H. Rept. 113-91 - 113th Congress (2013-2014)
May 29, 2013, As Reported by the Appropriations Committee

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House Report 113-91 - DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2014




[House Report 113-91]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]


113th Congress  }                                             {  Report
  1st Session   }       HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES              {  113-91
=======================================================================

 
       DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2014 

                                _______
                                

  May 29, 2013.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

      Mr. Carter of Texas, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                     MINORITY AND ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 2217]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for the Department of Homeland Security for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 2014.

                        INDEX TO BILL AND REPORT

                                                            Page number

                                                            Bill Report
TITLE I--DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
        Office of the Secretary and Executive Management...     2
                                                                      8
        Office of the Under Secretary for Management.......     3
                                                                     15
        Office of the Chief Financial Officer..............     4
                                                                     18
        Office of the Chief Information Officer............     5
                                                                     21
        Analysis and Operations............................     7
                                                                     23
        Office of Inspector General........................     7
                                                                     23
TITLE II--SECURITY, ENFORCEMENT, AND INVESTIGATIONS
        U.S. Customs and Border Protection.................     7
                                                                     25
                Salaries and Expenses......................     7
                                                                     25
                Automation Modernization...................     9
                                                                     34
                Border Security Fencing, Infrastructure, 
                    and Technology.........................    10
                                                                     35
                Air and Marine Operations..................    10
                                                                     37
                Construction and Facilities Management.....    11
                                                                     38
        U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement...........    12
                                                                     39
                Salaries and Expenses......................    12
                                                                     39
                Automation Modernization...................    15
                                                                     47
                Construction...............................    15
                                                                     47
        Transportation Security Administration.............    15
                                                                     48
                Aviation Security..........................    15
                                                                     48
                Surface Transportation Security............    18
                                                                     59
                Transportation Threat Assessment and 
                    Credentialing..........................    19
                                                                     60
                Transportation Security Support............    19
                                                                     63
                Federal Air Marshal Service................    20
                                                                     64
        Coast Guard........................................    20
                                                                     65
                Operating Expenses.........................    20
                                                                     65
                Environmental Compliance and Restoration...    22
                                                                     69
                Reserve Training...........................    22
                                                                     69
                Acquisition, Construction, and Improvements    22
                                                                     70
                Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation    27
                                                                     74
                Medicare Eligible Retiree Health Care Fund 
                    Contribution...........................      
                                                                     75
                Retired Pay................................    28
                                                                     75
        United States Secret Service.......................    28
                                                                     76
                Salaries and Expenses......................    28
                                                                     76
                Acquisition, Construction and Improvements.    31
                                                                     80
TITLE III--PROTECTION, PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND RECOVERY
        National Protection and Programs Directorate.......    32
                                                                     81
                Management and Administration..............    32
                                                                     81
                Infrastructure Protection and Information 
                    Security...............................    32
                                                                     82
                Federal Protective Service.................    33
                                                                     88
                Office of Biometric Identity Management....    33
                                                                     89
        Office of Health Affairs...........................    35
                                                                     90
        Federal Emergency Management Agency................    35
                                                                     92
                Salaries and Expenses......................    35
                                                                     92
                State and Local Programs...................    37
                                                                     94
                Firefighter Assistance Grants..............    40
                                                                     96
                Emergency Management Performance Grants....    41
                                                                     97
                Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program    41
                                                                     98
                United States Fire Administration..........    42
                                                                     98
                Disaster Relief Fund.......................    42
                                                                     99
                Flood Hazard Mapping and Risk Analysis.....    47
                                                                    100
                National Flood Insurance Fund..............    47
                                                                    101
                National Predisaster Mitigation Fund.......    49
                                                                    102
                Emergency Food and Shelter.................    49
                                                                    102
TITLE IV--RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, TRAINING, AND SERVICES
        United States Citizenship and Immigration Services.    50
                                                                    103
        Federal Law Enforcement Training Center............    51
                                                                    105
                Salaries and Expenses......................    51
                                                                    105
                Acquisition, Construction, Improvements, 
                    and Related Expenses...................    52
                                                                    106
        Science and Technology.............................    53
                                                                    107
                Management and Administration..............    53
                                                                    107
                Research, Development, Acquisition, and 
                    Operations.............................    53
                                                                    107
        Domestic Nuclear Detection Office..................    54
                                                                    112
                Management and Administration..............    54
                                                                    112
                Research, Development, and Operations......    55
                                                                    112
                Systems Acquisition........................    56
                                                                    113
TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS
        This Act...........................................
                                                                    114
                House of Representatives Report 
                    Requirements...........................
                                                                    120
                Detailed Explanations in Report............
                                                                    145

    The accompanying bill contains recommendations for new 
budget (obligational) authority for fiscal year 2014 for the 
Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The following table 
summarizes these recommendations and reflects comparisons with 
the budget, as amended, and with amounts appropriated to date 
for fiscal year 2013:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Budget                       House compared witrh
                                           New budget    estimates  of              ----------------------------
                                         (obligational        new       Recommended
                 Title                     authority    (obligational)    by  the      New budget       Budget
                                          fiscal year     authority,       House        authority     estimate,
                                              2013        fiscal year                  fiscal year   fiscal year
                                                             2014                         2013           2014
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Title I: Departmental Management and        1,086,101       1,239,310       931,922        -154,179     -307,388
 Operations............................
Title II: Security, Enforcement and        31,278,113      30,283,338    30,751,036        -527,077      467,698
 Investigations........................
Title III: Protection, Preparedness,       12,321,757      11,009,401    11,522,061        -799,696      512,660
 Response and Recovery.................
Title IV: Research, Development,            1,520,660       2,214,058     1,889,594         368,934     -324,464
 Training and Services.................
Title V: General Provisions............       104,396         -50,000       -15,800        -120,196       34,200
                                        ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Grand total......................    46,311,027      44,696,107    45,078,813      -1,232,214      382,706
                                        ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total............................    39,311,027      39,027,721    38,992,836        -613,205      -34,885
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note: The above amounts are discretionary only and do not include OCO/GWOT funding or the 251A sequester and
  sec. 3004 OMB ATB.

                               References

    The Committee report refers to the following laws as 
follows: Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission 
Act of 2007, Public Law 110-53, is referenced as the 9/11 Act; 
Security and Accountability for Every Port Act of 2006, Public 
Law 109-347, is referenced as the SAFE Port Act; and the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, Public Law 111-
5, is referenced as ARRA. References to the, ``Committees'' 
refers to the Committees on Appropriations in the House of 
Representatives and the Senate, unless otherwise noted. The 
Committee also refers to, ``full time equivalent'' positions 
as, ``FTE''; ``Program, Project, Activity'' line items as, 
``PPA''; and the, ``Government Accountability Office'' as, 
``GAO''.

              Summary of Major Recommendations in the Bill

    The Committee recommends $38,993,000,000 in discretionary 
funding for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) for 
fiscal year 2014, -$34,885,000, or -.09 percent, below the 
amount requested and -$613,205,000, or -1.55 percent, below 
fiscal year 2013 enacted levels (defined as the amount provided 
for DHS in Public Law 113-6 and excluding emergency funding, 
disaster relief adjustments, the President's 251A sequester, 
and any other rescission adjustments imposed by the Office of 
Management and Budget (OMB) pursuant to section 3004 of Public 
Law 113-6). Unlike previous years, funding for the Coast 
Guard's support of the Global War on Terror/Overseas 
Contingency Operations are not included in the bill and are 
instead supported via permissive transfer from Department of 
Defense, Navy, Operations & Maintenance. The Committee does not 
include requested increases for civilian pay across the 
Department. Should the President provide a civilian pay 
increase for 2014, it is assumed that the cost of such a pay 
increase will be absorbed within other amounts appropriated for 
fiscal year 2014.

 The President's Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Request for the Department of 
                           Homeland Security

    The President's fiscal year 2014 budget for DHS's fiscal 
year 2014 proposes to:
          
 Reduce Coast Guard staffing by -850 military 
        personnel;
          
 Reduce Immigration and Customs Enforcement 
        (ICE) staffing by -1,000 FTE;
          
 Reduce the Secret Service's staffing by -376 
        FTE;
          
 Reduce the Federal Emergency Management 
        Agency's (FEMA) First Responder Grant programs by -$250 
        million;
          
 Reduce the Office of Bombing Prevention by 
        more than -39 percent.
          
 Reduce Custom and Border Protection's 
        (CBP's) Air & Marine resources by nearly $84.0 million 
        and reduce flight hours by more than 40 percent.
          
 Reduce CBP mission support by -$103.7 
        million.
          
 Reduce ICE's detention capacity by -2,200 
        beds per day and the Alternatives to Detention program 
        by -$24.0 million.
          
 Reduce the Coast Guard's recapitalization 
        and acquisitions by -40 percent; and
          
 Reduce almost every vital aspect of ICE's 
        investigative mission, to include substantial 
        reductions to national security investigations, 
        immigration enforcement, human trafficking 
        investigations, counter smuggling operations, counter 
        proliferation investigations, child exploitation 
        investigations, and intellectual property protection.
    Beyond these proposed reductions, further analysis reveals 
that the President's fiscal year 2014 budget request for DHS 
will have the following performance impacts:
          
 The lowest level of drug interdiction 
        effectiveness in the past five years;
          
 A complete inability of the Coast Guard to 
        fulfill its patrol boat mission requirements;
          
 A nearly -50 percent reduction in operating 
        capabilities of CBP aerial surveillance along our 
        borders and coastlines;
          
 The inability of ICE to fully comply with 
        the statutory mandate to detain certain immigration law 
        violators and sustain custody operations;
          
 A deterioration of ICE's capacity to 
        investigate severe transnational crimes, such as 
        illegal weapons exportation, narcotics trafficking, and 
        cyber crime, including child exploitation;
          
 A reduction in the capacity of the Office of 
        Bombing Prevention to implement domestic applications 
        of lessons learned from the wars in Iraq and 
        Afghanistan on improvised explosive devices; and
          
 A reduction of five years in the average 
        experience of Secret Service agents assigned to vital 
        protective details by fiscal year 2018.
    In short, the fiscal year 2014 budget request for DHS 
proposes to not only reduce the immediate resources of the 
Department's most critical frontline components, it proposes to 
substantially diminish the long-term security capabilities of 
our Nation.
    The Committee categorically rejects this flawed budget 
request for DHS.

                         Priorities in the Bill

    This fiscal year 2014 appropriations bill for DHS 
reprioritizes scarce funding towards our Nation's security 
priorities and rectifies the President's detrimental budget 
proposal for the Department. Furthermore, for the fourth year 
in a row, the Committee reduces the Department's discretionary 
budget and considerably decreases bureaucratic overhead. The 
funding recommendations and oversight contained in this bill 
are intended to:
          
 Prioritize operations and frontline 
        staffing;
          
 Provide sufficient resources to fulfill 
        essential mission requirements;
          
 Instill fiscal discipline;
          
 Reduce bureaucratic overhead; and
          
 Administer greater oversight and 
        accountability.
    In particular, the bill includes targeted increases 
directly related to current threats, including recent domestic 
and international security events. These increases above the 
request include:
          
 Restoration of the proposed reductions to 
        CBP's operations and vital mission support functions 
        while also supporting the requested addition of 1,600 
        new CBP officers;
          
 For the third year in a row, increases to 
        CBP's targeting and TSA's SecureFlight programs above 
        the budget request to improve information sharing, 
        automation, and watchlisting capacity and processes;
          
 Increases to ICE's capacity to conduct visa 
        overstay investigations and analysis;
          
 Increases to FEMA's First Responder Grants 
        by $36.4 million above the amount provided in fiscal 
        year 2013 and $402 million (18.9 percent) above the 
        amount requested by the President for fiscal year 2014;
          
 An increase of $5.0 million above the 
        current services level for ``If You See Something Say 
        SomethingTM'' efforts; and
          
 The doubling of the requested funding level 
        for Bombing Prevention to improve training and 
        awareness of domestic usage of improvised explosive 
        devices.
    In addition, the bill supports essential security 
operations by:
          
 Restoring the proposed reductions to ICE's 
        investigations and enforcement programs, to include 
        full funding for the mandated detention level of 34,000 
        detention beds and the Alternatives to Detention 
        program, and increases funding for investigations into 
        human smuggling and trafficking above the amount 
        provided in fiscal year 2013;
          
 Restoring nearly all of the proposed 
        reductions to the Coast Guard's operating and 
        acquisition budgets and increases funding for 
        counternarcotics operations and sustainment of aging 
        assets;
          
 Restoring the proposed reductions to Secret 
        Service agents and investigative operations, including 
        prevention of electronic crime and support for the 
        prevention of child exploitation;
          
 Adding 40 new canine enforcement teams to 
        TSA, fully funding the training pipeline for canine 
        teams through 2015;
          
 Increasing funding for cybersecurity by 
        $30.0 million above the amount provided in fiscal year 
        2013;
          
 Continuing to fully fund E-Verify; and
          
 Restoring proposed reductions to 
        cybersecurity analysis and counterintelligence 
        programs.

                           FISCAL DISCIPLINE

    While the Department is charged with countering serious 
threats to our security, the Nation faces another, perhaps 
equally devastating threat. This threat lies not in foreign 
countries or from unseen enemies, but here at home, where 
America's fiscal situation remains unsustainable. In light of 
this enormous challenge, the Committee recommends reducing 
overall spending at DHS by $617,458,000, or 1.56 percent, below 
the amount provided for fiscal year 2013. This marks the fourth 
straight fiscal year where discretionary spending for DHS has 
been reduced from the previous fiscal year's enacted level. 
These reductions are made not only to help restore America's 
fiscal health, but also to compel the Department to address 
inefficiencies in a bureaucracy that is among the largest in 
the Federal government. The importance of the Department's 
mission does not make it immune from fiscal discipline.
    The Committee rejects any false ``tradeoff'' between 
security and spending restraint. The Committee's 
recommendations are intended to force the Department to make 
wiser investment decisions with limited resources and overhead 
that will ultimately deliver better capabilities and result in 
improving the Nation's security. The Committee will not 
tolerate programs that are underperforming or failing to 
achieve desired outcomes, which is why the bill makes 
responsible and targeted reductions where taxpayers are not 
seeing results.
    Moreover, the Committee makes recommendations to instill 
fiscal discipline at DHS over the long term by rejecting poorly 
justified aspects of the budget request; substantially reducing 
bureaucratic overhead through no less than a 15 percent 
reduction in the Department's Administrative staffing and a 25 
percent reduction in administrative expenses and services; 
decreasing TSA's Federal staffing level, saving $60 million; 
and forcing the Department to revisit costly acquisitions to 
ensure better value to taxpayers. The bill also compels the 
Department to more clearly link funding requests to mission 
requirements and to provide a better accounting of results 
before seeking additional funding for programs with a 
questionable or mixed track record. Finally, for the second 
year in a row, the Committee recommends denying DHS requests to 
expand its bureaucracy through new standalone offices and 
instead forces the Department to look at consolidations across 
a number of overlapping and duplicative programs.

                               OVERSIGHT

    The Committee recommends decisive action to improve 
accountability in fiscal year 2014; including withholding funds 
from Departmental management offices until the Secretary 
submits to the Committee statutorily required reports and plans 
that are due at the time of the President's fiscal year 2015 
budget submission. The Department has been repeatedly and 
egregiously late in responding to Congressional direction, 
including failing to submit the majority of statutorily 
required reports on time. This failure to comply with the law 
is wholly unacceptable. The investment plans, expenditure 
plans, reports, and justifications outlined by the Committee 
are essential if it is to help DHS better protect the American 
people and live up to exacting standards of fiscal 
responsibility demanded by the taxpayers. By flouting 
Congressional requirements, the Department is effectively 
disregarding the taxpayers' right to see whether or not their 
scarce dollars are spent wisely. Additional reductions are 
taken throughout the Department to demonstrate the seriousness 
of compliance and to compel DHS leadership to develop greater 
responsiveness to statutory requirements and Congressional 
requests.
    In fiscal year 2014, the Committee recommends continuing 
major reforms put in place in fiscal year 2012 and recommends 
new actions to streamline and strengthen the Department. The 
bill rejects the unauthorized grant proposal submitted in the 
budget, and, instead, the Committee recommends continuing last 
year's reforms and emphasizes that limited Federal dollars must 
be applied to areas of highest risk. The Committee further 
strengthens its stringent oversight of the Disaster Relief Fund 
by continuing annual and monthly reporting requirements. The 
Committee continues to press reform of inefficient budgeting 
for Coast Guard acquisitions by aligning funding to 
requirements based on the fiscal year of need. The Committee 
also rejects the Department's request to remove functions from 
the Office of Policy to create three additional, stand-alone 
offices. This request to proliferate direct reports to the 
Secretary is inconsistent with the goal of a more consolidated 
Department with lower bureaucratic overhead and is, therefore, 
not approved. Furthermore, the Committee recommends better 
alignment of specific functions within the Department to both 
mission and budget, such as continued reform of biometric 
identity management efforts.

                               CONCLUSION

    The Committee's intent is to prioritize funding for vital 
frontline security operations; enable the Department to rapidly 
and forcibly address current threats, including the type of 
improvised explosive device attack perpetrated at the finish 
line of the Boston Marathon; enable the Department to rapidly 
and responsibly acquire much needed operational capabilities; 
equip the Department to address long-standing Federal network 
security vulnerabilities; push the Department to set clear and 
well-reasoned priorities that align to stated mission 
requirements; and require the Department to practice sound 
financial and program management that disciplines funding and 
aligns resources to results in terms of improved security. 
Moreover, the bill mandates that the Department budget 
adequately to support known and expected costs of operations, 
including disaster relief; strengthen vital preparedness and 
response partnerships between and among Federal, State, local, 
tribal, and private sector entities; and move the Department 
toward the lean and responsive organization it was envisioned 
to be when it was established in 2003. The Committee remains 
deeply committed to helping the Department confront long-
standing and emergent homeland security threats, and sincerely 
appreciates the hard work and dedication of the thousands of 
agents, officers, Coast Guard personnel, field staff and 
administrative and support staff who make it their business 
every day to enforce Federal laws, work to keep the Nation safe 
from terrorist threats, and improve the Nation's resiliency to 
disasters.

            TITLE I--DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS


            Office of the Secretary and Executive Management





Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $129,870,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................       126,554,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       103,246,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................       -26,624,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................       -23,308,000

*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The mission of the Office of the Secretary and Executive 
Management (OSEM) is to provide efficient leadership and 
services to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and to 
support the Department's efforts to achieve its strategic 
goals, as outlined in the Quadrennial Homeland Security Review.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $103,246,000 for OSEM, $23,308,000 
below the amount requested and $26,624,000 below the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2013. This includes no more than 
$45,000 for official representation and reception allowances, 
$6,000 below the request. A total of $5,000,000, $2,000,000 
above the amount requested and $5,000,000 above the amount 
provided for fiscal year 2013, is provided for enhancements to 
``If You See Something Say SomethingTM'' efforts.
    Unless otherwise noted below, the recommendation reflects 
reductions in funding needed to offset significant shortfalls 
in the President's budget request for DHS due to: (1) assumed 
increases in aviation passenger fee collections that have yet 
to be authorized and that are not under the jurisdiction of the 
Committee on Appropriations; (2) detrimental proposals to 
severely reduce the Department's vital operational components 
and frontline personnel; and (3) the repeated failure to comply 
with statutory requirements. In addition, the reductions 
reflect Committee dissatisfaction with inconsistent or 
incomplete responses by the Department to the Committee's 
repeated requests for factual information.
    Due to the Department's chronic, unacceptable delays in 
submitting statutorily required reports and plans, the 
Committee reduces the requested amounts for the Office of the 
Chief of Staff and the Executive Secretary by 50 percent. 
Furthermore, the bill withholds fifty percent of the total 
amount appropriated by this Act for OSEM from obligation until 
the Committee receives all reports that are, by statute, 
required to be submitted with or in conjunction with the fiscal 
year 2015 budget request.
    To enable better oversight of expenditures and personnel 
changes within OSEM, the Committee has provided separate 
funding recommendations for each sub-office as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Budget Estimate      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Immediate Office of the Secretary.         $4,128,000         $3,492,000
Immediate Office of the Deputy              1,822,000          1,536,000
 Secretary........................
Office of the Chief of Staff......          2,200,000          1,084,000
Executive Secretary...............          7,603,000          3,740,000
Office of Policy..................         27,815,000         29,998,000
Office of Public Affairs..........          8,661,000          9,326,000
Office of Legislative Affairs.....          5,498,000          4,625,000
Office of Intergovernmental                 2,518,000          2,120,000
 Affairs..........................
Office of General Counsel.........         21,000,000         17,691,000
Office for Civil Rights and Civil          21,678,000         18,272,000
 Liberties........................
Citizenship and Immigration                 5,344,000          4,501,000
 Services Ombudsman...............
Privacy Officer...................          8,143,000          6,861,000
Office of International Affairs...          7,626,000              - - -
Office of State and Local Law                 852,000              - - -
 Enforcement......................
Private Sector Office.............          1,666,000              - - -
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total.........................       $126,554,000       $103,246,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    For the second year in a row, the Committee disagrees with 
the proposed creation of three, new direct-reporting entities 
within OSEM, including the Office of International Affairs 
(OIA), the Office of State and Local Law Enforcement (SLLE), 
and the Private Sector Office (PSO). This proposal is 
inconsistent with the goal of a more streamlined organization 
within the Department and of reducing administrative overhead. 
Additionally, the Committee views international affairs policy 
formulation and coordination as an inherently appropriate 
function of the Office of Policy and directs that it remain as 
such. The Committee, therefore, denies the proposed breakout of 
these three offices into separate and distinct PPAs, directs 
that they remain elements within the Office of Policy, and 
includes a $2,000,000 reduction to the total amount requested 
for these three offices to compel greater administrative 
efficiency within the Office of Policy. This direct $2,000,000 
reduction to the aggregate funding of $10,144,000 requested for 
OIA, SLLE, and PSO should be realized proportionally from 
reductions in duplicative administrative functions across the 
three offices.

                            Office of Policy

    The Committee recommends $29,998,000 for the Office of 
Policy, $7,961,000 below the amount requested, when including 
the requested funding for OIA, SLLE, and PSO, and $13,708,000 
below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. Funding provided 
for this office includes OIA, SLLE, and PSO as noted in the 
previous paragraph. The Committee expects the Office of Policy 
to engage with components and offices in establishing, tracking 
progress of, and implementing DHS strategic planning and policy 
guidance across the entire spectrum of homeland security 
activities.
    The Committee directs the Department to provide, with the 
submission of its fiscal year 2015 budget request, a detailed 
expenditure plan for the Office of Policy that lists planned 
projects, including details on necessary travel, for each sub-
office within the Office of Policy along with their associated 
funding and staffing requirements. This expenditure plan shall 
include all details on staffing to include organizational 
structure, distribution of FTE, and current vacancies. In 
addition, to improve oversight of operations and priorities of 
the Office, the Committee directs the Department to report not 
later than December 1, 2013, on fiscal year 2013 travel by 
political employees of the Office of Policy, listing the follow 
information per trip: dates, destinations, purpose, costs, mode 
of travel, and the total number of government personnel 
accompanying the political appointees.
    The Committee directs the Department to ensure that the 
Office of Policy is a full participant in interagency 
discussions on visa policy matters, consistent with DHS 
authorities.

                    Office of International Affairs

    Since its creation, DHS has struggled with maintaining the 
appropriate international footprint to ensure the full range of 
DHS interests, particularly given the fact that the individuals 
deployed overseas largely represent DHS components with very 
specific mission needs and programs. DHS has determined that a 
handful of critical locations merit a dedicated DHS Attache, 
selected by the Secretary, to further Secretarial priorities, 
represent Department-wide interests, and support the U.S. 
Ambassador. While the Committee has supported the limited 
assignment of appropriate Attache positions, the Committee 
believes the Department has failed to adequately budget for 
these positions within OIA. Rather, OIA has apparently relied 
on a fragmentary approach of negotiating with individual 
Departmental components to fund such positions. The Committee 
directs the DHS Chief Financial Officer (CFO) to provide, not 
later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the 
costs associated with these positions and the sources of funds 
from which they are supported. CFO shall also ensure that these 
positions are funded and clearly identified within the Office 
of Policy budget in the fiscal year 2015 request.
    The Committee is concerned by the Office of International 
Affairs' (OIA) promotion of international rotations of DHS 
personnel through secondment positions in foreign countries. 
These rotations involve significant associated costs, 
particularly in cases where an entire family accompanies 
seconded personnel, and the degree of commensurate benefit 
appears limited. Similar benefits can be achieved with close 
coordination on concrete projects and, as necessary, limited 
travel. Further, the liaison function is often duplicative of 
other positions, such as Attaches already stationed at the 
embassy. The Committee directs OIA to submit a report not later 
than 15 days after the date of enactment of this Act on the 
costs and locations of all DHS secondment positions posted 
since fiscal year 2008 and denies the use of funding for any 
further secondment positions in fiscal year 2014. The Committee 
asserts that this funding restriction is not meant to hamper 
best practice exchanges.

                        Office of Public Affairs

    The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for improvements to the 
``If You See Something Say SomethingTM'' campaign, 
$2,000,000 above the amount requested and $5,000,000 above the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2013. Additional funding above 
the fiscal year 2013 level is provided for improvement to 
homeland security awareness efforts, most especially those 
efforts specifically aimed at identifying and mitigating the 
risks of domestic use of improvised explosive devices. The 
Office of Public Affairs is directed to brief the Committees on 
a spend plan for these funds not later than 30 days after the 
date of enactment of this Act.

              Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

    The Committee recommends $18,272,000 for the Office for 
Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (OCRCL), $3,406,000 below the 
amount requested and $3,346,000 below the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2013. Part of this reduction reflects, as noted 
above, the need to offset significant budget shortfalls created 
by assumptions of unauthorized and inaccessible fee revenue as 
well as a substantially imbalanced budget request that 
disproportionally reduces the Department's operational 
components and frontline staffing. Included within the amount 
recommended for this office is a total of $2,394,000 for OCRCL 
reviews of 287(g) agreements and ICE's Secure Communities. 
However, the Committee expects the Department to ensure that 
OCRCL efforts complement, but in no way duplicate, those of the 
Office of Inspector General or other oversight elements of 
components, such as the Office of Professional Responsibility 
in ICE. It has come to the attention of the Committee that 
there is significant overlap in the oversight efforts of these 
different organizations that results in duplicative demands on 
ICE resources, potentially at the expense of vital enforcement 
operations; therefore, the Committee directs that such 
duplication should be eliminated to the extent possible.
    The Committee directs OCRCL, in conjunction with the DHS 
Privacy Officer, to conduct a joint review of U.S. Customs and 
Border Protection (CBP) efforts to ensure the use of unmanned 
aerial systems (UAS) complies with existing law and all 
applicable privacy and civil liberty standards. This joint 
review shall also address how CBP ensures its UAS usage is 
limited to operation along the border and coastal areas of the 
United States. This review shall be referred to the Government 
Accountability Office not later than 90 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act for evaluation. The Comptroller General 
of the United States shall report to the Committees not later 
than April 1, 2014, on this evaluation.
    As noted in fiscal year 2013, the Committee is aware that 
OCRCL submits annual reports to Congress, but is dissatisfied 
with their chronic lateness. In order to afford the Committee a 
current understanding of the work, priorities, and funding 
requirements of the Office, the Committee directs OCRCL to 
provide a briefing not later than 30 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act on OCRCL operations in fiscal year 2013 
and planned for fiscal year 2014. The briefing should cover 
workload, and staffing associated with different core functions 
and missions; travel; publications; and measures of performance 
associated with execution of OCRCL statutory responsibilities.

                           Expenditure Plans

    Throughout this bill and report, the Committee has included 
language requiring the Department and components to submit 
expenditure and obligation plans for significant investment 
programs or programs for which there is a need for sustained 
visibility into planning and execution of important milestones. 
Regrettably, in far too many instances, such expenditure 
plans--which should reflect decisions already made by the 
Department to align current program priorities with available 
resources--have been inexcusably late, incomplete, or have not 
yet been submitted at all. Such poor responsiveness and 
compliance is intolerable and reflects poorly on the 
Department's duty to disclose its spending to the Congress and 
American taxpayers. Throughout the bill, considerable 
reductions from the request are recommended because of the 
Department's lack of responsiveness toward such Congressional 
requirements. Moreover, the Committee withholds substantial 
funds to compel the Department to ensure plans are submitted 
timely to the Committees on Appropriations.

          Quarterly Reports and Other Information Requirements

    The Department is directed to continue to send quarterly 
reports as specified in the explanatory statement accompanying 
Public Law 113-6, in particular the Border Security Status 
Reports and the Detention and Removal Operations Quarterly 
Reports. Given the achievement of nationwide deployment of 
Secure Communities in early 2013, the Committee discontinues 
the statutory requirement for Secure Communities Quarterly 
Reports. The Detention and Removal Operations reports should 
incorporate operational information associated with Secure 
Communities hits and results, as it includes all detention and 
removal operations statistics.

                                 Travel

    The Committee commends the Department on reducing executive 
travel costs. Travel by Department leadership and senior staff 
is necessary when it supports critical Department missions, 
advances national policy interests, or is for fundamental 
oversight and management purposes. However, as noted by the 
Committee over the past several years, some travel by 
Department officials has failed to meet the test of being both 
necessary and efficient.
    In addition, the Committee is concerned about the funding 
sources for travel by Department leadership. The Committee 
expects the Department to comply with the letter of the law; 
official travel funding may not be augmented at the expense of 
operations. To gain better insight into the appropriateness of 
DHS use of travel funding, the Committee directs the Department 
to provide a quarterly report to the Committee not later than 
30 days after the end of each fiscal quarter, beginning with 
the end of the first quarter after the date of enactment of 
this Act. The report shall detail all costs of official and 
nonofficial travel by the Secretary and the Deputy Secretary 
(both direct and indirect), delineated by each trip for that 
quarter within all DHS appropriations.
    Further, the Committee directs the Department and the Coast 
Guard to expedite the completion of an updated Memorandum of 
Agreement that takes into account the fluctuations in the cost 
of fuel and inflation. The Committee remains concerned that the 
Department has narrowly defined direct and indirect costs such 
that the total cost of executive travel is needlessly 
obfuscated.

                     Bonuses and Performance Awards

    The Committee recognizes bonuses and other forms of 
monetary awards for exemplary performance serve as important 
tools in recognizing and motivating high achieving agency 
personnel. These bonuses can be a useful means to provide 
positive feedback to agency personnel and to encourage all 
employees to help the Department better execute its missions by 
increasing productivity and employing creative ideas. However, 
the Committee continues to note that for many Department 
components, offices and sub-offices, such awards, along with 
quality step increases, have been given to more than half the 
employees in an organization--in some cases, reaching 90 
percent or higher. Such flawed practices give the appearance 
incentive awards are being used simply as another form of 
compensation in lieu of pay increases, rather than as the 
intended award. Such broad use may cause these awards to lose 
their value as a form of recognition or incentive. However, the 
Committee understands that the Department decided to not award 
any performance awards in fiscal year 2013 due to imposed 
funding reductions. The Department is directed to include 
within the President's budget request for fiscal year 2015 the 
amounts estimated, by component, for such awards for fiscal 
year 2015 and the standards and criteria that will be applied 
to grant such awards.

                Reception and Representation Allowances

    Within OSEM, the Committee provides $45,000 for official 
reception and representation expenses, $6,000 below the amount 
requested. Within this total, no more than $17,000 shall be for 
international programs within the Office of Policy and 
necessary activities related to the visa waiver program. The 
Department is directed to track its reception and 
representation expenses in enough detail to explain how these 
funds were used as the Committee conducts its oversight efforts 
next year. The Committee expects the Department to review 
representation allowances for all DHS agencies for equitable 
alignment of funds with responsibilities and submit any 
proposed changes as part of the fiscal year 2015 budget 
request.

                     Conferences and Special Events

    For fiscal year 2013, Congress mandated new, strict 
oversight requirements for conferences and special events. The 
Committee continues this stringent oversight and expects DHS to 
comply with such statutory requirements for fiscal year 2014.
    Furthermore, not later than 30 days after the end of fiscal 
year 2014, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) shall report 
to the Committee on the Department's event-related spending, 
which shall substantiate the degree of DHS compliance with all 
applicable laws and regulations and describe in detail the 
total costs to the Government associated with events. The 
report shall include the number of conferences held, the amount 
of funds obligated, and expenses by appropriation or other 
source of funding, including budget accounts and subaccounts 
used to pay for events.

                          Performance Metrics

    In today's fiscal climate, Congress must be confident that 
the investment of taxpayer dollars in government services and 
activities result in the achievement of stated goals and the 
efficient implementation of planned strategies. The 
Department's annual performance reports, however, do not 
satisfactorily tie resources to results, despite efforts by 
this Committee to foster good planning and performance metrics. 
As a result, Congress is forced to make resource allocation 
decisions without sufficient information about the impact of 
those decisions.
    The Committee recognizes the Department of Homeland 
Security has worked to define its missions, strategies, goals, 
and priorities related to homeland security, but it must make 
significant additional progress in these areas, including in 
the development of the next Quadrennial Homeland Security 
Review (QHSR), Future Years Homeland Security Programs (FYHSP), 
and the Department's annual budget requests. In particular, the 
Department must more systematically and comprehensively tie 
long-term strategies and goals to performance measures 
involving programs, assets, capabilities, policies, and 
authorities, and must clearly link prioritized goals to 
anticipated resources. This type of performance-based budgeting 
adds effectiveness and economizing factors to traditional 
aspects of budgeting.
    The Committee directs the Department of Homeland Security 
to include, in future QHSRs, FYHSPs, and annual budget 
proposals, clearly defined and prioritized mission goals and 
associated, multi-year plans for providing sufficient resources 
to realize those goals. Performance measures in future budget 
justifications should clearly demonstrate the extent to which 
prior year investments in programs, projects and activities can 
be tied to progress toward achieving priority goals and include 
estimates for how proposed investments will contribute to 
additional progress. In particular, performance measures should 
measure outcome (results/impact), output (volume) and 
efficiency. In order to achieve this endeavor, the Committee 
includes a provision that directs the Department, working with 
the Government Accountability Office, to provide a 
comprehensive report that provides updated performance metrics 
that are measurable, repeatable, and directly linked to 
requests for funding.

                Employee Morale and Workforce Innovation

    The Committee is very concerned with recent findings of low 
morale and a weak environment for innovation across the 
Department. According to two recent independent studies, DHS 
ranks among the lowest-rated Federal agencies in both employee 
morale and innovative workplaces, with eight offices ranked in 
the bottom 12 percent and the Office of the Under Secretary for 
Science and Technology ranking 292nd out of 292 agencies in one 
set of rankings. To address this issue, not later than 60 days 
after the date of enactment of this Act, DHS is directed to 
report to the relevant Congressional Committees of jurisdiction 
on a corrective action plan to address and improve low employee 
morale and the poor climate for workplace innovation. The plan 
must examine root causes and establish metrics of success 
within the action plans that are clear and measurable.

                          Leadership Vacancies

    The Committee is concerned about the increasing number of 
vacancies among political leadership at DHS. Lack of effective 
leadership was noted in the Office of Personnel Management's 
2012 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey as a particular weakness 
at DHS. As noted above, these surveys also indicate innovation 
declining yet again--ranking DHS near the bottom of the Federal 
government. Innovation and proactive thinking are often lacking 
when a government agency or office is under acting leadership 
as career leaders seek to reinforce established business 
processes without disruption.
    The Committee is specifically concerned about the lack of 
appointed leadership at CBP and the OIG. No Senate confirmed 
CBP Commissioner has been in place since the beginning of 2009 
and the recently appointed Deputy Commissioner is seemingly set 
to remain Acting Commissioner for an unknown period of time. 
Likewise, no Senate confirmed Inspector General has been in 
place since early 2011.

               Oversight Consolidations and Streamlining

    The Government Performance and Results Modernization Act of 
2010 (Public Law 111-352) requires OMB to publish a list of 
Congressionally-mandated plans and reports that it considers 
outdated or duplicative as part of the fiscal year 2013 budget 
submission. Although the Administration failed to meet the 
statutorily required deadline, it recently posted the list of 
excess reports on the Performance.gov website. Of the reports 
and plans identified on this list, the Committee has eliminated 
six reports and three have been streamlined or decreased in 
frequency. These reports are identified as:

    Eliminated:
        CBP--Antidumping and Countervailing Duties Report
        CBP--Drug Trafficking Organization Spotters
        CBP--FY12 Anti Dumping and Countervailing
        CBP--Outstanding Antidumping
        ICE--Trade Compliance Expenditure Plan
        USCG--Sexual Assaults in the Coast Guard (need for this 
        report was superseded by authorizing committee in 2010)

    Streamlined:
        ICE--Quarterly Unobligated Balances-merged with 
        staffing and hiring quarterly
        ICE--Staffing and Hiring Monthly-merged with monthly 
        execution report
        TSA--Quarterly Recovery of Deobligated Funds for 
        Explosive-semiannual
    Furthermore, the Committee recommendation includes numerous 
consolidations and eliminations of reports and expenditure 
plans. Multiple reporting and expenditure plan requirements 
have been statutorily required with the annual budget 
submission. In addition, expenditure plans have been decreased 
as budget justification documents are improved.

              Office of the Under Secretary for Management

 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $218,293,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................       202,686,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       171,173,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................       -47,120,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................      -31,513,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The Office of the Under Secretary for Management's (USM) 
primary mission is to deliver quality administrative support 
services for human resources and personnel; manage facilities, 
property, equipment and other material resources; ensure 
safety, health and environmental protection; and identify and 
track performance measurements relating to the responsibilities 
of the Department. This office is also charged with 
implementing a mission support structure for DHS administrative 
services, while eliminating redundancies and reducing support 
costs.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $171,173,000 for USM, $31,513,000 
below the amount requested and $47,120,000 below the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2013. Within the amount provided, no 
more than $2,250 is for official reception and representation 
expenses.
    Unless otherwise noted below, the recommendation reflects 
reductions in funding needed to offset significant shortfalls 
in the President's budget request for DHS due to: (1) assumed 
increases in aviation passenger fee collections that have yet 
to be authorized and that are not under the jurisdiction of the 
Committee on Appropriations; (2) detrimental proposals to 
severely reduce the Department's vital operational components 
and frontline personnel; and (3) the repeated failure to comply 
with statutory requirements. In addition, the reductions 
reflect Committee dissatisfaction with inconsistent or 
incomplete responses by the Department to the Committee's 
repeated requests for factual information. In light of the 
Department's chronic delays in submitting statutorily required 
reports and plans, the bill withholds 50 percent of the total 
amount appropriated by this Act for USM from obligation until 
the Committee receives all reports that are required by statute 
to be submitted with or in conjunction with the fiscal year 
2015 budget request.
    The Committee has provided separate funding recommendations 
in order to adequately track expenditures for each office, as 
detailed in the following table:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Budget Estimate      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Under Secretary for Management....         $2,735,000         $2,305,000
Office of Security................         66,025,000         55,799,000
Office of the Chief Procurement            66,915,000         56,459,000
 Officer..........................
Office of the Chief Human Capital          31,489,000         26,586,000
 Officer..........................
Office of the Chief Administrative         35,522,000         30,024,000
 Officer..........................
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total.........................       $202,686,000       $171,173,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Immediate Office for the Under Secretary for Management

    The Committee recommends $2,305,000 for the Immediate 
Office of the Under Secretary for Management, $430,000 below 
the amount requested and $792,000 below the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2013. The Committee directs this office to resume 
its efforts to compel the Department to submit a zero-based 
budget within its annual budget justification documents.

                Office of the Chief Procurement Officer

    The Committee recommends $56,459,000 for the Office of the 
Chief Procurement Officer, $10,456,000 below the amount 
requested and $15,469,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2013. The Committee continues statutory language in this 
section requiring the Comprehensive Acquisition Status Report 
and subsequent quarterly updates, and expects the Department 
will comply with those requirements in terms of both content 
and schedule.

               Office of the Chief Administrative Officer

    The Committee recommends $30,024,000, for the Office of the 
Chief Administrative Officer, $5,498,000 below the amount 
requested and $9,697,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2013. Within this total, the Committee includes 
$4,020,000, $709,000 below the amount requested and $1,423,000 
below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013, for improvements 
and maintenance of the Nebraska Avenue Complex and to sustain 
current operations at the site. The Committee encourages the 
Department to find additional efficiencies in its logistics and 
acquisitions operations, including through appropriate staff 
training and the sharing of best practices employed by DHS 
components, the Department of Defense, other large Federal 
agencies, and the private sector. The Committee notes that it 
has received no official documentation or rationale for 
renaming this office and continues the current title until the 
Department submits such justification.

