subsistence of 
firefighters.
    Permitting the use of grants, contracts and cooperative 
agreements for hazardous fuels reduction, including cost-
sharing and local assistance.
    Permitting cost-sharing of cooperative agreements with non-
Federal entities under certain circumstances.
    Providing for local competition for hazardous fuel 
reduction activities.
    Permitting reimbursement to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service for 
consultation activities under the Endangered Species Act.
    Providing certain terms for leases of real property with 
local governments.
    Providing for the transfer of funds between the Department 
of the Interior and the Department of Agriculture for wildland 
fire management.
    Providing funds for support of Federal emergency response 
actions.
    Allowing for international forestry assistance to or 
through the Department of State.

                FLAME Wildfire Suppression Reserve Fund

    Providing funds for the FLAME fund.

                    Central Hazardous Materials Fund

    Providing funds for response action, including associated 
activities, performed pursuant to the Comprehensive 
Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act.

                Natural Resource Damage Assessment Fund

    Providing funds for activities to carry out the 
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and 
Liability Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, the Oil 
Pollution Act of 1990, and Public Law 101-337.

                          Working Capital Fund

    Allowing funds for the financial and business management 
system and information technology improvement.
    Prohibiting use of funds to establish reserves in the 
working capital fund with exceptions.
    Allowing assessments for reasonable charges for training 
services at the National Indian Program Center and use of these 
funds under certain conditions.
    Providing space and related facilities or the lease of 
related facilities, equipment or professional services of the 
National Indian Program Training Center to state, local and 
Tribal employees or other persons for cultural, educational or 
recreational activities.
    Providing that the Secretary may enter into grants and 
cooperative agreements to support the Office of Natural 
Resource Revenue's collection and disbursement of royalties, 
fees, and other mineral revenue proceeds, as authorized by law.

                        Administrative Provision

    Allowing acquisition of certain aircraft.
    Allowing the sale of existing aircraft with proceeds used 
to offset the purchase price of replacement aircraft.

             General Provisions, Department of the Interior

    Allowing transfer of funds for certain reconstruction of 
facilities, aircraft or utilities in emergency situations.
    Allowing transfer of funds in certain emergency situations, 
including wildfires and oil spill response, if other funds 
provided in other accounts will be exhausted within 30 days and 
a supplemental appropriation is requested as promptly as 
possible.
    Permitting the Department to use limited funding for 
certain services.
    Permitting the transfer of funds between the Bureau of 
Indian Affairs and the Office of Special Trustee for American 
Indians and limiting amounts for historical accounting 
activities.
    Authorizing the acquisition of lands and leases for Ellis, 
Governors and Liberty Islands.
    Providing the authority for the Secretary to collect 
nonrefundable inspection fees.
    Providing the authority for the Secretary to implement an 
oil and gas leasing Internet program.
    Permitting the reorganization of the Bureau of Ocean Energy 
Management, Enforcement and Regulation.
    Permitting the Secretary of the Interior to enter into 
long-term agreements for wild horse and burro holding 
facilities.
    Requiring the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to mark 
hatchery salmon.
    Addressing BLM actions regarding grazing on public lands.
    Prohibiting the use of funds to implement, administer or 
enforce Secretarial Order 3310.
    Providing the Secretary of the Interior statutory authority 
to enter into rental or lease agreements that benefit Bureau of 
Indian Education operated schools.
    Continuing through fiscal year 2020 forest ecosystem health 
and recovery activities.
    Maintaining the status quo on regulations relating to the 
legal domestic trade and transport of products containing 
ivory.
    Suspending any further study, withdrawal or finalization of 
any rule pertaining to the valley elderberry longhorn beetle 
and re-opening the public comment period.
    Limiting funds for a proposed rule for sage-grouse pursuant 
to the Endangered Species Act.
    Requiring the Fish and Wildlife Service to issue a recovery 
plan and economic analysis of recovery plan actions for certain 
amphibians.

               TITLE II--ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY


                         Science and Technology

    Providing for operating expenses in support of research and 
development.
    Designating funding for National Priorities research as 
specified in the explanatory statement to this Act.

