Report text available as:

(PDF provides a complete and accurate display of this text.) Tip?


                                                       Calendar No. 391
113th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 2d Session                                                     113-165

======================================================================



 
                       FOREST JOBS AND RECREATION

                                _______
                                

                  May 22, 2014.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

   Ms. Landrieu, from the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                          [To accompany S. 37]

    The Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, to which was 
referred the bill (S. 37) to sustain the economic development 
and recreational use of National Forest System land and other 
public land in the State of Montana, to add certain land to the 
National Wilderness Preservation System, to release certain 
wilderness study areas, to designate new areas for recreation, 
and for other purposes, having considered the same, reports 
favorably thereon with an amendment and recommends that the 
bill, as amended, do pass.
    The amendment is as follows:

  Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF CONTENTS.

  (a) Short Title.--This Act may be cited as the ``Forest Jobs and 
Recreation Act of 2013''.
  (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this Act is as 
follows:

Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents.

        TITLE I--MONTANA FOREST JOBS AND RESTORATION INITIATIVE

Sec. 101. Purpose.
Sec. 102. Definitions.
Sec. 103. Montana Forest Jobs and Restoration Pilot Initiative.
Sec. 104. Authorized forest and watershed restoration projects.
Sec. 105. Miscellaneous.

  TITLE II--DESIGNATION OF WILDERNESS AND SPECIAL MANAGEMENT AREAS IN 
                                MONTANA

Sec. 201. Purposes.
Sec. 202. Definitions.
Sec. 203. Designation of wilderness areas.
Sec. 204. Administration of wilderness areas.
Sec. 205. Release of Bureau of Land Management study areas.
Sec. 206. Release of Sapphire and West Pioneer Wilderness Study Areas.
Sec. 207. Special management and recreation management areas.
Sec. 208. All-terrain-vehicle study and report.

        TITLE I--MONTANA FOREST JOBS AND RESTORATION INITIATIVE

SEC. 101. PURPOSE.

  The purpose of this title is to establish an initiative--
          (1) to preserve and create local jobs in rural communities 
        that are located in or near National Forest System land;
          (2) to create an immediate, predictable, and increased flow 
        of wood fiber with commercial value to support and maintain 
        locally based infrastructure and economies that are necessary 
        for the appropriate management and restoration of National 
        Forest System land;
          (3) to promote cooperation and collaboration in the 
        management of National Forest System land;
          (4) to restore and improve the ecological structure, 
        composition, and function and the natural processes of priority 
        watersheds within the National Forest System;
          (5) to carry out collaborative projects to reduce the risk of 
        disturbances from fire, insects, and disease to communities, 
        watersheds, and natural resources through a collaborative 
        process of planning, prioritizing, and implementing ecological 
        restoration and hazardous fuel reduction projects; and
          (6) to collect information from the projects carried out 
        under this title in an effort to better understand the manner 
        in which to improve forest restoration and management 
        activities.

SEC. 102. DEFINITIONS.

  In this title:
          (1) Authorized forest and watershed restoration project.--The 
        term ``authorized forest and watershed restoration project'' 
        means a collection of activities within a watershed area that 
        are carried out--
                  (A) on eligible land; and
                  (B) to achieve the purposes of this title.
          (2) Decommission.--The term ``decommission'' means--
                  (A) to reestablish vegetation on a road or trail; and
                  (B) to restore any natural drainage, watershed 
                function, or other ecological processes that are 
                disrupted or adversely impacted by the road or trail by 
                removing or hydrologically disconnecting the road 
                prism.
          (3) Eligible land.--The term ``eligible land'' means--
                  (A) land within the approximately 1,900,000 acres of 
                land in the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest 
                designated as ``Suitable for Timber Production'' and 
                ``Timber Harvest Is Allowed'' as generally depicted on 
                the map entitled ``Beaverhead-Deerlodge National 
                Forest, Revised Forest Plan, Modeled Timber Harvest 
                Classification'' and dated December 10, 2008; and
                  (B) land within the Kootenai National Forest.
          (4) Initiative.--The term ``Initiative'' means the Montana 
        Forest Jobs and Restoration Pilot Initiative established by 
        section 103(a).
          (5) National forest.--The term ``National Forest'' means all 
        or part of a unit of the National Forest System.
          (6) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means the Secretary of 
        Agriculture, acting through the Chief of the Forest Service.
          (7) Stewardship contract.--The term ``stewardship contract'' 
        means a contract authorized under section 347 of the Omnibus 
        Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act, 
        1999 (16 U.S.C. 2104 note; Public Law 105-277) or a successor 
        law to carry out land management goals that meet local and 
        rural community needs through a source that is selected on a 
        best-value basis.
          (8) Watershed area.--The term ``watershed area'' means 1 or 
        more subwatersheds (also known as 6th code hydrologic units).

SEC. 103. MONTANA FOREST JOBS AND RESTORATION PILOT INITIATIVE.

  (a) Establishment.--There is established the Montana Forest Jobs and 
Restoration Pilot Initiative under which the Secretary shall implement 
authorized forest and watershed restoration projects and other land 
management projects on eligible land to achieve--
          (1) the performance requirements under subsection (b); and
          (2) the purposes of this title.
  (b) Performance Requirements.--
          (1) In general.--Subject to subsection (g), on the eligible 
        land, the Secretary shall place under contract for treatment of 
        vegetation--
                  (A) on the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, a 
                minimum of 5,000 acres annually until the date on which 
                a total of 70,000 acres in the National Forest have 
                been placed under contract; and
                  (B) on the Kootenai National Forest--
                          (i) 2,000 acres during the first year after 
                        the date of enactment of this Act;
                          (ii) 2,500 acres during the second year after 
                        the date of enactment of this Act; and
                          (iii) 3,000 acres during each subsequent year 
                        until the date on which a total of 30,000 acres 
                        in the National Forest have been placed under 
                        contract.
          (2) Priority for treatment in the three rivers district; 
        adjacent ranger districts.--
                  (A) Priority.--The Secretary shall seek to meet the 
                majority of the requirements under paragraph (1)(B) by 
                placing under contract land within the Three Rivers 
                District of the Kootenai National Forest.
                  (B) Adjacent ranger districts.--The Secretary may 
                place under contract land in the Libby District, the 
                Rexford District, or the Cabinet District of the 
                Kootenai National Forest to meet the requirements under 
                paragraph (1)(B).
          (3) Qualified treatments.--To meet the requirements under 
        paragraph (1), treatments shall--
                  (A) reduce the density of trees in a project area or 
                reduce hazardous fuels;
                  (B) be accomplished through the cutting of vegetation 
                with mechanized equipment or by hand with a power saw; 
                and
                  (C) primarily yield products that have commercial 
                value in local markets.
          (4) Limitation.--Prescribed fire may not be used to 
        accomplish the qualified treatments of vegetation required 
        under paragraph (1).
  (c) Collaboration.--
          (1) In general.--For each National Forest within the 
        Initiative, the Secretary may identify 1 or more collaborative 
        groups or resource advisory committees that support the 
        achievement of the purposes of this title.
          (2) Composition.--A collaborative group or resource advisory 
        committee identified under paragraph (1) shall include multiple 
        interested persons representing diverse interests in forest and 
        watershed management.
          (3) Consultation.--The Secretary shall consult with any 
        collaborative groups or resource advisory committees identified 
        under paragraph (1) in the development and implementation of 
        each authorized forest and watershed restoration project 
        carried out under the Initiative.
          (4) Expansion.--The Secretary shall seek to expand the public 
        participation and diversity of interests involved in the 
        implementation of authorized forest and watershed restoration 
        projects on the eligible land through the Initiative.
  (d) Administrative and Judicial Review.--
          (1) Predecisional objection process.--The Secretary shall 
        apply section 105(a) of the Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 
        2003 (16 U.S.C. 6515(a)) to proposed actions of the Forest 
        Service concerning authorized forest and watershed restoration 
        projects.
          (2) Administrative review.--A person may bring a civil action 
        challenging an authorized forest and watershed restoration 
        project in a Federal district court only in accordance with the 
        provisions of section 105(c) of the Healthy Forests Restoration 
        Act of 2003 (16 U.S.C. 6515(c)).
          (3) Judicial review.--Any judicial proceeding of a civil 
        action brought in a Federal District court against an 
        authorized forest and watershed restoration project shall be 
        conducted in accordance with section 106 of the Healthy Forests 
        Restoration Act of 2003 (16 U.S.C. 6516).
  (e) Reports.--
          (1) Compliance report.--Not later than 180 days after the end 
        of any fiscal year in which the Secretary fails to meet the 
        performance requirements under subsection (b)(1), the Secretary 
        shall submit to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources 
        of the Senate and the Committee on Natural Resources of the 
        House of Representatives a report that includes--
                  (A) a description of the work carried out for the 
                fiscal year on the eligible land;
                  (B) a detailed explanation of the reasons why the 
                performance requirements described in subsection (b)(1) 
                were not met; and
                  (C) any specific actions the Secretary plans to take 
                in the subsequent year to ensure that the performance 
                requirements described in subsection (b)(1) are met.
          (2) Progress report.--
                  (A) In general.--Not later than 5 years after the 
                date of enactment of this Act and every 5 years 
                thereafter until the date on which the Initiative is 
                terminated under subsection (h), the Secretary shall 
                submit to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources 
                of the Senate and the Committee on Natural Resources of 
                the House of Representatives, and make available to the 
                public, a report that assesses the progress of the 
                Initiative toward accomplishing the purposes of this 
                title.
                  (B) Inclusions.--The report under subparagraph (A) 
                shall include--
                          (i) an analysis, with respect to eligible 
                        land in the Initiative, of changes in--
                                  (I) risk from wildfire, including in 
                                the proportion of treated acres 
                                exhibiting a change in fire regime 
                                condition class;
                                  (II) biodiversity and wildlife 
                                habitat;
                                  (III) soil and water characteristics, 
                                including changes in road density and 
                                water quality;
                                  (IV) economic effects, including job 
                                creation, labor income, obligations of 
                                appropriated funds, and collected 
                                receipts; and
                                  (V) social implications, including 
                                attitudes towards land use;
                          (ii) recommendations concerning--
                                  (I) the need and appropriateness of 
                                seeking permanent authorization for any 
                                of the authorities that would otherwise 
                                be terminated under subsection (h); and
                                  (II) the need and appropriateness of 
                                expanding any of the authorities or 
                                requirements provided under this title 
                                to the National Forest System; and
                          (iii) an analysis of any additional measures 
                        for which the Secretary chooses to gather data 
                        and report on to determine if the Initiative is 
                        meeting the purposes of this title.
                  (C) Data analysis.--In preparing the report under 
                this paragraph, the Secretary may consult with regional 
                institutions of higher education and institutions with 
                the capacity to collect, coordinate, analyze, and 
                archive the data to be used to prepare the report.
                  (D) Limitation on length.--The report under 
                subparagraph (A) shall not exceed 7 pages in length.
  (f) Funding.--
          (1) Effect on other funds.--The Secretary may not divert 
        funding from a National Forest or grassland located outside of 
        the State of Montana to meet the performance requirements of 
        the Initiative.
          (2) Reprogramming authority.--On notifying the Senate and 
        House Committees on Appropriations, the Secretary may reprogram 
        any funds--
                  (A) made available through an appropriation for the 
                National Forest System; and
                  (B) allocated to be used on the eligible land.
  (g) Expansion of Initiative.--
          (1) In general.--The Secretary may elect to include the 
        Seeley Ranger District of the Lolo National Forest in the 
        Initiative, if--
                  (A) the Seeley Ranger District no longer receives 
                funding under section 4003(b)(1)(B) of the Omnibus 
                Public Land Management Act of 2009 (16 U.S.C. 
                7303(b)(1)(B)); and
                  (B) a collaborative group or resource advisory 
                committee identified by the Secretary under subsection 
                (c)(1) requests inclusion in the Initiative.
          (2) Requirements.--On the election by the Secretary to 
        include the Seeley Ranger District in the Initiative, the 
        project requirements of the Initiative under this title shall 
        apply to the District.
  (h) Termination Date.--
          (1) In general.--The Initiative shall terminate on the later 
        of--
                  (A) the date that is 15 years after the date of 
                enactment of this Act; or
                  (B) the date on which the Secretary determines that 
                the performance requirements under subsection (b)(1) 
                have been achieved.
          (2) Effect.--Nothing in this subsection affects a valid 
        contract in effect on the termination date under paragraph (1).