                Departmental Headquarters Consolidation

    Given the constraints of the current budget environment and 
the flawed and poorly justified reductions to the Department's 
operational components and frontline personnel within the 
President's fiscal year 2014 budget request for DHS, no funding 
is included for further development of the headquarters 
consolidation project. The budget included a request of 
$105,500,000 for this project in FY 2014. The CAO is directed 
to update the Committee not later than 30 days after the date 
of enactment of this Act on the expenditure plan for this 
project, including the $29,000,000 provided in fiscal year 
2013, and an updated analysis of alternatives for the project 
that fully considers the costs and benefits of its scope within 
a fiscal environment that is substantially constrained.
    The Committee understands that the Department, through USM, 
is actively exploring options to modify or consolidate current 
leases, with the expectation that a permanent headquarters 
construction site will be significantly delayed or amended. The 
Committee encourages the Department to continue this effort and 
to inform the Committee of its progress in consolidation not 
later than 30 days after the date of enactment of this Act, 
including a revised schedule and cost estimates.

                NON-DISCRIMINATION AND ANTI-RETALIATION

    The Department shall ensure that all contracts and 
subcontracts comply with existing law with respect to 
discrimination and retaliation against all employees. The 
Committee strongly supports compliance with existing laws such 
as the Equal Pay Act and the Fair Labor Standards Act.
    Discrimination and retaliation of any employee under any 
contract or subcontract must always be taken seriously and be 
given all due process under the law.

                 Office of the Chief Financial Officer

 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................       $51,449,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................        48,779,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        41,242,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................       -10,207,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................       -7,537,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The primary responsibilities and functions of the Office of 
the Chief Financial Officer include budget execution and 
oversight; performance analysis and evaluation; oversight of 
the Department's financial management system; oversight of the 
Department's business and financial management systems across 
all agencies and directorates; and oversight of credit card 
programs and audit liaisons.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $41,242,000 for the Office of the 
Chief Financial Officer (CFO), $7,537,000 below the amount 
requested and $10,207,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2013. As noted above, such reductions are made to offset 
the severe flaws of the budget request, including reliance upon 
unauthorized fee increases and the proposed disproportionate 
reductions to the Department's operational components and 
frontline personnel. The recommended reduction is also due to 
inconsistent and incomplete responses to the Committee's 
requests for factual information. In light of the Department's 
chronic delays in submitting statutorily required reports and 
plans, the bill withholds 50 percent of the total amount 
appropriated by this Act for the CFO from obligation until the 
Committee receives all reports that are required by statute to 
be submitted with or in conjunction with the fiscal year 2015 
budget request.

                    Financial Systems Modernization

    The Committee recognizes the importance of modernizing the 
financial systems on which the Department and its components 
rely, and supports the efforts led by the CFO to leverage 
existing systems and prioritize efforts. The Committee, 
therefore, directs the CFO to continue providing at least semi-
annual briefings to the Committee on its modernization efforts 
and to highlight any funding, schedule, or implementation 
issues that are relevant to continued progress. The CFO is 
directed to re-baseline this effort, include the total cost and 
schedule details, subdivided by Departmental component, and 
provide the information to the Committee not later than 30 days 
after the date of enactment of this Act.

                  Congressional Budget Justifications

    The Committee directs the Department to submit all of its 
fiscal year 2015 budget justifications on the first Monday in 
February, 2014, concurrent with the official submission of the 
President's budget to Congress. The detail should reflect the 
requirements set forth under this heading in the statement of 
managers accompanying Public Law 113-6, with the exception that 
the references to prior year funding information should relate 
to fiscal years 2013 and 2014.
    Consistent with section 874 of Public law 107-296, the 
Department shall submit a Future Years Homeland Security 
Program budget as part for the fiscal year 2015 budget 
justification, reflecting anticipated spending for fiscal years 
2015-2019. It shall be in unclassified form so as to be 
accessible to the public.
    The Committee also directs that the Department ensure, for 
all appropriations requested in fiscal year 2015, and for which 
a proposal is made to increase or decrease funding for an 
activity within a PPA category, that it informs the Committee 
of the base funding level for such activity--and not simply the 
total PPA funding.

            Unrealistic Budgeting Practices and Assumptions

    As in prior years, the President's budget once again 
assumes that new revenue will be realized in the coming fiscal 
year. In this case, the budget request was built upon 
assumptions that $322,500,000 in new aviation security fee 
revenue will be realized in fiscal year 2014, of which 
$200,000,000 would go to general deficit reduction and with the 
expectation that such collections would generate more than $25 
billion in new revenue in the next decade. However, as in the 
past, the proposal depends on enactment of new legislative 
authority that is outside the jurisdiction of the Committee. 
The direct impact on the Department's budget in fiscal year 
2013, as estimated by the Congressional Budget Office, was a 
shortfall of $122,500,000. As this Committee has underscored 
repeatedly over the past several Congresses, such an approach 
to budgeting is unrealistic and requires this Committee to take 
drastic measures to offset the unnecessary gap. The Committee 
reiterates its message and rejects such budgetary legerdemain. 
The consequences, in terms of additional reductions to 
Department requests, are evident throughout this bill.
    If and when such proposals are enacted into law, the 
Committee will take them into account as it drafts legislation, 
and the Department should keep the Committee informed of any 
progress in this regard. However, until such action occurs, 
these unauthorized proposals will not be treated as relevant to 
the Committee's appropriations work. The Committee also takes 
this approach to the Department's request to increase CBP's 
fees to pay for additional staffing, since the proposal is also 
not under the jurisdiction of the Committee on Appropriations.

                     Monthly Reporting Requirements

    The Committee continues bill language requiring monthly 
budget and staffing reports within 45 days after the close of 
each month.

                        International Rotations

    The Committee is concerned by OIA's promotion of 
international rotations of DHS personnel through secondment 
positions in foreign countries due to the significant cost, 
particularly for cases in which an entire family moves along 
with the seconded DHS employee, and the lack of commensurate 
benefit. The Committee expects the costs of all such positions 
across DHS to be fully reviewed by the CFO and denies the use 
of funding for any further secondment positions in fiscal year 
2014.

                          Working Capital Fund

    The Committee recommends no more than $772,661,000 for the 
Department's Working Capital Fund (WCF), $250,000,000 below the 
amount requested and $178,866,000 above the estimated current 
services level for fiscal year 2013. The Committee is extremely 
concerned with the massive increase requested for the 
Department's WCF and adjusts the cash balance and rates 
downward by a total of $250,000,000. The Committee believes a 
nearly 72.2 percent increase from current services levels to 
the amount requested for fiscal year 2014 is insufficiently 
justified and excessive. The Committee notes that the 
Congressional Justification for the WCF did not include a 
detailed business case analysis for the proposed increase to 
the WCF, including the proposed staffing increase of 152 FTE 
above the current services level. Furthermore, the Committee is 
very concerned with the combined impacts of such substantial 
increases in WCF rates, increased out-year cost of new 
personnel, and the Administration's mandated efficiencies upon 
the Department's operational components.
    The Committee, as in prior years, directs the Department to 
include a separate justification for the WCF in the fiscal year 
2015 budget request. This should include a description of each 
activity funded by the WCF; the basis (including a business 
case analysis) for the pricing; the number of full-time Federal 
employees funded in each activity; a list of each departmental 
organization that is allocating funds to the activity; and the 
funding each organization is providing in fiscal years 2013 and 
2014, and what is estimated to be provided in 2015. If a 
project contained in the WCF is a multi-year activity with a 
defined cost, scope, and schedule, estimated costs and schedule 
shall be clearly delineated. The Department is directed to 
improve the justification for the WCF in the fiscal year 2015 
budget request and directs the Department to brief the 
Committees not later than 15 days after the date of enactment 
of this Act on the details of the business case justification 
for the substantial increase in WCF rates, including the 
staffing increases being supported via the WCF, along with the 
managerial needs of the WCF.
    The Committee expects all initiatives funded by multiple 
DHS organizations to be included in the WCF. The Committee does 
not support taxing departmental organizations for cross-cutting 
initiatives outside the WCF. As such, the justification should 
identify any cross-cutting initiatives or activities that 
benefit more than one organization that are not included in the 
WCF and should explain the omission.
    The Committee directs the Department to notify it promptly 
of any additions, deletions, or changes made to the WCF plan 
during the fiscal year. Furthermore, the Department should not 
fund any activities through the WCF that the House or Senate 
Committees on Appropriations have disapproved either in report 
language or in their responses to reprogramming requests.

                Office of the Chief Information Officer

 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $243,488,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................       327,254,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       210,735,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................       -32,753,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................     -116,519,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The Chief Information Office (CIO) has oversight of 
information technology (IT) projects in the Department. The CIO 
reviews and approves all DHS IT acquisitions estimated to cost 
over $2,500,000 and also approves the hiring and oversees the 
performance of all DHS component CIOs.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $210,735,000 for the Office of the 
CIO, $116,519,000 below the amount requested and $32,753,000 
below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. However, the 
amount reported in the table, above, for the CIO in fiscal year 
2013 does not reflect $54,945,000 that was provided to the CIO 
for data center migration through a general provision, while 
the budget request does include a proposal for such funds.
    Unless otherwise noted, the recommendation reflects 
reductions in funding needed to offset significant shortfalls 
in the President's budget request for DHS due to: (1) assumed, 
but unauthorized increases in aviation passenger fee 
collections that are not under the jurisdiction of the 
Committee on Appropriations; and (2) a severely flawed budget 
request that includes disproportionate reductions in vital 
operational components and frontline personnel.
    In addition, funding reductions are the result of the 
Department's continuing failure to comply with certain 
statutory requirements, and due to the complete inadequacy of 
the CIO budget justification for fiscal year 2014. The 
Committee expects inclusion of cost and schedule details on all 
projects and, most especially, on large multi-agency projects 
such as data center migration and the proposed upgrades to the 
Homeland Secure Data Network. The fiscal year 2014 
justification documents for both of these multi-agency projects 
included no such details or clear subdivisions by DHS 
component.
    The bill continues a requirement for a multi-year 
investment plan for the Department's information technology 
funding within a separate general provision.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Budget Estimate      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Salaries and Expenses.............       $117,347,000        $99,397,000
Information Technology Activities.         32,712,000         25,612,000
Infrastructure and Security               100,063,000         45,863,000
 Activities.......................
Homeland Secure Data Network......         77,132,000         39,863,000
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total, Chief Information             $327,254,000       $210,735,000
     Officer......................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                 Infrastructure and Security Activities

    The CIO's office is directed to update the Committees--in 
coordination with other Departmental components as necessary--
not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act 
on Department-wide efforts to combat ``insider threats'' in the 
cyber domain, including, but not limited to an overview of: (1) 
the extent of the Department's ability to monitor the 
unauthorized removal of sensitive unclassified and classified 
material from DHS information systems; (2) any new restrictions 
on access to DHS information systems and databases, both 
internally and for external stakeholders; (3) any recent 
restrictions placed on DHS users by external, interagency 
stakeholders on access to certain databases and an assessment 
of the operational impact of such restrictions; and (4) plans 
to improve the DHS information security architecture and 
policies to preclude breaches from happening at DHS.

                         Data Center Migration

    The Committee recommends $34,200,000 for the migration of 
component resources to the Department's two consolidated data 
centers, $20,000,000 below the amount requested and $20,745,000 
below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. Funding for this 
activity is provided in Title V of this bill. While the 
Committee supports such migration as necessary to reduce IT 
costs, risk, and to rationalize the operations of the 
Department, the funding for this project has been reduced due 
to the need to offset significant shortfalls in the President's 
budget request for DHS due to: (1) assumed, but authorized 
increases in aviation passenger fee collections that are not 
under the jurisdiction of the Committee on Appropriations; (2) 
a severely flawed budget request that includes disproportionate 
reductions in vital operational components and frontline 
personnel; and (3) failure to comply with statutory 
requirements. Furthermore, as noted previously, the budget 
justification did not include sufficient detail on this 
project. Therefore, the Committee directs the Department to 
provide not later than 15 days after the date of enactment of 
this Act a detailed spend plan for this project in fiscal year 
2014; to continue to brief the Committees quarterly on the 
status, cost, and schedule of its data center migration 
efforts; and to include all relevant details associated with 
future funding for this activity in the relevant annual budget 
justification documents submitted to the Committee.

                        Analysis and Operations

 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $321,958,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................       309,228,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       291,623,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................       -30,335,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................      -17,605,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    Analysis and Operations houses the Office of Intelligence 
and Analysis and the Directorate of Operations Coordination, 
which together collect, evaluate, and disseminate intelligence 
information, as well as provide incident management and 
operational coordination.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $291,623,000 for Analysis and 
Operations, $17,605,000 below the amount requested and 
$30,335,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. The 
Committee reduces funding for the Office of Operations 
Coordination and Planning due to a need to offset severe flaws 
within the Department's budget request and due to an inadequate 
justification. The Committee also denies the requested decrease 
to Cybersecurity analysis and Counter-intelligence and restores 
funding for these functions. Additional direction on funding 
for this appropriation is included within the classified annex 
accompanying this report.

                          Classified Programs

    Recommended adjustments to classified programs and more 
detailed oversight of funding for the Office of Intelligence 
and Analysis are addressed in the classified annex accompanying 
this report.

                      Office of Inspector General

 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*\1\...................      $145,019,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014\1\...................       143,309,000
Recommended in the bill\2\............................       137,903,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................        -7,140,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................       -5,406,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.
\1\All funding levels include a transfer of $24,000,000 from the FEMA
  Disaster Relief Fund for oversight, audits, and investigations
  directly related to funding for disaster relief efforts.

                                Mission

    The Homeland Security Act of 2002 established an Office of 
Inspector General (OIG) in DHS by amendment to the Inspector 
General Act of 1978. This office was established to provide an 
objective and independent organization that would be effective 
in: (1) preventing and detecting fraud, waste, and abuse in 
departmental programs and operations; (2) providing a means for 
keeping the Secretary and the Congress fully and currently 
informed of problems and deficiencies in the administration of 
programs and operations; (3) fulfilling statutory 
responsibilities for the annual audit of the Department's 
financial statements; (4) ensuring the security of DHS 
information technology pursuant to the Federal Information 
Security Management Act; and (5) reviewing and making 
recommendations regarding existing and proposed legislation and 
regulations to the Department's programs and operational 
components. According to the authorizing legislation, the 
Inspector General is to report dually to the Secretary of 
Homeland Security and to the Congress.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends a total $137,903,000 for OIG, 
$5,406,000 below the amount requested and $7,140,000 below the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2013. The Committee continues 
the practice in fiscal year 2014 of transferring $24,000,000 
from the Disaster Relief Fund (DRF) to OIG for disaster-related 
audits and investigations. The total funding level provided 
maintains OIG at a current services level. Reductions are due 
to the budget request's severe shortfalls in vital operational 
components and funding to support frontline personnel. For 
fiscal year 2015 and thereafter, OIG shall submit a detailed 
expenditure plan within its annual budget justification 
documents. This spend plan shall include all DRF transfers 
(which shall satisfy the requirements for notification of DRF 
transfers under section 503 of this Act).
    The Committee remains concerned about the quality of OIG 
communications with the Committee regarding border corruption 
investigations, particularly related to the coordination of 
these investigations with ICE and CBP. The Committee directs 
OIG to submit an expenditure plan of integrity oversight funds 
in coordination with CBP and ICE, which shall be submitted 
along with its annual expenditure plan.

                  Management and Efficiency Oversight

    The Committee strongly supports efforts by OIG to identify 
and correct instances of fraud and waste affecting Departmental 
activities, and therefore directs OIG to provide a semiannual 
briefing to the Committees on Appropriations regarding such 
efforts, with particular focus on procurement, grant 
administration, and travel.

                     Conferences and Special Events

    As noted above in the OSEM section of this report, the 
Committee continues the requirement for OIG to report to the 
Committees not later than 30 days after the end of fiscal year 
2014 on DHS spending on conferences, ceremonies, and similar 
events, based on quarterly reporting to OIG. The report shall 
substantiate DHS compliance with all applicable laws and 
regulations and describe in detail the total costs to the 
Government associated with events. It shall include the number 
of conferences held, the amount of funds obligated, and 
expenses by appropriation or other source of funding, including 
budget accounts and subaccounts used to pay for events.

          TITLE II--SECURITY, ENFORCEMENT, AND INVESTIGATIONS


                   U.S. Customs and Border Protection


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................    $8,285,056,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................     9,237,088,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     8,275,983,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................        -9,073,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................     -961,105,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The mission of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is 
to protect the borders of the United States by preventing, 
preempting and deterring threats against the homeland through 
ports of entry (POE) and by interdicting illegal crossings 
between POE. CBP's mission integrates homeland security, safety 
and border management to ensure goods and persons cross U.S. 
borders in accordance with applicable laws and regulations, and 
pose no threat to the country. The priority of CBP is to 
prevent terrorists and their weapons from entering the United 
States, and to support related homeland security missions 
affecting border and airspace security. CBP is also responsible 
for apprehending individuals attempting to enter the U.S. 
illegally, stemming the flow of illegal drugs and other 
contraband, including weapons and bulk cash into and out of the 
country, protecting U.S. agricultural and economic interests 
from harmful pests and diseases, protecting American businesses 
from theft of their intellectual property, regulating and 
facilitating international trade, collecting import duties and 
enforcing U.S. trade laws. CBP maintains a workforce of more 
than 60,000, including CBP officers, Air Interdiction agents, 
Marine Interdiction agents, canine enforcement officers, Border 
Patrol agents, Agriculture Specialists, trade specialists, 
intelligence analysts and mission support staff.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $8,275,983,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses, $961,105,000 below the amount requested and 
$9,073,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. After 
accounting for transfers and realignments of PPAs the 
recommendation is $35,039,000 above the request. The 
recommendation promotes strong border security, expands efforts 
to facilitate trade and travel, underscores the importance of 
CBP's targeting capabilities and encompasses appropriate 
oversight and direction. Resources sufficient to maintain no 
less than 21,775 CBP officers are included. Additional 
resources are targeted to priority frontline operations such 
as:
          (1) $105,000,000 to phase-in 1,600 new CBP officers;
          (2) $60,000,000 to restore mission support cuts;
          (3) $10,000,000 to support Field Operations 
        transformation initiatives and to restore partial funds 
        for Land Border Integration efforts and the Port 
        Runner/Absconder Mitigation program;
          (4) $11,000,000 to make further enhancements to the 
        Automated Targeting System for continuous data quality 
        improvement and enrichment initiatives;
          (5) $3,500,000 to increase readiness of Air and 
        Marine operations;
          (6) $2,000,000 to improve international cargo 
        security and facilitate trade by mitigating the cuts to 
        the Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-
        TPAT) program; and
          (7) $1,000,000 to sustain southern Border Patrol 
        stations proposed for deactivation.
    Consistent with Public Law 113-6, the Committee's 
recommendation realigns funds from the Salaries and Expenses 
account to other mission-specific accounts as follows:
          (1) $241,000,000 from US-VISIT to accounts in CBP, 
        ICE and the Office of Biometric Identity Management 
        (OBIM);
          (2) $367,860,000 for the Office of Information 
        Technology (OIT) to the Automation Modernization 
        account; and
          (3) $287,000,000 for Air and Marine Salaries and 
        Expenses to the Air and Marine Operations account.
    A comparison of the budget estimate to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Budget estimate      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Headquarters, Management, and
 Administration:
    Border Security Inspections          $620,656,000              - - -
     and Trade Facilitation.......
    Border Security and Control           592,330,000              - - -
     between Ports of Entry.......
    Commissioner..................              - - -        $25,288,000
    Chief Counsel.................              - - -         45,022,000
    Congressional Affairs.........              - - -          2,482,000
    Internal Affairs..............              - - -        162,568,000
    Public Affairs................              - - -         12,920,000
    Training and Development......              - - -         76,512,000
    Technology, Innovation and                  - - -         22,972,000
     Acquisition..................
    Intelligence/Investigative                  - - -         61,105,000
     Liaison......................
    Administration................              - - -        293,091,000
    Rent..........................        407,898,000        407,898,000
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Headquarters          1,620,884,000      1,109,858,000
         Management and
         Administration...........
Border Security Inspections and
 Trade Facilitation:
    Inspections, Trade, and Travel      2,837,294,000      2,887,718,000
     Facilitation at Ports of
     Entry........................
    Harbor Maintenance Fee                  3,274,000          3,274,000
     Collection (Trust Fund)......
    International Cargo Screening.         72,260,000         71,961,000
    Other international programs..         24,740,000         24,596,000
    Customs-Trade Partnership              40,183,000         41,960,000
     Against Terrorism............
    Trusted Traveler Programs.....          6,311,000          6,311,000
    Inspection and Detection              112,526,000        112,504,000
     Technology Investments.......
    Automated Targeting Systems...        109,944,000        132,932,000
    National Targeting Center.....         65,474,000         65,106,000
    Training......................         47,651,000         40,703,000
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Border Security       3,319,657,000      3,387,065,000
         Inspections and Trade
         Facilitation.............
Border Security and Control
 between Ports of Entry:
    Border Security and Control...      3,700,317,000      3,723,502,000
    Training......................         55,928,000         55,558,000
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Border Security       3,756,245,000      3,779,060,000
         and Control between POEs.
Air and Marine Operations.........        286,769,000              - - -
US-VISIT..........................        253,533,000              - - -
                                   -------------------------------------
            Total.................     $9,237,088,000     $8,275,983,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

              Headquarters, Management and Administration

    The Committee recommends $1,109,858,000 for Headquarters, 
Management and Administration, $511,026,000 below the amount 
requested and $269,918,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2013. The distribution of funds in the table above 
incorporates by reference the structure of the Headquarters 
Management and Administration PPAs included in House Report 
112-492, which CBP is directed to follow. The essential 
continuity functions performed by the former Joint Operations 
Division will now be functions within the Office of the 
Commissioner. The recommendation fully accounts for the WCF 
contributions. The Committee realizes that this recommendation 
will be adjusted pursuant to the implementation of Section 504 
of the Act.

            Increasing Transparency of User Fee Collections

    Regrettably, the Committee lacks confidence in CBP's 
ability to forecast, collect and manage user fees, a failure 
which reflects poor financial management and a paucity of 
fiscal control. Consequently, CBP is directed to report to the 
Committee biannually on collections, anticipated carryover 
balances and all uses and activities for which fees are 
expended, including any duplication of activities for which 
discretionary funds are appropriated.
    The Committee recognizes the President's request included a 
permanent indefinite appropriation of $8,533,000 for the Small 
Airport User Fee. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO), 
however, scored the fee at $5,000,000, the amount of which is 
reflected in the Committee's recommendation.

                      Hiring and Staffing Reports

    The Committee directs CBP to continue submitting monthly 
staffing and hiring reports in the format used in prior fiscal 
years.

             Efforts to Counter Abuse of Prescription Drugs

    The Committee supports strongly CBP's efforts to combat 
prescription drug smuggling and abuse. CBP and ICE are directed 
to update the Committee on their activities, resources and 
challenges, including relevant information regarding the 
illicit transnational smuggling of generic oxycodone along the 
U.S.-Canada border. The report shall be submitted no later than 
February 15, 2014.

                      Northern Border Initiatives

    The Committee supports bilateral discussions between the 
United States and Canada that resulted in the Beyond the Border 
Action Plan, which articulated a shared approach to security 
and economic competitiveness. CBP is directed to provide a 
briefing to the Committee not later than December 1, 2013, on 
the status of implementing this plan, and include information 
on how electronic systems are being harmonized to enhance and 
expedite trade compliance between the United States and Canada.

                      Preventing Human Trafficking

    The Committee endorses wholeheartedly CBP's vigorous 
efforts to prevent and disrupt human trafficking by developing 
public awareness programs. Within funds recommended, $5,000,000 
is for the Blue Lightning Initiative, which trains U.S. 
commercial airlines on how to identify potential human 
trafficking victims and provides them with the tools to quickly 
notify Federal authorities.
    Likewise, CBP should continue to ensure that unaccompanied 
children are adequately protected by appropriate officials 
while traveling, and properly screened for sexual assault, 
trafficking, exploitation or other mistreatment. Local child 
welfare organizations are uniquely qualified to provide 
training to recognize the signs of mistreatment; therefore, the 
Committee urges the Commissioner to utilize the skills and 
expertise of these organizations to ensure CBP personnel are 
properly trained and vigilant on behalf of the Nation's young 
traveling public.

                            Ethics Training

    CBP should continue its efforts to ensure that its ethics 
programs include training at all stages in an agent or 
officer's career. GAO-13-59 included several recommendations to 
mitigate the risk of employee corruption and misconduct. The 
Committee directs CBP to provide a briefing on the status of 
efforts to implement those recommendations, and any other 
measures under consideration, not later than 120 days after the 
date of enactment of this Act.

  GUAM-COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORHERN MARIANA ISLANDS (CNMI) VISA WAIVER 
                                PROGRAM

    The Committee is aware of ongoing discussions at DHS 
regarding the Guam-CNMI visa waiver program, and is concerned 
that DHS has made inadequate progress toward finalizing these 
deliberations. The Committee urges DHS to finalize decisions 
and pending rulemakings relating to the Guam-CNMI visa waiver 
program, to include appropriate security protocols, as 
necessary.

           Border Security Inspections and Trade Facilitation

    Border Security Inspections and Trade Facilitation is 
funded at $3,387,065,000, $67,408,000 above the amount 
requested and $183,814,000 above the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2013. Of this amount:
          
 $2,887,718,000 is for Inspections, Trade and 
        Travel Facilitation at Ports of Entry, a $50,424,000 
        increase above the amount requested and $171,783,000 
        above the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. The 
        recommendation includes $10,000,000 to restore Field 
        Operations' business transformation initiatives, 
        including those being undertaken through the Land 
        Border Integration effort and the Port Runner/Absconder 
        Mitigation program. Also included is $12,284,000 from 
        US-VISIT to the Inspections, Trade, and Travel 
        Facilitation at POEs PPA to ensure transition of US-
        VISIT program management and planning efforts 
        associated with entry-exit policy and operations to the 
        Office of Field Operations;
          
 $3,274,000 is for the Harbor Maintenance Fee 
        Collection (Trust Fund) as requested, $3,000 above the 
        amount provided in fiscal year 2013;
          
 $71,961,000 is for International Cargo 
        Screening, $299,000 below the amount requested and 
        $545,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. 
        The recommendation includes $13,032,000 to re-baseline 
        the Container Security Initiative. As requested, the 
        Committee recommends transferring funds to the Other 
        International Programs PPA from International Cargo 
        Screening;
          
 $24,596,000 is for Other International 
        Programs, $144,000 below the amount requested and 
        $178,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. 
        As requested, the Committee's recommendation includes 
        transferring these funds to the Other International 
        Programs PPA from International Cargo Screening;
          
 $41,960,000 is for Customs-Trade Partnership 
        Against Terrorism (C-TPAT), $1,777,000 above the amount 
        requested and $1,066,000 below the amount provided in 
        fiscal year 2013. The recommendation includes 
        $2,000,000 to mitigate reductions to the C-TPAT 
        program, to bolster international cargo security 
        partnerships and to facilitate trade;
          
 $6,311,000 is for Trusted Traveler Programs 
        as requested, $4,489,000 below the amount provided in 
        fiscal year 2013;
          
 $112,504,000 is for Inspection and Detection 
        Technology Investments, $22,000 below the amount 
        requested and $4,943,000 below the amount provided in 
        fiscal year 2013. The Committee continues to require 
        the multi-year investment and management plan required 
        by law for investments and operations of radiation 
        detection equipment and non-intrusive inspection 
        systems to be submitted with the fiscal year 2015 
        budget request. As the request does not reflect a plan 
        to address replacement of assets approaching the end of 
        their lifecycles, the Committee is concerned about 
        CBP's long-term planning to responsibly replace and 
        upgrade aging equipment. The Committee directs CBP and 
        the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office to brief on its 
        long-term planning efforts;
          
 $132,932,000 is for Automated Targeting 
        Systems (ATS), $22,988,000 above the amount requested 
        and $19,220,000 above the amount provided in fiscal 
        year 2013. The Committee's recommendation includes a 
        $23,000,000 increase above the amount requested for 
        targeting enhancements to ATS, one of our Nation's most 
        effective tools to counter terrorist travel and 
        identify risky, illicit activity in the global trade 
        and travel systems. Specifically, these additional 
        funds will enable CBP to build an even more effective 
        search engine tool across ATS subsystems and modules, 
        as well as other capabilities, to facilitate CBP's 
        daily operations as well as its response capabilities 
        associated with real-time incidents and intelligence. 
        The Committee directs CBP to provide quarterly briefs 
        to the Committee on progress to implement enhancements 
        and resulting operational successes. The Committee 
        notes that this recommendation increases funds for 
        CBP's targeting programs for the third fiscal year in a 
        row, reflecting the Committee's belief in such programs 
        as invaluable to our Nation's security and trade 
        efforts;
          
 $65,106,000 is provided for the National 
        Targeting Center (NTC), $368,000 below the amount 
        requested and $2,953,000 below the amount provided in 
        fiscal year 2013; and
          
 $40,703,000 is for Training, $6,948,000 
        below the amount requested and $5,892,000 above fiscal 
        year 2013, due to the lag in hiring and training of the 
        new CBPOs requested.

          Student Visa Holders and Verifying Status upon Entry

    ICE has made slow progress improving the Student and 
Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS), including 
eliminating vulnerabilities identified by an interagency review 
and the GAO. Sadly, it is clear that prior to the Boston 
attack, one of those vulnerabilities was exploited. CBP has 
addressed that weakness in the days since the attack, but the 
Committee is concerned that CBP's labor-intensive solution is 
not sustainable. CBP and ICE must work expeditiously to address 
the weaknesses in SEVIS and develop an automated solution that 
reduces the potential for human error. For that reason, the 
Committee directs CBP and ICE to brief on its plan to mitigate 
known vulnerabilities associated with SEVIS, including the cost 
and schedule for implementing the plan. Further, the briefing 
shall include the cost and schedule for implementing the 
automated solution to ensure that officers at POEs have the 
most updated, accurate information available on student visa 
holders and their status. The briefing shall take place no 
later than June 15, 2013.

                    Increasing CBP Officer Workforce

    Prompt and efficient processing of arriving passengers at 
U.S. POEs is a key performance metric of CBP. To assess CBP's 
operational effectiveness, the Committee renews its directive 
to conduct quarterly briefings on the number of passengers 
whose entry exceeds 60 minutes. Moreover, CBP is directed to 
include the information on its website.
    The budget request proposes $210,100,000 to hire 1,600 new 
Border Patrol Officers (CBPOs), 70 canine teams and 245 
operational and mission support personnel to facilitate the 
flow of legitimate travelers and cargo into the United States. 
Despite supporting this request, the Committee is concerned 
with the findings of an internal audit that reveal systemic 
failures within CBP's budget formulation for salaries and 
benefits of its operational workforce. Therefore, the Committee 
is concerned that such a rapid and substantial increase in 
staffing in fiscal year 2014 could further exacerbate a long-
standing problem. Furthermore, the Committee recognizes that 
conducting background checks and training so many new officers 
will take a considerable amount of time. Accordingly, the 
Committee recommends $105,000,000 to allow for a more 
methodical phase-in of the additional personnel requested to be 
supported through an increase in appropriated funds.
    Similarly, the request proposes to hire 1,877 additional 
CBP officers with revenues generated by unauthorized user fees. 
Again, though sympathetic to this request for increased 
operational capacity, offsetting the costs from user fees is 
outside the Committee's jurisdiction. The Commissioner is 
encouraged to seek authority for this effort from the 
appropriate congressional committees.

           Ports of Entry Operations--Manpower and Innovation

    Innovation and process reengineering at POEs can be 
effective methods to reduce administrative overhead, which 
enables officers to focus on core operational activities. To 
facilitate this goal, the Committee recommends that CBP 
continue to: (1) fully implement the Land Border Initiative and 
new automated pedestrian processing procedures; (2) expand and 
improve ATS targeting capabilities; (3) expand the use of the 
workload alignment tool at more airports; (4) explore public-
private partnerships to facilitate trade and travel; and (5) 
better integrate and standardize trusted traveler programs like 
the Global Entry and Free and Secure Trade (FAST) programs.

                               Wait Times

    CBP continues to face challenges managing processing times 
at our Nation's POEs. The Committee directs CBP to continue the 
quarterly briefings to the Committee on the number of passenger 
arrivals at air and sea POEs where immigration and customs 
processing time exceeds 60 minutes and actions CBP is taking to 
reduce these delays. The Committee also directs CBP to continue 
including current wait time information for air, land and sea 
POEs on its website. The Committee encourages CBP to continue 
working with appropriate stakeholders at each POE to provide 
wait time data and reductions in average processing times.

                     Reimbursable Agreements Pilot

    Section 560 of Public Law 113-6 authorized CBP to enter 
into no more than five pilots to study voluntary reimbursable 
agreements. Until the results of those pilots are received and 
analyzed, no additional reimbursable agreements are allowed. 
The Committee expects the pilots to be implemented in fiscal 
year 2013 and directs CBP to provide regular briefings on any 
agreements in place, to include best practices, lessons 
learned, tangible security and trade benefits to the Nation, 
and anticipated and actual funds collected.

    Cargo Security Strategy and Inspecting High Risk Cargo Overseas

    In May 2012, the Secretary notified Congress that she would 
extend by two years the deadline for complying with the 9/11 
Act requirement to scan 100 percent of containers bound for the 
United States prior to loading them on a vessel in a foreign 
port. The Committee notes, however, that no funds are requested 
for fiscal year 2014 that are directly related to the future 
implementation of that requirement. According to the 
Department, the implementation costs are substantial; with 
equipment costs alone estimated at $16,800,000,000 for the 
2,100 shipping lanes at the more than 700 ports that ship to 
the United States. Last year, the Secretary testified that she 
believes implementation of the 100 percent scanning mandate is 
not feasible.
    Based on the Secretary's statements that the requirement in 
current law is cost-prohibitive, the Committee continues to 
believe it is incumbent upon the Department to propose a 
meaningful alternative to 100 percent scanning that goes beyond 
and is more detailed than the broad goals of the National 
Strategy for Global Supply Chain Security submitted by the 
Administration in January 2012. The Committee directs the 
Department to submit an alternative strategy for consideration 
by Congress no later than January 1, 2014. CBP shall provide an 
updated briefing on the status of implementing the current 
scanning requirement or developing an alternative strategy not 
later than 30 days after the date of enactment of this Act.

                           Trade Enforcement

    CBP trade enforcement and facilitation efforts are 
critically important to domestic and foreign producers, 
exporters, importers and retailers. The Committee recognizes 
that CBP has stepped up efforts to identify and investigate 
commercial fraud against U.S. economic and health and safety 
interests. The Committee directs CBP to provide a report to the 
Committee regarding the resources dedicated to cargo 
inspections and the number of cases of commercial fraud 
identified by CBP historically, 2010-2013, not later than 
November 15, 2013.
    Consistent with past guidance, the Committee directs CBP to 
submit a report not later than February 1, 2014, on the extent 
and frequency of customs fraud, including circumvention of 
duties and misclassification on entries of imports of goods 
from China.

                   Textile Transshipment Enforcement

    The Committee includes $4,750,000, to continue textile 
transshipment enforcement. The Committee directs CBP to ensure 
that the activities of the Textile and Apparel Policies and 
Programs Office, specifically seizures, detention, and special 
operations, are maintained at least at the level of those 
activities in prior years. The Committee directs CBP to update 
annually and submit a report with the budget request on the 
execution of its five-year strategic plan, consistent with 
prior year requirements.

                        Preclearance Operations

    A new statutory provision is included limiting the 
expenditure of funds for preclearance operations in new 
locations. This limitation is applicable until the following 
conditions are met:
          (1) The foreign policy and national security policy 
        rationales have been provided to the Committee;
          (2) A fully-burdened cost analysis has been conducted 
        and provided to the Committee, including planned 
        sources of funds; and
          (3) An economic impact analysis of the new location 
        on U.S. airline carriers has been conducted and 
        provided to the Committee.

                     CBP Officer Training Programs

    Recent terror incidents highlight the need for a vigilant 
and prepared workforce at the border. Since 2007, GAO has 
reported vulnerabilities and inefficiencies in delivering 
required training to CBP officers and has made numerous 
recommendations for improving the training curricula and 
strategy. Despite guidance in Public Law 113-6 directing CBP to 
brief the Committee on its action plan to implement 
recommendations from a December 2011 GAO report entitled, 
``Border Security: Additional Steps Needed to Ensure That 
Officers Are Fully Trained'' (GAO-12-269), the Committee 
remains uninformed on CBP's efforts to revise its training 
strategy. The Committee expects this briefing not later than 
June 30, 2013.

           Border Security and Control Between Ports of Entry

    The Committee recommends $3,779,060,000 for Border Security 
and Control between Ports of Entry, $22,815,000 above the 
amount requested and $77,031,000 above the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2013. This funding level supports a Border Patrol 
agent force of 21,370. Of the total amount, $3,723,502,000 is 
for Border Security and Control, $23,185,000 below the amount 
requested and $95,338,000 above the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2013. This recommendation includes $1,000,000 to restore 
cuts to inland Border Patrol Stations in states located along 
the Southern border of the United States. Funds are not 
provided to support detainee medical care and $55,558,000 is 
for training, $370,000 below the amount requested and 
$18,307,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013.

                          Detention Statistics

    The Committee directs the Department to continue issuing 
statistics on the number of individuals held in custody by CBP, 
including all Border Patrol stations, checkpoints and short-
term custody facilities (defined as facilities used to hold 
individuals for 72 hours or less). These statistics shall 
consist of all the facilities used for short-term custody, the 
country of origin of those in CBP custody, age, sex, death, 
detention duration and the circumstances of their release.
    The Committee directs the Department to publish these 
statistics in its annual statistical yearbook. Additionally, 
the Committee directs CBP to report to the Committee not later 
than 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act on the 
standards governing the conditions of custody and what 
oversight mechanisms CBP employs to monitor short-term 
detention conditions and lengths of detention. The Committee 
also directs CBP to work with ICE to establish efficient 
procedures for processing and transferring individuals from 
short-term detention to ICE detention.

                      Border Patrol Staffing Plan

    Pursuant to House Report 112-91 and the Joint Explanatory 
Statement accompanying Public Law 112-74, CBP was directed to 
submit a five-year staffing and deployment plan for the Border 
Patrol. The report failed to address any goals for border 
security that would shape staffing and resource deployment or 
note any factors that affect deployment. By December 1, 2013, 
CBP is directed to provide to the Committee a more complete 
five-year staffing and deployment plan that justifies the 
funded staffing level in detail, including the tasks performed 
by agents; outlines the factors related to deployment by 
sector; and provides criteria and options for redistributing 
resources to address existing and emerging threats.

                        AUTOMATION MODERNIZATION
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $719,146,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................       340,105,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       707,897,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013**.................       -11,249,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014**................     +367,792,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.
**Reflects transfer of +$368M from Salaries and Expenses.

                                Mission

    Automation Modernization is comprised of funds necessary to 
support the Office of Information Technology (OIT), and to 
modernize, sustain and develop those information technology 
(IT) systems critical to CBP's goals and objectives.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $707,897,000 for Automation 
Modernization, $367,792,000 above the amount requested and 
$11,249,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. The 
increase is the result of transferring funds from the Salaries 
and Expenses account to consolidate IT activities to ensure 
transparent financial management and fiscal control.
    IT capability is essential to mission success; however, 
little visibility has been provided into how this investment is 
managed. IT costs and requirements must be transparent in order 
for the Committee to adequately assess the requests. Therefore, 
statutory language is included requiring CBP to submit a multi-
year investment and management for fiscal years 2014-2018.
    The Committee recognizes that CBP is undertaking efforts 
this year to improve and enrich data quality in order to 
enhance targeting capabilities, and encourages the Commissioner 
to make progress on this initiative.
    A comparison of the budget estimate to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Budget estimate      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Information Technology............              - - -       $367,860,000
Automated Commercial Environment         $140,830,000        140,762,000
 (ACE)/International Trade Data
 System (ITDS)....................
Current Operations Protection and         199,275,000        199,275,000
 Processing Support (COPPS).......
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total.........................       $340,105,000       $707,897,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Automated Commercial Environment/International Trade Data Systems (ACE/
                                 ITDS)

    The Committee recommends $140,762,000 for ACE/ITDS, $68,000 
below the amount requested and $2,107,000 above the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2013. According to CBP officials, the 
ACE/ITDS is scheduled to increase its operational capability 
this year and will achieve full functionality by early 2016. 
The Committee will monitor closely the program's progress and 
directs CBP to continue quarterly briefings.

      Current Operations Protection and Processing Support (COPPS)

    The Committee recommends $199,275,000 as requested, 
$12,730,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2013 for 
COPPS. An assessment in October 2012 revealed TECS 
modernization required significantly more work than could 
reasonably be accomplished on its original schedule. As a 
consequence, the requirements of the program were evaluated, 
re-baselined and revised in a way that should result in 
expected functionality while lowering the total costs of 
ownership. Though the Committee is cautiously optimistic that 
the program is on track, the Commissioner and ICE are directed 
to provide an update on progress made by not later than October 
1, 2013.