                 ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS AND MANAGEMENT

    Allowing hire and maintenance of passenger motor vehicles 
and operation of aircraft and purchase of reprints and library 
memberships in societies or associations which issue 
publications to members only or at a price to members lower 
than to subscribers who are not members.
    Limiting amounts for official representation and reception 
expenses.
    Providing two-year funding availability for administrative 
costs of Brownfields program.
    Designating funding for National Priorities as specified in 
the explanatory statement to this Act.

                     HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE SUPERFUND

    Allowing distribution of funds to purchase services from 
other agencies under certain circumstances.
    Providing for the transfer of funds within certain agency 
accounts.

                LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAM

    Providing for grants to Federally-recognized Indian Tribes.

                   STATE AND TRIBAL ASSISTANCE GRANTS

    Limiting funding amounts for certain programs.
    Specifying funding for capitalization grants for the Clean 
Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Funds and allowing 
certain amounts for additional subsidies.
    Designating funds for specific sections of law.
    Providing certain grants under authority of Section 103, 
Clean Air Act.
    Providing waivers for certain uses of Clean Water and 
Drinking Water State Revolving Funds for State administrative 
costs for grants to federally-recognized Indian Tribes and 
grants to specific Territories and Freely Associated States.
    Requiring that 10 percent Clean Water and 20 percent of 
Drinking Water funds shall be used by States for forgiveness of 
principal or negative interest loans.
    Prohibiting the use of funds for jurisdictions that permit 
development or construction of additional colonia areas.
    Providing funding for environmental information exchange 
network initiatives grants, statistical surveys of water 
resources and enhancements to State monitoring programs, tribal 
grants, and underground storage tank projects.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Allowing awards of grants to federally-recognized Indian 
Tribes.
    Authorizing the collection and obligation of pesticide 
registration service fees.
    Allowing the transfer of funds from the ``Environmental 
Programs and Management'' account to support the Great Lakes 
Restoration Initiative and providing for certain interagency 
agreements and grants to various entities in support of this 
effort.
    Providing amounts for construction, alteration, repair, 
rehabilitation, and renovation of facilities.
    Authorizing additional persons that may be hired under 
certain authorities.
    Providing for grants to federally recognized Tribes.

                      TITLE III--RELATED AGENCIES


                             FOREST SERVICE

                     FOREST AND RANGELAND RESEARCH

    Providing funds for forest and rangeland research.
    Designating funds for the forest inventory and analysis 
program.

                       STATE AND PRIVATE FORESTRY

    Providing for forest health management, including 
treatments of certain pests or invasive plants, and for 
restoring damaged forests, and for cooperative forestry, 
education and land conservation activities, and conducting an 
international program.

                         NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM

    Providing funds for the National Forest System.
    Depositing funds in the Collaborative Forest Landscape 
Restoration Fund.
    Designating funds for forest products.
    Designating funds in the Integrated Resource Restoration 
pilot program.

                  CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT AND MAINTENANCE

    Providing funds for construction, reconstruction, and 
maintenance and acquisition of buildings and other facilities 
and infrastructure; and for construction, capital improvement, 
decommissioning, and maintenance of forest roads and trails.
    Requiring that funds becoming available in fiscal year 2014 
for the road and trails fund (16 U.S.C. 501) shall be 
transferred to the Treasury.
    Providing for the transfer of funds to the National Forest 
System for the Integrated Resource Restoration pilot program.

                            LAND ACQUISITION

    Requiring that funding for the program is derived from the 
Land and Water Conservation Fund.

         ACQUISITION OF LANDS FOR NATIONAL FORESTS SPECIAL ACTS

    Requiring that funding for the program is derived from 
forest receipts.

            ACQUISITION OF LANDS TO COMPLETE LAND EXCHANGES

    Requiring that funding for the program is derived from 
funds deposited by State, county, or municipal governments and 
non-Federal parties pursuant to Land Sale and Exchange Acts.

                         RANGE BETTERMENT FUND

    Providing that fifty percent of monies received for grazing 
fees shall be used for range improvements and limiting 
administrative expenses to six percent.

                     GIFTS, DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS

    Providing for gifts, donations and bequest per Federal law.

          MANAGEMENT OF NATIONAL FORESTS FOR SUBSISTENCE USES

    Providing funds for subsistence uses per the Alaska 
National Interest Lands Conservation Act.

