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                                                       Calendar No. 411
113th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 2d Session                                                     113-181

======================================================================



 
DEPARTMENTS OF COMMERCE AND JUSTICE, AND SCIENCE, AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                       APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2015

                                _______
                                

                  June 5, 2014.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

          Ms. Mikulski, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                                 REPORT

                         [To accompany S. 2437]

    The Committee on Appropriations reports the bill (S. 2437) 
making appropriations for the Departments of Commerce and 
Justice, Science, and Related Agencies for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2015, and for other purposes, reports 
favorably thereon and recommends that the bill do pass.



Total obligational authority, fiscal year 2015

Total of bill as reported to the Senate\1\.............. $62,167,092,000
Amount of 2014 appropriations...........................  61,403,600,000
Amount of 2015 budget estimate..........................  61,928,166,000
Bill as recommended to Senate compared to--
    2014 appropriations.................................    +763,492,000
    2015 budget estimate................................    +238,926,000

\1\This level does not include -$10,628,092,000 in adjustments that the 
Congressional Budget Office [CBO] scores to the bill. With these 
scorekeeping adjustments, the bill totals $51,202,000,000 in 
discretionary budget authority.


                                CONTENTS

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page

Purpose of the Bill..............................................     3
Summary of the Bill..............................................     3
Fighting Waste, Fraud, and Abuse.................................     5
Reprogrammings, Reorganizations, and Relocations.................     6
Congressional Budget Justifications..............................     7
Reporting Requirements...........................................     8
Reductions-in-Force..............................................     8
Appropriations Liaisons..........................................     8
Title I: Department of Commerce..................................     9
Title II: Department of Justice..................................    56
Title III: Science...............................................   104
    Office of Science and Technology Policy......................   104
    National Aeronautics and Space Administration................   106
    National Science Foundation..................................   122
Title IV: Related Agencies.......................................   130
    Commission on Civil Rights...................................   130
    Equal Employment Opportunity Commission......................   130
    International Trade Commission...............................   131
    Legal Services Corporation...................................   131
    Marine Mammal Commission.....................................   132
    Office of the United States Trade Representative.............   133
    State Justice Institute......................................   134
Title V: General Provisions......................................   135
Compliance With Paragraph 7, Rule XVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the 
  Senate.........................................................   138
Compliance With Paragraph 7(c) Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   142
Compliance With Paragraph 12, Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   142
Budgetary Impact of Bill.........................................   144
Comparative Statement of Budget Authority........................   145

                          Purpose of the Bill

    The bill provides funding for: (1) the Department of 
Commerce [DOC]; (2) the Department of Justice [DOJ]; (3) 
several independent science agencies: the Office of Science and 
Technology Policy [OSTP], the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration [NASA], and the National Science Foundation 
[NSF]; and (4) several related commissions and agencies: the 
Commission on Civil Rights, the Equal Employment Opportunity 
Commission [EEOC], the International Trade Commission [ITC], 
the Legal Services Corporation [LSC], the Marine Mammal 
Commission, the U.S. Trade Representative [USTR], and the State 
Justice Institute [SJI].

                          Summary of the Bill

    The bill is presented in the context of continued fiscal 
constraint. The sustained national debate on Federal spending, 
revenues, and the public debt continues to put pressure on 
discretionary spending. While the Murray-Ryan budget agreement 
provides an overall level of discretionary spending, 
Government-wide non-defense discretionary spending will rise 
less than one-tenth of 1 percent from fiscal year 2014 to 
fiscal year 2015. Yet the demands on non-defense discretionary 
spending continue to grow. This bill prioritizes the 
Committee's longstanding commitment to funding activities that 
keep America safe from terrorism and violent crime, save lives, 
and promote innovation and job creation.
    Keeping America safe begins with State and local law 
enforcement, and the Committee's recommendation provides 
funding to fight crime and violence in America's neighborhoods. 
The bill provides resources that assist State and local law 
enforcement in preventing, investigating, and prosecuting 
crime. The Committee's recommendation also provides resources 
for Federal law enforcement agents, correctional officers, 
investigators, and prosecutors who thwart terrorists, disrupt 
gangs and drug dealers, dismantle human trafficking rings, shut 
down cyber criminals, and bring fraudsters to justice. The bill 
also prioritizes resources throughout the departments and 
agencies it funds for cybersecurity, including funding for the 
Department of Justice to catch and prosecute cyber criminals; 
for the National Institute of Standards and Technology to 
develop standards and measurements to protect dot-mil, dot-gov, 
and dot-com; for the National Science Foundation to conduct 
basic cybersecurity research; and for all departments and 
agencies to improve the security of their own computer 
networks.
    Weather forecasting does more than tell people if an 
umbrella is needed. Severe weather warnings save lives by 
telling us when to seek shelter or evacuate from serious 
storms, tornadoes, and hurricanes. In 2013, there were seven 
major weather and climate disasters that are estimated to cost 
more than $1,000,000,000 each. While warning times for severe 
weather continue to improve, more can be done to give Americans 
time to get out of harm's way. Weather forecasts do not 
originate from local TV stations or a smartphone app. Forecasts 
are generated using satellite and radar data, ocean monitoring, 
modeling, and human expertise provided by the National Oceanic 
and Atmospheric Administration [NOAA]. The Committee continues 
to prioritize resources to ensure NOAA has the staff and 
technology to provide timely and accurate warnings and lengthen 
the amount of time before a storm that the public receives 
these warnings.
    On April 29, 2014, the Senate Appropriations Committee held 
a hearing on ``Driving Innovation Through Federal Investment.'' 
Witnesses and expert testimony for the record highlighted how 
scientific research and technology development foster job 
creation and economic growth in the private sector. The bill 
supports scientific research and development at Government 
labs, at colleges and universities, in the ocean, and across 
the solar system. This fundamental research generates ideas 
that become new products and foster job growth. The bill also 
ensures Americans profit from their innovations by funding 
patent protection and trade promotion.
    The bill continues to face the pressure of funding programs 
whose costs are rising outside of the control of the Committee. 
While not mandatory for budget purposes, these programs are not 
truly discretionary either. In fiscal year 2015, NOAA's 
flagship weather satellite programs, the incarceration of 
prisoners through the Bureau of Prisons [BOP] and U.S. Marshals 
Service's Federal Prisoner Detention, and the taking of the 
census are not optional and amount to more than 
$11,000,000,000, an increase of more than $410,000,000 above 
the fiscal year 2014 level.
    NOAA satellites are essential to saving lives with accurate 
warnings, but the cost of those satellites is staggering. 
NOAA's new polar satellites alone will cost approximately 
$11,300,000,000.
    The costs of incarceration continue to rise, and the bill 
must provide adequate funding to ensure that prison staff and 
communities are safe and that prisoners are securely housed, 
resulting in an average increase of $192,000,000 each year to 
the BOP's budget. According to the President's most recent 
budget submission, the total cost of Federal correctional 
activities will continue to rise through at least fiscal year 
2018. By that time, according to the DOJ Inspector General, if 
the BOP's budget increases at the same rate projected for all 
Federal correctional activities and the Department's budget 
remains flat, the BOP's budget will consume over 28 percent of 
the Department's discretionary budget.
    The decennial census is mandated by the Constitution. To 
provide essential personnel, and develop the methodology and 
technology, the annual cost of the census will rise each year 
until the count is complete. Fiscal year 2015 is a critical 
year for research and planning activities designed to lower the 
total cost of the 2020 census.
    The Committee has taken action and provided strong 
oversight to rein in growing satellite costs, to align 
Department of Justice policies related to the growing prison 
population with re-entry and rehabilitation efforts, and to 
ensure the 2020 census costs less than the 2010 census. The 
Committee appreciates the recommendations and oversight of the 
Inspectors General on these key programs. Nonetheless, these 
programs threaten to crowd out other important activities 
supported by the bill as downward pressure on discretionary 
spending continues.

                    Fighting Waste, Fraud, and Abuse

    The departments, agencies, boards, and commissions funded 
in this bill can and should continue to reduce operating 
expenses by placing greater scrutiny on overhead costs. Savings 
can and should be achieved by reducing non-essential travel, 
office supply, rent, and utility costs. The Committee also 
calls on departments, agencies, boards, and commissions funded 
in this bill to continue to achieve savings by lowering travel 
contractor costs related to air fares, as directed in fiscal 
year 2014.
    The Committee is outraged that some departments, agencies, 
boards, and commissions have made widespread errors in travel 
disclosures to the General Services Administration regarding 
premium travel. Some agencies have failed to meet disclosure 
requirements altogether. The Committee continues longstanding 
restrictions on first class travel and includes provisions to 
improve travel reporting.
    The Committee has also reduced official reception and 
representation funds by 25 percent since fiscal year 2011. 
Modest representation funds are included for agency executives 
to provide necessary courtesies to our diplomatic partners and 
hold events to honor fallen officers, or to mark historic 
occasions such as space exploration missions or stunning 
discoveries. However, savings can and should be achieved by 
reducing the costs of executive meetings, receptions, 
ceremonies, and conferences, and purchasing fewer promotional 
items such as t-shirts, hats, mugs, key chains, and other 
similar items.
    The Committee is extremely concerned about the persistent 
pattern of cost overruns and schedule slippages on major 
projects and missions carried out by the agencies within this 
bill. In addition, reports have exposed a culture within many 
agencies that exhibits a lack of accountability and oversight 
of grant funding. Therefore, the Committee has continued four 
bill-wide provisions to ensure greater oversight and fiscal 
responsibility of taxpayer dollars.
    First, the bill requires each agency to notify the 
Committee immediately upon identification of program cost 
overruns greater than 10 percent.
    Second, the bill requires the Inspectors General of the 
Departments of Commerce and Justice, NASA, NSF, and the Legal 
Services Corporation to conduct reviews of grant and contract 
funds to ensure funds are being spent appropriately.
    Third, the bill requires each department, agency, board, 
and commission funded in this act to report spending on large 
conferences, with costs in excess of $100,000 each, to the 
Inspectors General for audit.
    Fourth, the bill prohibits each department, agency, board, 
and commission funded in this act from awarding grants and 
cooperative agreements to tax cheats and felons.
    Finally, the Committee intends to continue to work with the 
Government Accountability Office [GAO] to review selected 
large-scale acquisition and construction projects. 
Specifically, the Committee directs ongoing GAO reviews of 
large NASA projects and separate reviews of the James Webb 
Space Telescope, with reports to the Committee on a biannual 
basis. Agencies shall provide access to all necessary data, as 
determined by the GAO, in order for the reviews to be completed 
and provided in a timely manner to the Committee. The Committee 
believes that these project status reports are valuable in 
identifying cost overrun and schedule slippage problems early, 
so they can be addressed immediately.

            Reprogrammings, Reorganizations, and Relocations

    Section 505 contained in the ``General Provisions'' of 
title V provides procedures for the reprogramming of funds. To 
reprogram is to change the use of funds from the specific 
purposes provided for in the act and the accompanying report 
or, in the absence of direction from the Committee, from the 
specific purposes provided for in the administration's budget 
request. Each title of the bill has also traditionally included 
separate provisions that define permissible transfers of 
resources between appropriation accounts. These transfer 
authority provisions are also pursuant to section 505, and were 
initiated in the early 1990s to provide additional flexibility 
to the agencies under the subcommittee's jurisdiction.
    The Committee expects each department and agency closely to 
follow the reprogramming procedures listed in section 505. 
These procedures apply to funds provided under this act, or 
provided under previous appropriations acts that remain 
available for obligation or expenditure in fiscal year 2015, or 
provided from any accounts in the Treasury available to the 
agencies funded by this act. Section 505 requires that the 
Committee on Appropriations be notified by letter, at least 15 
days prior to reprogramming of funds, whether permanent or 
temporary, in excess of $500,000 or 10 percent, whichever is 
less, between programs, projects or activities. This provision 
is also applicable in cases where several activities are 
involved with each receiving less than $500,000. In addition, 
the Committee is to be notified of reprogramming actions which 
are less than these amounts if such actions would have the 
effect of: committing the agency to significant funding 
requirements in future years; increasing funds or personnel by 
any means for any project or activity for which funds have been 
previously denied or restricted by Congress; creating new 
programs, offices, agencies or commissions or substantially 
augmenting existing programs, offices, agencies or commissions; 
relocating offices or employees; or reorganizing offices, 
programs, or activities.
    The Committee also expects that any items that are subject 
to interpretation will be reported. The Committee is concerned 
that, in some instances, the departments or agencies funded 
within this appropriations act are not adhering to the 
Committee's reprogramming guidelines that are clearly set forth 
in this report and in section 505 of the accompanying bill. The 
Committee expects that each department and agency funded in the 
bill will follow these notification policies precisely and will 
not reallocate resources or reorganize activities prior to 
submitting the required notifications to the Committee.
    The reprogramming process is based on comity between the 
Appropriations Committee and the administration. The Commerce, 
Justice, and Science, and Related Agencies appropriations bill 
provides specific program guidance throughout this report and 
tables accompanying the bill. The process is intended to 
provide flexibility to meet changing circumstances and 
emergency requirements of agencies, if there is agreement 
between the executive branch and the Congress that such a 
change is warranted. Reprogramming procedures provide a means 
to agree on adjustments, if necessary, during a fiscal year, 
and to ensure that the Committee is kept apprised of instances 
where nonappropriated resources are used to meet program 
requirements, such as fee collections and unobligated balances 
that were not considered in the development of the 
appropriations legislation.
    In the absence of comity and respect for the prerogatives 
of the Appropriations Committees and Congress in general, the 
Committee will have no choice but to include specific program 
limitations and details legislatively. Under these 
circumstances, programs, projects, and activities become 
absolutes and the executive branch shall lose the ability to 
propose changes in the use of appropriated funds through the 
reprogramming process between programs, projects, and 
activities without seeking some form of legislative action.
    The Committee expects each executive branch department and 
agency to manage its programs, projects and activities within 
the levels appropriated. Reprogramming or transfer requests 
shall be submitted only in the case of an unforeseen emergency 
or situation that could not have been anticipated when 
formulating the budget request for the current fiscal year.

                  Congressional Budget Justifications

    The Committee directs that all departments and agencies 
funded within this bill shall submit all of their fiscal year 
2016 budget justifications concurrently with the official 
submission of the administration's budget to Congress. Further, 
all departments and agencies with classified programs funded 
within this act are directed to submit their classified budget 
justification documents to the Committee, through appropriate 
means, at the same time the unclassified budget justifications 
are transmitted.
    These justifications shall include a sufficient level of 
detailed data, exhibits, and explanatory statements to support 
the appropriations requests, including tables that outline each 
agency's programs, projects, and activities for fiscal years 
2015 and 2016. For example, when requesting an enhancement of 
resources, the justification should detail the existing program 
and what the new resources would buy. The Committee directs the 
chief financial officer of each department or agency funded in 
this act's jurisdiction to ensure that adequate justification 
is given to each increase, decrease, staffing and function 
change proposed in the fiscal year 2016 budget, particularly 
within the departmental operations and management accounts.
    The Committee is concerned that many of the budget 
submissions are inadequate and necessitate multiple requests 
for additional information. At times, conflicting information 
is provided in justifications and other budget briefing 
documents. This process is inefficient and unnecessarily delays 
access to information that is fundamental to the work of the 
Committee. The Committee expects that the fiscal year 2016 
submissions will include sufficient detail to justify all 
programs, projects, and activities contained in each 
department, agency, or commission budget request. Budget 
justifications are prepared not for the use of the agencies but 
are the primary tool of the Committee to evaluate the resource 
requirements and proposals requested by the administration. 
Each budget justification shall include a detailed description 
of cybersecurity resources requested by the department or 
agency categorized according to resources that (1) prevent 
malicious cyber activity, including the protection of Federal 
systems; (2) detect, analyze, and mitigate intrusions, 
including investigating and prosecuting cyber criminals; and 
(3) shape the cybersecurity landscape, including research and 
development.

                         Reporting Requirements

    The Committee is frustrated by the inability of departments 
and agencies funded in this bill to complete and submit 
congressionally mandated reports on time. Reports are 
frequently submitted late, incomplete, or not at all. The 
Committee directs the departments and agencies funded in this 
bill to submit reports by their deadlines or to provide advance 
notification if there is sufficient reason why deadlines cannot 
be met, along with the expected date of submission.
    The Committee also recognizes that some reporting 
requirements from previous Appropriations bills may no longer 
be necessary for Committee oversight purposes. In the interest 
of reducing government waste and expediting responses to 
current report mandates, each departments or agencies is 
invited to submit a list of reporting requirements that it 
considers outdated or no longer relevant for the review of the 
Committees on Appropriations. Any such list submitted for 
review shall be limited to reports required under 
Appropriations bills, and shall cite the original authority as 
well as a justification for eliminating each reporting 
requirement.

                          Reductions-in-Force

    The Committee directs departments or agencies funded in the 
accompanying bill that are planning to conduct a reduction-in-
force [RIF] to notify the Committee in writing 30 days in 
advance of the date of the proposed personnel action.

                        Appropriations Liaisons

    The Committee prefers to channel the majority of its 
inquiries and requests for information and assistance through 
the budget offices or comptroller offices of the departments 
and agencies which it oversees, but reserves the right to call 
upon any individual or organization in any agency under its 
jurisdiction.

                                TITLE I

                         DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

    The Committee recommends a total of $8,555,875,000 for the 
Department of Commerce [DOC]. The recommendation is 
$375,258,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$190,596,000 below the budget request.
    The Department of Commerce is a major innovation engine for 
the Nation. Few departments in the U.S. Government have the 
opportunity to so strongly influence and protect America's 
businesses and competitiveness in this volatile economy. DOC's 
science and innovation programs strive to find new ways to 
solve today's problems and anticipate tomorrow's challenges. 
New research inspires new technology, and DOC's development of 
new standards allows the Department to partner with industry to 
keep citizens safe and manufacturers on the right track. These 
new technologies and ideas deserve protection, and the 
Department also preserves intellectual property for our 
Nation's creative thinkers--small and big businesses alike. 
Once products and services are ready for the global market, DOC 
promotes export of U.S. goods and enforces trade agreements, 
sending new ideas into the marketplace while protecting our 
workers and helping businesses create jobs at home. The 
Department monitors progress and prosperity through statistical 
analysis, economic monitoring, and periodic censuses.
    The Secretary of Commerce is the chief spokesperson for 
American business, but the Secretary is also the chief manager 
in charge of addressing major management challenges at the 
Department. Persistent problems need strong oversight, and 
accountability remains a top concern for the Committee.
    Controlling costs for the 2020 decennial census remains a 
top oversight concern for the Inspector General, the Government 
Accountability Office, and this Committee. Cost overruns became 
a major problem during the 2010 decennial census, and the 
Department cannot afford cost increases for the 2020 census. 
The budget request suggests that the Census Bureau intends to 
reduce the 2020 census costs to 2010 census levels by finding 
ways to reduce door-to-door operations, using the Internet to 
solicit responses, and using scalable technology such as 
elastic agency-wide IT systems that can expand for the 2020 
census and then contract back to normal operations. While this 
indicates improved direction at the Census Bureau, the 
Committee needs assurances that the Bureau will remain on a 
reliable path for achieving real cost savings.
    When it comes to protecting American intellectual property 
[IP], DOC needs to be cyber-obsessed and create ways to protect 
its own dot-gov systems while working with the private sector 
to better protect dot-com. The National Institute of Standards 
and Technology [NIST], DOC's outstanding science and research 
agency, helps the private sector find new ways to solve today's 
cybersecurity problems. This bill advances cybersecurity 
activities at NIST to protect online consumers and the private 
sector from cyber attacks.
    When it comes to saving lives and livelihoods, this bill 
provides balanced funding to allow all of the National Oceanic 
and Atmospheric Administration's [NOAA] services to function. 
Operational readiness is important to the scientists and 
forecasters who depend on NOAA to do their jobs. Information 
and forecasts from NOAA are vital to our communities--from the 
coastal States that depend on accurate hurricane forecasts to 
the interior States that depend on timely tornado and severe 
storm warnings. Commerce's budget request maintains reforms to 
NOAA's satellite programs in response to direction made by this 
Committee and to critical recommendations made by outside 
experts. The Committee welcomes these changes but remains 
guarded that these important missions retain financial and 
management stability, especially as downward pressure on non-
defense discretionary spending continues.
    Spending Plans.--Under section 534 of this act, the 
Department is required to submit a spending plan within 45 days 
of the enactment of this act. That plan should describe the 
programs, projects, and activities of the Department so that 
the Committee receives detailed descriptions of how the 
Department intends to operationalize the funding provided in 
annual appropriations bills. The Committee expects a detailed 
accounting of each bureau's spending, including reimbursable, 
fee-funded, or Working Capital Fund spending, particularly with 
regard to specific programs, projects, and activities described 
in the bill and accompanying report. However, with the 
exception of NOAA, the Department provides little detail about 
how it intends to execute its base activities. As a result, the 
Committee must make repeated inquiries about spending on 
specific activities and often receives inconsistent, confusing, 
and conflicting answers. The Department shall work with the 
Committees on Appropriations to ensure that its spending plans 
provide adequate information for continued oversight of the 
Department.
    The Committee looks forward to working with the Department 
of Commerce to promote innovation, stimulate economic growth, 
and protect American citizens and businesses during the 2015 
fiscal year and beyond.

                   International Trade Administration


                     OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $470,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     506,731,000
Committee recommendation................................     480,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $480,000,000 for 
the International Trade Administration [ITA]. The 
recommendation is $10,000,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and $26,731,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee recommendations, by function, are displayed 
in the following table:

               INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION FUNDING
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Industry and Analysis.................................            55,000
Enforcement and Compliance............................            74,500
Global Markets........................................           327,000
Executive Direction/Administration....................            23,500
                                                       -----------------
      Total...........................................           480,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Offsetting Fee Collections.--The Committee is disappointed 
to learn that ITA has consistently and significantly 
underestimated its fee collections in recent budget submissions 
to Congress. While ITA requested a fee offset of $9,439,000 for 
fiscal year 2015, the agency has actually collected more than 
this amount for each of the last 6 fiscal years. The Committee 
rejects the fee estimate in the congressional budget 
submission, and the funding recommendation shall be offset by 
fee collections of $10,000,000.
    ITA shall brief the Committee on its revised fee estimation 
process no later than 60 days after enactment of this act. ITA 
shall also identify and include expected fee collections and 
corresponding expenditures in the fiscal year 2015 spend plan 
and all future spend plans.
    SelectUSA.--The Committee supports the SelectUSA Initiative 
and provides up to $15,000,000 to facilitate foreign direct 
investment in the United States. ITA shall develop and share 
with the Committee a protocol to ensure that SelectUSA 
activities do not encourage investment in the United States by 
state-owned entities.
    Trade Enforcement.--The Committee provides up to 
$12,000,000 for the Interagency Trade Enforcement Center [ITEC] 
in partnership with the U.S. Trade Representative. ITA is 
directed to provide a detailed funding profile for ITEC as part 
of its fiscal year 2015 spending plan. Further direction for 
ITEC is provided under the heading ``Office of the United 
States Trade Representative''.
    Global Markets.--The Committee recognizes the important 
role that ITA's Global Markets division plays in promoting U.S. 
exports and attracting foreign investment, including through 
the U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service [CS] and the activities 
previously housed in the Market Access and Compliance division. 
The Committee urges Global Markets to deploy resources in a 
manner that maximizes economic potential for U.S. workers and 
businesses.
    National Export Initiative.--The Committee notes with 
interest that ITA and other Federal partners on the National 
Export Initiative are pursuing an increasingly customer 
service-driven strategy of export promotion. ITA shall report 
to the Committee no later than 90 days after enactment of this 
act on: how this strategy will affect the existing level of 
market-access and industry-based export assistance; how the 
strategy will affect CS fees and collections; and how ITA will 
examine return on investments for trade promotion service 
offerings to ensure that resources are spent where they can 
have the greatest impact on the U.S. economy.
    Commercial Service Resource Allocation.--The Committee 
supports ITA's increased attention to developing and emerging 
markets, including those in Asia and Africa. The Committee 
directs ITA to fund CS at the highest possible level in fiscal 
year 2015 while still preserving other essential functions 
within Global Markets. ITA should place particular emphasis on 
maintaining and expanding the number of CS officers and support 
staff overseas and on providing them with adequate resources to 
operate fully and effectively in their regions.
    The Committee has not yet received the report mandated by 
the fiscal year 2014 appropriations act regarding the factors 
used to determine how CS resources are allocated, including how 
these variables account for developing and emerging markets 
where U.S. exports may currently be low, but the potential for 
an increase in trade is high. ITA shall deliver this overdue 
report to the Committee no less than 30 days after enactment of 
this act. Additionally, ITA is directed to continue to notify 
the Committee within 30 days when changes are made to domestic 
or overseas Commercial Service posts or State Department 
Partner Posts.
    Staff Retention Overseas.--No later than 180 days after 
enactment of this act, ITA shall report to the Committee on 
ways to improve retention of valuable Locally Engaged Staff 
[LES] working with Foreign Commercial Service Officers and 
other Department of Commerce staff overseas, including 
opportunities for professional development.
    China Anti-dumping and Countervailing Duty Activities.--The 
Committee provides no less than $16,400,000 for China anti-
dumping and countervailing duty enforcement and compliance 
activities.
    Domestic Trade Coordination.--The Committee recognizes the 
important role that State and local governments play in 
promoting exports and urges ITA and the Trade Promotion 
Coordinating Committee [TPCC] to support the application of 
best practices among Federal, State, and local governments in 
promoting exports. Additionally, the Committee encourages the 
TPCC to continue collaborating with State trade partners to 
identify ways to reduce overlap and improve coordination 
between Federal and State agencies. This effort may include 
establishment of a working group including regionally equitable 
and diverse representatives of State international trade 
resource centers and Federal agencies involved in export 
promotion.
    Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Investigations.--The 
Committee recognizes the importance of ITA's efforts to promote 
trade and investment while ensuring fair trade through the 
enforcement of trade laws. In particular, the Committee 
recognizes the work of the Enforcement and Compliance unit, 
which verifies the accuracy and completeness of questionnaire 
responses provided to the Department of Commerce during 
antidumping [AD] and countervailing duty [CVD] investigations. 
The Committee encourages ITA to evaluate its procedures with 
respect to the number of on-site verifications it conducts and 
the number of respondents it investigates from each country in 
new trade cases. ITA shall provide a report to the Committee no 
later than 90 days after enactment of this act that assesses 
its AD/CVD investigations, including any additional steps that 
can be taken to improve the process or additional resources 
needed to ensure that a thorough investigation can be made to 
promote fair trade and investment.
    Foreign Subsidies.--ITA's Enforcement and Compliance 
division shall examine direct and indirect subsidies in 
countries that are thought to administer large amounts of 
subsidies in violation of World Trade Organization rules, 
particularly in those countries that have been major 
destinations for outsourced U.S. manufacturing jobs. ITA shall 
examine legal authorities and resources used by U.S. trade 
enforcement agencies to analyze foreign subsidies and is 
requested to coordinate its analysis with other Federal 
agencies. A report on such subsidies shall be provided to the 
Committee within 180 days of enactment of this act.
    Foreign Trade Zone Board.--Recently, the Foreign Trade Zone 
[FTZ] Board provided inaccurate and misleading information 
pursuant to a request from the Committee. Moreover, the 
Committee has learned that the Board, rather than correct the 
erroneous information as soon as it learned of its error, 
instead made a deliberative decision to allow the Committee to 
continue to operate with inaccurate information. These facts 
are troubling and unacceptable. The Department is reminded that 
the Committee plays a crucial oversight role for all activities 
funded under this title, including activities of the FTZ Board, 
and it is paramount that the Committee receives timely and 
accurate information. The Department is directed to work with 
the FTZ Board to ensure that it has the appropriate procedures 
in place to prevent similar problems from occurring in the 
future such that the Committee may perform necessary and 
appropriate oversight.

                    Bureau of Industry and Security


                     OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $101,450,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     110,549,000
Committee recommendation................................     105,549,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $105,549,000 for 
the Bureau of Industry and Security [BIS]. The recommendation 
is $4,099,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$5,000,000 below the budget request.
    BIS is the principal agency involved in the development, 
implementation, and enforcement of export controls for 
commercial technologies and for many military technologies as a 
result of the President's export control reform initiative. The 
Export Enforcement Division detects, prevents, investigates, 
and assists in the sanctioning of illegal exports of such 
items.
    Export Control Reform.--The Committee directs BIS to 
continue its exporter outreach program to educate companies of 
all sizes on the new regulatory requirements resulting from 
export control reform. The Committee encourages BIS to target 
small- and medium-sized businesses and to work with State and 
local trade and export associations in addition to working with 
national industry groups.

                  Economic Development Administration

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $246,500,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     248,182,000
Committee recommendation................................     232,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $232,000,000 for 
the Economic Development Administration [EDA]. The 
recommendation is $14,500,000 below the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and $16,182,000 below the budget request. The 
bill also provides access to $40,000,000 in prior-year 
recoveries and unobligated balances.
    EDA provides grants to local governments and nonprofit 
agencies for public works, planning, and other projects 
designed to facilitate economic development. Funding amounts 
for the two appropriations accounts under this heading are 
displayed below.

                ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $209,500,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     210,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     195,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $195,000,000 for 
Economic Development Assistance Programs. The bill also 
includes $40,000,000 in unobligated and deobligated funds from 
prior year appropriations for EDA's use in fiscal year 2015. 
The recommendation is $14,500,000 below the fiscal year 2014 
level and $15,000,000 below the budget request. The Committee 
expects EDA to use all available carryover and prior year 
recoveries to the maximum extent possible. EDA shall consider 
geographic equity in making all award decisions and shall 
ensure that rural projects are adequately represented among 
those selected for funding. Of the amounts provided, funds are 
to be distributed as follows. Any deviation of funds shall be 
subject to the procedures set forth in section 505 of this act:

                ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Public Works............................................         114,000
Economic Adjustment Assistance..........................          42,000
Trade Adjustment Assistance for Firms...................          15,000
Regional Innovation Program and Science Parks Loan                20,000
 Guarantees.............................................
Partnership Planning....................................          30,500
Technical Assistance....................................          12,000
Research and Evaluation.................................           1,500
Prior-year recoveries...................................         -40,000
                                                         ---------------
      Total.............................................         195,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee encourages the administration to focus on 
generating financial investment, job creation, and sustained 
economic growth in manufacturing, exports, innovation, and 
other areas of growth through EDA's existing grant programs, 
including Public Works, Economic Adjustment Assistance, Trade 
Adjustment Assistance, and the Regional Innovation Program. The 
Committee encourages EDA to identify ways to make strong 
investments in these areas while preserving the successful and 
national reach of existing grant programs, avoiding overlap in 
the mission or execution of such programs, and meeting the need 
for improved infrastructure across the country.
    Innovative Energy Efficiency Grants.--Within the amounts 
provided for Economic Adjustment Assistance, the Committee 
provides up to $5,000,000 to continue innovative energy 
efficiency finance programs that benefit small businesses. EDA 
shall report to the Committee within 90 days of enactment of 
this act on energy efficiency grants made with fiscal year 2013 
and 2014 funding.
    Regional Innovation Program.--The Committee maintains 
support for EDA's Regional Innovation Program, which awards 
competitive grants to regional entities in support of 
innovation and entrepreneurship, including investments in 
science parks, regional innovation clusters, and the i6 
Challenge program. The Committee provides $20,000,000 for 
grants and loan guarantees as authorized under the America 
COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010, of which no less than 
$5,000,000 shall be for loan guarantees for science park 
infrastructure. EDA shall make Regional Innovation Program 
awards to multiple grantees and in multiple and diverse 
geographic areas.
    Within funds provided for the Regional Innovation Program, 
$2,000,000 shall be for cluster grants to support nonprofit, 
job-creating, revolving, equity-based seed capital funds. EDA 
shall report to the Committee when these funds and similar 
funds from fiscal year 2014 are awarded, including the purposes 
of each grant.
    The Committee encourages EDA to support university-based, 
high-tech business incubators to encourage entrepreneurship and 
promote technology commercialization through business startups.
    Loan Guarantees.--In fiscal years 2012, 2013, and 2014, the 
Committee provided a cumulative total of $25,000,000 dedicated 
to loan guarantee programs for science parks and for innovative 
manufacturing. The Committee acknowledges the challenges in 
establishing loan guarantee programs but is dissatisfied with 
EDA's pace, progress, and effort put forth to accomplish this 
task. EDA is directed to work expediently to establish both 
programs as soon as possible.
    EDA shall provide to the Committees on Appropriations the 
report required in the fiscal year 2014 appropriations act on 
the status of loan guarantees as soon as possible. The report 
shall include a plan to establish, implement, and oversee loan 
guarantee programs including details on any necessary staff 
hiring, external expertise sought and utilized, and steps to 
ensure the programs remain solvent in the out years. EDA is 
directed to move forward with implementation of the loan 
guarantee programs expeditiously, and preparation of this 
report should not delay progress. EDA shall report to the 
Committee the status of the loan guarantee programs every 180 
days following the initial report until both loan guarantee 
programs are fully operational.
    Inconsistencies in Grant Review Process.--In a February 
2014 report titled: ``Economic Development Administration: 
Documentation of Award Selection Decisions Could Be Improved,'' 
GAO found significant inconsistencies in EDA's grant review 
process. In particular, the report called into question methods 
used by EDA's regional offices to award grants to distressed 
communities. The Committee finds this unacceptable and directs 
EDA to immediately implement GAO's recommendations to resolve 
these issues. Furthermore, EDA shall report to the Committee, 
within 90 days of enactment of this act, on specific actions 
taken to implement GAO's recommendations to ensure the grants 
award process remains fair and transparent across EDA's 
regional offices.
    Trade Adjustment Assistance for Firms.--The Committee again 
rejects the administration's proposal to cut funding for Trade 
Adjustment Assistance Centers [TAACs]. Trade Adjustment 
Assistance for Firms is a small but effective program. The 
Committee agrees that there is room for improvement in the 
management and administration of the program and centers, but 
notes that eliminating a significant portion of the program 
does not solve these institutional problems.
    The Committee appreciates EDA's efforts to improve its 
metrics across all programs and directs the agency to continue 
developing and implementing a success-based model of 
performance measurement for TAACs and other EDA grantees. 
However, the Committee is also concerned about issues raised in 
the GAO report titled ``Trade Adjustment Assistance: Commerce 
Program has Helped Manufacturing and Services Firms, but 
Measures, Data, and Funding Formula Could Improve.'' GAO found 
inconsistencies in EDA's data collection across TAACs. The 
Committee believes that EDA should systematically maintain data 
collected by TAACs about assisted firms in an easily accessible 
format, such as a database, that can be used by regions and 
headquarters. EDA shall also provide appropriate guidance 
regarding specific measures TAACs should be tracking, including 
metrics that assess program outcomes. Additionally, the 
Committee directs EDA to address the GAO recommendations 
regarding improvements to the current funding formula for TAACs 
and to brief or report to the Committee on the results. The 
Committee believes that EDA should do more to ensure that 
allocations of funding provided by this act for TAACs better 
reflect the varied need for assistance among firms and regions.
    Job Losses From Nuclear Power Plant Closures.--The 
Committee notes that recent closures of nuclear power plants 
throughout the United States have had a negative impact on the 
economic foundations of surrounding communities, and there is 
potential for additional plant closures in coming years. 
Research shows that the long-term economic impacts and job 
losses from nuclear power plant closures are substantial and 
difficult to address. The Committee believes that the EDA 
should help identify and develop best practices to aid 
communities facing nuclear power plant closures, including the 
coordination of economic development efforts across multiple 
States or Economic Development Districts.
    Investing in Manufacturing Communities Partnership Program 
[IMCP].--The Committee acknowledges the administration's recent 
announcement designating 12 regions as ``manufacturing 
communities'' through EDA's Investing in Manufacturing 
Communities Partnership [IMCP] program. The Committee remains 
disappointed that the Department proceeded with IMCP activities 
in spite of the Committee's rejection of proposed funding for 
such purposes in fiscal year 2014. No funding has been provided 
for the IMCP program in fiscal year 2015.
    It is the view of the Committee that IMCP, as proposed, 
does not constitute a coherent, well-designed program that 
meets the needs of the varied and diverse communities 
traditionally served by EDA. Moreover, in developing the 
proposal, the administration overlooked and even cut funding 
for existing EDA programs that accomplish similar goals in an 
effort to create a new economic development program. The 
Committee believes that the administration should have worked 
within EDA's existing structure to develop a comprehensive 
strategy to share and integrate best practices for economic 
planning while aiding communities across the country to 
maintain consistency with EDA's core mission and authorization.
    The Committee remains concerned with the underlying premise 
of IMCP, which selects a limited number of communities for 
special assistance through an incentive structure that affects 
grant programs across the Federal Government. This new 
structure awards ``extra credit'' to a select number of chosen 
communities applying for Federal grants, rather than putting 
all distressed communities on equal footing. In addition, the 
Committee is concerned that distressed regions not chosen for 
the IMCP program could be further disadvantaged through the 
IMCP incentive structure that provides favored treatment for 
designated communities.
    EDA shall provide a report to the Committee not later than 
90 days after the enactment of this act detailing a plan to 
better utilize existing programs to assist various types of 
distressed communities across the country using a bottom-up, 
demand-driven approach to manufacturing investment. 
Additionally, the report shall include a comprehensive strategy 
to share and integrate best practices for economic development 
planning to attract new manufacturing investments to distressed 
communities across the country.
    Coordinated Environmental Reviews.--A March 2014 GAO report 
titled ``Additional Actions Needed to Better Support Tribal 
Efforts'' raised concerns about the multiple environmental 
reviews required by Federal agencies that fund development 
projects. The Committee encourages EDA to work with the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development to reduce 
duplication in the environmental review process.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $37,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      38,182,000
Committee recommendation................................      37,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $37,000,000 for 
salaries and expenses. The recommendation is the same as the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $1,182,000 below the budget 
request.
    Staffing Decisions.--The Committee directs EDA to provide a 
report to the Committee within 30 days of enactment of this act 
detailing the geographic distribution of mission-critical staff 
vacancies in regional offices and geographic areas in need of 
additional staffing due to the size and location of respective 
jurisdictions. The report shall specifically address the wide 
geographic coverage areas for some Economic Development 
Representatives and Economic Development Specialists and any 
increasing demands for services in areas with vast distances 
between jurisdictions. EDA shall report to the Committees on 
Appropriations every 180 days thereafter on mission-critical 
vacancies in regional offices, including the specific location 
of each vacancy; a description of each vacant position and its 
associated responsibilities and geographic coverage, if 
applicable; and the amount of time the position has been 
vacant.
    The Committee notes that the information submitted in 
response to the fiscal year 2014 reporting requirement on 
mission-critical vacancies was submitted several months late 
and did not contain all of the requested information. EDA is 
directed to submit this report on time and to include all 
information listed above.

                  Minority Business Development Agency


                     MINORITY BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $28,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      28,286,000
Committee recommendation................................      28,286,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $28,286,000 for the 
Minority Business Development Agency [MBDA]. The recommendation 
is $286,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and is the 
same as the budget request. MBDA is the only Federal agency 
dedicated to promoting the growth of minority-owned firms and 
assists small, medium, and large minority business enterprises 
increase revenues and create jobs.
    New MBDA Centers.--The Committee commends MBDA for its 
efforts to reduce administrative expenses. MBDA used these 
savings to award funding for seven new MBDA Business Centers in 
fiscal year 2013.
    Export Opportunities for Minority-Owned Businesses.--The 
Committee recognizes the important services that MBDA provides 
to minority-owned businesses in every State and encourages MBDA 
to continue working with the International Trade Administration 
in pursuit of increased export opportunities and export-related 
jobs for minority-owned businesses, including small- and 
medium-sized enterprises.

                   Economic and Statistical Analysis


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $99,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     111,033,000
Committee recommendation................................     106,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $106,000,000 for 
Economic and Statistical Analysis [ESA]. The recommendation is 
$7,000,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$5,033,000 below the budget request. ESA conducts research to 
provide a better understanding of the U.S. economy, which helps 
Government make more informed policy decisions.
    Lease Negotiation.--The Committee recognizes the 
significant cost of the Bureau of Economic Analysis's [BEA] 
upcoming lease negotiation and directs BEA to work with the 
General Services Administration to find the most cost-effective 
move or renovation option without precluding the possibility of 
a future move into the Herbert C. Hoover Building, which is 
currently under renovation. BEA is directed to brief the 
Committee on the status of the lease negotiation, 
reconfiguration requirements, and moving costs within 60 days 
of enactment of this act and every 180 days thereafter until 
BEA is housed in the newly leased space.
    Propane Pricing Analysis.--The Committee is aware of 
difficulties encountered in the analysis of propane pricing 
data pursuant to the requirements of 15 U.S.C. 6408(a). The 
Committee encourages ESA to identify other sources of data that 
may be available to enable the Secretary to carry out the 
responsibilities of 15 U.S.C. 6408(a) and, using any statutory 
or other authorities available, restart the annual analysis of 
propane prices. Further, the Committee directs the Secretary to 
provide a report detailing the Department's progress on this 
effort not later than 120 days after the date of enactment of 
this act, including any recommended legislative changes to the 
authorizing statute.

                          Bureau of the Census

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $945,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   1,211,428,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,148,944,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $1,148,944,000 for 
the Census Bureau. The recommendation is $203,944,000 above the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $62,484,000 below the budget 
request.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $252,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     248,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     252,200,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $252,200,000 for 
salaries and expenses. The recommendation is $200,000 above the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $4,200,000 above the budget 
request. This account provides for the salaries and expenses 
associated with the statistical programs of the Bureau of the 
Census, including measurement of the Nation's economy and the 
demographic characteristics of the population.
    The increase above the request shall be used to expand the 
sample of the Current Population Survey's Annual Social and 
Economic Supplement, which shall compare health insurance 
statistics to baseline data from 2010 and 2013. In collecting 
additional health insurance data, the Census Bureau is directed 
to ensure that it maintains sufficient comparative data points 
to allow for data collected from 2010 to 2013 in the interest 
of preserving statistical rigor.