SEC. 104. AUTHORIZED FOREST AND WATERSHED RESTORATION PROJECTS.

  (a) Implementation.--
          (1) In general.--The Secretary shall annually implement 1 or 
        more authorized forest and watershed restoration projects on 
        the eligible land.
          (2) Landscape-scale projects.--The Secretary shall implement 
        in 1 or more watershed areas authorized forest and watershed 
        restoration projects in a manner that provides landscape-scale 
        work with the goal of minimizing entries into the watershed.
          (3) Stewardship contracts.--The Secretary may enter into 
        stewardship contracts or agreements to carry out authorized 
        forest and watershed restoration projects.
          (4) Prioritization.--
                  (A) In general.--Consistent with the purposes of this 
                title, the Secretary shall give priority to carrying 
                out authorized forest and watershed restoration 
                projects in areas--
                          (i) in which the road density exceeds 1.5 
                        miles per square mile;
                          (ii) in the wildland-urban interface (as 
                        defined in section 101 of the Healthy Forests 
                        Restoration Act of 2003 (16 U.S.C. 6511)) that 
                        are at risk of wildfire that would threaten 
                        public infrastructure or private property;
                          (iii) in which fish and wildlife habitat 
                        connectivity is compromised as a result of past 
                        management practices; and
                          (iv) that contain forests that are identified 
                        on the National Insect and Disease Risk Map as 
                        having a significant risk of tree mortality.
                  (B) Effect.--Nothing in this paragraph precludes the 
                Secretary from carrying out authorized forest and 
                watershed restoration projects on other land as 
                necessary to fulfill--
                          (i) the purposes of this title; and
                          (ii) the performance requirements under 
                        section 103(b)(1).
          (5) Environmental review.--An environmental review of an 
        authorized forest and watershed restoration projects shall be 
        carried out in accordance with the provisions for hazardous 
        fuel reduction projects set forth in section 104 of the Healthy 
        Forests Restoration Act of 2003 (16 U.S.C. 6514), except that--
                  (A) in addition to the requirements of that section, 
                the review shall address whether the proposed 
                authorized forest and watershed restoration projects 
                meets the purposes and requirements of this title;
                  (B) on signing of a decision document for the 
                authorized forest and watershed restoration project, 
                the Secretary shall implement the authorized forest and 
                watershed restoration project;
                  (C) the predecisional objection process promulgated 
                under part 218 of title 36, Code of Federal Regulations 
                (and successor regulations), shall apply; and
                  (D) if the Secretary or a court determines that 
                additional review is warranted due to significant new 
                circumstances after implementation of an authorized 
                forest and watershed restoration project has begun, the 
                additional analysis shall not interrupt the 
                implementation of the activities that are not subject 
                to the additional review, in accordance with the 
                National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 
                4321 et seq.).
  (b) Project Requirements.--
          (1) Riparian habitat protection.--The Secretary may develop 
        an aquatic and riparian habitat protection strategy to modify 
        the aquatic and riparian conservation requirements in existing 
        forest plans, if the Secretary determines, after considering 
        the best available science, that the modifications would meet 
        or exceed the aquatic and riparian protection requirements in 
        the existing forest plans.
          (2) Roads.--In carrying out any authorized forest and 
        watershed restoration project under this title, the Secretary 
        shall--
                  (A) not construct any permanent road, unless--
                          (i) the Secretary determines that the road is 
                        a justifiable realignment of a permanent road 
                        to restore or improve the ecological structure, 
                        composition, and function and the natural 
                        processes of the affected forest or watershed; 
                        and
                          (ii) the replaced road bed is decommissioned 
                        by removing the road prism;
                  (B) decommission any temporary road constructed to 
                carry out the land management project by the conclusion 
                of the contract; and
                  (C) decommission National Forest System roads and 
                unauthorized roads--
                          (i) subject to appropriations; and
                          (ii) consistent with the analysis required by 
                        subparts A and B of part 212 of title 36, Code 
                        of Federal Regulations.
          (3) Vegetation management.--The Secretary shall design 
        authorized forest and watershed restoration projects to produce 
        commercial and noncommercial wood products, consistent with the 
        purposes of this title.

SEC. 105. MISCELLANEOUS.

  (a) In General.--Except as otherwise provided in this title, the 
Secretary shall administer the National Forests subject to the 
Initiative in accordance with applicable law.
  (b) Agency Participation.--The Secretary may, in accordance with 
applicable law, permit a Field Manager from each applicable Bureau of 
Land Management office, the Seeley Lake District Ranger of the Lolo 
National Forest, and the Lincoln District Ranger of the Helena National 
Forest to serve on the Board of Directors of the Blackfoot Challenge in 
the official capacities of the Bureau of Land Management and the 
districts, respectively.

  TITLE II--DESIGNATION OF WILDERNESS AND SPECIAL MANAGEMENT AREAS IN 
                                MONTANA

SEC. 201. PURPOSES.

  The purposes of this title are--
          (1) to protect and enhance motorized recreational 
        opportunities in the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, the 
        Lolo National Forest, and the Kootenai National Forest; and
          (2) to protect and enhance the wild heritage and backcountry 
        traditions of the State through--
                  (A) the addition of certain land to the National 
                Wilderness Preservation System; and
                  (B) the management of other land in a manner that 
                preserves existing primitive and semi-primitive 
                recreational activities.

SEC. 202. DEFINITIONS.

  In this title:
          (1) Beaverhead-deerlodge national forest.--The term 
        ``Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest'' means the National 
        Forest that is--
                  (A) comprised of--
                          (i) the Beaverhead National Forest; and
                          (ii) the Deerlodge National Forest; and
                  (B) managed by the Secretary concerned as a single 
                administrative unit.
          (2) Designated road, trail, or area.--The term ``designated 
        road, trail, or area'' has the meaning given the term in 
        section 212.1 of title 36, Code of Federal Regulations (or a 
        successor regulation).
          (3) Forest plan.--The term ``forest plan'' means a land and 
        resource management plan prepared in accordance with section 6 
        of the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act of 
        1974 (16 U.S.C. 1604).
          (4) Secretary concerned.--The term ``Secretary concerned'' 
        means--
                  (A) the Secretary of Agriculture, acting through the 
                Chief of the Forest Service, with respect to National 
                Forest System land; and
                  (B) the Secretary of the Interior, with respect to 
                land managed by the Bureau of Land Management 
                (including land held for the benefit of an Indian 
                tribe).
          (5) State.--The term ``State'' means the State of Montana.

SEC. 203. DESIGNATION OF WILDERNESS AREAS.