                        Wildland Fire Management

    Permitting the use of funds for emergency rehabilitation 
and restoration and hazardous fuels reduction to support 
emergency response and wildfire suppression.
    Allowing the use of wildland fire funds to repay advances 
from other accounts.
    Allowing reimbursement of States for certain wildfire 
emergency activities.
    Designating funds for the Joint Fire Sciences Program and 
extending authorities for Fire Science Research.
    Allowing funds to be available for emergency 
rehabilitation, hazardous fuels reduction and emergency 
response.
    Designating funds for suppression, hazardous fuels 
reduction and national fire plan research.
    Designating funds for State fire assistance and volunteer 
fire assistance Federal and State and private lands.
    Providing for the acquisition of fire-fighting aircraft.
    Providing for cooperative agreements and grants.
    Allowing funds available for Community Forest Restoration 
Act to be used on non-Federal land.
    Limiting the transfer of wildland fire management funds 
between the Department of the Interior and the Department of 
Agriculture.
    Designating the use of hazardous fuels reduction funds for 
biomass grants.
    Providing that funds transferred from the FLAME Wildfire 
Suppression Reserve Fund shall be assessed for cost pools.
    Permitting the transfer of funds for the Integrated 
Resources Restoration pilot.

                FLAME Wildfire Suppression Reserve Fund

    Providing funds for the FLAME fund and authorizing 
transfers under certain conditions.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Permitting the purchase of passenger motor vehicles and 
proceeds from the sale of aircraft may be used to purchase 
replacement aircraft.
    Allowing funds for certain employment contracts.
    Allowing funds to be used for purchase and alteration of 
buildings.
    Allowing for acquisition of certain lands and interests.
    Allowing expenses for certain volunteer activities.
    Providing for the cost of uniforms.
    Providing for debt collections on certain contracts.
    Allowing transfer of funds in certain emergency situations 
if all other funds provided for wildfire suppression will be 
obligated within 30 days and the Secretary notifies the 
Committees.
    Allowing funds to be used through the Agency for 
International Development for work in foreign countries and to 
support other forestry activities outside of the United States.
    Allowing the Forest Service, acting for the International 
Program, to sign certain funding agreements with foreign 
governments and institutions as well as with certain domestic 
agencies.
    Authorizing the expenditure or transfer of funds for wild 
horse and burro activities.
    Prohibiting the transfer of funds under the Department of 
Agriculture transfer authority under certain conditions.
    Limiting the transfer of funds for the Working Capital Fund 
and Department Reimbursable Program (also known as Greenbook 
charges).
    Limiting funds to support the Youth Conservation Corps and 
Public Lands Corps.
    Limiting the use of funds for official reception and 
representation expenses.
    Providing for matching funds for the National Forest 
Foundation and making permanent authorities for the National 
Forest Foundation regarding interest bearing accounts.
    Providing for matching funds for the National Fish and 
Wildlife Foundation.
    Allowing funds to be used for technical assistance for 
certain rural communities.
    Allowing funds for payments to counties in the Columbia 
River Gorge National Scenic Area.
    Allowing funds to be used for the Older Americans Act.
    Permitting funding assessments for facilities maintenance, 
rent, utilities, and other support services.
    Limiting funds to reimburse the Office of General Counsel 
at the Department of Agriculture.
    Permitting eligible employees to be considered a Federal 
Employee.

                         Indian Health Service


                         INDIAN HEALTH SERVICES

    Providing that tribal contract and grant funding is deemed 
obligated at the time of grant or contract award and remains 
available until expended.
    Providing no-year funds for contract medical care including 
the Indian Catastrophic Health Emergency Fund.
    Providing for loan repayment under sections 104 and 108 of 
the Indian Health Care Improvement Act with certain conditions 
and making the funds available for certain other purposes.
    Providing funding and allocation direction for the 
methamphetamine, domestic violence, and substance abuse 
programs.
    Providing that certain contracts and grants may be 
performed in two fiscal years.
    Providing for use of collections and reporting of 
collections under Title IV of the Indian Health Care 
Improvement Act.
    Providing no-year funding for scholarship funds.
    Providing for the collection of individually identifiable 
health information relating to the Americans with Disabilities 
Act by the Bureau of Indian Affairs.
    Permitting the use of Indian Health Care Improvement Fund 
monies for facilities improvement and providing no-year funding 
availability.