                     PERIODIC CENSUSES AND PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $693,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     963,428,000
Committee recommendation................................     896,744,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $896,744,000 for 
periodic censuses and programs. The recommendation is 
$203,744,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$66,684,000 below the budget request.
    This account provides for the constitutionally mandated 
decennial census as well as other programs that are cyclical in 
nature. Additionally, individual surveys are conducted for 
other Federal agencies on a reimbursable basis.
    Oversight of Periodic Census Programs.--The Committee's 
recommendation provides $1,551,000 for the Office of Inspector 
General [OIG] to continue oversight and audits of periodic 
censuses and to provide the Bureau and Congress with 
independent recommendations for improving operations, which 
will be useful for oversight of the 2020 decennial census. The 
Committee directs the Bureau to continue to incorporate all of 
the OIG's recommendations as it transitions into the 2020 
decennial, including: a thorough review of the training 
process; better communication of Census' various enumeration 
practices; increased transparency and accuracy of budget 
formulations; and the development of a realistic research and 
testing schedule leading up to major 2020 design decisions.
    Monthly Status Reports.--Census is directed to continue its 
dashboard monthly status reports to the Committee as it 
transitions into preparations for the 2020 decennial.
    Working Capital Fund [WCF].--The Committee expects the 
Bureau to execute the funding to the fullest extent possible 
without any carryover balances. The Committee directs the 
Bureau to continue to use the WCF only as a repository for 
reimbursable funds from other agencies and to obligate and 
execute that funding expeditiously. The Census Bureau shall 
provide a report to the Committee within 30 days after 
enactment of this act regarding balances in the Working Capital 
Fund including carryover funds, the intended uses of those 
funds, and a spending plan. The spending plan shall include 
collections and obligations for both reimbursable and 
appropriated funding.
    2020 Decennial Census.--Controlling costs for the 2020 
decennial census remains a top oversight concern for the 
Committee. The Bureau shall continue to bring down the cost of 
the 2020 decennial census to a level less than the 2010 census 
and to work toward spending less than the 2000 census, not 
adjusting for inflation. The Committee has not yet received the 
report mandated in the fiscal year 2014 appropriations act 
regarding the Bureau's plan to reduce spending compared to the 
2010 decennial census and descriptions of any challenges the 
Bureau anticipates could prevent it from achieving the 
budgetary goal. The Census Bureau is directed to prioritize 
spending for activities that have the greatest potential to 
reduce cost and reduce risk for the 2020 census.
    Administrative Records.--One way the Census Bureau plans to 
save money during the 2020 decennial census cycle is by using 
existing records and data to reduce unnecessary and costly 
duplication, including using administrative records to update 
the Master Address File and to conduct more efficient non-
response follow up. However, the Committee is concerned that 
the Census Bureau is counting on these cost savings without 
adequately or accurately assessing the steps that need to be 
taken in order to secure access to this data. The Bureau is 
directed to work expeditiously with Federal, State, tribal, 
local, and other partners to obtain the necessary records. The 
Bureau shall report to the Committee and to the Office of 
Inspector General within 90 days of enactment of this act on 
its need for, and access to, specific administrative records 
for the 2020 census.
    Census Enterprise Data Collection and Processing.--The 
Committee recognizes the Bureau's need to develop a more 
efficient and secure data processing system well in advance of 
the 2020 census and supports the request level for the Census 
Enterprise Data Collection and Processing [CEDCaP] initiative. 
This initiative will create a single enterprise data system 
that can be scaled up for the decennial census and scaled down 
during years that require less data processing capacity. The 
long-term maintenance, operation, and security costs of the new 
CEDCaP system are expected to be lower than the cost of 
maintaining, operating, and securing the current series of 
redundant, single-use systems.
    The Committee also directs the Census Bureau to take 
appropriate steps to ensure that cost estimates and 
implementation timelines are accurate and that the new system 
is fully secured against cyber attack or intrusion before it 
becomes operational. The Bureau is directed to cooperate with 
the Office of Inspector General on all oversight activities for 
this system and shall brief the Committee on the development 
and implementation schedule for CEDCaP no less than 60 days 
after enactment of this act.
    Web-based Questionnaires.--The Committee directs the Bureau 
to continue to incorporate a Web-based version of its census 
forms, including the American Community Survey, when planning 
for the 2020 decennial census. Such digital tools will likely 
ensure a more complete initial response and reduce the need for 
nonresponse follow-up work, which is the most expensive phase 
of census operations. In planning and creating such a tool, 
Census is further directed to use the best cybersecurity 
practices and protocols to ensure personal information remains 
secure and confidential.
    American Community Survey [ACS].--The Committee directs the 
Bureau to continue using the ACS as a test bed for innovative 
survey and data processing techniques that will help to save 
money and reduce risk during the 2020 census cycle. 
Additionally, the Committee directs the Census Bureau to 
continue to provide an updated report to the Committee no later 
than 120 days after enactment of this act on efforts to 
evaluate questions included in the ACS, and the steps being 
taken by the ombudsman position established by the Census 
Bureau in fiscal year 2013 to ensure that the ACS is conducted 
as efficiently and unobtrusively as possible.

       National Telecommunications and Information Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $46,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      51,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      48,500,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $48,500,000 for the 
National Telecommunications and Information Administration 
[NTIA] salaries and expenses. The recommendation is $2,500,000 
above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $2,500,000 below 
the budget request.
    The Committee retains language from previous years allowing 
the Secretary of Commerce to collect reimbursements from other 
Federal agencies for a portion of the cost resulting from the 
coordination of spectrum management, analysis, and operations. 
NTIA shall submit a report to the Committee no later than June 
1, 2015, detailing the collection of reimbursements from other 
agencies. The Committee directs NTIA to continue monitoring 
broadband grants to ensure that funds are used appropriately by 
recipients.
    Broadband.--The Committee supports the request to continue 
monitoring existing broadband grants and directs NTIA to ensure 
that funds are used appropriately by recipients.
    Spectrum Management.--The Committee directs NTIA to 
continue to evaluate options for repurposing spectrum for 
broadband use in support of the President's goal of making 500 
MHz of spectrum available for wireless broadband use. The 
Committee directs NTIA to provide the Committee with a status 
update of making 500 MHz of spectrum available for commercial 
mobile use including: how much spectrum has been freed up from 
Federal agencies for exclusive commercial mobile use to date; 
how much revenue has been generated from spectrum freed up to 
date; and the strategy for freeing up additional spectrum from 
Federal agencies for exclusive commercial mobile use in order 
to meet the National Broadband Plan's goal of making all 500 
MHz available for commercial mobile use by 2020, including 
costs to Federal agencies for relocation and associated reserve 
potential.
    Internet Policy Center.--The Committee is concerned with 
the proposed creation of the Internet Policy Center [IPC], 
which would require an additional $7,500,000 and 11 employees 
to coordinate policy development within the Government related 
to the Internet and telecommunications infrastructure, 
technology, and services. As the lead agency for the Federal 
Government representing the Nation's interests in the 
governance and operations of the Internet, such activities 
should already be undertaken by NTIA as part of that 
responsibility. Should NTIA choose to initiate the IPC, or 
parts of the IPC, the agency may only do so from within funds 
provided and shall identify such activities in the agency's 
spending plan to the Committee.
    Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers 
[ICANN].--The Committee remains concerned that the Department 
of Commerce, through NTIA, has not been a strong advocate for 
American companies and consumers and urges greater 
participation and advocacy within the Governmental Advisory 
Committee [GAC] and any other mechanisms within ICANN in which 
NTIA is a participant. The Committee strongly encourages NTIA 
to be an active supporter for the interests of the Nation 
within ICANN and to ensure that the principles of 
accountability, transparency, security, and stability of the 
Internet are maintained for consumers, business, and the 
Government. The Committee awaits the past due report on NTIA's 
plans for greater involvement in the GAC and the efforts it is 
undertaking to protect U.S. consumers, companies, and 
intellectual property.
    Internet Assigned Numbers Authority.--The Committee 
understands NTIA's plans to transition the agency's technical 
stewardship of the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority [IANA] 
and is asking ICANN to convene a multi-stakeholder process to 
develop a transition plan that will maintain an open, 
transparent, and internationally supported process. However, 
the Committee is concerned that NTIA's move could lead to other 
government or inter-governmental control over IANA and 
subsequently the Internet. While NTIA has stated that it will 
not accept a proposal that includes government-led or 
intergovernmental control over ICANN, the Committee directs 
NTIA to conduct a thorough review and analysis of any proposed 
transition of the IANA contract. This review shall ensure that 
ICANN has in place a NTIA approved multi-stakeholder oversight 
plan that is insulated from foreign government and inter-
governmental control. Further, the Committee directs NTIA to 
report quarterly to the Committee on all aspects of the 
privatization process and further directs NTIA to inform the 
Committee, as well as the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation, not less than 7 days in advance of any decision 
with respect to a successor contract.
    FirstNet.--The Committee supports the transfer of 
$1,400,000 from FirstNet to the Department of Commerce's 
Inspector General for the purposes of oversight and 
accountability of FirstNet. The Committee encourages FirstNet 
to report on the cost efficiencies of using deployable and 
self-contained architectures that operate with and without 
backhaul capabilities which include fiber, microwave, and 
satellite services in FirstNet deployment.

    PUBLIC TELECOMMUNICATIONS FACILITIES, PLANNING, AND CONSTRUCTION

    The Committee provides bill language allowing the NTIA to 
continue oversight and administration of previously awarded 
grants. NTIA shall not use unobligated balances to award new 
grants.

               United States Patent and Trademark Office


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $3,024,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   3,458,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,458,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $3,458,000,000 for 
the United States Patent and Trademark Office [USPTO], which is 
$434,000,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and equal 
to the budget request, to be derived from offsetting fee 
collections.
    USPTO is the central hub of an innovation-friendly 
Government. USPTO examines patent applications, grants patent 
protection for qualified inventions, and disseminates 
technological information disclosed in patents. USPTO also 
examines trademark applications and provides Federal 
registration to owners of qualified trademarks.
    Budget Execution.--The Committee continues to allow USPTO 
full access to patent and trademark fees and provides language 
allowing USPTO to retain any revenue in excess of appropriated 
levels.
    Transfer to Office of Inspector General.--The Committee 
provides $2,000,000 for the Office of Inspector General [OIG] 
to continue oversight and audits of USPTO operations and budget 
transparency, and USPTO is directed to work with the Department 
of Commerce to implement all OIG recommendations.
    Fee Collections Projections.--The Committee directs the 
USPTO to continue to provide quarterly reports on its projected 
fee collections, and to notify the Committee during any month 
when significant changes in such projections prompt serious 
concern or require drastic budgetary responses. It is 
imperative that USPTO balance sustainable operations with 
realistic revenue and judicious reserve spending.
    Reprogramming and Spend Plan.--USPTO is required to 
continue to follow the reprogramming procedures outlined in 
section 505 of this act before using excess fee collections to 
forward fund expenses beyond fiscal year 2015. Any deviations 
from the funding distribution provided for, including carryover 
balances, are subject to the standard reprogramming procedures 
set forth in section 505 of this act. USPTO is directed to 
provide, as part of the spending plan required in section 534 
of this act, all carryover balances from previous fiscal years, 
and a description of any changes to the patent or trademark fee 
structure. Any changes from the spending plan shall also be 
subject to section 505 of this act. USPTO is directed to submit 
all reprogramming requests, spending plans and budget 
justifications to the Committee through the Department of 
Commerce.
    Hiring.--The Committee supports USPTO's plan to hire 1,000 
new patent examiners in each of fiscal years 2014 and 2015. 
This hiring will keep USPTO on track to reach its target 
pendency goals for patent decisions of 10 months for first 
action and 20 months for final action in fiscal year 2019.
    Patent Reviews.--The Committee urges USPTO to increase the 
quality of patent reviews by continuing to increase the level 
of industry expertise the agency retains on staff, including 
exploring innovative solutions such as engaging and employing 
retired industry experts on a part-time basis. The Committee 
also strongly encourages USPTO to reduce ambiguity in patent 
decisions by increasing examiner training regarding the 
appropriate use of rejections under 35 U.S.C. 112 (a) and (b), 
which dictate that the patent applicant more thoroughly defend 
the invention by describing it as fully, clearly, and exactly 
as possible, and by distinctly delineating its bounds at the 
time of application submission to USPTO.
    Satellite Offices.--The Committee maintains support for 
USPTO's nationwide workforce program and the establishment of 
satellite offices. The Committee's recommendation will support 
allowing existing satellite offices to occupy permanent 
facilities. Additionally, the Committee recognizes the value of 
creating additional satellite offices in regions with a high 
volume of patents filed and issued to provide increased access 
to patent seekers. When selecting locations for additional 
satellite offices, the Committee directs USPTO to consider the 
regional volume of patent activity, geographic distribution of 
existing satellite offices, availability of donated space for 
satellite offices within a geographic area not currently served 
by USPTO, access to transportation options, and proximity to 
universities and patent experts.
    Reducing Patent Application Fees.--The Committee supports 
USPTO's decision to pursue lower application fees for patent 
applications submitted online. This will reduce costs for 
inventors and businesses applying for patent protections and 
increase overall efficiency at USPTO.
    Intellectual Property Rights Attaches.--In addition to 
granting patents and registering trademarks, USPTO works to 
protect and promote the protection of American intellectual 
property domestically and overseas. USPTO advises the White 
House and all Federal agencies on national and international 
intellectual property policy issues and is authorized to 
provide guidance, conduct programs and studies, and otherwise 
interact with foreign intellectual property offices and 
international intergovernmental organizations on matters 
involving the protection of intellectual property.
    An important component of USPTO's international efforts is 
the Intellectual Property Rights [IPR] Attache Program. IPR 
Attaches, stationed in eight countries, promote U.S. Government 
IPR policy internationally, help secure strong and balanced IP 
protections in international agreements and host country laws, 
and otherwise encourage strong and balanced IPR protection and 
enforcement by U.S. trading partners for the benefit of U.S. 
stakeholders. The Committee encourages efforts within the 
Department of Commerce and the administration to strengthen the 
IPR Attache Program by, among other actions, elevating the 
diplomatic rank of the individuals serving as Attaches and 
ensuring sufficient funding to support their efforts.

             National Institute of Standards and Technology

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $850,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     900,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     900,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $900,000,000 for 
the National Institute of Standards and Technology [NIST]. The 
recommendation is $50,000,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and the same as the budget request. Up to 
$9,000,000 may be transferred from the Scientific and Technical 
Research and Services account to the Working Capital Fund.
    NIST's mission is to promote U.S. innovation and industrial 
competitiveness by advancing measurement science, standards, 
and technology in ways that enhance economic security and 
improve our quality of life.
    A description of each NIST account and the corresponding 
Committee recommendation follows in the subsequent three 
headings.

             SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL RESEARCH AND SERVICES

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $651,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     680,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     685,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $685,000,000 for 
NIST research and services. The recommendation is $34,000,000 
above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $5,000,000 above 
the budget request.
    Cybersecurity.--The Committee supports the administration's 
request for cybersecurity activities within NIST, which 
includes: $15,000,000 for the National Cybersecurity Center of 
Excellence [NCCoE]; $16,500,000 for the National Strategy for 
Trusted Identities in Cyberspace including further pilots; and 
$4,000,000 for the National Initiative for Cybersecurity 
Education in order to address the need for a well-trained 
cybersecurity workforce. In addition, the Committee provides no 
less than $60,700,000 for cybersecurity research and 
development, an increase of $5,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2014 level for cryptographic standards.
    The Committee expects the NCCoE to evolve into a technology 
transfer hub for cyber solutions derived from Government and 
private sector tools. As companies continue to partner and 
coordinate with NCCoE, the Committee encourages NIST to create 
a plan for increasing innovation opportunities by encouraging 
companies to co-locate near the Center. In order to maximize 
opportunities for collaboration with academia and business, the 
Committee encourages NIST to execute its responsibilities as 
coordinator of the National Initiative for Cybersecurity 
Education through the NCCoE.
    The Nation's retail sector is increasingly vulnerable to 
and targeted by cyber-attacks that seek both private customer 
data and valuable intellectual property and which threaten the 
growing e-commerce marketplace. In order to assist the retail 
sector to innovate and stay ahead of evolving threats, the 
Committee encourages the NCCoE to build upon existing industry-
sector focused work to create an initiative focused on retail 
sector challenges and solutions in addition to existing public-
private partnerships and initiatives focused on the health, 
energy and financial sectors.
    The Center should seek partnerships with national leaders 
in retail information technology [IT] security who have shown a 
willingness to innovate and involve their integrated supplier 
networks, as well as academic entities with experience in 
retail cybersecurity and retail supply chain management and 
logistics. The goal of this public-private partnership should 
be to enable cheaper and more widespread integration of 
advanced cybersecurity tools developed by the Federal 
Government for defense and homeland security applications to 
protect online financial transactions and retail IT networks.
    The Committee encourages DOC to fund multidisciplinary 
programs of study and research that focus on tackling 
cybersecurity issues on a global scale. When establishing 
criteria for external grant funding, consideration should only 
be given to institutions of higher education, including 
community colleges, designated by the National Security Agency 
as Centers of Academic Excellence for Information Assurance 
Education and Centers for Academic Excellence for Information 
Assurance Research.
    Lab-to-Market Technology Transfer.--More than 
$135,000,000,000 in Federal research and development (R&D) 
spending is requested government-wide for fiscal year 2015. In 
order to maximize the impact of Federal R&D, the Committee has 
included the full budget request of $6,000,000 for Lab-to-
Market Technology Transfer. This funding will allow NIST to 
develop and disseminate best practices and strategies to 
accelerate the transfer and commercialization of Federal 
technologies to help discoveries become companies that create 
jobs and expand the economy. This initiative shall coordinate 
with the NCCoE to help promote cybersecurity technology 
transfer through NIST's cybersecurity hub.
    Centers of Excellence.--The Committee includes the budget 
request level of $15,000,000 to support Centers of Excellence 
selected in fiscal year 2013 and to be selected in fiscal year 
2014 that produce collaborations between NIST, academic, and 
industry specialists on research focused on innovations in 
measurement science and new technology developments.
    The Committee encourages NIST to propose funding to create 
an appropriate number of new centers of excellence in future 
fiscal years, including centers in fields such as advanced 
photonics, cryptography, and technologies associated with 
ribonucleic acid.
    Forensic Science.--In addition to the funding requested to 
be provided to the Department of Justice and transferred to 
NIST, the Committee supports the full request for measurement 
science and standards in support of forensic science, an 
increase of $3,500,000 above fiscal year 2014, and directs NIST 
to continue to coordinate its activities with the Department of 
Justice and the National Science Foundation.
    Scientific Working Group on Digital Evidence.--Digital 
evidence is information stored or transmitted in digital form, 
including emails, the contents of computer memory, Internet 
browser histories, and many other items. Scientific Working 
Groups [SWG] consist of scientific subject-matter experts who 
collaborate to determine best practices and to develop 
consensus standards with the goal of improving the processes 
within a particular area of forensic science. The complex, 
diverse, and rapidly evolving technological advances of digital 
technologies dictates the need for a SWG in this field that is 
integrated into the Organization of Scientific Area Committees 
[OSAC] to establish consensus standards and guidelines to 
improve quality and consistency of forensic science practices 
for digital evidence.
    The Committee understands that the memorandum of 
understanding between NIST and the Department of Justice 
specifically prohibits the establishment of a SWG for digital 
evidence under the new NIST structure and disagrees with this 
prohibition. The Committee therefore directs NIST to establish 
a SWG for digital evidence within the OSAC. The NIST-supported 
Digital Evidence SWG should develop a transition plan to ensure 
that the members and expertise of the Justice-supported SWG can 
be transitioned and fully integrated into the overall OSAC 
process.
    Urban Dome Program.--The Committee notes the value of 
NIST's Urban Dome program and the importance of accurate 
measurement science for environmental monitoring and human 
health as more than half the world's population is living in 
urban areas, a level of concentration expected to intensify 
over the coming decades. The Committee has included an 
additional $2,000,000 for the Office of Special Programs to 
expand the number of urban dome locations in fiscal year 2015. 
The Committee expects a plan on the Urban Dome program 
including anticipated outcomes, inclusion of additional U.S. 
cities over the next 5 years, ways the United States can enlist 
the support of international partners for comparable efforts in 
other countries, and any plan for transitioning research to 
operations, including transitioning operations to another 
Government agency within the next 3 fiscal years. This plan 
should be submitted within 60 days of enactment of this act.
    Facility Security.--The Committee continues to provide 
funding for NIST to maintain security operations for its 
laboratories and facilities. The Federal Protective Services 
[FPS] has previously proposed to take over NIST's security 
operations, yet the Committee has not received a plan from the 
administration that would detail the transfer of security 
funding and responsibility from NIST to FPS. Therefore, the 
Committee does not grant such a transfer during fiscal year 
2015.
    STEM Education.--The Committee continues to support NIST's 
activities related to Science, Technology, Engineering and 
Mathematics [STEM] Education and fully funds its activities 
authorized under 15 U.S.C. 278g-2a.

                     INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY SERVICES

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $143,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     161,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     156,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $156,000,000 for 
Industrial Technology Services. The recommendation is 
$13,000,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$5,000,000 less than the budget request. Supporting the 
Nation's manufacturers, especially small businesses, is 
critical to keeping America innovative in a global marketplace. 
The Committee's recommendation provides $141,000,000 for the 
Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership Program and 
$15,000,000 for the Advanced Manufacturing Consortia.
    Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership Program 
[MEP].--The Committee recommends the full request of 
$141,000,000 for MEP. The Committee supports the MEP focus on 
strengthening the existing network of MEP centers and providing 
additional support to centers based on the documented 
performance of the center's activities and the manufacturing 
capacity of the area served by the center. The Committee 
encourages centers, as appropriate, to support efforts to 
reshore manufacturing operations and jobs.
    Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AmTech) Consortia.--
Initial funding for AmTech was provided in fiscal year 2013. 
The program's current activities include planning and small 
grants for industry-led consortia, which will identify and 
prioritize research projects supporting long term industrial 
research needs. The Committee reiterates its earlier view that 
there is no significant distinction between the AmTech 
consortia and the proposed National Network for Manufacturing 
Innovation [NNMI] institutes.
    While NNMI has not been authorized, the Committee 
recognizes that the Department of Defense and the Department of 
Energy have begun investments in mission-related NNMI pilot 
institutes using discretionary funding, and NIST is responsible 
for coordinating these efforts through the Advanced 
Manufacturing National Program Office. The Committee has not 
provided the $5,000,000 requested in the budget for NNMI 
coordination activities, but rather directs NIST to fund NNMI-
related activities through AmTech, as in fiscal years 2013 and 
2014. No funds are requested or provided for new NNMI pilot 
institutes. The Committee directs NIST to report, within 60 
days of enactment, on the AmTech-related resources necessary in 
fiscal year 2015 and the resources it expects to need in future 
years to support the existing NNMI institutes and any potential 
growth should NNMI authorization legislation be enacted.

                  CONSTRUCTION OF RESEARCH FACILITIES

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $56,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      59,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      59,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $59,000,000 for 
construction of research facilities. The recommendation is 
$3,000,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and equal 
to the budget request.
    The recommendation funds the highest priority construction, 
maintenance, and repair projects at NIST, including planning 
for renovation of Building 245. The Committee encourages NIST 
to include full funding to complete high priority projects like 
Building 245 renovation in the fiscal year 2016 request and 
directs NIST to provide quarterly reports on the status of all 
construction projects.

            National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $5,314,606,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   5,488,735,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,420,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $5,420,000,000 for 
the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [NOAA]. The 
recommendation is $105,394,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and $68,735,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee's recommendation for NOAA maintains a 
balanced science and research portfolio that encompasses all 
aspects of our oceans, coasts, and weather, while managing 
current fiscal constraints. The Committee has provided modest 
but sufficient increases to all of NOAA's line offices in an 
effort to advance research and operations while providing a 
necessary boost to NOAA's acquisitions accounts including 
supporting the requested increases for improving weather 
information technology infrastructure and the construction of 
our next generation of weather satellites.

                  OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $3,157,392,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   3,237,993,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,228,964,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $3,228,964,000 for 
NOAA's operations, research, and facilities. The recommendation 
is $71,572,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$9,029,000 below the budget request.

                      NOAA NATIONAL OCEAN SERVICE

    The Committee's recommendation provides $489,787,000 for 
the National Ocean Service [NOS]. NOS programs provide 
scientific, technical, and management expertise to promote safe 
navigation; assess the health of coastal and marine resources; 
respond to natural and human-induced threats; and preserve the 
coastal, ocean and global environments.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

       NATIONAL OCEAN SERVICE OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Navigation, Observations and Positioning:
    Navigation, Observations and Positioning...........          141,876
    Hydrographic Survey Priorities/Contracts...........           25,250
    Integrated Ocean Observing System--Regional                   29,500
     Observations......................................
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Navigation, Observations and Positioning..          196,626
                                                        ================
Coastal Science and Assessment:
    Coastal Science, Assessment, Response and                     71,613
     Restoration.......................................
    Competitive External Research......................           10,000
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Coastal Science and Assessment............           81,613
                                                        ================
Ocean and Coastal Management and Services:
    Coastal Science, Assessment, Response and                     43,274
     Restoration.......................................
    Coastal Management Grants..........................           71,646
    Coral Reef Program.................................           26,078
    National Estuarine Research Reserve System.........           21,550
    National Marine Sanctuaries........................           49,000
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Ocean and Coastal Management and Services.          211,548
                                                        ================
      GRAND TOTAL NOS..................................          489,787
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Navigation, Observations and Positioning.--The Committee 
supports the administration's request for activities under 
Navigation, Observations and Positioning, including the full 
operational funding for NOAA's Navigation Response Teams. A 
total of $25,250,000 is provided for Hydrographic Survey 
Contracts, which is $250,000 above the request. The Committee 
directs NOAA to report within 60 days of enactment on progress 
made to survey and prepare navigational information for the 
Bering Straits region and the Arctic. NOAA is further directed 
to report on hydrographic activities planned for fiscal year 
2015, including: vessels to be utilized, the areas to be 
surveyed, and the remaining gaps in the Arctic region.
    The Committee provides $3,700,000 within Navigation, 
Observations and Positioning to continue the competitive 
Geospatial Modeling Grants Program of which all funding shall 
be distributed externally.
    The Committee provides $5,500,000 for the Physical 
Oceanographic Real-Time System [PORTS]. The Committee believes 
these operations, which exist as a partnership between NOAA and 
local port authorities, are extremely valuable tools for 
providing information for safe vessel navigation and data for 
weather and coastal monitoring. The Committee encourages NOAA 
to request funding that reflects the totality of the program's 
costs, including operations and maintenance as authorized by 
Hydrographic Services Improvement Act (Public Law 110-386) in 
future budget submissions.
    The Committee supports the requested level and intended use 
of funds for Hydrographic Research and Technology Development. 
The Committee provides an additional $300,000 for NOAA to 
designate joint ocean and coastal mapping centers in other 
areas of the country to be co-located with an institution of 
higher education as authorized by the Omnibus Public Land 
Management Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-11). The Committee is 
disappointed that NOAA has yet to provide the report requested 
by the Committee in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014 
(Public Law 113-76) on the agency's plans to designate two 
additional joint ocean and coastal mapping centers, and directs 
NOAA to expedite delivery of this report.
    For fiscal year 2015, the Committee supports NOAA's 
Alliance for Coastal Technologies [ACT] given the program's 
valuable expertise in marine sensor technology development. The 
Committee directs NOAA to maintain full funding for ACT within 
the National Ocean Service.
    Coastal Science, Assessment, Response and Restoration.--
Within the funds provided for Coastal Science, Assessment, 
Response and Restoration, $2,500,000 shall be for operations 
and staffing of the Gulf of Mexico Disaster Response Center 
[DRC], of which up to $500,000 may be used to support 
authorized activities, carried out at the DRC, for the Gulf 
Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council, which was established by 
the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1321). The 
DRC shall serve as the Gulf Coast hub for NOAA's emergency 
preparedness, response, and recovery operations which 
complement the mission of the Restoration Council.
    National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science [NCCOS].--The 
Committee maintains strong support for NCCOS and the services 
that the various centers provide. As such, the Committee 
rejects NOAA's proposal to consolidate NCCOS facilities and 
instead continues funding for all existing labs in fiscal year 
2015.
    Not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this 
act, NOAA shall provide a report to the Committee outlining 
options to avoid unnecessary costs associated with maintaining 
a presence at the Center for Coastal Environmental Health and 
Biomolecular Research [CCEHBR] without significantly disrupting 
the ongoing partnership at the Hollings Marine Laboratory 
[HML]. In developing the report, NOAA shall consult and 
coordinate with representatives from each partner organization 
that is party to the Joint Project Agreement at HML.
    With regard to the Beaufort NCCOS lab, NOAA may explore 
options for transferring the lab and associated funding to a 
different line office outside of the National Ocean Service in 
future budget requests while ensuring that the important 
research conducted at the lab continues.
    The Committee notes that NCCOS provides valuable services 
to the Nation by leveraging internal expertise and extramural 
research. However, the West and Gulf Coasts of the United 
States currently lack a NCCOS presence, especially in the Gulf 
Coast where the National Ocean Service has shared 
responsibility over NOAA's RESTORE Act Science Program. As part 
of its 90-day report, NOAA shall include plans on how NCCOS 
could increase its presence on the West Coast and the Gulf 
Coast. The Committee encourages NOAA to leverage partnerships 
when planning these NCCOS expansions including through the co-
location of NCCOS staff and research equipment at university 
and non-profit research facilities on the West and Gulf coasts 
currently carrying out activities consistent with the goals of 
NCCOS.
    Marine Debris.--The Committee supports the requested level 
for NOAA's Marine Debris Program, but is concerned that NOAA 
has placed insufficient emphasis on efforts to clean up and 
dispose of marine debris resulting from the 2011 Japanese 
tsunami. Within the funds provided, NOAA shall give priority to 
clean-up and disposal activities on Federal lands within States 
inundated with debris from the 2011 Japanese tsunami.
    Additional consideration should be given to marine debris 
projects in urban communities that include the removal of 
abandoned vessels and pilings that harm the ecosystem and 
hinder recreational fishing.
    Coastal Zone Management and Services.--Within the increased 
funds for Coastal Zone Management and Services, the Committee 
encourages NOAA's Coastal Services Center to conduct research, 
provide services, and conduct educational programs to better 
prepare our citizens for disasters, both natural and man-made.
    Coastal Management Grants.--The Committee supports the 
requested funding levels for Coastal Zone Management Grants and 
Regional Coastal Resilience Grants.
    National Marine Sanctuary System.--Among the ongoing 
responsibilities of the Office of National Marine Sanctuary 
[ONMS] is the preservation and conservation of artifacts 
recovered from cultural resource sites within its boundaries, 
including the USS Monitor, which was designated as the first 
National Marine Sanctuary in 1975. Proper conservation of 
maritime artifacts can take years, and ONMS does not embark on 
such long-term commitments without crafting proper management 
plans and securing conservation agreements with its Federal and 
non-Federal partners. ONMS is directed to remain a good steward 
of these historic assets and that existing commitments and 
responsibilities are met before pursuing new ones.

                 NOAA NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE

    The Committee's recommendation provides $836,192,000 for 
the National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS]. NMFS programs 
provide for the management and conservation of the Nation's 
living marine resources and their environment, including fish 
stocks, marine mammals, and endangered species. Using science-
based conservation, management, and restoration activities, 
these resources can benefit the Nation on a sustained basis. 
NMFS seeks to build sustainable fisheries, recover protected 
species, and sustain healthy coastal ecosystems and the 
communities that depend on them.
    Committee recommendations are displayed in the following 
table:

 NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Protected Species Research and Management:
    Protected Species Research and Management Programs            39,200
     Base.............................................
    Species Recovery Grants...........................             5,000
    Marine Mammal Protection..........................            49,000
    Other Protected Species...........................            10,200
    Marine Turtles....................................            12,200
    Atlantic Salmon...................................             6,000
    Pacific Salmon....................................            60,000
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Protected Species Research and Management           181,600
                                                       =================
Fisheries Research and Management:
    Fisheries Research and Management Programs........           177,000
    National Catch Share Program......................            25,000
    Pacific Coast Groundfish Capacity Reduction.......               300
    Expand Annual Stock Assessments...................            72,000
    Economics and Social Sciences Research............             7,417
    Salmon Management Activities......................            30,200
    Regional Councils and Fisheries Commissions.......            32,738
    Fisheries Statistics..............................            22,000
    Fish Information Networks.........................            22,000
    Survey and Monitoring Projects....................            24,200
    Fisheries Oceanography............................             2,179
    American Fisheries Act............................             3,782
    Interjurisdictional Fisheries Grants..............             2,502
    National Standard 8...............................             1,001
    Reducing Bycatch..................................             3,508
    Product Quality and Safety........................             6,700
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Fisheries Research and Management........           432,527
                                                       =================
Enforcement and Observers:
    Enforcement and Surveillance......................            65,350
    Observers and Training............................            43,100
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Enforcement and Observers................           108,450
                                                       =================
Habitat Conservation and Restoration..................            52,190
                                                       =================
Other Activities Supporting Fisheries:
    Antarctic Research................................             2,942
    Aquaculture.......................................             6,000
    Climate Regimes and Ecosystem Productivity........             2,500
    Computer Hardware and Software....................             1,805
    Cooperative Research..............................            12,080
    Information Analyses & Dissemination..............            15,100
    Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and                      801
     Prediction Program...............................
    National Environmental Policy Act.................             6,609
    NMFS Facilities Maintenance.......................             3,302
    Regional Studies..................................            10,286
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Other Activities Supporting Fisheries....            61,425
                                                       =================
      GRAND TOTAL NMFS................................           836,192
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Protected Species, Marine Mammals.--The Committee supports 
NMFS's mission under this activity to monitor, protect, and 
recover at-risk marine mammal species who were listed under the 
Endangered Species Act in 2005, but whose populations continue 
to decline. The Committee directs NMFS to utilize funding for 
the protection and recovery of marine mammal species at risk 
due to factors such as limited prey species, water-borne toxin 
accumulation, and vessel and sound impacts. The Committee 
rejects the administration's proposal to reduce funding for the 
John H. Prescott Marine Mammal Rescue Assistance Grant Program 
and provides sufficient funding for Prescott grants within the 
Marine Mammal Protection account.
    Protected Species, Atlantic Salmon.--NOAA has identified 
major threats to Atlantic salmon, including interrelated 
effects of freshwater salmon habitat loss, lost prey buffering, 
and marine derived nutrients from declines of co-evolved 
diadromous species. Within the funds provided, the Committee 
encourages NOAA to enable a broader use of funds for 
restoration of diadromous species and habitat that support 
salmon recovery by providing ecological functions critical to 
the Atlantic salmon life cycle. The Committee also encourages 
NOAA to ensure that adequate resources continue to be provided 
for State agencies to effectively implement the recovery 
strategy.
    Protected Species, Pacific Salmon.--The Committee is 
concerned that NMFS is not allocating sufficient resources to 
the West Coast Region to fulfill the agency's full range of 
Pacific salmon recovery and management requirements in a timely 
manner. The requirements affect not only the well-being of the 
species but also important natural resource management 
decisions in the region such as water allocations. The 
Committee directs NOAA to provide the funding necessary to 
support Pacific salmon research and management activities 
carried out by the West Coast Region, including, but not 
limited to: Endangered Species Act compliance, reviews and 
permitting; operational decision support; revisions of Pacific 
salmon biological opinions; drought mitigation; drought 
barriers; real-time monitoring; adaptive management programs; 
and passive integrated transponder tagging programs.
    Protected Species, Marine Turtles.--The Committee provides 
$12,200,000 for marine turtle activities and opposes the budget 
request which specifically targeted Hawaiian sea turtles for 
reduced funding. The Committee reallocated $812,000 from NMFS's 
Fisheries Management account to provide the balance of the 
funding in fiscal year 2015 for marine turtles. The Committee 
understands that fiscal constraints may lead NOAA to request 
budget cuts to marine turtles, but should reduced funding be 
deemed necessary in future budget requests, the Committee 
directs NOAA to make such reductions equitable and not 
disproportionately target specific turtle species.
    Promote and Develop Fisheries Products and Research Funding 
Transfer.--The bill maintains the provision restricting the use 
of the Promote and Develop Fisheries Products and Research 
funds transferred from the Department of Agriculture to NOAA in 
a way that better meets the intended purpose of the transfer 
mandated by the Saltonstall-Kennedy Act. None of the funds may 
be used for internal NOAA or Department of Commerce management 
but rather funds may only be used for activities that directly 
help U.S. fisheries and fishery communities. Specifically, 
these funds may only be used for: cooperative research; annual 
stock assessments; efforts to improve data collection, 
including catch monitoring and reporting for commercial, 
charter, and recreational fisheries; interjurisdictional 
fisheries grants; and Fisheries Information Networks.
    As part of the fiscal year 2015 spending plan, NOAA shall 
include a clear accounting of how the Promote and Develop 
transfer funds will be allocated based on the funding criteria 
described in this bill.
    The Committee further directs that no less than 10 percent 
of the total amount of the transferred funds shall be provided 
for the competitive Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant program. NOAA 
shall consult with each Regional Fishery Management Council and 
the Marine Fisheries Commissions to identify regional funding 
priorities. Prior to the expenditure of any of these funds, 
NOAA shall provide the Committee with a detailed spending plan 
describing which fisheries activities will be funded in each of 
the regions and how the plan incorporates regional priorities.
    Red Snapper Stock Assessments.--The Committee directs NOAA 
to continue taking into account the benefits provided by 
artificial reefs and offshore man-made structures, such as oil 
rigs and other fixed energy exploration infrastructure, when 
updating stock assessments or conducting any new stock 
assessments for reef fish in the Gulf of Mexico under a 
Fisheries Management Plan, including red snapper. Furthermore, 
NOAA shall take into consideration any imbalance in the 
ecosystem that may be occurring between larger red snapper and 
other fish species before accepting amendments to existing 
regulations or implementing new regulations that directly 
affect red snapper quotas in the Gulf of Mexico.
    Epipelagic Apex Predators.--The Committee acknowledges 
growing evidence that yellowfin tuna and other epipelagic apex 
predators are aggregating at offshore oil platforms in a 
similar manner to their more traditional aggregation points. 
These offshore platforms may alter yellowfin movements, diet, 
diseases, growth, age at maturity, and spawning. However, NOAA 
lacks fundamental data on how this new association may impact 
these important species. Within funding provided, NOAA should 
examine the impact of offshore oil platforms on the biology of 
highly migratory species such as yellowfin tuna. NOAA shall 
provide a report on the results of this research no later than 
1 year after enactment of this act.
    Marine Recreational Information Program.--Improved stock 
assessments are critical to maintaining and, in some cases, 
rebuilding our Nation's fisheries, which is why the Committee 
has consistently provided increased funding for Annual Stock 
Assessments within NMFS's budget. However, such support does 
not come without accountability as the Committee monitors these 
funds to ensure that they are being spent effectively. 
Consequently, the Committee has serious concerns about the 
accuracy, reliability, and timeliness of recreational fisheries 
data collected and analyzed by NOAA's fisheries science 
centers.
    The Committee notes an opinion issued in March of 2014 by 
the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, which 
found that NMFS ``failed to use the best scientific information 
available,'' and carried out management actions that were 
``arbitrary and capricious'' for the Gulf of Mexico red snapper 
fishery. This resulted in harm to the commercial sector and 
will harm the recreational sector by further restricting future 
red snapper seasons for recreational anglers in the Gulf of 
Mexico. In the Caribbean, 11 separate NOAA stock assessments 
conducted between 2003 and 2013 failed to produce any usable 
data, yet the agency continues to refuse to incorporate 
additional outside data into its assessment process despite 
having insufficient resources to meet demand. In the Atlantic, 
erroneous data on recreational sea bass catches remain 
uncorrected and unsubstantiated, and continue to propagate into 
NOAA's regulations resulting in unjustified size and catch 
limits.
    Despite years of transition, the Marine Recreational 
Information Program's [MRIP's] improvements upon the legacy 
Marine Recreational Fisheries Statistics Survey have yet to be 
fully realized, and reforms to MRIP that were intended to be 
made years ago--such as license data audits--have yet to be 
implemented. Therefore, the Committee finds that MRIP may be 
inadequate to serve as the primary source of data collection 
for recreational fishing used to make management decisions 
throughout the country. The Committee encourages NMFS to 
augment, or replace when feasible, MRIP data with data 
collected from electronic reporting programs approved by 
regional fishery management councils.
    Furthermore, the Committee directs the Government 
Accountability Office to review MRIP methodologies including 
the general practices and procedures of NOAA's fisheries 
science centers, to provide recommendations about how the 
agency can address the specific issues associated with the 
aforementioned events and improve overall coordination with all 
stakeholders.
    Pacific Coast Groundfish.--In the event that legislation is 
enacted during fiscal year 2015 that authorizes changes to the 
existing loan program that has funded the Pacific Coast 
groundfish fishing capacity reduction program, the 
recommendation includes up to $300,000 to support those 
changes.
    Salmon Management Activities.--Within the amount provided 
for Salmon Management activities, the Committee recommends 
$10,900,000 to enable States and tribal communities to 
implement necessary Pacific Salmon Treaty agreements. The 
Committee fully supports all other aspects of the budget 
request for Salmon Management activities that are essential to 
meeting these treaty obligations. The Committee also provides 
additional funding above the request to be used for the 
operation and maintenance of Mitchell Act hatcheries.
    Baseline Data for Gulf of Mexico.--The Committee directs 
NOAA to continue supporting baseline research for fisheries 
health in the Gulf of Mexico, including studies of pelagic 
species. NOAA is encouraged to increase and continue 
collaborations in the gulf to establish an integrated and 
comprehensive ecosystem-level fisheries monitoring enterprise 
and sentinel species program.
    Charter Vessels.--To help improve the quality and abundance 
of fishery data used for stock assessments, the Committee 
continues to encourage NOAA to expand the agency's activities 
in chartering commercial fishing vessels to serve as research 
and fishery survey vessels. Increasing these charter 
opportunities will enlarge the geographically diverse data 
collection for broad fish populations and enhance numerous 
ocean research programs. Other parts of NOAA, including the 
National Ocean Service and the Office of Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Research line offices, shall charter commercial 
fishing vessels, when applicable, to augment ongoing survey and 
research activities.
    American Lobster.--The southern New England stock of 
American lobster continues to decline and is under increasing 
stress. Although the Atlantic States Marine Fishery Commission 
exercises primary regulatory responsibility for this fishery, 
portions of six out of seven management areas are in Federal 
waters. NMFS implements complementary regulations for the 
fishery in these areas, but a lack of data about the condition 
of this fishery still exists. To improve coordination and 
consistency, the Committee continues to direct NMFS to engage 
the industry in conducting surveys and research that 
complements activities undertaken by the States and directs 
NOAA to report to the Committee within 120 days of enactment of 
this act on its progress in working with industry on this 
mandate.
    Bycatch Reduction.--The development and implementation of 
practical bycatch solutions is a priority for U.S. and 
international fisheries management and protected species 
conservation. The Committee supports the requested amount for 
Reducing Bycatch, of which NMFS is directed to make $2,500,000 
available for competitive grants to non-Federal researchers 
working with U.S. fishermen on the development of improved 
fishing practices and innovative gear technologies.
    Enforcement and Observation.--The Committee is aware that 
implementation of the Northeast Multispecies fishery sector 
management program continues to present substantial financial 
challenges to the participants as well as to the economic 
sustainability of the fishery and fishing communities 
throughout the region. Within the funding provided for the 
National Catch Share Plan and observer coverage, the Committee 
directs NMFS to provide adequate funding for at-sea and 
dockside monitoring for fisheries with approved catch share 
management plans that impose observer coverage as a condition 
for new or expanded fishing opportunities.
    Electronic Logbooks.--The Committee supports NOAA's efforts 
to transition to cellular electronic logbooks and monitoring 
systems, which are essential to the implementation of current 
fishery regulations. Within the funds provided for NMFS, NOAA 
is directed to maintain full funding for the continued 
installation of new logbooks and monitoring systems during the 
initial transition phase, including, but not limited to, the 
Gulf of Mexico shrimp fishery. During the development and 
implementation of electronic reporting and monitoring programs, 
NOAA shall consult directly with industry and work through the 
Fishery Management Councils pursuant to 16 U.S.C. 1851-1852k to 
develop appropriate cost-sharing arrangements.
    NMFS shall continue work in fiscal year 2015 with small 
boat fixed gear fleets throughout the country to implement a 
cooperative research program designed to test the functionality 
of available electronic monitoring systems. This cooperative 
research program shall address data quality, costs, species 
identification capabilities, and the reliability of hardware. 
NMFS shall ensure that this effort is adequately resourced for 
the fiscal year 2015 work program.
    Further, NMFS is encouraged to exercise reasonable 
discretion when evaluating requests by small boat fixed gear 
vessels seeking a release from the requirement to carry a human 
observer due to a lack of physical space or other operational 
constraint. The Committee is concerned with NMFS's approach to 
granting observer release based on hardship and therefore 
directs the agency to grant such releases based on the actual 
number of bunks on a vessel and reasonable assessment of vessel 
operations with due consideration for the well-being of the 
crew. The Committee encourages NMFS to support the use of 
experimental fisheries permits, to continue the expeditious 
development of electronic monitoring equipment and procedures, 
and to use the experimental fisheries permits as the bridge 
between cooperative research and the implementation of 
electronic monitoring technology by regulation as a component 
of the Observer Program for small boat fixed gear fleets.
    In addition, within the funds provided for NMFS, $2,000,000 
shall be available, pursuant to 16 U.S.C. 3701, for 
collaborative partnerships that include non-Federal matching 
funds, to implement cost-shared electronic monitoring and 
reporting programs that support fisheries conservation and 
management, including but not limited to, on a voluntary basis, 
the for-hire recreational fishery in the Gulf of Mexico.
    Habitat Conservation and Restoration.--The Committee 
maintains support for the consolidation of coastal habitat 
programs into the Habitat Conservation and Restoration program 
and supports the requested level for Fisheries Habitat 
Restoration. The Committee encourages NOAA to include a 
broader, ecosystem-based management philosophy, expand criteria 
to include recreational species, managed commercial species, 
and forage species, and prioritize proposals that engage 
communities. NOAA is directed to give priority to habitat 
restoration grants for river basins that are critical to the 
restoration of priority fisheries, especially restoration 
projects that support multistakeholder agreements, including 
settlements of litigation and conflict over water management, 
particularly involving the settlement of tribal water rights. 
Furthermore, NOAA is encouraged to work with local communities 
and tribal governments so they can engage in collaborative 
management and restoration of fisheries.
    Coastal Ecosystem Resiliency Grants.--The Committee 
provides an additional $10,000,000 to NMFS's Habitat 
Conservation and Restoration, to fund coastal zone restoration 
projects to specifically enhance ocean and coastal ecosystem 
resiliency to extreme weather. NOAA shall coordinate with other 
appropriate Federal agencies, especially the United States Army 
Corps of Engineers, Governors from coastal States, academic 
institutions, and nonprofit organizations to solicit and 
identify projects in coastal zones that would improve or 
restore ocean and coastal ecosystems such as erosion 
stabilization through living shorelines, wetlands restoration, 
and dam removal. To maximize the usefulness of these funds, 
NOAA should include a cost sharing requirement in the grant 
solicitation as part of its criteria for selecting projects. 
NOAA may use these funds to support a project for a coastal 
State only with the approval of the State's Governor.
    Aquaculture.--Within the funds provided for Aquaculture, 
the Committee supports ongoing research in off-bottom oyster 
production in coastal areas, including the Gulf of Mexico, and 
encourages NMFS to dedicate resources for further research in 
oyster genetics, disease, and economic modeling.
    Lionfish.--The Committee is concerned about the increasing 
threat posed by the invasive marine fish belonging to the genus 
Pterois, particularly the lionfish. The lionfish has invaded 
habitats along the southeastern coast of the United States and 
recent sightings have been reported off western portions of the 
gulf coast. The Committee encourages NOAA to work with 
interested State, local, private and nonprofit partners to 
mitigate the negative impacts of lionfish on natural 
ecosystems, including but not limited to studying how 
artificial reefs may affect lionfish migration into the gulf.
    Oyster Reef Restoration.--The Committee continues to 
encourage NOAA to work with its State and non-Federal partners 
to consider supporting oyster shell recycling programs as part 
of the agency's competitive external funding opportunities for 
habitat restoration projects.
    Cooperative Research.--Depleted fish stocks result in 
significant economic losses to our Nation. At a time when 
fishing opportunities are constrained by uncertainty in stock 
assessment, and increased access to healthy stocks depends on 
better data, the Committee believes that maintenance of ongoing 
monitoring programs and surveys is critical. The Committee 
encourages NMFS to continue to prioritize long-time series 
surveys, with emphasis on surveys that are conducted 
cooperatively with industry and States. In addition, the 
Northeast Fisheries Science Center is directed to work 
collaboratively with the fishing industry to update the 
Northeast Cooperative Research Strategic Plan, including: the 
identification of science priorities; a process for greater 
involvement of fishermen in data collection; and better 
communication of how the results of cooperative fisheries 
research are used.
    Big Eye Tuna Quotas in the Western and Central Pacific.--
The Committee notes that NMFS intends to amend the fishery 
management plans in its Pacific Islands region to allow for the 
assignment of unused big eye tuna quota from American Samoa, 
the Commonwealth of the Marianas Islands, and Guam to Hawaii's 
longline fleet. This amendment is crucial to support the well-
managed domestic longline fishery for big eye tuna. The 
Committee directs NMFS to complete adoption of the amendment no 
later than 30 days after enactment of this act.
    Seafood Reporting.--The United States leads the world in 
responsibly managed fisheries and aquaculture, and the 
Committee supports NOAA's activities to inform consumers about 
our Nation's sustainable fisheries through the agency's 
FishWatch program. However, the Committee is concerned that the 
exclusive use or recognition of third-party certifications for 
seafood sustainability by the Department could have unintended 
consequences for various domestic fisheries. The Committee 
acknowledges that some United States fisheries voluntarily 
utilize third-party seafood sustainability certification 
schemes but believes it is not the Department's role to adopt 
such certification schemes when doing so could result in the 
Department arbitrarily influencing the United States domestic 
seafood market. The Committee believes support for third-party 
certifications is best presented in non-governmental forums. 
Therefore, the Committee directs the Department not to adopt, 
use, or promote any third-party certification scheme for 
seafood sustainability, but to instead continue providing 
consumers with independent and accountable information 
generated from within the Department.