        BORDER SECURITY FENCING, INFRASTRUCTURE, AND TECHNOLOGY
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $323,775,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................       351,454,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       351,454,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................       +27,679,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................             - - -*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The Border Security Fencing, Infrastructure, and Technology 
(BSFIT) account funds the technology and tactical 
infrastructure solutions to achieve effective control of the 
U.S. border.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $351,454,000 for BSFIT as 
requested, $27,679,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 
2013. With this recommendation, the Committee continues its 
strong support of border security infrastructure and technology 
deployment to meet Border Patrol's needs. Like last year, the 
Committee reminds CBP that it must submit an updated multi-year 
investment and management plan annually with its budget 
request.
    A comparison of the budget estimate to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Budget estimate      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Development and Deployment:
    Southwest Border Technology...       $138,816,000       $138,816,000
    Northern Border Technology....         10,000,000         10,000,000
    Tactical Communications.......         40,000,000         40,000,000
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Development and         160,435,000        160,435,000
         Deployment...............
Operation and Maintenance.........        191,019,000        191,019,000
                                   -------------------------------------
            Total.................       $351,454,000       $351,454,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       Development and Deployment

    The Committee recommends $160,435,000 for Development and 
Deployment as requested, $28,192,000 below the amount provided 
in fiscal year 2013. The recommendation includes funds for new 
investments and surveillance and detection technologies, 
including $77,366,000 to support integrated fixed towers and 
$40,000,000 for tactical communications.
    Included in the recommendation is $1,765,000 to mitigate 
damage originating from construction and deployment of BSFIT. 
Purchasing land is not a permitted activity. The Committee 
directs CBP to continue to work closely with the Department of 
the Interior and the Department of Agriculture to maintain a 
commitment to environmental and cultural stewardship and 
encourages CBP to seek alternatives and creative solutions in 
order to ensure that mission requirements are met.

                       Operations and Maintenance

    The Committee recommends $191,019,000 for Operations and 
Maintenance as requested, $55,871,000 above the amount provided 
in fiscal year 2013.

                      Southwest Border Technology

    The Committee is alarmed by chronic delays in procuring 
assets necessary to meet the deployment schedule of BSFIT, and 
more importantly, to deliver much needed capability to 
frontline Border Patrol agents. CBP is directed to brief the 
Committee on a quarterly basis on the status of its investment 
strategy, acquisition schedule, and obligated and unobligated 
balances. CBP is directed to continue to provide weekly 
notifications including reasons for delays on procurement 
actions on each technology investment until all initial 
contract awards have been made.
    In developing the multi-year investment and management 
plan, the Committee directs CBP to include an assessment of 
fixed versus mobile and airborne capabilities for border 
security surveillance, including the short- and long-term costs 
and benefits of different assets.

             DOD Technologies for Improving Border Security

    DOD has researched, developed and employed advanced 
surveillance technologies for service in overseas conflicts 
such as Iraq and Afghanistan. As these conflicts come to a 
close, technologies such as VADER, aerostats, manned and 
unmanned aerial systems, and associated audio, visual, radar 
and other detection and monitoring systems in use or under 
development may become excess equipment. Many of these systems, 
proven in battlefield environments, have been adapted to meet 
DHS border security requirements and provide a cost effective 
way to increase situational awareness of illicit cross border 
traffic. DHS should actively seek to capitalize on DOD's 
expertise and work with DOD to expedite the identification, 
designation, transfer and integration of technologies and 
equipment to support border security improvements. To that end, 
CBP is directed to brief the Committee on the status of their 
collaboration with DOD by July 15, 2013.

            Office of Technology Innovation and Acquisition

    The Committee remains disappointed by the lack of progress 
CBP has made to procure proven technologies, particularly those 
planned in the Arizona Border Technology Plan. In theory, the 
Office of Technology Innovation and Acquisition (OTIA) is 
supposed to facilitate and strengthen CBPs acquisition 
programs, but the Committee sees no evidence of improvement. In 
fact, there seems to be a direct relationship between internal 
upheaval in OTIA's establishment and the protracted pace of 
acquiring these essential technologies; consequently, the 
Committee will continue to monitor the role OTIA plays in CBP's 
major programs.

                       AIR AND MARINE OPERATIONS
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $798,207,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................       427,701,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       802,741,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................        +4,534,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................     +375,040,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    CBP's Office of Air and Marine provides integrated and 
coordinated border interdiction and law enforcement for 
homeland security missions; supports counterterrorism efforts 
of other law enforcement agencies; provides airspace security 
for high-risk areas or National Special Security Events; and 
combats efforts to smuggle narcotics and other contraband into 
the United States. Included in this account are salaries and 
expenses, procurement and operations and maintenance.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $802,741,000 for Air and Marine 
Operations, $375,040,000 above the amount requested and 
$4,534,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Budget Estimate      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Salaries and Expenses.............              - - -       $292,791,000
Operations and Maintenance........       $353,751,000        392,000,000
Procurement.......................         73,950,000        117,950,000
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total.........................       $427,701,000       $802,741,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Regrettably, the Administration's request fails to provide 
adequate funds to meet Air and Marine's critical mission 
requirements. To rectify this seemingly annual shortfall within 
the President's budget proposal, the Committee increases 
Salaries and Expenses to fund overtime and pay; boosts 
Operations and Maintenance to fund increased fuel costs and 
reinstate 107,000 flight hours; and augments Procurement to 
purchase two multi-role enforcement aircraft, the P-3 Service 
Life Extension Program and two Blackhawk conversions.
    The Committee continues to support planning the expansion 
of facilities at the Air and Marine Operations Center (AMOC) 
and modernizing AMOC systems. The Committee directs CBP to 
provide a briefing on its assessment of AMOC needs as well as 
the schedule and cost associated with any modernization plans 
not later than December 1, 2013.
    In order to ensure appropriate fiscal control and 
oversight, CBP is directed again to provide an updated five-
year recapitalization plan with the fiscal year 2015 budget 
request.

                      Unmanned Aircraft Operations

    The Committee continues its unwavering support for robust 
airborne intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance to 
extend the reach of CBP's drug interdiction and border security 
operations. Therefore, the Committee directs the Commissioner 
to review how air assets are integrated into current concepts 
of operations and provide recommendations on any changes that 
are necessary to improve interdiction tactics. Likewise, the 
Committee directs a review of the readiness rates of all 
unmanned aircraft. Finally, the Committee directs CBP to 
evaluate and brief the Committee on the need for an alternate 
base to support unmanned aircraft operations on the Southwest 
border not later than January 30, 2014. The brief should 
include information on the number of canceled flights and 
whether an alternate base for operations with more landing and 
support services would allow for more unmanned aircraft flights 
and increased interdiction rates.

                    Integrating the Civil Air Patrol

    In November 2012, the GAO issued a report (GAO-13-56) about 
the effective integration of the Civil Air Patrol into CBP's 
mission objectives, particularly in securing the border. The 
Committee is encouraged by these findings and directs CBP to 
assess specific areas and missions where collaborating with the 
Civil Air Patrol makes sense, and to provide a briefing on the 
assessment not later than 120 days after the date of enactment 
of this Act.

                 CONSTRUCTION AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $233,330,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................       471,499,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       471,278,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................      +237,948,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................         -221,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The Construction and Facilities Management account 
consolidates funding for planning and design, construction, 
leasing acquisition, facility program support, operations, 
management, headquarters support and tunnel remediation 
activities. Facilities eligible for these funds include Border 
Patrol stations, checkpoints, temporary detention facilities, 
mission support facilities, training facilities and CBP-owned 
POEs.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $471,278,000 for Construction and 
Facilities Management, $221,000 below the amount requested and 
$237,948,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. 
These recommendations support current sustainment and 
maintenance needs.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Budget Estimate      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Facilities Construction and              $385,398,000       $385,398,000
 Sustainment......................
Program Oversight and Management..         86,101,000         85,880,000
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total.........................       $471,499,000       $471,278,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    CBP is directed to submit a real property inventory on an 
annual basis. As a component of this inventory, CBP is directed 
to provide an annual plan describing construction and major 
renovation initiatives and their costs. In addition, CBP is 
directed to rank LPOEs, including GSA's, in order of which are 
most critical to improve border security and facilitate trade 
and travel into and out of the United States. Included in the 
briefing should be a description of the physical condition of 
each facility and any plans to recapitalize the facility.

                        Delegation of Authority

    The Committee acknowledges the Administration's ability to 
delegate authority from GSA-owned LPOEs to CBP. With this 
delegation, funds targeted formerly to rent will be directed to 
asset management and facility renovations, enabling CBP to 
perform operational missions more efficiently. Though hopeful 
that costs will be lower, the Committee is concerned that this 
proposal could increase the costs of routine maintenance and 
operations. Therefore, the Committee directs CBP and GSA to 
provide a briefing on the plan to execute this transfer, the 
costs associated with the transfer and the projected costs of 
routine maintenance and building operations not later than 
December 1, 2013.

                U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................    $5,389,008,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................     4,956,822,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     5,344,461,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................       -44,547,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................     +387,639,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is the 
agency responsible for enforcing immigration and customs laws. 
ICE protects the United States by investigating, deterring and 
detecting threats arising from the movement of people and goods 
into and out of the country. ICE consists of approximately 
20,500 employees within two major divisions: Homeland Security 
Investigations and Enforcement and Removal Operations.

                             Recommendation

    Upon reviewing the President's budget submission, the 
Committee was alarmed to see such a drastic reduction in ICE's 
capacity to investigate a range of issues that threaten the 
national security, trade and immigration laws of the United 
States, including human rights violations, human smuggling, 
human trafficking, drug smuggling and arms trafficking, 
worksite enforcement and intellectual property rights. 
Moreover, the budget request reduced funds necessary to detain 
and remove illegal aliens. These decreases undermine ICE's 
ability to carry-out their duties to enforce the law. The 
Boston Marathon bombings are just one example of why ICE must 
be funded at levels that ensure it is fully mission capable to 
prevent terrorism, protect the border, enhance security and 
ensure the integrity of the Nation's immigration system, which 
includes removing people who have overstayed their visa 
authority.
    The Committee recommends $5,344,461,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses, $387,639,000 above the amount requested and 
$44,547,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. The 
increase restores the President's proposed cuts to ICE, 
especially those that adversely affect critical missions such 
as investigations, enforcement, removal and operations.
    The Committee recommends the following increases above the 
budget request: $168,531,000 to ensure that not fewer than 
34,000 detention beds are maintained, as mandated in statutory 
language; $43,592,000 to restore the 287(g) program to the 
fiscal year 2013 level; and $133,336,000 to restore the 
proposed reduction to operations and investigations, including 
additional funds for human trafficking and visa overstay 
enforcement. In addition, the Committee recommends increases 
above the budget request of $4,930,000 for Secure Communities; 
$24,025,000 for Alternatives to Detention (ATD); and $9,031,000 
for Fugitive Operations. Realignments include $3,756,000 from 
the former US-VISIT program to ICE for overstay analysis and 
$8,000,000 from CBP to ICE's detainee medical costs.
    A comparison of the budget estimate to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Budget estimate      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Headquarters Management and
 Administration:
    Personnel, Compensation and          $192,236,000       $209,755,000
     Benefits.....................
    Headquarters-Managed                  141,294,000        151,132,000
     Information Technology
     Investments..................
                                   -------------------------------------
    Subtotal, Headquarters                333,530,000        360,887,000
     Management and Administration
Legal Proceedings.................        204,651,000        205,921,000
Domestic Investigations...........      1,599,972,000      1,710,172,000
International Investigations:
    International Operations......        100,544,000        100,187,000
    Visa Security Program.........         31,630,000         31,541,000
                                   -------------------------------------
    Subtotal, International               132,174,000        131,728,000
     Investigations...............
Intelligence......................         75,448,000         74,908,000
Detention and Removal Operations:
    Custody Operations............      1,844,802,000      2,038,239,000
    Fugitive Operations...........        125,771,000        134,802,000
    Criminal Alien Program........        291,721,000        289,155,000
    Alternatives to Detention.....         72,435,000         96,460,000
    Transportation and Removal            255,984,000        276,925,000
     Program......................
                                   -------------------------------------
    Subtotal, Detention and             2,590,713,000      2,835,581,000
     Removal Operations...........
Secure Communities................         20,334,000         25,264,000
                                   -------------------------------------
      Total, ICE Salaries and          $4,956,822,000     $5,344,461,000
       Expenses...................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In order to understand budget proposals, justification 
material must be clear, substantive and fiscally sound. 
Explanations for proposed increases and reductions require 
significant improvement. Therefore, the Committee encourages 
ICE and the DHS CFO to work with the Committee to improve the 
materials in the future.
    The Committee directs ICE to submit monthly staffing and 
hiring updates, as well as unobligated balance reports along 
with the Monthly Execution Report provided to the Committees.

               Headquarters Management and Administration

    The Committee recommends $360,887,000 for ICE Headquarters 
Management and Administration, $27,357,000 above the amount 
requested and $19,241,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2013. The increases fully restore 287(g) funding and a 
portion of the President's proposed cut to mission support.

                           Legal Proceedings

    The Committee recommends $205,921,000 for Legal 
Proceedings, $1,270,000 above the amount requested and $913,000 
below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. This amount 
restores the funding for attorneys engaged in prosecuting and 
removing aliens and supports 287(g) initiatives.

                        Domestic Investigations

    The Committee recommends $1,710,172,000 for domestic 
investigations, $110,200,000 above the amount requested and 
$25,000,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. The 
increase restores $29,085,000 for 287(g) initiatives; realigns 
$3,756,000 from US-VISIT for overstay analysis; increases the 
level for overstay investigations by $10,000,000; includes 
$20,000,000 for the ICE Child Exploitation Investigation Unit 
(CEIU) and for field office support of CEIU activities; adds 
$5,000,000 for Angel Watch; and includes $63,867,000 to sustain 
investigations related to money laundering, seizure of drugs 
and illegal firearms, indictments for child exploitation and 
pornography and worksite enforcement.
    Once again, the Committee directs ICE to provide a spend 
plan for Domestic Investigations not later than 30 days after 
the date of enactment of this Act. In addition, the Committee 
directs ICE to provide quarterly data on investigative 
activities and expenditures. Finally, the Committee supports 
ICE efforts to measure how investigative activities are 
dismantling transnational criminal enterprises and requires a 
briefing on the results of these efforts not later than 60 days 
after the date of enactment of this Act.
    The Committee directs ICE to work jointly with the Attorney 
General to assess cross-border violence and metrics collected 
by inter-agency task forces, particularly along the Southwest 
Border. Not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of 
this Act, ICE is directed to brief the Committee on the 
findings of this assessment and provide recommendations for 
additional resources needed to track and investigate cross-
border violence.
    The Committee commends ICE for its work to combat child 
sexual exploitation, particularly child rescue, child victim 
identification and training, and hiring wounded warriors for 
law enforcement support positions.

                   Overstay Analysis and Enforcement

    The Committee believes visa enforcement is paramount to our 
Nation's security and a fundamental lesson of 9/11 as well as 
several terrorism incidents that have followed, including the 
recent bombings at the Boston marathon.
    To reinforce this commitment, the Committee directs that 
the fiscal year 2014 spend plan for Domestic Investigations 
include no less than $10,000,000 above fiscal year 2013 levels 
to increase enforcement investigation of visa overstays. 
Clearly, an automated means to identify SEVIS violators is long 
overdue. The Committee directs a joint briefing with CBP on the 
solution, its costs and the timetable by which it will be in 
place by not later than June 15, 2013.
    ICE is in a better position to enforce overstay violations 
now that it is directly responsible for this analysis. 
Enforcement, however, requires finding and removing individuals 
who fail to comply with the terms and conditions of their visa. 
Therefore, the Committee directs ICE to provide semi-annual 
briefings on the overstay backlog elimination effort, to ensure 
that similar backlogs do not arise in the future and to update 
the Committee on its overstay enforcement plans and domestic 
investigation strategy. Further, the Committee directs ICE to 
brief the Committee not later than December 1, 2013, on the 
number of visa overstays in the United States by nationality 
and actionable measures ICE will take to reduce the overstay 
population.

                           Human Trafficking

    The Committee is committed to the prevention and disruption 
of human trafficking and staunchly supports ICE's efforts to 
combat this heinous activity. ICE is directed to include in the 
fiscal year 2014 spending plan not less than $10,000,000 above 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2013 for human trafficking. 
At least $5,000,000 is provided for Angel Watch. The Committee 
believes it is essential that ICE agents receive training to 
identify and assist trafficking victims. Therefore, the 
Committee continues to encourage ICE to work with appropriate 
non-profit organizations and victim service providers to ensure 
appropriate training of ICE investigators to assist in the 
identification of human trafficking victims and provide 
appropriate referrals to victim service providers.
    The Committee reaffirms support for the Blue Campaign as a 
legitimate and necessary DHS program and directs ICE to include 
funds in the fiscal year 2015 budget request.

                          Worksite Enforcement

    The Committee directs ICE to continue quarterly briefings 
on worksite enforcement efforts not later than 30 days after 
the end of each quarter. Likewise, the Committee directs ICE to 
provide an annual report on the number of opened and closed 
enforcement investigations, employee and employer arrests, both 
criminal and administrative, and the fines assessed and 
collected each fiscal year. This report shall be submitted to 
the Committee within 45 days after the end of each fiscal year.

             Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) Enforcement

    The Committee continues to support trade enforcement, 
particularly the efforts of the National IPR Coordination 
Center, which leads the government's response to intellectual 
property theft. The Center provides an invaluable forum to 
access expertise of member agencies, share information, develop 
initiatives, coordinate enforcement actions and conduct 
investigations. The Committee directs ICE to report to the 
Committee on the number of agents in the United States and 
abroad dedicated to commercial fraud and IPR investigations, 
the number of hours spent by agents in fiscal year 2014 on 
these investigations, and the number of investigations that 
have resulted in charges in fiscal year 2014, not later than 
October 30, 2014.

                   Textile Transshipment Enforcement

    As with the CBP account, the Committee includes $4,750,000, 
for ICE to continue textile transshipment enforcement. The 
Committee directs ICE to ensure that their activities are 
maintained at least at the level in prior years. The Committee 
directs ICE to provide an update annually on these activities.

                              Intelligence

    For the Office of Intelligence, the Committee recommends 
$74,908,000, $540,000 below the amount requested and $3,466,000 
below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. The Committee 
continues to expect the Office of Intelligence to support all 
of ICE's operations, including providing robust information to 
Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) and coordinating with 
CBP on its assessments of illicit cross-border activities and 
criminal organizations.

                              Vetted Units

    The Committee affirms ICE's transnational criminal 
investigative unit program, which establishes vetted units of 
select foreign partner agency personnel. Because the budget 
request fails to request funds for this program, the Committee 
directs that no less than $8,000,000 from within the funds 
provided for Homeland Security Investigations shall be for 
ICE's vetted units.

                    Detention and Removal Operations

    The Committee recommends $2,835,581,000 for Detention and 
Removal operations, $244,868,000 above the amount requested and 
$84,725,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. The 
request proposes to realign ERO officers in different PPAs. The 
Committee is concerned that these movements may impact 
operations and directs ICE to explain staff moves in a briefing 
by July 30, 2013. Of the total amount:
    
 $2,038,239,000 is for Custody Operations, 
$193,437,000 above the amount requested and $15,248,000 above 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. The recommendation 
includes an additional $147,531,000 to retain 34,000 detention 
bed spaces as the statutory minimum number that must be 
maintained on a daily basis, and restores $44,469,000 in cuts 
to operations and staffing.
    
 $134,802,000 is for Fugitive Operations, 
$9,031,000 above the amount requested and $10,378,000 below the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2013. Of this amount, sufficient 
funds are available to maintain and sustain fugitive operations 
teams. In addition, the Committee recommends $4,000,000 to 
ensure procurement and sustainment funds for mobile, biometric 
readers used by Fugitive Operations Teams. The Committee 
directs ICE to provide a spend plan for fugitive operations not 
later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act. The 
Committee reiterates the realignment of responsibility for 
prioritizing, locating, and arresting criminal aliens on parole 
and probation from Domestic Investigations to Fugitive 
Operations.
    
 $289,155,000 is for the Criminal Alien Program, 
$2,566,000 below the amount requested and $72,862,000 above the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2013. A significant increase is 
proposed in CAP as part of the Secure Communities realignment. 
ICE is directed to brief the Committee on program activities no 
later than October 30, 2013.
    
 $96,460,000 is for ATD, $24,025,000 above the 
amount requested and the same as the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2013. The Committee continues to support enrolling 
detainees in the program who pose neither a flight risk nor a 
risk to public safety or national security.
    
 $276,925,000 is for the Transportation and Removal 
Program, $20,941,000 above the amount requested and $6,993,000 
above the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. This increase 
supports the requirement to maintain 34,000 detention bed 
spaces.
    As noted in fiscal year 2013, the Committee does not 
recognize the ``midnight man count'' as equivalent to the 
statutory mandate for 34,000 detention beds. The Committee 
directs ICE to discuss with the Committee a metric that 
corresponds more accurately to the mandated bed level, conveys 
the picture of complex operations and more closely relates to 
the number of detainees for whom ICE incurs costs on a daily 
basis.
    After providing sufficient resources and reprograming 
authority to accommodate the bed mandate, the Committee was 
surprised to learn that ICE released a significant number of 
detainees to less restrictive forms of supervision in February 
2013, citing ``budget concerns.'' Because the identification, 
detention and adjudication of individuals suspected of illegal 
presence in the United States is a significant resource 
investment, such releases are highly disturbing, and suggest 
that ICE criteria for determining who qualifies for less 
restrictive forms of supervision may be overly flexible and not 
firmly grounded in assessments regarding whether an individual 
is a flight risk, a risk to the community or a risk to national 
security.
    Adequate resources and reprogramming authority are provided 
in this recommendation to enforce the 34,000 bed mandate. ICE 
is directed to refrain from administratively releasing any 
individual who has been placed in other than short-term 
detention to a less restrictive form of supervision unless it 
notifies the Committee in advance, including an explanation of 
the rationale for such release and a certification that such 
individual clearly meets ICE's criteria for a particular non-
detention form of supervision. In addition, should ICE find 
itself in the future with a shortage of funding to comply with 
the 34,000-detention bed mandate, detain individuals who are 
either subject to mandatory detention, or who meet ICE criteria 
for detention, the Committee is more than receptive to a 
proposal from the Department to transfer or reprogram funding 
to address any such funding shortfall.
    The Committee has provided funds to bolster the 
transformation initiative to continue to look at potential 
efforts to improve ICE's management of detention resources. The 
Committee directs ICE to continue to provide quarterly 
briefings to the Committee on all steps being taken to reduce 
the costs of detention and removal, including transportation, 
processing and contracting costs. ICE is also encouraged to 
consider the costs and benefits of public and private providers 
for all services, including medical services. The Committee 
understands that detention bed space is readily available in 
many locations where ICE most needs it, including in public and 
private facilities at potentially lower costs. The first 
comprehensive briefing of these issues will take place not 
later than 30 days after the date of enactment of this Act.

                    Detention and Removal Reporting

    Language is included in the bill giving permission to 
apprehend all illegally present or otherwise removable aliens 
encountered when enforcing our immigration laws. The Department 
does not collect or report comprehensive statistics on all of 
its encounters with inadmissible and deportable aliens by 
source as well as the disposition of all such encounters. The 
Committee continues to direct ICE, in conjunction with CBP and 
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), to improve 
its capabilities to provide comprehensive reporting on 
enforcement actions. ICE shall provide additional data as it is 
available in the Border Security Status and Detention and 
Removal Operations reports.
    For fiscal year 2014, ICE is directed to continue reporting 
quarterly on detention and removal, including the number of 
deportation, exclusion, and removal orders sought and obtained 
by ICE. The first fiscal year 2014 quarterly report is to be 
submitted not later than February 15, 2014.

           Cooperation From Foreign Countries on Repatriation

    The Committee remains gravely concerned about the impacts 
to public safety of the release of criminal aliens due to the 
ruling of Zadvydas v. Davis, 533 U.S. 678, 121 S. Ct. 2491 
(2001). With a few exceptions, many aliens with final removal 
orders may not be detained beyond six months unless there is a 
significant likelihood of removal in the reasonably foreseeable 
future. Thus, when certain countries refuse to repatriate 
aliens, most of these aliens, including criminals who have 
completed their sentences, must be released into our 
communities.
    With regard to repatriation of aliens, the April 2011 MOU 
between ICE and the Department of State Bureau of Consular 
Affairs limited the actions available for the United States 
against a challenging country. The Committee encourages DHS and 
the Department of State to take more dramatic steps, where 
warranted, to move countries into compliance with their 
responsibilities under international law.
    ICE continues to incur significant costs and administrative 
burdens pursuing removal of aliens with final orders of removal 
where countries do not cooperate in this effort.

                       Alternatives to Detention

    The Committee recommends $96,460,000 for ICE ATD programs, 
an increase of $24,025,000 above the amount requested, to 
restore fiscal year 2013 funding levels.
    ATD remains hampered by the ability to move cases through 
the non-detained docket in a timely manner. The Committee 
directs ICE, in partnership with the Department of Justice, 
Executive Office for Immigration Review, to continue to expand 
the Fast Track pilot programs through which ATD cases were 
prioritized in the non-detained docket and brief the Committee 
quarterly on the Fast Track pilots and the progress being made.

                          Detention Standards

    Maintaining appropriate detention standards remains an 
important issue for Committee oversight. The Committee 
continues to direct ICE to consider the cost implications of 
assessing and implementing Performance-Based National Detention 
Standards. The Committee expects the Department to issue a 
final rule on compliance with the standards and requirements of 
the Prison Rape Elimination Act as soon as possible, and 
expects DHS detention and holding facilities to begin 
implementing the rule before the end of fiscal year 2013. The 
Committee requests an update on the status of implementation of 
the Act's requirements not later than October 1, 2013.
    Within the update required in the previous paragraph, ICE 
shall include a description of how it facilitates the 
appropriate involvement of parents in all proceedings affecting 
custody of their children and how it allows detained parents, 
legal guardians and primary caregivers to arrange appropriate 
child care.

                           Secure Communities

    The Committee recommends $25,264,000 for Secure 
Communities, $4,930,000 above the amount requested and 
$112,847,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. The 
$4,930,000 is to improve the effectiveness of ERO's analytical, 
planning, reporting and performance management processes, 
particularly as they relate to detention and removal 
activities.
    The Committee remains gravely concerned about State and 
local jurisdictions flouting ICE detainers and releasing aliens 
who clearly pose a risk to public safety. Further, the 
Committee can imagine a scenario in which an alien who poses a 
national security risk slips through law enforcement fingers as 
a result of such a release. The Committee directs the 
Department to update the Committee not later than September 1, 
2013, on the number of jurisdictions failing to honor ICE 
detainers, the number of individuals released as a result and 
the number of those individuals remaining at large as a result.

                        AUTOMATION MODERNIZATION
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................       $33,467,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................        34,900,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        34,900,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................        +1,433,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................            - - -*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The Automation Modernization account funds major 
information technology projects and operations for ICE.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $34,900,000 for Automation 
Modernization, the same as the amount requested and $1,433,000 
above the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. This account 
supports critical IT systems that underpin ICE operations and 
data.
    The following table illustrates funding by specific 
investment project:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Budget estimate      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
IT investment.....................              - - -         $8,400,000
TECS Modernization................        $34,900,000         23,000,000
Detention and Removals                          - - -              - - -
 Modernization....................
Electronic Health Records.........              - - -          3,500,000
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total.........................        $34,900,000        $34,900,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                           TECS Modernization

    The Committee directs CBP and ICE to brief the Committee on 
progress made to modernize TECS not later than September 1, 
2013. In addition, the bill reaffirms the requirement that a 
three-year investment and management plan be provided with the 
President's budget submission.

                       Electronic Health Records

    Electronic detainee health records are expected to reduce 
costs of medical care, increase the effectiveness of the care 
and yield efficiencies in costs associated with moving 
detainees from one facility to another. The Committee urges ICE 
to continue making progress on the eHR (electronic health 
records) initiative.

                              CONSTRUCTION
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................        $4,995,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................         5,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................         5,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................            +5,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................             - - -*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The Construction account supports maintenance of ICE's 
owned and directly leased facilities.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for Construction as 
requested, $5,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 
2013. ICE is directed to provide the Committee with any changes 
to its proposed project list and costs.

                 Transportation Security Administration


                           AVIATION SECURITY
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................    $5,047,567,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................     4,968,036,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     4,872,739,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................      -174,828,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................      -95,297,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    Aviation security is focused on protecting the air 
transportation system against terrorist threats, sabotage and 
other acts of violence through deployment of passenger and 
baggage screeners; detection systems for explosives, weapons, 
and other contraband; and other, effective security 
technologies.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $4,872,739,000 for Aviation 
Security, $95,297,000 below the amount requested and 
$174,828,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. 
Funds within this account are partially offset through the 
collection of security user fees paid by aviation travelers and 
airlines. A comparison of the budget estimate to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Budget Estimate      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Screening Operations..............     $3,899,525,000     $3,824,625,000
Aviation Security Direction and         1,068,511,000      1,048,114,000
 Enforcement......................
[Mandatory Aviation Security            [250,000,000]      [250,000,000]
 Capital Fund\1\].................
                                   -------------------------------------
    Subtotal, Aviation Security...     $4,968,036,000    $4,872,739,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\The Aviation Security Capital Fund is not included in the Subtotal
  for aviation security because it is not directly appropriated and is
  paid for entirely from user fees.

                         Aviation Security Fees

    In total, the Committee applies the Congressional Budget 
Office estimate for the collection of $2,120,000,000 in current 
aviation security user fees, $3,397,000 below the amount 
estimated in the budget request, and $50,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2013 collection estimate. These fees will be 
collected from both aviation passengers and the airlines and 
will partially offset the Federal appropriation for aviation 
security. However, it is important to note that the Committee 
estimate does not reflect implementation of the 
Administration's proposed increase in aviation security fees, 
which represented $122,500,000 in illusory offsets in the 
budget request and was subsequently scored by CBO as 
$105,000,000, because necessary new authorization legislation 
has not been enacted--legislation that is not under the 
jurisdiction of the Committee. Because of the Administration's 
chronic reliance upon an unauthorized, fictitious offset of 
increased aviation security fees, the Committee has once again 
been forced to reduce the funding for management and 
administrative offices across Departmental functions.

                          Screening Operations

    The Committee recommends $3,824,625,000 for passenger and 
baggage screening operations, $74,900,000 below the amount 
requested and $146,916,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2013. The recommendation supports current operations and 
all currently programmed acquisitions. The recommendation 
reflects the following reductions to the President's budget 
request: a reduction of $28,132,000 in cost savings associated 
with 446 screeners that will not be annualized as proposed in 
the President's budget request; a reduction of $17,800,000 to 
Screener Consumables and Uniforms; and a denial of the proposed 
realignment of $6,000,000 from Aviation Regulation to support 
TSA's collective bargaining process. Further, the 
recommendation realigns $10,000,000 requested for Screener 
Compensation and Benefits for Privatized Screening to support 
and enhance the Screener Partnership Program. The Committee 
recommends $83,845,000 for Explosive Detection System (EDS) 
procurement and installation, rather than the $83,987,000 
requested.
    An increase of $15,648,000 above the level provided in 
fiscal year 2013 is provided for the Screening Partnership 
Program (SPP) to support expansion to at least one additional 
airport and accommodate other applicants. The Committee 
emphasizes that the cuts to Personnel Compensation and Benefits 
are in part offset by increases to the SPP program, and reflect 
the Committee's intention that TSA move aggressively toward a 
leaner organizational approach to its screening and security 
missions. The Committee believes there must be a better balance 
between personnel and technology, public and private 
capabilities, and increased use of risk-based strategies in 
organization, operations, staffing, and acquisitions.
    As in fiscal year 2013, the Committee has chosen to make 
these reductions primarily to compensate for non-existent 
aviation security fee revenue built into the Administration's 
budget. The Committee recognizes the need to recapitalize the 
EDS technology currently in place and expects that TSA will 
ensure that the funding provided is targeted at those systems 
most in need of replacement or upgrades, while fully 
considering the impact of installing technology that may become 
obsolete by the completion of these projects.
    A comparison of the budget estimate to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Budget Estimate      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Screener Workforce:
    Privatized Screening..........       $153,190,000       $163,190,000
    Screener Personnel,                 3,033,526,000      2,972,715,000
     Compensation and Benefits....
                                   -------------------------------------
    Subtotal, Screener Workforce..      3,186,716,000      3,135,905,000
Screener Training and Other.......        226,936,000        203,057,000
Checkpoint Support................        103,377,000        103,309,000
EDS/ETD Systems:
    EDS Procurement and                    83,987,000         83,845,000
     Installation.................
    Screening Technology                  298,509,000        298,509,000
     Maintenance and Utilities....
                                   -------------------------------------
    Subtotal, EDS/ETD systems.....        382,496,000        382,354,000
                                   -------------------------------------
        Total, Screening               $3,899,525,000     $3,824,625,000
         Operations...............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          Privatized Screening

    The Committee recommends $163,190,000 for privatized 
screening, $10,000,000 above the amount requested and 
$15,648,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. For 
the second year in a row, the Committee has increased funding 
to ensure adequate resources to support new participants in the 
Screening Partnership Program (SPP) and to encourage TSA to 
make greater use of the valuable program. Sixteen airports 
currently participate in the SPP, the same number of airports 
as last year.
    The Committee is dismayed that TSA has not utilized the SPP 
to the extent that Congress has directed. The Committee 
believes TSA should more proactively utilize the SPP and 
expects TSA to expeditiously approve applications of airports 
seeking to participate in the SPP that meet legislatively 
mandated criteria. Further, the Committee directs TSA to cease 
disapproving any new SPP contract applications, awards or 
renewals, based solely on their own determination that the 
annual cost of the SPP contract exceeds the annual cost to TSA 
of providing Federal screening services. The Committee expects 
TSA to implement generally accepted accounting methodologies 
for such cost and performance comparisons. This includes, but 
is not limited to, proper, comprehensive, and accurate 
comparisons of Federal employee retirement costs, a legitimate 
and reasonable comparison of the net present value of 
Federalized screeners, and the administrative overhead 
associated with Federal screening services. In addition, the 
Committee directs TSA to fully implement all previous GAO 
recommendations deemed necessary to accurately compare cost and 
performance of SPP airports and non-SPP airports and to provide 
a report to the Committee, not later than 90 days after the 
date of enactment of this Act, with the results of these 
implemented changes, which the Committee expects to be 
sufficiently transparent and reflective of a cost and 
performance comparison using proper and generally accepted 
accounting principles. Further, as it assesses those airports 
that seek to renew their contracts or those that are new 
applicants, TSA is directed to consult with and fully inform 
stakeholders at such airports prior to the implementation of 
any status changes. The Committee directs TSA to report not 
later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act on 
how it is complying with the FAA Reauthorization Act (Public 
Law 112-95) provisions and to provide the Committees quarterly 
reports on its execution of the SPP program and processing of 
applications for participation, including the status of 
applications by date of application and date of decision.

             Screener Personnel, Compensation, and Benefits

    The Committee recommends $2,972,715,000 for Screener 
Personnel, Compensation, and Benefits, $60,811,000 below the 
amount requested, and $102,915,000 below the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2013. This sustains the current services level for 
current screeners and includes a reduction of $28,132,000 for 
savings associated with the cost of 446 screeners that will not 
be annualized as proposed in the President's budget request. 
The Committee continues language that restricts funding from 
being used to hire additional full-time screeners if the result 
would be to exceed a total number of 46,000 full-time 
equivalent screeners. While the Committee continues to support 
dedicated TSA screener personnel as they strive to ensure the 
safety of the traveling public and our civil aviation system, 
it remains a matter of concern that the growth in staffing for 
checkpoint and related security operations has not been 
tempered by the use of improved technology and more rational, 
risk-based approaches. The latter includes the PreCheck pilots 
being introduced at airports nationwide. The Committee 
therefore retains the limitation on full-time screener staffing 
to compel TSA and the Department to optimize the balance 
between technology and screener personnel.

                      Screener Training and Other

    The Committee recommends $203,057,000 for Screener Training 
and Other, $23,879,000 below the amount requested and 
$21,702,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. The 
recommendation does not include the requested increase of 
$6,000,000 realigned from Aviation Regulation and Enforcement 
to support collective bargaining, nor does it approve the 
requested increase of $17,800,000 for Screener Consumables and 
Uniforms. As the Committee has noted before, given the known 
threats to aviation security, the Committee expects TSA's 
Office of Inspection and the DHS OIG to enhance their periodic 
red team investigations to better emulate the latest threats 
and identify vulnerabilities to improve screener training and 
the use of screening technology. TSA must ensure its screeners 
are trained against the most current threats, and such training 
should be calibrated to measurably reduce operational and 
technological vulnerabilities identified by red teams and 
improve the productivity of screener operations overall.

                                Uniforms

    The Committee directs TSA to provide a report not later 
than 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act describing 
in detail how it is complying with the Buy American Act, 
including what measures it is taking to ensure compliance, and 
the total number of uniforms and screener consumables purchased 
in fiscal year 2012 and fiscal year 2013.

                           Checkpoint Support

    The Committee recommends $103,309,000 for Checkpoint 
Support, $68,000 below the amount requested and $11,780,000 
below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. The Committee is 
aware that while this funding will not be used for additional 
Advanced Imaging Technology (AIT) systems, it will support 
enhanced baggage screening technology while work continues on 
developing next generation AITs. The Committee is keenly aware 
that the checkpoint continues to be a major challenge both for 
security and for the efficiency of passenger processing, and 
expects to see improvements going forward both in terms of the 
application of risk-based analysis (e.g., the PreCheck approach 
to identifying lower risk travelers) as well as new 
configurations of technology to reduce the number of screener 
personnel required.

                          Passenger Screening

    The Committee notes that TSA continues to deploy new 
technology at its checkpoints to help reduce passenger wait 
times, including innovative approaches to measuring wait times 
(therefore providing TSA managers with information that could 
be used to adjust screener assignments to reduce delays), 
automated document readers, and similar technology. The 
Committee directs TSA to provide a briefing not later than 90 
days after the date of enactment of this Act on its progress in 
meeting the objective of keeping average passenger wait times 
to ten minutes or less. TSA is also directed to brief the 
Committee at that time on the wait times at screening 
checkpoints where automated wait time measurement technology 
has been deployed.
    The Committee also encourages TSA to pursue the development 
and deployment of systems that will increase security at the 
checkpoint while offering passengers the benefit of reduced 
divestment. This should include the development of better 
explosives detection systems, as well as more capable AIT 
systems with lower false alarm rates, more effective 
resolution, improved protection of privacy and civil rights, 
and a means to simultaneously scan shoes for threats. TSA shall 
ensure all such technology fully complies with applicable laws 
pertaining to privacy and civil rights.
    The Committee is aware that parents and guardians traveling 
with young children present a unique challenge to TSA when a 
personal search is required of either adults or their minor 
children. It is particularly important that TSA, while carrying 
out any pre-boarding inspections of passengers, not separate 
children from their parents or guardians. The Committee directs 
TSA, in processing such travelers, to respect the civil rights 
and privacy of individuals, with particular sensitivity to 
children traveling with their parents and guardians, so as to 
minimize any distress or discomfort.
    Further, the Committee is aware that TSA is conducting an 
internal investigation based on reported allegations that some 
TSA employees may have subjected passengers to secondary 
screening based only on the passenger's perceived race or 
religion. TSA is directed to brief the Committee on the 
findings of that investigation not later than 30 days after the 
date of enactment of this Act, as well as the types of training 
provided to TSA officers on compliance with applicable laws 
pertaining to privacy, civil rights, and civil liberties, and 
to prevent profiling based on race or religion. This briefing 
shall also address any changes to TSA officer training prompted 
by the internal investigation.