                        Indian Health Facilities

    Providing that facilities funds may be used to purchase 
land, modular buildings and trailers.
    Providing for TRANSAM equipment to be purchased from the 
Department of Defense.
    Prohibiting the use of funds for sanitation facilities for 
new homes funded by the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development.
    Allowing for the purchase of ambulances.
    Providing for a demolition fund.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Providing for per diem expenses for senior level positions.
    Providing for payments for telephone service in private 
residences in the field, purchase of motor vehicles, aircraft 
and reprints.
    Providing for purchase and erection of modular buildings.
    Providing funds for uniforms.
    Allowing funding to be used for attendance at professional 
meetings.
    Providing that health care may be extended to non-Indians 
at Indian Health Service facilities, subject to charges, and 
for the expenditure of collected funds.
    Providing for transfers of funds from the Department of 
Housing and Urban Development to the Indian Health Service.
    Prohibiting limitations on certain Federal travel and 
transportation expenses.
    Allowing de-obligation and re-obligation of funds applied 
to self-governance funding agreements.
    Prohibiting the expenditure of funds to implement new 
eligibility regulations.
    Permitting certain reimbursements for goods and services 
provided to Tribes.
    Providing that reimbursements for training, technical 
assistance, or services include total costs.

            Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry


            TOXIC SUBSTANCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH

    Providing for the conduct of health studies, testing, and 
monitoring.
    Providing deadlines for health assessments and studies.
    Limiting the number of toxicological profiles.

                   Executive Office of the President


  COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

    Limiting the use of funds for official reception and 
representation expenses.
    Designating the appointment and duties of the chairman.

              Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation

    Providing for the transfer of funds to the Department of 
the Interior Office of Inspector General.

             Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board

    Permitting use of funds for hire of passenger vehicles, 
uniforms or allowances, and limiting the use of funds for per 
diem expenses and the number of senior level positions.

                        Smithsonian Institution


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    Limiting certain lease terms.
    Providing for purchase of passenger vehicles and certain 
rental, repair and cleaning of uniforms.
    Designating funds for certain programs including the 
National Museum of African American History and Culture and 
providing no-year funds.
    Providing that funds may be used to support American 
overseas research centers.
    Allowing for advance payments to independent contractors 
performing research services or participating in official 
Smithsonian presentations.

                           Facilities Capital

    Designating funds for maintenance, repair, rehabilitation, 
and construction and for consultant services.
    Providing funding to continue construction of the National 
Museum of African American History and Culture.

                        National Gallery of Art


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    Allowing payment in advance for membership in library, 
museum, and art associations or societies.
    Allowing for purchase, repair, and cleaning of uniforms for 
guards and employees and allowances therefor.
    Allowing purchase or rental of devices for protecting 
buildings and contents thereof, and maintenance, alteration, 
improvement, and repair of buildings, approaches, and grounds.
    Providing for restoration and repair of works of art by 
contract under certain circumstances.
    Providing no-year funds for special exhibitions.

            Repair, Restoration, and Renovation of Buildings

    Providing lease agreements of no more than 10 years 
addressing space needs created by renovations under the Master 
Facilities Plan.
    Permitting the Gallery to perform work by contract under 
certain circumstances.

             John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts


                       OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE

    Providing funds to the John F. Kennedy Center for the 
Performing Arts Kennedy Center for operational and maintenance 
costs.

                     Capital Repair and Restoration

    Providing funds to the John F. Kennedy Center for the 
Performing Arts Kennedy Center for facility repair.

                    National Endowment for the Arts


                       GRANTS AND ADMINISTRATION

    Providing funds for the support of projects and productions 
in the arts, including arts education and public outreach 
activities.

                 National Endowment for the Humanities


                       GRANTS AND ADMINISTRATION

    Specifying funds to carry out the matching grants program.
    Allowing obligation of National Endowment for the 
Humanities current and prior year funds from gifts, bequests, 
and devises of money for which equal amounts have not 
previously been appropriated.

  Administrative Provisions, National Foundation on the Arts and the 
                               Humanities

    Prohibiting the use of funds for grants and contracts which 
do not include the text of 18 U.S.C. 1913.
    Prohibiting the use of appropriated funds and permitting 
the use of non-appropriated funds for reception expenses.
    Allowing the chairperson of the National Endowment for the 
Arts to approve small grants under certain circumstances.