                 NOAA OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH

    The Committee's recommendation provides $430,033,000 for 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Research [OAR]. OAR programs provide 
the environmental research and technology needed to improve 
NOAA weather services, air quality warnings, forecasts, climate 
predictions, and marine services. To accomplish these goals, 
OAR supports a network of scientists in its Federal research 
laboratories, universities, and joint institutes and 
partnership programs.
    Committee recommendations are displayed in the following 
table:

  OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH OPERATIONS, RESEARCH AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Climate Research:
    Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes..........            60,000
    Regional Climate Data and Information............            40,000
    Climate Competitive Research.....................            60,000
                                                      ------------------
      Total, Climate Research........................           160,000
                                                      ==================
Weather and Air Chemistry Research Programs:
    Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes..........            64,547
    U.S. Weather Research Program....................             7,236
    Tornado Severe Storm Research/Phased Array Radar.            13,111
                                                      ------------------
      Total, Weather and Air Chemistry Research......            84,894
                                                      ==================
Ocean, Coastal and Great Lakes Research:
    Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes..........            26,669
    National Sea Grant College Program...............            62,800
    Marine Aquaculture Research......................             5,000
    Sustained Ocean Observations and Monitoring......            41,347
    Integrated Ocean Acidification...................            11,000
    Ocean Exploration................................            26,220
                                                      ------------------
      Total, Ocean, Coastal and Great Lakes Research.           173,036
                                                      ==================
High Performance Computing Initiatives...............            12,103
                                                      ==================
      GRAND TOTAL OAR................................           430,033
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes.--The Committee 
provides an increase to Ocean, Coastal and Great Lakes Research 
Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes and expects the 
administration to fully fund these cooperative institutes at 
appropriate levels in future years, including well-established 
institutes focused on: watershed impacts on marine ecosystems; 
remote sensing; and long-term monitoring of oil spill impacts 
on marine ecosystem health. The Committee also encourages NOAA 
to consider how additional cooperative institutes could 
strengthen NOAA's ability to improve coastal sustainability and 
resilience, and better prepare coastal communities to make 
smart land-use decisions.
    Climate Research.--The Committee provides the requested 
level for supporting and expanding the National Integrated 
Drought Information System, including the Regional Drought 
Early Warning Information System, and for increased funding for 
the Arctic Research Program to improve regional-scale 
information. The Committee also encourages NOAA to sustain and 
expand an observation and analysis system with existing 
enterprises to provide 20 additional towers to support this 
effort and to leverage existing capital expenditures and 
relevant data to support the accurate measurement of greenhouse 
gases.
    Multi-Function Phased Array Radar.--The bill includes 
$13,111,000 for continued development of the multi-function 
phased array radar [MPAR], the same as the budget request. The 
Committee recognizes the benefits current MPAR research has 
provided to both NOAA and the Federal Aviation Administration 
[FAA], while recognizing the continued uncertainty about cost 
sharing between the FAA and NOAA for both technical risk 
reduction and non-recurring engineering costs. The Committee 
directs NOAA to serve as the technical agent for the execution 
and completion of the MPAR program. The Committee requires a 
joint spending plan from NOAA and the FAA within 45 days of 
enactment of this act that incorporates investments from both 
the FAA and NOAA with a consolidated approach to completing the 
program's technical risk reduction and making more transparent 
choices on the program's initial investment decision milestone.
    A promising MPAR design, which effectively combines dual 
polarization with phased arrays, is the Cylindrical 
Polarimetric Phased Array Radar [CPPAR]. Within funds provided, 
the Committee encourages NOAA to expand research in CPPAR, 
including developing a full-scale prototype to examine how 
CPPAR capabilities could add value to weather forecasting and 
future severe storm research.
    Vortex-Southeast [Vortex-SE].--The southeastern United 
States commonly experiences devastating tornadoes under 
variables and conditions that differ considerably from the 
Midwest where conditions for tornado research have historically 
been focused. Within funds provided for Weather and Air 
Chemistry Research Programs, OAR shall collaborate with the 
National Science Foundation's Vortex-SE to better understand 
how environmental factors that are characteristic of the 
southeast United States affect the formation, intensity, and 
storm path of tornadoes for this region. NOAA shall report to 
the Committee within 90 days of enactment of this act on OAR's 
role and contributions to the Vortex-SE program.
    National Sea Grant Program.--The Committee opposes the 
administration's requested decrease to the National Sea Grant 
Program base and the proposed elimination of education and 
fellowship activities within the program. Within funds 
provided, NOAA is encouraged to leverage resources and pursue 
partnerships with Sea Grant universities and other Federal 
agencies to carry out aquatic animal health monitoring and 
research. This effort contributes to Sea Grant and NOAA's 
broader mission of providing services to enhance coastal 
community resilience. Further, NOAA is encouraged to continue 
its partnership with academic programs that provide legal 
expertise related to the missions of the program and NOAA.
    Marine Aquaculture Research.--The Committee encourages 
NOAA, in partnership with universities, to support marine 
aquaculture research and development efforts that have led to 
beneficial outcomes such as development and commercialization 
of new technologies to meet U.S. demand for warm water marine 
seafood, including finfish, shrimp, and oysters.
    Ocean Exploration.--The bill provides $26,220,000 for the 
Ocean Exploration Program. NOAA is encouraged to continue 
fundamental ocean exploration in which open source data are 
collected for the oceanographic community in real-time through 
telepresence technology. Within funds provided, NOAA is 
encouraged to award competitive grants to institutions that 
have partnered with OAR in the past, including those with ocean 
going assets, to support new exploration missions, expeditions, 
and deep sea research. Another primary focus should be the 
continued exploration of the United States Exclusive Economic 
Zones. As in the past, the program shall use ships operated by 
non-governmental organizations and academic institutions 
provided that any data acquired are open-sourced. In addition, 
the Committee rejects the budget request to eliminate Ocean 
Exploration's education program.

                     NOAA NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE

    The Committee's recommendation provides $954,153,000 for 
the NOAA National Weather Service [NWS]. NWS programs provide 
timely and accurate meteorologic, hydrologic, and oceanographic 
warnings and forecasts to ensure the safety of the population, 
mitigate property losses, and improve the economic productivity 
of the Nation. NWS is also responsible for issuing operational 
climate forecasts for the United States. The Committee has made 
saving lives and livelihoods though accurate weather 
forecasting a priority.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

      NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Observations..........................................           210,777
Central Processing....................................            96,617
Analyze, Forecast, and Support........................           483,060
Dissemination.........................................            40,099
Science and Technology Integration....................           123,600
                                                       =================
      GRAND TOTAL NWS.................................           954,153
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Weather Service Modernization.--The Committee remains 
supportive of NWS moving forward with plans to modernize its 
services, operations, and infrastructure. As such, the 
Committee approves the NWS budget reorganization proposed in 
the 2015 budget request and supports the requested relocation 
of the National Logistics Supply Center and National 
Reconditioning Center. The Committee encourages NWS to continue 
working with all of its external partners and internal 
components to deliver a comprehensive weather modernization 
plan to the Committee that includes short-term and long-term 
objectives.
    Information Technology Officers.--For the third year in a 
row, the Committee does not support the budget request to 
eliminate Information Technology Officer positions at the 
forecast offices around the country. This repeated request 
continues to ignore the Committee's direction to provide 
perspective on how this proposal fits within NWS's broader 
workforce and modernization plans. The Committee also notes 
that NOAA has not provided the report requested in fiscal year 
2014 outlining a multi-phase plan for consolidating NWS's 
information technology operations that would streamline system 
configuration, shore up existing cybersecurity vulnerabilities, 
contribute to the expedited rollout of Advanced Weather 
Interactive Processing System, and achieve cost savings while 
resulting in no degradation of service.
    Facilities.--The Committee recommends that, wherever 
possible, NWS co-locate its local or regional facilities with 
established universities, emergency management offices, and 
private sector atmospheric research entities that have forecast 
capabilities for atmospheric events, placing priority on 
developing more accurate and timely warnings and forecasts of 
high impact weather events that endanger life and property. 
Fiscal year 2015 funds may be used for the planning, design, 
and long-term co-location lease agreements, with priority given 
to the States most impacted by recent extreme weather events 
where current leases may be expiring.
    National Data Buoy Center [NDBC].--The Committee provides 
sufficient funding to maintain, at a minimum, NDBC operations 
at 80 percent data availability. The Committee understands the 
challenges associated with deploying, operating and maintaining 
the National Data Buoy Center's network of buoys in the 
offshore marine environment and is encouraged that some 
progress is being made to restore operability of buoys. 
However, the Committee remains concerned by the large number of 
outages and service interruptions experienced within the 
National Data Buoy network. In many instances, buoys have been 
partially or entirely offline for longer than 18 months. The 
Committee directs NOAA to include as part of the agency's 
spending plan a schedule to restore existing data buoy 
operability and its strategy to minimize outages in the future.
    The Committee is aware that NOAA has developed a new 
version of the DART buoy known as the Easy-To-Deploy DART [ETD-
DART], and has been informed that other nations have 
successfully deployed the ETD-DARTs at significant savings 
without compromise to public safety. NOAA is therefore directed 
to conduct a cost-benefit analysis on replacing or enhancing 
its current network of DART buoys with ETD-DART buoys and 
submit the analysis to the Committee no later than 180 days 
from enactment of this act.
    National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program [NTHMP].--The 
Committee rejects NOAA's proposal to terminate funding for 
tsunami preparedness within the NTHMP, and instead instructs 
the Agency to maintain funding at the fiscal year 2014 level 
and to strengthen the NTHMP in accordance with the 2011 
evaluation by the National Academy of Sciences.
    Central Forecast Guidance.--NOAA shall maintain its efforts 
to develop and implement the COASTAL Act (Public Law 112-141). 
The Committee supports NOAA's work to assist homeowners 
impacted by destructive winds and storm surges associated with 
hurricanes and super-storms. The Committee directs NOAA to 
continue to leverage existing Federal assets, expertise, and 
partnerships in carrying out COASTAL Act activities.
    Small Business Innovation Research.--The Committee is 
encouraged by NWS's success in carrying out Small Business 
Innovation Research [SBIR] contracts as part of the agency's 
technology transfer initiative. NWS has effectively designed 
these SBIR contracts to build community resilience in the face 
of increasing vulnerability to extreme weather impacts, which 
is part of NWS's ``Weather-Ready Nation'' concept. These 
contracts, in part, will better inform emergency managers, 
first responders, government officials, businesses, and 
ultimately the public, to make fast, smart decisions to save 
lives and livelihoods. The Committee directs NWS to continue to 
support, and even expand, these SBIR contracts in fiscal year 
2015.
    National Mesonet Program.--The Committee provides 
$16,000,000 for the continuation and expansion of the National 
Mesonet Program and is encouraged by the Administration's 
request to maintain the program. Funds should be made available 
through a competitive weather data procurement that sustains 
coverage of areas currently included within the national 
mesonet, as well as an expansion of coverage in high risk 
areas. NOAA is also encouraged to add new observations such as 
coastal observations, boundary layer data and total lightning 
data. NOAA should require that awardees provide mesonet data in 
formats that can be integrated by NWS for use in forecasts and 
severe weather alerts. NOAA should also encourage efforts to 
demonstrate the validity of mesonet observation data in 
increasing severe weather warning times and demonstrate the 
economic benefit of Mesonet observations for various key 
sectors, such as commercial aviation and electric grid 
management. Of the funds provided, up to $500,000 may be used 
for Meterological Assimilation Data Ingest System [MADIS] 
activities including transitioning MADIS from research to 
operations and enabling the distribution of Mesonet data 
through the Advanced Weather Interaction Processing System 
[AWIPS]. Up to $500,000 may be used for costs associated with 
the National Mesonet Program Office. The Committee sees the 
national mesonet as an important component of any effort to 
effectively develop a ``Weather-Ready Nation'' and expects that 
future NOAA budget requests will continue to reflect it as a 
priority.
    Space Weather.--The Committee is concerned that the Nation 
is ill prepared for the potential for a severe space weather 
event that could substantially disrupt critical infrastructure 
and that our ability to forecast such events is not 
sufficiently robust to mitigate these effects. The Committee 
therefore directs the NOAA Administrator to convene an outside 
panel of experts, in concert with other Federal agencies 
engaged in activities directly related to space weather, to 
review and consider how best to provide decisionmakers with 
relevant and timely space weather and operational information 
and processes to mitigate and utilize space weather effects. 
Such a panel should offer its recommendations to the NOAA 
Administrator not later than June 1, 2015, with concurrent 
transmission of its findings to the Committee.

     NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE, DATA AND INFORMATION SERVICE

    The Committee's recommendation provides $189,167,000 for 
the National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information 
Service [NESDIS] operations. NESDIS programs operate 
environmental polar-orbiting and geostationary satellites, and 
collect and archive global environmental data and information 
for distribution to users in commerce, industry, agriculture, 
science and engineering, the general public, and Federal, 
State, and local agencies.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

     NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE, DATA AND INFORMATION SERVICE
                  OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Environmental Satellite Observing Systems:
    Office of Satellite and Product Operations........            92,500
    Product Development, Readiness & Application......            26,000
    Commercial Remote Sensing Licensing & Enforcement.             1,100
    Office of Space Commercialization.................             1,000
    Group on Earth Observations [GEO].................               500
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Environmental Satellite Observing Systems           121,100
                                                       =================
National Environmental Information Office.............            68,067
                                                       -----------------
      GRAND TOTAL NESDIS..............................           189,167
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    National Environmental Information Office.--The Committee 
recommends $68,067,000 for the National Environmental 
Information Office [NEIO], which is a new office that 
consolidates several programs that were previously funded 
separately. While the Committee supports the new budget 
structure for NESDIS, it is essential to ensure that key 
programs continue to receive adequate funding. Specifically, 
the Committee provides no less than $6,000,000 for the Regional 
Climate Services, $3,650,000 for Regional Climate Centers, and 
$4,567,000 for Coastal Data Development. These amounts reflect 
fiscal year 2014 funding levels. Within NEIO, the Committee 
encourages NOAA to fully support critical international 
partnerships, including the Global Climate Observing System.

                       NOAA-WIDE PROGRAM SUPPORT

    The Committee's recommendation provides $460,632,000 for 
NOAA-wide program support. These programs provide for overall 
NOAA management, including staffing of the Under Secretary's 
office and services to NOAA and DOC field offices through the 
regional Administrative Support Centers. These programs also 
support NOAA's Education Office consistent with the 
recommendations of the Joint Ocean Commission. The facilities 
subactivity provides for repair and maintenance to existing 
facilities, facilities planning and design, and environmental 
compliance. The Office of Marine and Aviation Operations 
provides aircraft and marine data acquisition, repair, and 
maintenance of the existing fleet, planning of future 
modernization, and technical and management support for NOAA-
wide activities through the NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps.
    Committee recommendations are displayed in the following 
table:

          PROGRAM SUPPORT OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Corporate Services:
    Under Secretary and Associate Offices Base........            27,000
    Facilities........................................            24,000
    NOAA Wide Corporate Services and Agency Management           114,500
    DOC Accounting System.............................            10,000
    IT Security.......................................             8,300
    DOC Working Capital Fund..........................            43,000
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Corporate Services.......................           226,800
                                                       =================
NOAA Education Program................................            27,200
                                                       =================
Fleet and Aircraft Operations.........................           206,632
                                                       =================
      GRAND TOTAL, PROGRAM SUPPORT....................           460,632
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Corporate Services.--Within the increased funds for 
Corporate Services, NOAA is directed to focus on restoring the 
functionality of its Workforce Management Office and 
Acquisition and Grant Services.
    The Committee remains concerned about administrative costs 
incurred by NOAA's corporate staff and line offices, including 
regional and field offices. The Committee is aware of NOAA's 
practice to excise a portion of program funds from line offices 
to support line office operations and management. In continuing 
this practice, NOAA shall ensure transparency and equity among 
all programs charged within a particular line office. In its 
annual budget request and in its spending plan required by 
section 534 of this act, the Committee directs NOAA to include 
any proposed funds taken from each program activity in order to 
support line office operations and management, and to disclose 
the total amount of operations and management funding for each 
line office. During any fiscal year, NOAA shall not make any 
changes to the amount taken from programs for line office 
operations unless approved as part of that fiscal year's 
spending plan, or the Committee has been notified 30 days prior 
to any change regardless of the amount. NOAA is reminded of 
overall direction included in this report to reduce overhead 
and achieve administrative savings.
    NOAA's Use of Radio Frequency Spectrum.--The fiscal year 
2015 budget request includes the administration's plan to 
auction, or assign via fee, the 1675-1680 megahertz band of 
radio frequency spectrum, which NOAA currently uses for weather 
balloon communications. This portion of spectrum has been 
identified as part of National Telecommunications and 
Information Administration's Ten-Year Plan and Timetable to 
make 500 megahertz of Federal and non-Federal spectrum 
available for wireless broadband use. The Committee is aware 
that NOAA's radio frequency requirements can be relocated 
adequately to another band of spectrum. Therefore, the 
Committee supports this auction and the expeditious relocation 
of NOAA's operations to a different radio frequency band 
provided that the proceeds of the auction will be used to 
offset NOAA's relocation costs.
    Education.--Within the funds provided for NOAA's Education 
Program, $5,600,000 is for competitive educational grants, 
which includes continued support for Environmental Literacy 
Grants and for improving geographic literacy; $14,400,000 is 
for the educational partnership program with minority-serving 
institutions; and $7,200,000 is for Bay-Watershed Education and 
Training regional programs, which was touted by the Department 
of Education as a model program for how Federal and State 
agencies should collaborate on STEM education.
    A full description of the Committee's assessment and 
direction regarding the administration's Co-STEM consolidation 
proposal is found in the Office of Science Technology and 
Policy portion of this report. For NOAA's part, the Committee 
continues to encourage efforts to streamline STEM education 
programs across NOAA line offices that make sense and support 
the internal consolidation of NOAA education programs. However, 
the Committee does not support the elimination of NOAA's 
Teacher at Sea program and the Dr. Nancy Foster Scholarship 
Program.
    Justification Improvement.--NOAA is directed to continue to 
work with the Committee to reformat the budget justification 
into a more transparent, informative, and user-friendly 
document. The Committee also expects the justification to be 
submitted on time with the rest of the Department's 
justifications.
    Marine and Aviation Operations.--Any decisions related to 
laying up any vessels, grounding any aircraft, or 
decommissioning any capital asset are subject to the standard 
reprogramming procedures set forth in section 505 of this act. 
Any changes from the spending plan shall also be subject to 
section 505 of this act. NOAA shall continue to provide the 
Committee with a monthly operational status of the fleet and 
aircraft. NOAA is further directed to provide the Committee 
with updated long-term management and acquisition plans for the 
fleet and aircraft within 60 days of enactment of this act.
    New Vessel Construction.--The Committee supports NOAA's 
plan to construct a new ocean-going survey vessel in an effort 
to modernize its aging fleet. NOAA is urged to ensure that 
sufficient funding to commence the new vessel construction is 
included in its fiscal year 2016 request.

               PROCUREMENT, ACQUISITION, AND CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $2,022,864,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   2,206,392,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,131,686,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $2,131,686,000 for 
NOAA's procurement, acquisition, and construction. The 
recommendation is $108,822,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and $74,706,000 below the budget request.
    Committee recommendations are displayed in the following 
table:

                PROCUREMENT, ACQUISITION AND CONSTRUCTION
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Ocean Service:
    National Estuarine Research Reserve Construction..             1,700
    Marine Sanctuaries Construction/Acquisition.......             2,000
                                                       -----------------
      Total National Ocean Service--PAC...............             3,700
                                                       =================
Ocean and Atmospheric Research:
    Research Super Computing..........................            13,379
                                                       =================
National Weather Service:
    Observations......................................            12,000
    Central Processing................................            64,000
    Dissemination.....................................            45,000
    WFO Construction..................................            12,000
                                                       -----------------
      Total, National Weather Service--PAC............           133,000
                                                       =================
National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information
 Services:
    Geostationary Systems [GOES-R]....................           980,838
    Joint Polar Satellite System [JPSS]...............           916,267
    COSMIC-2..........................................             6,800
    Satellite Ground Services.........................            52,136
    System Architecture and Advanced Planning.........             4,000
    Projects, Planning, and Analysis..................            25,200
    Satellite CDA Facility............................             2,166
                                                       -----------------
      Total, NESDIS--PAC..............................         1,987,407
                                                       =================
Program Support:
    Vessel Equip. and Tech Refresh....................             7,200
                                                       -----------------
Unobligated balances from prior years.................          (13,000)
                                                       -----------------
      GRAND TOTAL, PAC................................         2,131,686
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    National Estuarine Research Reserve Construction.--The 
Committee remains concerned about the increased costs and lack 
of transparency associated with certain third-party green 
building rating systems. The use of certain green building 
standards can arbitrarily discriminate against domestic 
building materials such as wood that could be locally sourced, 
thereby increasing costs to taxpayers without significant 
benefits in energy and water savings. The Committee again 
directs NOAA to use funding provided for National Estuarine 
Research Reserve Construction on green building rating systems 
or standards that are voluntary consensus standards, have 
achieved American National Standard Institute [ANSI] 
Designation, or were developed by an ANSI Audited Designator, 
and take into consideration the environmental and economic 
benefits of building materials through lifecycle analysis. Not 
later than 90 days after the enactment of this act, NOAA shall 
report on any new, existing, or planned construction projects 
at NERRS sites that receive accreditation for energy savings 
from a third-party green building rating system.
    Research Supercomputing.--The Committee's recommendation 
fully funds the request of $13,379,000 for Research 
Supercomputing within the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Research. The Committee urges NOAA to continue to invest in the 
use of leadership class high performance computing [HPC] and 
directs NOAA to develop a long-term plan to upgrade deployed 
HPC technology and architecture and submit a report to the 
Committee within 180 days of enactment of this act.
    Weather Satellites.--The 2015 budget request shows a 
concerted direction from the administration to focus on weather 
data acquisitions as the primary requirement of NOAA's weather 
satellites. Given a constrained budget environment and finite 
resources, the Committee expects the Department to continue to 
highlight the budget requests for satellite procurement and 
acquisition as necessary funding for NOAA to accomplish its 
core missions. The Committee believes that NOAA should 
prioritize satellite programs directly related to weather 
forecasting including those that result in the greatest 
reduction of risk to lives and property.
    While the budget request shows that NOAA is staying within 
its projected life-cycle cost caps for the Joint Polar 
Satellite System [JPSS] and the Geostationary Operational 
Environmental Satellites R-series [GOES-R] missions, the 
Committee is concerned about the transparency of the annual 
cost accounting for individual fiscal years. One recent 
manifestation of this concern was NOAA's reprogramming request 
to the Committee in fiscal year 2014 that proposed to move 
funds from JPSS and GOES-R into other programs despite NOAA's 
previous insistence that all of the funds requested in fiscal 
year 2014 for these two weather satellite programs were 
essential to maintain schedule integrity. Keeping these 
flagship weather satellite missions on-budget and on-schedule 
is extremely important, but so is maintaining cost controls, 
especially when NOAA's satellite missions continue to dominate 
NOAA's annual budget increases. While the Committee provides 
the full funding request for JPSS and GOES-R in this bill, the 
Committee reiterates its direction to NOAA to find savings from 
operating expenses and to reduce duplicative Government 
overhead shared with the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration [NASA], starting with Projects, Planning and 
Analysis.
    The Committee is troubled by reports that the Commerce 
Inspector General has been excluded from portions of Program 
Management Council [PMC] satellite meetings. In particular, the 
Committee has learned that the Council has established 
alternative meeting structures in order to exclude the 
Inspector General from critical discussions regarding the 
status of weather satellite acquisition and procurement. The 
Inspector General serves a critical oversight role for the 
Department's weather satellite procurement and acquisition 
programs. Given the history of NOAA's satellite procurement 
program, including significant cost overruns and a looming gap 
in polar satellite data, it is vital that the Inspector General 
be present for all PMC satellite meetings to properly carry out 
his oversight responsibilities. The Department shall take 
necessary steps to ensure the Inspector General's office is 
represented and present for all PMC meetings and report back to 
the Committee, not later than 30 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act, on the steps the Department has taken to 
address these issues.
    JPSS Gap Mitigation.--The Committee is disappointed by the 
Department's failure to present a viable gap mitigation plan 
for JPSS. The Government Accountability Office and the 
Department of Commerce Inspector General project a potential 
gap in critical polar satellite data between the Suomi National 
Polar-Orbiting Partnership satellite and JPSS-1 up to 17 
months. While the Department has taken steps to ensure 
robustness and redundancy in JPSS-1 and JPSS-2, it has failed 
to put forth a comprehensive plan to fill or mitigate a 
potential gap that could occur before JPPS-1 becomes fully 
operational. The Committee finds this unacceptable and directs 
the Department to provide the Committee a report detailing 
specific steps NOAA is taking to mitigate a gap in polar 
satellite data as part of the agency's spending plan required 
in this bill. The report shall include viable proposals for a 
gap filler to ensure continuity of data provided by ATMS and 
CrIS instruments.
    Jason-3 and DSCOVR.--The Committee restates that NOAA's 
flagship weather satellites take financial priority over NOAA's 
smaller observing satellites despite the fact that these 
smaller missions have just as much scientific merit. In light 
of the financial pressure within NOAA's PAC account to keep the 
weather satellite missions moving forward, the Committee is 
transferring the development costs and responsibilities of 
Jason-3 and DSCOVR from NOAA to NASA's Earth Science mission 
directorate. NASA is already partnering with NOAA on 
constructing these important missions as well as arranging the 
launch vehicles. The underlying goal of this transition is to 
keep Jason-3 and DSCOVR on-schedule and on-budget given that 
both missions are set to launch in fiscal year 2015.
    Solar Irradiance Data and Rescue [SIDAR].--The Committee 
does not provide funding for the newly proposed satellite 
mission SIDAR which is primarily, though not solely, intended 
to fly another Total Solar Irradiance Sensor [TSIS-2] as a 
continuation of NASA's SORCE mission and of TSIS-1, which NASA 
is also managing per the Committee's direction in fiscal year 
2014. The Committee does not dispute the importance of 
maintaining the total solar irradiance dataset, but given 
NASA's current role in providing these instruments, NOAA is 
directed to work with NASA on how this follow-on mission can be 
better supported though that agency's Science directorate.
    Further, before the Committee considers funding another 
stand alone satellite mission or a non-weather centric polar 
free flyer proposal, NOAA must first create a comprehensive 
plan for weather gap mitigation discussed previously in this 
report. NOAA should prioritize submitting that plan rather than 
aggressively pursuing missions that do not directly contribute 
to weather forecasting or help mitigate any future weather 
gaps.
    Radio Occultation Data.--The Committee supports the request 
of $6,800,000 for continuing the advancement of acquiring the 
next generation of radio occultation [RO] data for the purposes 
of improving and augmenting baseline weather forecasting data. 
Currently NOAA is preparing to support the ground system for 
processing RO data from the first phase of the Constellation 
Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate 
[COSMIC] 2 RO satellites. Six COSMIC-2 satellites are planned 
to launch in fiscal year 2018 as part of this first phase, but 
the Committee has not received a comprehensive plan for the 
second phase of the COSMIC-2 mission. If further RO data is 
needed past the first phase of COSMIC-2, NOAA shall submit a 
plan no later than 120 days after enactment of this act, to 
include expected out year costs by agency and outside partners, 
with appropriate milestones and deliverables. NOAA shall also 
include an analysis for acquiring radio occultation weather 
data from private sector providers in this report.
    NOAA Satellite Reporting.--The Committee directs NOAA to 
provide quarterly programmatic and procurement status reports 
of all satellites actively flying and under development unless 
any reprogramming, system failure, or other extraordinary 
circumstance warrants an immediate update. As part of the 
agency's quarterly satellite briefing, NOAA shall include 
updates on preparations and enhancements, and initial cost 
estimates compared to actual expenditures that need to be made 
to accommodate the increased volume of satellite data.

                    PACIFIC COASTAL SALMON RECOVERY

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $65,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      50,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      65,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $65,000,000 for the 
Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery. The recommendation is the same 
as the fiscal year 2014 level and $15,000,000 above the budget 
estimate. Funds are for conservation and restoration of Pacific 
salmon populations. State and local recipients of this funding 
will provide matching contributions of at least 33 percent of 
Federal funds. In addition, funds will be available to tribes, 
which do not require matching dollars.

                      FISHERMEN'S CONTINGENCY FUND

Appropriations, 2014....................................        $350,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................         350,000
Committee recommendation................................         350,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $350,000 for the 
Fishermen's Contingency Fund. The recommendation is the same as 
the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and the President's request.

                   FISHERIES FINANCE PROGRAM ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2014....................................     -$6,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      -6,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      -6,000,000

    The Committee recommends that direct loans administered 
through this account for individual fishing quotas may not 
exceed $24,000,000. Traditional direct loans may not exceed 
$100,000,000, which is the same as the fiscal year 2014 level 
and budget request.

                                 OTHER


                        Departmental Management


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $55,500,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      57,637,000
Committee recommendation................................      56,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $56,000,000 for 
Departmental Management Salaries and Expenses. The 
recommendation is $500,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and $1,637,000 below the budget request.
    Within Departmental Management, the Salaries and Expenses 
account provides funding for the Secretary, Deputy Secretary, 
and support staff. Responsibilities involve policy development 
and implementation affecting United States and international 
activities, as well as establishing internal goals and 
operations of the Department.
    Within 90 days of enactment of this act, the Department 
shall submit to the Committee a report detailing actions taken 
to cut costs and a detailed account of funds saved by such 
actions across the Department's bureaus.
    BusinessUSA.--The Committee is supportive of the 
administration's request to continue BusinessUSA, an initiative 
designed to streamline government bureaucracy and create one-
stop shops for business assistance. The Committee provides bill 
language allowing the Secretary more flexibility to enter into 
office space agreements with BusinessUSA partners.
    Business Application Solutions.--The Committee supports the 
request for the Business Application Solutions [BAS] 
modernization project, which will consolidate and upgrade the 
systems used to manage finances, acquisitions, properties, and 
reporting requirements for the Department of Commerce. The 
Department is directed to brief the Committee on BAS 
implementation on a quarterly basis.
    Small Business Innovation Research [SBIR].--The Committee 
recognizes the important successes SBIR programs have in 
helping domestic small businesses to commercialize federally 
funded research and development projects. The Committee 
therefore directs the Department to place an increased focus on 
awarding SBIR awards to firms with fewer than 50 employees.
    Unobligated Balances.--The amount of unobligated funding 
within the Department of Commerce is of great concern to the 
Committee, which is one reason for the Committee's requirement 
to receive quarterly updates from the Department on unobligated 
balances. Thus, the Committee was alarmed by findings made by 
the Inspector General in a June 2013 report regarding the 
Department's relatively poor oversight and accounting of 
obligated balances. The Department is directed to report to the 
Committee on the status of steps taken to fulfill the Inspector 
General's recommendations no more than 30 days after enactment 
of this act. The Department shall continue to report every 60 
days thereafter until the OIG certifies to Congress that the 
steps taken to address the OIG's concerns are both adequate and 
complete.

                      RENOVATION AND MODERNIZATION

Appropriations, 2014....................................      $4,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      11,733,000
Committee recommendation................................      10,000,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $10,000,000, which is 
$6,000,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$1,733,000 below the budget request, for building renovation at 
the Department of Commerce.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $30,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      30,596,000
Committee recommendation................................      30,596,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $30,596,000 for the 
Office of Inspector General [OIG]. The recommendation is 
$596,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and the same 
as the budget request.
    In addition to funds provided under this heading, the 
Committee has recommended transfers to the OIG: $2,000,000 from 
the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office; $1,302,000 from the 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; and $1,551,000 
from the Census Bureau for oversight and audits of those 
activities.
    Working Capital Fund Audits.--The Committee continues to 
direct the OIG to audit all of the working capital funds within 
the Department. The objective of the audit is to evaluate the 
budgetary controls over all of the Department's working capital 
funds. The OIG shall assess: the controls in place to develop 
reimbursement formulas; the relationship of reimbursements to 
client services; the appropriateness of the level of fund 
balances; and compliance with appropriation law and direction. 
As part of this assessment, the Inspector General shall pay 
particular attention to the increasing amounts of funding 
needed to support the Department's Office of General Counsel, 
including the justification and metrics of how such funding is 
being levied against each agency and, reciprocally, how the 
agencies account for the services they receive from the Office 
of General Counsel.
    Hurricane Sandy Supplemental Funding.--The Committee is 
concerned by a May 2014 investigation by the Inspector General 
that highlighted possible improper spending by NOAA with regard 
to replacing equipment damaged by Hurricane Sandy. A portion of 
the emergency supplemental funding was designated for repairing 
and replacing NOAA's ocean observing and coastal monitoring 
assets damaged by the hurricane. These supplemental funds are 
separate from any existing operations and maintenance funding 
that is provided to NOAA in annual appropriations acts. 
However, the OIG found that the National Estuarine Research 
Reserve System [NERRS]--acting on guidance from NOAA and DOC's 
Office of General Counsel--spent supplemental funds to replace 
equipment that was not directly damaged by the storm. The 
amount in question is possibly as much as $550,200 of the 
$1,035,163 that NERRS was allocated out of a total $7,000,000 
the Committee appropriated to NOAA to repair or replace such 
equipment.
    The Committee's Hurricane Sandy Supplemental bill language 
and intent was clear, yet NOAA and DOC's Office of General 
Counsel apparently provided guidance to expand the eligibility 
of these funds. The Committee requests that the OIG conduct a 
full audit of the entire $7,000,000 of equipment repair funds 
as well as $9,000,000 that was provided to repair NOAA 
facilities damaged by Hurricane Sandy. NOAA and DOC are 
directed to provide the Committee within 30 days of enactment 
of this act a report on how the agency and the Department have 
implemented the five recommendations accompanying the Inspector 
General's investigation.
    Audits and Investigations.--The OIG serves a critical 
oversight role at the Department. The Committee believes that 
robust investigations and audits are essential to routing out 
waste, fraud and abuse, however, the current practice that 
limits inquiries to individuals in the Department does not lend 
itself to comprehensive findings and recommendations. The 
Committee directs the OIG to modify its policies and procedures 
to ensure that investigations or reports include interviews 
with all parties to the project or program in question, 
including, but not limited to, contractors responsible for 
projects under review. The Committee cautions the OIG against 
issuing preliminary findings prior to interviewing a majority 
of the entities involved with the program or project under 
investigation, unless the OIG believes the findings are time 
sensitive and additional interviews are immaterial.
    Allegations of Impropriety.--The Committee is disappointed 
by recent allegations that the OIG forbid former employees from 
talking to oversight authorities, including congressional 
committees. While the Committee recognizes that this may not 
have been the OIG's intent, the Inspector General, in 
particular, should recognize that even the appearance of threat 
or intimidation can be devastating to the cause of responsible 
governance.
    The Committee supports the steps that the OIG has taken to 
address this matter and directs the Inspector General to notify 
the Committee within 15 days of any future allegations related 
to employment contracts.

               General Provisions--Department of Commerce

    Section 101 makes Commerce Department funds available for 
advanced payments only upon certification of officials 
designated by the Secretary that such payments are considered 
to be in the public interest.
    Section 102 makes appropriations for salaries and expenses 
available for the hire of passenger motor vehicles, and for 
services, uniforms, and allowances as authorized by law.
    Section 103 provides the authority to transfer funds 
between Department of Commerce accounts. The provision makes 
transfers subject to the Committee's standard reprogramming 
procedures.
    Section 104 extends congressional notification requirements 
for the NOAA satellite programs.
    Section 105 provides authority for the Secretary of 
Commerce to furnish certain services within the Herbert C. 
Hoover Building.
    Section 106 clarifies that grant recipients under the 
Department of Commerce may continue to deter child pornography, 
copyright infringement, or any other unlawful activity over 
their networks.
    Section 107 provides NOAA the authority to share resources 
with entities outside the agency.
    Section 108 requires that, before charging for 
congressional reports, the National Technical Information 
Service [NTIS] advise the public of free ways to receive or 
access these reports. For those reports that cannot be found 
free of charge or when a customer requires a mailed, hard copy, 
NTIS may only charge a de minimus copying and mailing fee. The 
Committee is concerned about outrageous fees the National 
Technical Information Service charges the public for hard 
copies of congressional reports and documents available for 
free online.
    Section 109 allows NOAA to be reimbursed by Federal and 
non-Federal entities for performing certain activities.
    The Committee is concerned that agreements for offsetting 
collections provided for under this section could result in a 
conflict of interest, or the appearance of a conflict of 
interest, for the Department. The Department is directed to 
exercise caution and consider any unintended consequences that 
could result from such agreements, including, but not limited 
to, augmentation of appropriations, initiation of new programs 
not authorized by this act or any other act of Congress, and 
liabilities extending beyond the period of any such agreement. 
The Department shall provide to the Committee monthly updates 
on all offsetting fee collections, including each entity 
participating in the agreement, as well as the terms of and 
specific activities funded by the agreement. Additionally, 
estimates of anticipated fee collections shall be included in 
the Department's annual spend plans. To further ensure the 
Committee maintains sufficient oversight for activities carried 
out under this section, language is included specifying that 
any offsetting collection would require the consent of each 
party subject to the agreement and all offsetting collections 
shall be subject to procedures set forth by section 505 of this 
act.
    Section 110 allows the Secretary of Commerce to waive the 
bond requirement for research vessel repair and construction 
contracts which would align Commerce's authorities with those 
of other Federal agencies and address difficulties NOAA has 
experienced in obtaining competitive bids for ship repairs.
    Prior to exercising waiver authority under section 110 of 
this act, the Secretary of Commerce shall promulgate 
regulations specifying criteria under which waiver authority 
may be used, including the types of contracts eligible for 
consideration, surety alternatives and acceptable risk profiles 
in order to protect the taxpayer and ensure that NOAA 
experiences cost-savings. The Department is directed to notify 
the Committee not less than 15 days prior to any waiver issued 
under this section. In addition, the Department shall, not 
later than 120 days after the date of enactment of this act, 
prepare a report including the actual costs of repairing, 
rehabilitating and replacing vessels in fiscal years 2012, 2013 
and 2014 and annually thereafter, including an indication of 
those vessels for which NOAA waived the Miller Act.