        Explosive Detection Systems Procurement and Installation

    The Committee recommends $83,845,000 for EDS Procurement 
and Installation, $142,000 below the amount requested and 
$15,985,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. 
Including the existing mandatory Aviation Security Capital Fund 
of $250,000,000, the total appropriation (both mandatory and 
discretionary) for EDS procurement and installations is 
$333,845,000 for fiscal year 2014. Within this total, 
$213,000,000 is for installation of electronic baggage 
screening equipment; $117,000,000 is to procure EDS for 
deployment to facilities where modifications have been 
completed with prior year funds and to recapitalize existing 
equipment; and $3,845,000 is to install advanced surveillance 
systems. Although the Committee acknowledges the need to 
recapitalize aging inventory, the recommended funding level 
reflects the reality that the Committee is forced to offset the 
unauthorized aviation security fee increase built into the 
budget request.
    The Committee retains language added in fiscal year 2012 to 
permit funds in the Aviation Security Capital Fund to be used 
for acquisition of new and replacement EDS systems. The 
Committee expects TSA will ensure that there are sufficient 
balances in the Capital Fund to support currently known and 
validated needs for facility build out.
    As the Committee has previously stated, it is aware of 
TSA's work with airports on the optimization of electronic 
baggage screening systems to enhance safety and security, 
improve performance, increase efficiency, and reduce costs 
associated with in-line EDS. The Committee understands the 
potential for significant cost savings from the next generation 
of high-speed EDS, which is currently undergoing testing, 
because of an expected increase in handling capacity of up to 
1,400 bags per hour compared to the medium-speed baggage 
handling systems being considered by TSA. The Committee is 
concerned that the multi-year capital projects being planned 
with current, medium-speed handling systems may include 
technology installed with a lower level of detection standards 
than the next generation EDS, be more expensive over the life 
of the project, and could result in technology that is obsolete 
by the completion of the project. The Committee understands 
that there are multiple technologies in the process of being 
certified by TSA at the same time that optimization projects 
are being planned at numerous airports, and that TSA conducts 
extensive operational field tests with the systems prior to 
placing them on the qualified product list. The Committee 
encourages TSA to accelerate this process to ensure optimal 
systems are available for deployment in an expedient manner. 
Alternatively, the Committee encourages TSA to utilize industry 
best practices and processes, as used in industry product 
development, so that as a system achieves certain milestones, 
it can be considered in airport designs. TSA should consider 
incorporating next generation high-speed EDS that are achieving 
these milestones into multi-year design plans, when it is 
proven to enhance security and reduce long-term costs in the 
aviation sector.
    Because some of these optimization projects take several 
years to complete, the Committee directs TSA to provide a 
briefing to the Committee not later than 90 days after the date 
of enactment of this Act explaining how it is working with 
airports to optimize electronic baggage systems by including 
technology that is on the cusp of development when it will 
improve performance and reduce operating costs.
    The Committee is aware that while TSA must prioritize its 
EDS funding for installation and recapitalization, there remain 
claims from airports for reimbursement for previously incurred 
eligible costs associated with the construction and deployment 
of in-line baggage screening systems. The Committee understands 
some local airports, as a result of not receiving 
reimbursements, have delayed further security investments, 
which could be a source of risk in the aviation security 
environment. The Committee is concerned that TSA has not 
established a process to resolve such claims expeditiously. 
Therefore, the Committee directs TSA to provide a report not 
later than 60 days after date of enactment of this Act 
detailing the steps being taken to resolve such claims and how 
airports will be reimbursed for expenses stemming from 
capitalization costs previously incurred with the deployment of 
EDS and explosives trace detection equipment and whether these 
reimbursable costs will be prioritized to meet unpaid 
obligations represented in Letters of Intent and Other 
Transaction Agreements.

             Screening Technology Maintenance and Utilities

    The Committee recommends $298,509,000 for Screening 
Technology Maintenance and Utilities, the same as the amount 
requested and $10,182,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2013. The Committee expects that the two year warranty 
contracts that TSA is negotiating for its new AIT machines will 
continue to generate savings for new systems deployed in fiscal 
year 2014 and fiscal year 2015.

                               Exit Lanes

    The Aviation and Transportation Security Act (ATSA) (Public 
Law 107-71) gave TSA authority to regulate virtually all areas 
of aviation security, including all aspects of passenger and 
baggage screening. Under this broad authority, TSA assumed 
responsibility for staffing exit lanes at airports across the 
country--a responsibility that was handled by air carriers 
prior to the enactment of ATSA in November of 2001. Due to 
budget constraints, TSA recently announced its intention to 
shift this responsibility, and the associated costs, to airport 
operators. This proposal raises serious questions for the 
Committee, including whether this type of emergency rulemaking 
by TSA complies with the Administrative Procedures Act (Public 
Law 79-404), the fact that TSA continues to collect money for 
performing this function from air carriers through its Aviation 
Security Infrastructure Fee (ASIF), and that Transportation 
Security Officer's (TSO's) at exit lanes are currently 
responsible for clearing TSA personnel, armed law enforcement, 
and in some instances, participants in the Known Crew Member 
program.
    Unfortunately, because of the Administration's continued 
reliance upon the unauthorized, fictitious offset of increased 
aviation security fees and the submittal of a flawed and 
reckless budget proposal that would decimate critical frontline 
operations across DHS and substantially diminish the long-term 
security capabilities of our Nation, the Committee has been 
forced to reduce funding across TSA, including accepting the 
savings associated with shifting the responsibility of staffing 
exit lanes to airport operators. The Committee believes TSA has 
unveiled this proposal without full consultation with the 
impacted airports. The Committee directs TSA to work in 
conjunction with airport operators to assess the impact of this 
change and to consider delaying or at least phasing in the 
shift of responsibility to airport operators until affordable, 
effective technological solutions are certified by TSA, which 
may then be utilized by the airport operators to successfully 
staff exit lanes.

Expenditure Plans for Purchase and Deployment of Air Cargo, Checkpoint 
               Support and Explosive Detection Equipment

    The Committee withholds $20,000,000 from TSA Headquarters 
Administration and continues bill language requiring TSA to 
provide a detailed spending and deployment plan for air cargo, 
checkpoint support, and explosive detection equipment within 
its fiscal year 2015 congressional budget justification. This 
plan shall be submitted not later than 60 days after the date 
of enactment of this Act, and shall include: expenditures on an 
airport-by-airport basis for fiscal year 2013, including 
details on technologies purchased; project timelines; 
obligation schedules; and a table displaying actual versus 
anticipated unobligated balances at the close of the fiscal 
year, with an explanation for any deviation from original 
plans. TSA shall notify the Committee prior to any amendments 
to its expenditure plan and shall update the Committees 
semiannually on expenditures under the plan.

                           Perimeter Security

    TSA is directed to report to the Committee not later than 
90 days after the date of enactment of this Act on its efforts 
to work with State and local law enforcement to secure all 
perimeters at the Nation's airports.

                      Behavior Detection Officers

    The Committee believes that outstanding questions remain 
over the value of the Behavior Detection Officer (BDO) program, 
which has not been sufficiently validated and for which few 
measures have been developed to prove its intrinsic value to 
the aviation security environment. TSA is directed to brief the 
Committee not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of 
this Act on the impact the program has on aviation security, 
the metrics being utilized to measure this impact, and steps it 
has taken to develop a robust risk-based strategy for deploying 
BDOs. The Committee also continues to recommend that TSA 
implement standardization testing on an annual basis at those 
airports where the Screening of Passengers by Observation 
Techniques (SPOT) program is established.

              Aviation Security Direction and Enforcement

    The Committee recommends $1,048,114,000 for Aviation 
Security Direction and Enforcement, $20,397,000 below the 
amount requested and $27,912,000 below the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2013. The following table highlights funding levels 
by program, project, and activity:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Budget estimate      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Aviation, Regulation and Other           $354,650,000       $358,187,000
 Enforcement......................
Airport Management and Support....        590,871,000        555,242,000
Federal Flight Deck Officer and                 - - -         12,353,000
 Flight Crew Training.............
Air Cargo.........................        122,990,000        122,332,000
                                   -------------------------------------
    Subtotal, Aviation Security        $1,068,511,000     $1,048,114,000
     Direction and Enforcement....
------------------------------------------------------------------------

               Aviation Regulation and Other Enforcement

    The Committee recommends $358,187,000 for Aviation 
Regulation and Other Enforcement, $3,537,000 above the amount 
requested and $9,700,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2013. This includes $93,700,000 for the National Canine 
Program to support an additional 40 canine teams for domestic 
inspections in the air cargo and aviation regulation 
environments, in recognition of the effectiveness of canine 
operations in the detection of materials and explosives that 
threaten aviation security, and effectively maximizing canine 
capacity at TSA through fiscal year 2015.

                     Airport Management and Support

    The Committee recommends $555,242,000 for Airport 
Management and Support, $35,629,000 below the amount requested 
and $6,545,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. 
This reduction reflects the Committee's denial of the proposed 
transfer of $32,557,000 from the Federal Air Marshal Service 
(FAMS) Chief Administrative Officer. However, the Committee 
expects Airport Management and Support to fully absorb the 
proposed realignment of support functions from the FAMS Chief 
Administrative Officer within the amount recommended. This 
reduction is intended to partially offset the shortfall created 
by the inclusion of unauthorized aviation security fees in the 
budget.

                      Federal Flight Deck Officers

    The Committee supports the Federal Flight Deck Officer 
(FFDO) program, which the President's budget proposes to 
eliminate, and believes that the presence of armed and trained 
pilots and flight crew complement other security measures in 
the aviation security domain and represent a true last-line-of-
defense aboard an aircraft. The Committee therefore recommends 
$12,353,000 for FFDO, $12,353,000 above the amount requested.
    Additionally, the Committee directs TSA to provide a 
briefing not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of 
this Act detailing the recertification process for FFDOs, 
including the number of FFDOs enrolled; the latest data on 
recertification; an assessment of how well the program is 
meeting demand for participation; and an overview of how TSA is 
ensuring that training is available in a sufficient number of 
locations.

                               Air Cargo

    The Committee recommends $122,332,000 for air cargo, 
$658,000 below the amount requested and $685,000 above the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2013. This includes $29,800,000 
for the Canine Program in the screening of air cargo. While TSA 
has met its fiscal year 2013 goal of 100 percent screening of 
domestic air cargo, the Committee continues to support TSA 
efforts to achieve 100 percent system-wide screening of air 
cargo on passenger aircraft, to include flights originating 
from last point of departure airports overseas. Funding should 
be used to enhance inspection, investigation, and monitoring 
efforts, including on all-cargo airlines. The Committee 
continues a requirement for an expenditure plan for air cargo 
investments.

              Foreign Repair Station Security Regulations

    Congress directed the TSA to promulgate aircraft repair 
station security regulations in the 2003 Vision 100-Century of 
Aviation Reauthorization Act, and the 9/11 Act. In 2009, TSA 
finally issued a notice of proposed rulemaking for public 
comment on repair station security regulations, and in a 
December 2011 letter to stakeholders, TSA stated its 
expectation that the final rule would be finished by the fourth 
quarter of 2012. It is the Committee's understanding that the 
Department only recently submitted the final rule to the OMB 
for review. Unfortunately, the significant delay in finalizing 
this rule has had significant negative consequences for the 
aviation industry. The Committee urges OMB to expedite its 
review of the final rule so that the Federal Aviation 
Administration can restart the certification process for 
aviation repair stations.

                Five-Year Strategic Plan for Investments

    The Committee directs TSA to submit a five-year budget 
estimate within its fiscal year 2015 congressional budget 
justification that includes projected funding levels for each 
of the next five fiscal years for all passenger screening 
technology acquisitions. The plan shall indicate the total cost 
and estimated completion date for each technology.

    Use of Unclaimed Money for Assistance to Military Personnel and 
                               Dependents

    Section 44945 of title 49, United States Code, enacted as 
part of the fiscal year 2005 DHS Appropriations Act, authorized 
and directed unclaimed money collected at airport security 
checkpoints to be used for civil aviation security. However, 
such collections have been little used, and Congress has thus 
rescinded unobligated balances. The Committee prefers that 
these funds be applied productively to an important public 
mission. In the Explanatory Statement that accompanied the 
Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act (Public 
Law 113-6), the conferees directed DHS and TSA, in consultation 
with DOD, to submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations and Armed Services of the House and the Senate, 
the House Committee on Homeland Security, and the Senate 
Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation considering 
the feasibility of transferring the collections to nonprofit 
organizations, selected on a competitive basis, to operate 
airport centers in multiple locations throughout the United 
States to provide a place of rest and recuperation for members 
of the armed forces and their families. Therefore, the 
Committee directs TSA to provide a briefing, not later than 60 
days after the date of enactment of this Act, updating the 
Committee on all recommendations for needed statutory language; 
cost estimates for TSA to manage such a program; any 
administrative action that may be required; the mechanism for 
transferring unclaimed money to TSA headquarters; and how TSA 
will consolidate the collections. The Committee encourages TSA 
to act expeditiously so that these funds can be applied to an 
important public mission.

              Risk-Based Approaches to Passenger Screening

    The Committee has been encouraged to see that TSA is 
actively pursuing ways to apply a more risk-based approach to 
its screening and security systems and procedures. PreCheck, a 
limited scope ``trusted traveler'' program, is currently being 
utilized at a number of airports where participants who 
volunteer information about themselves for additional 
government review prior to flying are eligible for expedited 
screening at those airports. In 2014, TSA plans to expand the 
program and is implementing adjustments in its protocols for 
generally lower-risk populations. PreCheck offers great promise 
but steps must be taken to expand the number of eligible 
individuals who participate in the program. Absent a robust, 
critical mass of participants, the program will ultimately fail 
to achieve its objectives of enhanced security and efficiency. 
The steps that TSA has taken up to this point, through its 
largely airline-centric approach, have facilitated 
participation from Global Entry participants and a limited pool 
of other fliers. However, TSA must accelerate enrollment in the 
program in order to gain widespread participation. Airports 
have a long history of facilitating participation in trusted 
traveler programs, and as a regulated entity with ties to the 
communities they serve, they are uniquely qualified to 
facilitate enrollment in the PreCheck program.
    Therefore, the Committee directs TSA to work directly with 
airports to expand PreCheck and to consider additional 
populations through community-based, airport-centric enrollment 
approaches. Further, the Committee encourages TSA to establish 
the security standards and technical specifications necessary 
to allow airports to enroll individuals into a TSA-approved 
system for vetting and program participation.
    The Committee urges TSA to use its existing statutory 
authority, under the Aviation Transportation Security Act, to 
continue to develop, test, and expand the PreCheck program for 
U.S. citizens who voluntarily submit to a security threat 
assessment and criminal history background check, including a 
possible review of biometric data, in accordance with 
applicable privacy laws and standards. The Committee continues 
to encourage TSA to move forward in considering the potential 
of enrolling other low-risk populations, such as U.S. citizens 
possessing current Top Secret Security clearances.

                              Canine Teams

    The Committee is aware of the important role canine teams 
play in assisting in the screening of air cargo and in 
supporting efforts to prevent explosives from being introduced 
into mass transit and other transportation systems. Explosives 
detection canine teams are proven, reliable, and cost-effective 
resources in the detection of explosives and are a key 
component in a balanced counter-sabotage program. The 
Committee, as noted above, has included funding for an 
additional 40 teams in the Aviation Checkpoint environment, 
fully funding the canine training pipeline and effectively 
maximizing canine capacity at TSA through fiscal year 2015. It 
is the Committee's expectation that this enhancement will 
permit TSA to build up its current rate of deployment and 
training and move closer to higher screening percentages and 
more effective screening operations.

                    SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $124,294,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................       109,331,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       108,618,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................       -15,676,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................         -713,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    Surface Transportation Security is responsible for 
assessing the risk of terrorist attacks for all non-aviation 
transportation modes, issuing regulations to improve the 
security of those modes, and enforcing regulations to ensure 
the protection of the transportation system.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $108,618,000 for Surface 
Transportation Security, $713,000 below the amount requested 
and $15,676,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. 
Within this total, $73,898,000 is for surface transportation 
security inspectors and canines.
    Canadian authorities recently arrested two men accused of 
planning to carry out an al Qaeda-supported attack against a 
passenger train traveling between Canada and the United States. 
Because the investigation is fluid, TSA is encouraged to work 
with Canadian authorities as necessary and it is directed to 
keep the Committee apprised of the situation as it develops.

               Transport of Security-Sensitive Materials

    The Committee encourages TSA to diligently pursue 
implementation of programs required by and authorized pursuant 
to Section 1554 of the 9/11 Act as part of its mission to 
improve security of surface transportation modes and to develop 
risk management systems for shipments of security-sensitive 
materials.
    As part of its mission to improve the security of surface 
transportation, TSA is required to develop a program to 
facilitate the tracking of motor carrier shipments of highway 
security-sensitive materials (HSSM). This includes a tested and 
established center dedicated to the continual tracking of 
specific hazardous materials load types which could pose a 
security threat around the country. While the Committee 
recognizes that TSA has taken certain steps towards 
implementing the requirements of Section 1554, including a 
variety of research, reports and voluntary Security Action 
Items, the Committee is concerned that TSA does not yet have 
the system capabilities to implement a Tier 1 HSSM shipment 
tracking program if emergency conditions were to dictate a 
swift response. Because this critical requirement of the 9/11 
Act has not been met, the Committee expects that appropriated 
funds will be used to continue and complete, without 
interruption, any ongoing research and development initiatives 
that may inform and support the development of an eventual 
operational system for security sensitive material shipment 
tracking. The Committee directs TSA to provide semiannual 
updates on the implementation of the Tier 1 HSSM shipment 
tracking program.

           TRANSPORTATION THREAT ASSESSMENT AND CREDENTIALING
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $192,232,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................       180,617,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       182,617,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................        -9,615,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................       +2,000,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The mission of Transportation Threat Assessment and 
Credentialing (TTAC) is to reduce the probability of a 
successful attack on the transportation system through the 
application of threat assessment methodologies to identify 
known or suspected terrorist threats working in or seeking 
access to the Nation's transportation system. This 
appropriation consolidates management of all TSA vetting and 
credentialing programs, including Secure Flight, Crew Vetting, 
Transportation Worker Identification Credential, Registered 
Traveler, Hazardous Materials, and Alien Flight School.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends a direct appropriation of 
$182,617,000 for TTAC, $2,000,000 above the amount requested 
and $9,615,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. 
In addition, the Committee anticipates TSA will collect 
$66,000,000 in fees. A comparison of the budget estimate to the 
Committee's recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                         Estimate         Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Direct Appropriations:
    Secure Flight.................       $106,198,000       $108,198,000
    Crew and Other Vetting                 74,419,000         74,419,000
     Programs.....................
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Direct                  180,617,000        182,617,000
         Appropriations...........
Fee Collections:
    Transportation Worker                  36,700,000         36,700,000
     Identification Credential....
    Hazardous Materials...........         12,000,000         12,000,000
    Alien Flight School (transfer           5,000,000          5,000,000
     from DOJ)....................
    General Aviation..............            350,000            350,000
    Certified Cargo Screening               5,400,000          5,400,000
     program......................
    Secure Identification Display           6,500,000          6,500,000
     Area Checks..................
    Other Security Threat                      50,000             50,000
     Assessments..................
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Fee Collections.        $66,000,000        $66,000,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                             Secure Flight

    The Committee recommends $108,198,000 for Secure Flight, 
$2,000,000 above the amount requested and $1,370,000 above the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2013. Secure Flight's mission is 
to strengthen the security of commercial air travel into, out 
of, within, and over the United States through the use of 
improved watch list matching using risk-based security 
measures. Within this funding $14,717,000 is for expanded watch 
list vetting to support the General Aviation Security Rule, 
covering an anticipated 11 million additional passengers per 
year who fly on large aircraft and charter air transportation.

                 TTAC Infrastructure and Modernization

    The largest component of the crew and other vetting 
appropriation consists of $74,419,000 requested for TTAC 
infrastructure modernization, which includes $48,700,000 for 
TTAC Infrastructure Modernization (TIM). TSA proposes that TIM, 
in concert with a universal fee rule, will address and 
eliminate the need for subsequent IT investments and achieve 
significant economies of scale and other benefits associated 
with a unified integration effort.
    The Committee understands TSA's desire to centralize the 
process for all transportation worker programs in order to 
modernize and harmonize the vetting process. However, the 
background check process for transportation workers in the 
aviation environment currently operates successfully as a 
Federal/local partnership, with the Federal government holding 
sole responsibility for security threat assessments and other 
necessary government background checks, and with local airport 
authorities operating and managing enrollment, credentialing, 
badging, criminal background check adjudications and access 
control systems in accordance with strict Federal standards. 
This system operates at no cost to the Federal government.
    Therefore, the Committee recommends funding the request but 
expects the project to remain on schedule and under budget. TSA 
should continue its efforts to modernize and harmonize its 
internal vetting programs but moving forward, the Committee 
encourages TSA to work more directly with airports and to 
consider credentialing and access control systems that remain 
the responsibility of airport operators and reduce the costs to 
the government. To facilitate its oversight, the Committee 
directs TSA to brief the Committee on the status of TIM not 
later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act.

                        Biometric Access Control

    Implementation of stronger credential and access controls 
at airports using biometric features has been supported by 
Congress, the Department, and many airport and airline 
officials. The Committee strongly urges TSA to continue working 
with the airport and airline community to implement biometric 
access and credential use and to ensure such systems are 
compatible with the Transportation Worker Identification 
Credential (TWIC), as well as those credentials developed in 
compliance with Homeland Security Presidential Directive-12 
requirements.

                              TWIC Readers

    The mandate to establish a TWIC and a reader was carried in 
the Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2002 (MTSA), as 
amended by the SAFE Port Act. Within DHS, TSA and Coast Guard 
manage the TWIC program, which requires maritime workers to 
complete background checks and obtain biometric identification 
cards to gain unescorted access to secure areas of MTSA-
regulated entities. At present, over 30 reader technologies 
have been evaluated by TSA as capable of reading TWIC cards, 
and all are available from commercial sources. However, TWIC 
cards are still generally only used for visual inspection, 
making them essentially a ``flash pass,'' which significantly 
reduces their value as a security measure, and adds to the cost 
and time required to inspect them. TSA conducted a pilot 
program to test the use of TWICs with biometric card readers in 
part to inform the development of a regulation (rule) on using 
TWICs with card readers.
    GAO recently issued a report (GAO-13-198) assessing the 
extent to which the results from the TWIC pilot were 
sufficiently complete, accurate, and reliable for informing 
Congress and the proposed TWIC card reader rule. GAO compared 
the pilot data with the pilot report DHS submitted to Congress.
    GAO's review of the technology and operational impact of 
using TSA's TWIC with card readers showed that the pilot test's 
results were incomplete, inaccurate, and unreliable for 
informing Congress and for developing the rule for the readers. 
Further, GAO called into question the program's premise and 
overall effectiveness in enhancing security, stating the 
following:
          DHS did not correct planning shortfalls that GAO 
        identified in November 2009; installed TWIC readers and 
        access control systems could not collect required data, 
        including reasons for errors, on TWIC reader use; TSA 
        and the independent test agent did not record clear 
        baseline data for comparing operational performance at 
        access points with TWIC readers; TSA and the 
        independent test agent did not collect complete data on 
        malfunctioning TWIC cards; and Pilot participants did 
        not document instances of denied access.
    Based on these findings, GAO recommended to Congress that 
it halt DHS's efforts to promulgate a final regulation until 
the successful completion of a security assessment of the 
effectiveness of using TWIC. Accordingly, the Committee 
withholds $30,000,000 from TSA Headquarters Administration 
until DHS has completed this security assessment and provided 
it with the submission of the fiscal year 2015 President's 
budget proposal. In addition to detailing what steps DHS is 
taking to correct the planning shortfalls that GAO identified 
in November 2009, at a minimum, the assessment should include a 
comprehensive comparison of alternative credentialing 
approaches, which might include a more decentralized approach, 
for achieving TWIC program goals. Further, the Committee 
directs TSA to provide a briefing not later than 60 days after 
the date of enactment of this Act detailing the amount of time 
it currently takes to renew an expired TWIC, particularly for 
those with the Extended Expiration Date, and what measures are 
being taken to ensure an individual's TWIC is renewed in a 
reasonable amount of time.

                    TRANSPORTATION SECURITY SUPPORT
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $953,323,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................       997,789,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       901,666,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................       -51,657,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................      -96,123,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The Transportation Security Support account includes 
financial and human resources support; the Transportation 
Security Intelligence Service; information technology support; 
policy development and oversight; performance management and e-
government; communications; public information and legislative 
affairs; training and quality performance; internal conduct and 
audit; legal advice; and overall headquarters administration.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $901,666,000 for Transportation 
Security Support, $96,123,000 below the amount requested and 
$51,657,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. A 
comparison of the budget estimate to the Committee recommended 
level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Budget Estimate      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Headquarters Administration.......       $284,942,000       $265,712,000
Human Capital Services............        212,544,000        201,643,000
Information Technology............        455,484,000        389,750,000
Intelligence......................         44,809,000         44,561,000
                                   -------------------------------------
    Subtotal, Transportation             $997,789,000       $901,666,000
     Security Support.............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      Headquarters Administration

    The Committee recommends $265,712,000 for Headquarters 
Administration, $19,230,000 below the amount requested and 
$10,134,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. The 
Committee does not include the requested $3,701,000 as a 
transfer from the FAMS and has reduced funding an additional 
$14,247,000 as an offset for the budget shortfall created by 
reliance on unauthorized passenger security fees.

                         Human Capital Services

    The Committee recommends $201,643,000 for Human Capital 
Services, $10,911,000 below the amount requested and 
$13,970,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. The 
reduction, necessary to help offset the budgetary shortfall due 
to reliance on unauthorized aviation security fees, among other 
reasons, may come from advisory and assistance services.

                         Information Technology

    The Committee recommends $389,750,000 for Information 
Technology, $65,734,000 below the amount requested and 
$27,029,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013.
    The Committee does not include the requested $42,246,000 as 
a transfer from the FAMS and has reduced funding an additional 
$22,774,000 to help offset the budgetary shortfall due to 
reliance on unauthorized aviation security fees. The Committee 
expects Information Technology to fully absorb the proposed 
realignment of support functions from FAMS within the amount 
recommended.

                             Covert Testing

    The Committee supports the continued use of covert testing 
to help identify vulnerabilities in critical systems and 
directs TSA to aggressively probe, challenge, and improve 
transportation security systems. As in previous years, the 
Committee directs TSA to brief the Committees semiannually on 
its red teaming and covert testing activities, including 
testing results at airport checkpoints, in secure areas of 
airports, at air cargo facilities, and in other transportation 
modes. TSA should also report on critical operational errors 
and equipment failures.

          Account Structure and Availability of Appropriations

    The Committee intends the availability of appropriations 
for TSA to parallel that applying to other agencies funded in 
this bill, including a PPA structure reflecting one-year 
availability of appropriations for Personnel Compensation and 
Benefits, with a longer availability for investment 
expenditures.

                      FEDERAL AIR MARSHAL SERVICE
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $906,849,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................       826,522,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       821,107,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................       -85,742,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................       -5,415,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The Federal Air Marshal Service (FAMS) provides security 
for the Nation's civil aviation system through the effective 
deployment of armed Federal agents to detect, deter, and defeat 
hostile acts targeting U.S. air carriers, airports, passengers, 
and crews.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $821,107,000 for FAMS, $5,415,000 
below the amount requested and $85,742,000 below the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2013. Of the total funding provided, 
$709,254,000 is for Management and Administration, $5,415,000 
below the amount requested and $83,738,000 below the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2013, and $111,853,000 is for Travel 
and Training, the same as the amount requested and $2,004,000 
below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013.
    This funding decrease reflects the permanent realignment 
and integration of support functions from the FAMS 
appropriation to TSA's Airport Management and Support, 
Headquarters Administration, and Information Technology PPAs. 
However, as previously stated, the Committee expects 
Headquarters to fully absorb the realignment of support 
functions from FAMS within the amount recommended. The 
Committee believes that this funding level will provide 
adequate resources to ensure coverage of all high-risk 
international and domestic flights. Additional detail is 
included in the classified annex of this report.
    The Committee notes that there are additional law 
enforcement resources to complement the presence of FAMS. This 
includes Federal Flight Deck Officers (FFDOs), which the 
Committee recommends funding at $12,353,000 (as opposed to 
elimination of the program proposed in the President's 
request). In addition, the large number of Federal law 
enforcement officers and agents who fly offer a significant 
potential to leverage the FAMS operation. The Committee notes 
that there have been several attempts to leverage this 
population, which could serve as a force multiplier, or 
possibly a ``surge'' capability in response to increased threat 
environments, but none were adopted. Therefore, the Committee 
directs TSA to submit a report not later than 45 days after the 
date of enactment of this Act outlining the best options for 
leveraging the Federal law enforcement population to supplement 
FAMS resources, including a detailed description and status 
update of what the Department is doing to develop such options 
beyond a notional phase.
    The Committee expects FAMS staffing levels and deployment 
patterns to optimize coverage of flights so as to address known 
threats, minimize risk, and complement the full range of 
security resources available to TSA. It remains essential that 
TSA provide the Committee information about the analysis 
underpinning its staffing, scheduling and resource 
requirements. The Committee therefore directs TSA to brief the 
Committees on Appropriations not later than 90 days after the 
date of enactment of this Act on its optimal mix of staff; the 
types and frequency of flights for which FAMS coverage should 
be provided; and any legislative or regulatory changes that 
might be required to improve operations and overall aviation 
security. The Committee directs TSA to continue to submit 
quarterly reports on mission coverage, staffing levels, and 
hiring rates as in past years.

                              Coast Guard


                           OPERATING EXPENSES
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*\1\...................    $6,813,961,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014\2\...................     6,755,838,000
Recommended in the bill\2\............................     6,839,416,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................       +25,455,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................      +84,033,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.
\1\Does not include funding for the Global War on Terrorism/Overseas
  Contingency Operations.
\2\Does not include funds for Global War on Terrorism/Overseas
  Contingency Operations requested under Navy, Operations and
  Maintenance.

                                Mission

    The Coast Guard is the principal Federal agency charged 
with maritime safety, security, and stewardship. The Operating 
Expenses appropriation provides funding for the operation and 
maintenance of multipurpose vessels, aircraft, and shore units 
strategically located along the coasts and inland waterways of 
the United States and in selected areas overseas. This is the 
primary appropriation financing the operational activities of 
the Coast Guard.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends a total appropriation of 
$6,839,416,000 for Operating Expenses. The recommended funding 
level is $84,033,000 above the amount requested and $25,455,000 
above the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. The Committee's 
recommendation for Coast Guard Operating Expenses excludes 
funds requested to support the Global War on Terrorism/Overseas 
Contingency Operations.
    The Committee recommends full funding for the military pay 
raise included in the fiscal year 2014 request.
    The Committee recommends the following increases above the 
budget request: $32,000,000 to reduce the backlog in critical 
depot level maintenance; $7,721,000 to prevent the proposed 
retirement of two HC-130H aircraft, which will restore 
approximately 1,600 operating hours; $43,066,000 to restore 
cuts to training; and $6,946,000 to restore one of the two High 
Endurance Cutters proposed for decommissioning, which will 
restore approximately 1,665 cutter hours to support counter-
drug operations in source and transit zones. The Committee 
denies the request to close two seasonal air facilities.
    A comparison of the budget estimate to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Budget Estimate      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Military Pay and Allowances.......     $3,425,306,000     $3,440,053,000
Civilian Pay and Benefits.........        784,097,000        779,011,000
Training and Recruiting...........        181,617,000        216,588,000
Operating Funds and Unit Level          1,061,567,000      1,065,083,000
 Maintenance......................
Centrally Managed Accounts........        318,856,000        319,307,000
Depot Level Maintenance...........        983,940,000      1,019,374,000
                                   -------------------------------------
                                       $6,755,383,000     $6,839,416,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

            Rejection to Proposed Cuts to Reduce Operations

    Throughout this bill, the Committee prioritizes funding to 
frontline security operations and essential personnel across 
DHS--rejecting the false ``tradeoff'' between security and 
spending restraint presented by the Administration. Over the 
last several years, the Department has continually requested a 
substantial reduction in funding that would degrade the Coast 
Guard's operational capabilities and military workforce without 
proposing a compensatory proposal to rebuild the depleted 
capacity in the long term by investing in recapitalized assets. 
Those proposals had obvious, adverse implications for the Coast 
Guard's critical statutory missions of maritime safety, coastal 
security, and drug interdiction; ignored current threat 
activity and the ramifications for the Department's broader 
security and response efforts; and were resoundingly rejected 
by Congress.
    The fiscal year 2014 proposal is even more egregious, and 
gives the impression that this Administration does not 
appropriately value the work of the Coast Guard. It includes 
the lowest level of drug interdiction effectiveness in the past 
five years and reduces recapitalization funding to 
unsustainable levels. Over the past decade when our Nation has 
called for help, the Coast Guard has responded: they responded 
on the morning of 9/11 by helping untold numbers of people 
evacuate the devastation of lower Manhattan; they responded 
during the aftermath of Katrina by saving survivors stranded on 
rooftops; they responded by being the first to arrive in Haiti 
after an earthquake hit the country and killed thousands; and 
more recently, they responded to the worst oil spill in the 
history of our Nation. If the country intends for the Coast 
Guard of tomorrow to be as effective as the Coast Guard we have 
today, and have depended on for decades, these reductions must 
be resoundingly rejected. Within the recommendation, the 
Committee has made targeted increases to address the inadequacy 
of the Department's request--adding capacity to the Coast Guard 
for today and for tomorrow.

               Resources for the Global War on Terrorism

    The Committee does not recommend funding under this heading 
for the costs of the Coast Guard's support for the Global War 
on Terrorism and Overseas Contingency Operations. Instead, the 
fiscal year 2014 budget request includes these funds via a 
permissive transfer from Operations and Maintenance, Navy. The 
Committee concurs with this decision, since the funds requested 
are based on the needs of the Combatant Commander, which will 
not be fully defined until the year of execution. As future 
plans evolve, the Navy may transfer the amounts as needed to 
the Coast Guard for the expenses incurred based on requests for 
forces from the Combatant Commander.
    The Coast Guard is directed to notify the Committees within 
five days of a transfer of funds from Operations and 
Maintenance, Navy to Coast Guard, Operating Expenses. The 
notification shall include a detailed justification for the 
funds and how the funds are allocated across PPAs.

                Enhancements to Depot Level Maintenance

    The Committee recommends an additional $32,000,000 above 
the amount requested for enhancements to critical depot level 
maintenance programs. Additional funds are intended to 
replenish repair parts and execute backlogged and deferred 
critical depot level maintenance for assets, including: 
$19,000,000 to address maintenance requirements for aging 
cutters and improve the availability performance of the 210-
foot and 270-foot medium endurance cutter fleets; and 
$13,000,000 to address a recurring parts shortfall that is 
reducing aircraft availability and surge capacity.

                        Mission Needs Statement

    No Administration has ever proposed a budget that begins to 
close the mission hour gap the Coast Guard created on paper 
when it rebaselined its acquisition programs after 9/11. As 
highlighted by the GAO, the Coast Guard acquisition program is 
unachievable--particularly if the Coast Guard will be limited 
to a Capital Investment Plan (CIP) that is less than 
$1,000,000,000 per year for the next five years as is provided 
in the current plan. The Coast Guard's acquisition budget has 
grown dramatically in the years since 9/11, but, particularly 
in light of the steep and dramatic cuts proposed in this year's 
CIP, there is no reason to believe the gaping space between the 
1998 baseline and the 2004 baseline will ever close in any 
significant way for aircraft or patrol boats. The mission hour 
target dropped for major cutters in the 2004 rebaselining, but 
remains unattainable through 2030 since it appears to assume 
the production of two Offshore Patrol Cutters (OPC) per year. 
However, even if the OPC currently under source selection meets 
the requirements laid out in the Coast Guard's Operational 
Requirements Document, it seems unlikely at the levels included 
in the CIP that such a program would be sustainable. Therefore, 
the Committee directs the Coast Guard to begin the process of 
developing a new mission needs statement that takes into 
account today's fiscal environment. If the Administration truly 
plans for the Coast Guard funding level to be what was 
presented in the Fiscal Year 2014 CIP, then this process should 
also address what missions the Coast Guard will no longer be 
able to achieve. The Committee notes that in the Fiscal Year 
2014 Coast Guard Budget Hearing, the Commandant commented that 
the patrol boat hour requirement was ``specious''. The 
Committee cannot continue to accept a requirements document 
that is doubted by the senior leader of the Coast Guard. In 
order to plan for the future, the Coast Guard must match 
requirements to resources and provide an achievable plan.

               Columbia River Crossing Bridge Permitting

    The Coast Guard is currently in the process of reviewing 
the permit request for a new Columbia River Crossing bridge 
between Portland, Oregon and Vancouver, Washington. While there 
are many advantages to building a new bridge, the Committee is 
concerned with the proposed clearance height of the planned 
bridge, which would significantly limit navigation of the river 
by users up river. This inability to navigate may lead to 
devastating economic losses for the impacted users and could 
also negatively affect the surrounding communities. Over 
$500,000,000 in economic activity each year could be lost in 
addition to terminating 500 jobs in the surrounding area. This 
significant obstruction to the free flow of navigation on the 
Columbia River is very troubling. Furthermore, mitigation is 
limited for affected river users because the existing 
infrastructure cannot be replicated. To address these concerns, 
the Committee directs the Coast Guard to consider the economic 
impacts of the planned bridge including impacts due to lost use 
of the waterway and to therefore, ensure that, within reason, 
the river commerce is not blocked. The Coast Guard shall 
provide a report to the Committee on those economic impacts and 
any proposed mitigation activities to address lost access to 
the waterway. The Coast Guard shall provide this report prior 
to issuing a permit for the bridge.

                       STRONG Act Implementation

    The Committee is concerned that the Coast Guard has yet to 
implement an expedited request for transfer policy for victims 
of sexual assault. The Committee directs the Coast Guard to 
adapt and implement provisions to conform with the spirit and 
intent of the STRONG Act as enacted by the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012, (Public Law 112-81) to 
apply to Coast Guard service members with all deliberate speed. 
The Coast Guard shall report to the Committee on the 
implementation status of this policy not later than July 15, 
2013.

                        Fishing Safety Training

    The Committee encourages the Coast Guard to fully comply 
with Section 604 of the Coast Guard Reauthorization Act of 2010 
which authorizes competitive grants for a Coast Guard-certified 
Fishing Safety Training Grants Program. Once fully implemented, 
this program could provide irreplaceable training that prevents 
injuries and saves countless lives to include hands on training 
that is essential to the safety and future of commercial 
fishermen.

                ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE AND RESTORATION
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................       $13,138,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................        13,187,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        13,164,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................           +26,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................          -23,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The Environmental Compliance and Restoration appropriation 
assists in bringing Coast Guard facilities into compliance with 
applicable Federal, State and environmental regulations, 
preparing and testing facilities' response plans, developing 
pollution and hazardous waste minimization strategies, 
conducting environmental assessments, and furnishing necessary 
program support. These funds permit the continuation of a 
service-wide program to correct environmental problems, such as 
major improvements of storage tanks containing petroleum and 
regulated substances. The program focuses mainly on Coast Guard 
facilities, but also includes third party sites where Coast 
Guard activities have contributed to environmental problems.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $13,164,000 for Environmental 
Compliance and Restoration, $23,000 below the amount requested 
and $26,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2013.
    The Coast Guard is directed to submit an itemized 
expenditure plan for each project listed in the backlog report 
to the Committees with its annual budget submission.

                            RESERVE TRAINING
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $132,395,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................       109,543,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       112,991,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................       -19,404,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................       +3,448,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    This appropriation provides for the training of qualified 
individuals who are available for active duty in time of war or 
national emergency or to augment regular Coast Guard forces in 
the performance of peacetime missions. Program activities fall 
into the following categories:
          Initial training.--The direct costs of initial 
        training for three categories of non-prior service 
        trainees;
          Continued training.--The training of officer and 
        enlisted personnel;
          Operation and maintenance of training facilities.--
        The day-to-day operation and maintenance of reserve 
        training facilities; and
          Administration.--All administrative costs of the 
        reserve forces program.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $112,991,000 for Reserve Training, 
$3,448,000 above the amount requested and $19,404,000 below the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2013. This partially restores 
funding to prevent the reduction of full time support personnel 
and to prevent the transfer of Reservists to the Inactive Ready 
Reserve.

              ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................    $1,543,850,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................       951,116,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     1,222,712,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................      -321,138,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................     +271,596,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The Acquisition, Construction, and Improvements 
appropriation finances the acquisition of new capital assets, 
construction of new facilities, and physical improvements to 
existing facilities and assets. The appropriation covers Coast 
Guard-owned and operated vessels, aircraft, shore facilities, 
and other equipment such as computer systems, as well as the 
personnel needed to manage acquisition activities.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $1,222,712,000 for Acquisition, 
Construction, and Improvements, $271,596,000 above the amount 
requested and $321,138,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2013.
    The Committee recommends significant restructuring of 
numerous programs to align funding with the requirements in the 
fiscal year of need. Further, the recommendation provides 
funding for programs that have a proven track record, are low 
risk, have known costs, and provide increased capability.
    The Committee recommends a net reduction of $12,447,000 
requested for the National Security Cutter (NSC).
    The Committee recommends the following rescissions in Title 
V of this bill from prior year accounts: from funds provided in 
fiscal year 2010, $13,000,000 from Integrated Deepwater Systems 
and $1,500,000 from funds for the High Endurance Cutter 
program; from funds provided in fiscal year 2011, $9,000,000 
from the Integrated Deepwater Systems program and $12,612,000 
for excessive antecedent liability and economic price 
adjustment funding in the Fast Response Cutter (FRC) program; 
from funds provided in fiscal year 2012, $8,500,000 from funds 
for Major Shore and Major Acquisition Systems Infrastructure, 
$2,000,000 from funds for the MH-60 program, $1,000,000 from 
funds for the Other Systems Engineering and Integration 
program, and $29,500,000 from funds for the FRC to include 
$22,500,000 for excessive antecedent liability and economic 
price adjustment funding; and from funds provided in fiscal 
year 2013, $22,000,000 for excessive antecedent liability and 
economic price adjustment funding in the FRC program, 
$10,480,000 from the NSC program to include $5,000,000 for a 
post shakedown availability for NSC 4, $1,882,000 for a gantry 
crane and davit for NSC 6, and $3,598,000 for waterfront 
changes associated with NSC 6.
    The Committee recommends the following increases above the 
amount requested: an increase of $130,000,000 above the amount 
requested for two additional FRCs; an increase of $30,000,000 
for the replacement costs of two MH-60 helicopters; an 
additional $15,000,000 for C4ISR; an additional $91,710,000 for 
one missionized Long Range Surveillance Aircraft; and an 
increase of $77,000,000 for long lead time materials for NSC 8.
    A comparison of the budget estimate to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Budget Estimate      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Vessels
    In-service Vessel Sustainment.        $21,000,000        $21,000,000
    Cutter Small Boats............          3,000,000          3,000,000
    Fast Response Cutter (FRC)....         75,000,000        205,000,000
    National Security Cutter (NSC)        616,000,000        603,553,000
    Offshore Patrol Cutter (OPC)..         25,000,000         25,000,000
    Polar Ice Breaking Vessel.....          2,000,000          2,000,000
    Survey and Design-Vessels and           1,000,000          1,000,000
     Boats........................
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Vessels.........        743,000,000        860,553,000
Aircraft
    Long Range Surveillance                16,000,000        107,710,000
     Aircraft.....................
    Airframe Replacement..........  .................         30,000,000
    HH-65 Acquisition/Conversion/          12,000,000         12,000,000
     Sustainment..................
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Aircraft........         28,000,000        149,710,000
Other Equipment
    C4ISR.........................         35,226,000         50,226,000
    Government Program Management.         10,000,000         10,000,000
    Nationwide Automatic                   13,000,000         13,000,000
     Identification System........
    CG-LIMS.......................          1,500,000          1,500,000
    System Engineering and                    204,000            204,000
     Integration..................
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Other Equipment.         59,930,000         74,930,000
Shore Facilities and Aids to
 Navigation
    Major/Minor construction;               2,000,000          2,000,000
     Housing; ATON; and survey &
     design.......................
    Military Housing..............  .................         18,000,000
    Minor Shore...................          3,000,000          3,000,000
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Shore Facilities          5,000,000         23,000,000
         and Aids to Navigation...
Personnel and Related Support
    AC&I Core.....................            439,000            439,000
    Direct Personnel Costs........        114,747,000        114,080,000
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Personnel and           115,186,000        114,519,000
         Related Support..........
                                   -------------------------------------
            Total, Acquisition,          $951,116,000     $1,222,712,000
             Construction, and
             Improvements.........
------------------------------------------------------------------------

     Quarterly Reports on Acquisition Projects and Mission Emphasis

    The Commandant is directed to continue to brief the 
Committee quarterly on all major acquisitions consistent with 
the direction in the conference report accompanying Public Law 
112-74.

                        Capital Investment Plan

    The Committee is concerned by the Coast Guard's repeated 
noncompliance with the requirement in Public Law 112-74 to 
submit a CIP to Congress with the submission of the budget. To 
address these concerns, the Committee has withheld significant 
funds from various Headquarters' offices, to include 
$167,683,000 from Coast Guard Headquarters offices until the 
CIP is submitted. This level of withholding is consistent with 
the withholdings in Title I of this bill.
    The Coast Guard is directed to submit a CIP in accordance 
with the specified requirements listed in the bill in 
conjunction with the budget submission for fiscal year 2015. 
The Committee continues to believe the CIP serves as the 
primary means of oversight for tracking the Coast Guard's 
recapitalization efforts and therefore must be submitted in 
accordance with mandated timelines. The failure of the Coast 
Guard to submit the required information in a timely manner 
hinders the Committee's oversight responsibility and forces 
budgetary decisions to be made with limited program 
information.

                              Full Funding

    The Committee included a new general provision in fiscal 
year 2013 to address the lack of clarity in certain programs 
with respect to budgeting for long lead-time materials, end 
items, outfitting, post-delivery activities, spares, program 
management, and contract closeout. However, it is clear that 
the Department has chosen to ignore that direction based on 
this year's request for the NSC. Similar to the fiscal year 
2013 request, the fiscal year 2014 request for the NSC includes 
funding for post-delivery activities of the seventh NSC that 
will not occur until fiscal year 2019 and does not request 
funding for the long lead time materials for NSC 8, even though 
the Department plans to procure an eighth NSC in fiscal year 
2015.
    Section 557 of Public Law 113-6 specifically addressed 
these issues by mandating the Department develop a fiscal 
policy that prescribes budgetary policies, procedures, and 
technical direction necessary to comply with the section's 
definitions of full funding. To further address this issue, the 
Committee includes a new provision in Title V of this bill 
directing the Department to provide a report with the 
submission of the President's fiscal year 2015 budget that 
details its compliance with section 557 of Public Law 113-6.

                     Obligation Work Limiting Date

    The Committee directs the Coast Guard to establish guidance 
consistent with the Department of the Navy shipbuilding and 
construction guidance as it relates to the establishment of an 
obligation work limiting date for vessel construction. This 
will ensure that issues relating to construction of a vessel 
are funded by the Acquisition, Construction and Improvement 
appropriation as opposed to the Operating Expenses 
appropriation.

                        National Security Cutter

    The Committee recommends $603,553,000 for the NSC program 
to include long lead time material for NSC 8, $12,447,000 below 
the amount requested and $75,068,000 below the amount provided 
in fiscal year 2013. The recommendation includes a decrease of 
$12,447,000 for contract savings associated with the contract 
for the sixth NSC. The recommendation also defers funding for 
post-delivery activities that are requested unnecessarily ahead 
of need.

                          Fast Response Cutter

    The Committee recommends $205,000,000 for the acquisition 
of four FRCs, $130,000,000 above the amount requested and 
$129,665,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013.
    The fiscal year 2014 budget request included funding for 
only two FRCs. This represents almost $30,000,000 in savings 
that will not be realized and delays the delivery of much 
needed capability. This is the same type of budget gimmickry 
the Department proposed and Congress rejected in fiscal year 
2013. It is unclear as to how the Department plans to close the 
various gaps in needed capability if it continues to make such 
ineffective and unjustified budget requests.

                        Polar Ice Breaker Vessel

    The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for the polar 
icebreaker program, the same as the amount requested, and 
$5,992,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013.

                            H-60 Helicopter

    The Committee recommends $30,000,000 for the aircraft 
replacement of two H-60 helicopters, an increase of $30,000,000 
above the amount requested and $16,041,000 above the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2013. The Coast Guard continues to 
successfully modify former Navy Seahawk helicopters--which 
provide greater capability a lower cost. This funding will 
allow for the conversion of two additional helicopters and 
assist in replacement of assets lost in the line of duty.

                            HC-130J Aircraft

    The Committee recommends $107,710,000 for long range 
surveillance aircraft, an increase of $91,710,000 above the 
amount requested and $17,800,000 above the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2013. The Committee is concerned that while the 
Department has approved a program baseline for additional long 
range surveillance aircraft, they have decimated the total 
funding for recapitalization for the aircraft in the submitted 
CIP. The Department is urged to align the approved mission 
requirements with the appropriate level of funding needed to 
realize those requirements. Otherwise, it is unclear as to the 
value of either approved baselines, stated mission 
requirements, or out year planning.

                            Military Housing

    The Committee recommends $18,000,000 for military housing, 
$18,000,000 above the amount requested and $8,010,000 above the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2013. These funds assist in 
closing the family housing gaps that exist at various Coast 
Guard locations.
    The Coast Guard is directed to submit an expenditure plan 
for these funds to the Committee not later than 30 days after 
the date of enactment of this Act. Further, none of the funds 
included above the request may be obligated until five days 
after the Coast Guard briefs the Committee on the expenditure 
plan for the funds.

              RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................       $19,671,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................        19,856,000
Recommended in the bill...............................         9,928,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................        -9,743,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................       -9,928,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation allows the 
Coast Guard to maintain its non-homeland security research and 
development capability, while also partnering with DHS and the 
Department of Defense to leverage beneficial initiatives.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $9,928,000 for Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, $9,928,000 below the amount 
requested and $9,743,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2013. The Committee has consistently expressed dismay with 
the unacceptable lack of detailed information provided by the 
Coast Guard in the Congressional budget justification for this 
account. However, the Coast Guard continually defies this 
direction and provides the same insufficient justification 
year-after-year. Based on this lack of justification, the 
Committee recommends a reduction of $9,982,000 and directs the 
Coast Guard to work with the Committee to fully justify future 
funding requests. Additionally, due to the lack of 
justification for the need for multiyear funds, the Committee 
recommends only two years of availability for the account 
instead of five years, as has been provided in previous years.
    Further, the Committee directs the Coast Guard to submit 
the budget for fiscal year 2015 with a new ``Salaries and 
Expenses'' PPA and a ``Research'' PPA to provide oversight of 
funding requests and execution. Within the new ``Research'' 
PPA, the Committee directs the Coast Guard to include in the 
budget justification for fiscal year 2015 the following 
information for each project in excess of $100,000: project 
description, justification and scope; prior year key events, 
current year planned key events and budget year key events; 
funding history; available funding spend plan (projected 
obligations by year appropriated); contract information; 
project schedule; and type of research (basic; applied; 
advanced technology development; advanced component development 
and prototypes; or system development and demonstration), 
technical readiness level (as applicable) and transition plans.

       MEDICARE ELIGIBLE RETIREE HEALTH CARE FUND CONTRIBUTION\1\
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $202,797,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................       201,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       201,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................        -1,797,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................            - - -\1\This account is a permanent indefinite discretionary budgetary
  activity and is not carried in the bill.
*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The Medicare-eligible retiree health care fund contribution 
provides funding for the Department of Defense Medicare-
eligible health care fund for the health benefits of future 
Medicare-eligible retirees currently serving on active duty in 
the Coast Guard, retiree dependents, and their potential 
survivors. The authority for the Coast Guard to make this 
payment on an annual basis was provided in the Department of 
Defense Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 2005.

                             Recommendation

    While this account requires no annual action by Congress, 
the Committee provides $201,000,000 to fund the Medicare-
eligible retiree health care fund contribution, the same as the 
request and $1,797,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 
2013.

                              RETIRED PAY
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................    $1,423,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................     1,460,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     1,460,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................       +37,000,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................             - - -*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    This appropriation provides for the retired pay of Coast 
Guard military personnel and Coast Guard Reserve personnel, as 
well as career status bonuses for active duty personnel. 
Additionally, it provides payments to members of the former 
Lighthouse Service and beneficiaries pursuant to the retired 
serviceman's family protection plan and survivor benefit plan, 
as well as payments for medical care of retired personnel and 
their dependents under the Dependents' Medical Care Act.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $1,460,000,000 for Retired Pay, 
the same as the amount requested and $37,000,000 above the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2013. The Committee includes 
bill language that allows funds to remain available until 
expended. The Coast Guard's Retired Pay appropriation is a 
mandatory budgetary activity.

                      United States Secret Service


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................    $1,554,358,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................     1,494,614,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     1,534,589,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................       -19,769,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................      +39,975,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The United States Secret Service has statutory authority to 
carry out two primary missions: protection of the Nation's 
leaders and investigation of financial and electronic crimes. 
The Secret Service protects and investigates threats against 
the President and Vice President, their families, visiting 
heads of State, and other designated individuals; protects the 
White House, Vice President's Residence, foreign missions, and 
other buildings within Washington, D.C.; and manages the 
security at National Special Security Events (NSSEs). The 
Secret Service also investigates violations of laws relating to 
counterfeiting of obligations and securities of the United 
States; financial crimes that include, but are not limited to, 
access device fraud, financial institution fraud, identity 
theft, and computer fraud; and computer-based attacks on 
financial, banking, and telecommunications infrastructure. The 
agency also provides support for investigations related to 
missing and exploited children.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $1,534,589,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses, $39,975,000 above the amount requested and 
$19,769,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. 
Within the total, $919,928,000 is for costs associated with the 
core protective missions, $6,568,000 above the amount requested 
and $64,908,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013, 
including a reduction of $57,902,000 associated with candidate 
nominee protection, reflecting the winding down of the 
Presidential campaign. The recommendation includes $369,560,000 
for investigations, $22,169,000 above the request, to reflect 
sustaining forensic support and grant assistance for 
investigations on missing and exploited children, increasing 
support for electronic crimes investigations, and realigning 
support for operations of the National Computer Forensics 
Institute (NCFI) to the Secret Service, all described in more 
detail below.
    The recommendation includes $4,500,000, as requested, for 
contingencies associated with NSSEs in fiscal year 2014.
    A comparison of the budget estimate to the Committee 
recommended levels, by budget activity, is as follows under the 
current PPA structure:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Budget estimate      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Protection:
    Protection of Persons and            $841,078,000       $848,263,000
     Facilities...................
    Protective Intelligence                67,782,000         67,165,000
     Activities...................
    National Special Security               4,500,000          4,500,000
     Event fund...................
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Protection......        913,360,000        919,928,000
Investigations:
    Domestic Field Operations.....        316,433,000        330,391,000
    International Field Office             30,958,000         30,811,000
     Administration, Operations,
     and Training.................
    Support for Missing and                     - - -          8,358,000
     Exploited Children...........
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Investigations..        347,391,000        369,560,000
Headquarters, Management and              177,282,000        188,964,000
 Administration...................
Rowley Training Center............         55,552,000         55,118,000
Information Integration and                 1,029,000          1,019,000
 Technology Transformation........
                                   -------------------------------------
            Total, Salaries and        $1,494,614,000     $1,534,589,000
             Expenses.............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The budget request proposed a reorganization of the 
Salaries and Expenses appropriation into an Operating Expenses 
appropriation, regrouping PPA categories to align with mission 
requirements, consolidating personnel costs and facilitating 
financial execution and reporting.
    The Committee retains the current account structure for 
PPAs, with the following consolidations requested in the 
budget: White House mail screening is now funded within the 
``Protection of Persons and Facilities'' PPA, and the 
Electronic Crimes Special Agent Program (ECSAP) and Electronic 
Crimes Task Forces (ECTF) are now funded within Domestic Field 
Operations.
    The Committee does not agree with the proposal to reduce 
the number of PPAs to five, with single PPAs for pay and 
benefits, protection, and investigations. The Secret Service 
has stated that because the current PPA structure spreads pay 
and expenses across many programs, it is constantly challenged 
by having to balance shifting demands between protection and 
investigations, and as a result, must either submit formal 
reprogramming requests, or employ inefficient financial 
management to avoid them. The Committee understands this 
argument, particularly as it applies to the Secret Service 
field office organization, where the same agents may be 
involved in both protective operations and a variety of 
investigations efforts. While the Committees maintained the 
current PPA structure in fiscal year 2013, some flexibility is 
provided in statute to the Secret Service to reprogram 
$15,000,000 or 10 percent, whichever is lower, between the 
``Protection of Persons and Facilities'' PPA and the ``Domestic 
Field Operations'' PPA.
    The Committee understands the Secret Service is developing 
a financial reporting system that it asserts will enable it to 
report enterprise-wide labor costs on a timelier basis. The 
Committee will continue to work with the Secret Service to 
analyze the benefits associated with utilizing this reporting 
system.

     Domestic Field Operations and Electronic Crimes Investigations

    In fiscal year 2013, Congress provided a partial account 
consolidation that included incorporation of the previously 
separate PPA for ECSAP and ECTF into the ``Domestic Field 
Operations'' PPA. This consolidation did not reflect any 
dissatisfaction with the ECSAP or ECTF programs; on the 
contrary, the Committee found that those activities have proven 
highly productive and deserve strong support. Because the 
investigation of these crimes requires highly technical 
training in computer forensics, and recognizing that the Secret 
Service is a ``frontline'' operational agency, the Committee's 
focus is on the integration of new technology into the agency's 
operations. The Committee supports the efforts of the Secret 
Service through its ECSAP, and its leadership of a network of 
ECTFs comprised of Federal, State, and local law enforcement 
partners, the financial and information technology industries, 
and academic and research communities.
    The ECSAP was established to provide special agents with 
basic and advanced computer forensics training in order to 
conduct investigative examinations on evidence obtained from 
computers, personal data assistants, and other forms of 
electronic media. As a result, the Secret Service is 
continually recognized as one of the most effective U.S. 
Government agencies for combating cyber-crime and for providing 
training and education for State and local law enforcement. In 
order to continue and expand the Secret Service's efforts 
against electronic crimes, the Committee recommends a denial of 
the transfer of $4,000,000 to the Federal Law Enforcement 
Training Center (FLETC), as requested in the President's 
budget, to support the NCFI. Therefore, the Committee supports 
the current alignment of funds for NFCI within the Secret 
Service's budget, and recommends $60,968,000, $4,000,000 above 
the amount requested and $4,000,000 above the amount provided 
in fiscal year 2013, to continue and enhance current Secret 
Service initiatives, support ECSAP and the ECTF, and increase 
efforts for basic and advanced computer forensics training.
    While ECSAP and ECTF no longer have separate reporting and 
reprogramming lines, the Committee expects: (1) to receive 
periodic briefings on the status of investigations; (2) to see 
the funding and programmatic efforts sustained; and (3) the 
associated funding and personnel resources to continue to be 
identified in future budgets. Further, the Committee directs 
the Secret Service to continue coordinating with NPPD as the 
subject matter experts to ensure the curriculum is sound and 
consistent with current risk and threat, and to avoid 
duplication and ensure efficiency.

           National Center for Missing and Exploited Children

    The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, 
(NCMEC) was created in 1984 to serve as the Nation's resource 
on the issues of missing and sexually exploited children. The 
organization provides information and resources to law 
enforcement, parents, and children, including child victims, as 
well as other professionals. Under the provisions of the 
Violent Crime Control Act of 1994, Congress directed the Secret 
Service to provide forensic and technical assistance to NCMEC 
and other Federal, State, and local law enforcement agencies in 
matters involving missing and exploited children. NCMEC has 
been the historical recipient of grant funding related to 
missing and exploited children, and the Secret Service 
currently provides investigative assistance and liaison to 
NCMEC headquarters through the Secret Service Forensic Services 
Division. The Committee supports continuing this effort and 
therefore recommends sustaining the current funding level of 
$2,358,000 for forensic and investigative support related to 
missing and exploited children and $6,000,000 for grants 
related to investigations of missing and exploited children.

                    National Special Security Events

    The Committee provides $4,500,000, as requested, to defray 
costs specific to Secret Service execution of its statutory 
responsibilities to direct the planning and coordination of 
NSSEs. The Committee continues a general provision in the Act 
that provides that none of the funds in this Act may be used to 
reimburse any Federal department or agency for its 
participation in an NSSE.
    The Committee directs the Secret Service to provide 
periodic updates on NSSEs planned for fiscal year 2014 prior to 
and following each event.

                   International Field Investigations

    The Secret Service continues to show significant results 
from its efforts to stop the counterfeiting of U.S. currency, 
in concert with its counterparts in the Government of Colombia, 
and is building on this effort in its field offices. The 
Committee directs the Secret Service, in conjunction with the 
DHS Office of Policy, to keep it informed of developments in 
international investigative missions.

                         Technology Activities

    The Committee provides $1,019,000 for information 
integration and technology transformation activities of the 
Secret Service, and directs the agency to brief the Committee 
on all Secret Service information technology activities, 
including the multi-year investment plan.

                               Attrition

    The Committee is concerned that the President's budget 
request creates a pay shortfall that results in the reduction 
of at least 376 FTE from the Secret Service in fiscal year 2014 
and fundamentally alters the dual mission requirements of the 
Secret Service. At the current rate of attrition, by fiscal 
year 2018 the Secret Service workforce would be decimated by 
the loss of more than 1,500 FTE, far below the required 
workforce level to successfully protect our Nation's leaders 
and to investigate violations of laws relating to 
counterfeiting. This is simply unacceptable. The Committee is 
focused on funding the dual missions of the Secret Service and 
addressing the potential security gaps that this budget request 
creates. Therefore, to ensure the protection of our Nation's 
leaders and the investigation of financial and electronic 
crimes, the Committee recommends an additional $26,150,000 to 
halt the current rate of attrition within the Secret Service, 
including $13,600,000 to be applied to the Protection of 
Persons and Facilities PPA; $9,150,000 for the Domestic Field 
Operations PPA; and $3,400,000 for the Headquarters, Management 
and Administration PPA. Within this recommended funding level, 
the Secret Service shall align staffing resources with mission 
requirements and the Committee directs the Secret Service to 
provide a strategic human capital plan not later than 60 days 
after the date of enactment of this Act for fiscal years 2014 
through 2018, which addresses how mission requirements will be 
met with current resources and delineates between protective 
and investigative missions.

                   Permanent Change of Station Costs

    The President's budget request proposes agency wide 
efficiencies totaling $21,775,000, including a reduction of 
$4,432,000 from Permanent Change of Station (PCS) moves that 
would result in extending temporary assignments for agents and 
their families. The Committee will not tolerate this reduction 
to PCS, which would impose a severe burden on agents and their 
families and harm agent morale. In order to more fully address 
the shortfall in PCS funding, the Committee recommends an 
additional $9,000,000 above the request for the Headquarters, 
Management and Administration PPA.

              Professionalism Reinforcement Working Group

    The Secret Service recently reviewed its professional 
standards of conduct and issued new guidance for procedures and 
conduct of employees when engaged in overseas operations and 
protective missions. The Committee directs the Secret Service 
to provide a briefing not later than 90 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act on the status of the Professionalism 
Reinforcement Working Group review of Secret Service 
professional standards of conduct; and their relationship to 
training, policy and procedures, consistent with the agency's 
critical missions and unique position of public trust.

               ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION AND IMPROVEMENTS
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................       $56,694,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................        51,775,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        51,775,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................        -4,919,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................            - - -*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    This account supports the acquisition, construction, 
improvement, equipment, furnishing and related costs for 
maintenance and support of Secret Service facilities, including 
the Secret Service Memorial Headquarters Building and the James 
J. Rowley Training Center (JJRTC). It also provides for ongoing 
costs and investment for critical Information Integration and 
Technology Transformation, a program to sustain the information 
technology capabilities needed to support the Secret Service 
protective and investigative missions.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $51,775,000, the same amount as 
requested and $4,919,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2013. The Secret Service is directed to submit a multiyear 
investment and management plan for its Information Integration 
and Technology Transformation program for fiscal years 2015 
through 2018.

      TITLE III--PROTECTION, PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND RECOVERY


              National Protection And Programs Directorate


                     MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................       $50,170,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................        64,725,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        50,522,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................          +352,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................      -14,203,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD) 
includes programs focused on the security of the Nation's 
physical and cyber infrastructure and interoperable 
communications systems. The Management and Administration 
account funds the immediate office of the Under Secretary for 
National Protection and Programs; provides for administrative 
overhead costs such as IT support and shared services; and 
includes a national planning office for development of standard 
doctrine and policy for infrastructure protection and 
cybersecurity.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $50,522,000 for Management and 
Administration, $14,203,000 below the amount requested and 
$352,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2013.
    The Committee recognizes that over the last five years 
NPPD's Federal workforce has grown significantly to accommodate 
its increasing operational mission, but that NPPD's Management 
and Administration resources have not increased accordingly to 
manage and serve this growing workforce. While the Committee is 
aware that additional funding will need to be provided to 
support essential management functions, the recommendation 
reflects a reduction in funding needed in order to offset 
significant shortfalls in the President's budget request for 
DHS due to: (1) assumed increases in aviation passenger fee 
collections that have yet to be authorized and that are not 
under the jurisdiction of the Committee; (2) detrimental 
proposals to severely reduce the Department's vital operational 
components and frontline personnel; and (3) the repeated 
failure to comply with statutory requirements. Additionally, 
the Committee's is dissatisfied with NPPD for again failing to 
provide testimony in a timely manner with respect to its fiscal 
year 2014 budget hearing.

           INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION AND INFORMATION SECURITY
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................    $1,156,372,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................     1,201,994,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     1,176,629,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................       +20,257,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................      -25,365,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    Infrastructure Protection and Information Security (IPIS) 
works to reduce the vulnerability of the Nation's critical 
infrastructure, key resources, information technology networks, 
and telecommunications systems to terrorist attacks and natural 
disasters. IPIS is also responsible for maintaining effective 
telecommunications for government users in national 
emergencies, and for establishing policies and promoting 
solutions for interoperable communications at the Federal, 
State, and local level.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $1,176,629,000 for IPIS, 
$25,365,000 below the amount requested and $20,257,000 above 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2013.
    Within the total amount provided, the Committee recommends 
$260,133,000 for Infrastructure Protection, $817,000 below the 
amount requested and the same amount provided in fiscal year 
2013. This decrease is due to the continued delays in the 
implementation of the Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism 
Standards (CFATS) program and the Committee's concern with the 
Infrastructure Security Compliance Division's (ISCD) inability 
to mitigate real risks.
    The Committee supports efforts to strengthen our Nation's 
Cybersecurity and recommends $916,496,000 for Cybersecurity and 
Communications, $24,548,000 below the amount requested and 
$20,257,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. 
However, as budgets continue to tighten, the Committee cannot 
allow funds to sit idly for multiple fiscal years. Therefore, 
reductions to the Network Security Deployment PPA are 
attributable to carry over balances and the inability of the 
NCSD to fully obligate the funds provided by Congress.
    A comparison of the budget estimate to the Committee 
recommended level is as follows:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       Budget Request
                                                                                              Recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Infrastructure Protection:
    Infrastructure Analysis & Planning............................        $57,975,000            $66,144,000
    Sector Management & Governance................................         60,477,000             60,335,000
    Regional Field Operations.....................................         56,708,000             56,550,000
    Infrastructure Security Compliance............................         85,790,000             77,104,000
                                                                   ---------------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Infrastructure Protection.......................        260,950,000            260,133,000
Cybersecurity and Communications:
Cybersecurity:
    Cybersecurity Coordination....................................          4,338,000              4,320,000
    US-Computer Emergency Readiness Team Operations...............        102,636,000            102,486,000
    Federal Network Security......................................        199,769,000            199,725,000
    Network Security Deployment...................................        406,441,000            382,367,000
    Global Cybersecurity Management...............................         19,057,000             19,037,000
    Critical Infrastructure Cyber Protection & Awareness..........         73,043,000             73,013,000
    Business Operations...........................................          5,125,000              5,089,000
                                                                   ---------------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Cybersecurity...................................        810,409,000            786,037,000
Communications:
    Office of Emergency Communications............................         36,516,000             36,446,000
    Priority Telecommunications Services..........................         53,412,000             53,372,000
    Next Generation Networks......................................         21,160,000             21,158,000
    Programs to Study and Enhance Telecommunications..............         10,102,000             10,074,000
    Critical Infrastructure Protection Programs...................          9,445,000              9,409,000
                                                                   ---------------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Communications..................................        130,635,000            130,459,000
                                                                   ---------------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Cybersecurity and Communications................        941,044,000            916,496,000
                                                                   ---------------------------------------------
            Total, Infrastructure Protection and Information           $1,201,994,000         $1,176,629,000
             Security.............................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                           Bombing Prevention

    Within Infrastructure Protection, Bombing Prevention (BP) 
leads and coordinates DHS efforts to enhance the Nation's 
counter-improvised explosive device (C-IED) capabilities and 
reduce the threat of explosive attacks against critical 
infrastructure. BP aligns DHS and national efforts by 
centralizing coordination of ongoing programs with national 
policy goals and by recommending strategic adjustments based on 
the understanding of global IED threats. BP systematically 
identifies and assesses the Nation's capabilities to counter 
IED threats and drives capability improvement through enhanced 
strategy, investment, and planning-based resource optimization. 
The Committee rejects the President's budget request to reduce 
funding to BP by 39 percent and, therefore, recommends 
$16,514,000 for Bombing Prevention, $8,257,000 above the amount 
requested and $2,963,000 above the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2013. The Committee directs NPPD to provide an expenditure 
plan not later than 15 days after the date of enactment of this 
Act, detailing how BP will utilize these funds, including how 
it will more effectively apply lessons learned on improvised 
explosive devices from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

               Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards

    Section 550 of Public Law 109-295 authorized DHS to 
regulate security at high-risk chemical plants and other 
locations that maintain large quantities of potentially 
dangerous chemicals. Authority to also regulate the sale or 
transfer of ammonium nitrate fertilizer was granted to DHS in 
Public Law 109-329. Since that time and in spite of ample 
appropriations provided by Congress, the Department has made 
only marginal progress in carrying out its regulatory 
responsibilities for both the CFATS program and the Ammonium 
Nitrate Security Program.
    Based on a recently issued report by GAO, the ISCD has 
improved its Security Plan Review Process. However, GAO has 
reported to the Committee, and the Department has confirmed, 
that its system for risk evaluation is not consistent with its 
own CFATS regulations, or with the Department's basic standards 
for risk evaluation which require that risk be evaluated by 
weighing threat, vulnerability, and the consequence of 
potential terrorist acts for each chemical facility. GAO found 
that for CFATS covered facilities, consequence is only 
partially considered, while threat and vulnerability are not 
factored in at all. The risk-based process is the foundation of 
CFATS. These facility evaluation gaps mean that basic building 
blocks of the CFATS program are missing. Acknowledging these 
gaps the Department has undertaken an experts' review process 
to contemplate corrections in the risk evaluation process. 
Despite this process, GAO estimates it could take another seven 
to nine years to review the plans of thousands of facilities 
that have already been assigned a final tier. In an effort to 
comply with DHS's requirements, small and large businesses 
alike have invested time and resources into the development of 
their site security plans. Yet they are now asked to wait 
nearly a decade to have those plans approved. Within that time, 
technology changes, plans become outdated, and facilities 
remain vulnerable to attack. This is simply unacceptable. The 
Committee expects the Department to effectively manage programs 
to mitigate serious risks.
    Because NPPD has been challenged to meet the statutory 
requirements of the CFATS program, the Committee directs NPPD 
to provide a report to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
Senate and the House and the relevant authorizing committees of 
jurisdiction, to include the House Committees on Homeland 
Security and on Energy and Commerce not later than 90 days 
after the date of enactment of this Act explaining how ISCD 
will further accelerate the review process for these 
facilities, reduce the current backlog of approximately 3,120 
facilities, and detail the actions DHS is taking to better 
manage its chemical security program, including its progress in 
addressing the recommendations in the GAO report (GAO-13-353) 
and in implementing the associated action plan.
    According to a recent report by DHS OIG, the CFATS program 
has been slowed by inadequate tools and poorly executed 
processes and implementation efforts that have resulted in 
systematic noncompliance with sound Federal Government internal 
controls. Unfortunately, ISCD chose not to concur with four of 
the 24 recommendations the OIG made to correct these 
deficiencies. In Recommendation #19, for example, ISCD 
disagreed with an OIG finding that ISCD has made inappropriate 
use of Administratively Uncontrollable Overtime (AUO), a form 
of premium pay used to compensate employees who occupy 
positions that require substantial amounts of irregular, 
unscheduled overtime work. Chemical Security Inspectors have 
received the maximum AUO allowable by OPM regulations; however, 
the OIG was unable to determine a definitive rationale for why 
inspectors receive AUO. AUO usage reviews were not conducted by 
ISCD as required and, as a result, inspectors were 
inappropriately paid approximately $2,000,000 in AUO for fiscal 
year 2012. Consequently, the OIG recommended ISCD eliminate the 
authorization and payment of AOU overtime for all ISCD 
personnel.
    The Committee will not tolerate anything less than sound 
program management and it is concerned that chemical security 
inspectors are continuing to be inappropriately paid AUO at the 
same time that DHS is proposing to cut funding for vital 
frontline security operations. The Committee expects NPPD to 
comply with these recommendations and heed the advice of its 
Inspector General. Accordingly, the Committee directs NPPD to 
report quarterly on the status of its progress in complying 
with all of the recommendations in the DHS OIG report and to 
include an associated timeline for NPPD's compliance. 
Furthermore, the Committee directs the Under Secretary of NPPD 
to provide a detailed expenditure plan not later than September 
30, 2014.

                        Personnel Surety Program

    The Committee is determined to see NPPD establish a 
functional and efficient Personnel Surety Program (PSP) and it 
remains concerned with the proposal for personnel surety. 
First, industry continues to assert that DHS should not mandate 
how a covered chemical facility meets the personnel surety 
standard, if the facility has already adopted strong and 
identifiable personnel measures designed to verify and validate 
identity, check criminal history, verify and validate legal 
authorization to work, and identify individuals with terrorist 
ties by utilizing a Federal vetting program. Second, as the new 
screening program is currently designed, a facility still may 
not be notified if a person has been identified in the TSDB. 
While the Committee understands the need to protect ongoing 
investigations, the liability concerns of allowing a person in 
the TSDB into a chemical facility continues to concern the 
Committee and industry stakeholders. Third, the Committee 
remains concerned that DHS is not leveraging the existing 
infrastructure within DHS and industry, as it would still 
require facilities to provide identifying information even for 
employees or visitors who have a TWIC card or another 
credential that is issued only following screening against the 
TSDB.
    Last year, the Committee directed the Under Secretary of 
NPPD to address these concerns prior to moving forward with a 
personnel surety program and the Committee is encouraged by the 
fact that, following input from stakeholders, NPPD recently 
published an Information Collection Request in the Federal 
Register that made numerous changes to the original proposal, 
including: (1) an option to comply with Risk Based Performance 
Standard-12(iv) electronically using TWIC readers or other 
authorized technology; (2) an opportunity for high-risk 
chemical facilities to propose alternative methods for meeting 
RBPS-12(iv) in their Site Security Plans or Alternative 
Security Programs; (3) the option for a CFATS covered chemical 
facility to identify third parties to enter information into 
the web portal for the PSP on its behalf; and (4) an 
acknowledgment that high-risk chemical facilities may be 
contacted by DHS or Federal law enforcement as a part of law 
enforcement investigative activity. However, the Committee 
believes DHS and NPPD should more consistently engage with 
stakeholders on the structure of the PSP and encourages NPPD to 
more effectively address stakeholder concerns, including 
concerns related to how a covered facility can meet the 
personnel surety standard.
    Accordingly, the Under Secretary shall provide a report to 
the Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and the House 
and the relevant authorizing committees of jurisdiction, 
including the House Committees on Energy and Commerce and on 
Homeland Security, no later than April 1, 2014, on steps NPPD 
is taking to: (1) leverage the existing infrastructure within 
DHS and industry to avoid costly duplication of programs; and 
(2) ensure the safety of facilities is not compromised 
inadvertently due to the overzealous protection of criminal 
investigations. The report shall also include a detailed 
explanation from NPPD describing why DHS intends to mandate how 
a covered facility meets the personnel surety standard, if the 
facility has already adopted strong and identifiable personnel 
measures designed to verify and validate identity, check 
criminal history, verify and validate legal authorization to 
work, and identify individuals with terrorist ties by utilizing 
a Federal vetting program.

                            Ammonium Nitrate

    Section 563 of the Homeland Security Appropriations Act of 
2008 (Public Law 110-161) provided DHS and NPPD with the 
authority to regulate the purchase and sale of ammonium nitrate 
to prevent its misappropriation or use in an act of terrorism. 
The Committee is dismayed that five years later, NPPD has 
failed to fully implement a comprehensive Ammonium Nitrate 
Security Program. Although the recent tragedy in West, Texas is 
assumed not to be connected to terrorism, it nevertheless 
highlights the importance of a functional and efficient CFATS 
program. Even more specifically, however, this event highlights 
the inability of NPPD to implement the Ammonium Nitrate 
Security Program, and it raises serious concerns that the 
Department's Chemical Security Inspectors were unaware that 
West Fertilizer Co. was handling 270 tons of potentially 
explosive ammonium nitrate.
    The Committee is also aware that since the termination of 
its contract with a vendor, the ISCD may lack the ability to 
access risk or validation data of the 40,000 chemical 
facilities that are under the purview of the CFATS program, 
making it increasingly difficult to monitor these facilities to 
assess risk and ensure the continued compliance of these 
facilities. ISCD is directed to assign a unique business 
identifier to each chemical facility in the Top Screen Program 
to support ongoing tracking and data management, verify the 
business information submitted by current registrants, and help 
ensure the compliance of current Top Screen registrants through 
ongoing, proactive risk monitoring. Further, the Committee 
directs the Under Secretary for NPPD to undertake a critical 
review of the Department's implementation of the Ammonium 
Nitrate Security Program and to report to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the Senate and the House and the relevant 
authorizing committees of jurisdiction, to include the House 
Committees on Homeland Security and on Energy and Commerce not 
later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act. In 
addition to providing the Committee with an assessment of the 
status of the proposed rule, the review is to focus on program 
implementation, and collaboration and communication within ISCD 
and between ISCD and the regulated community. Specifically, the 
review shall address the following questions:
          1. How will the Infrastructure Security Compliance 
        Division (ISCD) improve its facilities identification 
        methodology to include the full universe of covered 
        facilities in the United States? Is the ISCD sharing 
        information with State authorities overseeing chemical 
        facilities, such as State Emergency Management 
        Directors? Is the ISCD organized to efficiently and 
        effectively carry out the requirements detailed in 
        Section 563 of Public Law 110-161? If not, what are the 
        organizational gaps? How should it be structured and 
        staffed to ensure effective execution of Section 563 of 
        Public Law 110-161?
          2. Does the program include the appropriate level of 
        outreach to address valid stakeholder concerns? What 
        mechanisms are in place to ensure consistent outreach?
    In addition to fulfilling these reporting requirements, the 
Committee expects NPPD to provide a comprehensive update on the 
status of the corrective measures being taken to ensure that 
facilities with chemicals of interest are notified by ISCD when 
they fall within the purview of the CFATS program, an estimate 
of the potential number of outlier facilities unaware of the 
CFATS requirement, and a detailed performance evaluation of the 
Chemical Security Inspectors within ISCD.

                    Cyber Diagnostics and Mitigation

    The United States is the target of a massive cyber-
espionage campaign that threatens the country's economic 
competitiveness and endangers its national security. The 
Committee has continually recognized this threat and provided 
additional funding to NPPD to protect our Nation from cyber-
intrusions. To address the need for continuous monitoring and 
diagnostics on Federal ``.gov'' networks, the Committee 
recommends $199,725,000 for Federal Network Security to 
establish and sustain the new continuous monitoring and 
diagnostic system and to continue the procurement and 
operations of the system.
    The Committee recommends $382,367,000 for Network Security 
Deployment to continue the planned procurement of the third 
generation of the National Cybersecurity Protection System 
(EINSTEIN 3), which is an integrated system of intrusion 
detection, analytics, intrusion prevention, and information 
sharing capabilities that are used to defend the IT 
infrastructure of Federal civilian departments and agencies. 
Specifically, the funds shall be used to provide risk-based, 
cost-effective cybersecurity to address escalating and rapidly 
evolving threats to information security, including the 
acquisition and operation of a continuous monitoring and 
diagnostic program. Diagnostic software procured by these 
funds, however, shall not collect or store personally 
identifiable information nor monitor the content of network 
traffic. This program shall also be installed, maintained, and 
operated in accordance with all applicable privacy laws and 
related agency restrictions regarding personally identifiable 
information and sensitive data or content. This diagnostic 
program must therefore ensure both the security and network 
integrity of Federal government systems, as neither can be 
compromised.
    The Committee directs the Under Secretary for NPPD to 
submit a report detailing the obligation and expenditure of 
funds no later than January 1, 2014, and quarterly thereafter 
to the Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and the House 
of Representatives.

                       Cyber Workforce Initiative

    The Committee continues to have serious concerns that the 
size, capability, and development of the current and future 
cybersecurity workforce are inadequate to address the public's 
cyber vulnerabilities. The Committee believes too little 
strategic planning and funding has focused on the development 
of the current workforce and of a workforce development 
pipeline. This effort must be comprehensive from primary 
education to employment. The Committee supports the 
Department's leveraging of the existing capability of the 
Centers of Excellence and directs DHS to review how it can 
support these Centers' ability to provide not just cyber 
training but access to projects and programs that will allow 
individuals to gain critical security clearances while 
training.

                          Outreach to Veterans

    The Committee is aware of the growing need for well-trained 
cybersecurity, computer forensics, and information assurance 
professionals at every level of government and throughout the 
private sector. The Committee is also aware of the alarming 
unemployment rate among post 9/11 era veterans, especially 
younger veterans. Attempts have been made to address these 
concerns, but challenges remain. By effectively training 
veterans in these critical areas of need, the government can 
enable employment and address the growing threat of cyber-
attacks. The Committee directs the Secretary of Homeland 
Security, in conjunction with the Departments of Veterans 
Affairs, Defense, and Labor, to implement a plan for a 
veteran's cybersecurity workforce that will leverage training 
capabilities across government, academia, and the private 
sector to put veterans to work securing our Nation's cyber 
infrastructure.

                       Cybersecurity Partnerships

    The Committee directs the Under Secretary for NPPD to 
review existing government cyber organizations to leverage the 
vast capability that already exists in organizations outside of 
NPPD. There are numerous organizations throughout the Nation 
that work every day in the cybersecurity environment. Their 
experience should be sought after and used. Further, the 
Committee directs the Under Secretary for NPPD to review the 
possible advantages in establishing a cooperative cybersecurity 
program with the DOD National Cyber Range and DOD software 
engineering centers to enhance the development of innovative 
software that improves the Nation's ability to counter threats 
to our cybersecurity, and to provide a report to the Committee 
not later than 120 days after the date of enactment of this Act 
on its efforts in this area.