                        Commission of Fine Arts


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    Permitting the charging and use of fees for its 
publications and accepting gifts related to the history of the 
Nation's Capital.

               National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs

    Providing funding for the National Capital Arts and 
Cultural Affairs.

                  National Capital Planning Commission

    Providing funding for the National Capital Planning 
Commission.
    Providing that one-quarter of one percent may be used for 
official reception and representational expenses.

                United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

    Designating funds for equipment replacement.
    Designating funds for repair, rehabilitation and for 
exhibition design and production and providing no year 
availability for these funds.

                      TITLE IV--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Prohibiting the use of funds to promote or oppose 
legislative proposals on which Congressional action is 
incomplete.
    Providing for annual appropriations unless expressly 
provided otherwise in this Act.
    Providing for reprogramming procedures, disclosure of 
administrative expenses, assessments and requirements for 
operating plans.
    Continuing a limitation on accepting and processing 
applications for patents and on the patenting of Federal lands; 
permitting processing of grandfathered applications; and 
permitting third-party contractors to process grandfathered 
applications.
    Limiting the use of funds for contract support costs on 
Indian contracts.
    Limiting the use of fiscal year 2014 funds for contract 
support costs on Indian contracts.
    Limiting the use of fiscal year 2015 funds for contract 
support costs on Indian contracts.
    Allowing the extension of forest plans and prohibiting 
funds for the revised Chapter 70 of the Forest Service Handbook 
related to wilderness per the Forest and Rangeland Renewable 
Resources Planning Act.
    Limiting leasing and preleasing activities within National 
Monuments.
    Limiting takings for acquisition of lands except under 
certain conditions.
    Modifying a provision addressing timber sales involving 
Alaskan Red Cedar.
    Modifying a provision continuing certain authorities to 
renew grazing permits or leases administered by the Forest 
Service or Department of the Interior.
    Prohibiting funds to enter into certain no-bid contracts 
except under certain conditions.
    Requiring reports to Congress to be posted on public agency 
websites.
    Continuing a provision that delineates grant guidelines for 
the National Endowment for the Arts.
    Continuing a provision that delineates program priorities 
for the programs managed by the National Endowment for the 
Arts.
    Modifying existing insurance caps for loaned domestic and 
foreign works under the Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Act.
    Requiring that the Department of the Interior, the EPA, the 
Forest Service, and the Indian Health Service provide the 
Committees on Appropriations a quarterly report on the status 
of balances of appropriations.
    Requiring a government-wide report regarding expenditures 
on climate change.
    Continuing a provision prohibiting the use of funds to 
promulgate or implement any regulation requiring the issuance 
of permits under title V of the Clean Air Act for carbon 
dioxide, nitrous oxide, water vapor, or methane emissions.
    Continuing a provision prohibiting the use of funds to 
implement any provision in a rule if that provision requires 
mandatory reporting of greenhouse gas emissions from manure 
management systems.
    Prohibiting the government from entering into contracts or 
agreements with any corporation that was convicted of a felony 
criminal violation under any Federal law within the preceding 
24 months.
    Prohibiting funds for contracts or agreements with entities 
with unpaid Federal tax liabilities that have not entered into 
payment agreements to remedy the liability.
    Extending by one year the authorization for American 
Battlefield Protection program grants.
    Providing a one-year extension of the Federal Lands 
Recreation Enhancement Act.
    Prohibiting the use of funds to regulate the lead content 
of ammunition or fishing tackle.
    Modifying authorities relating to the Dwight D. Eisenhower 
Memorial Commission.
    Extending the maximum authorized term for grazing permits 
and leases.
    Prohibiting the use of funds to develop, adopt, implement, 
administer, or enforce a change or supplement to a rule or 
guidance documents pertaining to the definition of waters under 
the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.
    Prohibiting the use of funds to develop, carry out, 
implement, or enforce proposed regulations published on June 
18, 2010.
    Prohibiting the use of funds to limit recreational shooting 
and hunting on Federal and public lands except for public 
safety.
    Prohibiting the use of funds to implement the National 
Ocean Policy under Executive Order 13547 and requiring a report 
identifying Federal expenditures for the development, 
administration, and implementation of such Policy.
    Prohibiting EPA from using funds to implement, administer, 
or enforce the lead renovation rule until EPA has approved a 
commercially available lead test kit.
    Prohibiting EPA from using funds to develop, propose, 
finalize, implement, enforce, or administer any regulation that 
would establish new financial responsibility requirements under 
CERCLA.
    Prohibiting the use of funds to develop, issue, implement, 
or enforce any greenhouse gas New Source Performance Standards 
on any new or existing source that is an electric utility 
generating unit.
    Prohibiting the use of funds to compile or disclose 
personal information of dairy or livestock owners, operators, 
and employees unless the information was voluntarily offered or 
aggregated at the local level.
    Making available vacant grazing allotments for permittees 
impacted by drought or wildfire.
    Clarifying the protection of water rights with regard to 
Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management permits.
    Prohibiting the use of funds from making any change to the 
regulations in effect on October 1, 2012, pertaining to the 
definitions of the terms ``fill material'' or ``discharge of 
fill material''.
    Limiting administrative costs for programs addressing 
invasive species.
    Maintaining the long-standing exemption under the 
definition of solid waste for legitimate scrap metal recyclers.
    Limiting the use of funds pertaining to certain updates to 
the social cost of carbon.
    Designating February 22, George Washington's actual 
birthday, as a national holiday.
    Prohibiting EPA from finalizing a rule allowing the Agency 
to collect fines and penalties via administratively garnishing 
wages.
    Applying Buy American requirements to the Drinking Water 
State Revolving Fund.
    Establishing a Spending Reduction Account in the bill.