                                TITLE II

                         DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

    The Committee recommends a total of $27,996,816,000 for the 
Department of Justice [DOJ]. The recommendation is $260,257,000 
above the fiscal year 2014 funding level and $23,282,000 above 
the budget request. Funding recommendations for the 
Department's classified programs are detailed in the classified 
annex accompanying this report. The Committee's recommendation 
emphasizes key priorities regarding funding for the 
Department's critical ongoing missions and activities to 
protect the safety, security, and rights of our citizens.
    Justice Lifecycle.--The Committee must provide the Federal 
Bureau of Prisons [BOP] and the U.S. Marshals Service's Federal 
Prisoner Detention program an increase of $97,307,000 above the 
fiscal year 2014 level to safely guard the Nation's Federal 
prison inmate and detention populations. While these activities 
are not considered mandatory for budget purposes, they are not 
truly discretionary in that the Committee has an obligation to 
adequately fund them regardless of budgetary constraints. While 
the annual increase in the Federal inmate population has 
leveled off in recent years, the cost of detaining these 
inmates has not. Absent substantial decreases in the Federal 
inmate population, the day may be approaching when Federal 
prison and detention demands, which are not dynamic budget 
requests, overwhelm the Department's budgetary resources. The 
Committee knows all too well that neither the Department nor 
Congress can afford to let this happen.
    The administration has announced a ``Smart on Crime'' 
initiative and a ``Clemency Initiative,'' both intended to 
reform the criminal justice system. These efforts are 
consistent with the Committee's direction in fiscal year 2014 
for the Department and the administration to work together with 
Congress to carefully assess and, where necessary, reform all 
aspects of the DOJ's enforcement and incarceration policies. 
The Committee is pleased that the budget request suggests that 
the ```Smart on Crime' initiative will help stem the tide of 
offenders entering the BOP and will lead to lower average 
sentences, where appropriate, and thus should decrease the 
BOP's population growth over the long term.'' However, more 
work remains to contain the growing costs of the BOP while 
maintaining our adherence to the rule of law in order to 
protect the people of this Nation. The Committee expects to 
work with the administration on appropriate steps forward 
pursuant to any findings or recommendations resulting from the 
GAO report requested in fiscal year 2014 on incarceration and 
the recommendations of the Charles Colson Task Force on Federal 
Corrections, due in fiscal year 2015.
    Department of Veterans Affairs.--The Committee is deeply 
troubled by allegations that veterans may have suffered, or 
perhaps even died, due to lack of medical care as officials at 
the Department of Veterans Affairs [VA] kept patients 
languishing on secret waiting lists while maintaining false 
patient care records purporting to show that no such delays 
existed. Further, allegations that VA employees may have 
submitted such false records in order to justify their own 
receipt of performance bonuses suggest the possibility that 
deceit and mistreatment may also have been compounded by fraud. 
While the Inspector General of the VA is currently conducting 
an investigation and a separate review of the allegations is 
underway, evidence has also come to light suggesting that 
senior officials may have known about these problems for some 
years. The Committee believes that this tragedy has dragged on 
for far too long, and has become mired in internal VA politics. 
To that end, this bill provides adequate resources for criminal 
and civil investigations into allegations that the VA falsified 
patient records at one or more of the VA's 150 medical centers 
and 820 community outpatient clinics. The Offices of United 
States Attorneys, the Office of Public Integrity, the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation and any other component within the 
Department should swiftly and definitively determine whether 
any current or former VA officials violated the law, and bring 
any charges that might be appropriate against any responsible 
parties. The Department of Justice shall report to the Congress 
not later than 30 days after the date of enactment of this act 
regarding the initiation of investigations and a description of 
the activities being conducted by each component, and shall 
hereafter provide quarterly reports to the Committee regarding 
the progress of the investigations and any pending 
recommendations and/or criminal proceedings.
    Combating Gun Violence and Enforcing Gun Laws.--Gun 
violence has touched States, counties, cities, and towns across 
our Nation, and it is clear that this problem must be 
addressed. The Committee's recommendation provides a total of 
$1,150,613,000, an increase of $38,513,000 above the fiscal 
year 2014 enacted level, in Federal, State, and local resources 
in order to reduce gun violence and prevent future tragedies. 
These resources will be provided to the Bureau of Alcohol, 
Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives [ATF], the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation [FBI], and State, local, and tribal law 
enforcement partners to keep guns out of the wrong hands; help 
those on the ground prevent and mitigate violent situations 
when they occur; keep people safe; and secure our cities, 
neighborhoods, and schools.
    Heroin Crisis.--Law enforcement, health officials, and 
communities across the United States are alarmed by the drastic 
increase in heroin use and overdoses. According to the 
Department of Health and Human Services, heroin use rose 79 
percent nationwide between 2007 and 2012 (from 373,000 users in 
2007 to 669,000 users in 2012). Heroin is often an inexpensive 
substitute for prescription pills, costing as little as $10 a 
hit. About four in five new heroin addicts report that they 
became addicted to prescription pills before they ever used 
heroin. Unlike pills, there is no way to regulate the dosage of 
heroin, given its undetermined purity.
    According to the Drug Enforcement Administration, heroin 
availability rose in 2012, likely due to an escalation of 
Mexican production and traffickers expanding into new markets 
including suburban and rural communities. Between 2008 and 
2012, the amount of heroin seized each year at the Southwest 
border more than tripled from 1,200 pounds in 2008 to 4,000 
pounds in 2012.
    The Federal Government must have a comprehensive approach 
to the growing heroin crisis. While a strong law enforcement 
effort is critical to the response, heroin is not simply an 
enforcement problem. As discussed at the subcommittee's hearing 
on the Department of Justice's fiscal year 2015 budget request 
on April 3, 2014, the Committee directs the DOJ to lead the 
response by convening a multi-agency task force to address the 
growing heroin problem in the United States. The task force 
should convene experts from the law enforcement, medical, 
public health, and educational fields to develop a coordinated 
response to help our citizens and communities. The Department 
is directed to report back to the Committee on the 
establishment and progress of this multi-disciplinary task 
force not later than 30 days after the date of enactment of 
this act and issue a final report along with any related 
funding and policy recommendations within 1 year of enactment 
of this act.
    Boko Haram and International Terrorism.--The Committee 
encourages the Department to offer any available law 
enforcement assistance in response to international acts of 
terrorism, violations of human rights, and criminal cases of an 
international nature when appropriate. In regard to the April 
2014 abduction of nearly 300 Nigerian schoolgirls by the U.S.-
designated terrorist group Boko Haram, the Committee commends 
the immediate offer of assistance from INTERPOL and the offer 
of intelligence and technical capabilities by the FBI to the 
Government of Nigeria.
    Cybersecurity.--In 2013, cybersecurity breaches became 
front page headlines. Major retailers, Internet security 
protocols, and web browsers suffered vulnerabilities that 
exposed personal information as well as trade secrets. 
Computers and the Internet have become tools for the full range 
of criminal activities as nation-state actors, terrorists, 
organized criminals, spies, corporate thieves, human 
traffickers, child predators, and other common criminals 
threaten Americans, our economy, and our National security. The 
Committee believes that increased public awareness of the 
nature and scope of the cyber threat is essential to enable all 
Americans to protect themselves and their families in 
cyberspace. Therefore, the Committee encourages the Department 
to expand its efforts to inform the public of the importance of 
cybersecurity and of its own activities in defending against 
the cyber threat.
    For several years, the Committee has provided increased 
resources for the Department to combat cybercrime and to carry 
out its role, consistent with the February 2014 Executive Order 
on Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity. As a 
result, on May 19, 2014, the Department announced a first-of-
its-kind criminal cyber-espionage case against Chinese military 
officials accused of industrial espionage and a major 
prosecution of criminal hackers accused of writing and 
distributing malware that infected more than 500,000 computers 
in 100 countries. These efforts are supported by the strategic 
initiatives the Department has developed to improve its ability 
to investigate and prosecute cases and to deter, detect, and 
disrupt cyber threats, particularly efforts to ensure that all 
DOJ investigators and attorneys receive training on cybercrime 
and digital evidence. The Committee's recommendation again 
supports the full request for cybersecurity efforts across the 
Department to allow the DOJ to catch and prosecute cyber 
criminals and to support efforts to secure its own information 
technology systems.
    In fiscal year 2015, the Department has continued to 
prioritize cybersecurity in its Strategic Plan. The Department 
plans an annual review of all objectives in the Strategic Plan 
and has developed performance measures to evaluate progress 
toward meeting these objectives. The Committee directs the 
Department to identify and report, within 180 days of 
enactment, on specific metrics by which its efforts to fight 
cybercrime may be measured, including the number of disruptions 
and dismantlements of computer intrusions; investigations 
conducted; indictments returned; percentage of cases favorably 
resolved; and enforcement efforts carried out in conjunction 
with state and local law enforcement partners.
    Gang Violence.--The Committee recognizes the challenges 
posed by the increasing number of gang members and the violent 
crimes they commit in urban, suburban, and rural communities. 
The Committee understands that to combat these gangs, continued 
and increased cooperation between Federal, State, and local law 
enforcement is required as well as support, coordination, and 
expertise from the Federal level. The Committee acknowledges 
the work currently being undertaken to fight gangs by the FBI 
Violent Safe Streets Task Forces, the Drug Enforcement 
Administration [DEA], the National Gang Targeting, Enforcement 
and Coordination Center [GangTECC], the ATF, the U.S. Marshals 
Service [USMS], BOP, the U.S. Attorneys' offices, and other 
Federal agencies. The Committee urges these agencies to 
intensify current efforts, while enhancing coordination across 
the Federal Government and with State and local law enforcement 
in order to maximize the impact of limited personnel resources. 
The Committee's recommendation includes $5,000,000 for the USMS 
for gang enforcement efforts within the Regional Fugitive Task 
Forces and $8,500,000 for the Violent Gang and Gun Crime 
Reduction Program within the Office of Justice Programs aimed 
at reducing gang violence.
    Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty Reform.--The Committee 
supports the Department's full request for much needed reform 
to the Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty [MLAT] process which will 
not only provide resources to the Criminal Division, FBI and 
the U.S. Attorneys Offices, but also help improve our Nation's 
interaction with our international partners. This funding will 
significantly increase personnel dedicated to reviewing and 
executing MLAT requests as well as technological enhancements 
to improve the way requests are analyzed, categorized, and 
prioritized. Should the Department need additional resources to 
fully fund this effort, funding from unobligated balances 
should be used. The Department is directed to submit a detailed 
spending plan to the Committee including personnel hires and 
technology upgrades to improve the MLAT process within 45 days 
of enactment of this act.
    Crimea.--The Committee remains concerned about the Russian 
aggression in Ukraine, Russia's illegal annexation of Crimea, 
and Russia's illegal and unacceptable efforts to exploit stolen 
Crimean resources, and urges that none of the funds in this act 
be used to recognize, or imply recognition of, the sovereignty 
of the Russian Federation over Crimea, its territory, airspace, 
or territorial waters.
    Scientific Working Group on Digital Evidence.--The 
Committee understands that the memorandum of understanding on 
forensic science between the National Institute of Standards 
and Technology [NIST] and the Department of Justice 
specifically prohibits the establishment of a Scientific 
Working Group [SWG] for digital evidence under the new NIST-run 
Organization for Scientific Area Committees and disagrees with 
this prohibition. In order to ensure continued support of the 
digital evidence SWG, the Committee directs NIST to establish a 
digital evidence SWG in title I of the report. The Committee 
expects that members and expertise developed by the Justice-led 
digital evidence SWG would be transitioned to the NIST-
supported SWG and that NIST would continue to operate all SWGs 
in a consensus-driven manner that places value on input from a 
wide range of practitioners.
    Crime and the Bakken Oil Region.--The Committee recognizes 
the growing incidence of serious crimes committed in the Bakken 
oil region which crosses multiple State and local 
jurisdictions. Communities in the region are experiencing 
unprecedented growth and an influx of workers due to continued 
demand for labor. Unfortunately, increased crime, including 
incidents of violence, sexual assault, and sex trafficking, 
have also risen. The Committee directs the DOJ to report within 
90 days of enactment of this act on the Department's current 
and anticipated presence in the Bakken oil region, including 
the associated level of staffing and resource needs among its 
law enforcement and prosecutorial components. The Department 
shall also include an analysis of crime trends in the region in 
its report to the Committee.
    Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crime Act.--The Committee 
fully supports the goals of the Emmett Till Unsolved Civil 
Rights Crime Act of 2007 (Public Law 110-344) to investigate 
and prosecute previously unresolved civil rights era ``cold 
case'' murders suspected of having been racially motivated, 
through a partnership among the Civil Rights Division [CRT], 
the FBI, and the Community Relations Service [CRS], as well as 
with State and local grant resources. To continue supporting 
Emmett Till activities, the Committee urges the Department to 
use such sums as may be necessary from within the budget base 
for the CRT's Cold Case Initiative; for the FBI to pursue 
Emmett Till Act cold cases; and for the CRS to partner with law 
enforcement agencies and communities to help resolve conflicts 
resulting from the investigation of unsolved civil rights era 
cases. Additionally, the Committee directs the National 
Institute of Justice, the Bureau of Justice Assistance, and the 
Office for Victims of Crime to continue providing grants for 
cold case DNA investigations to aid State and local law 
enforcement agencies in their investigation and prosecution of 
unsolved civil rights cold cases.
    Eliminating Duplication and Improving Efficiencies in DOJ 
Grants.--The Committee continues to believe that, given current 
budgetary constraints, it is prudent to ensure that 
governmental resources, including those awarded through grants 
and subgrants, are appropriately targeted and that duplication 
is eliminated.
    Within 90 days of enactment of this act, the Committee 
directs the Department to submit a report on the progress made 
on the assessment of grant duplication required by Public Law 
113-76 along with any changes to law needed to ensure 
efficiency in grant funding.
    Working Capital Fund [WCF].--The Committee expects the 
Department to execute the funding to the fullest extent 
possible without any carryover balances. The Committee directs 
the DOJ to continue to use the WCF only as a repository for 
reimbursable funds from components and to obligate and execute 
that funding expeditiously. The DOJ shall provide a report to 
the Committee within 30 days after enactment of this act 
regarding balances in the WCF including carryover funds, the 
intended uses of those funds, and a spending plan. The spending 
plan shall include collections and obligations for both 
reimbursable and appropriated funding. The Department is 
further directed to provide quarterly updates on the WCF to the 
Committee.
    Spending Plan.--In compliance with section 534 of this act, 
the Committee directs the Department of Justice to submit a 
spending plan, signed by the Attorney General, within 45 days 
of enactment of this act.

                         General Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $110,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     128,851,000
Committee recommendation................................     115,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $115,000,000 for 
General Administration salaries and expenses. The 
recommendation is $5,000,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and $13,851,000 below the budget request.
    The General Administration account provides funding for 
senior policy officials responsible for Departmental management 
and policy development. The specific offices funded by this 
account include the following: the immediate Office of the 
Attorney General; the immediate Office of the Deputy Attorney 
General; the immediate Office of the Associate Attorney 
General; Office of Legal Policy; Office of Public Affairs; 
Office of Legislative Affairs; Office of Professional 
Responsibility; Office of Intergovernmental and Public Liaison; 
and the Justice Management Division.
    Coordination on Tribal Land and the Office of Tribal 
Justice.--The Committee encourages the Department of Justice 
and the Bureau of Indian Affairs [BIA] to improve coordination 
to provide critical law enforcement resources to tribes. Both 
agencies support investigators, tribal courts, and detentions 
centers, which all play an important role in comprehensive law 
enforcement in Indian Country, including providing adequate 
assistance for the operation and maintenance of detention 
centers. The Committee strongly encourages the Department to 
renew its focus on working with the BIA to ensure that tribes 
are receiving sufficient resources to operate detention 
centers.
    Wildlife Trafficking.--The Committee notes the recent 
increase of illegal trade in rhinoceros horns, elephant ivory, 
and illegally harvested timber, along with the large sums of 
money that these products command on the black market. The 
linkages between illegal wildlife and natural resources 
trafficking and other transnational organized crimes (including 
trafficking in narcotics, arms and humans) is indisputable. The 
illegal harvesting of elephant ivory and other high-value 
wildlife products used to finance armed insurgencies and other 
groups threatens the stability and development of African 
countries and poses a threat to U.S. security interests. The 
Committee is pleased with the Department's membership on the 
Presidential Task Force on Wildlife Trafficking that was 
established by Executive Order on July 1, 2013. The Committee 
directs the Attorney General to submit a status update report, 
not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this 
act, outlining the specific steps being taken by the Department 
to further address wildlife trafficking and the illegal natural 
resources trade; the engagement of the Department with the 
Presidential Task Force on Wildlife Trafficking, including 
steps to build prosecutorial and legal structures to help 
address wildlife trafficking in other countries; the efforts to 
implement the National Strategy on Wildlife Trafficking; and 
the resources that have been aligned with activities and 
initiatives to this end.

                 JUSTICE INFORMATION SHARING TECHNOLOGY

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $25,842,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      25,842,000
Committee recommendation................................      25,842,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $25,842,000 for 
Justice Information Sharing Technology [JIST]. The 
recommendation is equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted level 
and the budget request.
    The Committee's recommendation includes the requested 
transfer of up to $35,400,000 from agency components to augment 
JIST base resources to advance initiatives to transform DOJ-
wide information technology [IT] enterprise infrastructure and 
cybersecurity, and to create a reinvestment pool to provide 
funding for smart IT investments.
    Cybersecurity.--The Committee's recommendation fully funds 
JIST's budget request for cybersecurity of $4,422,000 so DOJ 
may continue to proactively defend against and respond to 
current and emerging cybersecurity threats and attacks against 
DOJ's network infrastructure. The Committee supports the 
Department's efforts to better protect its networks and other 
IT assets, and expects that these resources will allow DOJ to 
maintain successful cybersecurity implementation as documented 
by its Federal Information Security Management Agency [FISMA] 
report card. DOJ and other Federal agencies should lead by 
example on cybersecurity and have an obligation to secure their 
dot-gov networks.

                   ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW AND APPEALS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $315,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     351,072,000
Committee recommendation................................     351,072,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $351,072,000 for 
Administrative Review and Appeals, of which $4,000,000 is a 
transfer from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services 
[USCIS] Immigration Examiners Fee Account. The recommendation 
is $36,072,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
equal to the budget request.
    This account fully funds the Executive Office for 
Immigration Review [EOIR], including the Board of Immigration 
Appeals [BIA], immigration judges, and administrative law 
judges who decide through administrative hearings whether to 
admit or exclude aliens seeking to enter the country, and 
whether to deport or adjust the status of aliens whose status 
has been challenged. This account also fully funds the Office 
of the Pardon Attorney, which receives, investigates, and 
considers petitions for all forms of executive clemency.
    EOIR represents the Department's frontline presence with 
respect to the application of immigration law. EOIR receives 
cases directly from Department of Homeland Security [DHS] 
enforcement personnel, in which the Federal Government is 
seeking the removal of immigrants who are in the United States 
without lawful status or who have committed some act, typically 
a criminal offense, that renders them removable. EOIR's 
immigration court caseload continues to increase as a result of 
heightened border enforcement efforts. The annual caseload 
increased by over 60 percent between fiscal year 2009 and the 
end of the second quarter of fiscal year 2014, to more than 
360,000 new matters for adjudication. Additionally, the BIA 
receives more than 30,000 appeals per year, an extremely large 
volume for an appellate court. Court dockets are scheduled 
unacceptably far into the future, with most courts backlogged 
at least a year.
    Given these increasing caseload demands, the Committee's 
recommendation includes the requested programmatic increase of 
$17,000,000 to add 35 new Immigration Judge [IJ] Teams, for a 
total of 284 IJ teams. This will allow EOIR to better 
coordinate with DHS enforcement efforts and to help adjudicate 
up to 39,000 more cases annually.
    Legal Orientation Program [LOP].--The Committee's 
recommendation includes $10,024,000, an increase of $2,824,000 
above fiscal year 2014, and equal to the budget request, to 
cover the expansion of LOP. The Committee supports LOP, which 
informs detained non-citizens about their legal rights and 
responsibilities in immigration court. The Committee 
understands that approximately 80 percent of immigration 
detainees must act pro se in immigration court, and these 
individuals greatly benefit from accurate information about 
their legal claims and removal proceedings. The Committee 
emphasizes that LOP also benefits taxpayers by increasing the 
efficiency of immigration proceedings and reducing costs 
related to immigration detention.
    Recognizing that LOP served detained individuals in a 
limited number of States last year, the Committee directs that 
attention be paid to geographic equity as LOP expands the reach 
of its services to additional detention centers. The Committee 
notes the particular need for legal services at more remote 
immigration detention sites that are far from legal service 
providers in urban centers.
    The Committee's recommendation includes $2,000,000, as 
requested in the budget base for LOP, pursuant to the 
Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008 
(Public Law 110-457), for custodians of unaccompanied, 
undocumented children to address the custodian's responsibility 
for the child's appearance at all immigration proceedings, and 
to protect the child from mistreatment, exploitation, and 
trafficking.
    Pilot-Innovation Ideas.--The Committee provides the 
requested $5,824,000 to fund the ``Pilot-Innovation Ideas'' to 
improve the level and quality of legal representation for 
unaccompanied minor children. The Committee directs EOIR to 
work with the Department of Health and Human Services' Office 
of Refugee Resettlement [ORR] as well as the Department of 
Homeland Security to ensure that the services provided by each 
agency are complimentary, rather than duplicative, so that 
cases can be adjudicated more efficiently. The Committee 
directs EOIR to submit a report on the status of the pilot 
program to include a detailed breakout of spending within 45 
days of enactment of this act. In addition, the Committee 
directs EOIR, in consultation with ORR, to submit a plan 
detailing the responsibilities of each agency, along with 
recommended funding, to ensure the representation of these 
children along with the fiscal year 2016 budget.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $86,400,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      88,577,000
Committee recommendation................................      88,577,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $88,577,000 for the 
Office of Inspector General [OIG]. The recommendation is 
$2,177,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and equal 
to the budget request.
    This account finances the activities of the OIG, including 
audits, inspections, investigations, and other reviews of 
programs and operations of the Department of Justice to promote 
efficiency and effectiveness, and to prevent and detect fraud, 
waste, and abuse, as well as violations of ethical standards 
arising from the conduct of Department employees in their 
numerous and diverse activities.
    Right to Access.--The Committee has included bill language 
providing the Inspector General access to documents and other 
materials at the Department of Justice which may be necessary 
in the normal conduct of the Inspector General's duties. The 
Committee asks the Inspector General to report on the 
effectiveness of this provision within 180 days of enactment.

                    United States Parole Commission


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $12,600,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      13,308,000
Committee recommendation................................      13,308,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $13,308,000 for the 
United States Parole Commission. The recommendation is $708,000 
above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and equal to the 
budget request.

                            Legal Activities


            SALARIES AND EXPENSES, GENERAL LEGAL ACTIVITIES

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $867,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     935,854,000
Committee recommendation................................     915,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $915,000,000 for 
General Legal Activities salaries and expenses. The 
recommendation is $48,000,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and $20,854,000 below the budget request.
    This appropriation funds the establishment of litigation 
policy, conduct of litigation, and various other legal 
responsibilities, through the Office of the Solicitor General, 
the Tax Division, the Criminal Division [CRM], the Civil 
Division [CIV], the Environmental and Natural Resources 
Division, the Civil Rights Division [CRT], the Office of Legal 
Counsel, and INTERPOL Washington.
    INTERPOL Washington.--From within funds provided for 
General Legal Activities, the Committee directs the Department 
to provide $32,000,000 for INTERPOL Washington, equal to the 
budget request. The Committee has provided no-year authority in 
the amount of $685,000 to ensure sufficient resources are 
available for INTERPOL Washington's dues payments and help the 
Department better manage fluctuations in currency exchange 
rates. The mission of INTERPOL Washington is to provide the 
United States' Federal, State, local, and tribal law 
enforcement authorities a central point of communication to the 
international law enforcement community, and to serve as the 
official U.S. representative to the International Criminal 
Police Organization [INTERPOL]. INTERPOL Washington's command 
center [IOCC] operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days 
a year, responding to requests for international criminal 
investigative and humanitarian assistance from more than 18,000 
U.S. law enforcement agencies and their counterparts in 189 
other INTERPOL-member countries. In fiscal year 2013, the IOCC 
processed an average of 27,472 individual requests for 
assistance each month, or 903 requests per day. INTERPOL 
Washington's responsibility to respond to increasing foreign 
and domestic requests places additional operational demands on 
the resources of this organization.
    Cybersecurity.--The Committee's recommendation fully funds 
the requested programmatic increase of $2,580,000 and 25 
positions, including 9 attorneys, for a total of $31,637,000, 
to enable the CRM to combat the growing and evolving cyber 
threat. The Committee expects that these new positions will be 
devoted solely to cybersecurity and will allow the Department 
to bring additional prosecutions of cyber criminals.
    Intellectual Property Rights [IPR] Enforcement.--The 
Committee supports the Department's request of $2,200,000, and 
11 positions, to support the CRM in combating international 
theft of IP, which causes losses of hundreds of billions of 
dollars each year and reduces the incentive for innovation and 
creativity within the U.S. economy.
    Human Trafficking and Slavery.--The Committee's 
recommendation provides $6,500,000 for the Human Trafficking 
and Slavery Prosecution Unit [HTSPU] in the CRT to fight human 
trafficking and slavery. The Committee encourages the HTSPU and 
the Anti-Trafficking Coordination Teams to continue working 
with victim service providers and non-governmental 
organizations to ensure victim needs are prioritized as part of 
the overall strategy to combat human trafficking, forced labor, 
and slavery in the United States.
    Civil Rights.--The Committee provides a total of 
$158,000,000 to the CRT to strengthen its efforts to enforce 
civil rights laws; expand its capacity to prosecute and provide 
litigation support for human trafficking, hate crimes, and 
unsolved civil rights era crimes; carry out its 
responsibilities associated with the civil rights of 
institutionalized persons and the access rights of the 
disabled; investigate and prosecute police misconduct; and 
enhance the enforcement of fair housing and fair lending laws.
    Civil Rights Violations in State and Local Prisons and 
Jails.--The Committee continues to be concerned by reports of 
civil rights violations in State and local prisons and jails, 
and directs the CRT to increase efforts to investigate and 
address violations of the Civil Rights of Institutionalized 
Persons Act in State and local prisons and jails. The Committee 
directs the CRT to use such sums as necessary from amounts 
appropriated in fiscal year 2015 to address such issues in 
State and local prisons and jails.
    Human Rights Crimes.--The Committee remains concerned by 
the large number of suspected human rights violators from 
foreign countries who have found safe haven in the United 
States and directs the CRM to continue its efforts to 
investigate and prosecute serious human rights crimes, 
including genocide, torture, use or recruitment of child 
soldiers, and war crimes. For this purpose, the Committee's 
recommendation supports continued funding for the CRM to 
investigate and prosecute individuals who violate Federal laws 
regarding serious human rights abuses.

               THE NATIONAL CHILDHOOD VACCINE INJURY ACT

Appropriations, 2014....................................      $7,833,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................       7,833,000
Committee recommendation................................       7,833,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides a reimbursement of 
$7,833,000 for legal costs. The recommendation is equal to the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and the budget request.
    This account covers the Department's expenses associated 
with litigating cases under the National Childhood Vaccine 
Injury Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-660).

               SALARIES AND EXPENSES, ANTITRUST DIVISION

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $160,400,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     162,246,000
Committee recommendation................................     162,246,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $162,246,000 for 
the Antitrust Division. The recommendation is $1,846,000 above 
the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and equal to the budget 
request. This appropriation is offset by $100,000,000 in pre-
merger filing fee collections, resulting in a direct 
appropriation of $62,246,000.

                        UNITED STATES ATTORNEYS

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $1,944,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   1,955,327,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,950,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $1,950,000,000 for 
the Executive Office for United States Attorneys [EOUSA] and 
the 94 U.S. Attorneys' [USAs] offices. The recommendation is 
$6,000,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$5,327,000 below the budget request.
    As in past years, the Committee directs the USAs to focus 
their efforts on those crimes where the unique resources, 
expertise, or jurisdiction of the Federal Government can be 
most effective.
    Adam Walsh Act Implementation.--The Committee expects the 
EOUSA to continue to focus on investigations and prosecutions 
related to the sexual exploitation of children, as authorized 
by the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 
(Public Law 109-248), and as part of Project Safe Childhood. 
The recommendation fully funds the budget request of 
$43,998,000 for this purpose in fiscal year 2015.
    Combating Financial and Mortgage Fraud.--The Committee's 
recommendation fully funds the request of $55,708,000, to hold 
accountable criminals who perpetrate financial and mortgage 
fraud, deter future perpetrators of fraud, and recover monies 
stolen from U.S. taxpayers. The USAs will conduct criminal 
investigations and prosecutions of mortgage and financial 
fraud, predatory lending, financial fraud, and market 
manipulation matters. The USAs will also increase civil 
enforcement efforts to continue to obtain recoveries from 
individuals and companies that have defrauded the Government by 
violating the terms of Federal contracts, grants, loans, and 
subsidies.
    Human Trafficking.--The Committee directs the EOUSA, in 
consultation with the USAs, to designate a point of contact in 
each U.S. Attorney's office who shall serve as the coordinator 
for all activities within that office concerning human 
trafficking and slavery matters covered by the Trafficking 
Victims Protection Act. Designating a point of contact improves 
communication and coordination within each jurisdiction, 
including with victim service organizations, in order to better 
serve the victims of human trafficking, forced labor, and 
slavery.
    Intellectual Property Rights [IPR] Enforcement.--The 
Committee expects the Department to continue to make IPR 
enforcement an investigative and prosecutorial priority for 
Federal prosecutors.
    National Advocacy Center.--The Committee is aware of the 
excellent training for U.S. Attorneys, Assistant U.S. 
Attorneys, and other legal professionals which has been 
provided for two decades at the National Advocacy Center. The 
Committee expects the Department to maintain the integrity of 
the original agreement in light of unavoidable delays impeding 
the Federal Government's ability to take possession of the 
facility.

                   UNITED STATES TRUSTEE SYSTEM FUND

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $224,400,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     225,908,000
Committee recommendation................................     225,908,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $225,908,000 for 
the U.S. Trustee System Fund. The recommendation is $1,508,000 
above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and equal to the 
budget request. The appropriation is fully offset by fee 
collections.
    The U.S. Trustee Program, authorized by 28 U.S.C. 581 et 
seq., is the component of the Department with responsibility 
for protecting the integrity of the bankruptcy system by 
overseeing case administration and litigation to enforce the 
bankruptcy laws. In fiscal year 2015, the U.S. Trustee Program 
will participate in an estimated 1.4 million business and 
consumer bankruptcy case filings.

      SALARIES AND EXPENSES, FOREIGN CLAIMS SETTLEMENT COMMISSION

Appropriations, 2014....................................      $2,100,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................       2,326,000
Committee recommendation................................       2,326,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $2,326,000 for the 
Foreign Claims Settlement Commission. The recommendation is 
$226,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and equal to 
the budget request.
    The Foreign Claims Settlement Commission settles claims of 
American citizens arising from nationalization, expropriation, 
or other takings of their properties and interests by foreign 
governments.

                     FEES AND EXPENSES OF WITNESSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $270,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     270,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     270,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $270,000,000 for 
fees and expenses of witnesses. The recommendation is equal to 
the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and the budget request.
    This appropriation, which is considered mandatory for 
scorekeeping purposes, provides for fees and expenses of 
witnesses who appear on behalf of the Government in cases in 
which the United States is a party, including fact and expert 
witnesses. These funds are also used for mental competency 
examinations, as well as witness and informant protection.
    The Committee expects that no funds will be expended for 
expert witness services, including the payment of fees and 
expenses of expert witnesses, from any DOJ accounts but Fees 
and Expenses of Witnesses.

           SALARIES AND EXPENSES, COMMUNITY RELATIONS SERVICE

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $12,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      12,972,000
Committee recommendation................................      12,972,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $12,972,000 for the 
Community Relations Service [CRS]. The recommendation is 
$972,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and equal to 
the budget request.
    The Community Relations Service, established by title X of 
the Civil Rights Act of 1964, provides assistance to 
communities and persons in the prevention and resolution of 
disagreements arising from discriminatory practices.
    Hate Crimes Prevention.--Within the funds provided, the 
Committee provides $2,500,000 to handle an increase in workload 
and responsibilities stemming from passage of the Matthew 
Shepard and James Byrd, Jr., Hate Crimes Prevention Act [HCPA] 
(Public Law 111-84). The HCPA has expanded the CRS's mandate, 
requiring that it help communities prevent and respond to 
violent hate crimes committed on the basis of gender, gender 
identity, sexual orientation, religion, and disability, in 
addition to race, color, and national origin. These 
enhancements will maximize the CRS crisis response nationwide 
and enable it to fulfill both its original mandate and expanded 
mandate under the HCPA.

                         ASSETS FORFEITURE FUND

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $20,500,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      20,514,000
Committee recommendation................................      20,514,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $20,514,000 for the 
Assets Forfeiture Fund [AFF]. The recommendation is $14,000 
above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and equal to the 
budget request.
    The AFF provides funds for qualifying expenses of Federal 
law enforcement agencies and their State or local partners. 
Funds for these activities are provided from receipts deposited 
in the AFF resulting from the seizure and liquidation of 
assets. Expenses related to the management and disposal of 
assets are also provided from the AFF by a permanent, 
indefinite appropriation.

                     United States Marshals Service

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $2,727,800,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   2,790,107,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,790,107,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides a total of 
$2,790,107,000 for the United States Marshals Service [USMS]. 
The recommendation is $62,307,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and equal to the budget request.

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $1,185,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   1,185,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,185,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $1,185,000,000 for 
USMS salaries and expenses. The recommendation is equal to the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and the budget request.
    The core missions of the USMS include the apprehension of 
fugitives; protection of the Federal judiciary and witnesses; 
execution of warrants and court orders; and the custody and 
transportation of unsentenced prisoners.
    Regional Fugitive Task Forces.--The Committee strongly 
supports the USMS's Regional Fugitive Task Forces [RFTFs], 
which are effective partnerships with other Federal, State and 
local law enforcement agencies to apprehend violent fugitives. 
These task forces exemplify well-coordinated law enforcement 
efforts. The Committee directs the USMS to ensure that existing 
RFTFs have the resources and work space necessary to maintain 
their continued success at capturing fugitives. The Committee 
directs the USMS to provide a report detailing the space 
arrangements currently available for each of the RFTFs and any 
plans for acquiring new or additional space no later than 30 
days after the date of enactment of this act.
    Tactical Training Space.--The Committee is concerned that 
the USMS has interpreted the Office of Management and Budget 
Memorandum [OMB] M-1212, Section 3 ``Freeze the Footprint'' 
policy to include tactical training space thereby prohibiting 
the acquisition of such space by RFTFs. However, the guidance 
specifically states that agencies ``shall not increase the 
total square footage of their domestic office and warehouse 
inventory . . .'' and defines office space as ``buildings 
primarily used for office space or military headquarters.'' The 
Committee believes that tactical training space does not meet 
the definition of ``office space'' included in the memorandum. 
Tactical training space, including live fire simunitions shoot 
houses, allows Federal law enforcement as well as their State 
and local partners to train together as cohesive units under 
realistic conditions through scenario-based training. The RFTFs 
have developed an intensive, specialized, and comprehensive 
training curriculum for all task force participants ensuring 
personnel are trained to the same standards. The Committee 
directs the USMS to ensure that its application of OMBs 
``Freeze the Footprint'' policy is consistent with the 
definitions included therein and does not incorporate tactical 
training space. The USMS is directed to report to Congress on 
its progress in and plans for obtaining tactical training space 
for RFTFs not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of 
this act.
    Gang Enforcement.--With some 20,000 violent street gangs, 
motorcycle gangs, and prison gangs with nearly one million 
members criminally active in the United States today, the 
Committee recognizes the urgent need to reduce the 
proliferation of gang members and gang crime. One of the key 
strengths of the USMS RFTF model is the ability to conduct 
short-term, street level enforcement operations. This expertise 
enhances the Marshals Service's Federal, State, and local law 
enforcement partners' ability to track down, root out, and 
prosecute the most dangerous violent gang members, thereby 
removing gangs and the tools of their trade--illicit weapons, 
drugs, and laundered money--from communities plagued by 
violence.
    Within the amount provided in the budget request, the USMS 
shall dedicate no less than $5,000,000 to operate anti-gang 
investigative units within the RFTFs, including supporting the 
supervisory, operational, equipment, and training needs of 
these units, in order to target gangs of national significance. 
These units will increase law enforcement's ability to 
identify, locate, and arrest violent gang fugitives, as well as 
increase USMS gang training and increase innovative anti-gang 
and violent crime reduction operations. If necessary, the 
Committee urges the Department to submit a reprogramming 
request in 2015 that would reallocate funds from lower priority 
programs across the Department or from unobligated no-year 
balances to enable the USMS to expand its gang enforcement 
mission.
    Sex Offender Apprehension.--The Adam Walsh Child Protection 
and Safety Act of 2006 [AWA] (Public Law 109-248) gives the 
USMS the authority to treat convicted sex offenders who fail to 
register as fugitives. The act also directs the USMS to assist 
jurisdictions in locating and apprehending these individuals. 
In 2013, the USMS tracked down and arrested more than 11,800 
fugitive sex offenders and opened 3,607 Adam Walsh Act 
investigations.
    The USMS currently has on board 160 Deputy Marshals to 
assist States in locating and apprehending sex offenders who 
violate sex offender registration requirements. However, the 
USMS estimates it needs a dedicated force of at least 500 
Deputy Marshals to expand AWA enforcement activities in 
districts across the country. The Committee's recommendation 
provides not less than $55,733,000 to continue AWA enforcement.
    The funds provided will also continue support for the 
National Sex Offender Targeting Center and reinforce 
infrastructure including costs associated with the use of 
administrative subpoenas so that Deputy Marshals have timely, 
accurate investigative information to track down and arrest 
those who prey on our Nation's children.

                              CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2014....................................      $9,800,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................       9,800,000
Committee recommendation................................       9,800,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $9,800,000 for 
construction in space controlled, occupied, or utilized by the 
USMS in Federal courthouses and buildings, including but not 
limited to the creation, renovation, and expansion of prisoner 
movement areas, elevators, and other law enforcement and court 
security support space. The recommendation is equal to the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and the budget request.
    The Committee notes that the budget request will result in 
funding for this account dropping roughly 63 percent in a span 
of 5 years, from $26,625,000 in fiscal year 2010 to $9,800,000 
provided in the recommendation. The USMS has approximately 
$47,000,000 in shovel-ready construction and/or renovation 
projects pending at Federal courthouses and buildings. These 
upgrades are essential for maintaining the security and safety 
of judicial officials, courtroom participants, the public, USMS 
personnel, and prisoners. The Committee expects future budget 
submissions to more realistically reflect construction needs.

                       FEDERAL PRISONER DETENTION

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $1,533,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   1,595,307,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,595,307,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $1,595,307,000 for 
Federal Prisoner Detention [FPD]. The recommendation is 
$62,307,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and equal 
to the budget request.
    The Committee expects the USMS to anticipate the true 
funding needs for this account in order to avoid funding 
shortfalls and the need for emergency reprogrammings to avert 
deficiencies. The Committee directs the USMS to report to the 
Committee on a quarterly basis the current number of 
individuals in the detention system, the projected number of 
individuals, and the annualized costs associated with them.

                       National Security Division


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $91,800,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      91,800,000
Committee recommendation................................      91,800,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $91,800,000 for the 
National Security Division [NSD]. The recommendation is equal 
to the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and the budget request.
    The NSD coordinates the Department's national security and 
counterterrorism missions through law enforcement 
investigations and prosecutions, and handles counterespionage 
cases. The NSD works in coordination with the FBI, the 
Intelligence Community, and the U.S. Attorneys. Its primary 
function is to prevent acts of terrorism and espionage from 
being perpetrated in the United States by foreign powers.
    Combating Cyber Threats to National Security.--The 
Committee's recommendation funds the full request of 
$29,675,000 for cybersecurity activities within the NSD for 
investigative, prosecutorial, intelligence collection, and 
oversight abilities that support the Intelligence Community in 
identifying and disrupting cyber threats to national security. 
This amount is the same as the fiscal year 2014 enacted level.

                      Interagency Law Enforcement


                 INTERAGENCY CRIME AND DRUG ENFORCEMENT

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $514,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     505,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     505,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $505,000,000 for 
Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement. The recommendation is 
$9,000,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and equal 
to the budget request.
    The Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement account funds 
the Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Forces [OCDETF], 
which is the centerpiece of the Department's drug enforcement 
and counternarcotics efforts. The mission of the OCDETF is to 
ensure a coordinated, multi-agency, intelligence-based, and 
prosecutor-led approach to identifying, disrupting, and 
dismantling those drug trafficking and money laundering 
organizations primarily responsible for the Nation's illicit 
drug supply and drug-related violence.
    Law Enforcement Coordination.--The Committee notes the 
important role that the OCDETF provides by allowing Federal law 
enforcement agencies to work together to combat drug 
trafficking and money laundering. The Committee requests the 
Department provide non-sensitive law enforcement information 
regarding how, under the OCDETF program, law enforcement 
agencies prioritize and coordinate information and activities 
across the country to combat drug trafficking, especially in 
areas of the United States that have a disproportionately high 
level of drug trafficking not later than 90 days after 
enactment of this act.