  (a) Land Administered by the Forest Service.--In furtherance of the 
purposes of the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), the following 
areas in the State are designated as wilderness areas and as components 
of the National Wilderness Preservation System:
          (1) Anaconda pintler wilderness additions.--Certain land in 
        the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, comprising 
        approximately 65,407 acres, as generally depicted on the map 
        entitled ``Anaconda-Pintler Wilderness Additions'' and dated 
        December 17, 2013, is incorporated in, and shall be considered 
        to be a part of, the Anaconda-Pintler Wilderness.
          (2) Bob marshall wilderness additions.--Certain land in the 
        Lolo National Forest, comprising approximately 40,072 acres 
        generally depicted as the ``North Fork Blackfoot-Monture Creek 
        Wilderness Addition (Bob Marshall Addition)'' and approximately 
        7,792 acres generally depicted as the ``Grizzly Basin of the 
        Swan Range Wilderness Addition'' on the map entitled ``Bob 
        Marshall, Mission Mountains and Scapegoat Wilderness Additions 
        and Otatsy Recreation Management Area'' and dated December 17, 
        2013, is incorporated in, and shall be considered to be a part 
        of, the Bob Marshall Wilderness.
          (3) Dolus lakes wilderness.--Certain land in the Beaverhead-
        Deerlodge National Forest, comprising approximately 9,407 
        acres, as generally depicted on the map entitled ``Dolus Lakes 
        Wilderness'' and dated December 17, 2013, which shall be known 
        as the ``Dolus Lakes Wilderness''.
          (4) East pioneers wilderness.--Certain land in the 
        Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, comprising approximately 
        77,438 acres, as generally depicted on the map entitled ``East 
        Pioneers Wilderness'' and dated December 17, 2013, which shall 
        be known as the ``East Pioneers Wilderness''.
          (5) Electric peak wilderness.--Certain land in the 
        Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, comprising approximately 
        4,992 acres, as generally depicted on the map entitled 
        ``Electric Peak Wilderness and Thunderbolt Creek Recreation 
        Management Area'' and dated December 17, 2013, which shall be 
        known as the ``Electric Peak Wilderness''.
          (6) Highlands wilderness.--Certain land in the Beaverhead-
        Deerlodge National Forest, comprising approximately 15,659 
        acres, as generally depicted on the map entitled ``Highlands 
        Wilderness Area and Special Management Area'' and dated 
        December 17, 2013, which shall be known as the ``Highlands 
        Wilderness''.
          (7) Italian peaks wilderness.--Certain land in the 
        Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, comprising approximately 
        29,677 acres, as generally depicted on the map entitled 
        ``Italian Peaks Wilderness'' and dated December 17, 2013, which 
        shall be known as the ``Italian Peaks Wilderness''.
          (8) Lee metcalf wilderness additions.--Certain land in the 
        Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, comprising approximately 
        17,201 acres, as generally depicted on the map entitled ``Lee 
        Metcalf Wilderness Additions'' and dated December 17, 2013, is 
        incorporated in, and shall be considered to be a part of, the 
        Lee Metcalf Wilderness.
          (9) Lima peaks wilderness.--Certain land in the Beaverhead-
        Deerlodge National Forest, comprising approximately 35,012 
        acres, as generally depicted on the map entitled ``Lima Peaks 
        Wilderness'' and dated December 17, 2013, which shall be known 
        as the ``Lima Peaks Wilderness''.
          (10) Mission mountains wilderness addition.--Certain land in 
        the Lolo National Forest, which comprises approximately 4,460 
        acres, as generally depicted as the ``West Fork Clearwater 
        Wilderness Addition'' on the map entitled ``Bob Marshall, 
        Mission Mountains and Scapegoat Wilderness Additions and Otatsy 
        Recreation Management Area'' and dated December 17, 2013, is 
        incorporated in, and shall be considered to be a part of, the 
        Mission Mountains Wilderness designated by Public Law 93-632 
        (88 Stat. 2153).
          (11) Mount jefferson wilderness.--Certain land in the 
        Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, comprising approximately 
        2,110 acres, as generally depicted on the map entitled ``Mount 
        Jefferson Wilderness'' and dated December 17, 2013, which shall 
        be known as the ``Mount Jefferson Wilderness''.
          (12) Quigg peak wilderness.--Certain land in the Beaverhead-
        Deerlodge National Forest, comprising approximately 8,275 
        acres, as generally depicted on the map entitled ``Quigg Peak 
        Wilderness'' and dated December 17, 2013, which shall be known 
        as the ``Quigg Peak Wilderness''.
          (13) Roderick wilderness.--Certain land in the Kootenai 
        National Forest, which comprises approximately 29,467 acres, as 
        generally depicted as the ``Roderick Wilderness Area'' on the 
        map entitled ``Roderick Wilderness and Special Management Area 
        and Three Rivers Special Management Area'' and dated December 
        17, 2013, which shall be known as the ``Roderick Wilderness''.
          (14) Sapphires wilderness.--Certain land in the Beaverhead-
        Deerlodge National Forest, comprising approximately 43,101 
        acres, as generally depicted on the map entitled ``Sapphires 
        Wilderness'' and dated December 17, 2013, which shall be known 
        as the ``Sapphires Wilderness''.
          (15) Scapegoat wilderness additions.--Certain land in the 
        Lolo National Forest, which comprises approximately 30,967 
        acres, as generally depicted as the ``North Fork Blackfoot-
        Monture Creek Wilderness Addition (Scapegoat Addition)'' on the 
        map entitled ``Bob Marshall, Mission Mountains and Scapegoat 
        Wilderness Additions and Otatsy Recreation Management Area'' 
        and dated December 17, 2013, is incorporated in, and shall be 
        considered to be a part of, the Scapegoat Wilderness designated 
        by Public Law 92-395 (86 Stat. 578).
          (16) Snowcrest wilderness.--Certain land in the Beaverhead-
        Deerlodge National Forest, comprising approximately 71,068 
        acres, as generally depicted on the map entitled ``Snowcrest 
        Wilderness'' and dated December 17, 2013, which shall be known 
        as the ``Snowcrest Wilderness''.
          (17) Stony mountain wilderness.--Certain land in the 
        Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, comprising approximately 
        14,213 acres, as generally depicted on the map entitled ``Stony 
        Mountain Wilderness'' and dated December 17, 2013, which shall 
        be known as the ``Stony Mountain Wilderness''.
          (18) West big hole wilderness.--Certain land in the 
        Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, comprising approximately 
        44,156 acres, as generally depicted on the map entitled ``West 
        Big Hole Wilderness and Recreation Management Area'' and dated 
        December 17, 2013, which shall be known as the ``West Big Hole 
        Wilderness''.
          (19) West pioneers wilderness.--Certain land in the 
        Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, comprising approximately 
        26,534 acres, as generally depicted on the map entitled ``West 
        Pioneers Wilderness and Recreation Management Area'' and dated 
        December 17, 2013, which shall be known as the ``West Pioneers 
        Wilderness''.
  (b) Land Administered by the Bureau of Land Management.--In 
furtherance of the purposes of the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et 
seq.), the following areas in the State are designated as wilderness 
areas and as components of the National Wilderness Preservation System:
          (1) Blacktail mountains wilderness.--Certain public land 
        administered by the Bureau of Land Management, comprising 
        approximately 10,675 acres, as generally depicted on the map 
        entitled ``Blacktail Mountains Wilderness'' and dated July 27, 
        2010, which shall be known as the ``Blacktail Mountains 
        Wilderness''.
          (2) Centennial mountains wilderness.--Certain public land 
        administered by the Bureau of Land Management, comprising 
        approximately 23,700 acres, as generally depicted on the map 
        entitled ``Centennial Mountains Wilderness'' and dated June 1, 
        2012, which shall be known as the ``Centennial Mountains 
        Wilderness''.
          (3) Ruby mountains wilderness.--Certain public land 
        administered by the Bureau of Land Management, comprising 
        approximately 16,300 acres, as generally depicted on the map 
        entitled ``Ruby Mountains Wilderness'' and dated July 27, 2010, 
        which shall be known as the ``Ruby Mountains Wilderness''.
          (4) East fork blacktail wilderness.--Certain public land 
        administered by the Bureau of Land Management, comprising 
        approximately 6,125 acres, as generally depicted on the map 
        entitled ``East Fork Blacktail Wilderness'' and dated July 27, 
        2010, which shall be known as the ``East Fork Blacktail 
        Wilderness''.
          (5) Humbug spires wilderness.--Certain public land 
        administered by the Bureau of Land Management, comprising 
        approximately 8,900 acres, as generally depicted on the map 
        entitled ``Humbug Spires Wilderness'' and dated July 27, 2010, 
        which shall be known as the ``Humbug Spires Wilderness''.
  (c) Transfer of Administrative Jurisdiction.--Administrative 
jurisdiction over certain public land administered by the Bureau of 
Land Management, comprising approximately 663 acres, as generally known 
as ``Farlin Creek Administrative Transfer'' depicted on the map 
entitled ``East Pioneers Wilderness'' and dated September 13, 2010, is 
transferred to the Secretary of Agriculture, and is incorporated in, 
and shall be considered to be a part of, the East Pioneers Wilderness 
designated by subsection (a)(4).

SEC. 204. ADMINISTRATION OF WILDERNESS AREAS.