                       FEDERAL PROTECTIVE SERVICE
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................    $1,301,824,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................     1,301,824,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     1,301,824,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................             - - -
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................             - - -*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The Federal Protective Service (FPS) is responsible for the 
protection of federally owned and leased buildings and 
properties, particularly those under the charge and control of 
the General Services Administration (GSA). Funding for FPS is 
provided through a security fee charged to all GSA building 
tenants in FPS-protected buildings. FPS has three major law 
enforcement initiatives: protection services to all Federal 
facilities throughout the United States and its territories; 
expanded intelligence and anti-terrorism capabilities; and 
Special Programs, including weapons of mass destruction 
detection, hazardous material detection and response, and 
canine programs.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $1,301,824,000 for FPS, the same 
as the amount requested and the same amount provided in fiscal 
year 2013. Within this recommended funding level, FPS shall 
align staffing resources with mission requirements. All of 
these expenditures will be paid by fees collected from FPS 
customer agencies.

                OFFICE OF BIOMETRIC IDENTITY MANAGEMENT
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $232,190,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................             - - -
Recommended in the bill\1\............................       232,190,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................             - - -
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................      +232,190,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.
\1\Reflects the realignment of $232,190,000 from US-VISIT, consistent
  with Public Law 113-6.

                                Mission

    The mission of the Office of Biometric Identity Management 
(OBIM) is to collect, maintain and share biometric and selected 
biographic data with authorized DHS, Federal, State, tribal, 
local law enforcement agencies and strategic foreign partners. 
As the agency responsible for maintaining the Automated 
Biometric Identification System (IDENT) and a biometric center 
of expertise, OBIM provides an invaluable capability to ensure 
national security, public safety and the integrity of the 
Nation's immigration system. OBIM is charged with fostering 
full interoperability and real-time data sharing among the 
Homeland Security, Justice and Defense Departments' biometric 
identity management systems. Finally, OBIM is responsible for 
maintaining the Arrival and Departure Information System 
(ADIS), which supports CBP and ICE operations.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $232,190,000 for OBIM, the same as 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. The Committee's 
recommendation reflects the enactment of Public Law 113-6, 
realigning US-VISIT funding to this account, ICE and CBP. To 
ensure no ambiguity about core program responsibilities due to 
the realignment of funds, the Committee reiterates that ICE is 
responsible for conducting over-stay analysis and CBP is 
responsible for carrying out entry and exit program policy and 
operations.
    Language is included in the bill requiring a multi-year 
investment and management plan be submitted with the 
President's budget request that justifies current and future 
requirements.

                        International Activities

    The Department shall update the Committee on whether 
international conferences and activities result or advance data 
sharing arrangements, including the Five Country Conference and 
Visa Waiver Program.

           Automated Biometric Identification System (IDENT)

    The Committee is disappointed in the lack of progress 
toward enrolling TSA's special vetted populations and 
departmental employees and contractors into the biometrics 
system. Consequently, OBIM is directed to provide a briefing on 
its progress and strategy for these enrollments not later than 
60 days after the date of enactment of this Act. The Committee 
continues to encourage OBIM efforts to reduce IDENT 
infrastructure operating costs while ensuring that current 
levels of services are maintained.

                            Unique Identity

    DHS is encouraged to work cooperatively with the 
Departments of Justice, Defense and State to standardize and 
share biometric information. The Committee directs OBIM to 
provide semi-annual briefings on progress toward integrating 
the various systems, including Unique Identity, to describe 
existing capability gaps and a methodology by which to close 
them.

                        Office of Health Affairs

 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $132,367,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................       131,797,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       123,425,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................        -8,942,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................       -8,372,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The Office of Health Affairs (OHA) serves as the Department 
of Homeland Security's principal agent for all medical and 
public health matters. Working across Federal, State, local, 
tribal, and territorial governments and with the private 
sector, OHA has the lead DHS role in the establishment of a 
scientifically rigorous, intelligence-based, medical and 
biodefense architecture that ensures the health and medical 
security of our Nation.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $123,425,000 for OHA, $8,372,000 
below the amount requested and $8,942,000 below the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2013. A comparison of the budget 
estimate to the Committee recommended level by budget activity 
is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Budget Estimate      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
BioWatch..........................        $90,609,000        $79,534,000
National Biosurveillence                    8,000,000         13,000,000
 Integration System...............
Chemical Defense Program..........            824,000            824,000
Planning and Coordination.........          4,995,000          4,995,000
Salaries and Expenses.............         27,369,000         25,072,000
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total, Office of Health              $131,797,000       $123,425,000
     Affairs......................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       Biosurveillance Activities

    The Committee recommends $79,534,000 for the BioWatch 
program, $11,075,000 below the amount requested and $5,771 
below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. This funding 
sustains Generations 1/2 at the current services level.
    The Committee is dismayed by the lack of progress on the 
Biowatch Generation 3 program. In September 2012, the 
Department briefed the Committees on the new approved path 
forward for the program based on the new Acquisition Decision 
Memorandum (ADM) to include the plans for a release of a 
Request for Proposals and Source Selection. However, none of 
those activities have occurred. Further, the Committee was 
briefed on the development of a new Analysis of Alternatives 
(AoA), but the schedule for completion of that product has also 
slipped. The Department now states that the current funding 
will be allowed to lapse with no movement forward planned until 
the AoA is completed in the fall.
    The Committee finds this delay unacceptable. The Department 
is directed to immediately proceed with an effective use of the 
current funding or issue a new ADM. The Department shall fund 
either continued development of autonomous biodectection or 
other similar technology that would further the Nation's 
biodetection capability with the available unobligated funds. 
The Department should ensure that the plan ahead motivates 
industry to continue cost-sharing in future biodetection 
development and to continue pursuing development efforts so as 
not to lose valuable experience in the field. Restarting the 
effort at a later date to create autonomous biodetection would 
require extra funding and time to re-establish a critical mass 
of national capability.

              National Biosurveillance Integration System

    The Committee recommends $13,000,000 for the National 
BioSurveillance Integration System (NBIS), $5,000,000 above the 
amount requested and $13,000 above the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2013. Funds provided for this function shall be 
used to sustain existing biosurveillance capabilities and 
activities. Beginning in 2012, NBIS planned to develop several 
pilot projects with other Federal, State, private sector, and 
non-governmental entities in the following areas: food; 
agriculture; emerging diseases and human health; social media; 
and State and local biosurveillance data sharing. The increase 
of $5,000,000 above the request is to sustain existing 
biosurveillance activities and to expand the diversification of 
biosurveillance capabilities through new pilots that shall be 
awarded on a competitive basis. The Committee directs the 
Department to brief the Committee on the expenditure plan for 
use of the increase above the request prior to obligation of 
the funds.

                         Salaries and Expenses

    The Committee recommends $25,072,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses, $2,297,000 below the amount requested and $1,603,000 
below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013.

                  Federal Emergency Management Agency


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $972,145,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................     1,042,382,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       914,795,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................       -57,350,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................     -127,587,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) manages and 
coordinates the Federal response to major domestic disasters 
and emergencies of all types in accordance with the Robert T. 
Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act. It 
supports the effectiveness of emergency response providers at 
all levels of government in responding to terrorist attacks, 
major disasters, and other emergencies. FEMA also administers 
public assistance and hazard mitigation programs to prevent or 
reduce the risk to life and property from floods and other 
hazards. Finally, FEMA leads all Federal incident management 
preparedness and response planning through a comprehensive 
National Incident Management System that involves Federal, 
State, tribal, and local government personnel, agencies, and 
regional authorities.
    FEMA provides for the development and maintenance of an 
integrated, nationwide capability to prepare for, mitigate 
against, respond to, and recover from the consequences of major 
disasters and emergencies of all types in partnership with 
other Federal agencies, State, local and tribal governments, 
volunteer organizations, and the private sector. Salaries and 
Expenses support all of FEMA's programs by coordinating all 
policy, managerial, resource, and administrative actions 
between headquarters and regional offices.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $914,795,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses, $127,587,000 below the amount requested and 
$57,350,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. FEMA 
shall provide an expenditure plan not later than 90 days after 
the date of enactment of this Act. The plan shall be detailed 
by the PPA structure as detailed in this report and by office. 
It shall include actual funding from the prior year, the 
current fiscal year, and deviations between the two years. Each 
year shall include the number of positions, the number of FTE, 
the amount for salaries and benefits, and the amount for the 
program, showing all sources of funding. Specific information 
regarding the transfer of funding from other appropriations 
should be included, with the same level of detail currently 
provided to the Committee.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendation:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget Request      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Administrative and regional              $240,736,000       $229,213,000
 offices..........................
Preparedness and protection.......        293,684,000        174,766,000
Response..........................        171,665,000        170,837,000
    Urban search and rescue              [27,513,000]       [27,513,000]
     response system..............
Recovery..........................         55,530,000         55,121,000
Mitigation........................         25,882,000         25,808,000
Mission Support...................        144,579,000        148,744,000
Centrally managed accounts........        110,306,000        110,306,000
                                   -------------------------------------
      Total, Salaries and Expenses     $1,042,382,000       $914,795,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       Office of External Affairs

    The Committee provides $7,309,000 for the Office of 
External Affairs, a reduction of $7,309,000 below the amount 
requested and $7,518,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2013. The Committee recommends this reduction due to the 
failure of this office to provide timely and accurate 
information. The continued failures are unacceptable and must 
be addressed at the highest leadership level within FEMA. 
Senior leaders need to ensure that the office is prepared to 
maintain a level of effort commensurate with other DHS 
component offices, to include responding expeditiously to 
requests for information. Limited taxpayer funds cannot be 
allowed to be squandered on this office while at the same time 
the Department is proposing to cut funding for vital frontline 
security operations.

                         Facilities Management

    The Committee recommends an additional $5,000,000 for 
repairs and capital improvement to address unfunded projects at 
national training centers. None of these funds may be obligated 
until five days after the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) of FEMA 
briefs the Committee on an execution plan for these funds.

                  National Capital Region Coordination

    The Committee provides no funds for activities authorized 
by Section 882 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002, a 
reduction of $2,602,000 below the amount requested. The 
functions and personnel shall be transferred to the Office of 
the Administrator to allow for a more efficient and effective 
use of taxpayer funds. The Committee directs the Administrator 
of FEMA to provide a report not later than 60 days after the 
date of enactment of this Act on how FEMA will fulfill the 
requirement of Section 882 utilizing a new organizational 
process.

               Mount Weather Emergency Operations Center

    The Committee recommends $22,000,000 for the Mount Weather 
Emergency Operations Center facility, $10,000,000 below the 
amount requested and the same amount as provided in fiscal year 
2013. Due to the inadequacy of the budget request and the 
inability of FEMA to provide the requested spend plans, this 
bill reprioritizes scarce funding towards operations and 
frontline staffing. The Committee notes that funds requested 
must be fully justified in the official budget justification 
and if needed, in the classified annex.

                        Urban Search and Rescue

    The Committee recommends $27,513,000 for Urban Search and 
Rescue from within the amount provided for Salaries and 
Expenses, the same as the amount requested and $7,667,000 below 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2013.
    The Committee notes that once a search and rescue team is 
activated to respond to a disaster, the individual team's 
expenses are funded from within the funds provided for the 
Disaster Relief Fund.

                              Social Media

    The Committee directs the Administrator of FEMA to brief 
the Committee not later than 30 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act on the status of the agency's efforts to 
use social media in disaster response activities. This briefing 
shall serve as an update to the related report directed by 
House Report 112-492.

                        STATE AND LOCAL PROGRAMS
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................    $1,464,617,000
Budget estimate, fiscal year 2014\1\..................     2,123,200,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     1,500,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................       +35,383,000
    Budget estimate, fiscal year 2014.................     -623,200,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.
\1\The Administration proposed moving Emergency Management Performance
  Grants and Firefighter Assistance Grants under State and Local
  Programs.

                                Mission

    State and Local Programs help build and sustain the 
preparedness and response capabilities of the first responder 
community. These programs include support for various grant 
programs and training programs.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $1,500,000,000 for State and Local 
Programs, $623,200,000 below the amount requested and 
$35,383,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2013.
    As part of the budget request, the Administration proposed 
including Firefighter Assistance Grants and Emergency 
Management Performance Grants under this account. The Committee 
again denies this proposal and provides funding for both of 
these grant programs as separate appropriations, consistent 
with prior years.
    In fiscal year 2013 and again in fiscal year 2014, FEMA 
proposed a new grant program called the National Preparedness 
Grant Program under State and Local Programs. This proposal is 
denied due to the lack of Congressional authorization and the 
lack of the necessary details that are required for the 
initiation of a new program, to include grant guidance and 
implementation plans. The Department should work with the 
appropriate committees of jurisdiction to obtain the necessary 
authorizing legislation and to clearly define the Federal role 
and reassess the most effective delivery of support and 
resources to sustain and improve homeland security capabilities 
prior to submitting a budget request for such a program.
    Due to these concerns, the Committee continues the grant 
structure as enacted in Public Law 112-74. The funds provided 
for State and Local Program grants are to be allocated by the 
Secretary according to threat, vulnerability, and consequence 
to assist high-risk urban areas, States, local and Tribal 
governments, and other homeland security partners in 
preventing, preparing for, protecting against, and responding 
to acts of terrorism.
    Within the funds available, the Committee recommends 
$50,000,000 for Operation Stonegarden. All awards under 
Operation Stonegarden shall be made on a competitive basis to 
tribal governments and units of local government, including 
towns, cities, and counties along borders of the United States, 
to enhance the coordination between local and Federal law 
enforcement agencies in furtherance of the Nation's border 
security. Operation Stonegarden's eligible costs include, but 
shall not necessarily be limited to: overtime; vehicle 
maintenance; vehicle and equipment rental costs; reimbursement 
for mileage; fuel costs; equipment replacement costs; and 
travel costs for law enforcement entities assisting other local 
jurisdictions in law enforcement activities. The Committee 
directs that only CBP and FEMA make award decisions. No 
administrative costs shall be deducted from Operation 
Stonegarden award totals by States.
    The Committee recommends $235,174,000 for National 
Programs, $235,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 
2013, to sustain these programs at the same funding levels and 
for the same purposes as provided in fiscal year 2013. The 
Committee is aware of the unique capabilities of regional 
training centers, which provide initial training to first 
responders and additional training related to new techniques 
and technologies. The Committee encourages the Department to 
continue to work with regional training centers in future 
funding requests. Within the funds recommended for National 
Programs, the Committee includes $27,000,000 for continuing 
training and directs FEMA to prioritize funding to be 
competitively awarded for FEMA-certified rural training in 
crisis management for school-based incidents, mass fatality 
planning and response, the development of emergency operations 
plans, bioterrorism awareness, media engagement strategies for 
first responders, and hazardous materials.
    The Committee continues bill language mandating timeframes 
for the application process for certain grants to ensure that 
funds do not languish at DHS and limits to not more than five 
percent the amount a grantee may allocate for expenses directly 
related to administration of the grant. The Committee continues 
bill language allowing for the construction of communication 
towers and requiring grantees to provide reports on their use 
of funds.
    In accordance with the 9/11 Act, at least 25 percent of 
funds allocated to the State Homeland Security Grant Program 
and Urban Area Security Initiative shall be used for Law 
Enforcement Terrorism Prevention activities. In addition, each 
State and Puerto Rico shall pass on no less than 80 percent of 
their grant funding to local units of government within 45 days 
of receiving the funds.
    The Committee is pleased that in fiscal year 2012, the 
Department began restoring the original intent of the Urban 
Area Security Initiative (UASI) program by limiting funding to 
31 regions. The Committee continues to believe the UASI program 
should be further focused on the areas under the greatest 
threat and at the greatest risk, providing funding to a maximum 
of 25 regions. This will ensure that only those regions at 
highest-risk of terrorist attack receive funding under UASI in 
the current fiscal environment.
    The Committee is aware that previous grant guidance 
conflicts with the 9/11 Act by further limiting the amount of 
funds that can be used to pay the salaries and expenses of 
intelligence analysts. The Committee directs FEMA to fully 
comply with the 9/11 Act.
    For the purposes of determining eligibility for funds, any 
county, city, village, town, district, borough, parish, port 
authority, transit authority, intercity rail provider, commuter 
rail system, freight rail provider, water district, regional 
planning commission, council of government, Indian tribe with 
jurisdiction over Indian country, authorized tribal 
organization, Alaskan Native village, independent authority, 
special district, or other political subdivision of any State 
shall constitute a ``local unit of government.''
    The Committee notes that the purpose of FEMA's grants, as 
authorized, are not to serve as operating subsidies for States 
and local governments; rather, grant funds are intended to 
improve preparedness capabilities. The Committee directs FEMA 
to be cognizant of the extended timelines associated with 
necessary, well-justified capital improvements and ensure the 
guidance for the various grants allow for capital improvements, 
as appropriate. Further, FEMA should review the use of one-year 
extensions, if needed. The Committee encourages grant guidance 
allow for the funding of reverse 911 for weather emergencies.
    The Committee includes a general provision requiring FEMA 
to brief the Committee five days prior to any announcement of 
State and local grant awards. Such briefings shall include 
detailed information on the risk analysis employed, the process 
for determining effectiveness, the process or formula used for 
selecting grantees, and any changes to methodologies used in 
the previous fiscal year.
    The Committee directs that future grant guidance for all 
homeland security grant programs shall inform recipients that 
expenditures on any training, programs, presentations, and 
speakers regarding counterterrorism that include information 
about violent extremism, homegrown violent extremism, or 
domestic violent extremism, which are acquired from an entity 
other than the Department must be consistent with applicable 
laws with respect to racial, ethnic, and religious profiling.
    The Committee remains concerned with the lack of 
measurement by FEMA of State and Local Grants. While FEMA 
continues to move forward with the implementation of the 
National Preparedness Goal, the lack of quantifiable metrics to 
measure the return on investment needs to be addressed 
expeditiously.

                     FIREFIGHTER ASSISTANCE GRANTS
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $674,326,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014\1\...................             - - -
Recommended in the bill...............................       675,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................          +674,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................     +675,000,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.
\1\The budget request includes $675,000,000 for Firefighter Assistance
  Grants within State and Local Programs.

                                Mission

    Firefighter Assistance Grants are provided to local fire 
departments for the purpose of protecting the health and safety 
of the public and protecting firefighting personnel, including 
volunteers and emergency medical service personnel, against 
fire and fire-related hazards.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $675,000,000 for Firefighter 
Assistance Grants, $675,000,000 above the amount requested and 
$674,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. The 
budget request did not include a separate appropriation for 
Firefighter Assistance Grants, but instead proposed 
$675,000,000 for this activity within State and Local Programs. 
Within this level, the Committee recommends $337,500,000 for 
the Assistance to Firefighters Grant program (AFG), which 
provides firefighter equipment, training, vehicles, and other 
resources. The Committee also recommends $337,500,000 for 
firefighter jobs under the Staffing for Adequate Emergency 
Response (SAFER) program.
    FEMA is directed to continue granting funds directly to 
local fire departments and to include the United States Fire 
Administration during the grant decision process. FEMA is also 
directed to maintain an all-hazards focus and is prohibited 
from limiting beyond current law the list of eligible 
activities, including those related to wellness. Funds are 
available until September 30, 2015.
    The Committee continues the requirement for FEMA to peer 
review AFG and SAFER grant applications that meet criteria 
established by FEMA and the Fire Service to clearly define the 
criteria for peer review in the grant application package; to 
rank order applications according to peer-review; and to fund 
applications according to their rank order. For those 
applicants whose grant applications are not reviewed, FEMA must 
provide an official notification detailing why the application 
did not meet the criteria for review.

                EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE GRANTS
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $349,650,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014\1\...................             - - -
Recommended in the bill...............................       350,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................          +350,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................     +350,000,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.
\1\The budget request includes $350,000,000 for Emergency Management
  Performance Grants within State and Local Programs.

                                Mission

    Emergency Management Performance Grant (EMPG) funds are 
used to support comprehensive emergency management at the State 
and local levels and to encourage the improvement of 
mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery capabilities 
for all hazards.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $350,000,000 for EMPG, 
$350,000,000 above the amount requested and $350,000 above the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2013. The request did not 
include a separate appropriation for EMPG but instead proposed 
$350,000,000 for this activity within State and Local Programs. 
Consistent with past years, the Committee again does not agree 
to transfer EMPG to State and Local Programs, continuing 
instead to fund the EMPG program as a separate appropriation.
    The Committee directs FEMA to continue EMPG grant practices 
used in fiscal year 2007, including a continued emphasis on 
all-hazards activities and the inclusion of personnel expenses 
and Emergency Operations Centers as eligible uses of funding.

              RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PROGRAM
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................       -$1,443,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................        -1,272,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        -1,272,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................          +171,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................            - - -*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program (REPP) 
ensures that the public health and safety of citizens living 
near commercial nuclear power plants will be adequately 
protected in the event of a nuclear power station incident. In 
addition, the program informs and educates the public about 
radiological emergency preparedness. REPP provides funding only 
for emergency preparedness activities of State and local 
governments that take place beyond nuclear power plant 
boundaries.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee provides for the receipt and expenditure of 
REPP fees, which are collected as authorized by Public Law 105-
276. The request estimates that fee collections will exceed 
expenditures by $1,272,000 in fiscal year 2014. The Committee 
urges FEMA to work with the Department of Defense Chemical 
Biological Medical Systems Directorate and the Department of 
Health and Human Services to develop protection capabilities 
that could increase protection for the civilian population in 
the event of a nuclear or radiological incident.

                   UNITED STATES FIRE ADMINISTRATION
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................       $43,956,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................        41,306,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        42,162,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................        -1,794,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................         +856,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 O
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The mission of the United States Fire Administration (USFA) 
is to reduce economic losses and loss of life due to fire and 
related emergencies through leadership, coordination, and 
support. USFA trains the Nation's first responder and health 
care leaders to evaluate and minimize community risk, enhance 
the security of critical infrastructure, and better prepare 
communities to react to emergencies of all kinds.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $42,162,000 for USFA, $856,000 
above the amount requested and $1,794,000 below the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2013. The Committee denies the proposal 
to transfer grant authority from USFA to AFG and provides an 
increase of $1,000,000 for the USFA to continue the grant 
program, as authorized. The Committee requests that future 
budget justifications identify funding levels for the National 
Fire Incident Reporting System and National Fire Academy, as 
well as any other initiatives. Further, the Committee 
understands that the USFA has been in the process of making 
upgrades to the National Fire Incident Reporting System. These 
changes include allowing fire chiefs to obtain real-time data 
about their communities and compare their fire data to data 
from similar-sized departments to identify trends and 
efficiencies. The Committee urges the Administrator of FEMA to 
work with the USFA to ensure that USFA has the technical and 
financial resources to finish these upgrades.

                          DISASTER RELIEF FUND
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*\1\...................    $6,983,342,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014\2\...................     6,220,908,000
Recommended in the bill\2\............................     6,220,908,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................      -786,434,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................             - - -*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.
\1\Includes $6,400,000,000 that was provided in Public Law 112-77 and is
  designated for major disasters pursuant to 251(b)(2)(D) of the
  Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
\2\Includes $5,262,386,000 designated for major disasters pursuant to
  251(b)(2)(D) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act
  of 1985.

                                Mission

    FEMA is responsible for administering disaster assistance 
programs and coordinating the Federal response following 
presidential disaster declarations. Major activities under the 
Disaster Relief Fund (DRF) include: providing aid to families 
and individuals; supporting the efforts of State and local 
governments to take emergency protective measures, clear 
debris, and repair infrastructure; mitigate the effects of 
future disasters; and help States and local communities manage 
disaster response, including through the assistance of disaster 
field office staff and automated data processing support.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends a total of $6,220,908,000 for the 
Disaster Relief Fund. Of the funds provided, $5,626,386,000 is 
designated by the Congress as being for disaster relief 
pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(D) of the Balanced Budget and 
Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985. Of the funding not 
designated by the Congress as being for disaster relief 
pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(D) of the Balanced Budget and 
Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, $24,000,000 shall be 
transferred to the DHS OIG for audits and investigations 
related to disasters. The Committee directs FEMA to brief the 
Committee not later than July 15, 2013, on the implementation 
of the numerous DHS OIG recommendations that direct FEMA to 
recover funds from various public assistance grants.
    A provision is continued in the bill stating the timeframes 
and information which FEMA must report to the Committees on the 
DRF. A report on the expenditure of funds for disaster 
readiness and support, including quarterly updates, is 
required, as in previous years.
    The Committee continues statutory requirements for annual 
and monthly DRF reporting as originally directed in Public Law 
112-74 and Public Law 113-2. The request deletes these 
requirements even though the reports are used extensively 
within the Administration and within Congress. The Committee is 
perplexed that an Administration that prides itself on 
transparency would propose to delete such vital oversight 
tools.
    The Committee directs FEMA, not later than 90 days after 
the date of enactment of this Act, to submit a report to the 
Committee and to the House Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure describing options for making housing 
cooperative and condominium associations eligible for Federal 
disaster assistance. The report shall include the following: 
(1) a description of the current eligibility of housing 
cooperative and condominium association owners and residents 
for disaster relief under the Individual Assistance Program 
(IA); (2) a description of the availability of IA for owners or 
residents to help cover the costs of repairing disaster-related 
damage to common areas, including any details of instances in 
the past 10 years where cooperative and condominium owners or 
residences received IA to help cover costs and assessments for 
repairs to common areas; and (3) a discussion of options, 
including any proposed changes to statute, for making housing 
cooperative and condominium associations directly eligible for 
Federal disaster assistance based on disaster-related damage to 
common areas, through either an existing program or through a 
new program.
    In a report issued in September 2012 (GAO-12-838), GAO 
noted that FEMA needed improved criteria to assess a 
jurisdiction's capability to respond and recover on its own 
following a disaster. Specifically, FEMA primarily relies on a 
population-based criterion to determine whether to recommend to 
the President that a locality receive funding. To address the 
concerns raised by GAO, the Committee directs FEMA to provide a 
report to the Committee not later than 30 days after the date 
of enactment of this Act on the status of FEMA's implementation 
of the recommendations included in GA0-12-838, to include 
actions already taken and a timeline for full implementation.

                 FLOOD HAZARD MAPPING AND RISK ANALYSIS
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................       $95,234,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................        84,361,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        95,202,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................           -32,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................      +10,841,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The mission of the Flood Hazard Mapping and Risk Analysis 
fund is to modernize, maintain, and digitize the inventory of 
maps and develop a more integrated process of identifying, 
assessing, communicating, and mitigating flood related risks. 
This information is used to determine appropriate risk-based 
premium rates for the National Flood Insurance Program, 
complete hazard determinations required for the Nation's 
lending institutions, and develop appropriate mitigation and 
disaster response plans for Federal, State, and local emergency 
management personnel.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $95,202,000 for Flood Hazard 
Mapping and Risk Analysis, $10,841,000 above the amount 
requested and $32,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 
2013. The Committee notes that an additional $154,300,000 is 
available for flood plain management and mapping activities 
within the National Flood Insurance Fund. The Committee 
encourages FEMA to prioritize as criteria the number of 
streams, rivers and coastal miles within a State and the 
participation of the State in leveraging non-Federal 
contributions. The Committee notes that there are still 
thousands of miles of streams, rivers, and coastal lines that 
still need detailed studies and remapping.

                     NATIONAL FLOOD INSURANCE FUND
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $170,829,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................       176,300,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       176,300,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................        +5,471,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................             - - -*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The National Flood Insurance Fund (NFIF), which was 
established in the Treasury by the National Flood Insurance Act 
of 1968, is a fee-generated fund that supports the National 
Flood Insurance Program. The Act, as amended, authorizes the 
Federal government to provide flood insurance on a national 
basis.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee includes bill language providing up to 
$22,000,000 for salaries and expenses to administer the NFIF, 
the same as the amount requested and the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2013. Consistent with the budget request, the 
Committee provides $120,000,000 for flood-related grants. No 
less than $154,300,000 is available for flood plain management 
and flood mapping. Flood mitigation funds are available until 
September 30, 2015 and funding is offset by premium 
collections.
    The Committee is concerned about persistent reports of 
steep flood insurance rate increases that numerous NFIP 
policyholders are experiencing as a result of the 
implementation of the Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Act of 
2012. While the Committee shares the very important objective 
of making the NFIP an actuarially sound program, it is 
concerning that homeowners who have been in compliance with 
relevant building codes and whose properties have not 
experienced repetitive flood events are being subjected to 
sudden, unanticipated and exorbitant NFIP rate increases. The 
Committee directs FEMA to provide a report within 60 days after 
the date of enactment of this Act setting forth steps that are 
being taken to address this problem and what changes in the 
law, regulations or administrative procedures may be necessary 
to eliminate or reduce the rate increases for homeowners 
described above.

                  NATIONAL PREDISASTER MITIGATION FUND
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................       $24,975,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................             - - -
Recommended in the bill...............................        22,500,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................        -2,475,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................       +22,500,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The National Predisaster Mitigation Fund (PDM) provides 
technical assistance and grants to State, local, and tribal 
governments, and to universities to reduce the risks associated 
with disasters. Resources support the development and 
enhancement of hazard mitigation plans, as well as the 
implementation of disaster mitigation projects.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $22,500,000 for the PDM, 
$22,500,000 above the amount requested and $2,475,000 below the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2013. The Committee rejects the 
proposed termination of this program. PDM grants are one of the 
only programs that provide funding to communities prior to a 
disaster. It has been repeatedly demonstrated during disasters 
that these types of investments lead to significant savings by 
significantly mitigating risks and damage.

                       EMERGENCY FOOD AND SHELTER
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $119,880,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................       100,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       120,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................          +120,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................       +20,000,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The Emergency Food and Shelter National Board Program was 
created in 1983 to supplement the work of local social service 
organizations within the United States, both private and 
governmental, to help people in need of emergency assistance. 
The program provides funds to local communities for homeless 
programs, including soup kitchens, food banks, shelters, and 
homeless prevention services.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $120,000,000 for the Emergency 
Food and Shelter Program, $20,000,000 above the amount 
requested and $120,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 
2013.

       TITLE IV--RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, TRAINING, AND SERVICES


           United States Citizenship and Immigration Services

 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $111,812,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................       124,213,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       114,213,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................        +2,401,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................      -10,000,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The mission of the United States Citizenship and 
Immigration Services (USCIS) is to process all immigrant and 
non-immigrant benefits provided to visitors to the United 
States; adjudicate naturalization requests; promote national 
security as it relates to immigration issues; eliminate 
immigration adjudication backlogs; and implement solutions to 
improve immigration customer services. USCIS also maintains 
substantial records and data related to the individuals who 
have applied for immigration benefits.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $114,213,000 for USCIS, 
$10,000,000 below the amount requested and $2,401,000 above the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2013. The recommendation does 
not include amounts for requested cost of living adjustment, 
thereby increasing E-Verify by $324,000 for program 
enhancements. Though the recommendation for this account does 
not include appropriated funds for immigrant integration 
grants, bill language is included in Title V permitting USCIS 
to expend no more than $10,000,000 in user fees to support 
these grants.

                                E-Verify

    While the accuracy of E-Verify is much improved, the 
Committee supports USCIS's intent to ensure individuals are not 
incorrectly identified as ineligible to work. The Committee 
again directs USCIS to continue to develop a review process for 
E-Verify final non-confirmations and provide quarterly 
briefings to the Committee about the progress of this 
development.
    Appropriate controls and analytical systems are critical 
for identifying improper use of E-Verify by employers. The 
Committee directs USCIS to continue regular briefings on its 
progress to implement a robust compliance review program for E-
Verify, including any instances of misuse of the system and 
actions taken to address those instances. Likewise, the 
Committee strongly urges USCIS to update and publish regular E-
Verify accuracy and performance audits.

                        User Fee Funded Programs

    Virtually all USCIS's activities are funded through user 
fees generated by persons applying for immigration benefits. In 
fiscal year 2014, USCIS estimates it will expend 
$3,095,253,000, which is sufficient to support operations and 
authorized activities. USCIS is directed to continue quarterly 
briefings on fee revenues and obligations.
    USCIS is finalizing a study which will inform an updated 
fee schedule. The Committee directs USCIS to provide a briefing 
on the conclusions and projected date of release of the fee 
study at least 30 days before the new schedule is made public. 
Included within this briefing, USCIS shall provide the current 
and projected costs of operations, like asylum and refugee 
processing. USCIS is urged to remain sensitive to maintaining 
affordable naturalization application fees.

                     Immigrant Integration Programs

    The Department requested funds to support the Office of 
Citizenship and award grants to organizations that provide 
citizenship preparation services. While the Committee supports 
the efforts of the Office of Citizenship to promote civic 
education through the naturalization process, the Committee 
recommends the use of fee funds for this purpose. Active civic 
participation is critical to the American way of life, which is 
why individuals seeking citizenship must take the 
naturalization test to assess their civic knowledge. Legal 
permanent residents who are seeking citizenship preparation 
services are the direct beneficiaries of this funding. USCIS 
has sufficient cash balances in its fee accounts to support 
these limited grants, if it chooses to prioritize its use of 
fee funds for such a purpose. The bill continues a general 
provision clarifying the availability of fee funds for these 
grants. At the same time, the Committee notes that private, 
non-profit organizations across the country also provide 
funding and services for immigrant integration.

                            Deferred Action

    Not later than 30 days after the date of enactment of this 
Act, the Committee directs USCIS to provide detailed data 
regarding applications for Deferred Action for Childhood 
Arrivals, to include the number of applications received, 
approved and denied, and cost incurred since program inception 
and anticipated for the program in fiscal years 2013 and 2014. 
Additionally, the Committee directs USCIS to provide processing 
times for all application types not later than 30 days after 
the date of enactment of this Act.

                 Fraud Detection and National Security

    The Committee acknowledges the important work and efforts 
of the Fraud Detection and National Security workforce but 
remains concerned about the limited resources dedicated to this 
function. The Committee urges USCIS to build the Fraud 
Detection and National Security workforce in accordance with 
recommendations derived from USCIS's resource allocation model.

                        Military Naturalizations

    The Committee notes that the costs of military 
naturalizations are reimbursed by the DOD through the execution 
of an annual Inter-Agency Agreement (IAA). Therefore, no funds 
are appropriated in this account for that purpose. The 
Committee directs USCIS to ensure that IAAs are executed in a 
timely manner.

                          USCIS Transformation

    The Committee recognizes the importance of transformation 
to USCIS operations and directs USCIS to continue quarterly 
updates on this program.

              Electronic Access to Immigration Information

    The Committee recognizes the headway USCIS has made 
converting immigration records to a digital format and 
encourages the agency to continue its efforts. Not later than 
30 days after the date of enactment of this Act, USCIS is 
directed to update the Committee on the progress and to include 
information about improvements to the Enterprise Document 
Management System. In addition, USCIS is directed to coordinate 
with ICE on the use of digital records in legal proceedings.

         Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlements (SAVE)

    Last year, the Committee requested the DHS OIG review the 
SAVE program to determine whether systems and processes are 
adequate to ensure accurate information for validating an 
individual's immigration status. Without precise information on 
immigration status, agencies risk granting benefits to 
unentitled individuals. The report, ``Improvements Needed for 
SAVE To Accurately Determine Immigration Status of Individuals 
Ordered Deported,'' was released in December 2012. Multiple 
recommendations were suggested in order to update USCIS systems 
and improve accuracy of information. USCIS is directed to 
provide a briefing to the Committee on the OIG recommendations 
and the extent to which they have been adopted or rejected by 
October 31, 2013.

                       Naturalization Ceremonies

    The Committee is concerned that USCIS failed to comply with 
the direction in House Report 112-492 to identify funds 
allocated to naturalization and oath of allegiance ceremonies. 
The Committee directs USCIS to provide this information not 
later than July 31, 2013.
    Again, the Committee directs USCIS to work with local 
public and private groups to hold naturalization and oath of 
allegiance ceremonies as part of community Independence Day 
celebrations. The Committee also encourages USCIS to review 
internal policies that limit its ability to use fee revenues to 
make small grants and to provide agency employee support to 
local community groups that would otherwise be financially 
unable to host such ceremonies.

                Federal Law Enforcement Training Center


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $228,239,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................       240,544,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       227,845,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................          -394,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................      -12,699,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC) 
provides the necessary facilities, equipment and support 
services to conduct advanced, specialized and refresher 
training for Federal law enforcement personnel. FLETC serves as 
an interagency law enforcement training organization for 90 
Federal agencies having law enforcement responsibilities. FLETC 
also provides services to State, local and international law 
enforcement agencies, and on a space available basis, to other 
Federal agencies with related law enforcement missions.
    FLETC is headquartered in Glynco, GA, and has facilities in 
Artesia, NM, and Charleston, SC. Each of these facilities is 
designed primarily for residential training operations. A 
fourth training facility is located in Cheltenham, MD, and 
provides in-service and re-qualification training for officers 
and agents in the Washington, D.C., area. In cooperation with 
the State Department, FLETC also manages an International Law 
Enforcement Academy in Gaborone, Botswana, and a FLETC staff 
member serves as Deputy Director at the International 
Enforcement Academy in Bangkok, Thailand.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $227,845,000 for FLETC, 
$12,699,000 below the amount requested and $394,000 below the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2013. The requested amount 
includes a reduction of $23,380,000 in identified efficiencies, 
an increase of $4,500,000 to expand active shooter threat 
training programs and funds sufficient to phase-in 1,600 new 
CBP officers. The Committee denies the proposed transfer of the 
National Computer Forensics Institute from the U.S. Secret 
Service to FLETC.

                           FLETC Utilization

    The Committee directs FLETC to provide data on the number 
of training classes, customers and trainees and the utilization 
of training capacity with the fiscal year 2015 budget request.

     ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, IMPROVEMENTS, AND RELATED EXPENSES
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................       $28,357,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................        30,885,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        30,885,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................        +2,528,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................            - - -*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    This account provides for the acquisition, construction, 
improvements, equipment, furnishings and related costs for 
expanding and maintaining of facilities of FLETC.

                             Recommendation

    As requested, the Committee recommends $30,885,000 for 
Acquisition, Construction, Improvements and Related Expenses, 
$2,528,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. Of 
this amount, $1,500,000 supports debt service payments on the 
Energy Savings Performance Contract.

                         Science and Technology


                     MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $131,868,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................       129,608,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       129,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................        -2,868,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................         -608,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The Management and Administration appropriation provides 
for the salaries and expenses of the Science and Technology 
Directorate (S&T).

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $129,000,000 for S&T Management 
and Administration, $608,000 below the amount requested and 
$2,868,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013.

           RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, ACQUISITION, AND OPERATIONS
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $702,767,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................     1,397,488,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     1,096,488,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................      +393,721,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................     -301,000,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The mission of the Science and Technology Directorate is to 
develop and deploy technologies and capabilities to secure the 
US homeland. The Directorate conducts, stimulates, and enables 
research, development, testing, evaluation, and the timely 
transition of homeland security capabilities to Federal, State, 
and local operational end users. This activity includes 
investments in both evolutionary and revolutionary capabilities 
with high-payoff potential; early deployment of off-the-shelf, 
proven technologies to provide for initial defense capability; 
near-term utilization of emerging technologies to counter 
current terrorist threats; and development of new capabilities 
to thwart future and emerging threats.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $1,096,488,000 for Research, 
Development, Acquisition and Operations (RDA&O), $301,000,000 
below the amount requested and $393,721,000 above the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2013.
    A comparison of the budget estimate to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Budget Estimate      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Research, Development and
 Innovation (RD&I):
    RD&I: Apex....................      [$15,013,000]        $15,013,000
    RD&I: Border Security.........       [31,580,000]         31,580,000
    RD&I: Chem/Bio/Radiological/        [194,294,000]        194,294,000
     Nuclear/Explosives Defense...
    RD&I: Disaster Resilience.....      [130,723,000]        130,723,000
    RD&I: Cyber Security..........       [70,829,000]         70,829,000
    RD&I: Counter Terrorist.......       [24,561,000]         24,561,000
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Research,               467,000,000        467,000,000
         Development and
         Innovation...............
Acquisition and Operations Support         41,703,000         41,703,000
Laboratory Facilities.............        857,785,000         547,785,00
University Programs...............         31,000,000         40,000,000
                                   -------------------------------------
            Total RDA&O...........     $1,397,488,000     $1,096,488,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                 Research, Development, and Innovation

    For fiscal year 2014, the Committee recommends $467,000,000 
for RD&I. This is the same as the amount requested and 
$16,896,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. Of 
the funds provided, no less than $5,000,000 shall be 
competitively awarded to university-based entities with 
demonstrated success in rapidly developing and delivering 
models, prototypes and products and facilitating the commercial 
adoption of S&T-sponsored technologies.