                    Federal Bureau of Investigation


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $8,245,802,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   8,278,219,000
Committee recommendation................................   8,291,233,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $8,291,233,000 for 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation [FBI] salaries and 
expenses. The recommendation is $45,431,000 above the fiscal 
year 2014 enacted level and $13,014,000 above the budget 
request.
    Next Generation Cyber Initiative.--Cyber threats expand and 
evolve each year with cyber criminals using whatever 
vulnerabilities they can find, from sandwich menus and heating 
and cooling systems to relentless, nation-state sponsored 
assaults to compromise U.S. Government and private sector 
computer networks. Whether the criminals behind the keyboard 
are seeking profit, intelligence, or intellectual property, the 
FBI is in a unique position to counter the threat. The FBI 
remains the only agency with the statutory authority, 
expertise, and ability to combine counterterrorism, 
counterintelligence, and criminal investigatory resources to 
neutralize, mitigate, and disrupt illegal computer-supported 
operations domestically.
    The Committee recognizes the FBI's efforts to counter cyber 
threats and recommends continued funding at the fiscal year 
2014 enacted level, to further the FBI's investigatory, 
intelligence gathering, and technological capabilities. These 
funds will support efforts by the Comprehensive National 
Cybersecurity Initiative [CNCI] to increase coverage of cyber-
terrorist threats and allow the FBI's National Cyber 
Investigative Joint Task Force [NCIJTF] to continue 24/7 
operations. The NCIJTF plays an important role in coordinated 
national cybersecurity operations. Because threat actors 
operate globally, a significant volume of cyber threat activity 
occurs outside of normal business hours. The increasing need 
for real-time analysis to support operations and provide 
program management for multi-agency efforts requires the NCIJTF 
to boost its after-hours presence.
    Cyber Training for Field Agents.--The Committee expects the 
FBI to continue using, from within funds provided, $5,000,000 
to train FBI cyber agents involved in national security 
intrusion cases. This will allow the FBI to continue building 
its cyber threats workforce by increasing the number of cyber 
agents qualified to understand current techniques and tactics 
used by those engaged in illicit cyber activities, and stay 
abreast of emerging technologies that are used to overcome 
computer systems' defenses and to infiltrate networks, such as 
those of the U.S. Government, utility companies, defense 
contractors, and financial institutions.
    National Instant Criminal Background Check System [NICS].--
The Committee's recommendation fully funds the programmatic 
increase of $13,424,000 for a total of $141,864,000, to 
maintain the substantial improvements to NICS in fiscal year 
2014 that increased the capacity of the existing NICS system to 
perform background checks on prospective firearms buyers.
    National Gang Threat Assessment.--The Committee finds the 
information provided in the National Gang Intelligence Center's 
[NGIC] National Gang Threat Assessment useful and urges the 
NGIC to issue its biannual report not later than the end of the 
calendar year in which it is due. Additionally, in order to 
better inform policy makers, the Committee encourages the NGIC 
to work with State, local, and Federal law enforcement to 
include as much detailed information about the location of 
gangs and gang members by State and region as is possible.
    Financial and Mortgage Fraud.--The FBI continues to develop 
new approaches and techniques for detecting, investigating, and 
combating the highest impact and most complex financial 
crimes--corporate fraud, securities and commodities fraud, and 
mortgage fraud. The Committee's recommendation includes the 
request of $147,103,000 to support the FBI's ability to combat 
financial and mortgage fraud at all levels of organizations, 
and will enable the FBI to adapt as new fraud schemes emerge.
    The FBI identifies mortgage fraud as the top white collar 
crime problem in the United States. The Bureau is currently 
investigating nearly 1,600 mortgage fraud cases, compared to 
approximately 700 investigations in fiscal year 2005. Roughly 
70 percent of the FBI's pending investigations involve losses 
exceeding $1,000,000 per case. Efforts to combat mortgage fraud 
are paying off and, in 2013, the FBI successfully pursued cases 
that resulted in nearly 1,300 convictions.
    Intellectual Property Rights [IPR] Enforcement.--The 
Committee expects IPR enforcement to remain an investigative 
priority at the FBI. A 2012 report by the U.S. Department of 
Commerce found that IP-intensive industries, including 
copyright industries, contributed $5,060,000,000,000, or 34.8 
percent of GDP, to the U.S. economy and supported the jobs of 
40 million American workers. The FBI shall, as part of the 
spend plan, provide specific information regarding the number 
of dedicated agents investigating IPR cases. In addition, the 
FBI shall provide quarterly updates to the Committee detailing 
the activities of its dedicated agents investigating IPR cases.
    Criminal Justice Information Services [CJIS] Division.--The 
Committee's recommendation provides $765,055,511, including fee 
collections, for the CJIS Division, derived from $347,031,257 
in appropriated funds and $418,024,254 in anticipated user 
fees.
    FBI Headquarters Consolidation.--The Committee directs the 
FBI to coordinate closely with the General Services 
Administration [GSA] to move forward in a timely and 
transparent way with the full consolidation of FBI Headquarters 
so that employees currently located at the J. Edgar Hoover 
building may be co-located with their colleagues who are 
currently spread out across 20 leased offices in the region. 
The Committee strongly encourages the FBI and GSA to pursue a 
strategy for a new FBI Headquarters using federally owned or 
donated land within a reasonable distance of the White House, 
the United States Capitol, and the FBI Complex in Quantico, 
Virginia, that is also within 2 miles of a Metrorail station 
and 2.5 miles of the National Capital Region Beltway. This 
consolidation is in the best interest of the FBI's information 
sharing, collaboration, and integration of strategic 
priorities. The FBI must have a central headquarters that meets 
its needs for security and transportation access.
    TEDAC.--The Committee recommendation includes $25,000,000 
for the Terrorist Explosive Device Analytical Center for 
additional FBI staff required to complete the activation of new 
facilities. This funding will strengthen the role of TEDAC as 
the U.S. Government's strategic-level improvised explosive 
device exploitation center and provide the resources necessary 
to staff the new facility as it comes online. The Committee 
views TEDAC as a key U.S. Government interagency resource in 
combating the global threat posed by terrorist use of 
explosives and in sharing IED threat information and 
intelligence. The Committee is especially encouraged by the 
joint initiative of the FBI and the Department of Homeland 
Security to leverage resources and collaborate on explosives 
characterization and performance testing at the TEDAC 
facilities.
    Hazardous Devices School.--The Committee is aware that 
limitations on student capacity at the Hazardous Devices School 
[HDS] are impacting the ability of the FBI to satisfy demands 
for both basic and advanced training, resulting in a waiting 
list for classes. HDS is the sole U.S. Government entity for 
accrediting and certifying U.S. public safety bomb squads and 
bomb technicians. Ensuring sufficient training capacity at HDS 
is critical to providing State and local public safety bomb 
technicians with the basic and advanced knowledge, tools, and 
techniques needed as the first line of defense in responding to 
threats posed by terrorist use of improvised explosive devices. 
The Committee recommendation includes $3,000,000 for the HDS 
within the Salaries and Expenses account for additional 
training staff to provide expanded course offerings.
    Human Rights Violations.--The Committee remains concerned 
by the large number of suspected human rights violators from 
foreign countries who have found safe haven in the United 
States, and directs the FBI to continue its efforts to 
investigate and support the DOJ's criminal prosecution of 
serious human rights crimes committed by these foreign 
nationals, including genocide, torture, use or recruitment of 
child soldiers, and war crimes. The Committee's recommendation 
supports funding at the fiscal year 2014 enacted level for this 
effort.
    Sexual Exploitation and Sex Trafficking of Minors Through 
Online Web Sites.--The Committee is concerned by the use of 
online classified advertising Web sites that facilitate human 
trafficking, and in particular the sexual exploitation and sex 
trafficking of minors, by expanding an illegal market 
previously inaccessible to most people. Criminal gangs are 
increasingly finding human trafficking to be more lucrative 
than other traditional forms of revenue generation. The 
Committee directs the FBI to report within 120 days of 
enactment of this act on any instance where an online 
classified adult Web site is determined to be the conduit for 
exploiting trafficked persons, especially minors. The report 
should include the number of incidents; the location of the 
incidents, including the city and State; and, with the help of 
the Department and the Executive Office for United States 
Attorneys, the number of resulting prosecutions and 
convictions.
    Innocent Images National Initiative [IINI].--The 
Committee's recommendation provides the $58,021,000 requested 
in base funding for the Innocent Images National Initiative, 
which allows the FBI to target and investigate sexual predators 
on the Internet. This funding will address the critical 
requirements for Federal law enforcement in targeting child 
sexual exploitation and child victimization. The Committee 
trusts that the budget request is sufficient to cover the 
current Innocent Images caseload. Should the threat of child 
predators on the Internet increase, however, the Committee 
expects that future budget requests for the FBI will include 
adequate resources dedicated to investigate child predators who 
prey on children online.

                              CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $97,482,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      68,982,000
Committee recommendation................................      93,982,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $93,982,000 for FBI 
construction. The recommendation is $3,500,000 below the fiscal 
year 2014 funding level and $25,000,000 above the budget 
request. Of the amount provided, $2,000,000 is for the annual 
operations and maintenance for Terrorist Explosive Device 
Analytical Center operations facilities, transfer, build-out, 
and related costs, and $23,000,000 is provided for construction 
of additional classrooms, mock training venues, and facilities 
upgrades of the existing Hazardous Devices School facility.

                    Drug Enforcement Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $2,378,917,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   2,384,680,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,384,680,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides total resources of 
$2,384,680,000 for the Drug Enforcement Administration [DEA], 
of which $366,680,000 is derived from the DEA's Drug Diversion 
Control Fee Account. The recommendation is $5,763,000 above the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and equal to the budget request.
    The DEA's mission is to enforce the controlled substances 
laws and regulations of the United States and bring to the 
criminal and civil justice system of the United States--or any 
other competent jurisdiction--those organizations and principal 
members of organizations involved in the growing, 
manufacturing, or distribution of controlled substances 
appearing in or destined for illicit traffic in the United 
States; and to support non-enforcement programs aimed at 
reducing the availability of illicit controlled substances on 
the domestic and international markets.
    Diversion Control Program.--Full funding of $366,680,000 is 
provided for the Diversion Control Program, which is an 
increase of $5,763,000 from the fiscal year 2014 enacted level 
for expanded forensic support of diversion cases and is fully 
offset with fee collections.
    Prescription Drug Abuse.--The Committee continues to 
believe that prescription drug abuse is an urgent public health 
crisis and reiterates its direction to the Department in Public 
Law 113-76 to provide a report on how the DEA is approaching 
this growing epidemic. This report was due to the Committee on 
May 14, 2014, but has not yet been delivered. The Committee 
directs the DEA to prioritize production of this report.
    Prescription Drug Take-Back Days.--The Department shall 
take steps to ensure that of the funds appropriated for the 
DEA's Diversion Control Fee Account, sufficient resources shall 
be allocated to increase the annual number of Prescription Drug 
Take-Back Days.
    International Mission.--The DEA currently assists the 
Government of Afghanistan in establishing drug enforcement 
institutions and capabilities needed to enforce the rule of 
law. The Committee encourages the DEA to continue its 
counternarcotics activities in Afghanistan including, to the 
extent practicable, continued funding for Sensitive 
Investigative Units, National Interdiction Units, and Technical 
Investigative Units. The Committee directs the DEA to submit an 
assessment of past effectiveness of its Sensitive Investigative 
Units and the costs and benefits of expanding the program in 
Central America and West Africa no later than 90 days after 
enactment of this act.
    Drug Take-Back Operations for Servicemembers and 
Veterans.--The Committee continues to be concerned about the 
alarming rate of suicide among servicemembers and veterans. In 
2012, the Department of Defense [DOD] reported 349 suicides of 
military personnel and the Department of Veterans Affairs [VA] 
estimated 22 veterans a day were lost to suicide based on 
information gathered from 21 States. A February 2014 report by 
the DOD Inspector General found that many servicemembers, 
including high-risk patients such as wounded warriors, do not 
have a reliable, safe, accessible, and accountable method to 
dispose of medications no longer needed for treatment. As a 
result, many may be at risk for overdose or misuse of unneeded 
medications that could result in unnecessary hospitalization 
and even death. The report recommended that the Attorney 
General expedite the decision to allow for DOD medical 
treatment facility pharmacies to conduct routine take-backs of 
unnecessary prescription medication.
    It is essential that DOD and VA facilities be allowed to 
fully participate in DEA's drug take-back efforts in order to 
combat the unique challenge posed by prescription drug misuse 
and abuse and the continuing crisis of military and veteran 
suicides. The Committee understands that the rule is currently 
undergoing review at the Office of Management and Budget, but 
expects that the DEA's final rule, once published, will provide 
the DOD and the VA with the means to establish meaningful drug 
take-back programs for their beneficiaries in order to reduce 
prescription drug misuse and abuse, and avoid tragic events.

          Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $1,179,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   1,201,004,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,201,004,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $1,201,004,000 for 
the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives [ATF]. 
The recommendation is $22,004,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and equal to the budget request.
    The ATF reduces the criminal use of firearms and illegal 
firearms trafficking, and assists other Federal, State, and 
local law enforcement agencies in reducing crime and violence. 
The ATF investigates bombing and arson incidents and assists 
with improving public safety by reducing the criminal misuse of 
and trafficking in explosives, combating acts of arson and 
arson-for-profit schemes, and removing safety hazards caused by 
improper and unsafe storage of explosive materials.
    Combating Gun Violence and Enforcing Gun Laws.--The 
Committee's recommendation provides the requested increase of 
$22,004,000 to enhance the ATF's ability to enforce existing 
firearms laws and perform regulatory oversight and training, as 
well as to update and expand the National Integrated Ballistics 
Information Network [NIBIN]. This will enhance the ATF's 
ability to collect, report, and share ballistic intelligence 
with Federal, State, local and tribal law enforcement partners 
to identify, target, and disrupt violent criminals, including 
serial shooters. These funds will support the replacement of 
outdated equipment and software upgrades that will enable 
firearms examiners to more easily discern distinct markings on 
the cartridge casings and link evidence for separate cases. 
Funds will also be used to support work with State and local 
law enforcement agencies and laboratories to collect ballistic 
hit information to provide leads to Firearms Intelligence 
Groups for investigations and document successful prosecutions 
as a result of NIBIN.
    National Integrated Ballistics Information Network 
Improvements.--The Committee is aware that the ATF has 
successfully operated NIBIN for over a decade, linking more 
than 185 State and local law enforcement partner agencies to a 
database with approximately 2.5 million images of ballistics 
evidence retrieved from gun crime scenes. To date, nearly 
123,000 shootings have been linked, providing crime solving 
leads to investigators. The Committee supports NIBIN, including 
the significant investment made by State and local law 
enforcement partners to build the current NIBIN database.
    Pursuant to direction from the Committee in Public Law 113-
76 instructing the Department to take the necessary steps to 
ensure ballistics information is entered into NIBIN when 
Federal law enforcement recovers evidence such as fired bullets 
and cartridge cases at a crime scene, the Committee directs the 
ATF to provide a report detailing its efforts in that regard 
not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this act.
    United States-Mexico Firearms Trafficking.--The Committee 
continues to support the ATF's efforts to combat weapon 
trafficking on the border. The ATF shall continue to provide 
the Committee with annual data on the total number of firearms 
recovered by the Government of Mexico, and of those, the number 
for which an ATF trace is attempted, the number successfully 
traced, and the number determined to have originated in the 
United States prior to being recovered in Mexico.
    National Center for Explosives Training and Research 
[NCETR].--Preventing the criminal use of explosives is one of 
the core missions of the ATF, and NCETR serves as the Bureau's 
Center of Excellence in this regard. A key goal of NCETR is to 
foster arson- and explosives-related training and expertise 
through research and training courses. While the ATF has 
increased the number of staff and course offerings at NCETR, 
more is needed. To that end, the Committee directs the ATF to 
provide $4,000,000, from within the additional resources 
provided, to NCETR to restart the advanced fire investigation 
training course and provide additional advanced explosives 
disposal techniques courses for public safety bomb technicians.

                         Federal Prison System

    The Committee's recommendation provides a total of 
$6,911,700,000 for the Federal Prison System, or the Bureau of 
Prisons [BOP]. The recommendation is $50,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $15,000,000 above the budget 
request.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $6,769,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   6,804,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   6,804,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $6,804,000,000 for 
BOP salaries and expenses. The recommendation is $35,000,000 
above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and equal to the 
budget request.
    The recommendation shall be expended, consistent with the 
budget request, in the following manner:

                          SALARIES AND EXPENSES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Inmate Care and Programs...............................        2,560,219
Institution Security and Administration................        2,986,408
Contract Confinement...................................        1,051,323
Management and Administration..........................          206,050
                                                        ----------------
      Total............................................        6,804,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    By law, the BOP must accept and provide for all Federal 
inmates, including but not limited to inmate care, custodial 
staff, contract beds, food, and medical costs. The BOP cannot 
control the number of inmates sentenced to prison and, unlike 
other Federal agencies, cannot limit assigned workloads and 
thereby control operating costs. In effect, the BOP's expenses 
are mandatory, which leaves the Bureau with extremely limited 
flexibility.
    Prison Overcrowding.--Prison overcrowding has been 
identified as a programmatic material weakness in every 
Performance and Accountability Report prepared by the 
Department since 2006. According to the Office of the Inspector 
General [OIG], the DOJ faces a significant challenge in 
``addressing the growing cost of housing a continually growing 
and aging population of Federal inmates and detainees.'' In 
order to address this challenge, the BOP has contracted with 
private sector, State, and local facilities to house certain 
groups of low security inmates, purchased existing facilities, 
and even constructed new, Federal facilities. None of these 
efforts, however, have had a significant impact on 
overcrowding.
    Overall prison overcrowding has been decreasing, at 38 
percent in fiscal year 2012, 36 percent in fiscal year 2013, 
and projected to be 33 percent in fiscal year 2014, due to a 
decrease in the overall institutional prison population, an 
increase in the number of beds, and greater use of contract bed 
space. However, medium-security facilities are 41 percent 
overcrowded, while high-security facilities are 51 percent 
overcrowded.
    While the trends in incarceration rates and overall 
overcrowding are encouraging, the fact remains that the 
Bureau's budget consumes 25 percent of the budget for the 
Department of Justice. Moreover, recent per capita expenditure 
data from the BOP indicate that it is becoming more expensive 
each year to incarcerate an inmate in the Federal system. In 
fact, from fiscal year 2000 to fiscal year 2013 the cost of 
incarceration rose from approximately $22,000 per inmate to 
more than $29,000 per inmate, an increase of 35.6 percent. 
These numbers suggest that the BOP could eventually consume an 
even greater share of the Department's overall budget and 
potentially lead to an increase in the overall crowding rate as 
resources become tighter.
    In order to address this challenge, the OIG made a number 
of recommendations in fiscal year 2014 regarding the use of 
existing programs. While the BOP has limited ability to address 
crowding in the Federal Prison System due to the requirement of 
housing inmates commensurate with their sentences, the programs 
identified by the OIG, as well as the use of contract 
confinement for low security inmates, are options currently 
available to the BOP. The Committee is aware of efforts at the 
BOP to establish a system for considering compassionate release 
applications and is pleased that this effort is underway. This 
is, however, only one step towards the development of a 
comprehensive plan to address the growth in the Federal prison 
population as directed last year. The Committee recognizes that 
there is a comprehensive assessment underway by the GAO that 
may be beneficial to the BOP in developing such a plan. 
However, the Committee expects the BOP to provide an update on 
its progress and any impediments or delays that may inhibit 
BOP's ability to deliver the plan within the required 180 day 
deadline. A comprehensive plan that includes the use of 
authorities vested in the BOP to address crowding issues as 
well as administrative efforts previously announced by the 
Attorney General, are essential to inform policymakers as they 
consider efforts to reduce overcrowding in our Federal prisons.
    Oleoresin Capsicum [OC] Aerosol Spray Pilot Program.--The 
Committee is concerned about the safety of correctional 
officers and other prison staff and wants to determine if OC 
spray would help enhance safety needs of the BOP's staff. The 
Committee directs the BOP to report no later than 90 days after 
enactment of this act on the status and results of the pilot 
program authorizing use of OC spray by some corrections 
officers in 20 BOP facilities. The report should include the 
BOP's full review of and recommendations regarding the OC 
program, along with any plans for expanding the program to 
allow the carrying of OC spray by other BOP employees and at 
other BOP facilities.
    Contract Confinement.--The Committee's recommendation fully 
funds the request of $1,051,323,000 for contract confinement 
needs. This activity provides for the confinement of sentenced 
Federal offenders in Government-owned, contractor-operated 
facilities, contracts with State and local facilities, the care 
of Federal prisoners in contract community residential centers, 
and assistance by the National Institute of Corrections to 
State and local corrections. This activity also covers costs 
associated with management and oversight of contract 
confinement functions.
    Activations and Expansions.--The Committee fully funds the 
request to activate prisons that currently sit empty or 
partially empty due to prior year budget constraints. These 
funds will continue the activation of a high-security prison in 
Yazoo City, Mississippi, a medium-security prison in Hazelton, 
West Virginia, and a high-security prison in Thomson, Illinois. 
With the overcrowding rate at 51 percent at high-security 
prisons and 41 percent at medium-security prisons, the 
completion of these three activations will help to reduce these 
incredibly high overcrowding rates. The Committee expects the 
BOP to adhere to the activation schedule included in the BOP's 
budget submission regarding those prison facilities. The BOP 
shall notify the Committee of any deviations to this schedule.
    Strategic Sourcing.--A recent GAO Report entitled, ``Audit 
of the Federal Bureau of Prisons' Efforts to Improve 
Acquisition Through Strategic Sourcing,'' found that purchasing 
operations at the BOP are, ``largely de-centralized, with 
institutions making procurement decisions locally,'' which 
resulted in an underutilization of cost-savings efforts. 
Moreover, the report found that, ``BOP had not conducted a 
comprehensive spend analysis to identify areas where multiple 
suppliers are providing similar goods and services, and where 
leveraging the BOP's buying power would be most beneficial.'' 
While there are uncontrollable factors that impact the BOP's 
overall budget, the lack of clarity regarding broad 
expenditures throughout the Bureau that are, in fact, 
controllable is troubling. To that end, the Committee directs 
the BOP to immediately undertake a comprehensive spend analysis 
as recommended by the GAO. Further, the Committee believes that 
the Bureau should develop a strategic sourcing plan and take 
steps to consolidate purchases in order to better leverage the 
Government's buying power particularly when it comes to medical 
and healthcare services. Specifically, the Committee believes 
that efforts to consolidate contracts for the provision of 
medical services could produce significant overall savings and 
should be carefully considered. The BOP is directed to report 
back to the Committee on its progress in achieving these 
directives no later than 45 days after the date of enactment of 
this act as well as quarterly thereafter with an accounting of 
cost savings achieved through these efforts.
    Contraband Cell Phones in Prisons.--The Committee continues 
to be concerned about the use of contraband cell phones in 
facilities administered by or under contract with the BOP and 
urges the BOP to accelerate its testing of available 
technology, including jamming technology and managed access 
systems, to detect and combat the use of unauthorized cell 
phones in prisons. The BOP is directed to submit a report to 
the Committee no later than 90 days after enactment of this act 
detailing the results of the detection technologies tested and 
the current cost to implement, in a single, representative BOP 
facility, a viable cell phone detection technology.

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $90,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      90,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     105,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $105,000,000 for 
the construction, modernization, maintenance, and repair of 
prison and detention facilities housing Federal prisoners. The 
recommendation is $15,000,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and the budget request. Of the amount provided, 
$91,000,000 is for modernization and repairs of which 
$15,000,000 is for modernization and repairs at USP Thomson.
    The Committee includes bill language in Title V--General 
Provisions stipulating that no BOP resources may be used for 
facilities to house detainees from the United States Naval 
Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
    Long-Term Planning.--The Committee is concerned about the 
seemingly ad hoc process for determining the need for new 
prison construction or facility expansion, the prioritization 
of those projects, consideration of capacity needs by region, 
inmate proximity to home, inmate movement from one facility to 
another, and communication with impacted communities regarding 
facility plans. The Committee believes that the consideration 
of any new facility or facility expansion should be based upon 
a long-term strategic plan which incorporates a robust capital 
planning process including leading capital planning practices 
as outlined in OMB and GAO guidance. The Committee directs the 
BOP to undertake the development of a formal process that 
addresses the issues raised heretofore and memorialize that 
process in a published plan, not later than 45 days after the 
date of enactment of this act. The BOP is directed to provide 
quarterly reports to the Committee on the progress of its 
efforts.
    Construction.--The BOP currently has no plans to activate 
new prisons, aside from those activations proposed in the 
fiscal year 2015 request, and the Committee reiterates its 
direction to BOP in Public Law 113-76 regarding any significant 
construction appropriation requests in coming fiscal years. 
After receipt of the GAO's comprehensive assessment of ways to 
reduce prison overcrowding, the BOP shall submit to the 
Committee a comprehensive plan, including funding for new 
prison construction if merited in future requests.
    The Committee directs the BOP to continue providing the 
Committee the most recent monthly status of construction 
report, and to notify the Committee of any deviations from the 
construction and activation schedule identified in that report, 
including detailed explanations of the causes of delays and 
actions proposed to address them. These reports are critical to 
the Committee's ability to monitor and assess the BOP's needs. 
The BOP shall collaborate and coordinate with the Justice 
Management Division on methods that will efficiently deliver 
these critical reports to the Committee in a timely manner.

                FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INCORPORATED

                (LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES)

Appropriations, 2014....................................      $2,700,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................       2,700,000
Committee recommendation................................       2,700,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides a limitation on the 
administrative expenses of $2,700,000 for the Federal Prison 
Industries, Inc. The recommendation is equal to the fiscal year 
2014 enacted level and the budget request.

               State and Local Law Enforcement Activities

    In total, the Committee recommends $2,263,300,000 for State 
and local law enforcement and crime prevention grant programs, 
including $2,192,300,000 in discretionary appropriations. The 
discretionary total is $1,000,000 below the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and $10,300,000 above the budget estimate.
    Collaboration Between Grants Administering Components.--For 
many years, the Office on Violence Against Women [OVW], the 
Office of Justice Programs [OJP], and the Office of Community 
Oriented Policing Services [COPS] have collaborated on many 
projects and initiatives to address problems that fall within 
their respective missions. The Committee expects the OVW, OJP, 
and COPS to continue and improve upon their collaborative 
efforts, where feasible, in order to avoid duplication of 
effort and to make the best possible use of their 
appropriations.
    Management and Administration Expenses.--The Department 
shall, in preparation of its fiscal year 2015 spending plan, 
assess management and administration [M&A] expenses against 
program funding. The Committee directs the Department to ensure 
that its assessment methodology is equitable and, for programs 
funded through the Crime Victims Fund, that the assessment 
reflects a fair representation of the share of each program 
devoted to common M&A costs. The Committee also directs grant 
offices to minimize administrative spending in order to 
maximize the amount of funding that can be used for grants or 
training and technical assistance. The Committee reiterates the 
direction provided in Public Law 113-76 that the Department 
shall detail, as part of its budget submission for fiscal year 
2016 and future years, the actual costs for each grant office 
with respect to training, technical assistance, research and 
statistics, and peer review for the prior fiscal year, along 
with estimates of planned expenditures by each grant office in 
each of these categories for the current year and the budget 
year.
    Evidence-Based Programs.--Faced with an era of budget 
constraints, the Committee strongly urges the OJP, COPS, and 
OVW to ensure that, to the greatest extent practicable, 
competitive grants are used for evidence-based programs and 
activities of proven effectiveness, innovation, targeted 
training and technical assistance, and multi-disciplinary 
collaboration, so as to maximize the result for each dollar 
spent.
    Grants Consolidation.--Many of the initiatives proposed by 
the Department come at the expense of effective existing grant 
programs popular with Congress. This leaves the Committee in 
the position of filling holes, while trying to provide some 
funding for the administration's priorities. This also means 
that the number of grant programs grows, and the Committee 
cannot fund several programs at the levels necessary to be most 
effective.
    While the proposed activities of many of these grant 
programs are noble, the Committee remains concerned that the 
perpetual authorization and proposal of new grants programs, 
while not de-authorizing or omitting redundant and archaic 
ones, has become unmanageable, particularly during these tight 
fiscal times. The Committee directs the Department to work more 
closely with the appropriate congressional committees to 
seriously consider the modification or omission of existing 
outdated programs before new proposals and initiatives are 
unveiled. The Committee once again urges the DOJ, working with 
Congress and stakeholder groups, to devise a proposal to 
consolidate and eliminate ineffective grant programs and focus 
on successful programs that have a proven track record and are 
cost-effective for the taxpayers' dollars, but reminds the 
Department that the appropriations process is not the venue for 
broad authorizing changes.
    Grant Funding Set-Asides.--The Committee notes the 
significant number of reductions in grant funding allowable for 
various purposes, including training, technical assistance, 
research, evaluation and statistics activities with set-asides 
ranging anywhere from 2 percent to 10 percent of total grant 
funding provided. In years past, the Committee sought to obtain 
a detailed accounting of these reductions by grant category as 
specified in the bill to no avail. To that end, the Committee 
directs the Department to prepare a comprehensive report to be 
provided concurrent with the spending plan that details the 
total amount provided for each grant program in this act, the 
specific reductions taken, the purpose for those reductions and 
the final use of those resources, including any transfers that 
may occur within the OJP, OVW and COPS. The Committee expects 
that the report will provide a complete analysis of the final 
amounts externally awarded and the amounts retained internally 
for other purposes.
    Performance Partnership Pilots.--The bill includes language 
permitting OJP to participate, with other Federal agencies, in 
the Performance Partnership Pilot program authorized in 
division H of Public Law 113-76. Performance Partnership Pilots 
take an evidence-based approach to better serve disconnected 
youth in our communities. The Committee supports innovative 
efforts to coordinate programs across the Federal Government 
that serve these young people. Nonetheless, the Department must 
remain accountable for the proper use and effectiveness of its 
grant funds. The proposal for these pilots states that outcome-
focused criteria will be used as part of the evaluation 
process. In addition, jurisdictions receiving funding will be 
held accountable to a set of cross-agency, data-driven outcomes 
and interventions will be measured and rigorously evaluated 
using real-time performance and outcome data.
    The OJP shall inform the Committee, not later than 45 days 
after enactment of this act, on how it intends to participate 
in Performance Partnership Pilots, including the intended 
amount and source of funding; how the Department will 
participate in evaluating and soliciting grant applications 
including evaluation and accountability criteria; and how the 
Department will ensure oversight and accountability for its 
contributions. Not later than 15 days after pilots have been 
selected, the Department shall brief the Committee with 
detailed information on the pilots in which it is 
participating, including detailed information about the 
grantee, the program being undertaken, specific metrics 
incorporated to determine outcomes, and the accountability 
measurements associated with these metrics. The Department's 
Office of Inspector General should coordinate with the 
Inspectors General of other participating departments and 
agencies to ensure timely audits and oversight of these funds.
    The Committee encourages the Department to work with 
appropriate authorizing committees to share lessons learned 
from the pilots, including recommendations to improve DOJ-
administered grant programs.
    One-Year Prision Rape Elimination Act [PREA] Exemption.--
The Committee has included bill language providing a 1 year 
exemption from the penalties required under the PREA for the 
following grant programs: the OVW's Services, Training, 
Officers, and Prosecutors [STOP] Grants; the OJP's Edward Byrne 
Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Program; and the Office of 
Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention's Title II Formula 
Grant Program.
    Blue Alert System.--Similar to the AMBER Alert system, a 
Blue Alert system would rapidly notify law enforcement 
agencies, the media, and the public to aid in the apprehension 
of violent criminals who kill or seriously injure local, State, 
or Federal law enforcement officers. The Committee directs the 
Department to report, not later than 180 days after the date of 
enactment of this act, on the costs and feasibility of 
establishing a national Blue Alert communications network to 
issue alerts in coordination with State and local law 
enforcement agencies, and other appropriate entities. The 
report should include an evaluation of the potential use of 
existing systems of infrastructure that could facilitate the 
implementation of this type of alert.

                    Office on Violence Against Women


       VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN PREVENTION AND PROSECUTION PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $417,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     422,500,000
Committee recommendation................................     430,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $430,000,000 for 
OVW grants. The recommendation is $13,000,000 above the fiscal 
year 2014 enacted level, and $7,500,000 above the budget 
request. Resources are provided to the OVW above the budget 
request to respond to the needs of all victims of domestic 
violence, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking, 
including, but not limited to, Native women, immigrants, LGBT 
victims, college students, youths, and public housing 
residents.
    Timeliness of Grant Awards.--The Committee expects the OVW 
to award grants within the same fiscal year that funds are 
appropriated. While the Committee recognizes there may be 
exceptions to this rule, such as the creation of or substantial 
funding for a new grant program, the Committee has made it a 
priority to provide adequate funding for the OVW salaries and 
expenses in order to ensure the timeliness of grant awards. The 
Committee expects the OVW to discuss, calculate, and plan in 
detail the best way to administer a grant program. However, the 
OVW cannot allow the perfect to become the enemy of the good 
when too much preparation results in unnecessary delays of 
getting grants out the door and on the ground to help victims. 
Not later than 45 days after the end of the current fiscal 
year, the OVW shall submit to the Committee a report on grants 
appropriated but not awarded in that year, including a detailed 
explanation of such delays and the expected award dates, as 
well as the OVW's end-of-year unobligated balances from both 
fiscal year 2015 and prior years.
    The table below displays the Committee's recommendations 
for the programs under this office.

       VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN PREVENTION AND PROSECUTION PROGRAMS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                        Program                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
STOP Grants............................................         195,000
Transitional Housing Assistance........................          26,000
National Institute of Justice Research and Evaluation             3,000
 on Violence Against Women.............................
Consolidated Youth Oriented Program....................          10,000
Grants to Encourage Arrest Policies....................          50,000
    Homicide Reduction Initiative......................          (4,000)
Sexual Assault Victims Services........................          30,000
Rural Domestic Violence Assistance Grants..............          33,000
Violence on College Campuses...........................          12,000
Civil Legal Assistance.................................          42,500
Elder Abuse Grant Program..............................           4,500
Family Civil Justice...................................          16,000
Education and Training for Disabled Female Victims.....           6,000
National Center on Workplace Responses.................             500
Research--Violence Against Indian Women................           1,000
Sex Assault in Indian Country Clearinghouse............             500
                                                        ----------------
      Total............................................         430,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    STOP Grants.--Within the discretionary budget authority 
appropriated, $195,000,000 is for formula grants to the States. 
This is $2,000,000 above both the budget request and the fiscal 
year 2014 enacted level. The fiscal year 2015 recommendation 
will allow jurisdictions to implement mandatory pro-arrest and 
prosecution policies to prevent, identify, and respond to 
violent crimes against women, support coordination of State 
victim services, assist Native victims in Indian country, and 
provide secure settings and specialized procedures for 
visitation and exchange of children in families experiencing 
domestic violence. The recommendation supports increasing 
access to comprehensive legal services for victims, providing 
short-term housing assistance and support services for domestic 
violence victims, and education and training to end violence 
against and abuse of women with disabilities.
    Sexual Assault Services Act [SASA].--The Committee's 
recommendation provides $30,000,000, which is $3,000,000 above 
both the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and the budget request, 
to fund directly the needs of sexual assault victims.
    As part of the VAWA 2005 and reauthorized by VAWA 2013, the 
Sexual Assault Services Program addresses considerable gaps in 
services to sexual assault victims. The Committee supports a 
dedicated stream of funding to provide a broad range of 
services to male, female, and child sexual assault victims and 
their families through the well-established and well-regarded 
system of community-based rape crisis centers throughout the 
United States, and maintains its strong commitment to ensuring 
that these rape crisis centers have access to technical 
assistance, training, and support.

                       Office of Justice Programs

    The Office of Justice Programs [OJP] is responsible for 
providing leadership, coordination, and assistance to its 
Federal, State, local, and tribal partners to enhance the 
effectiveness and efficiency of the United States justice 
system in preventing, controlling, and responding to crime. As 
most of the responsibility for crime control and prevention 
falls to law enforcement officers in States, cities, and other 
localities, the Federal Government is effective in these areas 
only to the extent that it can enter into successful 
partnerships with these jurisdictions. Therefore, the OJP is 
tasked with administering grants; collecting statistical data 
and conducting analyses; identifying emerging criminal justice 
issues; developing and testing promising and innovative 
approaches to address these issues; evaluating program results; 
and disseminating these findings and other information to 
State, local, and tribal governments.
    The Committee directs the OJP to submit a quarterly report 
on grant programs that do not receive a sufficient number of 
applicants.
    Gang Prevention Grants and Crime Rates.--The Committee 
remains concerned about gang activity and violent crime 
throughout the country, noting that Federal partnership with 
law enforcement is essential--not only in our largest cities, 
but also in suburban and rural jurisdictions, where gang 
activity and violent crime rates can exceed national averages. 
To strengthen Federal partnership across all jurisdictions, the 
Committee directs the OJP to review the criteria by which OJP 
awards discretionary grants relating to gang violence and 
prevention under the State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance 
and Juvenile Justice Programs on a per capita basis, of 
applicant cities and jurisdictions where gang activity and 
violent crime rates exceed national averages. The Committee 
encourages the OJP to report on the relative success rate of 
awards granted to applicant cities and jurisdictions with 
disproportionately high gang and violent crime activity, 
including the murder rates of those cities and jurisdictions. 
The report should also consider the relative success rate of 
applicant cities and jurisdictions that have an established 
gang commission or community planning body, have completed the 
Office of Juvenile Justice Delinquency Prevention [OJJDP] gang 
assessment, and have consulted with or received technical 
assistance from the OJJDP National Gang Center regarding gang 
initiatives in the community.
    Safe Return.--Each year more than 600,000 ``wandering'' 
incidences occur that involve autistic children, placing these 
children at risk of death or serious injury, and resulting in 
enormous strains on families and responding law enforcement 
agencies. The Committee encourages OJP to evaluate autism 
spectrum disorders [ASD] wandering safe return strategies, 
which may serve as the basis for launching a coordinated 
nationwide response to meet the needs of the 1-in-88 Americans 
with ASD, their families, and law enforcement. To the extent 
appropriate, OJP should explore ways for law enforcement to 
quickly and efficiently share information that will aid in 
identifying children with ASD who have wandered. The Committee 
is pleased that the Department expanded eligibility under the 
Byrne-JAG program to include wandering-prevention technology 
for those with ASD in February 2014 and encourages OJP to make 
potential pools of grant awardees aware of this expanded 
offering for fiscal year 2015.

                  RESEARCH, EVALUATION AND STATISTICS

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $120,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     136,900,000
Committee recommendation................................     115,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $115,000,000 for 
the Research, Evaluation and Statistics account. The 
recommendation is $5,000,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and $21,900,000 below the budget request.
    Funding in this account provides assistance in the areas of 
research, evaluation, statistics, hate crimes, DNA and 
forensics, criminal background checks, and gun safety 
technology, among others.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

                   RESEARCH, EVALUATION AND STATISTICS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Program                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Bureau of Justice Statistics.........................            42,000
National Institute of Justice........................            38,000
Regional Info Sharing Activities.....................            30,000
Forensic Initiative..................................             5,000
    Transfer to NIST.................................            (4,000)
                                                      ------------------
      Total..........................................           115,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Spending Plans.--The Department shall submit to the 
Committee as part of its spending plan for State and Local Law 
Enforcement Activities a plan for the use of all funding 
administered by the National Institute of Justice and the 
Bureau of Justice Statistics [BJS], respectively, for approval 
by the Committee prior to the obligation of any such funds.
    National Institute of Justice [NIJ].--The Committee's 
recommendation provides $38,000,000 for the NIJ, in addition to 
$1,000,000 transferred from the OVW for research and evaluation 
on violence against women and Indian women. The NIJ's mission 
is to advance scientific research, development, and evaluation 
to advance the administration of justice and public safety.
    Forensic Initiative.--The Committee provides $5,000,000 for 
a forensics initiative, of which $4,000,000 is provided by 
transfer to the National Institute of Standards and Technology 
[NIST] to support Scientific Working Groups. The Department of 
Justice shall coordinate its forensics initiative activities 
with NIST.
    Building Digital Forensics Capabilities.--The Committee 
continues to stress the importance of training and equipping 
State and local law enforcement with the tools and expertise 
needed to investigate and prosecute electronic crime. As 
smartphones and the Internet have become fundamental parts of 
daily life, these technologies have also become a fundamental 
part of criminal acts and enterprises, including drug deals and 
murder hits ordered by text, to ATM heists via laptops, to 
child pornography Web sites.
    Given that more than 95 percent of all criminal cases are 
investigated and prosecuted at the State and local levels, the 
Committee remains concerned that the ability of State and local 
law enforcement to investigate and effectively prosecute cases 
involving digital evidence- and computer-based crimes will 
diminish without the Department's support of training and 
research. The Committee encourages the Department to prioritize 
State and local assistance for computer forensics tool 
development and digital evidence training for investigations 
surrounding drug, violent, and financial crimes, and crimes 
against children.
    Regional Information Sharing Activities.--The Committee 
recommends $30,000,000, an increase of $5,000,000 above the 
budget request, to support activities that enable the sharing 
of nationwide criminal intelligence and other resources with 
State, local, and other law enforcement agencies and 
organizations. Such activities should address critical and 
chronic criminal threats, including gangs, terrorism, 
narcotics, weapons and officer safety or ``event 
deconfliction,'' and should reflect regional as well as 
national threat priorities. In addition, funds shall be 
available to support local-to-local law enforcement data and 
information sharing efforts focused on solving routine crimes, 
especially in rural areas, by sharing law enforcement 
information not categorized as criminal intelligence. All 
activities shall be consistent with national information-
sharing standards and requirements as determined by the Bureau 
of Justice Assistance.
    Gun Safety Technology.--From within funds made available 
under the set-aside for criminal justice research, evaluation, 
and statistics, the Committee supports the administration's 
request for an additional $2,000,000 for a gun safety 
technology initiative to encourage the development of 
innovative and cost-effective gun safety technology.
    The fiscal year 2014 enacted bill also provided funding for 
this purpose. The Committee directs the Department to provide a 
report detailing the use of these resources within 45 days of 
enactment of this act.
    Missing Persons and Unidentified Remains Databases.--Tens 
of thousands of Americans go missing every year, while at the 
same time, there are an estimated 40,000 sets of unidentified 
human remains being held or disposed of across the country. Due 
to gaps in the Nation's missing persons systems, missing 
persons and unidentified remains are rarely matched. While 
Federal law mandates that law enforcement report missing 
children, there are no such requirements for adults, or for 
unidentified decedents. Even when missing adults and remains 
are reported, the wide range of unconnected Federal, state, 
local, and non-profit databases to help match the missing with 
unidentified remains makes finding a match an often 
insurmountable challenge. The Committee directs the Government 
Accountability Office [GAO] to conduct a review on how to 
better integrate national missing persons databases, 
particularly the NIJ's National Missing and Unidentified 
Persons System [NamUs] and the FBI's National Crime Information 
Center [NCIC], including technical challenges that may exist. 
The GAO should also examine ways to facilitate reporting of 
missing persons by States, local law enforcement authorities, 
medical examiners, and coroners to NamUs and NCIC.