  (a) Management.--Subject to valid existing rights, each area 
designated as wilderness by section 203 shall be administered by the 
Secretary concerned in accordance with the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 
1131 et seq.), except that--
          (1) any reference in that Act to the effective date shall be 
        considered to be a reference to the date of enactment of this 
        Act; and
          (2) with respect to public land administered by the Bureau of 
        Land Management, any reference in that Act to the Secretary of 
        Agriculture shall be considered to be a reference to the 
        Secretary of the Interior.
  (b) Maps and Legal Descriptions.--
          (1) In general.--As soon as practicable after the date of 
        enactment of this Act, the Secretary concerned shall file a map 
        and a legal description of each wilderness area and potential 
        wilderness area designated by this section, with--
                  (A) the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources of 
                the Senate; and
                  (B) the Committee on Natural Resources of the House 
                of Representatives.
          (2) Force of law.--The maps and legal descriptions filed 
        under paragraph (1) shall have the same force and effect as if 
        included in this title, except that the Secretary concerned may 
        correct typographical errors in the maps and legal 
        descriptions.
          (3) Public availability.--Each map and legal description 
        filed under paragraph (1) shall be on file and available for 
        public inspection in the appropriate offices of the Forest 
        Service and the Bureau of Land Management.
  (c) Incorporation of Acquired Land and Interests.--Any land within 
the boundary of a wilderness area designated by section 203 that is 
acquired by the United States shall--
          (1) become part of the wilderness area in which the land is 
        located; and
          (2) be managed in accordance with this section, the 
        Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), and any other 
        applicable law.
  (d) Withdrawal.--Subject to valid existing rights, the Federal land 
designated as wilderness by section 203 is withdrawn from all forms 
of--
          (1) entry, appropriation, or disposal under the public land 
        laws;
          (2) location, entry, and patent under the mining laws; and
          (3) disposition under all laws pertaining to mineral and 
        geothermal leasing or mineral materials.
  (e) Fire, Insects, and Diseases.--In accordance with section 4(d)(1) 
of the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1133(d)(1)), within the wilderness 
areas designated by section 203, the Secretary concerned may take such 
measures as are necessary to control fire, insects, and diseases, 
subject to such terms and conditions as the Secretary concerned 
determines to be appropriate.
  (f) Access to Private Land.--In accordance with section 5(a) of the 
Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1134(a)), the Secretary concerned shall 
provide any owner of private land within the boundary of a wilderness 
area designated by section 203 adequate access to the private land.
  (g) Fish and Wildlife.--
          (1) In general.--Nothing in this title affects the 
        jurisdiction or responsibilities of the State with respect to 
        fish and wildlife, including the regulation of hunting, 
        fishing, and trapping.
          (2) Management activities.--In furtherance of the purposes 
        and principles of the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), 
        the Secretary concerned may carry out management activities to 
        maintain or restore fish and wildlife populations (including 
        activities to maintain and restore fish and wildlife habitats 
        to support the populations) in a wilderness area designated by 
        section 203 if the activities are--
                  (A) consistent with applicable wilderness management 
                plans; and
                  (B) carried out in accordance with applicable 
                guidelines and policies.
  (h) Snow Sensors and Stream Gauges.--Nothing in this title prevents 
the installation or maintenance of hydrological, meteorological, or 
climatological instrumentation in a wilderness area designated by 
section 203 if the Secretary concerned determines that the installation 
or maintenance of the instrumentation is necessary to further the 
scientific, educational, or conservation purposes of the wilderness 
area.
  (i) Livestock.--Within the wilderness areas, the grazing of livestock 
in which grazing is established before the date of enactment of this 
Act shall be allowed to continue, subject to such reasonable 
regulations, policies, and practices as the Secretary concerned 
determines to be necessary, in accordance with--
          (1) section 4(d)(4) of the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 
        1131(d)(4));
          (2) with respect to wilderness areas administered by the 
        Secretary of Agriculture, the guidelines described in House 
        Report 96-617 of the 96th Congress; and
          (3) with respect to wilderness areas administered by the 
        Secretary of the Interior, the guidelines described in Appendix 
        A of House Report 101-405 of the 101st Congress.
  (j) Outfitting and Guide Activities.--
          (1) In general.--In accordance with section 4(d)(5) of the 
        Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1133(d)(5)), commercial services 
        (including authorized outfitting and guide activities) within 
        the wilderness areas designated by section 203 may be performed 
        to the extent necessary for activities that are proper for 
        realizing the recreational or other wilderness purposes of the 
        wilderness areas.
          (2) Effect.--Nothing in this title requires the Secretary 
        concerned to modify permits in effect as of the date of 
        enactment of this Act to provide outfitting and guide services 
        within the areas designated as wilderness by section 203, if 
        the Secretary concerned determines that the activities are in 
        compliance with section 4(d)(5) of the Wilderness Act (16 
        U.S.C. 1133(d)(5)).
  (k) Adjacent Management.--
          (1) In general.--The designation of a wilderness area by 
        section 203 shall not create any protective perimeter or buffer 
        zone around the wilderness area.
          (2) Nonwilderness activities.--The fact that nonwilderness 
        activities or uses can be seen or heard from areas within a 
        wilderness area designated by section 203 shall not preclude 
        the conduct of the activities or uses outside the boundary of 
        the wilderness area.
  (l) Water Impoundment Structures.--
          (1) In general.--The Secretary concerned may issue a special 
        use authorization to an owner of a water storage, transport, or 
        diversion facility located within the areas designated as 
        wilderness by section 203 for the continued operation, 
        maintenance, and reconstruction of the facility if--
                  (A) the facility was in existence before the date of 
                the designation of the wilderness area; and
                  (B) the Secretary concerned determines that--
                          (i) the facility has been in substantially 
                        continuous use to deliver water for the 
                        beneficial use on the non-Federal land of the 
                        owner since the date of the designation of the 
                        wilderness area;
                          (ii) the owner of the facility holds a valid 
                        water right for use of the water under State 
                        law, with a priority date that predates the 
                        date of the designation of the wilderness area; 
                        and
                          (iii) it is not practicable or feasible to 
                        relocate the facility to land outside the 
                        boundary of the wilderness and continue the 
                        beneficial use of water on the non-Federal land 
                        recognized under State law.
          (2) Use of motorized equipment and mechanized transport.--The 
        special use authorization under paragraph (1) may allow for the 
        use of motorized equipment and mechanized transport if the 
        Secretary concerned determines, after conducting a minimum tool 
        analysis, that the use of nonmotorized equipment and 
        nonmechanized transport is impracticable or infeasible.
          (3) Terms and conditions.--The Secretary concerned may 
        include such terms and conditions in the special use 
        authorization under paragraph (1) as the Secretary concerned 
        determines appropriate to protect the wilderness values of the 
        area.
  (m) Snowcrest Wilderness Area.--With respect to the Snowcrest 
Wilderness Area--
          (1) the continuation of motorized access to maintain water 
        infrastructure for cattle that was constructed to protect 
        fluvial Arctic Grayling and other aquatic species in the Ruby 
        River may continue--
                  (A) subject to a permit; and
                  (B) in accordance with--
                          (i) section 4(d)(4) of the Wilderness Act (16 
                        U.S.C. 1133(d)(4)); and
                          (ii) the guidelines described in House Report 
                        96-617 of the 96th Congress; and
          (2) the trailing of sheep across the Snowcrest Wilderness 
        area to reach existing grazing allotments in the Gravelly 
        Mountains may be continued for the tenure of the allotments--
                  (A) subject to--
                          (i) a permit; and
                          (ii) a determination by the Secretary of 
                        Agriculture (acting through the Forest 
                        Supervisor) that the use of nonmechanized 
                        transport is impracticable or infeasible; and
                  (B) to the maximum extent practicable, in accordance 
                with the guidelines described in House Report 96-617 of 
                the 96th Congress.

SEC. 205. RELEASE OF BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT STUDY AREAS.

  (a) Finding.--Congress finds that, for purposes of section 603 of the 
Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1782), any 
portion of a wilderness study area described in subsection (b) that is 
not designated as a wilderness area by section 203 or any other Act 
enacted before the date of enactment of this Act has been adequately 
studied for wilderness.
  (b) Description of Study Areas.--The study areas referred to in 
subsection (a) are--
          (1) the Axolotl Lakes Wilderness Study Area;
          (2) the Bell and Limekiln Canyons Wilderness Study Area;
          (3) the Blacktail Mountains Wilderness Study Area;
          (4) the Centennial Mountains Wilderness Study Area;
          (5) the Farlin Creek Wilderness Study Area;
          (6) the Henneberry Ridge Wilderness Study Area;
          (7) the Hidden Pasture Wilderness Study Area;
          (8) the Humbug Spires Wilderness Study Area; and
          (9) the Ruby Mountains Wilderness Study Area.
  (c) Release.--Any study area described in subsection (b) that is not 
designated as a wilderness area by section 203--
          (1) is no longer subject to section 603(c) of the Federal 
        Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1782(c)); and
          (2) shall be managed in accordance with the applicable land 
        management plans adopted under section 202 of that Act (43 
        U.S.C. 1712).

SEC. 206. RELEASE OF SAPPHIRE AND WEST PIONEER WILDERNESS STUDY AREAS.

  (a) Findings.--Congress finds that--
          (1) the studies conducted under section 2 of the Montana 
        Wilderness Study Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-150; 91 Stat. 1243) 
        regarding each study area described in subsection (b) are 
        adequate for the consideration of the suitability of each study 
        area for inclusion as a component of the National Wilderness 
        Preservation System; and
          (2) the Secretary of Agriculture is not required--
                  (A) to review the wilderness option for each study 
                area described in subsection (b) prior to the revision 
                of the forest plan required for each land that 
                comprises each study area in accordance with the Forest 
                and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act of 1974 
                (16 U.S.C. 1600 et seq.); and
                  (B) to manage the portion of each study area 
                described in subsection (b) that is not designated as 
                wilderness by section 203 to ensure the suitability of 
                the area for designation as a component of the National 
                Wilderness Preservation System pending revision of the 
                applicable forest plan.
  (b) Description of Study Areas.--The study areas referred to in 
subsection (a) are those portions of the following wilderness study 
areas which are not designated as wilderness by section 203:
          (1) The portion of the Sapphire Wilderness Study Area that is 
        located on the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, as 
        described in section 2(4) of the Montana Wilderness Study Act 
        of 1977 (Public Law 95-150; 91 Stat. 1243).
          (2) The West Pioneer Wilderness Study Area, as described in 
        section 2(1) of the Montana Wilderness Study Act of 1977 
        (Public Law 95-150; 91 Stat. 1243).

SEC. 207. SPECIAL MANAGEMENT AND RECREATION MANAGEMENT AREAS.