                  Appropriations Not Authorized by Law

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1)(B) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the following table lists the 
appropriations in the accompanying bill which are not 
authorized by law:


                   COMPARISON WITH BUDGET RESOLUTION

    Section 308(a)(1)(A) of the Congressional Budget and 
Impoundment Control Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, requires that the report accompanying a bill providing 
new budget authority contain a statement detailing how the 
authority compares with the reports submitted under section 302 
of the Act for the most recently agreed to concurrent 
resolution on the budget for the fiscal year. This information 
follows:


                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                         Budget Authority                     Outlays
                                                 ---------------------------------------------------------------
                                                     Committee                       Committee
                                                    Allocation    Amount of bill    Allocation    Amount of bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with Committee
 allocations to its subcommittees: Subcommittee
 on Interior, Environment and Related Agencies
    General Purpose Discretionary...............          30,220          30,220       30,191\1\          32,740
    Mandatory...................................              62              62              62              62
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

                      FIVE-YEAR OUTLAY PROJECTIONS

    In compliance with section 308(a)(1)(B) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, the following table contains five-year projections 
associated with the budget authority provided in the 
accompanying bill:


                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                         Budget Authority                     Outlays
                                                 ---------------------------------------------------------------
                                                     Committee                       Committee
                                                    Allocation    Amount of bill    Allocation    Amount of bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Projection of outlays associated with the
 recommendation:
    2015........................................            n.a.            n.a.         n.a.\2\          20,494
    2016........................................            n.a.            n.a.            n.a.           5,818
    2017........................................            n.a.            n.a.            n.a.           2,352
    2018........................................            n.a.            n.a.            n.a.             976
    2019 and future years.......................            n.a.            n.a.            n.a.             486
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\2\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

               ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS

    In accordance with section 308(a)(1)(C) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, the financial assistance to State and local 
governments is as follows:


                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                         Budget Authority                     Outlays
                                                 ---------------------------------------------------------------
                                                     Committee                       Committee
                                                    Allocation    Amount of bill    Allocation    Amount of bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Financial assistance to State and local                     n.a.           5,593         n.a.\2\           2,391
 governments for 2015...........................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\2\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
n.a.: Not Applicable.

                          PROGRAM DUPLICATION

    No provision of this bill establishes or reauthorizes a 
program of the Federal government known to be duplicative of 
another Federal program, a program that was included in any 
report from the Government Accountability Office to Congress 
pursuant to section 21 of Public Law 111-139, or a program 
related to a program identified in the most recent Catalog of 
Federal Domestic Assistance.

                          DIRECTED RULE MAKING

    The bill does not direct any rule making.

                    TABLE OF FUNDING RECOMMENDATIONS

    The following table provides the amounts recommended by the 
Committee compared with the budget estimates by account.