               STATE AND LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $1,171,500,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   1,032,900,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,149,500,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $1,149,500,000 for 
State and local law enforcement assistance. The recommendation 
is $22,000,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level, and 
$116,600,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

               STATE AND LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Program                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grants.............           376,000
    SLATT Intelligence State and Local Training......            (1,000)
    State & Local Help Desk and Diagnostic Center....            (2,000)
    VALOR Initiative.................................           (15,000)
    Smart Policing...................................           (10,000)
    Smart Prosecution................................            (5,000)
    Firearm Safety & Gun Locks.......................            (3,000)
State Criminal Alien Assistance Program..............           150,000
Byrne Competitive Grants.............................            10,000
Victims of Trafficking Grants........................            15,000
Drug Courts..........................................            41,000
Mentally Ill Offender Courts.........................             9,000
Residential Substance Abuse Treatment................            12,000
Capital Litigation/Wrongful Prosecution Review.......             2,000
Economic, High-Tech, and Cybercrime Prevention.......            15,000
    IP Enforcement...................................            (2,500)
John R. Justice Grant Program........................             2,000
Adam Walsh Act Implementation........................            20,000
Children Exposed to Violence Initiative..............             8,000
Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation Program............            17,000
Bulletproof Vests Partnership........................            23,000
    Transfer to NIST/OLES............................            (1,500)
National Sex Offender Public Web site................             1,000
Violent Gang and Gun Crime Reduction.................             8,500
National Instant Criminal Background Check System                58,500
 [NICS] Initiative...................................
    NICS Improvements................................           (12,000)
Paul Coverdell Forensic Science......................            12,000
DNA Initiative.......................................           125,000
    Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grants..................          (117,000)
    Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing                 (4,000)
     Grants..........................................
    Sex Assault Exam Kits............................            (4,000)
Community-Based Sexual Assault Response Reform.......            41,000
Court-Appointed Special Advocates [CASA].............             6,000
Second Chance Act....................................            70,000
    Smart Probation..................................            (7,000)
    Children of Incarcerated Parents Demo Grants.....            (5,000)
    Pay for Success..................................           (15,000)
Veterans Treatment Courts............................             5,000
Prescription Drug Monitoring.........................             7,000
Campus Public Safety.................................             2,000
Justice Reinvestment Initiative......................            22,000
Project HOPE.........................................             4,000
Vision 21............................................            12,500
Comprehensive School Safety Program..................            75,000
                                                      ------------------
      Total..........................................         1,149,500
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Program.--
The Committee recommends $376,000,000 for Edward Byrne Memorial 
Justice Assistance Grants (Byrne-JAG). Funding is not available 
for luxury items, real estate, or construction projects. The 
Department should expect State, local, and tribal governments 
to target funding to programs and activities that conform with 
evidence-based strategic plans developed through broad 
stakeholder involvement. The Committee directs the Department 
to make technical assistance available to State, local, and 
tribal governments for the development or updating of such 
plans.
    VALOR Initiative.--The Committee's recommendation fully 
funds the budget request of $15,000,000 within Byrne-JAG for 
the Preventing Violence Against Law Enforcement Officer 
Resilience and Survivability Initiative [VALOR]. This is a 
national training initiative that promotes a culture of safety 
within Federal, State, local, and tribal law enforcement 
agencies by training officers to respond to and react better in 
deadly situations, such as ambush attacks, while on duty. The 
Committee expects Federal law enforcement to continue and 
expand on efforts to provide local police with information as 
to whether or not a suspect has a violent history, to the 
extent that transfer of such information is allowable and 
available via Federal law enforcement databases, in an effort 
to prevent officer deaths.
    National Instant Criminal Background Check System [NICS] 
Initiative Grants.--The Committee recommends funding the 
program at $58,500,000, equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level, to continue to improve the submission of State criminal 
and mental health records to the National Instant Criminal 
Background Check System [NICS]. This investment will strengthen 
the national background check system by assisting States in 
finding ways to make more records available in the NICS system, 
especially mental health records, thereby addressing gaps in 
Federal and State records currently available in NICS. Those 
gaps significantly hinder the ability of NICS to quickly 
confirm whether a prospective purchaser is prohibited from 
acquiring a firearm.
    National Technical Assistance and Training.--The Committee 
encourages the Department to continue its efforts to assist 
States in the development and use of criminal justice 
information systems that accelerate the automation of 
identification processes for fingerprints and other criminal 
justice data, and which improve the compatibility of State and 
local law enforcement systems with the FBI's Integrated 
Automated Fingerprint Identification System [IAFIS].
    Human Trafficking.--The United States is a destination 
country for thousands of men, women, and children trafficked 
largely from Mexico and East Asia, as well as countries in 
South Asia, Central America, Africa, and Europe, for the 
purposes of sexual and labor exploitation. Trafficking victims 
are subjected to physical, mental, and sexual abuse. Victims 
need various types of assistance to begin healing and recovery, 
including counseling, housing, medical care, support groups, 
and legal assistance.
    The Committee's recommendation provides $15,000,000 for 
task force activities and services for U.S. citizens, permanent 
residents, and foreign nationals who are victims of 
trafficking, including no less than $7,000,000 for victim 
services for foreign national victims of trafficking. The OJP 
shall consult with stakeholder groups in determining the 
overall allocation of Victims of Trafficking funding and shall 
provide to the Committee a plan for the use of these funds as 
part of the Department's fiscal year 2015 spending plan. The 
spending plan should be guided by the best information 
available on the regions of the United States with the highest 
incidence of trafficking.
    An effective national criminal justice response to human 
trafficking requires quick and accurate identification of 
victims along with immediate protection and support. The 
Committee supports further efforts to pursue evidence-based 
approaches that ensure trafficking victims' services are 
comprehensive, culturally competent, and use a trauma-informed 
care approach that maximizes safety, trust, and choice for 
survivors.
    The Committee notes that funding provided in this program 
may be used for victims of sex trafficking who are minors, 
which is authorized under VAWA 2013. Child trafficking victims 
require specialized care, and grant funding can be used for 
items like residential care, emergency social services, mental 
health counseling, and legal services.
    Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation Program.--Persistent 
crime and public safety problems, especially gang activity and 
youth violence, cannot be addressed solely by law enforcement. 
These issues require a comprehensive interagency approach that 
enables law enforcement, educators, social services agencies, 
and community organizations to address both public safety 
problems and their underlying causes.
    The Committee provides $17,000,000 to support the Byrne 
Criminal Justice Innovation Program, which provides 
demonstration grants in communities to support innovative, 
evidence-based approaches to fighting crime and improving 
public safety, as well as addressing its underlying problems. 
The OJP will coordinate with the Department of Housing and 
Urban Development [HUD] and other agencies to promote 
interagency collaboration and enable a wide range of new and 
existing partners to further stabilize neighborhoods that face 
the most severe violence and crime. This program builds upon 
the approach of supporting communities with strategies that 
combine law enforcement, community policing, prevention, 
intervention, treatment, and neighborhood restoration.
    Byrne Competitive Grants.--The Committee's recommendation 
includes $10,000,000 for competitive, peer-reviewed grants to 
programs of national significance to prevent crime, improve the 
administration of justice or assist victims of crime. The 
Committee expects that the OJP will take all steps necessary to 
ensure fairness and objectivity in the award of these and 
future competitive grants.
    Violent Gang and Gun Crime Reduction.--Violent crime and 
homicide continue to exact a heavy toll on victims, families, 
and neighborhoods. The Committee's recommendation provides 
$8,500,000, equal to the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$3,500,000 above the request, for competitive grants aimed at 
reducing homicides and gun-related violent crime in communities 
overwhelmed by gangs of national significance, and illegally 
purchased and trafficked guns. Popularly known as the Project 
Safe Neighborhoods model, this funding shall be used to hire 
new Federal and State prosecutors, support investigators, 
provide investigative and litigation training, deter juvenile 
gun crime, and develop and promote community outreach efforts, 
as well as to support other gun and gang violence reduction 
strategies.
    Drug, Mental Health, and Problem Solving Courts.--For the 
seventh straight year, the Committee's recommendation rejects 
the administration's proposal for a new Drug, Mental Health, 
and Problem Solving Courts grant program.
    The Committee notes the distinct success of the Drug Courts 
and Mentally-Ill Offender Courts grant programs. While the 
Committee recognizes the Department's attempt to consolidate 
grant programs, the Committee rejects this proposal given that 
professionals in the field have made a clear distinction 
between the two programs, and congressional support for 
maintaining separate programs remains strong.
    Veterans Treatment Courts.--The recommendation provides 
$5,000,000 for veterans treatment courts, an increase of 
$1,000,000 over the fiscal year 2014 enacted level. The 
Committee expects the Department to work in conjunction with 
the Department of Veterans Affairs, as appropriate, to provide 
grant support for collaborative, rehabilitative approaches for 
continuing judicial supervision of offenders who are veterans.
    Bulletproof Vests.--Within the $23,000,000 provided for 
bulletproof vests, $1,500,000 is to be transferred directly to 
the NIST Office of Law Enforcement Standards [OLES] to continue 
supporting ballistic- and stab-resistant material compliance 
testing programs. The Committee expects the BJA to continue 
strengthening internal controls to manage the Bulletproof Vest 
Partnership program. Improving grantee accountability in the 
timely use of Federal funds to purchase body armor will help 
every police officer who needs a vest to get one, thus saving 
officers' lives.
    Second Chance Act/Offender Reentry Programs.--The 
recommendation provides $70,000,000 for Second Chance Act [SCA] 
grants. The Committee expects that SCA funding will support 
grants that foster the implementation of strategies that have 
been proven to reduce recidivism and ensure safe and successful 
reentry back to their communities of adults released from 
prisons and jails. The SCA supports activities such as 
employment assistance, substance abuse treatment, housing, 
mentoring, family programming, and victim support. SCA grants 
will also support demonstration projects designed to test the 
impact of new strategies and frameworks. Within the amount 
provided, the Committee's recommendation makes targeted 
investments in initiatives requested by the administration to 
test and replicate new models of improving criminal justice 
efficiencies and recidivism outcomes.
    The Department is directed to submit as part of its 
spending plan for State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance a 
plan for the use of all funds appropriated for Second Chance 
Act programs, including new initiatives requested by the 
Department that are funded in this recommendation. It is 
expected that such a plan will designate funds for proven, 
evidence-based programs that will further the goal of 
maximizing public safety, as well as for promising new 
approaches and projects.
    Criminal Justice Reform and Recidivism Reduction.--The 
Committee provides $22,000,000 for a justice reinvestment 
initiative, which expands OJP's investment in data-driven 
approaches to improve public safety, drive down corrections and 
related criminal justice spending, and reinvest savings in 
effective strategies that can reduce crime and recidivism and 
strengthen neighborhoods. The Committee supports the OJP's 
steps to make justice reinvestment a national model for much-
needed criminal justice reform. Funds may be used to provide 
technical assistance and competitive financial support to 
States, counties, cities, and tribes that are either currently 
engaged in justice reinvestment activities or are preparing to 
undertake such work.
    Colson Task Force.--The Committee looks forward to 
reviewing the report from the Charles Colson Task Force on 
Federal Corrections, which was established and fully funded in 
the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014 (Public Law 113-
76). The bi-partisan task force is expected to address 
challenges in the Federal corrections system including 
overcrowding and violence in BOP facilities and prisoner 
reentry programs by developing practical, data-driven policy 
options to increase public safety, improve offender 
accountability, reduce recidivism, and control growth of 
spending on corrections.
    DNA Backlog/Crime Lab Improvements.--The Committee 
continues its strong support for DNA backlog and crime lab 
improvements by recommending $125,000,000 to strengthen and 
improve Federal and State DNA collection and analysis systems 
that can be used to accelerate the prosecution of the guilty 
while simultaneously protecting the innocent from wrongful 
prosecution. Within the funds provided, $117,000,000 is for 
Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Reduction grants, $4,000,000 is for 
Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing grants, and 
$4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners grants. From 
within the funding provided for Debbie Smith DNA Backlog 
Reduction grants, the Committee expects the Department to 
prioritize reducing rape kit backlogs, given that it is the 
primary reason why the Committee continues to provide robust 
funding for these grants.
    The Committee expects that the OJP will make funding for 
DNA analysis and capacity enhancement a priority to meet the 
purposes of the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program. The 
Committee directs the Department to submit to the Committee as 
part of its spending plan for State and Local Law Enforcement 
Activities a plan with respect to funds appropriated for DNA-
related and forensic programs, including the alignment of 
appropriated funds with the authorized purposes of the Debbie 
Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program.
    Community-Based Sexual Assault Response Reform.--Untested 
sexual assault kits represent lost opportunities for survivors 
to heal as well as sexual assault for perpetrators to be 
brought to justice. The Committee has a strong track record of 
supporting DNA and forensics grants, including the Debbie Smith 
DNA Backlog Grant Program, that tests kits backlogged in crime 
labs, and this bill continues that support. However, it is 
estimated that as many as 400,000 sexual assault kits are 
languishing in police evidence lockers nationwide. Once a 
backlog is acknowledged and kits begin to be tested, 
communities are still left to grapple with the enormous task of 
not just finding a way to test all of their backlogged kits, 
but also investigating and prosecuting these cases, reengaging 
victims in the process, and addressing any systemic failures 
that led to the creation of the backlog in the first place.
    In 2011, the NIJ supported two action research studies in 
Houston, Texas, and Detroit, Michigan, focusing on the issue of 
untested sexual assault kits, the need to improve sexual 
assault investigations and improving services to sexual assault 
victims. The projects were conducted in several phases that 
included planning, cataloging and accounting of untested kits, 
testing, and follow up, including investigation, prosecution, 
and victim services. In Detroit, for example, law enforcement, 
prosecutors, researchers and advocates worked together to 
understand the causes of the backlog and develop and implement 
a plan for testing kits and resolving cases.
    The Committee provides $41,000,000 for a competitive grant 
program to support multi-disciplinary community response teams 
tasked with developing and implementing comprehensive reform 
regarding sexual assault, including reducing the backlog of 
sexual assault kits at law enforcement agencies. The Committee 
notes that this effort is to compliment and not duplicate other 
DNA-related efforts focused on the testing of sexual assault 
kits at crime labs. The Committee directs that this new grant 
program be predicated on the lessons learned from the NIJ's 
initial research projects in Detroit and Houston and that the 
OJP establish a record of best practices for community-based 
sexual assault response reform. These best practices shall be 
disseminated nationwide along with the results of grantees' 
projects so other jurisdictions can capitalize on this work to 
implement their own processes for change.
    Grant applications shall specifically include planning, 
implementation, and long-term evaluation. The planning phase 
shall include an inventory of backlogged rape kits and 
development of a comprehensive approach to addressing the 
resolution of all cases in the backlog. In the implementation 
phase, grants may be used to test kits, develop ``cold case'' 
units to pursue new investigative leads, and support victims 
throughout the process. Grants shall also be used to develop 
evidence-tracking systems, train law enforcement on sexual 
assault investigations, and conduct research on outcomes in 
sexual assault cases. The Committee expects the NIJ to brief 
the Committee on the design of this program not less than 45 
days after the enactment of this act, including design and 
evaluation criteria for the program, ideal grant size, and the 
number of jurisdictions where this intervention is needed. The 
Committee encourages the administration to work with 
appropriate authorizing committees to develop a comprehensive 
approach to ending the backlog of untested sexual assault kits 
regardless of where they are stored.
    Economic, High-Tech, and Cybercrime Prevention.--The 
Committee recommends $15,000,000 to assist State and local law 
enforcement agencies in the prevention, investigation, and 
prosecution of economic, high-tech, and Internet crimes. Given 
the importance of protecting our Nation's new technologies, 
ideas, and products, the Committee includes the request of 
$2,500,000 for competitive grants that help State and local law 
enforcement tackle intellectual property [IP] thefts, such as 
counterfeiting and piracy.
    The Committee also supports the continued efforts of the 
Department to provide State and local law enforcement with the 
training, technical assistance, and outreach support needed to 
prevent, investigate, and prosecute economic and cybercrimes. 
The Committee directs the OJP to provide $2,000,000 for 
operational support of existing or proposed computer forensics 
and digital evidence at the State and local levels.
    Flexible Tribal Assistance.--The Committee recommends 
funding tribal grant programs by permitting 5 percent of 
discretionary grant and reimbursement program funds made 
available to the OJP to be used for tribal criminal justice 
assistance, and continues to strongly support efforts to help 
tribes improve the capacity of their criminal justice systems. 
The OJP is expected to consult closely with tribal stakeholders 
in determining how tribal assistance funds will be awarded for 
detention facilities, courts, alcohol and substance abuse 
programs, civil and criminal legal assistance, and other 
priorities. The Committee directs the OJP to submit, as part of 
the Department's spending plan for fiscal year 2015, a plan for 
the use of these funds that has been informed by such 
consultation. The Committee notes that the bill includes 
additional grant funding for tribal law enforcement programs 
through COPS and OVW.
    HOPE Grants.--As part of the Committee's efforts to reduce 
recidivism, the Committee's recommendation includes $4,000,000 
for a nationwide program based on the successful court-based 
HOPE model. HOPE identifies probationers with a high risk for 
re-offending, focusing on reducing drug use, new crimes, and 
incarceration. Offenders are deterred from using drugs and 
committing crimes by frequent and random drug tests, backed by 
swift and certain jail stays, along with treatment, when 
necessary. This funding will be used for replicating the use of 
``swift and certain'' sanctions in probation at additional 
sites.
    Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services.--The Committee's 
recommendation provides $12,500,000 for Vision 21. The 
Committee directs the Department to submit as part of its 
spending plan for State and Local Law Enforcement Activities a 
plan for the use of all funding administered by the Office for 
Victims of Crime [OVC] for Vision 21.
    Rather than follow the administration's proposal to fund 
this program out of the mandatory Crime Victims Fund, the 
Committee chooses to provide funding through discretionary 
resources. The Committee encourages the Department to work with 
Congress on legislation that will best meet the needs of crime 
victims in the 21st century including submitting a proposal to 
authorize Vision 21.
    The Committee supports Vision 21's goals of funding 
initiatives that will address the need for more data-driven 
research and evaluation on victimization and services; holistic 
legal assistance for crime victims; resources to reach tribal 
and rural victims in areas where service providers do not 
exist; support of national emergency hotlines, online, and 
other programs that serve American crime victims at the 
national and international level; and capacity building to 
provide technology- and evidence-based training and technical 
assistance.
    Comprehensive School Safety.--The Committee's 
recommendation includes $75,000,000 to continue a competitive 
grant program as part of the comprehensive school safety 
initiative started in fiscal year 2014. The NIJ shall provide 
competitively awarded grants with strong research and 
evaluation components to local school districts and State 
educational agencies to support the implementation of school 
safety interventions under the existing construct. The 
Committee directs the NIJ to provide a report not later than 
120 days after the date of enactment of this act, on its 
progress in developing a strategy and model for comprehensive 
school safety as required by Public Law 113-76.

                       JUVENILE JUSTICE PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $254,500,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     299,400,000
Committee recommendation................................     257,500,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $257,500,000 for 
juvenile justice programs. The recommendation is $3,000,000 
above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $41,900,000 below 
the budget request.
    The mission of the Office of Juvenile Justice and 
Delinquency Prevention [OJJDP] is to provide national 
leadership, coordination and resources to prevent and respond 
to juvenile delinquency and victimization. The OJJDP supports 
States, tribes and local communities in efforts to develop, 
implement and improve the juvenile justice system in order to 
protect the public safety, hold offenders accountable, and 
provide treatment and rehabilitative services tailored to the 
needs of juveniles and their families.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

                        JUVENILE JUSTICE PROGRAMS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Part B--State Formula..................................          61,500
    Emergency Planning--Juvenile Detention Facilities..            (500)
Youth Mentoring Grants.................................          53,000
Title V--Delinquency Prevention........................          37,000
    Tribal Youth.......................................          (5,000)
    Gang and Youth Violence Education and Prevention...          (3,000)
    Alcohol Prevention.................................          (1,000)
    Juvenile Justice and Education Collaboration                 (8,000)
     Assistance........................................
Victims of Child Abuse (VOCA)..........................          19,000
Community-Based Violence Prevention....................          11,000
Missing & Exploited Children Programs..................          68,000
Child Abuse Training for Judicial Personnel............           1,500
National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention............           1,000
Children of Incarcerated Parents Web Portal............             500
Girls in the Justice System............................           2,000
Juvenile Indigent Defense..............................           3,000
                                                        ----------------
      Total............................................         257,500
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Any deviation from the above plan is subject to the 
reprogramming requirements of section 505 of this act.
    Part B: State Formula Grants.--The Committee provides 
$61,500,000 for grants to implement comprehensive State 
juvenile justice plans, including community-based prevention 
and intervention programs and activities for juvenile 
offenders. This amount is $6,000,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
level and $11,500,000 above the budget request.
    Within the amount provided, the Committee recommends 
$500,000 for competitive demonstration grants for State, local, 
and tribal juvenile justice detention facilities and systems to 
meet the needs of children and adolescents housed in detention 
facilities in preparation for, during, and after a disaster, as 
detailed in the 2011 emergency planning guidance issued by the 
OJJDP.
    The Committee directs the OJP to submit as part of its 
spending plan for State and Local Law Enforcement Activities a 
plan for the administration of Part B State Formula Grants. The 
Committee expects this plan to include details pertaining to 
the formulas utilized in awarding grants under this heading.
    The Committee urges DOJ to encourage title II grant 
recipients to coordinate with their State education agencies to 
support continuity of education opportunities for adjudicated 
youth.
    Youth Mentoring Grants.--To support the critical work of 
national, regional, and local organizations in nurturing and 
mentoring at-risk children and youths, the Committee recommends 
$53,000,000 for competitive, peer-reviewed youth mentoring 
grants. Within 45 days of enactment of this act, the OJP is 
directed to provide a report and spend plan to the Committee 
detailing the criteria and methodology that will be used to 
award these grants as well as an explanation of any deviations 
from the criteria used in fiscal year 2014. The Committee 
expects that the OJJDP will take all steps necessary to ensure 
fairness and objectivity in the award of these and future 
competitive grants.
    Victims of Child Abuse Act.--The Committee's recommendation 
provides $19,000,000 for the various programs authorized under 
the Victims of Child Abuse Act [VOCA] (Public Law 101-647) and 
directs the OJJDP to ensure that not less than 90 percent of 
the grants awarded are for the purposes of developing and 
maintaining child advocacy centers, including training and 
accreditation. The Committee rejects the administration's 
request to eliminate this program. Within the funds provided, 
$5,000,000 shall be for Regional Children's Advocacy Centers 
[RCACs] Programs. The RCACs were established to provide 
information, consultation, training, and technical assistance 
to communities, and to help establish child-focused programs 
that facilitate and support coordination among agencies 
responding to child abuse.
    Missing and Exploited Children Programs.--The OJP works 
with law enforcement agencies to find missing children and to 
target and prosecute predatory child molesters and those who 
traffic in child pornography. The Committee recommends 
$68,000,000 for Missing and Exploited Children Programs and 
expects the Department to allocate no less than the current 
funding level for task force grants, training and technical 
assistance, research and statistics, and administrative costs 
for the Internet Crimes Against Children [ICAC] program. The 
Committee directs the OJP to provide a spending plan for the 
use of these funds as part of the Department's spending plan 
for fiscal year 2015.
    The Committee supports efforts across the country to train 
child protection professionals beginning with undergraduate and 
graduate curricula and following up with ongoing training for 
professionals in the field, including the development of State 
forensic interviewing courses. The Committee directs the OJJDP 
to provide training and technical assistance to improve 
forensic interview training for investigation and prosecution 
professionals, evidence-based community prevention programs for 
child protection professionals, and undergraduate and graduate 
curricula on the maltreatment and exploitation of children.
    Improving Juvenile Indigent Defense.--The Committee 
provides $3,000,000 for a new program within the OJJDP to 
develop and implement standards of practice and policy for the 
management of effective model juvenile indigent defender 
offices. The program will also provide cost-effective and 
innovative training for the juvenile indigent defense bar, and 
court-appointed counsel working on behalf of juvenile indigent 
defendants, particularly in rural, remote, and underserved 
areas.

                    PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICERS BENEFITS

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $97,300,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      87,300,000
Committee recommendation................................      87,300,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $87,300,000 for 
public safety officers benefits. The recommendation is 
$10,000,000 below the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and equal 
to the budget estimate. This program provides a one-time death 
benefit payment to eligible survivors of Federal, State, and 
local public safety officers whose death was the direct and 
proximate result of a traumatic injury sustained in the line of 
duty or certain eligible heart attacks or strokes. Within funds 
provided, $71,000,000 is for death benefits for survivors, an 
amount estimated by the Congressional Budget Office and 
considered mandatory for scorekeeping purposes.
    The Committee also recommends $16,300,000, as requested, 
for disability benefits for injured officers and education 
benefits for the families of officers who have been permanently 
disabled or killed in the line of duty.

                  Community Oriented Policing Services


             COMMUNITY ORIENTED POLICING SERVICES PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $214,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     274,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     224,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $224,000,000 for 
community oriented policing services. The recommendation is 
$10,000,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and 
$50,000,000 below the budget request.
    Local law enforcement is not only essential to ensuring the 
safety of the public but also plays a critical role in 
preventing and responding to terrorist threats. Since its 
creation, the Community Oriented Policing Services [COPS] 
office has assisted State and local law enforcement agencies by 
providing grants, training, and technical assistance that not 
only ensure public safety from traditional crime, but also 
better enable law enforcement officers to address the growing 
threat from terrorist organizations.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

                  COMMUNITY ORIENTED POLICING SERVICES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                        Program                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Methamphetamine Lab Cleanup (Transfer to DEA)..........           7,000
Tribal Resources Grant Program.........................          16,500
COPS Hiring Grants.....................................         180,500
    Transfer to Tribal Resources Grant Program.........         (16,500)
    Community Policing Development/Training and                  (7,500)
     Technical Assistance..............................
    Collaborative Reform Model.........................          (5,000)
Anti-Meth Task Forces..................................          10,000
Anti-Heroin Task Forces................................          10,000
                                                        ----------------
      Total............................................         224,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Any deviations from the above plan are subject to the 
reprogramming requirements of section 505.
    COPS Hiring Program.--The Committee recommends $180,500,000 
for COPS Hiring grants to help State, local, or tribal law 
enforcement agencies to create and preserve police officer 
positions and to increase community policing capacity and crime 
prevention efforts. Like the request, the grants will have an 
award cap of $125,000 and require grantees to provide a 25 
percent local match.
    Training and Technical Assistance.--The Committee's 
recommendation provides $7,500,000 within the COPS Hiring 
Program to provide Training and Technical Assistance to assist 
agencies with developing innovative community policing 
strategies through applied research and evaluation initiatives.
    Due to limited tax bases and growing poverty levels, public 
safety professionals in rural areas face unique challenges when 
attempting to secure crime-fighting tools and personnel. The 
Committee encourages the COPS Office to focus on efforts to 
provide training and technical assistance to increase the 
capacity of law enforcement agencies, executives, and managers 
serving rural communities. This will allow these communities to 
enhance the use of community policing practices and innovations 
in policing to increase the effectiveness of limited resources.
    Methamphetamine Hot Spots.--The Committee's recommendation 
includes a $7,000,000 transfer to reimburse the DEA for 
assistance to State and local law enforcement for proper 
removal and disposal of hazardous materials at clandestine 
methamphetamine labs, and to initiate container programs. This 
is the level the DEA estimates will be sufficient in fiscal 
year 2015 to operate the full cleanup program for States to 
transition to container program cleanups, and to cover the 
costs of smaller methamphetamine cleanups in States where the 
problem is intermittent.
    Anti-Methamphetamine Task Forces.--The Committee's 
recommendation provides $10,000,000 for the COPS Office to make 
competitive grants to law enforcement agencies in States with 
high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, 
laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures. These funds shall 
be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate 
illicit activities such as precursor diversion, laboratories, 
or methamphetamine traffickers.
    Anti-Heroin Task Forces.--The DEA's 2013 National Drug 
Threat Assessment Summary notes the troubling trend of 
increases in the numbers of heroin seizures and overdose deaths 
caused by heroin in recent years. Heroin is relatively 
inexpensive, readily available, and highly addictive. The 
Committee's recommendation provides $10,000,000 for the COPS 
Office to make competitive grants to law enforcement agencies 
in States with high per capita levels of primary treatment 
admissions for both heroin and other opioids. These funds shall 
be utilized for drug enforcement, including investigations and 
activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful 
diversion and distribution of prescription opioids. Priority 
shall be given to those drug task forces, managed and operated 
by the State, serving a majority of counties in the State.
    Tribal Resources.--The Committee has provided a total of 
$33,000,000 in programs targeted entirely to tribal communities 
through the Tribal Resources Grant Program [TRGP]. Within the 
TRGP, $16,500,000 is provided through direct appropriations and 
$16,500,000 is provided by transfer from the COPS Hiring 
program. All funds available to the TRGP can be used for 
equipment and hiring or training of tribal law enforcement. 
This will allow tribes maximum flexibility to respond to the 
priorities they deem most urgent.
    School Resource Officers.--The placement of law enforcement 
officers in schools carries a risk of contributing to a 
``school-to-prison pipeline'' process where students are 
arrested or cited for minor, non-violent behavioral violations 
and then diverted to the juvenile court system. This pipeline 
wastes community resources and can lead to academic failure and 
greater recidivism rates for these students. The Committee 
takes note of the guidance and resource documents for schools 
issued by the Departments of Justice and Education which notes 
that schools using school-based law enforcement officers such 
as school resource officers or other school security should 
provide memoranda of understanding or other written agreements 
that clearly define these officers' roles and responsibilities 
on campus, focus officers' roles on safety, and provide proper 
training and monitoring of the program's activities, including 
data collection and evaluation. The Committee directs that the 
COPS Office continue to implement requirements and procedures 
regarding written memorandum of understanding and proper 
training for any COPS Hiring Grant funds used to hire school-
based law enforcement officers.

               General Provisions--Department of Justice

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions:
    Section 201 limits the amount of funding the Attorney 
General can use for official reception and representation.
    Section 202 prohibits the use of funds in this title to pay 
for an abortion except where the life of the mother would be in 
danger.
    Section 203 prohibits the use of funds in this title to 
require a person to perform or facilitate an abortion.
    Section 204 requires female prisoners to be escorted when 
off prison grounds.
    Section 205 allows the Department of Justice, subject to 
the Committee's reprogramming procedures, to transfer up to 5 
percent between appropriations, but limits to 10 percent the 
amount that can be transferred into any one appropriation.
    Section 206 authorizes the Attorney General to extend a 
personnel management demonstration project.
    Section 207 limits the placement of maximum or high 
security prisoners to appropriately secure facilities.
    Section 208 restricts Federal prisoner access to certain 
amenities.
    Section 209 requires review by the Deputy Attorney General 
and the Department's Investigative Review Board prior to the 
obligation or expenditure of funds for major technology 
projects.
    Section 210 requires the Department to follow reprogramming 
procedures prior to any deviation from the program amounts 
specified in this title or the reuse of specified deobligated 
funds provided in previous years.
    Section 211 prohibits the use of funds for OMB Circular A-
76 competitions for work performed by employees of the Bureau 
of Prisons or of the Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated.
    Section 212 prohibits U.S. Attorneys from simultaneously 
holding multiple jobs outside of the scope of a U.S. Attorney's 
professional duties.
    Section 213 permits up to 3 percent of grant and 
reimbursement program funds made available to the Office of 
Justice Programs to be used for training and technical 
assistance, permits up to 2 percent of grant and reimbursement 
program funds made available to that office to be transferred 
to the National Institute of Justice or the Bureau of Justice 
Statistics for criminal justice research and statistics, and 
permits up to 5 percent of discretionary grant and 
reimbursement program funds made available to OJP to be used 
for tribal criminal justice assistance. The Committee continues 
to support strongly efforts to help tribes improve the capacity 
of their criminal justice systems.
    Section 214 gives the Attorney General the authority to 
waive matching requirements for Second Chance Act adult and 
juvenile reentry demonstration projects; State, tribal and 
local reentry courts; and drug treatment programs.
    Section 215 waives the requirement that the Attorney 
General reserve certain funds from amounts provided for 
offender incarceration.
    Section 216 prohibits funds, other than funds for the 
national instant criminal background check system established 
under the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, from being 
used to facilitate the transfer of an operable firearm to a 
known or suspected agent of a drug cartel where law enforcement 
personnel do not continuously monitor or control such firearm.
    Section 217 requires the Department to provide documents to 
the Inspector General that are necessary as part of audits and 
investigations.
    Section 218 exempts the penalties required by the Prison 
Rape Elimination Act on certain grant programs for 1 year.
    Section 219 permits the Department of Justice to 
participate in Performance Partnership Pilot collaboration 
programs.

                               TITLE III

                                SCIENCE

                Office of Science and Technology Policy

Appropriations, 2014....................................      $5,555,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................       5,555,000
Committee recommendation................................       5,555,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $5,555,000. The 
recommendation is the same as the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and the budget request.
    The Office of Science and Technology Policy [OSTP] was 
created by the National Science and Technology Policy, 
Organization, and Priorities Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-282) 
and coordinates science and technology policy for the White 
House. OSTP provides scientific and technological information, 
analysis, and advice for the President and the executive 
branch; participates in formulation, coordination, and 
implementation of national and international policies and 
programs that involve science and technology; maintains and 
promotes the health and vitality of the U.S. science and 
technology infrastructure; reviews and analyzes, with the 
Office of Management and Budget, the research and development 
budgets for all Federal agencies; and coordinates research and 
development efforts of the Federal Government to maximize the 
return on the public's investment in science and technology and 
to ensure Federal resources are used efficiently and 
appropriately.
    Open Access to Federal Research.--The Committee has 
received a report by OSTP on the progress of all Federal 
agencies in developing and implementing policies to increase 
public access to federally funded scientific research. The 
Committee is pleased by the progress being made and expects all 
plans currently under review by OSTP to be finalized and 
approved by the relevant agencies by the end of calendar year 
2014. The Committee expects that a majority of Federal agencies 
will have entered into the implementation phase for their plan 
in early calendar year 2015. As these plans are finalized, OSTP 
is directed to report to the Committee every quarter on the 
implementation timelines for each participating agency and 
component. The report should also include an estimate of the 
associated implementation costs for each agency and associated 
components, as well as the cumulative cost and a timeline for 
full implementation.
    Medical Imaging Research Initiative.--The Committee 
believes there is potential in the near future to accelerate 
revolutionary new imaging technology for medical professionals 
and researchers to combat disease and support high-skilled 
manufacturing jobs in the United States. Such advances will 
require inter-agency coordination of Federal medical imaging 
research and development initiatives to accelerate the transfer 
of new technologies into commercial products manufactured in 
the United States and strengthen innovative research programs. 
Since many Federal agencies have existing and complementary 
roles on medical imaging research, there is a strong need for a 
Federal strategy that will coordinate and accelerate such 
research. The Committee directs OSTP, in cooperation with the 
National Institutes of Health as the lead agency, to establish, 
through the National Science and Technology Council's Committee 
on Science, a Medical Imaging Subcommittee [MIS] to coordinate 
Federal investments in imaging research. The MIS should be 
required to develop a roadmap for the full scope of imaging 
research and development, including: basic STEM science and 
technology creation, medical and translational research, 
evidence generation, clinical implementation, workforce and 
training support, and export-oriented manufacturing incentives.
    Ensuring American Manufacturing Competitiveness.--The 
Committee supports the goal of creating a national 
manufacturing strategy and believes updating the National 
Science and Technology Council's National Strategic Plan for 
Advanced Manufacturing is the best manner for creating such a 
plan. Consequently, the Committee directs OSTP to report to 
Congress within 180 days of enactment of this act identifying 
steps the agency can take to revise its National Strategic Plan 
for Advanced Manufacturing to include a recurring national 
strategic plan for manufacturing. This report should include an 
identification of agencies that should be included in the 
development of a national manufacturing strategy, topics to be 
addressed, stakeholders that should be consulted, how a 
comparative international perspective could improve the plan, 
what resources may be needed to produce an expanded plan, and 
an identification of metrics by which the success of a strategy 
can be measured, along with other matters that OSTP deems 
important. In drafting the report the Advanced Manufacturing 
Partnership Steering Committee of the President's Council of 
Advisors on Science and Technology [PCAST] should provide 
recommendations to assist OSTP.
    Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics 
Education.--Within the fiscal year 2015 budget request, the 
administration has again proposed a government-wide 
consolidation of STEM education programs. The Committee is 
encouraged that, unlike fiscal year 2014, the administration 
refrained from transferring existing STEM education programs 
from NOAA, NASA, NIST and other Federal science agencies into 
new lead STEM institutions--the National Science Foundation, 
the Department of Education, and the Smithsonian Institution--
until a more viable transition plan is formulated. The 
Committee is also encouraged that the administration listened 
to the Committee and voices outside of the administration that 
the list of programs slated for elimination in fiscal year 2014 
was over-reaching, resulting in a perception that the 
administration was only focused on reducing the number of 
programs and the amount of STEM funding rather than improving 
the quality of federally supported STEM education.
    For fiscal year 2015, the administration responded with a 
more focused and scaled-down proposal. However, while the 
Committee maintains its support of greater efficiencies and 
consolidation, several proven and successful programs have 
again been eliminated with no evaluation on why they were 
deemed duplicative or ineffective. The Committee still has 
concerns that the proposal as a whole has not been thoroughly 
communicated with the education community or congressional 
authorizing committees, and lacks thorough guidance and input 
from Federal agencies affected by this proposal.
    Therefore, the Committee continues to support effective 
mission-oriented STEM education programs at NASA, NOAA, and 
NIST within this bill, and encourages OSTP to work with the 
non-Federal education and outreach communities to present a 
proposal that supports efficiencies while garnering wider 
support. In seeking efficiencies for STEM programs, OSTP and 
its partners should be mindful of ensuring that scientists 
supported by the Federal Government are not absolved of 
responsibility to educate and train the next generation. OSTP 
should also take care to preserve effective training and 
education programs designed to directly fulfill the unique 
STEM-related mission needs of the agencies administering them.

             National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Appropriations, 2014.................................... $17,646,500,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................  17,460,600,000
Committee recommendation................................  17,900,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $17,900,000,000 for 
the National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA]. The 
recommendation is $253,500,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and $439,400,000 above the budget request.
    NASA was established by the National Aeronautics and Space 
Act of 1958 (Public Law 85-568) to conduct space and 
aeronautical research and development and to conduct flight 
activities for peaceful purposes. NASA's unique mission of 
exploration, discovery, and innovation is intended to preserve 
the United States' role as both a leader in world aviation and 
as the pre-eminent space-faring nation. It is NASA's mission 
to: advance human exploration, use and development of space; 
advance and communicate scientific knowledge and understanding 
of the Earth, the solar system, and the universe; and research, 
develop, verify, and transfer advanced aeronautics and space 
technologies.
    The budget request for NASA is below the fiscal year 2014 
level with unbalanced priorities resulting in a reduction of 
$179,200,000 to the Science directorate and a combined 
reduction of $363,900,000 to the Space Launch System and Orion 
Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle. The Committee is concerned that the 
budget request does not invest adequately in current or future 
missions, as evident by proposed cuts and cancellations for top 
priority missions. The Committee's recommendation seeks to 
reinstate a balanced space program that adequately funds 
science, space exploration, and aeronautics, all made possible 
by reliable and safe space transportation. For Science, the 
Committee's recommendation strives to keep NASA's near-term 
launches on track to continue progress in exploring our solar 
system and the universe, understanding the sun, and observing 
and protecting our planet. The Committee expects NASA to 
continue making progress on the recommendations of National 
Academies' decadal surveys, now and in the future.
    The Committee believes this bill represents a solid path 
forward for human spaceflight that reaches beyond low-Earth 
orbit with affordable crew and launch vehicles; invests in the 
burgeoning commercial launch industry that is bringing cargo, 
and eventually crew, to the International Space Station [ISS]; 
and revitalizes NASA science and technology programs. These 
elements should be viewed as complementary pieces of a balanced 
whole.
    NASA utilizes a broad variety of launch vehicles, from 
suborbital to heavy configurations, in order to successfully 
execute its missions. Missions are planned and payloads are 
designed and configured based upon the launch vehicle that will 
be used. While there are a variety of vehicles that NASA may 
choose in planning a mission, the Committee believes that NASA 
must weigh the needs of a mission when choosing a launch 
vehicle, including the ability of a launch provider to meet the 
intended launch schedule. In some cases, missions have launch 
windows of just seconds and delays due to conflicting launch 
manifests and vehicle oversubscription could have negative 
effects, including additional mission costs that could be 
avoided. The Committee encourages NASA to choose those launch 
vehicles that prioritize their manifests such that NASA has a 
reasonable confidence level that its missions can be reliably 
launched when scheduled. The Committee directs NASA to provide 
the Committee with a quarterly launch schedule, by mission, 
that describes risks associated with launch delays due to 
problems with the launch vehicle; impacts of launch delays to 
other missions in the launch queue, and a budget estimate of 
the anticipated carrying costs for missed launch windows.
    The Committee is counting on NASA to maintain focus on 
improving oversight and accountability throughout the agency. 
NASA's acquisition management remains on the Government 
Accountability Office's [GAO] ``high risk'' list, though the 
Committee notes that NASA is making progress in strengthening 
financial management. GAO's most recent assessment of NASA's 
large-scale projects found the agency's cost and schedule 
performance on major projects has improved since GAO's first 
assessment in 2009. The average cost overrun is down from 4 
percent to 3 percent, while average launch delays are down from 
4 months to under 3 months. NASA is directed to cooperate fully 
and to provide timely program analysis, evaluation data, and 
relevant information to the GAO so that GAO can report to 
Congress shortly after the annual budget submission of the 
President and semiannually thereafter on the status of large-
scale NASA programs, projects, and activities based on its 
review of this information.
    In addition, NASA is directed to include in its budget 
justification the reserve assumed by NASA to be necessary 
within the amount proposed for each directorate, theme, 
program, project, and activity, or, if the proposed funding 
level for a directorate, theme, program, project, or activity 
is based on confidence level budgeting, the confidence level 
assumed in the proposed funding level.
    This bill attempts to make tough choices in order to afford 
a balanced space program. To do that, the Committee was 
informed by the priorities of the Senate as well as the 
administration. However, the Committee does not always agree 
with the administration. The Committee grants NASA flexibility 
to craft spending plans that manage funds appropriately and, 
where necessary, address funding shortfalls that were not 
foreseen by the Congress or the agency prior to passage of 
annual appropriations. However, that latitude should not be 
viewed as a license to disregard the Congress' choices about 
where limited resources should be spent. The Federal funding 
priorities for NASA set forth in this bill should not be 
interpreted as a suggestion from the Committee; rather they 
should be interpreted like any other statutory requirement 
levied upon NASA. The Committee objects to NASA's efforts in 
recent fiscal years to redirect funding away from priorities 
clearly set by the Congress in law. Continued use of section 
505 of this bill in this manner will result in limited funding 
flexibility in the future.
    The Committee has chosen to articulate the funding levels 
of programs within the account structure for NASA in the form 
of tables. Major mission and program funding is listed within 
the tables and, if necessary, supplemented with explanatory 
report language.

                                SCIENCE

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $5,151,200,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   4,972,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,200,000,000

    The Committee provides $5,200,000,000 for Science, which is 
$48,800,000 above the fiscal year 2014 level and $228,000,000 
above the budget request. The Science account encompasses five 
lines of study: Earth Science, Planetary Science, Astrophysics, 
the James Webb Space Telescope, and Heliophysics. This funding 
seeks to answer fundamental questions concerning the ways in 
which Earth's climate is changing; the comparison of Earth with 
other planets in the solar system and around other stars; the 
connections between the Sun and Earth; and the origin and 
evolution of planetary systems, the galaxy, and the universe, 
including the origin and distribution of life in the universe. 
These objectives are achieved through robotic flight missions, 
ground-based scientific research and data analysis, and the 
development of new technologies for future missions.