  (a) Designation.--To conserve, protect, and enhance the scenic, fish 
and wildlife, recreational, backcountry heritage, and other natural 
resource values of the areas, the following areas in the State are 
designated for special management by the Secretary concerned in 
accordance with this section:
          (1) Highlands special management area.--Certain Federal land 
        in the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, comprising 
        approximately 5,011 acres, as generally depicted on the map 
        entitled ``Highlands Wilderness Area and Special Management 
        Area'' and dated September 13, 2010, which is designated as the 
        ``Highlands Special Management Area''.
          (2) Lost creek recreation management area.--Certain Federal 
        land in the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, comprising 
        approximately 14,589 acres, as generally depicted on the map 
        entitled ``Lost Creek Recreation Management Area'' and dated 
        September 13, 2010, which is designated as the ``Lost Creek 
        Recreation Management Area''.
          (3) Otatsy recreation management area.--Certain Federal land 
        in the Lolo National Forest, comprising approximately 1,859 
        acres, as generally depicted on the map entitled ``Bob 
        Marshall, Mission Mountains and Scapegoat Wilderness Additions 
        and Otatsy Recreation Management Area'' and dated September 13, 
        2010, which is designated as the ``Otatsy Recreation Management 
        Area''.
          (4) Roderick special management area.--Certain Federal land 
        in the Kootenai National Forest, comprising approximately 3,715 
        acres, as generally depicted on the map entitled ``Roderick 
        Wilderness and Special Management Area and Three Rivers Special 
        Management Area'' and dated September 13, 2010, which is 
        designated as the ``Roderick Special Management Area''.
          (5) Snowcrest special management area.--Certain Federal land 
        in the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, comprising 
        approximately 20,493 acres, as generally depicted on the map 
        entitled ``Snowcrest Special Management Area'' and dated 
        December 17, 2013, which is designated as the ``Snowcrest 
        Special Management Area''.
          (6) Three rivers special management area.--Certain Federal 
        land in the Kootenai National Forest, comprising approximately 
        71,994 acres, as generally depicted on the map entitled 
        ``Roderick Wilderness and Special Management Area and Three 
        Rivers Special Management Area'' and dated September 13, 2010, 
        which is designated as the ``Three Rivers Special Management 
        Area''.
          (7) Thunderbolt creek recreation management area.--Certain 
        Federal land in the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, 
        comprising approximately 20,432 acres, as generally depicted on 
        the map entitled ``Electric Peak Wilderness and Thunderbolt 
        Creek Recreation Management Area'' and dated September 13, 
        2010, which is designated as the ``Thunderbolt Recreation 
        Management Area''.
          (8) Tobacco roots recreation management area.--Certain 
        Federal land in the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, 
        comprising approximately 29,186 acres, as generally depicted on 
        the map entitled ``Tobacco Roots Recreation Management Area'' 
        and dated September 13, 2010, which is designated as the 
        ``Tobacco Roots Recreation Management Area''.
          (9) West big hole recreation management area.--Certain 
        Federal land in the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest 
        comprising approximately 95,144 acres, as generally depicted on 
        the map entitled ``West Big Hole Wilderness and Recreation 
        Management Area'' and dated September 13, 2010, which is 
        designated as the ``West Big Hole Recreation Management Area''.
          (10) West pioneers recreation management area.--Certain 
        Federal land in the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, 
        comprising approximately 128,361 acres, as generally depicted 
        on the map entitled ``West Pioneers Wilderness and Recreation 
        Management Area'' and dated September 13, 2010, which is 
        designated as the ``West Pioneers Recreation Management Area''.
  (b) Administration.--
          (1) Applicable law.--
                  (A) In general.--The Secretary concerned shall 
                administer each area designated by subsection (a)--
                          (i) in furtherance of the purposes for which 
                        the area is established; and
                          (ii) in accordance with--
                                  (I) this section; and
                                  (II) any laws (including regulations) 
                                relating to the National Forest System.
                  (B) Closure of trails.--Nothing in this title 
                precludes the Secretary concerned from closing any 
                trail or area located in the areas designated by 
                subsection (a)--
                          (i) to protect a natural resource; or
                          (ii) to help ensure public safety.
          (2) Withdrawal.--Subject to valid existing rights, any 
        Federal land within an area designated by subsection (a) 
        (including any Federal land acquired after the date of 
        enactment of this Act for inclusion in an area designated by 
        subsection (a)) is withdrawn from all forms of--
                  (A) entry, appropriation, or disposal under the 
                public land laws;
                  (B) location, entry, and patent under the mining 
                laws; and
                  (C) disposition under all laws pertaining to mineral 
                and geothermal leasing or mineral materials.
          (3) Timber harvesting.--
                  (A) In general.--Except as provided in subparagraph 
                (B) or as authorized under subsection (c), timber 
                harvesting shall not be permitted within an area 
                designated by subsection (a).
                  (B) Fire, insects, and disease.--Timber harvesting 
                may be permitted in an area designated by subsection 
                (a) to the extent consistent with protecting and 
                preserving the purposes of the areas designated by 
                subsection (a) for purposes relating to the necessary 
                control of fire, insects, and disease.
          (4) Use of motorized or mechanized vehicles.--
                  (A) In general.--Nothing in this section affects the 
                use of motorized or mechanized vehicles that the 
                Secretary concerned determines is necessary for 
                administrative use or to respond to an emergency.
                  (B) Mechanized vehicles, pedestrians, and horse 
                travel.--Except as authorized under subsection (c), 
                nothing in this section prohibits--
                          (i) the use of mechanized vehicles, access by 
                        pedestrians, or horse travel within the areas 
                        designated by subsection (a); or
                          (ii) the construction of trails for use by 
                        mechanized vehicles, pedestrians, and horse 
                        travel within the areas designated by 
                        subsection (a).
          (5) Firewood.--The Secretary concerned may allow for the 
        collection of firewood for noncommercial personal use within 
        the areas designated by subsection (a)--
                  (A) in accordance with any applicable laws; and
                  (B) subject to such terms and conditions as the 
                Secretary concerned determines to be appropriate.
  (c) Area Specific Management Requirements.--
          (1) Highlands special management area.--
                  (A) Campground development.--No permanent campground 
                may be constructed within the Highlands Special 
                Management Area.
                  (B) Motorized and mechanized recreation.--Except as 
                provided in subparagraph (C), and as necessary for 
                administrative use or to respond to an emergency, the 
                use of motorized or mechanized vehicles within the 
                Highlands Special Management Area shall be prohibited.
                  (C) Transmission towers and municipal water 
                pipelines.--Nothing in this section affects--
                          (i) the reasonable access of the government 
                        of the applicable county to operate and 
                        maintain the communication site located on 
                        Table Mountain under a special use permit 
                        issued by the Forest Service; and
                          (ii) the reasonable access of the city of 
                        Butte, Montana, to operate, maintain, and if 
                        necessary, upgrade or replace the water supply 
                        pipeline within the Highlands Special 
                        Management Area in existence as of the date of 
                        enactment of this Act for the city of Butte 
                        (including the surrounding community of the 
                        city of Butte).
                  (D) Helicopter landings.--Nothing in this section 
                precludes or restricts the authority of the Secretary 
                concerned to enter into agreements with the Secretary 
                of Defense or the Montana National Guard to authorize 
                limited and scheduled landings of aircraft in the 
                Highlands Special Management Area.
          (2) Lost creek, thunderbolt, and west pioneers recreation 
        management areas.--
                  (A) Motorized recreation.--Subject to any terms and 
                conditions the Secretary concerned determines to be 
                necessary, the use of motorized vehicles within the 
                Lost Creek, Thunderbolt, and West Pioneers Recreation 
                Management Areas shall be limited to--
                          (i) roads, trails, or areas that, as of the 
                        date of enactment of this Act, are designated 
                        roads, trails, or areas; and
                          (ii) during periods of adequate snow cover, 
                        the areas authorized for snowmobile use as of 
                        the date of enactment of this Act.
                  (B) Campground development.--No permanent campground 
                may be constructed within the Lost Creek Recreation 
                Area.
          (3) Otatsy recreation management area.--
                  (A) Motorized and mechanized recreation.--
                          (i) In general.--The use of motorized and 
                        mechanized vehicles in the Otatsy Recreation 
                        Management Area shall be permitted only on the 
                        roads, trails, and areas that are designated 
                        for use by motorized and mechanized vehicles by 
                        the management plan required under subparagraph 
                        (B).
                          (ii) Interim management.--Until the date on 
                        which the management plan required under 
                        subparagraph (B) is approved, and subject to 
                        any terms and conditions that the Secretary 
                        concerned determines to be necessary, the use 
                        of motorized or mechanized vehicles in the 
                        Otatsy Recreation Management Area shall be 
                        limited to the roads and trails designated for 
                        such use as of the date of enactment of this 
                        Act, except that during periods of adequate 
                        snow cover, the use of snowmobiles shall be 
                        allowed within the Otatsy Recreation Management 
                        Area.
                  (B) Management plan.--The Secretary concerned shall 
                prepare a management plan for the Otatsy Recreation 
                Management Area as part of the first revision of the 
                applicable forest plan that is carried out after the 
                date of enactment of this Act.
          (4) Three rivers and roderick special management areas.--
                  (A) Motorized and mechanized recreation.--Except as 
                provided in subparagraphs (B) and (C), the use of 
                motorized or mechanized vehicles within the Three 
                Rivers Special Management Area and the Roderick Special 
                Management Area shall be limited to the roads on which 
                use by highway legal vehicles is permitted as of the 
                date of enactment of this Act.
                  (B) Snowmobile area.--Subject to any terms and 
                conditions the Secretary concerned determines to be 
                necessary, during periods of adequate snow cover, the 
                use of snowmobiles shall be allowed in the areas 
                designated as ``motorized'' in the map entitled 
                ``Roderick Wilderness and Special Management Area and 
                Three Rivers Special Management Area'' and dated 
                December 17, 2013.
                  (C) Game carts.--The Secretary concerned may 
                authorize the use of nonmotorized game carts in the 
                area identified as ``Roderick Special Management Area'' 
                on the map described in subparagraph (B).
                  (D) Campground development.--No permanent campground 
                may be constructed in the Three Rivers Special 
                Management Area or the Roderick Special Management 
                Area.
          (5) Snowcrest special management area.--The Secretary 
        concerned may authorize the use of nonmotorized game carts 
        within the Snowcrest Special Management Area.
          (6) Tobacco roots recreation management area.--Subject to any 
        terms and conditions that the Secretary concerned determines to 
        be necessary, the use of motorized vehicles shall be limited to 
        the roads and trails in the Tobacco Roots Recreation Management 
        Area designated for such use as of the date of enactment of 
        this Act.
          (7) West big hole recreation management area.--
                  (A) Motorized recreation.--Subject to any terms and 
                conditions the Secretary concerned determines to be 
                necessary, the use of motorized vehicles within the 
                West Big Hole Recreation Management Area shall be 
                limited to--
                          (i) the roads, trails, and areas that, as of 
                        the date of enactment of this Act, are 
                        designated roads, trails, or areas; and
                          (ii) during periods of adequate snow cover, 
                        the areas authorized for snowmobile use as of 
                        the date of enactment of this Act.
                  (B) Timber harvest.--The Secretary concerned may 
                authorize post and pole, firewood, and fuel reduction 
                timber projects in the West Big Hole Recreation 
                Management Area, subject to such terms and conditions 
                that the Secretary concerned determines to be 
                appropriate.

SEC. 208. ALL-TERRAIN-VEHICLE STUDY AND REPORT.

  Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the 
Secretary concerned shall study and report on--
          (1) the opportunities for expanded all-terrain vehicle roads 
        and trails across the Three Rivers District and adjacent areas 
        on the Kootenai National Forest;
          (2) the interconnectedness of roads on private or State land; 
        and
          (3) the opportunities for expanded access points to existing 
        trails.