                              S&T Reforms

    During the past several years, funding for the S&T 
portfolio has fluctuated significantly--due in part to concerns 
with the Directorate's inability to measure the return on 
investment of its various research and development (R&D) 
programs and the lack of a comprehensive strategy for aligning 
R&D with DHS mission requirements. Unfortunately, there is 
currently no formal process or guidance within the Department 
for setting R&D priorities, defining R&D requirements, 
establishing R&D goals and milestones, and coordinating R&D 
activities across components and with the S&T Directorate. To 
the extent that collaborative efforts do take place, they 
appear to be largely based on personal relationships between 
component and S&T personnel, as opposed to more structured 
interactions that transcend personnel changes and changes in 
leadership or administrations.
    Regrettably, these are not new concerns--many have been 
highlighted by the GAO or the National Association for Public 
Administration (NAPA). In a 2009 report, NAPA included a number 
of related recommendations for reforms but, regretfully, many 
were never addressed. In September 2012, GAO highlighted the 
failure of the Department to develop policies and guidance for 
defining and overseeing R&D. Such policies are needed to ensure 
that limited funds are spent on the highest priorities and that 
duplication of effort among components is avoided.
    The Department must do more than set high-level priorities 
for terrorism prevention, immigration enforcement, border 
security, first responders, cybersecurity and disaster 
resilience; it must establish a formal, comprehensive process 
for identifying capability gaps related to those priorities 
with a far greater degree of specificity. Such a process must 
include permanent mechanisms for S&T to regularly solicit input 
and receive constructive feedback from each component on 
capability gaps and research and technology requirements, and 
must ensure that component-level R&D activities complement but 
do not overlap with S&T activities.
    The process should also be informed by and contribute to 
the development of the Quadrennial Homeland Security Review and 
other departmental guidance documents.
    Lastly, the Department's R&D process must be able to 
measure the return on investment within the R&D portfolio, such 
as how often projects transition to an acquisition program or 
into the operational environment. This lack of measurement 
makes it difficult to defend or fully fund projects under the 
current fiscal constraints.
    To address these issues, the Committee includes bill 
language that requires the Department to provide a report with 
the submission of the fiscal year 2015 budget that details the 
following: a formalized process for establishing R&D 
priorities, to include how the priorities are developed and the 
degree of input from the various components and how they are 
reflected in the budget; how the Department is implementing the 
recommendations in GAO-12-837, to include timelines for full 
compliance; a formalized process for interactions among 
components and between components and S&T that includes senior 
departmental leadership involvement in the decision making 
process and ongoing portfolio reviews; and measurable metrics 
to quantify program status and return on investment.

                             PPA Structure

    The Committee recommendation reinstitutes a breakout of 
RD&I by PPA to provide additional oversight of programs. The 
new PPAs include the following: Apex, border security, chem/
bio/radiological/nuclear/explosives defense, cybersecurity and 
counter terrorist. The Committee directs the Department to 
submit all future budgets in this structure.

                          Budget Justification

    The Committee directs the Department to include in the 
budget justification for fiscal year 2015, and hereafter, the 
following information for each project in excess of $100,000: 
project description, justification and scope; prior year key 
events, current year planned key events and budget year key 
events; funding history; available funding spend plan 
(projected obligations by year appropriated); contract 
information; project schedule to include milestones; 
explanation for delayed milestones; type of research (basic; 
applied; advanced technology development; advanced component 
development and prototypes; or system development and 
demonstration), technical readiness level (as applicable) and 
transition plans.

                           Portfolio Reviews

    The Committee directs S&T to brief the Committee on the 
results of any portfolio reviews conducted in fiscal year 2014 
not later than 30 days after completion of the review and 
assessment of its results. The briefing shall include an 
assessment of the most promising projects; an appraisal of 
those that scored poorly; any plans to modify or reallocate 
funding from underperforming initiatives; and a detailed 
overview of how S&T measures and scrutinizes the cost and 
schedule of its research projects.

                             Apex Projects

    The Committee continues the direction that S&T and its 
partner components brief the Committees not later than 60 days 
after the date of enactment of this Act and periodically 
thereafter on funding, schedule, and progress of the Apex 
projects. The Committee further directs S&T to brief the 
Committee not later than 14 days before signing any agreement 
to initiate a new Apex project, to include, but not be limited 
to, information on the goals and full cost of the proposed 
effort.

                         Laboratory Facilities

    The Committee recommends $547,785,000 for laboratory 
facilities, $310,000,000 below the amount requested and 
$383,018,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. 
This includes $404,000,000 to incrementally fund construction 
efforts of the National Bio- and Agro-defense Facility (NBAF) 
which was competitively awarded and identified in the January 
16, 2009 Federal Register (Volume 74, Number 11). While this 
amount is lower than the amount requested in the President's 
budget proposal, it is a sufficient amount to ensure that 
construction of the facility proceeds on schedule and that 
fully leverages funding contributions by the State of Kansas.
    The Committee directs the Department to use the provided 
funding for the acquisition, design, and construction of the 
facility and to use funds provided under previous Acts, as 
needed. Further, the Committee directs the Department to use 
incremental funding for the construction of the facility and to 
award a single contract or related contracts for the 
development and construction of the facility which collectively 
include the full scope of the project.
    The Committee directs S&T to submit a detailed update of 
its NBAF construction plan and schedule, to include an updated 
plan for the expenditure of funds, not later than 30 days after 
the date of enactment of this Act.
    The Committee understands that, until NBAF is operational, 
the Nation will continue to rely on the Plum Island Animal 
Disease Center in New York to provide research on biological 
threats that may impact America's food and livestock 
industries. The Committee recommends $29,300,000 for high 
priority projects at the Plum Island Animal Disease Center.

             University Programs and Centers of Excellence

    The Committee recommends $40,000,000 for University 
Programs and Centers of Excellence, $9,000,000 above the 
request and $40,000 above fiscal year 2013. The Centers of 
Excellence at U.S. colleges and universities provide critical 
homeland security-related research and education to address 
high-priority domestic security related issues and to enhance 
homeland security capabilities over the long term. The 
Committee directs the Department to brief the Committee on the 
method used to measure performance of the Centers not later 
than 30 days after the date of enactment of this Act.

                               Bioassays

    The Committee recognizes the recent efforts in the use of 
detection technology under development within S&T that work 
with near term bioassays within the Chemical and Biological 
Defense Division. With the ongoing delays in existing bio 
programs, the Committee encourages continued development of 
assays for remaining high priority threat agents.

                Cyber Security Research and Development

    The Committee directs that not less than $10,000,000 of the 
funds provided for cybersecurity research and development be 
allocated, on a competitive basis, to research and development 
projects that leverage the expertise of existing governmental 
organizations to improve the intrusion detection, cyber 
forensic, and software assurance capabilities of DHS.

                            Canine Standards

    The Committee recognizes the critical role played by 
detection canines in homeland security efforts across a number 
of agencies in the Department. However, the Committee is 
concerned that no widely accepted standards or protocols exist 
on the breeding, training, conditioning and deployment of 
detection canine teams. Without these standards and protocols, 
the Committee is concerned that inconsistencies in the quality 
of the canine, handler, or their training and deployment can 
significantly reduce their effectiveness. The Committee directs 
the Department to work with the National Institute for 
Standards and Technology in conjunction with subject matter 
experts in academia, the private sector, and other governmental 
stakeholders to develop breeding, training, conditioning and 
deployment standards and protocols for detection canine teams.

                          Explosive Detection

    As shown recently in Boston, explosives defense is a 
critical National security research priority. The Committee 
encourages S&T to support developing mechanical and canine 
detection and defense assets.

                              Social Media

    The Committee strongly supports efforts to use social media 
applications for situational awareness in order to provide 
first responders with the ability to search on specified terms 
within a defined geographic area. The Committee is aware that 
DHS Science and Technology, Research and Development is 
currently examining this capability and urges the Directorate 
to pursue it in a timely manner.

                        First Responder Networks

    The Committee supports the efforts of the Science and 
Technology Directorate's First Responders Group to develop a 
national network where agencies and organizations can access 
and share information across disciplines, jurisdictions, and 
information types in a timely fashion. A number of Virtual USA 
pilot programs are well underway based on a voluntary 
information sharing model that links all levels of government 
within an effective technology framework established by the 
Federal government. The Committee concurs with DHS efforts to 
work collaboratively with the National Information Sharing 
Consortium and others dedicated to information sharing and 
interoperability, as well as the DHS strategy to build a 
network using commercial off-the-shelf information technology 
products to the maximum extent. The Committee directs the 
Secretary to provide a briefing to the Committee not later than 
60 days after the date of enactment of this Act regarding the 
process to date, future plans and schedules, and funding by 
fiscal year to establish a national network for first 
responders.

                          European Cargo Pilot

    While the Committee supports the Department's participation 
in the European Union Cargo Security Pilot, which is evaluating 
government-developed technologies that can secure and/or track 
intermodal cargo containers, it is concerned that the Pilot is 
not also evaluating commercially-developed technologies. To 
ensure the evaluation is comprehensive, the Committee strongly 
encourages the Department to include select commercial securing 
and/or tracking solutions in the evaluation.

                   Domestic Nuclear Detection Office


                     MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................       $39,610,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................        37,510,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        37,353,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................        -2,257,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................         -157,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The Management and Administration appropriation provides 
for the salaries and expenses of Domestic Nuclear Detection 
Office (DNDO) employees. This is a jointly-staffed office that 
consists of both Federal employees and interagency detailees.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $37,353,000 for Management and 
Administration, $157,000 below the amount requested due to the 
need to offset shortfalls created by the budget request's 
reliance on unauthorized fees.

                 RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND OPERATIONS
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................      $226,603,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................       211,210,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       211,210,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................       -15,393,000
    Budget request, fiscalyear 2014...................            - - -*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The Research, Development, and Operations appropriation 
funds all DHS nuclear detection research, development, test, 
evaluation, and operational support activities. DNDO is 
responsible for overseeing the Global Nuclear Detection 
Architecture, a worldwide network of systems used to detect and 
report attempts to import or transport a nuclear device or 
fissile or radiological material intended for illicit use. DNDO 
is continuing to improve the domestic portion of this 
architecture through an integrated research, development, test, 
and evaluation program, while providing support to current 
operations.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $211,210,000 for Research, 
Development, and Operations, the same as the amount requested, 
and $15,393,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2013. 
A comparison of the budget estimate to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Budget Estimate      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Systems Engineering and                   $21,222,000        $21,222,000
 Architecture.....................
Systems Development...............         21,243,000         21,243,000
Transformational Research and              75,291,000         75,291,000
 Development......................
Assessments.......................         39,918,000         39,918,000
Operations Support................         30,835,000         30,835,000
National Technical Nuclear                 22,701,000         22,701,000
 Forensics Center.................
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total.........................       $211,210,000       $211,210,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          SYSTEMS ACQUISITION
 Appropriation, fiscal year 2013*......................       $51,404,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2014......................        42,600,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        42,600,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2013...................        -8,804,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2014..................            - - -*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

                                Mission

    The Systems Acquisition appropriation provides for 
acquisition and deployment of radiation detection technologies 
for other components of the Department, in particular the Coast 
Guard, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, and the 
Transportation Security Administration. It also supports DNDO 
provision of systems engineering and test and evaluation 
programs, both in support of fielded systems and prior to 
acquisition, and includes funding for the development of 
appropriate training, exercise, and alarm response protocols. 
To carry out this mission, DNDO acquires a range of radiation 
detection technologies, including fixed, mobile, and 
relocatable radiation portal monitors and a range of human 
portable radiation detection systems.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $42,600,000 for Systems 
Acquisition, as requested, and $8,804,000 below the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2013.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Budget Estimate      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Radiation Portal Monitor Program..         $7,000,000         $7,000,000
Securing the Cities...............         22,000,000         22,000,000
Human Portable Radiation Detection         13,600,000         13,600,000
 Systems..........................
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total.........................        $42,600,000        $42,600,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          Securing the Cities

    The Committee recommends $22,000,000 for the Securing the 
Cities (STC) Program, as requested, to fund efforts in New York 
City, Los Angeles/Long Beach area and a third urban location. 
The Committee directs the Department to continue periodic 
updates on the program, including the development of plans to 
deploy the program to new cities, as well as a plan to 
transition regions off of Federal funds.

                 TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS--THIS ACT

    Section 501. The Committee continues a provision providing 
that no part of any appropriation shall remain available for 
obligation beyond the current year unless expressly provided.
    Section 502. The Committee continues a provision providing 
that unexpended balances of prior appropriations may be merged 
with new appropriation accounts and used for the same purpose, 
subject to reprogramming guidelines.
    Section 503. The Committee continues a provision providing 
reprogramming authority for funds within an account and not to 
exceed five percent transfer authority between appropriations 
accounts with the requirement for a 15-day advance 
Congressional notification. A detailed funding table 
identifying each Congressional control level for reprogramming 
purposes is included at the end of this Report. These 
reprogramming guidelines shall be complied with by all agencies 
funded by the Department of Homeland Security Appropriations 
Act, 2014.
    The Department shall submit reprogramming requests on a 
timely basis and provide complete explanations of the 
reallocations proposed, including detailed justifications of 
the increases and offsets, and any specific impact the proposed 
changes will have on the budget request for the following 
fiscal year and future-year appropriations requirements. Each 
request submitted to the Committees on Appropriations should 
include a detailed table showing the proposed revisions at the 
account, program, project, and activity level to the funding 
and staffing (full-time equivalent position) levels for the 
current fiscal year and to the levels requested in the 
President's budget for the following fiscal year.
    The Department shall manage its programs and activities 
within the levels appropriated. The Department should only 
submit reprogramming or transfer requests in the case of an 
unforeseeable emergency or situation that could not have been 
predicted when formulating the budget request for the current 
fiscal year. When the Department submits a reprogramming or 
transfer request to the Committees on Appropriations and does 
not receive identical responses from the House and Senate, it 
is the responsibility of the Department to reconcile the House 
and Senate differences before proceeding, and if reconciliation 
is not possible, to consider the reprogramming or transfer 
request not approved.
    The Department is not to submit a reprogramming or transfer 
of funds after June 30 except in extraordinary circumstances, 
which imminently threaten the safety of human life or the 
protection of property. If a reprogramming or transfer is 
needed after June 30, the notice should contain sufficient 
documentation as to why it meets this statutory exception.
    Deobligated funds are also subject to the reprogramming and 
transfer guidelines and requirements set forth in this section.
    Section 504. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision that prohibits funds appropriated or otherwise made 
available to the Department to make payment to the Department's 
Working Capital Fund, except for activities and amounts 
identified in the President's fiscal year 2014 request. Funds 
provided to the WCF are available until expended. The 
Department can only charge components for direct usage of the 
WCF and these funds may be used only for the purposes 
consistent with the contributing component. Any funds paid in 
advance or reimbursed must reflect the full cost of each 
service. The WCF shall be subject to the requirements of 
section 503 of this Act.
    As noted in Title I of this report, the Committee is 
extremely concerned with the massive increase requested for the 
Department's Working Capital Fund (WCF) and adjusts the cash 
balance and rates downward by a total of $250,000,000. The 
Committee believes a nearly 72.2 percent increase from current 
service levels to the amount requested for fiscal year 2014 is 
insufficiently justified and excessive.
    Section 505. The Committee continues a provision providing 
that not to exceed 50 percent of unobligated balances remaining 
at the end of fiscal year 2014 from appropriations made for 
salaries and expenses shall remain available through fiscal 
year 2015 subject to section 503 reprogramming guidelines.
    Section 506. The Committee continues a provision providing 
that funds for intelligence activities are deemed to be 
specifically authorized during fiscal year 2014 until the 
enactment of an Act authorizing intelligence activities for 
fiscal year 2014.
    Section 507. The Committee continues a provision requiring 
notification of the Committees on Appropriations three days 
before grant allocations, grant awards, contract awards, other 
transactional agreements, letters of intent, or task or 
delivery orders on a multiple contract award totaling 
$1,000,000 or more, or a task order greater than $25,000,000 
from multi-year funds, are announced by the Department, 
including contracts covered by the Federal Acquisition 
Regulation. This provision is modified from previous fiscal 
years to also include all sole source grant awards. The 
Department is required to brief the Committees on 
Appropriations five full business days prior to announcing the 
intention to make a grant under State and Local Programs. 
Notification shall include a description of the project or 
projects to be funded, including city, county and state.
    Section 508. The Committee continues a provision providing 
that no agency shall purchase, construct, or lease additional 
facilities for Federal law enforcement training without advance 
approval of the Committees on Appropriations.
    Section 509. The Committee continues a provision providing 
that none of the funds may be used for any construction, 
repair, alteration, and acquisition project for which a 
prospectus, if required under chapter 33 of title 40, United 
States Code, has not been approved.
    Section 510. The Committee continues a provision that 
consolidates by reference prior year statutory bill language 
into one provision. These provisions relate to a contracting 
officer's technical representative training; sensitive security 
information, as modified; and the use of funds in conformance 
with section 303 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992.
    Section 511. The Committee continues a provision that none 
of the funds may be used in contravention of the Buy American 
Act.
    Section 512. The Committee continues a provision on 
reporting requirements of the DHS Privacy Officer.
    Section 513. The Committee continues a provision regarding 
the oath of allegiance required by section 337 of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act.
    Section 514. The Committee continues a provision requiring 
the Chief Financial Officer to submit monthly budget execution 
and staffing reports within 45 days after the close of each 
month.
    Section 515. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision that directs that any funds appropriated or 
transferred to TSA ``Aviation Security'', ``Administration'', 
and ``Transportation Security Support'' in fiscal years 2004 
and 2005, which are recovered or deobligated, shall be 
available only for procurement and installation of explosive 
detection systems for air cargo, baggage, and checkpoint 
screening systems, subject to notification. The Committee also 
requires quarterly reports on recovered or deobligated funds.
    Section 516. The Committee continues a provision requiring 
any funds appropriated to the Coast Guard's 110-123-foot patrol 
boat conversion that are recovered, collected, or otherwise 
received as a result of negotiation, mediation, or litigation, 
shall be available until expended for the Fast Response Cutter 
program.
    Section 517. The Committee continues a provision relating 
to undercover investigative operations authority of the United 
States Secret Service for fiscal year 2014.
    Section 518. The Committee continues a provision 
classifying the functions of the instructor staff at the 
Federal Law Enforcement Training Center as inherently 
governmental for purposes of the Federal Activities Inventory 
Reform Act.
    Section 519. The Committee modifies a provision regarding 
grants or contracts awarded by any means other than full and 
open competition. The Inspector General is required to review 
Departmental contracts awarded noncompetitively and report on 
the results to the Committees.
    Section 520. The Committee continues a provision that 
prohibits funding for any position designated as a Principal 
Federal Official during a Stafford Act declared disaster or 
emergency.
    Section 521. The Committee continues a provision that 
precludes DHS from using funds in this Act to carry out 
reorganization authority. This prohibition is not intended to 
prevent the Department from carrying out routine or small 
reallocations of personnel or functions within components, 
subject to Section 503 of this Act. This language prevents 
large scale reorganization of the Department, which the 
Committee believes should be acted on statutorily by the 
relevant Congressional committees of jurisdiction.
    Section 522. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting funding to grant an immigration benefit to any 
individual unless the results of background checks required in 
statute, to be completed prior to the grant of the benefit, 
have been received by DHS.
    Section 523. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision relating to other transactional authority of DHS 
through fiscal year 2014.
    Section 524. The Committee continues a provision that 
requires the Secretary to link all contracts that provide award 
fees to successful acquisition outcomes.
    Section 525. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting the obligation of funds for the Office of Secretary 
and Executive Management for any new hires at DHS if they are 
not verified through the E-Verify program.
    Section 526. The Committee continues a provision related to 
prescription drugs.
    Section 527. The Committee continues a provision requiring 
the Secretary of Homeland Security, in conjunction with the 
Secretary of the Treasury, to notify the Committees of any 
proposed transfers from the Department of Treasury Forfeiture 
Fund to any agency within the Department of Homeland Security. 
No funds may be obligated until the Committees approve the 
proposed transfers.
    Section 528. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting funds for planning, testing, piloting or developing 
a national identification card.
    Section 529. The Committee continues a provision requiring 
the Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security (Transportation 
Security Administration) to certify that no security risks will 
result if an airport does not participate in the E-Verify 
program.
    Section 530. The Committee continues a provision regarding 
FEMA's public notice of damage assessment information used to 
determine disaster declarations.
    Section 531. The Committee continues a provision directing 
that any official required by this Act to report or certify to 
the Committees on Appropriations may not delegate any authority 
unless expressly authorized to do so in this Act.
    Section 532. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision that extends the date of the chemical facilities 
security program.
    Section 533. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting the use of funds for the transfer or release of 
individuals detained at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo 
Bay, Cuba.
    Section 534. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting funds in this Act to be used for first-class 
travel.
    Section 535. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting funds in this Act to be used for adverse personnel 
actions for employees who use protective equipment or measures, 
including surgical masks, N95 respirators, gloves, or hand-
sanitizers in the conduct of their official duties.
    Section 536. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting funds to be used to employ illegal workers as 
described in Section 274A(h)(3) of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act.
    Section 537. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision on the proper disposal of personal information 
collected through the Registered Traveler program. A report on 
procedures and status is required to be submitted not later 
than 30 days after the date of enactment of this Act.
    Section 538. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting funds appropriated or otherwise made available by 
this Act to pay for award or incentive fees for contractors 
with below satisfactory performance or performance that fails 
to meet the basic requirements of the contract.
    Section 539. The Committee continues a provision that 
requires the Assistant Secretary of TSA to report on how the 
agency will meet the requirement to screen 100 percent of air 
cargo transported on passenger aircraft arriving in the United 
States.
    Section 540. The Committee continues a provision that 
requires any new processes developed to screen aviation 
passengers and crews for transportation or national security to 
consider privacy and civil liberties, consistent with 
applicable laws, regulations, and guidance.
    Section 541. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision that makes deposits into the Immigration Examinations 
Fee Account available to USCIS for the purposes of immigrant 
integration grants, not to exceed $10,000,000, in fiscal year 
2014. Grants may not be used to provide services to aliens who 
have not been lawfully admitted for permanent residence.
    Section 542. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting funds appropriated or otherwise made available by 
this Act from being used to enter into Federal contracts unless 
in accordance with the Federal Property and Administrative 
Services Act or the Federal Acquisition Regulation, unless 
otherwise authorized by statute.
    Section 543. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision appropriating $34,200,000 for data center migration.
    Section 544. The Committee continues a provision regarding 
disposal of Service Processing Centers or other ICE owned 
detention facilities.
    Section 545. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting funds made available under this Act or any prior 
appropriations Act from being provided to the Association of 
Community Organizations for Reform Now.
    Section 546. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision regarding multi-year investment and management plans 
for CBP and ICE.
    Section 547. The Committee continues a provision requiring 
the Secretary to enforce existing immigration laws.
    Section 548. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision requiring the Secretary to submit with the fiscal 
year 2015 budget request a report detailing Coast Guard 
budgetary policies, procedures, and technical direction 
pertaining to acquisitions.
    Section 549. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision regarding Federal network security.
    Section 550. The Committee continues a provision regarding 
restrictions on electronic access to pornography, except for 
necessary law enforcement purposes.
    Section 551. The Committee continues a provision regarding 
the transfer of firearms by Federal law enforcement personnel.
    Section 552. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision withholding fifty percent of the appropriations 
provided for OSEM, USM, and CFO until specified reports 
required by law are submitted to the Committees on or before 
March 14, 2014.
    Section 553. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting funds from being obligated to implement the 
National Preparedness Grant Program or any other successor 
grant program unless specifically authorized by Congress.
    Section 554. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision prohibiting funds for the position of Public Advocate 
or a successor position within ICE.
    Section 555. The Committee continues a provision regarding 
funding restrictions and reporting requirements regarding 
conferences occurring outside of the United States.
    Section 556. The Committee continues a provision limiting 
the use of funds to enter into a contract, memorandum of 
understanding, or cooperative agreement with, make a grant to, 
or provide a loan or loan guarantee to, corporations convicted 
of a felony criminal violation of Federal law within the 
preceding 24 months. The Department shall provide an annual 
report to the Committee, due within 30 days of the end of each 
fiscal year, detailing its implementation of this provision, 
including a list of affected corporations and a justification 
for any cases in which the Department has determined that the 
limitation should not apply.
    Section 557. The Committee continues a provision limiting 
the use of funds to enter into a contract, memorandum of 
understanding, or cooperative agreement with, make a grant to, 
or provide a loan or loan guarantee to, corporations with 
certain unpaid Federal tax liabilities. The Department shall 
provide an annual report to the Committee, due within 30 days 
of the end of each fiscal year, detailing its implementation of 
this provision, including a list of affected corporations and a 
justification for any cases in which the Department has 
determined that the limitation should not apply.
    Section 558. The Committee includes a provision providing 
oversight and reporting requirements on conferences and 
ceremonies costing more than $20,000.
    Section 559. The Committee includes a new provision 
prohibiting new pre-clearance locations unless conditions 
specified in the report are met. These conditions are specified 
under CBP in this report.
    Section 560. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision that requires the Secretary to grant waivers from 
specified requirements of section 34 of the Federal Fire 
Prevention and Control Act of 1974.
    Section 561. The Committee includes a new provision 
prohibiting an increase in the land border crossing fee or to 
conduct a study relating to the imposition of such a fee.
    Section 562. The Committee includes a new provision 
prohibiting the elimination or reduction of funding for a PPA 
as proposed by the President's budget until such a proposal is 
enacted into law or unless such change is made pursuant to 
section 503 of this Act.
    Section 563. The Committee includes a new provision 
prohibiting funds from being used to approve a classification 
petition filed for or by a citizen or national of Brazil.
    Section 564. The Committee includes a new provision that 
prohibits the use of funds by ICE to pay for an abortion, 
except in the case of rape, incest, or to preserve the life of 
the mother.
    Section 565. The Committee includes a new provision that 
prohibits the use of funds by ICE to require any person to 
perform or facilitate the performance of an abortion.
    Section 566. The Committee includes a new provision that 
establishes the obligation of the Assistant Secretary of 
Homeland Security for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement 
to provide escort services to an inmate receiving an abortion 
outside of a Federal facility, as consistent with the preceding 
section.
    Section 567. The Committee includes a new provision 
requiring the Secretary to report on the Department's 
requirements for and usage of ammunition.
    Section 568. The Committee includes a new provision 
rescinding unobligated balances from Coast Guard--Acquisition, 
Construction, and Improvements.
    Section 569. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision permanently rescinding specified funds from the 
Treasury Forfeiture Fund.
    Section 570. The Committee continues a provision that 
prohibits new budget authority from exceeding budget allocation 
in Fiscal Year 2014.

    APPROPRIATIONS CAN BE USED ONLY FOR THE PURPOSES FOR WHICH MADE

    Title 31 of the United States Code makes clear that 
appropriations can be used only for the purposes for which they 
were appropriated as follows:
    Section 1301. Application.
    (a) Appropriations shall be applied only to the objects for 
which the appropriations were made except as otherwise provided 
by law.

              HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES REPORT REQUIREMENTS

    The following items are included in accordance with various 
requirements of the Rules of the House of Representatives.
<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>

         STATEMENT OF GENERAL PERFORMANCE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII off the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the following is a statement of 
general performance goals and objectives for which this measure 
authorizes funding:
    The Committee on Appropriations considers program 
performance, including a program's success in developing and 
attaining outcome-related goals and objectives, in developing 
funding recommendations.

                          RESCISSION OF FUNDS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the rescissions recommended in the accompanying 
bill:

Public Law 111-83, Coast Guard, AC&I--Reduction of Unobligated scissions
    Balances
    Integrated Deepwater Systems (surface)....................$9,000,000
    Integrated Deepwater Systems (other....................... 4,000,000
    High Endurance Cutter..................................... 1,500,000
Public Law 112-10, Coast Guard, AC&I--Reduction of Unobligated 
    Balances
    Integrated Deepwater Systems (surface).................... 7,000,000
    Integrated Deepwater Systems (other)...................... 2,000,000
    FRC Economic Price Adjustment (EPA)....................... 8,000,000
    FRC Antecedent Liabilities (AL)........................... 4,612,000
Public Law 112-74, Coast Guard, AC&I--Reduction of Unobligated 
    Balances
    Shore and ATON (Major Shore, MASI)........................ 8,500,000
    Aircraft (HH-60 Sustainment).............................. 2,000,000
    Other Systems Engineering and Integration................. 1,000,000
    FRC....................................................... 7,000,000
    FRC EPA...................................................13,500,000
    FRC AL.................................................... 9,000,000
Public Law 113-6, Coast Guard, AC&I--Reduction of Unobligated 
    Balances
    Post Shakedown Availability for NSC 4..................... 5,000,000
    NSC 6 Gantry Crane and Davit.............................. 1,882,000
    NSC 6 Waterfront Change Program........................... 3,598,000
    FRC EPA...................................................14,000,000
    FRC AL.................................................... 8,000,000
Treasury Forfeiture Fund.....................................100,000,000

                           TRANSFER OF FUNDS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2), rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is submitted describing 
the transfer of funds provided in the accompanying bill.
    The table shows, by title, department and agency, the 
appropriations affected by such transfers:

                                 Appropriation Transfers Recommended in the Bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 Account from which transfer
  Account to which transfer is to be made         Account               is to be made               Account
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Office of Inspector General................        $24,000,000  FEMA--Disaster Relief Fund...        $24,000,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    DISCLOSURE OF EARMARKS AND CONGRESSIONAL DIRECTED SPENDING ITEMS

    Neither the bill nor the report contains any Congressional 
earmarks, limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as 
defined in clause 9 of rule XXI.

          Compliance With Rule XIII, Cl. 3(e) (Ramseyer Rule)

  In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italics, existing law in which no change 
is proposed is shown in roman):

  2002 SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS ACT FOR FURTHER RECOVERY FROM AND 
           RESPONSE TO TERRORIST ATTACKS ON THE UNITED STATES

                          (Public Law 107-206)

AN ACT Making supplemental appropriations for further recovery from and 
response to terrorist attacks on the United States for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2002, and for other purposes.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


TITLE I--SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


CHAPTER 12--DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


GENERAL PROVISIONS--THIS CHAPTER

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


  Sec. 1202. (a) The Federal Law Enforcement Training Center 
may, for a period ending not later than [December 31, 2015] 
December 31, 2016, appoint and maintain a cadre of up to 350 
Federal annuitants: (1) without regard to any provision of 
title 5, United States Code, which might otherwise require the 
application of competitive hiring procedures; and (2) who shall 
not be subject to any reduction in pay (for annuity allocable 
to the period of actual employment) under the provisions of 
section 8344 or 8468 of such title 5 or similar provision of 
any other retirement system for employees. A reemployed Federal 
annuitant as to whom a waiver of reduction under paragraph (2) 
applies shall not, for any period during which such waiver is 
in effect, be considered an employee for purposes of subchapter 
III of chapter 83 or chapter 84 of title 5, United States Code, 
or such other retirement system (referred to in paragraph (2)) 
as may apply.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


        DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2007

(Public Law 109-295)

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


  Sec. 532. (a) United States Secret Service Use of Proceeds 
Derived From Criminal Investigations.--During fiscal year 
[2013] 2014, with respect to any undercover investigative 
operation of the United States Secret Service (hereafter 
referred to in this section as the ``Secret Service'') that is 
necessary for the detection and prosecution of crimes against 
the United States--
          (1) sums appropriated for the Secret Service, 
        including unobligated balances available from prior 
        fiscal years, may be used for purchasing property, 
        buildings, and other facilities, and for leasing space, 
        within the United States, the District of Columbia, and 
        the territories and possessions of the United States, 
        without regard to sections 1341 and 3324 of title 31, 
        United States Code, section 8141 of title 40, United 
        States Code, sections 3732(a) and 3741 of the Revised 
        Statutes of the United States (41 U.S.C. 11(a) and 22), 
        and sections 304(a) and 305 of the Federal Property and 
        Administrative Services Act of 1949 (41 U.S.C 254(a) 
        and 255);
          (2) sums appropriated for the Secret Service, 
        including unobligated balances available from prior 
        fiscal years, may be used to establish or to acquire 
        proprietary corporations or business entities as part 
        of such undercover operation, and to operate such 
        corporations or business entities on a commercial 
        basis, without regard to sections 9102 and 9103 of 
        title 31, United States Code;
          (3) sums appropriated for the Secret Service, 
        including unobligated balances available from prior 
        fiscal years and the proceeds from such undercover 
        operation, may be deposited in banks or other financial 
        institutions, without regard to section 648 of title 
        18, and section 3302 of title 31, United States Code; 
        and
          (4) proceeds from such undercover operation may be 
        used to offset necessary and reasonable expenses 
        incurred in such operation, without regard to section 
        3302 of title 31, United States Code.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  Sec. 550. (a) * * *
  (b) Interim regulations issued under this section shall apply 
until the effective date of interim or final regulations 
promulgated under other laws that establish requirements and 
standards referred to in subsection (a) and expressly supersede 
this section: Provided, That the authority provided by this 
section shall terminate [on October 4, 2013] on October 4, 
2014.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


HOMELAND SECURITY ACT OF 2002

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


TITLE VIII--COORDINATION WITH NON-FEDERAL ENTITIES; INSPECTOR GENERAL; 
UNITED STATES SECRET SERVICE; COAST GUARD; GENERAL PROVISIONS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                        Subtitle D--Acquisitions

SEC. 831. RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS.

  (a) Authority.--Until [September 30, 2013,] September 30, 
2014, and subject to subsection (d), the Secretary may carry 
out a pilot program under which the Secretary may exercise the 
following authorities:
          (1) In general.--When the Secretary carries out 
        basic, applied, and advanced research and development 
        projects, including the expenditure of funds for such 
        projects, the Secretary may exercise the same authority 
        (subject to the same limitations and conditions) with 
        respect to such research and projects as the Secretary 
        of Defense may exercise under section 2371 of title 10, 
        United States Code (except for subsections (b) and 
        (f)), after making a determination that the use of a 
        contract, grant, or cooperative agreement for such 
        project is not feasible or appropriate. The annual 
        report required under subsection (b) of this section, 
        as applied to the Secretary by this paragraph, shall be 
        submitted to the President of the Senate and the 
        Speaker of the House of Representatives.
          (2) Prototype projects.--The Secretary may, under the 
        authority of paragraph (1), carry out prototype 
        projects in accordance with the requirements and 
        conditions provided for carrying out prototype projects 
        under section 845 of the National Defense Authorization 
        Act for Fiscal Year 1994 (Public Law 103-160). In 
        applying the authorities of that section 845, 
        subsection (c) of that section shall apply with respect 
        to prototype projects under this paragraph, and the 
        Secretary shall perform the functions of the Secretary 
        of Defense under subsection (d) thereof.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (c) Additional Requirements.--
          (1) In general.--The authority of the Secretary under 
        this section shall terminate [September 30, 2013,] 
        September 30, 2014, unless before that date the 
        Secretary--
                  (A) issues policy guidance detailing the 
                appropriate use of that authority; and
                  (B) provides training to each employee that 
                is authorized to exercise that authority.
          (2) Report.--The Secretary shall provide an annual 
        report to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
        Senate and the House of Representatives, the Committee 
        on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs of the 
        Senate, and the Committee on Homeland Security of the 
        House of Representatives detailing the projects for 
        which the authority granted by subsection (a) was used, 
        the rationale for its use, the funds spent using that 
        authority, the outcome of each project for which that 
        authority was used, and the results of any audits of 
        such projects.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


              COMPLIANCE WITH RULE XIII, CLAUSE 3(F)(1)(A)

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee has inserted at the 
appropriate place in the report a description of the effects of 
provisions proposed in the accompanying bill which may be 
considered, under certain circumstances, to change the 
application of existing law, either directly or indirectly.
    The bill provides, in some instances, funding of agencies 
and activities where legislation has not yet been finalized. In 
addition, the bill carries language, in some instances, 
permitting activities not authorized by law. Additionally, the 
Committee includes a number of general provisions.

             TITLE I--DEPARTMENT MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS

            Office of the Secretary and Executive Management

    The Committee includes language providing funds for the 
Office of the Secretary and Executive Management (OSEM) 
offices, including funds for official reception and 
representation expenses. The Committee requires spend plans for 
specified offices within OSEM. The Committee also limits the 
funds available until certain reporting actions have been 
taken.

              Office of the Under Secretary for Management

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
reception and representation expenses; for costs necessary to 
consolidate headquarters operations, including tenant 
improvements and relocation costs; and for the human resources 
information technology program. The Committee also limits the 
funds available until certain reporting actions have been 
taken.

                 Office of the Chief Financial Officer

    The Committee includes language providing funds for the 
Chief Financial Officer. The Committee also limits the funds 
available until certain reporting actions have been taken.

                Office of the Chief Information Officer

    The Committee includes language providing funds for the 
Chief Information Officer and for the development and 
acquisition of information technology equipment, software, 
services, and related activities.

                        Analysis and Operations

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
information analysis and operations coordination activities, 
including funding for official representation expenses.

                      Office of Inspector General

    The Committee includes language providing funds for the 
Office of Inspector General as well as certain confidential 
operational expenses, including the payment of informants.

          TITLE II--SECURITY, ENFORCEMENT, AND INVESTIGATIONS

                   U.S. Customs and Border Protection

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee includes language making funds available for 
border security, immigration, customs, and agricultural 
inspections and regulatory activities; purchase or lease of 
vehicles; contracting with individuals for personal services; 
Harbor Maintenance Fee collections; official reception and 
representation expenses; Customs User Fee collections; payment 
of rental space in connection with pre-clearance operations; 
and compensation of informants. The Committee includes language 
regarding overtime compensation. The Committee also requires 
submission of a multi-year investment and management plan.

                        AUTOMATION MODERNIZATION

    The Committee includes language making funds available for 
automated systems.

        BORDER SECURITY FENCING, INFRASTRUCTURE, AND TECHNOLOGY

    The Committee includes language making funds available for 
border security fencing, infrastructure, and technology.

 AIR AND MARINE INTERDICTION, OPERATIONS, MAINTENANCE, AND PROCUREMENT

    The Committee includes language making funds available for 
the operations, maintenance and procurement of marine vessels, 
aircraft, unmanned aircraft systems, and other equipment; 
travel; and assistance to other law enforcement agencies and 
humanitarian efforts. The Committee includes language 
prohibiting the transfer of aircraft and related equipment out 
of Customs and Border Protection unless certain conditions are 
met. In addition, the Committee requires submission of an 
updated five-year strategic plan for air and marine operations.

                 CONSTRUCTION AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

    The Committee includes language making funds available for 
the planning, acquisition, construction, renovating, equipping, 
and maintaining of buildings and facilities. In addition, 
language is included requiring an expenditure plan, as well as 
a real property inventory and construction plan.

                U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee includes language making funds available to 
conduct investigations of criminal violations of federal law 
relating to border security, customs and trade, immigration and 
naturalization, and travel and transportation; and for the 
civil enforcement of the immigration and customs laws, 
including the detention and removal of immigration status 
violators; special operations; official reception and 
representation expenses; compensation to informants; and 
reimbursement of other Federal agencies for certain costs. The 
Committee includes language regarding overtime compensation and 
forced child labor laws, as well as a minimum number of 
detention bed spaces that must be maintained. The Committee 
also includes language that requires the Secretary to identify 
illegal aliens who have been convicted of a crime or who pose a 
serious risk to public safety or national security who are 
eligible for removal. The Committee prohibits the delegation of 
law enforcement authority for the 287(g) program if terms of 
the agreement have been violated. The Committee prohibits funds 
to continue any contract for detention services if two recent 
evaluations are less than adequate.

                        AUTOMATION MODERNIZATION

    The Committee includes language making funds available for 
automated systems.

                              CONSTRUCTION

    The Committee includes language making funds available to 
plan, construct, renovate, equip and maintain buildings and 
facilities.

                 Transportation Security Administration

                           AVIATION SECURITY

    The Committee includes language making funds available for 
civil aviation security, including the availability of funds 
for one year for Screener Compensation and Benefits; and 
establishing conditions under which security fees are collected 
and credited. The Committee also includes language providing 
funds for reception and representation expenses. The Committee 
limits staffing to 46,000 full-time equivalent screeners, not 
including part-time hires, and requires a report on advanced 
technology and staffing deployment. Finally, the bill includes 
language clarifying a variety of people are not exempt from 
screening.

                    SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY

    The Committee includes language providing funds for surface 
transportation security programs of the Transportation Security 
Administration, including additional surface canine teams for 
the mass transit and maritime domain.

           TRANSPORTATION THREAT ASSESSMENT AND CREDENTIALING

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
screening programs.

                    TRANSPORTATION SECURITY SUPPORT

    The Committee includes language providing funds for TSA's 
transportation security support and intelligence programs. The 
Committee includes language requiring the submission of 
detailed expenditure plans for air cargo, checkpoint support 
systems, and explosive detection systems refurbishment, 
procurement and installation.

                          FEDERAL AIR MARSHALS

    The Committee includes language providing funds for the 
Federal Air Marshals, and requires an expenditure and staffing 
plan.

                              Coast Guard

                           OPERATING EXPENSES

    The Committee includes a provision regarding passenger 
motor vehicles, small boats, repairs and service life-
replacements, minor shore construction projects, recreation and 
welfare, and the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund. The Committee 
also includes language on reception and representation 
expenses. The Committee withholds funding for the Headquarters 
Directorate until certain conditions have been met.

                ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE AND RESTORATION

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
environmental compliance and restoration of the Coast Guard and 
directs the inclusion of costs associated with backlogged 
projects be included in the annual budget submission.

                            RESERVE TRAINING

    The Committee includes language providing funds for the 
Coast Guard reserve, including maintenance and operation of the 
reserve program, personnel and training costs, equipment and 
services.

              ACQUISITIONS, CONSTRUCTION AND IMPROVEMENTS

    The Committee includes language providing for funds for the 
Coast Guard acquisition, construction, renovation, and 
improvement of aids to navigation, shore facilities, housing, 
vessels, and aircraft as well as for maintenance, 
rehabilitation, lease and operations of facilities and 
equipment. The Committee includes provisions clarifying 
contracting for long lead time materials, availability of funds 
for production and post-production costs, and requiring a 
capital investment plan for future appropriations years with 
certain conditions.

              RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION

    The Committee includes language providing funds for applied 
scientific research, development, test, and evaluation; and for 
maintenance, rehabilitation, lease and operation of facilities 
and equipment. The Committee includes language allowing funds 
to remain available until September 30, 2015; authorizing funds 
to be derived from the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund; and 
authorizing funds received from State and local governments, 
other public authorities, private sources, and foreign 
countries to be credited to this account and used for certain 
purposes.

                              RETIRED PAY

    The Committee includes language providing funds for retired 
pay and medical care for the Coast Guard's retired personnel 
and their dependents and makes these funds available until 
expended.

                      United States Secret Service

                           OPERATING EXPENSES

    The Committee includes language that provides funds for the 
purchase and replacement of vehicles; the hire of aircraft; 
purchase of motorcycles; services of expert witnesses as may be 
necessary; rental of certain buildings; improvements to 
buildings as may be necessary for protective missions; per diem 
and subsistence allowances; firearms matches; presentation of 
awards; protective travel; research and development; grants for 
behavioral research; official reception and representation 
expenses; technical assistance and equipment to foreign law 
enforcement organizations; advance payment for commercial 
accommodations; and uniforms. The Committee provides for two-
year availability of funds for protective travel. The Committee 
authorizes the obligation of funds in anticipation of 
reimbursements for training, under certain conditions. The 
Committee also restricts the obligation of funds to compensate 
employees for overtime in an annual amount in excess of $35,000 
except under certain conditions. Finally the Committee 
prohibits funds to be available for the protection of the head 
of a Federal agency other than the Secretary of Homeland 
Security unless the Secret Service has entered into a 
reimbursable agreement.

              ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

    The Committee includes language providing funds for the 
acquisition, construction, improvement, and related expenses of 
Secret Service facilities.

                  TITLE III--PREPAREDNESS AND RECOVERY

              National Protection and Programs Directorate

                     MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION

    The Committee includes language providing funds for the 
Office of the Under Secretary for National Protection and 
Programs Directorate as well as to support business operations 
and information technology. The Committee also includes 
language providing funds for official reception and 
representation expenses.

           INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION AND INFORMATION SECURITY

    The Committee includes language making funds available for 
cyber security activities and infrastructure protection, of 
which certain funds are available until September 30, 2015.

                       FEDERAL PROTECTIVE SERVICE

    The Committee includes language making funds available 
until expended for the operations of the Federal Protective 
Service.

                Office of Biometric Identity Management

    The Committee includes language making funds available for 
the Office of Biometric Identity Management.

                        Office of Health Affairs

    The Committee includes language making funds available for 
health affairs, biosurveillance, BioWatch, medical readiness 
planning, and chemical response. The Committee also includes 
language providing funds for official reception and 
representation expenses.

                  Federal Emergency Management Agency

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee includes language that provides funds for 
salaries and expenses. The Committee also includes a provision 
providing funds for reception and representation expenses, 
Urban Search and Rescue Response System, Mount Weather 
Emergency Operations Center, and a provision limiting 
administrative costs for Urban Search and Rescue Teams.

                        STATE AND LOCAL PROGRAMS

    The Committee includes language that provides funds for 
grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, other activities, 
including grants to State and local governments for terrorism 
prevention. The Committee also includes a provision identifying 
the amount of funds available for Operation Stonegarden and for 
National Programs. The Committee includes language specifying 
the conditions under which both applications and grants are 
made to certain grants made in the Act. The Committee also 
includes language specifying the conditions for distribution of 
certain grants.

                     FIREFIGHTER ASSISTANCE GRANTS

    The Committee includes language that provides funds for 
grants.

                EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE GRANTS

    The Committee includes language that provides funds for 
grants.

              RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PROGRAM

    The Committee includes a provision regarding charges 
assessed for the radiological emergency preparedness program, 
including conditions and methodology for the assessment and 
collection of fees.

                   UNITED STATES FIRE ADMINISTRATION

    The Committee includes language that provides funds for 
expenses of the U.S. Fire Administration.

                            DISASTER RELIEF

    The Committee includes language making funds available 
until expended and requires a variety of reporting 
requirements.

                 FLOOD HAZARD MAPPING AND RISK ANALYSIS

    The Committee includes language making funds available for 
flood hazard mapping, including administrative costs.

                     NATIONAL FLOOD INSURANCE FUND

    The Committee includes language limiting funds available 
for salaries and expenses and language making funds available 
for flood hazard mitigation floodplain management available 
until September 30, 2015. The Committee includes provisions 
limiting operating expenses; for interest on Treasury 
borrowings; for agents' commissions and taxes; for fees 
collected and available for floodplain management; and for 
flood mitigation activities associated with sections of the 
National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. The Committee includes 
language permitting additional fees collected be credited as an 
offsetting collection and available for floodplain management. 
The Committee includes language providing that not to exceed 
four percent of the total appropriation is available for 
administrative costs.

                  NATIONAL PREDISASTER MITIGATION FUND

    The Committee includes language authorizing grant awards to 
be available until expended.

                       EMERGENCY FOOD AND SHELTER

    The Committee includes language making funds available 
until expended and limiting total administrative costs to 3.5 
percent of the total appropriation.

       TITLE IV--RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, TRAINING, AND SERVICES

           United States Citizenship and Immigration Services

    The Committee includes language making funds available for 
the E-Verify program, as well as permitting replacement of 
vehicles.

                Federal Law Enforcement Training Center

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee includes language making funds available for 
official representation expenses; purchase of police type 
pursuit vehicles; student athletic and related recreational 
activities; conducting and participating in firearms matches; 
public awareness and community support; room and board; 
services authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109; law enforcement 
accreditation; reimbursements for certain mobile phone 
expenses. The Committee includes language authorizing the 
training of certain law enforcement personnel; authorizes the 
use of appropriations and reimbursements for such training and 
establishes a cap on total obligations. The Committee also 
includes language authorizing funds for the compensation of 
accreditation costs for participating agencies; and on the 
scheduling of basic or advanced law enforcement training.

      ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, IMPROVEMENTS AND RELATED EXPENSES

    The Committee includes language making funds available for 
real property and facilities and authorizes reimbursement from 
government agencies request construction of special use 
facilities.

                         Science and Technology

                     MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
management and administration as well as official reception and 
representation expenses. The Committee also includes a 
provision requiring the submission of a reporting detailing 
reforms within the S&T Directorate.

           RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, ACQUISITION AND OPERATIONS

    The Committee includes language making funds available for 
research, development, test and evaluation; acquisition; and 
operations. The Committee also includes a provision providing 
funds for the National Bio- and Agro-defense Facility.

                   Domestic Nuclear Detection Office

                     MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION

    The Committee includes language that provides funds for 
management and administration. The Committee also includes a 
provision providing funds for reception and representation 
expenses, and requires a strategic investment plan for 
implementation of Department of Homeland Security 
responsibilities under the domestic component of the global 
nuclear detection architecture.

           RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, ACQUISITION, AND OPERATIONS

    The Committee includes language making funds available for 
nuclear detection research, development, testing and 
evaluation.

                          SYSTEMS ACQUISITION

    The Committee includes language making funds available for 
the purchase and deployment of radiation detection equipment.

                      TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Language limiting the availability of any appropriation for 
obligation beyond the current year unless expressly provided.
    Language permitting unexpended balances of prior 
appropriations to be merged with new appropriation accounts and 
used for the same purpose, subject to reprogramming guidelines.
    Language providing reprogramming authority for funds within 
an account and limiting the percent that can be transferred 
between appropriations accounts with the requirement for a 15-
day advance Congressional notification. A detailed funding 
table identifying each Congressional control level for 
reprogramming purposes is included at the end of this Report. 
These reprogramming guidelines shall be complied with by all 
agencies funded by the Department of Homeland Security 
Appropriations Act, 2014, for obligation and deobligation of 
funds.
    Language prohibiting funds appropriated or otherwise made 
available to the Department to make payment to the Working 
Capital Fund (WCF), except for activities and amounts allowed 
in the President's fiscal year 2014 request. Funds provided to 
the WCF are available until expended. The Department can only 
charge components for direct usage of the WCF and these funds 
may be used only for the purposes consistent with the 
contributing component. Any funds paid in advance or reimbursed 
must reflect the full cost of each service. The WCF shall be 
subject to the requirements of section 503 of this Act.
    Language providing that not to exceed 50 percent of 
unobligated balances remaining at the end of fiscal year 2014 
from appropriations made for salaries and expenses remain 
available through fiscal year 2015 subject to reprogramming 
guidelines.
    Language providing that funds for intelligence activities 
are deemed to be specifically authorized during fiscal year 
2014 until the enactment of an Act authorizing intelligence 
activities for fiscal year 2014.
    Language requiring notification of the Committees on 
Appropriations three days before grant allocations, grant 
awards, contract awards, other transactional agreements, letter 
of intents, or task or delivery order on a multiple contract 
award totaling $1,000,000 or more, or a task order greater than 
$25,000,000 from multi-year funds, is announced by the 
Department, including contracts covered by the Federal 
Acquisition Regulation or sole source grant award. The 
Department is required to brief the Committees on 
Appropriations five full day business days prior to announcing 
the intention to make a grant under State and Local Programs.
    Language prohibiting any agency from purchasing, 
constructing, or leasing additional facilities for Federal law 
enforcement training without advance approval of the Committees 
on Appropriations.
    Language prohibiting funds to be used for any construction, 
repair, alteration, and acquisition project for which a 
prospectus, if required under chapter 33 of title 40, United 
States Code, has not been approved.
    Language consolidating, by reference, prior year statutory 
bill language into one provision. These provisions relate to 
contracting officer's technical representative training; 
sensitive security information; and the use of funds in 
conformance with Section 303 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. 
The language eliminates statutory reporting requirements for 
SSI.
    Language prohibiting funds being used in contravention of 
the Buy American Act.
    Language on reporting requirements for the DHS Privacy 
Officer.
    Language maintaining the use of the oath of allegiance 
required by Section 337 of the Immigration and Nationality Act.
    Language requiring the Chief Financial Officer to submit 
monthly budget execution and staffing reports within 45 days 
after the close of each month.
    Language directing that any funds appropriated or 
transferred to TSA ``Aviation Security'', ``Administration'', 
and ``Transportation Security Support'' in fiscal years 2004 
and 2005, which are recovered or deobligated, shall be 
available only for procurement and installation of explosive 
detection systems for air cargo, baggage, and checkpoint 
screening systems. The Committee also requires quarterly 
reports on recovered or deobligated funds.
    Language requiring any funds appropriated to the Coast 
Guard's 110-123 foot patrol boat conversion that are recovered, 
collected, or otherwise received as a result of negotiation, 
mediation, or litigation, be available until expended for the 
Fast Response Cutter program.
    Language relating to undercover investigative operations 
authority of the Secret Service for fiscal year 2014.
    Language classifying the functions of the instructor staff 
at FLETC as inherently governmental for purposes of the Federal 
Activities Inventory Reform Act.
    Language prohibiting the obligation of funds to the Office 
of the Secretary and Executive Management, the Office of the 
Under Secretary for Management, and the Office of the Chief 
Financial Officer for grants or contracts awarded by any means 
other than full and open competition. Certain exceptions apply, 
and this provision does not require new competitions of 
existing contracts during their current terms. The bill also 
requires the Inspector General to review Departmental contracts 
awarded noncompetitively and report on the results to the 
Committees.
    Language prohibiting funding for any position designated as 
a Principal Federal Official during a Stafford Act declared 
disaster or emergency.
    Language precluding DHS from using funds in this Act to 
carry out reorganization authority.
    Language prohibiting funding to grant an immigration 
benefit to any individual unless the results of background 
checks required in statute be completed prior to the grant of 
the benefit have been received by DHS.
    Language relating to the use of transactional authority by 
DHS through fiscal year 2014.
    Language requiring the Secretary to link all contracts that 
provide award fees to successful acquisition outcomes.
    Language prohibiting the obligation of funds for the Office 
of Secretary and Executive Management for any new hires at DHS 
if they are not verified through E-Verify.
    Language regarding prescription drugs.
    Language requiring the Secretary, in conjunction with the 
Secretary of Treasury, to notify the Committees of any proposed 
transfers from the Department of Treasury Forfeiture Fund to 
any agency within DHS. No funds may be obligated until the 
Subcommittees approve the proposed transfers.
    Language prohibiting funds for the planning, testing, 
piloting or developing a national identification card.
    Language requiring the Administrator of TSA to certify that 
no security risks will result if an airport does not 
participate in the E-Verify program.
    Language requiring FEMA to publish on its website a report 
summarizing damage assessment information used to determine 
disaster declarations.
    Language directing that any official required by this Act 
to report or certify to the Committees on Appropriations may 
not delegate any authority unless expressly authorized to do so 
in this Act.
    Language extending the date of the chemical security 
program.
    Language prohibiting the use of funds for the transfer or 
release of individuals detained at United States Naval Station, 
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
    Language prohibiting funds in this Act to be used for 
first-class travel.
    Language prohibiting funds in this Act to be used for 
adverse personnel actions for employees who use protective 
equipment or measures, including surgical masks, N95 
respirators, gloves, or hand-sanitizers in the conduct of their 
official duties.
    Language prohibiting funds to be used to employ illegal 
workers as described in Section 274A(h)(3) of the Immigration 
and Nationality Act.
    Language on the proper disposal of personal information 
collected through the Registered Traveler program. A report on 
procedures and status is required to be submitted 30 days after 
the date of enactment of this Act.
    Language prohibiting funds appropriated or otherwise made 
available by this Act to pay for award or incentive fees for 
contractors with below satisfactory performance or performance 
that fails to meet the basic requirements of the contract.
    Language requiring the Assistant Secretary of TSA to submit 
quarterly reports on how the agency will meet the requirement 
to screen 100 percent of air cargo transportation on passenger 
aircraft arriving in the United States.
    Language requiring any new processes developed to screen 
aviation passengers and crews for transportation or national 
security to consider privacy and civil liberties, consistent 
with applicable laws, regulations, and guidance.
    Language making immigration examination fee collections 
explicitly available for immigrant integration grants, not to 
exceed $10,000,000, in fiscal year 2014.
    Language prohibiting funds appropriated or otherwise made 
available by this Act from being used to enter into federal 
contracts unless in accordance with the Federal Property and 
Administrative Services Act or the Federal Acquisition 
Regulation, unless otherwise authorized by statute.
    Language appropriating $34,200,000 for data center 
migration.
    Language permitting the Secretary to dispose of Service 
Processing Centers or other ICE owned detention facilities by 
directing GSA to sell all real and related property subject to 
such terms and conditions as necessary to protect Government 
interests and meet program requirements, provided that the 
proceeds of the sale shall be deposited as offsetting 
collections and shall be available and subject to 
appropriation.
    Language prohibiting funds appropriated or otherwise made 
available by this Act from being provided to the Association of 
Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN).
    Language directing CBP and ICE to submit to the Committees 
at the time of the budget proposal for fiscal year 2015, the 
information required in the multi-year investment and 
management plans required in the Consolidated Appropriations 
Act, 2012.
    Language requiring the Secretary to enforce existing 
immigration laws.
    Language requiring the Secretary to submit with the fiscal 
year 2015 budget request a report detailing Coast Guard 
budgetary policies, procedures, and technical direction 
pertaining to acquisitions.
    Language appropriating funds for Federal network security.
    Language prohibiting funds made available in this Act from 
being used to establish or maintain computer networks unless 
such networks block pornography.
    Language regarding the transfer of firearms by Federal law 
enforcement personnel.
    Language withholding fifty percent of the appropriations 
provided for OSEM, USM and CFO until specified reports required 
by law are submitted.
    Language prohibiting funds for the implementation of the 
National Preparedness Grant Program or any successor grant 
program.
    Language prohibiting funds for the position of Public 
Advocate or successor position within ICE.
    Language including a new provision regarding funding 
restrictions and reporting requirements regarding conferences 
occurring outside of the United States
    Language prohibiting funds made available by this act from 
being used to enter into a contract or agreement with, or 
provide a loan or loan guarantee to, any corporation that was 
convicted of a felony criminal violation within the last 24 
months.
    Language prohibiting funds made from being used to enter 
into a contract or agreement with any corporation that has any 
unpaid Federal tax liabilities.
    Language regarding funding restrictions and reporting 
requirements for conferences, ceremonies, cornmissionings, and 
decommissionings for which the cost to the Government was more 
than $20,000.
    Language prohibiting pre-clearance locations unless CBP 
meets certain conditions and conducts the necessary analysis 
and reporting.
    Language requiring DHS to grant waivers to section 34 of 
the Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974 when making 
grants for Firefighter Assistance Grants.
    Language prohibiting DHS from imposing border crossing fees 
at land ports of entry along the Southern or Northern borders, 
or to conduct any fee study.
    Language prohibiting DHS from carrying out activities in 
the manner proposed by the President's budget request until 
enacted into law by a subsequent Appropriation Act.
    Language prohibiting CIS from approving classification 
petitions filed for or by a citizen or national of Brazil to 
receive immigrant visas.
    Language prohibiting ICE from paying for abortions except 
in certain circumstances.
    Language prohibiting ICE from requiring any person to 
perform an abortion.
    Language authorizing ICE to escort female detainees outside 
the detention facilities.
    Language requiring the Secretary to report on the 
Department's requirements, inventories, and usage of 
ammunition.
    Language rescinding unobligated balances from Coast Guard--
Acquisition, Construction, and Improvements.
    Language permanently rescinding unobligated balances from 
the Treasury Forfeiture Fund.
    Language prohibiting new budget authority from exceeding 
the budget allocation in fiscal year 2014.

                  APPROPRIATIONS NOT AUTHORIZED BY LAW

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1) of rule XIII of the House of 
Representatives, the following table lists the appropriations 
in the accompanying bill that are not authorized by law:

                                                     FY 2014 SCHEDULE OF UNAUTHORIZED APPROPRIATIONS
                                                       [Gross Discretionary--Dollars in thousands]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Last year of                                 Appropriation in last    Appropriations in this
                   Agency/program                          authorization           Authorized level      year of authorization             bill
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Office of the Secretary and Executive Management....                     2002                      N/A                      N/A                 $126,554
Office of the Under Secretary for Management........                     2002                      N/A                      N/A                 $202,686
Office of the Chief Financial Officer...............                     2002                      N/A                      N/A                  $48,779
Office of the Chief Information Officer.............                     2002                      N/A                      N/A                 $327,254
Analysis & Operations\1\............................                     2002                      N/A                      N/A                 $309,228
Office of the Inspector General.....................                     1978                 $129,614                 $129,614                 $143,309
Customs and Border Protection, Salaries and Expenses                     2004            \2\$3,083,259            \3\$4,396,350               $8,275,983
Customs and Border Protection, Automation                                 N/A                      N/A                      N/A                 $797,897
 Modernization......................................
Customs and Border Protection, Border Security,                           N/A                      N/A                      N/A                 $351,454
 Fencing, Infrastructure and Technology, Tactical
 Communications\4\..................................
Customs and Border Protection, Air and Marine                             N/A                      N/A                      N/A                 $802,741
 Interdiction, Operations, Maintenance, and
 Procurement........................................
Customs and Border Protection, Construction and                           N/A                      N/A                      N/A                 $471,278
 Facilities Management..............................
Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Salaries and             \5\2003/\6\2004         N/A\5\$1,399,592    \7\$3,032,094; N/A\8\               $5,344,461
 Expenses...........................................
Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Automation                       \5\2003                      N/A                 $380,000                  $34,900
 Modernization......................................
Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Construction...                  \5\2003                      N/A              \5\$258,637                   $5,000
Transportation Security Administration, Aviation                         2011                      N/A               $5,219,546               $4,872,739
 Security...........................................
Transportation Security Administration, Surface                          2011                      N/A                 $105,961                 $108,618
 Transportation Security............................
Transportation Security Administration,                                  2005                Such sums                  $54,919                 $248,617
 Transportation Threat Assessment and
 Credentialing\5\...................................
Transportation Security Administration,                                   N/A                      N/A                      N/A                 $901,666
 Transportation Security Support....................
Transportation Security Administration, Federal Air                      2011                Such sums                 $929,802                 $821,107
 Marshal Service....................................
United States Coast Guard, Operating Expenses.......                 \10\20I3           \11\$7,077,783            \1\$6,813,961               $6,839,416
United States Coast Guard, Environmental Compliance                      2013                  $16,699                  $13,138                  $13,164
 and Restoration....................................
United States Coast Guard, Reserve Training.........                     2013                 $136,778                 $132,395                 $112,991
United States Coast Guard, Acquisition Construction,                     2013               $1,421,924               $1,543,354                 $951,116
 and Improvements...................................
United States Coast Guard, Research Development Test                     2013                  $19,779                  $19,664                  $19,856
 and Evaluation.....................................
United States Coast Guard, Retired Pay..............                     2013               $1,440,157               $1,423,000               $1,460,000
United States Secret Service, Acquisition,                                N/A                      N/A                      N/A                  $51,775
 Construction, Improvements and Related Expenses....
United States Secret Service, Salaries and                               2010                      N/A                      N/A               $1,534,589
 Expense\12\........................................
NPPD--Federal Protective Service....................                 \13\2002                      N/A                      N/A               $1,301,824
Office of Health Affairs\14\........................                      N/A                      N/A                      N/A                 $123,425
FEMA, Salaries and Expenses.........................                      N/A                      N/A                      N/A                 $914,795
FEMA, State and Local Programs......................            Various Years          Various Amounts          Various Amounts               $1,500,000
    FEMA, State and Local Programs: State Homeland                       2008                 $950,000                 $950,000                      N/A
     Security Grant Program.........................
    FEMA, State and Local Programs: Emergency                            2008                 $400,000                 $300,000                 $350,000
     Management Performance Grants..................
    FEMA, State and Local Programs: Urban Area                           2008                 $850,000                 $820,000                      N/A
     Security Initiative............................
    FEMA, State and Local Programs: Urban Search and                     2008                  $45,000                  $36,700                      N/A
     Rescue Response System.........................
    FEMA, State and Local Programs: Interoperable                        2008                      N/A                  $50,000                      N/A
     Emergency Communications Grants................
    FEMA, State and Local Programs: Operation                             N/A                  $54,890                  $54,890                  $55,000
     Stonegarden....................................
    FEMA, State and Local Programs: Citizen Corps                        2002                  $10,000                  $10,000                      N/A
     Program........................................
    FEMA, State and Local Programs: Metropolitan                         2007                      N/A                      N/A                      N/A
     Medical Response System........................
    FEMA, State and Local Programs: Drivers License                      2009                Such sums                      N/A                      N/A
     Security Program...............................
    FEMA, State and Local Programs: Buffer Zone                           N/A                      N/A                      N/A                      N/A
     Protection Program Grants......................
FEMA, Assistance for Firefighters grants............                     2013                 $750,000                 $675,000                 $675,000
FEMA, Emergency Management Performance Grants.......                     2008                 $400,000                 $300,000                 $350,000
FEMA, Flood Map Modernization Fund..................                     2011                      N/A                      N/A                  $95,202
FEMA, Disaster Relief Fund..........................                      N/A                      N/A                      N/A               $6,220,908
FEMA, U.S. Fire Administration......................                     2009                  $45,588                  $45,588                  $42,162
United States Citizenship and Immigration Services..                     2002                 $631,745                 $707,392                 $114,213
Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, Salaries &                       N/A                      N/A                      N/A                 $227,845
 Expenses...........................................
Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, Acquisition                      N/A                      N/A                      N/A                  $30,885
 Construction and Improvements Related Expenses.....
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Analysis & Operations Appropriation partially authorized under the FY 2013 Intelligence Authorization Act.
\2\For FY 2004, P.L. 107-210, section 311(b)(1) authorized $1,683,667,050 for Commercial Activities and section 311(a)(2) authorized $1,399,592,400 for
  non-Commercial Activities; in FY 2002 ``Such Sums'' were authorized for Agriculture, Plant and Health Inspection Service, which received $730,710,000
  in appropriations; and in FY 2003 $2,739,695,000 was authorized for Immigration and Naturalization Service--inspection, investigations, Border Patrol,
  detention and deportation only, and $3,195,094 was appropriated as follows: $2,862,094,000 for FY 2003 INS Salaries and Expenses appropriation, and
  $333,000,000 for FY 2003 Wartime Supplemental Appropriations Act, P.L. 108-11. P.L. 109-347, for FY 2010: section 203(g)(3) $37,485,000 for
  ``Automated Targeting System'', and section 205(m) (3) $153,300,000 for the Container Security Initiative. P.L. 109-347, for FY 2010, section
  223(a)(3) authorized $75,600,000 for Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT) and for FY 2012, section 223(b)(5) authorized $21,000,000
  for C-TPAT additional personnel; and 19 U.S.C. 2075, as amended, section 301(h)(3)(E) authorized up to 1000 additional Customs and Border Protection
  Officers, $217,000,000.
\3\Total for Salaries and Expenses, including for unauthorized activities such as immigration inspection and enforcement, Border Patrol, air and marine
  enforcement operations, and agriculture inspections.
\4\CBP/BSFIT only authorized for ``improvement of barriers at the border.''
\5\Immigration and Naturalization Service--inspection, investigations, Border Patrol, detention and deportation only (8 U.S.C. 1101, note; Immigration
  and Nationality Act, section 404(a)).
\6\Customs Service, including the investigations function (19 U.S.C. 2075(b)(1)).
\7\Includes $2,862,094,000 from the FY 2003 INS Salaries and Expenses appropriations, and $170,000,000 included in the FY 2003 Wartime Supplemental
  Appropriations Act, PL 108-11.
\8\No 2004 appropriation for the U.S. Customs Service.
\9\The Transportation Threat Assessment and Credentialing Appropriation has not been authorized. The Indirect Air cargo Fee and Certified Cargo
  Screening Program Fee are included under the Air Cargo Fee in FY 2013. Large Aircraft Security Program Fee and Sensitive Security Information Fee
  included in Other Security Threat Assessment Fee in FY 2013.
\10\Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2012, P.L. 112-213, was signed December 20, 2012 (FY 2013).
\11\Amounts for Coast Guard Operating Expenses excludes amount appropriated for Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terror.
\12\The Secret Service is established in 18 U.S.C. 3056 and 18 U.S.C. 3056A. 18 U.S.C. 1029 and 1030 specifically authorized the Service to investigate
  offenses under those sections.
\13\Section 1706 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002.
\14\The Chief Medical Officer is authorized in P.L. 109-295 and the National Biosurveillance Integration Center is authorized in P.L. 110-053, Section
  1101.

                   COMPARISON WITH BUDGET RESOLUTION

    Section 308(a)(1)(A) of the Congressional Budget Act 
requires the report accompanying a bill providing new budget 
authority to contain a statement comparing the levels in the 
bill to the suballocations submitted under section 302(b) of 
the Act for the most recently agreed to concurrent resolution 
on the budget for the applicable fiscal year. That information 
is provided in the table headed ``Comparison of Reported Bill 
to Section 302(b) Suballocation.''

                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 302 (b) allocation             This bill
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                                                                 Budget                    Budget
                                                               authority     Outlays     authority     Outlays
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with Committee allocations
 to its subcommittees: Subcommittee on Homeland Security
    General Purpose Discretionary...........................       44,619       45,983       44,619    \1\45,983
    Mandatory...............................................        1,460        1,478        1,460       1,478
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

                      FIVE YEAR OUTLAY PROJECTIONS

    In compliance with section 308(a)(1)(B) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, the following table contains five-year projections 
associated with the budget authority provided in the 
accompanying bill:

                        [In millions of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               Outlays
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Projection of outlays associated with the recommendation:
    2014...................................................       25,845
    2015...................................................        9,282
    2016...................................................        5,604
    2017...................................................        2,844
    2018 and future years..................................       2,183
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

               ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS

    In accordance with section 308(a)(1)(C) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, the financial assistance to state and local 
governments is as follows:

                        [In millions of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                   Budget
                                                 authority     Outlays
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Financial assistance to State and local               5,436       \1\359
 governments for 2014.........................
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

                          PROGRAM DUPLICATION

    The bill extends the expiration date for the Chemical 
Facilities Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) program for the 
duration of fiscal year 2014 to assure no lapse in this program 
pending the reauthorization of the program by the authorization 
committee. To the Committee's knowledge, this program has not 
been included in a report from the Government Accountability 
Office pursuant to section 21 of Public Law 111-319, the 
Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance has not identified other 
programs related to the program, and this program does not 
duplicate another Federal program.

                          DIRECTED RULE MAKING

    The bill does not contain any provision that specifically 
directs the promulgation or completion of a rule.

                    DETAILED EXPLANATIONS IN REPORT

    The following table contains detailed funding 
recommendations at the program, project, and activity (PPA) 
level. Public Law 112-10 (signed into law on April 15, 2011) 
required the Department to submit a detailed fiscal year 2011 
expenditure plan by program, project, and activity no later 
than May 9, 2011. Because the Department and the Committee 
continued to reconcile discrepancies on this expenditure plan 
days before both the Subcommittee and Full Committee markups of 
this fiscal year 2012 bill, the following table does not 
include fiscal year 2011 enacted funding per PPA. Subsequent 
technical adjustments to funding comparisons between the 
recommended and enacted funding levels may be required. 
Furthermore, it should be emphasized again that a more detailed 
statement describing the effect of the above provisions 
inserted by the Committee that directly or indirectly change 
the application of existing law may be found at the appropriate 
place in this report.
<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>


              MINORITY VIEWS OF NITA LOWEY AND DAVID PRICE

    We want to begin by commending Chairman Carter for the 
open, collaborative and bipartisan process he led in the 
development of his Subcommittee mark. We are supportive of the 
funding levels provided in the bill, with certain exceptions, 
although we object to a number of unnecessary and, in some 
cases, harmful policy provisions.
    The bill provides adequate funding for the front line 
employees of the Department of Homeland Security, so that they 
can continue to conduct critical operations along our borders, 
protect our nation's airports and seaports, and respond to 
natural disasters. The bill maintains or increases funding for 
critical grant programs while rejecting the Administration's 
proposed reformulation of the grant structure, which is lacking 
in detail and has not been authorized. Specifically, we are 
pleased that funding for FEMA State and Local grants was 
increased by $35 million over the fiscal year 2013 enacted 
level, and that both fire grants and emergency management 
performance grants are funded at the requested levels. Equally 
important, the bill provides an increase of $17 million for 
research and development efforts through the Science and 
Technology Directorate, allowing work on high priority research 
efforts to continue as well as new projects to begin, and 
provides $404 million for the construction of the National Bio 
and Agro Defense Facility. The bill also increases funding for 
operations and for critical acquisitions for the Coast Guard 
and the Customs and Border Protection Office of Air and Marine 
to recapitalize aging assets and procure new assets in support 
of front-line activities. It funds the additional 1,600 Customs 
and Border Protection Officers requested by the Administration, 
and substantially strengthens cyber security protection 
efforts. In addition, the bill funds disaster relief at the 
requested level, including $5.6 billion through the Budget 
Control Act cap adjustment.

                         Overall Funding Level

    We are dismayed by the House Majority's refusal to go to 
conference to forge a bipartisan agreement on the budget 
resolution that addresses sequestration and provides workable 
302(b) allocations for Appropriations bills. This failure of 
the House Leadership imperils this year's appropriations 
process, making it nearly impossible to move all 12 bills. 
Sequestration was intended to be a mechanism to force the 
parties to come together to address our long-term fiscal 
challenges. It was never meant to be, in itself, a tool for 
deficit reduction, and it was certainly never meant to be the 
basis for a discretionary spending cap in a budget resolution.
    The allocation for the fiscal year 2014 Department of 
Homeland Security appropriations bill is generous compared to 
the allocations for most other subcommittees, although it is 
still lower than needed to allow the Department to fulfill its 
important security and enforcement missions. If the current 
302(a) allocation stays in effect, however, we will likely 
advance only a few bills with reasonable allocations, including 
the Homeland Security appropriations bill, while most of the 
remaining bills are left below sequestration levels, totally 
inadequate and impossible to pass. Using the Ryan budget 
allocation for discretionary spending, the only thing this 
Committee will produce is a long summer and early fall with no 
real progress on most of the FY 2014 Appropriations bills, 
making inevitable the need for a continuing resolution, or a 
series of them, well into the coming fiscal year in order to 
keep the government open and running.

                   Burdensome Immigration Provisions

    While we appreciate the willingness of the Chairman to 
continue statutory language on the deportation of criminal 
aliens, continued oversight of 287(g) agreements, and funding 
above the request for the Alternatives to Detention program, we 
strongly oppose the inclusion of statutory language mandating 
that Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) maintain a level 
of not less than 34,000 detention beds, which is 2,200 more 
than the budget request. Setting an arbitrary minimum for 
detention beds, especially in this fiscal climate, denies ICE 
the flexibility it needs to manage its enforcement and removal 
resources in response to changing circumstances and to use 
cheaper, alternative forms of supervision when appropriate.
    The bill also unnecessarily maintains the 287(g) program, 
which, in addition to being seriously flawed, is in fact 
obsolete with the full implementation of the Secure Communities 
program

    Reductions to Facilities Construction and Information Technology

    Recognizing that the majority had to make cuts to meet the 
Ryan budget cap, it is nonetheless unfortunate that the bill 
provides no funding for construction activities at the new DHS 
headquarters and provides less funding for the consolidation of 
data center activities. As we continue through the 
appropriations process, we will need additional resources to 
invest in these important priorities, both of which will reduce 
future costs and improve efficiency.

                        Departmental Management

    The bill makes significant cuts to DHS headquarters 
accounts, in part as a consequence for inadequately responding 
to Committee deadlines and directives, but also to prioritize 
funding for the Department's front-line operations. For 
example, the bill reduces the appropriation for the Office of 
the Secretary and Executive Management (OSEM) by 18.4 percent 
compared to the request, including a 50 percent cut to both the 
Office of the Executive Secretary and the Office of the Chief 
of Staff. The Office of the Undersecretary for Management (USM) 
and the Office of the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) are both 
cut by approximately 15 percent compared to the request, and 
many management accounts for the component offices are also 
substantially reduced below the requested level, the fiscal 
year 2013 enacted level, or both.
    In addition, the bill withholds 50 percent of the already 
limited funding provided to OSEM, USM, and CFO until these 
offices submit certain required reports and plans to the 
Committee.
    We support the general commitment to oversight evinced in 
the bill--a consistent theme for this Subcommittee since the 
Department was formed in 2003--but we are concerned that these 
steps go beyond what is needed to improve compliance with the 
Committee's directives and reporting deadlines. We agree that 
the Department has been unacceptably delinquent in providing 
statutorily required reports that are critical to Committee 
decision making, but hope we can temper some of the 
withholdings and restore OSEM, USM, CFO and other management 
accounts to more realistic funding levels as we continue to 
move through the process.

           Women's Health Amendment Adopted in Full Committee

    Over strong Democratic objections, the Full Committee 
adopted an amendment containing three general provisions 
related to the availability of reproductive health services for 
women detained by ICE. The amendment: (1) prohibits ICE from 
paying for abortions, except for cases in which the life of the 
mother would be endangered, or in the case of rape or incest; 
(2) prohibits ICE from requiring a person to perform or 
facilitate the performance of an abortion; and (3) clarifies 
that the amendment does not remove ICE's obligation to provide 
escort services for a female detainee to obtain abortion 
services outside the detention facility, as consistent with 
(2).
    These restrictions on the use of federal funds for abortion 
procedures are already applicable to ICE and the Department of 
Homeland Security by President Obama's Executive Order 13535, 
issued on March 24th, 2010, and are specifically formalized in 
Part 4.4 of ICE's Detention Standards. While many of us believe 
that those restrictions are excessive, they are a settled 
matter, and so we fail to see the point of interjecting this 
issue on a Homeland Security funding bill. The effect of this 
amendment is to pick an unnecessary political fight--as if we 
did not already have enough controversies to divide the 
Committee.
    Before a similar amendment was offered last year, this bill 
had never touched on the topic of abortion because it is not 
relevant to the Department of Homeland Security and falls far 
outside the lines of jurisdiction of the Subcommittee. We will 
continue to work to remove these unnecessary provisions from 
the bill.

                   Regular Order in Committee Markup

    We were disappointed that the majority chose to violate the 
spirit of comity that normally characterizes Committee 
consideration of appropriations bills by offering both a 
substitute amendment and a second degree perfecting amendment 
with no advance notice to the minority. According to the 
majority's own requirements for markups, ``each Member wishing 
to offer an amendment must . . . distribute a copy of such 
amendment to each Member prior to the start of Full 
Committee.'' Beyond any rule that may apply, advance notice of 
amendments is a basic courtesy, demonstrating mutual respect 
between the minority and the majority, as well as respect for 
the Committee as an institution.

                               Conclusion

    We want to reiterate our appreciation for the efforts by 
Chairman Carter and his staff to work with the minority 
throughout the drafting of this bill, and for his efforts to 
sustain our frontline homeland security operations. In many 
respects, the bill represents an improvement over the budget 
request, although it is still a far cry from the bill we would 
craft were we operating under a more appropriate allocation. As 
we continue moving through the appropriations process, we hope 
to work with the Chairman to rectify the bill's shortfalls.

           ADDITIONAL VIEWS OF THE HONORABLE ROSA L. DeLAURO

    I acknowledge Chairmen Rogers and Carter for producing a 
bipartisan homeland security appropriations bill. It is a 
shame, however, that the two Chairmen did not allow a straight 
up or down vote on the amendment I offered that would have 
barred contractors and subcontractors doing business with the 
Department of Homeland Security from retaliating against 
employees (other than those employees whose essential job 
function involves wage information) who discuss their wages.
    Instead of allowing an up or down vote on my 
straightforward, common-sense amendment, the Chairmen changed 
my amendment and turned it into a toothless recitation of 
existing law. Women will not be fooled by this slight of hand 
and need the real solution that would have been achieved by a 
vote in favor of my amendment, a vote no member of the 
Committee was allowed to take.
    Pay secrecy is one of the main reasons that, even now, 
fifty years after the Equal Pay Act, women are still only paid 
77 cents on the dollar for the same job as men. It is 
especially difficult to uncover pay discrimination when 
employees are prohibited from discussing their salaries. Right 
now, nearly half of all workers in the private sector are 
either expressly prohibited or actively discouraged from 
discussing their pay with their co-workers. For simply 
discussing their pay, these workers fear punishment--they can 
be demoted, passed over for raises and promotions, or even 
fired.
    We know that unequal pay is a persistent problem in the 
workplace, and that pay secrecy and retaliation helps to 
perpetuate discrimination in the workplace. What happened to 
Lilly Ledbetter is but one example. Lilly found out about 
decades of pay discrimination only because she got an anonymous 
note, long after she began work at Goodyear. Goodyear did and 
still does have a pay secrecy policy.
    Terri Kelly, from Nashville, Tennessee, also worked for a 
company with a pay secrecy policy. She uncovered her unequal 
pay because she worked in the same job as her husband, with the 
same experience, education, and performance--and he made more!
    Six states already ban retaliation for wage disclosure--
California, Illinois, Michigan, Maine, Colorado and Vermont. 
This should be our federal policy too, and should apply to all 
private employers who do business with the federal government.
    The Homeland Security Department does $6 billion a year or 
more in contracts with the private sector. The bill that passed 
the Committee includes provisions establishing policies 
regarding contractor performance--policies that ban DHS from 
doing business with private contractors with unpaid tax 
liabilities, or felony convictions. My amendment would have 
added one more such policy provision--so that private 
contractors doing business with DHS cannot discipline or fire 
employees who talk about their pay. In fact, we know from the 
National Association of Working Women that a uniform company 
that does business with DHS had such a pay secrecy policy until 
last year. We are certain that other companies doing business 
with DHS still have pay secrecy policies.
    Unequal pay is not just a problem for women--When women 
take home less pay than they deserve, that affects the income 
of the entire family, at a time when millions of families are 
already struggling to get by. At the moment, fear of pay 
secrecy retaliation only exacerbates the many hurdles that 
employees face in gathering information that would suggest they 
have experienced wage discrimination.
    Simply put, my amendment would have given workers at 
private companies who do business with DHS the freedom to 
discuss their pay with one another, without fear of being 
demoted or fired. The Majority on the Committee just did not 
believe workers who are discriminated against, primarily women, 
are important enough to provide this safeguard.