                                 SCIENCE
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Earth Science:
    Earth Science Research.............................          447,200
    Earth Systematic Missions..........................          850,600
    Earth System Science Pathfinder....................          266,100
    Earth Science Multi-Mission Operations.............          176,100
    Earth Science Technology...........................           55,600
    Applied Sciences...................................           36,300
                                                        ----------------
      Subtotal, Earth Science..........................        1,831,900
                                                        ================
Planetary Science:
    Planetary Science Research.........................          215,500
    Discovery..........................................          250,800
    New Frontiers......................................          281,400
    Mars Exploration...................................          345,000
    Outer Planets......................................           79,000
    Technology.........................................          130,000
                                                        ----------------
      Subtotal, Planetary Science......................        1,301,700
                                                        ================
Astrophysics:
    Astrophysics Research..............................          164,300
    Cosmic Origins.....................................          260,300
    Physics of the Cosmos..............................          108,800
    Exoplanet Exploration..............................           47,500
    Astrophysics Explorer..............................          126,900
                                                        ----------------
      Subtotal, Astrophysics...........................          707,800
                                                        ================
James Webb Space Telescope.............................          645,400
                                                        ================
Heliophysics:
    Heliophysics Research..............................          220,800
    Living with a Star.................................          256,400
    Solar Terrestrial Probes...........................           70,400
    Heliophysics Explorer..............................          123,600
                                                        ----------------
      Subtotal, Heliophysics...........................          671,200
                                                        ================
Education..............................................           42,000
                                                        ================
      Total, Science...................................        5,200,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Earth Science Missions.--The Committee maintains the 
ongoing development of the Tier I Earth Science missions, and 
provides the full budget requests for the Soil Moisture Active 
and Passive [SMAP] and the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation 
Satellite [IceSat-2] missions.
    Given the importance to water resource management, ice 
dynamics measurement, and earthquake and tsunami research, the 
Committee directs NASA to provide sufficient funding to ensure 
that the dual L-band and S-band synthetic aperture radar 
mission can pass into formulation in mid-fiscal year 2015.
    Pre-Aerosol, Clouds, Ecosystem.--The Committee maintains 
support for the Pre-Aerosol, Clouds, Ecosystem [PACE] mission, 
and provides an additional $25,000,000 to begin technology risk 
reduction and formulation studies. By starting this mission in 
fiscal year 2015, the gap in the essential Ocean Color time-
series will be reduced by 2 to 3 years. Restoring this data 
stream will better equip the ocean ecology, ocean biology, 
aerosol and cloud science communities to address challenges 
highlighted in the National Academies' Earth Science Decadal 
Survey.
    Landsat Data Continuity.--The Committee provides 
$68,100,000, $4,000,000 above the request, for a land imaging 
mission successor to Landsat 8. With Landsat 7 at risk for 
ending its mission life as early as 2017, the Committee is 
deeply troubled at the potential loss of 8-day continuous 
terrestrial coverage now provided through the Landsat satellite 
series. The Committee does not concur with various 
administration efforts to develop alternative ``out of the 
box'' approaches to this data collection--whether they are 
dependent on commercial or international partners. Given the 
constraints in Federal funding, and the absence of credible 
alternatives to a conventional land imaging mission that 
ensures Landsat data continuity, NASA should proceed with an 
acquisition in fiscal year 2015 for a mission to launch a 
follow on to Landsat 8 by not later than 2020 that does not 
exceed a cost cap of $650,000,000, inclusive of all launch 
vehicle costs. Such a mission shall maximize the utilization of 
non-recurring engineering efforts from Landsat 8 to maintain a 
relatively low level of project risk. In addition, as a follow 
on to Landsat 8, program reserves shall be limited to not more 
than 10 percent for the duration of the mission's development 
and all hardware contracts should be firm fixed price and 
reflect steep discounts over the price paid for comparable 
components for Landsat 8. The Committee notes that the notional 
land imaging fiscal year 2016 budget is now more than 
$100,000,000 below what is needed for a 2020 launch. Hence, the 
Committee expects the 2016 budget to reflect resources 
necessary to meet that launch date.
    Carbon Monitoring.--Of the funds provided within the Earth 
Science research and analysis activity, the Committee 
recommends no less than $8,000,000 to continue efforts for the 
development of a carbon monitoring system. The majority of the 
funds should be directed toward acquisition, field sampling, 
quantification, and development of a prototype monitoring, 
reporting and verification system. Priority should be given to 
mapping States that have previously demonstrated the ability 
and willingness to map forests on a county level to enable the 
program to demonstrate how to cost effectively scale these 
measurements.
    Jason-3 and DSCOVR.--The Committee transfers development 
costs and responsibility of Jason-3 and the Deep Space Climate 
Observatory [DSCOVR] from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration [NOAA] to NASA within the funding provided for 
Earth Systematic Missions. The Committee provides additional 
funds on top of the requested amounts for these two missions to 
account for funding that had been requested within NOAA, which 
results in $25,600,000 for Jason-3 and $24,800,000 for DSCOVR. 
NASA is directed to complete the construction and launch of 
these important Earth science missions on schedule and on 
budget, which NASA is already facilitating on behalf of NOAA. 
NASA shall continue to partner with NOAA to transfer 
operational components of both programs as planned.
    Planetary Science.--With the exception of increased funding 
for Mars Exploration and the Discovery Program, the Committee 
supports Planetary Science at the budget request levels, 
including $137,200,000 for Technology, $40,000,000 for Near 
Earth Object Observations within Planetary Science Research, 
and $281,400,000 for New Frontiers, which includes $224,800,000 
for the OSIRIS-REx mission.
    Discovery Program.--The Committee recommends $250,800,000 
for the Discovery Program in fiscal year 2015, an increase of 
$20,000,000 above the budget request. The additional funds 
should be allocated for future Discovery lines in other 
missions and data analysis to initiate Phase B activities 
consistent with an upcoming announcement of opportunity [AO]. 
The Committee is concerned by the Agency's delays in issuing 
this AO and for the proposed scheduling of Discovery launches 
every 36 months rather than the 24-month cycle long supported 
by the Committee and recommended by the Planetary Science 
Decadal Survey ``Visions Voyages for Planetary Sciences 2013-
2022''. The Committee opposes any lengthening of the launch 
cycle for Discovery missions.
    New Frontiers.--The Committee is concerned about the dearth 
of opportunities for medium-sized planetary missions after 
fiscal year 2015. The Juno and New Horizons missions will 
deliver new science discoveries over the next 2 years, followed 
by the launch of OSIRIS-REx in 2016. However, beyond these 
opportunities, NASA lacks a plan for the next set of medium 
class missions. As a result, the Committee directs NASA to 
initiate a New Frontiers announcement of opportunity as soon as 
practicable with the expectation of launching the next New 
Frontiers mission within 48 months of the award. The fiscal 
year 2016 budget submission should reflect an enhanced profile 
to accommodate this effort.
    New Horizons.--The Committee notes that the Planetary 
Science Decadal Survey that recommended the New Horizons 
mission also recommended that NASA retarget the spacecraft 
toward Kuiper Belt objects following the encounter with Pluto 
in July 2015. The Committee encourages the planetary science 
community to select the secondary destination as soon as 
possible in order to maximize the opportunity for success 
during an extended mission. The Committee strongly supports 
surveying the accessible region of space that the New Horizons 
spacecraft will be able to transit in order to determine if 
potential targets of opportunity exist that the spacecraft can 
explore.
    Europa.--A mission to Europa represents one of the highest 
large mission priorities of the Planetary Science Decadal 
Survey. As one of these top priorities, Europa presents NASA 
with an opportunity to capitalize on investments it has made in 
producing a heavy lift launch vehicle capability. The Committee 
believes that any planning for a Europa mission should seek to 
maximize the scientific return and utilize the capabilities of 
NASA's own heavy lift launch vehicle. The Committee directs 
NASA, in setting the baseline Europa mission highlighted in the 
decadal survey, to use the Space Launch System as the launch 
vehicle.
    Mars Exploration.--The Committee provides $345,000,000, 
which is $65,700,000 above the request level, for Mars 
Exploration. The Committee does not support the budget request 
to cut funding for robotic rovers and in-space observatories 
expected to culminate in a Mars sample return, which was 
identified as the top priority for planetary science by the 
Planetary Science Decadal Survey.
    Astrophysics.--Within funds provided to advance scientific 
knowledge of the origins of the universe, the Committee 
provides $98,600,000 for the Hubble Space Telescope [HST], 
$87,000,000 for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared 
Astronomy [SOFIA], and $38,000,000 for the Balloon Project.
    The Committee disagrees with NASA's position that a change 
in HST's grants administration offers any significant savings 
over fiscal year 2014 operations. In the history of NASA, HST 
has proven to be the agency's premier scientific observatory. 
Therefore, HST's operations and grant awards, particularly in 
an era of fiscal constraint, should not be used as a budget 
gimmick to achieve artificial savings. In order to plan for the 
remaining life of HST and provide for an initial overlap with 
the James Webb Space Telescope through 2020, NASA is directed 
to undertake a study of operations and associated budget for 
fiscal years 2015 through 2020. This study should consider the 
full range of science capabilities, operational staffing, and 
risk reduction to assure a scientifically productive HST 
program.
    The Committee disagrees with NASA's effort to terminate the 
SOFIA mission and believes that such decisions for science 
missions should be made only after a senior review that 
evaluates the relative scientific benefit and return from 
continued investment.
    Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope [WFIRST] Science 
Mission.--Within the funds provided, the Committee provides 
$56,000,000 for NASA to proceed with further risk reduction and 
detailed formulation on a science mission that meets the 
exoplanet and dark energy science objectives of WFIRST. This 
recommendation builds upon the Agency's work with both the 
Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope to 
ensure that the synergies and discoveries from those missions 
enhance WFIRST's scientific objectives so that they can be 
achieved in a way that is both cost effective and advances the 
field of study in astrophysics to guarantee world class 
results.
    Senior Review Panel for Astrophysics.--The Committee is 
aware that the Senior Review Panel for NASA's Astrophysics 
program deliberated after the fiscal year 2015 budget was 
submitted. The Committee notes that the panel's May 2014 report 
states: ``The operation of the nation's space borne 
observatories is so severely impacted by the current funding 
climate in Washington that the Senior Review Panel feels that 
American pre-eminence in the study of the Universe from space 
is threatened to the point of irreparable damage if additional 
funds cannot be found to fill the projected funding gaps.'' The 
Committee believes that the decision to continue supporting 
large-scale science missions, such as these astrophysics 
resources, should first be considered for their scientific 
merit and viability and then in the context of any fiscal 
constraints. The Committee directs NASA to take into account 
the panel's recommendations when allocating funding for 
astrophysics programs in the agency's spending plan.
    James Webb Space Telescope.--The Committee maintains strong 
support for the completion of the James Webb Space Telescope 
[JWST], and provides $645,400,000, the same as the budget 
request. The bill maintains an overall development cost ceiling 
for JWST at $8,000,000,000, and the Committee intends to hold 
NASA and its contractors to that commitment. The Committee 
expects to be kept fully informed on issues relating to program 
and risk management, achievement of cost and schedule goals, 
and program technical status. The Committee appreciates GAO's 
continuing work to monitor JWST progress, costs, and schedule.
    Heliophysics.--Within funds provided to advance scientific 
knowledge of the Sun's impact on the Earth, the Committee 
recommends $43,900,000 for the Research and Analysis program, 
an increase of $10,000,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee directs NASA to implement the multiagency 
``Diversify, Realize, Integrate, Venture, and Educate'' [DRIVE] 
initiative as recommended in the Heliophysics Decadal Survey in 
order to take advantage of new opportunities yielded by the 
Heliophysics Systems Observatory assets and data.
    The Committee provides $48,500,000 for the Magnetospheric 
Multiscale [MMS] mission. The Committee expects NASA to 
maintain the current MMS launch profile and to keep the 
Committee apprised on this matter.
    The Committee also provides $145,600,000 for the Solar 
Probe Plus mission, the same as the budget request. The 
Committee strongly affirms its multiyear commitment to a 2018 
launch for the solar probe plus mission as advanced technology 
development funds provided to NASA in prior years have retired 
substantial technical risk and made the funding profile for the 
mission manageable, points independently verified by outside 
reviews. The Committee fully expects that all future NASA 
budget submissions will adhere to a funding profile that 
guarantees a 2018 launch.
    The Committee provides the budget request of $123,600,000 
for the Heliophysics Explorer Program. The Committee believes 
that this program and other programs of opportunity are crucial 
to a robust space science program, and that each Explorer 
selection round should be adequately funded to guarantee one 
full mission for astrophysics and a corresponding one for 
heliophysics. The Committee expects to monitor this activity 
carefully since this program is one of NASA's longest running 
most successful programs, and more than 90 explorer missions 
have launched, including Explorer 1, which discovered the 
Earth's radiation belts, and the Nobel Prize-enabling Cosmic 
Background Explorer mission.
    Science Mission Directorate, Education.--The Committee is 
encouraged by the administration's attempt to follow the 
Committee's direction to preserve education funding within the 
Science Mission Directorate [SMD] by requesting $15,000,000 in 
fiscal year 2015. However, the administration touts this 
request as a generous new initiative when the amount is 
actually $27,000,000 below the fiscal year 2014 level of 
$42,000,000. For fiscal year 2015, the Committee provides no 
less than $42,000,000 for education as reflected in a more 
transparent single line within the SMD funding chart. This 
includes the $15,000,000 education funding included in the 
budget submission within the Astrophysics program. However, the 
Committee supports the recommendation that the Astrophysics 
program administer this SMD-wide education funding.
    The Committee notes that the $42,000,000 is well below the 
authorized mandate that 1 percent of all NASA science funds are 
allocated to education-related efforts. Thus, this amount does 
not represent a cumulative total of all on-going and 
longstanding education activities that will be conducted 
throughout SMD in fiscal year 2015.

                              AERONAUTICS

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $566,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     551,100,000
Committee recommendation................................     551,100,000

    The Committee provides $551,100,000 for Aeronautics, which 
is $14,900,000 below the fiscal year 2014 level and equal to 
the budget request. The Aeronautics account funds research in 
key areas related to the development of advanced aircraft 
technologies and systems, including those related to aircraft 
safety, environmental compatibility and fuel efficiency, and 
research that supports the Next Generation Air Transportation 
System in partnership with the Joint Planning and Development 
Office.
    The Committee supports the budget reorganization for the 
Aeronautics directorate that is proposed with the fiscal year 
2015 budget. However, the Committee is disappointed in the 
requested reduction in rotary craft research and encourages 
NASA to increase funding for this activity within funds 
provided.
    The Committee supports the budget request level of 
$25,000,000 for the Advanced Composites Project within the 
Advanced Air Vehicles Program.
    The Committee also supports the requested level of 
$127,000,000 for the Integrated Aviation Systems Program. The 
Committee notes that the Federal Aviation Administration [FAA] 
recently identified six sites it will use to establish unmanned 
aerial systems [UAS] safety standards and develop technology 
required to integrate UAS safely into the National Airspace 
System [NAS]. The Committee urges NASA to coordinate its UAS 
activities with the test sites to the greatest extent possible 
to ensure the safest and most efficient integration of these 
platforms into the NAS.

                            SPACE TECHNOLOGY

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $576,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     705,500,000
Committee recommendation................................     580,200,000

    The Committee provides $580,200,000 for Space Technology, 
which is $4,200,000 above the fiscal year 2014 level and 
$125,300,000 below the budget request. The Space Technology 
Program funds basic research that can advance multi-purpose 
technologies to enable new approaches to NASA's current 
missions. It includes NASA's Small Business Innovative Research 
[SBIR] and Small Business Technology Transfer [STTR] programs.
    Within Space Technology, the Committee prioritizes funding 
for ongoing activities including Crosscutting Space Technology. 
The Committee recommends Space Technology continue to fund 
satellite servicing in concert with the Space Operations 
directorate. This funding will contribute to a competitive 
demonstration mission and shall be managed by the Space 
Operations mission directorate.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of the SBIR program 
and its previous success in commercialization of results from 
federally funded research and development projects. The SBIR 
program encourages domestic small businesses to engage in 
Federal research and development, and creates jobs. The 
Committee therefore directs NASA to place an increased focus on 
awarding SBIR awards to firms with fewer than 50 employees.
    Within the funds provided for Crosscutting Space Technology 
Development, the Committee provides $17,000,000 for Flight 
Opportunities.

                              EXPLORATION

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $4,113,200,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   3,976,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   4,367,700,000

    The Committee provides $4,367,700,000 for Exploration, 
which is $254,500,000 above the fiscal year 2014 level and 
$391,700,000 above the budget request. The Exploration account 
funds the capabilities required to develop, demonstrate, and 
deploy the transportation, life support, and surface systems 
that will enable sustained human presence throughout the solar 
system, including at the International Space Station [ISS], in 
low-Earth orbit, and beyond low-Earth orbit.
    The Committee believes the Nation deserves a safe, robust 
human spaceflight program. This program aims to regularly and 
reliably provide access to the ISS and enable exploration 
beyond low-Earth orbit. Capabilities to reach the ISS with U.S. 
vehicles and to explore beyond low-Earth orbit must work hand 
in hand. The United States must continue building a heavy lift 
rocket to complement emerging domestic capabilities for a 
sustainable human spaceflight program that can accomplish both 
of these goals.
    Furthermore, the United States must engage its 
international partners to have a truly robust and successful 
program. With the funds provided here, the United States will 
be able to contribute heavy lift launch technology to that 
effort, including the capability to launch humans beyond low-
Earth orbit.

                               EXPLORATION
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Exploration Research and Development...................          311,400
Commercial Space Flight................................          805,000
Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle........................        1,200,000
Space Launch System....................................        1,700,000
Exploration Ground Systems.............................          351,300
                                                        ----------------
      TOTAL............................................        4,367,700
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Human Exploration Capabilities.--The Committee is committed 
to the development of a U.S. capability that will enable NASA 
to access space beyond low-Earth orbit and do so, carrying U.S. 
astronauts. The development of the Space Launch System [SLS] 
and Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle [MPCV] will ensure the 
United States has the inherent capability to take humans to 
destinations well beyond current capabilities. SLS and Orion 
MPCV will also provide a capability that is not achievable by 
the vehicles currently under development in the commercial crew 
program. The goal of our human space program has always been to 
explore beyond our own planet. To attain NASA's goal, proper 
resources are essential to ensure that the development of SLS 
and Orion MPCV will be successful. Unfortunately, the requested 
funding levels for these vehicles have again fallen below what 
is necessary. In fact, since the inception of the program, the 
Committee has repeatedly included the funding necessary to keep 
these programs on schedule and on budget because the budget 
request itself has fallen far short of requirements by 
providing unreliable and unsubstantiated cost estimates.
    The Committee remains disappointed that the funding 
requested by NASA for SLS and the Orion MPCV once again bears 
little relation to either funding levels provided in previous 
years or NASA's own cost estimates and policies. NASA has yet 
to provide independent cost and schedule assessments for SLS 
and Orion MPCV, which the Committee has requested since the 
programs began. To preserve the current schedule and maintain 
proper funding for planned work and reserve levels, the 
Committee must rectify NASA's planned budget shortfall for SLS 
and Orion MPCV. The bill provides $1,700,000,000 for SLS rocket 
development to keep the program on a path toward successfully 
meeting its launch milestones. The proposed funding for SLS, by 
NASA's own cost and schedule standards, is not sufficient to 
deliver an initial test launch by the planned December 2017 
date. Moreover, insufficient funding for SLS will lead to cost 
escalation and unnecessary schedule delays that will have to be 
addressed in future budget years. The Committee has 
consistently supported funding for SLS and has done so again 
this year. The additional resources provided in this bill will 
ensure that NASA can make the investments necessary, including 
those required for risk mitigation, to maintain a 2017 launch 
date.
    The Committee also provides $1,200,000,000 for the Orion 
MPCV. The Committee believes the funds above the request are 
necessary to maintain the consistent progress this program has 
achieved, including a path to achieve Exploration Mission-1, 
scheduled for 2017, the first mission to integrate Orion MPCV 
and the SLS.
    In response to longstanding issues with cost overruns and 
schedule delays in NASA missions, NASA issued NASA Procedural 
Requirements [NPR] 7120.5E which instituted the joint cost and 
schedule confidence level [JCL] process. The JCL is intended to 
assess potential risk and cost of a mission and consequently 
determine the likelihood of completing all remaining work at or 
below the budgeted levels on or before the mission's planned 
completion date. The standard JCL that NASA requires is 70 
percent meaning the mission has a 70 percent chance of meeting 
budget and schedule targets. The Government Accountability 
Office [GAO], in its annual assessment of NASA's large-scale 
projects, has indicated that the JCL process helps ensure 
estimates are more realistic, but cautions that NASA has a 
cultural tendency to be optimistic. In addition, GAO's 2014 
annual report states that overall, the JCL process ``has likely 
contributed to the recent decrease in cost and schedule growth 
in [NASA's] portfolio compared to historical levels.''
    During the course of the Committee's annual budget 
hearings, NASA testified that SLS did not need a JCL of 70 
percent, as specified in NPR 7120.5E, yet NASA has not provided 
any documentation to substantiate this claim. A budget proposal 
resulting in a low JCL ties NASA's hands by limiting its 
ability to mitigate technical risks, control program cost 
growth, and minimize schedule delays. These risks are contrary 
to the stated purpose of NPR 7120.5E to ``improve program and 
project performance.''
    To ensure that NASA follows its own guidance and does not 
require SLS and Orion MPCV to incur a higher risk profile than 
other major missions, the bill directs NASA to formulate a 
reliable and realistic JCL. In doing so, NASA shall provide the 
Committee with an annual budget profile based upon NASA's own 
70 percent JCL standard which is to be submitted concurrently 
with the annual budget submission. Any JCL that is less than 70 
percent shall be justified and documented, and NASA shall still 
provide the Committee with the full cost estimates that would 
be needed to achieve a 70 percent JCL.
    Commercial Crew.--The Committee has been consistent in its 
direction that NASA use a FAR-based contract for the 
development of a domestic crew capability. The use of the FAR 
was considered necessary due to the risks associated with 
transporting humans. Additionally, the Committee felt that a 
FAR-based contract was the only contracting vehicle that would 
provide NASA the transparency necessary to ensure the 
appropriateness of cost and pricing data and the insight into 
the ongoing work. While NASA has chosen to use a FAR-based 
contract, it has also waived significant portions of the 
standard FAR-based contract, including verifiable cost data, 
capping repayment of funds in case of inability to perform, and 
rights in data. NASA has informed the Committee that these 
deviations were necessary to ensure competition. However, with 
multiple entrants that collectively have extensive Federal 
contracting experience, the Committee questions the true need 
to waive these traditional requirements.
    While the Committee appreciates NASA's commitment to a 
firm, fixed-price contract for a commercial crew launch 
vehicle, it remains concerned that NASA may use other funding 
vehicles to provide additional resources. Given the importance 
of the commercial crew program to the long-term viability of 
the International Space Station, the need for transparency only 
grows in importance. As with any such project, the technical 
risk and probability for cost growth is high. Without the 
proper foundation and necessary requirements for certified cost 
and pricing data, NASA will have no insight into ongoing cost 
growth that could jeopardize the viability of the program.
    In order for NASA and Congress to have the appropriate 
level of transparency to ensure that the cost of the program is 
in line with the activities undertaken and that it does not 
grow exponentially, the Committee directs NASA to maintain FAR 
15.403-4, related to certified cost and pricing data for prime 
contractors, for any contracts entered into to support the 
development of a commercial crew vehicle. Further, NASA shall 
require quarterly reports to be submitted to NASA and the 
Committee that detail the funds invested by NASA and by the 
awardees during the previous quarter and cumulatively, 
including legacy launch systems that may be integrated with the 
crew vehicle.
    The Committee agrees with concern expressed by the 
Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel, the OIG, and others that Space 
Act agreements may not give NASA sufficient oversight to 
correct safety defects. The Committee directs NASA to only 
place astronauts on a commercial crew vehicle that NASA 
acquired under a FAR contract that allows NASA to require the 
company to meet all safety requirements. The Committee 
encourages NASA to continue working closely with commercial 
companies, even under Space Act agreements, so that those 
companies know what will be acceptable should NASA eventually 
contract for crew transportation services aboard those 
companies' vehicles. The Committee encourages NASA to develop 
plans to fully utilize NASA-owned rocket testing infrastructure 
for commercially developed launch vehicles to ensure that these 
vehicles are not only tested in the same manner as Government-
developed launch vehicles but at the same facilities to ensure 
consistency in testing across all potential vehicles.
    Advanced Exploration Systems.--Within Exploration Research 
and Development, the Committee recommends the request level of 
$182,900,000 for Advanced Exploration Systems. The Committee 
encourages NASA to continue to develop and test technology for 
supporting human spaceflight, including the use of expandable 
habitats, per the budget request.

                            SPACE OPERATIONS

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $3,778,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   3,905,400,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,830,800,000

    The Committee provides $3,830,800,000 for Space Operations, 
which is $52,800,000 above the fiscal year 2014 level and 
$74,600,000 below the budget request. The Space Operations 
account funds the International Space Station [ISS], and the 
supporting functions required to conduct operations in space. 
The ISS is a complex of research laboratories in low-Earth 
orbit in which American, Russian, Canadian, European, and 
Japanese astronauts are conducting unique scientific and 
technological investigations in a microgravity environment.
    International Space Station.--The Committee provides 
$3,012,800,000 for the ISS Program, which includes ISS 
Operations, ISS Research, and ISS Crew and Cargo Services. This 
Committee has consistently supported the construction and 
operation of the ISS on the promise that it would support 
world-class, international science that could improve life on 
Earth. The Committee is encouraged by NASA's recent 
announcement in January 2014 to extend the life of 
International Space Station [ISS] to 2024, and encourages NASA 
to work with its international partners to ensure this new goal 
is financially viable to maintain a high level of safety and 
sufficient research production. The Committee considers 
astronaut safety its highest priority and maintains support for 
the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel's recommendation that NASA 
reconsider its criteria for future human spaceflight to the 
ISS. NASA must ensure that safety standards for transportation 
to, and ongoing operations at, the ISS improve should NASA 
begin to purchase crew transportation services from commercial 
providers.
    Commercial Cargo Resupply.--The Committee recommends the 
requested amount of $1,530,700,000 for ISS resupply 
transportation. NASA, in partnership with private industry, has 
successfully developed and enabled a domestic cargo resupply 
capability for the ISS. This capability would not have been 
possible without significant Federal investment. The additional 
investments NASA is currently making to advance crew vehicle 
development will ultimately enable greater competition for ISS 
cargo resupply missions through the creation of more viable 
entrants than were originally available. With a more mature 
competitive environment, the Committee believes that exceptions 
to procurement practices to provide reliable cargo transport 
may be unnecessary. As NASA begins soliciting participants for 
the second round of cargo resupply missions, certified cost and 
pricing data should be required and made available to NASA.
    Satellite Servicing.--The Committee recommends $130,000,000 
for satellite servicing within Space Operations, which includes 
funds transferred from the Space Technology directorate. Funds 
should be used for: space technology developments including 
continued work related to demonstrations on the International 
Space Station; continuing a Restore Pathfinder mission to be 
achieved no later than 2017 and which may be used for either a 
low-earth orbit or geostationary orbit servicing of government 
assets only; and recommendations for a Restore mission beyond 
2017.
    The Committee notes that the replacement value of existing 
government assets in space, including operational weather 
satellites and other platforms critical to essential government 
activities, is in the tens of billions. Given constraints 
imposed by the Budget Control Act, satellite servicing offers a 
unique and valuable means to stagger the capital requirements 
for new missions by significantly extending the useful life of 
existing ones. The Committee continues to be deeply concerned 
with, and highly frustrated by, the agency's most senior 
leadership not embracing this transformational approach to 
managing the Nation's governmental space assets. The Committee 
expects NASA to provide for a full program of record on 
satellite servicing that includes technology development, the 
Restore Pathfinder, and recommendations for a Restore follow-on 
mission in the fiscal year 2016 budget. The Committee remains 
resolute in its commitment to this mission and believes it to 
be in the best interests of taxpayers and agencies with a large 
portfolio of space assets whose replacement value continues to 
increase at a time when resources are greatly constrained.
    21st Century Launch Complex Program.--The Committee 
provides $33,900,000 for the 21st Century Space Launch Complex, 
which is $8,000,000 above the request. The Committee is 
concerned about the ability of commercial space launch 
providers to plan for the future, given the preponderance of 
funding that is dedicated from the 21st Century Space Launch 
Complex to the facilities at Kennedy Space Center. The 
program's authorized purposes include projects at all NASA-
owned launch facilities. The Committee directs that any new 
Commercial Space Flight infrastructure investment proposals for 
the 21st Century Space Launch Complex program take into account 
the cargo mission needs also demonstrated at the Wallops Flight 
Facility [WFF]. There are now growing capacity issues at WFF 
that, if not resolved, could soon prevent the center from 
taking on small and large missions due to limitations 
associated with spacecraft processing and fueling facility and 
associated facilities that need to be addressed. Therefore, the 
Committee provides the increased funding to fill maintenance 
gaps at the WFF launch complex, and further directs NASA to 
take to consideration the full potential of all NASA-owned 
launch complexes.

                               EDUCATION

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $116,600,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      88,900,000
Committee recommendation................................     108,000,000

    The Committee provides $108,000,000 for Education, which is 
$8,600,000 below the fiscal year 2014 level and $19,100,000 
above the budget request. The Education account funds science, 
technology, engineering, and mathematics [STEM] education 
activities to educate and inspire our next generation of 
explorers and innovators.

                                EDUCATION
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
NASA Space Grant........................................          40,000
Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research..          18,000
Minority University Research and Education Program......          30,000
STEM Education and Accountability Projects..............          20,000
                                                         ---------------
    TOTAL...............................................         108,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Workforce Development.--The Committee continues to direct 
NASA to review all existing programs that offer internships, 
fellowships, and other related undergraduate and graduate 
programs and identify those programs that are directly 
associated with NASA's mission, and those that are of general 
value which may be more effectively coordinated through the 
National Science Foundation. NASA should also consider whether 
fellowships funded in Space Technology are more appropriate for 
the Education mission directorate.
    Space Grant.--The Committee provides $40,000,000 for Space 
Grant, and directs NASA to support an extension of the current 
Space Grant program, and to allocate the funding for consortia-
led institutions in all 52 participating jurisdictions 
according to the percentage allocation provided to States in 
the current 5-year grant award.
    STEM Education and Accountability Program.--The Committee 
provides no more than $10,000,000 for the Competitive Program 
for Science, Museums, Planetariums and NASA Visitors Centers 
within the STEM Education and Accountability Program [SEAP]. 
This competitive grant program creates interactive exhibits, 
professional development activities, and community-based 
programs to engage students, teachers, and the public in 
science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

                          CROSS AGENCY SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $2,793,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   2,778,600,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,778,600,000

    The Committee provides $2,778,600,000 for Cross Agency 
Support, which is $14,400,000 below the fiscal year 2014 level 
and the same as the budget request. The Cross Agency Support 
account funds agency management, including headquarters and 
each of the nine NASA field centers, as well as the design and 
execution of non-programmatic Construction of Facilities and 
Environmental Compliance and Restoration activities.
    Independent Verification and Validation [IV&V] Program.--
Within the amounts provided for cross-agency support, the 
Committee recommends $39,100,000 for NASA's IV&V Program.
    Cybersecurity.--NASA spends more than $1,500,000,000 
annually on approximately 550 IT systems used to control 
spacecraft; collect, process, and archive scientific data; and 
communicate within NASA as well as with contractors, academia, 
and the public. NASA is an attractive target for hackers 
whether they are seeking recognition for attacking a well-known 
agency, or seeking to obtain personal information for identity 
theft and fraud, or intellectual property.
    The Inspector General [IG] testified in May 2014 that 
NASA's IT governance structure remains one of NASA's top 
management challenges. On May 15, 2014, the IG reported to the 
Committee that NASA is expected to fully implement the IG's 
recommendations from the June 2013 report ``NASA's Information 
Technology Governance'' by the end of calendar year 2014.
    The Committee's recommendation includes the full request of 
$183,600,000 for Agency Information Technology [IT] Services to 
support shifting NASA's IT model to one with strong governance 
and strong information security practices.
    Employee Performance Communications System [EPCS].--The 
EPCS is the performance appraisal system used by NASA as the 
basis for training, rewarding, reassigning, promoting, reducing 
in grade, retaining, and removing employees. The Committee 
notes that EPCS data from some NASA centers indicates 
significantly lower performance ratings for African-American, 
Hispanic and Asian-American employees compared to non-minority 
employees during each of the last 5 years of this system's 
implementation. This 5-year trend also indicates managerial 
employees receiving superlative ratings at a significantly 
higher rate than those in non-supervisory positions.
    As a means of mitigating the effect of any sources of bias 
resulting in these disparities and adverse outcomes, the 
Committee encourages NASA to work with agency management, 
employee representatives, employee resource groups, and other 
stakeholders at NASA centers to reform and implement more fair 
and equitable performance-related criteria.

       CONSTRUCTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE AND RESTORATION

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $515,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     446,100,000
Committee recommendation................................     446,100,000

    The Committee provides $446,100,000 for Construction and 
Environmental Compliance and Restoration, which is $68,900,000 
below the fiscal year 2014 level and the same as the budget 
request. The Construction and Environmental Compliance and 
Remediation account provides for design and execution of 
programmatic, discrete and minor revitalization, construction 
of facilities projects, facility demolition projects, and 
environmental compliance and remediation activities.
    In order to maintain continuity within the projects for 
major construction, NASA shall prioritize available funding 
towards activities that have initiated demolition, site 
preparation, or construction activities during the previous 
fiscal year, followed by projects that were deferred in 
previous budget requests and have since been requested again 
for funding in the fiscal year 2015 request.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $37,500,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      37,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      37,500,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $37,500,000 for the 
Office of Inspector General [IG], which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2014 level and $500,000 above the budget request. 
The Office is responsible for promoting efficiency and 
preventing and detecting crime, fraud, waste, and 
mismanagement.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    The Committee includes bill language regarding the 
availability of funds for certain prizes. The Committee also 
includes bill language regarding transfers of funds between 
accounts and the NASA spending plan for fiscal year 2015.

                      National Science Foundation

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $7,171,918,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   7,255,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   7,255,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $7,255,000,000 for 
the National Science Foundation [NSF]. The recommendation is 
$83,082,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and the 
same as the budget request.
    The National Science Foundation was established as an 
independent agency by the National Science Foundation Act of 
1950 (Public Law 81-507) and is authorized to support research 
and education programs that promote the progress of science and 
engineering in the United States. The Foundation supports 
research and education in all major scientific and engineering 
disciplines through grants, cooperative agreements, contracts, 
and other forms of assistance in all parts of the United 
States. The Foundation also supports unique, large-scale 
research facilities and international facilities.

                    RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $5,808,918,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   5,807,460,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,838,690,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $5,838,690,000. The 
recommendation is $29,772,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level and $31,230,000 above the budget request.
    The Research and Related Activities [R&RA] appropriation 
funds scientific discovery, trains a dynamic workforce, and 
supports broadly accessible state-of-the-art tools and 
facilities. Research activities will contribute to the 
achievement of these outcomes through expansion of the 
knowledge base; integration of research and education; 
stimulation of knowledge transfer among academia and public and 
private sectors; and international activities, and will bring 
the perspectives of many disciplines to bear on complex 
problems important to the Nation. The Foundation's discipline-
oriented R&RA account includes: Biological Sciences; Computer 
and Information Science and Engineering; Engineering; 
Geosciences; Mathematical and Physical Sciences; Social, 
Behavioral and Economic Sciences; Office of 
Cyberinfrastructure; Office of International Science and 
Engineering; Office of Polar Programs; Integrative Activities; 
and the U.S. Arctic Research Commission.
    The Committee's fiscal year 2015 recommendation renews its 
support for Federal long-term basic research that has the 
potential to be transformative to our economy and our way of 
life in the context of a stagnant Federal budget.
    Scientific Facilities and Instrumentation.--A critical 
component of the Nation's scientific enterprise is the 
infrastructure that supports researchers in discovery science. 
Investments to advance the frontiers of research and education 
in science and engineering are critical to the Nation's 
innovation enterprise. The Committee expects the NSF to fully 
fund world-class U.S. scientific research facilities and 
instruments to adequately support scientists and students 
engaged in research to maximize sustained investments in 
science.
    Astronomy.--U.S.-based astronomy facilities continue to 
make groundbreaking discoveries and maintain excellent world-
class scientific research even as operating budgets have been 
continually constrained. The Committee expects NSF to sustain 
support for the scientific facilities funded by the 
Astronomical Sciences division, including the National Radio 
Astronomy Observatory, which shall be funded at no less than 
the fiscal year 2014 level of $43,140,000.
    Advanced Manufacturing.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance of domestic biomanufacturing and the considerable 
investments made by U.S. competitors in this field. As part of 
its Advanced Manufacturing initiative, the Committee encourages 
NSF to include at least $15,000,000 for new research in 
biomanufacturing to advance the U.S. global competitiveness in 
this area.
    High Performance Computing.--The Committee requests a plan 
from NSF on how the agency plans to maintain and modernize its 
high performance computing infrastructure, software, and 
applications that support all areas of its scientific research 
and education. The plan should also include how the agency 
plans to transition research using high performance computers 
to operations that will require similar computing capacity. The 
plan should include NSF's estimate of cost for any 
modernization efforts as well as any costs associated with 
maintaining these systems.
    Cybersecurity.--The Committee's recommendation includes the 
fiscal year 2014 level of $159,000,000 for cybersecurity 
research, including support for core computer science research 
at academic institutions. The discovery and innovation in 
cybersecurity supported by NSF will form the intellectual 
foundations for practical applications that make our 
information networks safer, more secure, and better able to 
predict, resist, repel, and recover from cyber attacks.
    Experimental Program To Stimulate Competitive Research 
[EPSCoR].--Within the amount provided, the Committee provides 
$159,690,000 for EPSCoR, an amount equal to the fiscal year 
2015 request.
    Ocean Science Infrastructure--The Committee supports the 
requested increase in funding for the planning and design of 
the regional class research vessels. The Committee directs NSF 
to ensure that these vessels will soon be approved for 
inclusion in the Major Research Equipment and Facilities 
Construction account.
    Icebreakers.--The Committee supports the interagency 
process to develop requirements for a new polar-class 
icebreaker, recognizing the strategic importance of Arctic 
operations to our Nation's future security and prosperity and 
the critical support that such a vessel will provide to NSF's 
research and logistics in Antarctica. NSF is encouraged to work 
with its interagency partners to support this effort, which 
should result in an operational requirements document no later 
than 180 days after the date of enactment of this act.
    Southeast Tornado Research.--NSF has previously worked with 
NOAA on tornado related research in the Midwest with the Vortex 
I and Vortex II research campaigns. This research provides 
valuable insight into the formation of storms in this region 
and assists in lengthening the warning time for these violent 
storms. The Southeast region of the country also experiences 
tornado activity, but under different environmental and 
geologic conditions. The Southeast has not been the focus of 
previous Vortex research campaigns. Therefore, the Committee 
directs NSF to collaborate with NOAA's Weather and Air 
Chemistry Research Programs to focus on tornadic activity in 
the Southeast through a Vortex Southeast [Vortex-SE] research 
campaign. NSF shall report to the Committee within 180 days 
after the enactment of this act on these efforts.
    Science, Engineering, and Education for Sustainability 
[SEES].--The Committee supports the full budget request for 
SEES and encourages NSF to expand efforts in the Hazard SEES 
Interdisciplinary Research in Hazards and Disasters program and 
the Sustainable Chemistry, Engineering, and Materials program.

          MAJOR RESEARCH EQUIPMENT AND FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $200,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     200,760,000
Committee recommendation................................     200,760,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $200,760,000. The 
recommendation is $760,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and is the same as the budget request.
    The major research equipment and facilities construction 
appropriation supports the acquisition, procurement, 
construction, and commissioning of unique national research 
platforms and facilities as well as major research equipment. 
Projects supported by this appropriation will push the 
boundaries of technology and offer significant expansion of 
opportunities, often in new directions, for the science and 
engineering community. Preliminary design and development 
activities, on-going operations, and maintenance costs of the 
facilities are provided through the Research and Related 
Activities appropriation account.
    The Committee's recommendation includes funding at the 
requested level for the following ongoing projects: the 
Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory; 
the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope; the Ocean Observatories 
Initiative; the National Ecological Observatory Network; and 
the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

                     EDUCATION AND HUMAN RESOURCES

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $846,500,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     889,750,000
Committee recommendation................................     889,750,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $889,750,000 for 
this account. The recommendation is $43,250,000 above the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and the same as the budget 
request.
    The Education and Human Resources appropriation supports a 
comprehensive set of programs across all levels of education in 
science, technology, engineering, and mathematics [STEM]. The 
appropriation supports activities that unite school districts 
with institutions of higher learning to improve precollege 
education. Other precollege activities include the development 
of the next generation of precollege STEM education leaders, 
instructional materials, and the STEM instructional workforce. 
Undergraduate activities support curriculum, laboratory, and 
instructional improvement; expand the STEM talent pool; attract 
STEM participants to teaching; augment advanced technological 
education at 2-year colleges; and develop dissemination tools. 
Graduate support is directed to research and teaching 
fellowships and internships and instructional workforce 
improvement by linking precollege systems with higher 
education. Programs also seek to broaden the participation of 
groups underrepresented in the STEM enterprise and promote 
informal science education. Ongoing evaluation efforts and 
research on learning strengthen the base for these programs.
    Committee on STEM Education.--The Committee believes that 
NSF is well suited to handle undergraduate and graduate 
fellowships, internships, and specific grants similar to its 
current mission and, if there are general needs across 
Government, that NSF could similarly serve as a clearinghouse 
for such students. However, the Committee remains concerned 
that moving all or too many graduate related fellowships and 
scholarships to NSF will not meet the long-term, mission-
specific, STEM workforce needs of the entire Government. The 
Committee requests that NSF continue to work with OSTP on 
refining a plan for ways NSF could implement a broader program 
for graduate and undergraduate programs across the entire 
Federal Government, and to identify which programs across 
Government could benefit from such a program.
    Advanced Technological Education.--The Committee supports 
the full request level of $64,000,000 for Advanced 
Technological Education.
    Robert Noyce Scholarship Program.--The Committee provides 
the budget request level of $60,890,000 for the Robert Noyce 
Scholarship program. This program helps fill the critical need 
for STEM teachers in elementary and secondary schools by 
funding institutions of higher education to provide 
scholarships, stipends, and programmatic support to recruit and 
prepare STEM majors and professionals to become K-12 teachers. 
Scholarship and stipend recipients are required to complete 2 
years of teaching in a high-need school district for each year 
of support.
    CyberCorps: Scholarships for Service.--The CyberCorps: 
Scholarships for Service program helps the Federal Government 
respond to threats to our information technology infrastructure 
by providing scholarships to train cybersecurity professionals. 
In return, scholarship recipients agree to serve in a Federal 
Government agency position, building the Government's capacity 
to understand, respond to, and prevent cyber threats. More than 
900 students have completed the program, which was initiated in 
fiscal year 2001; 92.6 percent of students have placed with 
more than 120 Federal agencies. The Committee provides 
$45,000,000, which is $20,000,000 above the requested level and 
the same as the fiscal year 2014 level, for the Federal Cyber 
Service: Scholarships for Service program.
    Not less than $5,000,000 of the additional amount should be 
used to continue work with community colleges that have been 
designated a Center of Academic Excellence in Information 
Assurance 2-Year Education [CAE2Y] by the National Security 
Agency and the Department of Homeland Security.
    Informal Science Education.--The Committee maintains its 
strong support for NSF's informal science education program and 
supports the requested levels of $55,000,000 for Advancing 
Informal STEM Learning and $57,080,000 for STEM-C Partnerships. 
The Committee encourages the NSF to coordinate and provide 
necessary support for investments in and out of school time 
STEM education programs across Federal agencies, including 
support for extracurricular STEM programs. The Committee also 
encourages NSF to include components to STEM-C Partnerships 
that could improve geographic literacy.
    Division on Human Resource Development.--The Committee 
continues its longstanding support for existing initiatives to 
broaden participation in STEM fields and recognizes these 
programs have various purposes and engage students in a 
different manner. The Committee notes support for these 
programs has stagnated in spite of increases to the overall NSF 
budget. The Committee recommends $32,000,000 for the 
Historically Black Colleges and Universities [HBCUs] 
Undergraduate Program, $8,000,000 for the Alliance for Graduate 
Education and the Professoriate, $46,000,000 for the Louis 
Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation, $13,500,000 for 
the Tribal Colleges and Universities Program, and $24,000,000 
for Centers for Research Excellence in Science and Technology. 
In proposal selection, the Committee encourages NSF to give 
priority to grant proposals that have demonstrated maturity, 
including previous partnerships with other Federal agencies.
    Innovation Corps.--The Committee supports the NSF's request 
to increase the size and scope of the Innovation Corps [I-
Corps] program to build on the initial successes of his 
innovative public-private partnership model. However, the 
Committee is concerned that despite over 140 I-Corps awards to 
date, none have been made to HBCUs. This trend of failing to 
include HBCUs does little to connect minority-serving 
institutions to local innovation ecosystems that create new 
economic opportunities in all communities. NSF's budget 
justification states that the agency will support approximately 
15 new Innovation Corps sites. The Committee encourages that no 
fewer than three of these awards shall be made to qualified 
HBCU applicants using the standard peer review processes.
    HBCUs Excellence in Research.--HBCUs often lack human 
capital and the research infrastructure to effectively compete 
for Federal research funding. Currently, institutions that are 
modestly successful in winning Federal research investments are 
concentrated at a very small number of HBCU research 
universities, which significantly limits the access of 
underrepresented populations to benefit at the graduate or 
undergraduate levels from meaningful research experiences. With 
the Committee's urging, NSF has developed some research 
experience programs through its Education and Human Resources 
directorate. However, NSF's primary research directorates have 
a far more anemic track record in this support--a reality that 
the Committee believes must change if the Nation is to take 
advantage of the country's growing diversity to enhance 
America's economic competitiveness. No later than 120 days 
after enactment of this act, the NSF Director shall convene a 
high-level panel to devise a comprehensive strategy to 
accelerate significant competitive opportunities for HBCUs that 
can continuously tap NSF's core research directorates rather 
than its education and human resources program base. The 
strategy should include measurable milestones, and the panel 
should be comprised primarily of leaders from the Nation's 
HBCUs with an emphasis on those institutions with strong 
graduate programs that are successful at capturing Federal 
research funding.
    Transformative Learning Initiative.--The Committee is aware 
of complaints from the business community that recent college 
graduates are often poorly prepared for the workforce, and 
specifically lack necessary critical thinking, reasoning, and 
problem solving skills. While this problem does not have one 
source or solution, there is research that suggests that 
college professors can use teaching methods that increase the 
chances for students to experience a ``transformative learning 
experience'' that both improves subject knowledge and boosts 
these needed critical thinking skills. The Committee directs 
NSF to report to the Committee within 120 days from enactment 
of this act on a description of the agency's existing research 
on transformative learning and professional development 
approaches, particularly within respect to undergraduate 
programs at urban universities and HCBUs. If NSF is not 
currently conducting any transformative learning research or 
education initiatives, then, as part of the report, NSF shall 
provide the Committee with recommendation on establishing such 
an initiative including scope and costs.
    Life STEM.--The Committee believes that without targeted 
interventions at an early age, it will become increasingly 
difficult to guarantee a stable pipeline of minority applicants 
who can become candidates for degrees in STEM-related fields. 
While some institutions of higher education in urban areas have 
experimented with programs to generate greater minority 
candidates for STEM fields, they have generally not been 
sustained for long periods of time or subject to sufficient 
evaluation to determine their effectiveness. NSF, with its 
longstanding efforts to examine the means to address STEM-
related challenges through use of innovative intervention, has 
the ability to pursue a rigorous program of record to 
experiment with various models on how best to create a pipeline 
for life and bioscience careers for minorities beginning with 
elementary school.
    For this reason, the Committee directs NSF to use up to 
$7,500,000 within existing programs targeting broadening 
participation, particularly at HBCUs, to create effective 
models of intervention to nurture students from elementary 
school through undergraduate studies with an emphasis on life 
sciences. NSF shall report to the Committee not later than 180 
days from enactment of this act on the prospects for creating a 
mechanism for evaluating effective models of creating or 
retaining pipelines that would increase the numbers of 
underrepresented minorities in advanced science fields 
targeting minority serving institutions with an emphasis on 
STEM sciences that partner with elementary, middle and high 
schools near their institutions. The evaluation should examine 
formal and informal educational experiences on a year-round 
basis, including curriculum development, teacher support, and 
engagement in after school and related activities.
    Hispanic-Serving Institutions [HSI] Program.--Investment in 
STEM education is vital for American economic competitiveness, 
and Hispanic Americans are underrepresented in science and 
engineering disciplines. The Committee provides $5,000,000 as 
authorized under 42 U.S.C. 1862o-12 for NSF to implement a 
Hispanic-Serving Institutions [HSI] Program that is designed to 
increase the recruitment, retention, and graduation rates of 
Hispanic students pursuing associate or baccalaureate degrees 
in STEM fields.