                                PURPOSE

    The purposes of S. 37 are to direct the Forest Service to 
conduct certain restoration treatments, to designate Federal 
land in Montana as wilderness and other special management 
areas, and to release certain wilderness study areas.

                          BACKGROUND AND NEED

    In recent years, stakeholders interested in the management 
of the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest, including both 
timber industry representatives and conservationists, developed 
a proposal to increase timber harvests through projects 
designed to restore the ecological conditions of the National 
Forest and projects designed to reduce the amount of vegetation 
that could serve as a fuel source for wildfires. The proposal 
also included a list of potential areas to be designated as 
wilderness areas or other protected areas. The Beaverhead-
Deerlodge National Forest is the largest of the national 
forests in Montana and covers 3.6 million acres scattered 
across the southwest corner of the State.
    Similarly, but separately, stakeholder groups developed 
proposals for expediting forest management and conservation 
efforts on the Three Rivers District of the Kootenai National 
Forest and the Seeley Lake District of the Lolo National 
Forest. The Kootenai National Forest covers 2.1 million acres 
in northwest Montana and northeast Idaho; the Three Rivers 
District occupies the land adjacent to the Montana-Idaho and 
U.S.-Canada borders. The Lolo National Forest covers 2.6 
million acres near the middle of the western border of Montana; 
the Seeley Lake District occupies the land northeast of 
Missoula, Montana.
    As ordered reported, S. 37 would direct the Secretary of 
Agriculture (Secretary) to implement the key aspects of the 
proposals, which will increase and make predictable the 
quantity of timber sold from these National Forests, to 
designate new areas for recreation, and to add land to the 
National Wilderness Preservation System. The Secretary would 
establish an initiative under which 70,000 acres on the 
Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest and 30,000 acres on the 
Kootenai National Forest would be placed under contract for 
treatment. Title II of S. 37 would designate approximately 
642,700 acres of Federal lands administered by the Forest 
Service and the Bureau of Land Management as wilderness, and 
approximately 390,775 acres of National Forest lands as special 
management areas.

                          LEGISLATIVE HISTORY

    Senator Tester introduced S. 37 on January 22, 2013. 
Senator Walsh is a cosponsor. The Subcommittee on Public Lands, 
Forests, and Mining held a hearing on S. 37 on July 30, 2013 
(S. Hrg. 113-85). At its business meeting on December 19, 2013, 
the Committee ordered the bill favorably reported with an 
amendment in the nature of a substitute. Senators Murkowski, 
Barrasso, Lee, Heller, Flake, Scott, Hoeven, and Portman asked 
to be recorded as voting no.
    A similar bill, S. 268, was introduced by Senators Tester 
and Baucus in the 112th Congress. Senator Inouye was also a 
cosponsor. The Subcommittee on Public Lands and Forests held a 
hearing on S. 268 on May 25, 2011 (S. Hrg. 112-131). In the 
111th Congress, similar legislation, S. 1470, was introduced by 
Senators Tester and Baucus. The Subcommittee on Public Lands 
and Forests held a hearing on S. 1470 on December 17, 2009 (S. 
Hrg. 111-364). Similar language was also included in Title VII 
of Division G of Senate Amendment 4805 to H.R. 3082 (Continuing 
Appropriations and Surface Transportation Extensions Act, 
2011), but the Senate took no action on that amendment. Later 
in the 111th Congress, similar legislation, S. 4049, was 
introduced by Senator Tester on December 18, 2010; however, no 
further action was taken on that bill.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, in an 
open business session on December 19, 2013, by a voice vote of 
a quorum present, recommended that the Senate pass S. 37, if 
amended as described herein.

                          COMMITTEE AMENDMENT

    During its consideration of S. 37, the committee adopted an 
amendment in the nature of a substitute. In addition to making 
several technical, clarifying, and conforming edits, the 
amendment: enables the Secretary of Agriculture to increase 
stream protections in project areas if an increase is 
determined to be warranted, specifies that projects that would 
be completed under the Montana Forest Jobs and Restoration 
Pilot Initiative would utilize the administrative and judicial 
review provisions in the Healthy Forest Restoration Act of 
2003, makes the reporting requirements of the bill less 
burdensome, and updates the map references of the lands to be 
designated as Recreation Management Areas or Wilderness areas 
to reflect boundary and acreage adjustments.
    The amendment is explained in detail in the section-by-
section analysis, below.

                      SECTION-BY-SECTION ANALYSIS

    Section 1 contains the short title, the ``Forest Jobs and 
Recreation Act of 2013.''

Title I

    Section 101 lists that the purposes of this title are to 
create jobs, to make more predictable the rate of forest 
products harvesting, to encourage collaborative approaches to 
land management, to restore the condition of watersheds, to 
reduce risks posed by fire, and to use monitoring to improve 
management.
    Section 102 defines key terms and map references used in 
the bill.
    Section 103(a) establishes the Montana Forest Jobs and 
Restoration Pilot Initiative as the way to achieve the purposes 
of this Title.
    Subsection (b) requires the Secretary to treat 70,000 acres 
on the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest and 30,000 acres on 
the Kootenai National Forest. On this land, the Secretary is to 
reduce the density of the standing trees in an effort to 
decrease the risk posed by fire. Moreover, this treatment is to 
be conducted in a manner that primarily yields commercial 
forest products.
    Subsection (c) enables the Secretary to consult with 
groups, comprised of individuals representing diverse 
interests, in developing projects.
    Subsection (d) extends the administrative and judicial 
review provisions, which govern projects conducted under the 
Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003, to the projects 
authorized in this bill.
    Subsection (e) requires the Secretary to report to Congress 
every year in which the Secretary fails to comply with the 
performance requirements in this bill, and more comprehensively 
every five years after the date of enactment. To ensure the 
Secretary prioritizes the preparation and implementation of 
projects over the writing of these reports, the more 
comprehensive report is limited in length to seven pages.
    Subsection (f) enables the Secretary to use funds from 
various budget line items within the National Forest System 
appropriation to realize the performance requirements in this 
bill; however, the Secretary is prohibited from diverting 
funding from National Forests located outside the State of 
Montana to complete work on the lands identified in this bill.
    Subsection (g) enables the initiative to be expanded to the 
Seeley Ranger District of the Lolo National Forest.
    Subsection (h) requires that the Montana Forest Jobs and 
Restoration Pilot Initiative terminate fifteen years after the 
date of enactment or when the treatments required in this bill 
have been completed.
    Section 104(a) requires the Secretary to give priority to 
watershed restoration projects that would be conducted in areas 
with existing roads, in areas that are located close to 
communities at risk of wildfire, and in areas that contain 
trees likely to be killed by insects or disease.
    Subsection (b) establishes that the stream protections 
currently required for restoration projects can be modified, 
but they cannot be made to be less restrictive than their 
present state. Subsection (b) also prohibits the Secretary from 
constructing any additional permanent roads to implement 
projects.
    Section 105(a) specifies that the Secretary must still 
adhere to all other laws, such as the National Environmental 
Policy Act and the Endangered Species Act, when carrying out 
restoration projects under the Montana Forest Jobs and 
Restoration Pilot Initiative.
    Subsection (b) clarifies that employees from the Bureau of 
Land Management and the Forest Service may serve on the Board 
of Directors of the Blackfoot Challenge, a non-profit 
organization that coordinates multi-party conservation efforts 
in the Blackfoot Watershed.