                 AGENCY OPERATIONS AND AWARD MANAGEMENT

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $298,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     338,230,000
Committee recommendation................................     307,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $307,000,000. The 
recommendation is $9,000,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and $31,230,000 below the budget request.
    The appropriation provides salaries and expenses funds for 
staff salaries, benefits, travel, training, rent, advisory and 
assistance services, communications and utilities expenses, 
supplies, equipment, and other operating expenses necessary for 
management of the National Science Foundation's research and 
education activities.
    The Committee reiterates its direction to NSF to find 
savings from operating expenses and future headquarters 
planning.
    The Committee reiterates its long-standing requirement that 
NSF submit reprogrammings when initiating new programs or 
activities of more than $500,000 or when reorganizing 
components. The Committee expects to be notified of 
reprogramming actions which involve less than the above-
mentioned amount if such actions would have the effect of 
changing the agency's funding requirements in future years, or 
if programs or projects specifically cited in the Committee's 
reports are affected.

                  OFFICE OF THE NATIONAL SCIENCE BOARD

Appropriations, 2014....................................      $4,300,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................       4,370,000
Committee recommendation................................       4,370,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $4,370,000. The 
recommendation is $70,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and equal to the budget request.
    The National Science Board is the governing body of NSF and 
is charged with serving as an independent adviser to the 
President and Congress on policy matters related to science and 
engineering research and education.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $14,200,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      14,430,000
Committee recommendation................................      14,430,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $14,430,000. The 
recommendation is $230,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and equal to the budget request.
    The Office of Inspector General appropriation provides 
audit and investigation functions to identify and correct 
deficiencies that could create potential instances of fraud, 
waste, or mismanagement.

                        ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISION

    The bill includes one administrative provision to allow 
limited transfers of funds among accounts.

                                TITLE IV

                            RELATED AGENCIES

                       Commission on Civil Rights

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................      $9,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................       9,400,000
Committee recommendation................................       9,400,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $9,400,000 for the 
salaries and expenses of the Commission on Civil Rights. The 
recommendation is $400,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and equal to the budget request.

                Equal Employment Opportunity Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $364,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     365,531,000
Committee recommendation................................     365,000,000

    The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission [EEOC] is the 
leading Federal agency dedicated to eradicating employment 
discrimination in both the public and private sectors on the 
basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, 
pregnancy, age, disability, and family medical history or 
genetic information. The EEOC serves both U.S. public and 
private workplaces by helping provide a fair and inclusive 
workplace, which engenders employee satisfaction and 
commitment, and enhances employee retention, productivity, and 
profitability.
    The Committee's recommendation provides $365,000,000 for 
EEOC salaries and expenses. This recommendation is $1,000,000 
above the fiscal year 2014 enacted level, and $531,000 below 
the request. This funding will support the EEOC's obligations 
to investigate and prosecute charges of employment 
discrimination. The Committee notes that the EEOC has also 
undertaken reforms that should enable it to reduce its pending 
inventory of private sector charges, enhance efficiency in the 
Federal sector, and help prevent employment discrimination.
    Implementing Efficiencies and Cost Savings.--The EEOC 
should continue its efforts to leverage technology to increase 
productivity and streamline customer service. These efforts 
include the establishment of an electronic portal for private 
sector charges for intake inquiries, scheduling, uploading 
charge documents, and checking the status of a charge online, 
as well as an electronic portal for Federal sector cases. The 
Committee encourages the EEOC, during implementation of its 
Strategic Plan and Strategic Enforcement Plan, to also review 
other proposals that may increase efficiencies and generate 
cost savings, which in turn may improve services provided to 
the public.
    Transparency of EEOC Processes and Commitment to Bipartisan 
Efforts.--The Committee commends the EEOC for its transparency 
during the development of its Strategic Plan, Strategic 
Enforcement Plan, and Quality Control Plan, as well as for the 
bipartisan manner in which the Commission operates. The 
Committee expects the Commission will continue its efforts at 
transparency and bipartisanship.
    State and Local Enforcement Assistance.--The Committee 
recommends up to $30,000,000 to assist State and local 
enforcement agencies. This will ensure that EEOC provides 
adequate resources to its State partners.

                     International Trade Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $83,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      86,459,000
Committee recommendation................................      85,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $85,000,000. The 
recommendation is $2,000,000 above the fiscal year 2014 level 
and is $1,459,000 below the budget request.
    The International Trade Commission [ITC] is an independent, 
quasi-judicial agency responsible for conducting trade-related 
investigations and providing Congress and the President with 
independent technical advice related to United States 
international trade policy.
    The Committee appreciates ITC's timely responses to 
Committee inquiries and continued on-time delivery of mandated 
reports.

                       Legal Services Corporation


               PAYMENT TO THE LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $365,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     430,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     400,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $400,000,000 for 
payment to the Legal Services Corporation [LSC]. The 
recommendation is $35,000,000 above the fiscal year 2014 
enacted level, and $30,000,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee's recommendation provides $367,000,000 for 
basic field programs, to be used for competitively awarded 
grants and contracts; $19,000,000 for management and 
administration; $4,000,000 for client self-help and information 
technology; $4,000,000 for the Office of the Inspector General 
[OIG]; $1,000,000 for loan repayment assistance, and $5,000,000 
for the LSC's Pro Bono Innovation Fund.
    Governance and Management.--The LSC must continue its 
governance and management improvement efforts in order to 
further restore the credibility of the organization and direct 
additional funds into legal aid, where they are desperately 
needed. The Committee expects the Inspector General of the LSC 
to continue conducting annual audits of LSC grantees to ensure 
that funds are not being used in contravention of the 
restrictions by which LSC grantees are required to abide.
    Pro Bono Innovation Fund.--The Committee's recommendation 
provides full funding of $5,000,000 to continue the Pro Bono 
Innovation Fund. This fund will support innovative projects 
that promote and enhance pro bono initiatives throughout the 
Nation, as well as leverage Federal dollars to increase free 
legal aid for low-income Americans by engaging private 
attorneys.
    Consideration of Catastrophic Events.--The Committee 
recognizes that catastrophic natural disasters can have 
disparate impacts on the funding allocations provided to 
States. The LSC is encouraged to consider the circumstances 
resulting in widespread displacement of residents which might 
drastically alter the poverty level when making state 
allocations.

          ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISION--LEGAL SERVICE CORPORATION

    The Committee's recommendation continues the administrative 
provisions contained in the fiscal year 1998 appropriations act 
(Public Law 105-119) regarding operation of this program to 
provide basic legal services to disadvantaged individuals and 
the restrictions on the use of LSC funds.
    LSC funds cannot be used to engage in litigation and 
related activities with respect to a variety of matters 
including: (1) redistricting; (2) class action suits; (3) 
representation of illegal aliens; (4) political activities; (5) 
abortion; (6) prisoner litigation; (7) welfare reform; (8) 
representation of charged drug dealers during eviction 
proceedings; and (9) solicitation of clients. The exception to 
the restrictions occurs in a case where there is imminent 
threat of physical harm to the client or prospective client.
    The bill makes no changes to the permanent restrictions 
established under the Legal Services Corporation Act (42 U.S.C. 
Sec. 2996 et seq.). The Committee provides language that 
affects only the 1996 appropriations rider in the following 
manner: (1) keeps the restriction on use of funds from all 
private and public sources for abortion-related litigation, 
representation of prisoners, and class action suits; and (2) 
lifts the restriction on use of funds from all private 
sources--but keeps the restriction on use of all public 
sources--for all other activities currently restricted by the 
rider. This provision was included to level the playing field 
between legal aid attorneys and their counterparts in the 
private sector and open potentially crucial sources of 
additional revenue to legal aid providers given that State and 
private funding sources have declined in recent years.

                        Marine Mammal Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................      $3,250,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................       3,431,000
Committee recommendation................................       3,431,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $3,431,000. The 
recommendation is $181,000 above the fiscal year 2014 enacted 
level and is the same as the budget request.
    The Marine Mammal Commission and its Committee of 
Scientific Advisors on Marine Mammals provide oversight and 
recommend actions on domestic and international topics to 
advance policies and provisions of the Marine Mammal Protection 
Act. The Commission provides precise, up-to-date scientific 
information to Congress on issues related to the safety of 
marine mammals.

            Office of the United States Trade Representative


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $52,601,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      56,170,000
Committee recommendation................................      55,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $55,000,000 for the 
Office of the United States Trade Representative [USTR]. The 
recommendation is $2,399,000 above the fiscal year 2014 level 
and is $1,170,000 below the budget request.
    USTR is responsible for developing and leading 
international negotiations for the United States on policies 
regarding international trade, direct investment, and 
commodities. Its areas of responsibility include all matters 
relating to the World Trade Organization; trade, commodity, and 
direct investment matters dealt with by certain international 
institutions; industrial, agricultural and services trade 
policy; and trade-related protection of intellectual property 
and the environment. The Committee's recommendation supports 
the Interagency Trade Enforcement Center [ITEC].
    Economy Act Transfers.--USTR is directed to continue 
isolating Economy Act payments as individual transfers, and to 
submit documentation of and justification for all Economy Act 
transfers, regardless of amount, to and from other Federal 
agencies, to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
not less than 15 days before such transfers of sums are made.
    Responsiveness.--The Committee is concerned by USTR's lack 
of responsiveness and attention to Committee inquiries and 
requests. USTR leads an aggressive trade agenda for the 
Administration, participating in various trade negotiation and 
enforcement activities that have a significant impact on all 
sectors of our economy. The Committee serves a crucial 
oversight role ensuring that funds provided for USTR activities 
are spent effectively and responsibly in order to protect and 
advance our Nation's interests. To ensure that the Committee is 
able to provide necessary and appropriate oversight, USTR is 
directed to provide monthly travel reports detailing all trips 
outside of the United States, including the purposes and costs 
of such trips. In addition, beginning in the second quarter of 
fiscal year 2015, USTR shall provide the Committee quarterly 
reports outlining ongoing trade negotiations as well as 
enforcement activities and objectives achieved for existing 
trade agreements.
    Interagency Trade and Enforcement Center.--The Committee 
supports ITEC's efforts to facilitate activities among Federal 
agencies involved in trade enforcement. However, the Committee 
is concerned that ITEC's role in the trade enforcement process 
are not clearly defined or well understood.
    ITEC is directed to work with participating trade 
enforcement agencies to develop a publicly available document 
that describes the types of trade violations, the available 
remedies for each, and the role each agency plays in the trade 
enforcement process, including ITEC. The Committee feels that 
this information will enable businesses, intellectual property 
holders, government officials, and other stakeholders to better 
understand, support, and participate in the trade enforcement 
process.

                        State Justice Institute


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................      $4,900,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................       5,121,000
Committee recommendation................................       5,121,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $5,121,000 for the 
State Justice Institute. The recommendation is $221,000 above 
the fiscal year 2014 enacted level and equal to the budget 
request.
    The Institute was created in 1984 to further the 
development and adoption of improved judicial administration in 
State courts.

                                TITLE V

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

                        (INCLUDING RESCISSIONS)

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions 
for the departments, agencies and commissions funded in the 
accompanying bill. Similar provisions were included in the 
fiscal year 2014 act.
    Section 501 prohibits the use of appropriations for certain 
publicity and propaganda purposes. The Committee directs the 
Departments of Commerce and Justice and the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration to provide, within 180 
days of enactment, a detailed summary of any advertising funded 
by the Department or Administration, including the total amount 
spent for development and placement of the advertising, the 
authority under which the advertising was conducted, and what 
the advertising is intended to accomplish. This summary shall 
be provided to the Committees on Appropriations and may be 
provided to relevant authorizing committees.
    Section 502 prohibits any appropriations contained in this 
act from remaining available for obligation beyond the current 
fiscal year unless expressly provided.
    Section 503 limits funds for certain consulting purposes.
    Section 504 provides that should any provision of the act 
be held to be invalid, the remainder of the act would not be 
affected.
    Section 505 stipulates the policy and procedures by which 
funding available to the agencies funded under this act may be 
reprogrammed for other purposes.
    Section 506 provides for a penalty for persons found to 
have falsely mislabeled products.
    Section 507 requires agencies to provide quarterly reports 
to the Appropriations Committees regarding unobligated 
balances.
    Section 508 requires agencies and departments funded in 
this act to absorb any necessary costs related to downsizing or 
consolidation within the amounts provided to the agency or 
department.
    Section 509 limits funds for the sale or export of tobacco 
or tobacco products.
    Section 510 stipulates obligation of receipts available 
under the Crime Victims Fund.
    Section 511 prohibits the use of Department of Justice 
funds for programs that discriminate against, denigrate, or 
otherwise undermine the religious beliefs of students 
participating in such programs.
    Section 512 limits transfers of funds between agencies.
    Section 513 provides that funding for E-government 
initiatives are subject to reprogramming guidelines established 
by this act.
    Section 514 requires the Inspectors General of the 
Departments of Commerce and Justice, the National Aeronautics 
and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, and 
the Legal Services Corporation to conduct reviews of activities 
funded in this act; prohibits the use of funds for certain 
banquets and conferences; and requires certifications regarding 
conflicts of interest.
    Section 515 prohibits funds for information technology 
acquisitions unless the acquiring department or agency has 
assessed the supply chain risk of the technology.
    Section 516 prohibits the use of funds to support or 
justify the use of torture.
    Section 517 limits funds pertaining to certain activities 
related to the export of firearms.
    Section 518 limits funds to process permits to import 
certain products.
    Section 519 prohibits funds for activities that seek to 
include certain language in new trade agreements.
    Section 520 prohibits funds to authorize a national 
security letter in contravention of the statutes authorizing 
the FBI to issue national security letters.
    Section 521 requires notification to the Committees in the 
event of cost overruns.
    Section 522 authorizes funds appropriated for intelligence 
activities for the Department of Justice during fiscal year 
2015 until the enactment of the Intelligence Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2015.
    Section 523 prohibits contracts or grant awards in excess 
of $5,000,000 unless the prospective contractor or grantee has 
certified in writing that he or she has filed all Federal tax 
returns, has not been convicted of a criminal offense under the 
IRS Code of 1986, and has no unpaid Federal tax assessment.
    Section 524 specifies rescissions of prior appropriations.
    Section 525 prohibits the use of funds to purchase first 
class or premium airline travel in contravention of current 
regulations and improves reporting.
    Section 526 prohibits the use of funds to pay for the 
attendance of more than 50 employees at any single conference 
outside the United States.
    Section 527 prohibits the use of funds in a manner that is 
inconsistent with the principal negotiating objective of the 
United States with respect to trade remedy laws.
    Section 528 prohibits the use of funds in this act for the 
transfer or release of certain individuals detained at Naval 
Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to or within the United States, 
its territories or possessions.
    Section 529 prohibits the use of funds in this act to 
construct, acquire, or modify any facility in the United 
States, its territories, or possessions to house certain 
individuals who, as of June 24, 2009, were located at Naval 
Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for the purposes of detention or 
imprisonment in the custody or control of the Department of 
Defense.
    Section 530 requires, when practicable, the use of ``Energy 
Star'' or ``Federal Energy Management Program'' designated 
light bulbs.
    Section 531 requires agencies funded in this act to report 
on undisbursed balances.
    Section 532 prohibits funds made available by this act from 
being used to deny the importation of certain shotgun models.
    Section 533 prohibits the use of funds to establish or 
maintain a computer network that does not block pornography, 
except for law enforcement purposes.
    Section 534 requires the Department of Commerce, the 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National 
Science Foundation to submit spending plans to the House and 
Senate Appropriations Committees within 45 days of enactment of 
this act.
    Section 535 prohibits funds made available by this act from 
being used for contract, memorandum of understanding, 
cooperative agreement, grant, or loan activities if the 
proposed recipient has been convicted of a felony criminal 
violation.
    Section 536 prohibits funds made available by this act from 
being used for contract, memorandum of understanding, 
cooperative agreement, grant, or loan activities if the 
proposed recipient has unpaid Federal tax liabilities.
    Section 537 specifies reporting requirements regarding 
vehicle fleets for all agencies and departments funded by this 
act.
    Section 538 prohibits funds in this act to be used for 
portraits.
    Section 539 requires agencies to report conference spending 
to the Inspectors General.

  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Rule XVI, paragraph 7 requires that every report on a 
general appropriation bill filed by the Committee must identify 
items of appropriation not made to carry out the provisions of 
an existing law, a treaty stipulation, or an act or resolution 
previously passed by the Senate during that session.
    The Committee is filing an original bill, which is not 
covered under this rule, but reports this information in the 
spirit of full disclosure. 
    The Committee recommends funding for the following programs 
or activities that currently lack an authorization for fiscal 
year 2015, either in whole or in part, and therefore fall under 
this rule:

         APPROPRIATIONS NOT AUTHORIZED BY LAW--FISCAL YEAR 2015
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Last year of
                     Agency/program                        authorization
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Commerce:
    International Trade Administration:
        Export Promotion................................            1996
    Bureau of Industry and Security:
        Export Administration...........................            2001
    Economic Development Administration:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2008
        Economic Development Assistance Programs:
            Public Works and Economic Development.......            2008
            Trade Adjustment Assistance.................            2013
            Investing in Manufacturing Communities Fund.            2013
            Regional Export Challenge Programs..........            2013
            Regional Innovation Research and Information            2013
    Bureau of the Census:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2014
    National Telecommunications and Information
     Administration:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            1993
    National Institute of Standards and Technology:
        Scientific and Technical Research and Services..            2013
        Industrial Technology Services..................            2013
        Construction of Research Facilities.............            2013
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration:
        Operations, Research, and Facilities:
            National Ocean Service:
                Coral Reef Conservation.................            2004
                Hydrographic Services...................            2007
                Coastal Zone Management.................            1999
                Marine Protection, Research,                        2005
                 Preservation & Sanctuaries.............
                Estuary Restoration.....................            2012
            National Marine Fisheries Service:
                Endangered Species Act Amendment........            1992
                Marine Mammal Protection................            1999
                NOAA Marine Fisheries Program...........            2000
                Interjurisdictional Fisheries...........            2012
                Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation               2013
                 and Management.........................
            Oceanic and Atmospheric Research:
                National Sea College Program............            2008
        Procurement, Acquisition and Construction:
            National Ocean Service:
                Marine Protection, Research,                        2005
                 Preservation & Sanctuaries.............
Department of Justice:
    General Administration:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2009
        Justice Information Sharing Technology..........            2009
    Administrative Review & Appeals:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2009
    Office of Inspector General:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2009
    U.S. Parole Commission:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2009
    Legal Activities:
        General Legal Activities:
            Salaries and Expenses.......................            2009
        Antitrust Division:
            Salaries and Expenses.......................            2009
        U.S. Attorneys:
            Salaries and Expenses.......................            2009
        Foreign Claims Settlement Commission:
            Salaries and Expenses.......................            2009
        Fees and Expenses of Witnesses..................            2009
        Community Relations Service:
            Salaries and Expenses.......................            2009
        Assets Forfeiture Fund Current Budget Authority.            2009
    U.S. Marshals Service...............................            2009
        Salaries and Expenses...........................             N/A
        Federal Prison Detention........................             N/A
        Construction....................................             N/A
    National Security Division:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................             N/A
    Interagency Law Enforcement:
        Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement..........            2009
    Federal Bureau of Investigation.....................            2009
        Salaries and Expenses...........................             N/A
        Construction....................................             N/A
    Drug Enforcement Administration:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2009
    Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2009
    Federal Prison System...............................            2009
        Salaries and Expenses...........................             N/A
        Buildings and Facilities........................             N/A
    Office on Violence Against Women Programs:
        STOP Grants.....................................            2018
        Transitional Housing Assistance.................            2018
        National Institute of Justice Research and                   N/A
         Evaluation on Violence Against Women...........
        Consolidated Youth Oriented Program.............             N/A
        Grants to Encourage Arrest Policies.............            2018
            Homicide Reduction Initiative...............             N/A
        Sexual Assault Victims Services.................            2018
        Rural Domestic Violence Assistance Grants.......            2018
        Violence on College Campuses....................            2018
        Civil Legal Assistance..........................            2018
        Elder Abuse Grant Program.......................            2018
        Family Civil Justice............................            2018
        Education and Training for Disabled Female                  2018
         Victims........................................
        National Center on Workplace Responses..........            2018
        Research--Violence Against Indian Women.........            2015
        Sex Assault in Indian Country Clearinghouse.....             N/A
    Office of Justice Programs:
        Research, Evaluation, and Statistics:
            National Institute of Justice...............            1995
            Bureau of Justice Statistics................            1995
            Regional Information Sharing Activities.....            2003
            Evaluation Clearinghouse....................            2013
            Forensic Sciences...........................             N/A
                Forensic Science Advisory Committee.....             N/A
    State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance:
        Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grants........            2012
            SLATT Intelligence State and Local Training.             N/A
            State and Local Help-Desk & Diagnostic                  2013
             Center.....................................
            VALOR Initiative............................            2013
            Smart Policing..............................             N/A
            Smart Prosecution...........................             N/A
        John R. Justice Grant Program...................            2014
        Byrne Competitive Grants........................             N/A
        Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation Program.......             N/A
        Adam Walsh Act..................................            2009
        Children Exposed to Violence Initiative.........            2013
        State Criminal Alien Assistance Program.........            2011
        Victims of Trafficking Grants...................            2011
        Residential Substance Abuse Treatment...........            2000
        Mentally Ill Offender Act.......................            2014
        Drug Courts.....................................            2008
        Capital Litigation (and Wrongful Prosecution                2009
         review)........................................
        Economic, High Tech and Cybercrime Prevention...             N/A
        Second Chance Act/Offender Reentry..............            2010
            Smart Probation.............................            2013
            Children of Incarcerated Parents Demo Grants             N/A
            Pay for Success (Discretionary).............             N/A
            Pay for Success (Permanent Supportive                    N/A
             Housing Model).............................
        Coverdell Forensic Science Grants...............            2009
        Violent Gang and Gun Crime Reduction............            2013
        Bulletproof Vests...............................            2012
            NIST/OLES Transfer..........................             N/A
        National Sex Offender Website...................             N/A
        Court-Appointed Special Advocates...............            2013
        National Instant Criminal Background Check                  2013
         System (NICS)..................................
        Criminal Records Upgrade (NCHIP)................            2007
        DNA Initiative:
            Debbie Smith DNA Backlog....................       N/A; 2014
            Post-Conviction DNA Testing.................            2009
            Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners..............       N/A; 2009
        Veterans Treatment Courts Program...............            2013
        National Center for Campus Public Safety........            2013
        Justice Reinvestment Initiative.................             N/A
        Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with                      N/A
         Enforcement....................................
        Vision 21.......................................             N/A
        Comprehensive School Safety Initiative..........             N/A
    Juvenile Justice Programs:
        Part B--State Formula...........................            2007
            Emergency Planning in Juvenile Justice                  2013
             Research Facilities........................
        Part G--Youth Mentoring.........................       N/A; 2007
        Title V--Local Delinquency Prevention Incentive             2008
         Grants.........................................
            Tribal Youth................................             N/A
            Gang/Youth Violence Education and Prevention             N/A
            Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws............       N/A; 2007
            Juvenile Justice & Education Collaboration               N/A
             Assistance (JJECA).........................
            Juvenile Justice Realignment Incentive                   N/A
             Grants.....................................
        Victims of Child Abuse Act......................            2005
        Community-Based Violence Prevention Initiatives.             N/A
        Training for Judicial Personnel.................             N/A
        Missing and Exploited Children Programs.........            2018
        National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention.....             N/A
        Competitive Grants for Girls in the Justice                  N/A
         System.........................................
        Children of Incarcerated Parents Web Portal.....             N/A
    COPS Programs:
        COPS Hiring Program.............................            2009
        Transfer to DEA for Methamphetamine Clean-Up....            2013
        Comprehensive School Safety Program.............             N/A
        Anti-Methamphetamine Task Forces................             N/A
National Aeronautics and Space Administration:
    Science.............................................            2013
    Aeronautics.........................................            2013
    Exploration.........................................            2013
    Space Operations....................................            2013
    Education...........................................            2013
    Cross-Agency Support Programs.......................            2013
    Construction and Environmental Compliance and                   2013
     Restoration........................................
    Office of the Inspector General.....................            2013
National Science Foundation.............................            2013
Related Agencies:
    U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2000
    Commission on Civil Rights:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            1995
    International Trade Commission:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2004
    Payment to the Legal Services Corporation:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            1980
    Marine Mammal Commission:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            1999
    Office of the U.S. Trade Representative:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2004
    State Justice Institute:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2008
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\NOAA authorizations are spread across over 60 separate statutory
  authorities. In many cases, the authorizations do not match exactly to
  specific programs.


COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(c), RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, on June 5, 2014, 
the Committee ordered favorably reported an original bill 
making appropriations for the Departments of Commerce and 
Justice, Science, and Related Agencies for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2015, and for other purposes, provided, 
that the bill be subject to amendment and that the bill be 
consistent with the subcommittee allocation, by a recorded vote 
of 30-0, a quorum being present. The vote was as follows:
        Yeas                          Nays
Chairwoman Mikulski
Mr. Leahy
Mr. Harkin
Mrs. Murray
Mrs. Feinstein
Mr. Durbin
Mr. Johnson
Ms. Landrieu
Mr. Reed
Mr. Pryor
Mr. Tester
Mr. Udall
Mrs. Shaheen
Mr. Merkley
Mr. Begich
Mr. Coons
Mr. Shelby
Mr. Cochran
Mr. McConnell
Mr. Alexander
Ms. Collins
Ms. Murkowski
Mr. Graham
Mr. Kirk
Mr. Coats
Mr. Blunt
Mr. Moran
Mr. Hoeven
Mr. Johanns
Mr. Boozman

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of the rule XXVI requires that Committee 
reports on a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any 
statute or part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the 
statute or part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and 
(b) a comparative print of that part of the bill or joint 
resolution making the amendment and of the statute or part 
thereof proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through 
type and italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate 
typographical devices the omissions and insertions which would 
be made by the bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form 
recommended by the Committee.''
    In compliance with this rule, the following changes in 
existing law proposed to be made by this bill are shown as 
follows: existing law to be omitted is enclosed in black 
brackets; new matter is printed in italic; and existing law in 
which no change is proposed is shown in roman.

OMNIBUS CONSOLIDATED RESCISSIONS AND APPROPRIATIONS ACT OF 1996, PUBLIC 
                              LAW 104-134


DEPARTMENTS OF COMMERCE, JUSTICE, AND STATE, THE JUDICIARY, AND RELATED 
                       AGENCIES APPROPRIATION ACT


                       TITLE V--RELATED AGENCIES


                       Legal Services Corporation


         ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION

    Sec. 504. (a) None of the funds appropriated in this Act to 
the Legal Services Corporation may be used to provide financial 
assistance to any person or entity (which may be referred to in 
this section as a ``recipient'') that uses Federal funds (or 
funds from any source with regard to paragraphs (7), (14) and 
(15)) in a manner--
            (1) that makes available any funds, personnel, or 
        equipment for use in advocating or opposing any plan or 
        proposal, or represents any party or participates in 
        any other way in litigation, that is intended to or has 
        the effect of altering, revising, or reapportioning a 
        legislative, judicial, or elective district at any 
        level of government, including influencing the timing 
        or manner of the taking of a census;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    [(d)(1) The Legal Services Corporation shall not accept any 
non-Federal funds, and no recipient shall accept funds from any 
source other than the Corporation, unless the Corporation or 
the recipient, as the case may be, notifies in writing the 
source of the funds that the funds may not be expended for any 
purpose prohibited by the Legal Services Corporation Act or 
this title.
    [(2) Paragraph (1) shall not prevent a recipient from--
            [(A) receiving Indian tribal funds (including funds 
        from private nonprofit organizations for the benefit of 
        Indians or Indian tribes) and expending the tribal 
        funds in accordance with the specific purposes for 
        which the tribal funds are provided; or
            [(B) using funds received from a source other than 
        the Legal Services Corporation to provide legal 
        assistance to a covered individual if such funds are 
        used for the specific purposes for which such funds 
        were received, except that such funds may not be 
        expended by recipients for any purpose prohibited by 
        this Act or by the Legal Services Corporation Act.]

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    [(e)] (d) Nothing in this section shall be construed to 
prohibit a recipient from using funds derived from a source 
other than the Legal Services Corporation to comment on public 
rulemaking or to respond to a written request for information 
or testimony from a Federal, State or local agency, legislative 
body or committee, or a member of such an agency, body, or 
committee, so long as the response is made only to the parties 
that make the request and the recipient does not arrange for 
the request to be made.
    [(f)] (e) As used in this section:
            (1) The term ``controlled substance'' has the 
        meaning given the term in section 102 of the Controlled 
        Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 802).
            (2) The term ``covered individual'' means any 
        person who--
                    (A) except as provided in subparagraph (B), 
                meets the requirements of this Act and the 
                Legal Services Corporation Act relating to 
                eligibility for legal assistance; and
                    (B) may or may not be financially unable to 
                afford legal assistance.
            (3) The term ``public housing project'' has the 
        meaning as used within, and the term ``public housing 
        agency'' has the meaning given the term, in section 3 
        of the United States Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 
        1437a).

                        BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL


  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS
                                                     AMENDED
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               Budget authority                 Outlays
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee    Amount  in     Committee    Amount  in
                                                           allocation       bill       allocation       bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with the subcommittee
 allocation for 2015: Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice,
 Science, and Related Agencies:
    Mandatory...........................................          317           317           308        \1\308
    Discretionary.......................................       51,202        51,202        63,795     \1\61,664
        Security........................................        5,031         5,031            NA            NA
        Nonsecurity.....................................       46,171        46,171            NA            NA
Projections of outlays associated with the
 recommendation:
    2015................................................  ............  ............  ............    \2\39,217
    2016................................................  ............  ............  ............       13,495
    2017................................................  ............  ............  ............        3,061
    2018................................................  ............  ............  ............        1,466
    2019 and future years...............................  ............  ............  ............        4,798
Financial assistance to State and local governments for            NA        -7,677            NA            47
 2015...................................................

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\2\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

NA: Not applicable.


  COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2014 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL
                                                                        YEAR 2015
                                                                [In thousands of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                         Senate Committee recommendation
                                                                                                                             compared with (+ or -)
                                Item                                       2014       Budget estimate     Committee    ---------------------------------
                                                                      appropriation                     recommendation        2014
                                                                                                                         appropriation   Budget estimate
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

                 International Trade Administration

Operations and administration......................................         470,000          506,731          480,000          +10,000          -26,731
Offsetting fee collections.........................................          -9,439           -9,439          -10,000             -561             -561
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation.........................................         460,561          497,292          470,000           +9,439          -27,292

                  Bureau of Industry and Security

Operations and administration......................................          69,450           74,549           69,549              +99           -5,000
    Defense function...............................................          32,000           36,000           36,000           +4,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Bureau of Industry and Security.......................         101,450          110,549          105,549           +4,099           -5,000
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                Economic Development Administration

Economic development assistance programs...........................         209,500          210,000          195,000          -14,500          -15,000
Salaries and expenses..............................................          37,000           38,182           37,000   ...............          -1,182
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Economic Development Administration...................         246,500          248,182          232,000          -14,500          -16,182
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                Minority Business Development Agency

Minority business development......................................          28,000           28,286           28,286             +286   ...............

                 Economic and Statistical Analysis

Salaries and expenses..............................................          99,000          111,033          106,000           +7,000           -5,033

                        Bureau of the Census

Salaries and expenses..............................................         252,000          248,000          252,200             +200           +4,200
Periodic censuses and programs.....................................         693,000          963,428          896,744         +203,744          -66,684
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Bureau of the Census..................................         945,000        1,211,428        1,148,944         +203,944          -62,484
                                                                    ====================================================================================
     National Telecommunications and Information Administration

Salaries and expenses..............................................          46,000           51,000           48,500           +2,500           -2,500

             United States Patent and Trademark Office

Salaries and expenses, current year fee funding....................       3,024,000        3,458,000        3,458,000         +434,000   ...............
Offsetting fee collections.........................................      -3,024,000       -3,458,000       -3,458,000         -434,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, United States Patent and Trademark Office.............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
           National Institute of Standards and Technology

Scientific and technical research and services.....................         651,000          680,000          685,000          +34,000           +5,000

Industrial technology services.....................................         143,000          161,000          156,000          +13,000           -5,000
    Manufacturing extension partnerships...........................        (128,000)        (141,000)        (141,000)        (+13,000)  ...............
    Advanced manufacturing technology consortia....................         (15,000)         (15,000)         (15,000)  ...............  ...............
    Manufacturing innovation institutes coordination...............  ...............          (5,000)  ...............  ...............         (-5,000)

Construction of research facilities................................          56,000           59,000           59,000           +3,000   ...............
Working Capital Fund (by transfer).................................          (2,000)          (9,000)          (9,000)         (+7,000)  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Institute of Standards and Technology........         850,000          900,000          900,000          +50,000   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
          National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Operations, research, and facilities...............................       3,157,392        3,237,993        3,228,964          +71,572           -9,029
    (by transfer)..................................................        (115,000)        (123,164)        (116,000)         (+1,000)         (-7,164)
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................       3,157,392        3,237,993        3,228,964          +71,572           -9,029

Procurement, acquisition and construction..........................       2,022,864        2,206,392        2,131,686         +108,822          -74,706
Pacific coastal salmon recovery....................................          65,000           50,000           65,000   ...............         +15,000
Fishermen's Contingency Fund.......................................             350              350              350   ...............  ...............
Fisheries disaster assistance......................................          75,000   ...............  ...............         -75,000   ...............
Fisheries finance program account..................................          -6,000           -6,000           -6,000   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.......       5,314,606        5,488,735        5,420,000         +105,394          -68,735
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                      Departmental Management

Salaries and expenses..............................................          55,500           57,637           56,000             +500           -1,637
Renovation and modernization.......................................           4,000           11,733           10,000           +6,000           -1,733
Office of Inspector General........................................          30,000           30,596           30,596             +596   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Departmental Management...............................          89,500           99,966           96,596           +7,096           -3,370
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title I, Department of Commerce.......................       8,180,617        8,746,471        8,555,875         +375,258         -190,596
      (By transfer)................................................         117,000          132,164          125,000           +8,000           -7,164
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                  TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

                       General Administration

Salaries and expenses..............................................         110,000          128,851          115,000           +5,000          -13,851
Justice information sharing technology.............................          25,842           25,842           25,842   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, General Administration................................         135,842          154,693          140,842           +5,000          -13,851
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Administrative review and appeals..................................         315,000          351,072          351,072          +36,072   ...............
    Transfer from immigration examinations fee account.............          -4,000           -4,000           -4,000   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Direct appropriation.......................................         311,000          347,072          347,072          +36,072   ...............

Office of Inspector General........................................          86,400           88,577           88,577           +2,177   ...............

                  United States Parole Commission

Salaries and expenses..............................................          12,600           13,308           13,308             +708   ...............

                          Legal Activities

Salaries and expenses, general legal activities....................         867,000          935,854          915,000          +48,000          -20,854
Vaccine Injury Compensation Trust Fund.............................           7,833            7,833            7,833   ...............  ...............
Salaries and expenses, Antitrust Division..........................         160,400          162,246          162,246           +1,846   ...............
    Offsetting fee collections--current year.......................        -103,000         -100,000         -100,000           +3,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Direct appropriation.......................................          57,400           62,246           62,246           +4,846   ...............

Salaries and expenses, United States Attorneys.....................       1,944,000        1,955,327        1,950,000           +6,000           -5,327
United States Trustee System Fund..................................         224,400          225,908          225,908           +1,508   ...............
    Offsetting fee collections.....................................        -224,400         -225,908         -225,908           -1,508   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Direct appropriation.......................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............

Salaries and expenses, Foreign Claims Settlement Commission........           2,100            2,326            2,326             +226   ...............
Fees and expenses of witnesses.....................................         270,000          270,000          270,000   ...............  ...............
Salaries and expenses, Community Relations Service.................          12,000           12,972           12,972             +972   ...............
Assets Forfeiture Fund.............................................          20,500           20,514           20,514              +14   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Legal Activities......................................       3,180,833        3,267,072        3,240,891          +60,058          -26,181
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                   United States Marshals Service

Salaries and expenses..............................................       1,185,000        1,185,000        1,185,000   ...............  ...............
Construction.......................................................           9,800            9,800            9,800   ...............  ...............
Federal prisoner detention.........................................       1,533,000        1,595,307        1,595,307          +62,307   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, United States Marshals Service........................       2,727,800        2,790,107        2,790,107          +62,307   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                     National Security Division

Salaries and expenses..............................................          91,800           91,800           91,800   ...............  ...............

                    Interagency Law Enforcement

Interagency crime and drug enforcement.............................         514,000          505,000          505,000           -9,000   ...............

                  Federal Bureau of Investigation

Salaries and expenses..............................................       3,345,322        3,358,219        3,363,753          +18,431           +5,534
    Counterintelligence and national security......................       4,900,480        4,920,000        4,927,480          +27,000           +7,480
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................       8,245,802        8,278,219        8,291,233          +45,431          +13,014

Construction.......................................................          97,482           68,982           93,982           -3,500          +25,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Bureau of Investigation.......................       8,343,284        8,347,201        8,385,215          +41,931          +38,014
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                  Drug Enforcement Administration

Salaries and expenses..............................................       2,378,917        2,384,680        2,384,680           +5,763   ...............
    Diversion control fund.........................................        -360,917         -366,680         -366,680           -5,763   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Drug Enforcement Administration.......................       2,018,000        2,018,000        2,018,000   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
        Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives

Salaries and expenses..............................................       1,179,000        1,201,004        1,201,004          +22,004   ...............

                       Federal Prison System

Salaries and expenses..............................................       6,769,000        6,804,000        6,804,000          +35,000   ...............
Buildings and facilities...........................................          90,000           90,000          105,000          +15,000          +15,000
Limitation on administrative expenses, Federal Prison Industries,             2,700            2,700            2,700   ...............  ...............
 Incorporated......................................................
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Prison System.................................       6,861,700        6,896,700        6,911,700          +50,000          +15,000
                                                                    ====================================================================================
             State and Local Law Enforcement Activities

Office on Violence Against Women:
    Prevention and prosecution programs............................         417,000          422,500          430,000          +13,000           +7,500

Office of Justice Programs:
    Research, evaluation and statistics............................         120,000          136,900          115,000           -5,000          -21,900
    State and local law enforcement assistance.....................       1,171,500        1,032,900        1,149,500          -22,000         +116,600
    Juvenile justice programs......................................         254,500          299,400          257,500           +3,000          -41,900

    Public safety officer benefits:
        Death benefits.............................................          81,000           71,000           71,000          -10,000   ...............
        Disability and education benefits..........................          16,300           16,300           16,300   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................          97,300           87,300           87,300          -10,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Total, Office of Justice Programs........................       1,643,300        1,556,500        1,609,300          -34,000          +52,800
                                                                    ====================================================================================

Community oriented policing services:
    COPS programs..................................................         214,000          274,000          224,000          +10,000          -50,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, State and Local Law Enforcement Activities............       2,274,300        2,253,000        2,263,300          -11,000          +10,300
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title II, Department of Justice.......................      27,736,559       27,973,534       27,996,816         +260,257          +23,282
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                         TITLE III--SCIENCE

Office of Science and Technology Policy............................           5,555            5,555            5,555   ...............  ...............

           National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Science............................................................       5,151,200        4,972,000        5,200,000          +48,800         +228,000
Aeronautics........................................................         566,000          551,100          551,100          -14,900   ...............
Space technology...................................................         576,000          705,500          580,200           +4,200         -125,300
Exploration........................................................       4,113,200        3,976,000        4,367,700         +254,500         +391,700
Space operations...................................................       3,778,000        3,905,400        3,830,800          +52,800          -74,600
Education..........................................................         116,600           88,900          108,000           -8,600          +19,100
Cross agency support...............................................       2,793,000        2,778,600        2,778,600          -14,400   ...............
Construction and environmental compliance and restoration..........         515,000          446,100          446,100          -68,900   ...............
Office of Inspector General........................................          37,500           37,000           37,500   ...............            +500
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.........      17,646,500       17,460,600       17,900,000         +253,500         +439,400
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                    National Science Foundation

Research and related activities....................................       5,741,398        5,739,460        5,771,170          +29,772          +31,710
    Defense function...............................................          67,520           68,000           67,520   ...............            -480
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................       5,808,918        5,807,460        5,838,690          +29,772          +31,230

Major research equipment and facilities construction...............         200,000          200,760          200,760             +760   ...............
Education and human resources......................................         846,500          889,750          889,750          +43,250   ...............
Agency operations and award management.............................         298,000          338,230          307,000           +9,000          -31,230
Office of the National Science Board...............................           4,300            4,370            4,370              +70   ...............
Office of Inspector General........................................          14,200           14,430           14,430             +230   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Science Foundation...........................       7,171,918        7,255,000        7,255,000          +83,082   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title III, Science....................................      24,823,973       24,721,155       25,160,555         +336,582         +439,400
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                     TITLE IV--RELATED AGENCIES

                     Commission on Civil Rights

Salaries and expenses..............................................           9,000            9,400            9,400             +400   ...............

              Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

Salaries and expenses..............................................         364,000          365,531          365,000           +1,000             -531

                   International Trade Commission

Salaries and expenses..............................................          83,000           86,459           85,000           +2,000           -1,459

                     Legal Services Corporation

Payment to the Legal Services Corporation..........................         365,000          430,000          400,000          +35,000          -30,000

                      Marine Mammal Commission

Salaries and expenses..............................................           3,250            3,431            3,431             +181   ...............

              Office of the U.S. Trade Representative

Salaries and expenses..............................................          52,601           56,170           55,000           +2,399           -1,170

                      State Justice Institute

Salaries and expenses..............................................           4,900            5,121            5,121             +221   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title IV, Related Agencies............................         881,751          956,112          922,952          +41,201          -33,160
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                    TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS

NTIA, public telecommunications facilities, planning and                     -8,500   ...............  ...............          +8,500   ...............
 construction (rescission).........................................
Commerce, Departmental Management, Franchise Fund (rescission).....  ...............          -2,906           -2,906           -2,906   ...............
DOJ, Working Capital Fund (rescission).............................         -30,000          -54,000          -54,000          -24,000   ...............
DOJ, Assets Forfeiture Fund (rescission)...........................         -83,600         -193,000         -193,000         -109,400   ...............
Federal prisoner detention (rescission)............................  ...............        -122,000         -122,000         -122,000   ...............
Violence against women prevention and prosecution programs                  -12,200          -12,200          -12,200   ...............  ...............
 (rescission)......................................................
Office of Justice programs (rescission)............................         -59,000          -59,000          -59,000   ...............  ...............
COPS (rescission)..................................................         -26,000          -26,000          -26,000   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title V, Rescissions..................................        -219,300         -469,106         -469,106         -249,806   ...............

      Grand total..................................................      61,403,600       61,928,166       62,167,092         +763,492         +238,926
          Appropriations...........................................     (61,622,900)     (62,397,272)     (62,636,198)     (+1,013,298)       (+238,926)
          Rescissions..............................................       (-219,300)       (-469,106)       (-469,106)       (-249,806)  ...............
      (By transfer)................................................         117,000          132,164          125,000           +8,000           -7,164
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