Title II--Designation of Wilderness and Special Management Areas

    Section 201 sets forth the purposes of the title, which are 
to protect and enhance motorized recreational opportunities in 
the Beaverhead-Deerlodge, Lolo, and Kootenai National Forests 
in Montana, and to protect the wild heritage and backcountry 
traditions of the State through designation of certain lands as 
wilderness or other special management designations that 
preserve existing primitive and semi-primitive recreational 
activities.
    Section 202 defines key terms used in the title.
    Section 203(a) designates approximately 569,216 acres of 
National Forest lands in Montana as additions to the National 
Wilderness Preservation System.
    Subsection (b) designates approximately 65,700 acres of 
lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management as 
additions to the National Wilderness Preservation System.
    Subsection (c) transfers administrative jurisdiction over 
approximately 663 acres of lands administered by the Bureau of 
Land Management to the Forest Service, to be managed as part of 
the East Pioneers Wilderness designated in subsection (a).
    Section 204 provides for the management of the wilderness 
areas designated in section 203.
    Subsection (a) states that the wilderness areas shall be 
administered by the Secretary concerned in accordance with the 
Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.) except that any 
reference in that Act to the date of enactment shall be 
considered to be a reference to the date of enactment of this 
Act and, with respect to wilderness areas administered by the 
Bureau of Land Management, any reference in the Wilderness Act 
to the Secretary of Agriculture shall be considered to be a 
reference to the Secretary of the Interior.
    Subsection (b) directs the Secretary concerned to file a 
map and legal description of each wilderness area designated by 
this Act with the House and Senate authorizing committees, and 
to make the maps and legal descriptions publically available in 
the appropriate offices of the Forest Service and the Bureau of 
Land Management.
    Subsection (c) provides that any land within a wilderness 
area which is acquired by the United States shall become part 
of the wilderness area in which it is located and shall be 
managed in accordance with the Wilderness Act and other 
applicable law.
    Subsection (d) withdraws the Federal land designated as 
wilderness in section 203 entry, appropriation, or disposal 
under the public land laws; from location, entry, and patent 
under the mining laws; and from disposition under all laws 
pertaining to mineral or geothermal leasing, or mineral 
materials.
    Subsection (e) provides that, in accordance with section 
4(d)(1) of the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 11341(d)(1)), the 
Secretary concerned may take such actions within wilderness 
areas designated by section 203 as are necessary to control 
fire, insects, and diseases, such to such terms and conditions 
as the Secretary determines to be appropriate.
    Subsection (f) clarifies, in accordance with section 5(a) 
of the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1134(a)), the Secretary 
concerned shall provide any owner of private land within the 
boundary of a wilderness area designated by section 203 
adequate access to such privately-owned lands.
    Subsection (g) clarifies that nothing in this title affects 
the jurisdiction or responsibilities of the State of Montana 
with respect to fish and wildlife management, including the 
regulation of hunting, fishing, and trapping. The subsection 
authorizes the Secretary concerned to carry out management 
activities in a wilderness area to maintain or restore fish and 
wildlife populations, including habitat maintenance or 
restoration, if the activities are consistent with applicable 
wilderness management plans and are carried out in accordance 
with applicable guidelines and policies.
    Subsection (h) states that nothing in this title prevents 
the installation or maintenance of hydrological, 
meteorological, or climatological instrumentation within a 
wilderness area designated by section 20 if the Secretary 
concerned determines that the instrumentation is necessary to 
further the scientific, educational, or conservation purposes 
of the wilderness area.
    Subsection (i) allows for the grazing of livestock to 
continue within the wilderness areas designated by section 203 
if the grazing was established before the date of enactment of 
this Act, subject to such reasonable regulations, policies, and 
practices as the Secretary concerned determines to be 
necessary, in accordance with section 4(d)(4) of the Wilderness 
Act (16 U.S.C. 1131(d)(4)), and the wilderness grazing 
guidelines printed in H. Rept. 96-617 (for Forest Service 
wilderness areas) or Appendix A of H. Rept. 101-405 (for BLM 
wilderness areas).
    Subsection (j) provides that commercial services, including 
authorized outfitting and guide activities, may be performed 
within the wilderness areas designated by section 203 in 
accordance with section 4(d)(5) of the Wilderness Act (16 
U.S.C. 1133(d)(5)), to the extent necessary for activities that 
are proper for realizing the recreational or other wilderness 
purposes of the wilderness areas. The subsection also includes 
a savings clause clarifying that nothing in this title requires 
the Secretary concerned to modify permits in existence as of 
the date of enactment of this Act which provide outfitting and 
guide services within the designated wilderness areas if the 
Secretary concerned determines that the activities are in 
compliance with the Wilderness Act.
    Subsection (k) clarifies that the designation of a 
wilderness area in section 203 does not create any protective 
perimeter or buffer zone around the area, and the fact that 
non-wilderness activities or uses can be seen or heard from 
within a wilderness area shall not preclude the conduct of such 
activities or uses outside of the boundary of the wilderness 
area.
    Subsection (l) authorizes the Secretary concerned to issue 
a special use authorization to an owner of a water storage, 
transport, or diversion facility located within a wilderness 
area designated in section 203 for the continued operation, 
maintenance, and reconstruction of the facility, if the 
facility was in existence before the date of the designation of 
the wilderness area and the Secretary concerned determines: (1) 
the facility has been in substantially continuous use to 
deliver water for the beneficial use of the owner since the 
date of the designation of the wilderness area; (2) the owner 
of the facility holds a valid water right for use of the water 
under State law, with a priority date that predates the 
designation of the wilderness area, and (3) it is not 
practicable or feasible to relocate the facility to land 
outside the wilderness.
    Subsection (m) provides for the continuation of motorized 
access to maintain water infrastructure for cattle to protect 
fluvial Artic Grayling and other acquatic species in the Ruby 
River within the Snowcrest Wilderness, subject to a permit and 
in accordance with section 4(d)(4) of the Wilderness Act and 
the guidelines described in H. Rept 96-617. The subsection also 
provides for the trailing of sheep across the Snowcrest 
Wilderness to reach existing grazing allotments in the Gravelly 
Mountains to be continued for the tenure of the allotments, 
subject to a permit and a determination by the Forest Service 
that the use of non-mechanized transport is impracticable or 
infeasible, and to the maximum extent practicable in accordance 
with the guidelines described in H. Rept. 96-617.
    Section 205(a) contains a Congressional finding that, for 
purposes of section 603 of the Federal Land Policy and 
Management Act of 1976 (FLPMA; 43 U.S.C. 1782), any portion of 
a wilderness study area described in subsection (b) that is 
designated as a wilderness area in section 203 or any other Act 
enacted before the date of enactment of this Act has been 
adequately studied for wilderness.
    Subsection (b) identifies the wilderness study areas 
covered by this subsection.
    Subsection (c) provides that any portion of a BLM 
wilderness study area which is not designated as wilderness is 
no longer subject to section 603(c) of FLPMA and shall be 
managed in accordance with the applicable land management plans 
adopted under section 202 of FLPMA (43 U.S.C. 1712).
    Section 206 contains language similar to section 205 
releasing those portions of the Sapphire and West Pioneer 
Wilderness Study Areas managed by the Forest Service which are 
not designated as wilderness from further wilderness review or 
any requirement to manage them for wilderness suitability 
pending revision of the applicable forest plan.
    Section 207(a) designates 10 special management areas in 
Montana which combined total approximately 390,784 acres, to 
conserve, protect, and enhance the scenic, fish and wildlife, 
recreational, backcountry heritage, and other natural resource 
values of the areas.
    Subsection (b)(1) directs that the Secretary concerned 
shall administer each special management area designated by 
subsection (a) in furtherance of the purposes for which the 
area is established, in accordance with this section and any 
laws and regulations relating to the National Forest System.
    Paragraph (1) also provides that nothing in this title 
precludes the Secretary concerned from closing any trail or 
area located in any of the special management areas to protect 
a natural resource or to help ensure public safety.
    Paragraph (2) withdraws the Federal land designated as 
wilderness in section 203 entry, appropriation, or disposal 
under the public land laws; from location, entry, and patent 
under the mining laws; and from disposition under all laws 
pertaining to mineral or geothermal leasing, or mineral 
materials.
    Paragraph (3) prohibits timber harvesting within any of the 
special management areas, except to the extent consistent with 
protecting and preserving the purposes of the areas, for 
purposes relating to the necessary control of fire, insects, 
and disease.
    Paragraph (4) clarifies that the Secretary concerned may 
allow the use of motorized or mechanized vehicles with a 
special management area that the Secretary concerned determines 
is necessary for administrative use or to respond to an 
emergency. Except as specified in certain area-specific special 
management provisions in subsection (c), nothing in this 
section prohibits the use of mechanized vehicles, pedestrian 
access, or construction of trails within the special management 
areas.
    Paragraph (5) authorizes the Secretary concerned to allow 
for the collection of firewood for non-commercial, personal use 
within the special management areas, in accordance with 
applicable laws and subject to such terms and conditions as the 
Secretary concerned determines to be appropriate.
    Subsection (c) contains area-specific management 
requirements and prohibitions for 7 of the special management 
areas.
    Section 208 directs the Secretary concerned, within one 
year after the date of enactment of this Act, to study and 
report on the opportunities for expanded all-terrain vehicle 
roads and trails across the Three Rivers District and adjacent 
areas on the Kootenai National Forest, the interconnectedness 
of roads on private or State land, and opportunities for 
expanded access points to existing trails.

                   COST AND BUDGETARY CONSIDERATIONS

    The following estimate of costs of this measure has been 
provided by the Congressional Budget Office:

S. 37--Forest Jobs and Recreation Act of 2013

    Summary: S. 37 would establish a pilot program to carry out 
watershed restoration projects and increase the area in certain 
national forests where tree-thinning activities would be 
undertaken. The bill also would add about 640,000 acres of 
federal lands administered by the Forest Service and the Bureau 
of Land Management (BLM) to the National Wilderness 
Preservation System. Finally, the bill would designate parcels 
totaling about 390,000 acres of federal lands as special 
management areas.
    Based on information provided by the Forest Service, CBO 
estimates that implementing the legislation would cost $25 
million over the 2014-2019 period, assuming appropriation of 
the necessary amounts. Implementing S. 37 could affect 
offsetting receipts from timber sales; however, any increase in 
receipts would be contingent on future appropriations and not 
directly attributable to this bill. Because enacting the bill 
would not directly affect direct spending and would have no 
effect on revenues, pay-as-you-go procedures do not apply.
    S. 37 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA).
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: The estimated 
budgetary impact of S. 37 is shown in the following table. The 
costs of this legislation fall within budget function 300 
(natural resources and environment).

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             By fiscal year, in millions of dollars--
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
                                                   2014     2015     2016     2017     2018     2019   2014-2019
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  CHANGES IN SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION

Estimated Authorization Level..................        4        4        4        5        5        5        27
Estimated Outlays..............................        2        4        4        5        5        5        25
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Basis of estimate: For this estimate, CBO assumes that the 
legislation will be enacted in 2014 and that the necessary 
funds will be appropriated for each fiscal year, including 
supplemental amounts for 2014. Estimated outlays are based on 
historical spending patterns for similar programs
    S. 37 would require the Forest Service to reduce the 
density of trees on a specified number of acres each year 
within the Beaverhead-Deerlodge and Kootenai National Forests. 
The bill also would require the Forest Service to conduct 
annual watershed restoration projects in the affected forests. 
Based on information provided by the agency regarding the cost 
of conducting similar activities, CBO estimates that 
implementing those provisions would cost $25 million over the 
2014-2019 period, assuming appropriation of the necessary 
amounts.
    The bill also would designate roughly 1 million acres to be 
managed for conservation and recreational purposes. Because 
implementing the bill would not significantly affect the costs 
to administer the affected lands, which are already managed by 
the Forest Service and BLM, CBO estimates that implementing 
those provisions would have no significant effect on the 
federal budget.
    Finally, implementing S. 37 could increase gross offsetting 
receipts from the sale of harvested timber; however, any 
increase in receipts, which CBO estimates would probably be 
less than $500,000 annually, would be contingent on future 
appropriations.
    Intergovernmental and private-sector impact: S. 37 contains 
no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as defined in 
UMRA.
    Pay-As-You-Go considerations: None.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal Costs: Jeff LaFave; Impact on 
State, Local, and Tribal Governments: Michael Hirsch; Impact on 
the Private Sector: Amy Petz.
    Estimate approved by: Theresa Gullo, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

                      REGULATORY IMPACT EVALUATION

    In compliance with paragraph 11(b) of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee makes the following 
evaluation of the regulatory impact which would be incurred in 
carrying out S. 37.
    The bill is not a regulatory measure in the sense of 
imposing Government-established standards or significant 
economic responsibilities on private individuals and 
businesses.
    No personal information would be collected in administering 
the program. Therefore, there would be no impact on personal 
privacy.
    Little, if any, additional paperwork would result from the 
enactment of S. 37, as ordered reported.

                   CONGRESSIONALLY DIRECTED SPENDING

    S. 37, as reported, does not contain any congressionally 
directed spending items, limited tax benefits, or limited 
tariff benefits as defined in rule XLIV of the Standing Rules 
of the Senate.

                        EXECUTIVE COMMUNICATIONS

    The testimony provided by the Forest Service and the Bureau 
of Land Management on S. 37 at the July 30, 2013, Subcommittee 
on Public Lands, Forests, and Mining hearing follows:

   Statement of Leslie Weldon, Deputy Chief, National Forest System, 
               Forest Service, Department of Agriculture

    Mr. Chairman, Members of the Committee, I am Leslie Weldon, 
Deputy Chief, National Forest System, U.S. Forest Service, 
United States Department of Agriculture. Thank you for the 
opportunity to share the Department of Agriculture's views on 
S. 37, the `Forest Jobs and Recreation Act of 2013.'
    S. 37 directs the Secretary of Agriculture to develop and 
implement forest and watershed restoration projects on 70,000 
acres of the Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest and 30,000 
acres of the Kootenai National Forest within 15 years of 
enactment. The bill prescribes treatment methods, annual 
acreage targets, and standardized criteria to prioritize areas 
for restoration and hazardous fuel reduction projects. It also 
requires consultation with an advisory committee or 
collaborative group for each restoration project implemented by 
the Secretary, and calls for a monitoring report every five 
years. The bill designates twenty-four wilderness areas 
totaling approximately 666,260 acres, six recreation areas 
totaling approximately 288,780 acres, and three special 
management areas totaling approximately 80,720 acres. Some of 
the designations apply to lands managed by the Bureau of Land 
Management and we defer to the Department of the Interior on 
those provisions.
    The Department (USDA) supports S. 37 and looks forward to 
continuing to work with the Committee and Sponsor to develop 
modifications to the bill that could provide greater 
opportunities to accomplish the shared goals of restoration, 
recreation and economic development.
    The concepts embodied in this legislation, collaboratively 
developed landscape scale projects, increased use of 
stewardship contracting, and the importance of a viable forest 
products industry in restoring ecosystems and economies are 
fundamentally sound. USDA does have reservations about 
legislating forest management decisions and would hope that the 
work the Forest Service is doing to increase the pace and scale 
of forest restoration and management of the National Forests 
will make this type of legislation unnecessary in the future. 
In fact, the Forest Service is currently engaged in numerous 
programs and activities on the National Forests of Montana and 
around the nation that embrace the concepts in this bill.
    Examples of the work we are carrying out in the spirit of 
this legislation are underway as large-scale restoration 
projects on the national forests of Montana include: the Larry 
Bass Stewardship Project on the Bitterroot National Forest 
where we are completing hazardous fuel reduction work and are 
re-investing stewardship receipts to accomplish hazardous fuel/
bark beetle work within and around a popular ski area on the 
forest; Sparring Bulls and Young Dodge, two large landscape 
projects on the Kootenai National Forest developed with a local 
collaborative group; and the Southwestern Crown of the 
Continent project, which will treat close to 200,000 acres on 
the Lolo, Flathead and Helena National Forests with funding 
provided under the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration 
Program.
    Planned projects are increasingly focused on large 
landscape ecosystems to address shared issues across forest 
boundaries. For example, the Boulder Vegetation Project and a 
complex of projects planned on the Helena National Forest that 
focus on bark beetle infestations occurring on the two forests.
    Efforts such as these have helped the agency and 
stakeholders gain experience in identifying the factors 
necessary for the success of large-scale restoration projects, 
and I acknowledge the Senator's incorporation of their input 
into this legislation. I offer our continued support for 
further collaboration on addressing remaining concerns to 
ensure that it can serve as a model for similar efforts 
elsewhere.
    We recognize that the proposed bill is the product of a 
collaborative effort. Such efforts are critically important to 
increasing public support for needed forest management 
activities, particularly in light of the bark beetle crisis 
facing Montana and other western states. We believe these 
efforts can significantly advance forest restoration, reduce 
litigation surrounding restoration where parties are willing to 
collaborate, and make it easier to provide jobs and 
opportunities in the forest industry for rural communities. 
While we have seen significant successes from collaboration in 
some parts of the country, there are areas where groups are not 
interested in collaboration and continue to use appeals and 
litigation as methods to delay or stop forest treatments that 
restore resilient forests, reduce severe wildfire potential and 
other objectives. Montana in particular continues to see 
substantial litigation activity.
    As noted above, USDA is concerned about legislating forest 
management direction or specific treatment levels on a site-
specific basis. USDA wants to work with the Committee to ensure 
that this does not negatively impact other Forest Service 
priorities in Region 1 or draw important resources from 
priority work on other units of the National Forest System. We 
also would like to work with the Committee and sponsor on other 
aspects of the bill such as defining mechanical treatments, 
establishing reporting requirements, and provisions effecting 
other funds and road-density standards found in Title I.
    Regarding the land designations in Title II that pertain to 
lands under the jurisdiction of the Forest Service, we support 
the wilderness recommendations made in each Forest's land and 
resource management plan given the depth of analysis and public 
collaboration that goes into them. Regarding the input from the 
Department that the Senator has incorporated, there are two 
items in S. 37 for which I would like to express the 
Department's appreciation in particular: (1) the adjustments to 
wilderness area designations in Title II, which more closely 
reflect the extensive collaboration, analysis and resulting 
recommendations of the Beaverhead-Deerlodge 2009 Forest Plan 
and other forest plans; and (2) the incorporation of the CFR 
212.1 definitions of ``designated road, trail or area'' in the 
bill provides for consistency of implementation.
    In closing, I want to thank Senator Tester once again for 
his strong commitment to Montana's communities and natural 
resources. We appreciate the close work of the Senator's staff 
with the Forest Service to refine legislation that would 
provide a full suite of significant benefits for the people, 
economy, and forests of Montana and the nation. The continuing 
commitment to bring diverse interests together to find 
solutions that provide a context for restoration, renewal, and 
sustainability of public landscapes and to foster healthy rural 
economies is evident in the legislation being considered by 
this Committee today.
    We want to underscore our commitment to the continuing 
collaboration with the Senator and his staff, the Committee, 
and all interested stakeholders in an open, inclusive and 
transparent manner to provide the best land stewardship for our 
National Forest System Lands.
    This concludes my prepared statement, and I would be 
pleased to answer any questions you may have.

Statement of Ned Farquhar, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Land & Minerals 
                 Management, Department of the Interior

    Thank you for inviting the Department of the Interior to 
testify on S. 37, the Forest Jobs and Recreation Act. The 
Bureau of Land Management (BLM) supports the wilderness 
designations on BLM-managed lands included in S. 37.
    The vast majority of the designations and other substantive 
provisions of S. 37 apply to activities on National Forest 
System lands. We defer to the Department of Agriculture on 
those provisions.


                               background


    The southwestern corner of Montana is a critically 
important biological region. Linking the Greater Yellowstone 
Area and the Bitterroot Mountains of Idaho and Montana, these 
areas include important wildlife corridors that allow natural 
migrations of wildlife and help prevent species isolation. The 
Centennial Mountains are particularly noteworthy in this 
regard. The diversity of wildlife throughout this area is a 
strong indicator of its importance. Elk, mule deer, bighorn 
sheep, and moose, as well as their predators, such as bears, 
mountain lions and wolves, travel through this corner of 
Montana.
    Outstanding dispersed recreational opportunities abound in 
this region as well. A day's hunting, hiking or fishing may be 
pursued in the splendid isolation of the steeply forested Ruby 
Mountains or in the foothill prairies of the Blacktail 
Mountains, areas largely untouched and pristine. For the more 
adventurous, Humbug Spires offers 65 million year-old rocks now 
eroded into fanciful spires, appreciated both for their 
climbing challenges as well as their scientific value.


                                 s. 37


    Title I of S. 37, applies solely to National Forest System 
Lands. Accordingly the Department of the Interior defers to the 
Department of Agriculture on those provisions. The majority of 
the designations in Title II of the bill are also on National 
Forest System Lands, and again we defer to the Department of 
Agriculture.
    Section 203(b) of S. 37 designates five wilderness areas on 
lands administered by the BLM in southwestern Montana: the 
Blacktail Mountains Wilderness (10,675 acres), Centennial 
Mountains Wilderness (23,700 acres), Humbug Spires Wilderness 
(8,900 acres), East Fork Blacktail Wilderness (6,125 acres), 
and Ruby Mountains Wilderness (16,300 acres). The BLM supports 
these designations and we appreciate the Sponsor and the 
Committee working with us over the last year to refine these 
boundaries. All of these areas meet the definitions of 
wilderness in that they are areas where the land and its 
community of life are untrammeled. These areas have retained 
their primeval character and have been influenced primarily by 
the forces of nature, with outstanding opportunities for 
primitive recreation or solitude. We continue to encourage the 
Sponsor and the Committee to consider expanding the boundaries 
of the Centennial Mountains Wilderness in order to protect this 
area as a single coherent corridor, thereby providing enhanced 
benefit for the genetic diversity of the fauna inhabiting the 
Greater Yellowstone Area and the Bitterroot Range.
    Furthermore, we support the transfer of administrative 
jurisdiction over the 660-acre Farlin Creek area to the Forest 
Service for inclusion in the adjoining 77,000 acre East 
Pioneers Wilderness Area.
    Section 205 of S. 37 proposes to fully release four BLM-
managed wilderness study areas (WSAs) in Beaverhead and Madison 
counties from WSA management thereby allowing the consideration 
of a full range of multiple uses. In addition, in five other 
WSAs, some areas would be released from WSA status and other 
areas would be partially designated as wilderness, as noted 
above. In all, over 66,000 acres of WSAs are proposed for 
release, and nearly 66,000 acres are proposed for wilderness 
designation; we support these provisions.


                               conclusion


    Thank you for the opportunity to testify. We look forward 
to working cooperatively with the Congress to designate these 
special and biologically significant areas in this dramatic 
corner of Montana as wilderness.

                        CHANGES IN EXISTING LAW

    In compliance with paragraph 12 of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee notes that no 
changes in existing law are made by S. 37 as ordered reported.