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                                                       Calendar No. 435
113th Congress   }                                         {     Report
                                 SENATE
 2d Session      }                                         {    113-195

======================================================================
 
     DEPARTMENT OF STATE, FOREIGN OPERATIONS, AND RELATED PROGRAMS 
                       APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2015
                                _______
                                

                  June 19, 2014--Ordered to be printed

           Mr. Leahy, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                                 REPORT

                         [To accompany S. 2499]

    The Committee on Appropriations reports the bill (S. 2499) 
making appropriations for the Department of State, foreign 
operations, and related programs for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 2015, and for other purposes, reports favorably 
thereon and recommends that the bill do pass.



Amounts in new budget authority

Total of bill as reported to the Senate................. $47,182,900,000
Amount of 2014 appropriations...........................  49,159,900,000
Amount of 2015 budget estimate..........................  47,467,863,000
Bill as recommended to Senate compared to--
    2014 appropriations.................................  -1,977,000,000
    2015 budget estimate................................    -284,963,000


                                CONTENTS

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Public Law References............................................     5
Introduction.....................................................     6
Title I:
    Department of State and Related Agency:
        Department of State:
            Administration of Foreign Affairs:
                Diplomatic and Consular Programs.................    17
                Capital Investment Fund..........................    22
                Office of Inspector General......................    23
                Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs.......    23
                Representation Expenses..........................    25
                Protection of Foreign Missions and Officials.....    25
                Embassy Security, Construction, and Maintenance..    25
                Emergencies in the Diplomatic and Consular 
                  Service........................................    27
                Repatriation Loans Program Account...............    27
                Payment to the American Institute in Taiwan......    27
                Payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and 
                  Disability 
                  Fund...........................................    28
    International Organizations:
        Contributions to International Organizations.............    28
        Contributions for International Peacekeeping Activities..    29
    International Commissions:
        International Boundary and Water Commission, United 
          States and Mexico......................................    29
        Salaries and Expenses....................................    29
        Construction.............................................    29
        American Sections, International Commissions.............    29
        International Fisheries Commissions......................    30
    Related Agency:
        Broadcasting Board of Governors:
            International Broadcasting Operations................    30
            Broadcasting Capital Improvements....................    31
    Related Programs:
        The Asia Foundation......................................    32
        United States Institute of Peace.........................    32
        Center for Middle Eastern-Western Dialogue Trust Fund....    32
        Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Program...................    33
        Israeli Arab Scholarship Program.........................    33
        East-West Center.........................................    33
        National Endowment for Democracy.........................    33
    Other Commissions:
        Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage 
          Abroad.................................................    34
        United States Commission on International Religious 
          Freedom................................................    34
        Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe.........    35
        Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's 
          Republic of China......................................    35
        United States-China Economic and Security Review 
          Commission.............................................    35
Title II:
    United States Agency for International Development:
        Funds Appropriated to the President:
            Operating Expenses...................................    36
            Capital Investment Fund..............................    38
            Office of Inspector General..........................    38
Title III:
    Bilateral Economic Assistance:
        Funds Appropriated to the President:
            Global Health Programs...............................    39
            Development Assistance...............................    44
            International Disaster Assistance....................    54
            Transition Initiatives...............................    55
            Complex Crises Fund..................................    55
            Development Credit Authority.........................    55
            Administrative Expenses..............................    55
            Economic Support Fund................................    56
            Democracy Fund.......................................    66
        Department of State:
            Migration and Refugee Assistance.....................    68
            United States Emergency Refugee and Migration 
              Assistance.........................................    69
        Independent Agencies:
            Peace Corps..........................................    69
            Millennium Challenge Corporation.....................    69
            Inter-American Foundation............................    69
            United States African Development Foundation.........    70
        Department of the Treasury:
            International Affairs Technical Assistance...........    70
Title IV:
    International Security Assistance:
        Department of State:
            Contributions for International Peacekeeping 
              Activities.........................................    71
            International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement..    71
            Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining and 
              Related Programs...................................    74
            Peacekeeping Operations..............................    76
        Funds Appropriated to the President:
            International Military Education and Training........    76
            Foreign Military Financing Program...................    77
Title V:
    Multilateral Assistance:
        Funds Appropriated to the President:
            International Organizations and Programs.............    84
        International Financial Institutions.....................    85
            Global Environment Facility..........................    86
            Transition Fund......................................    86
            Contribution to the International Development 
              Association........................................    86
            Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative..................    86
            Contribution to the International Bank for 
              Reconstruction and Development.....................    87
            Limitation on Callable Capital Subscriptions.........    87
            Contribution to the Clean Technology Fund............    87
            Contribution to the Strategic Climate Fund...........    87
            Contribution to the Inter-American Development Bank..    87
            Limitation on Callable Capital Subscriptions.........    87
            Contribution to the Enterprise for the Americas 
              Multilateral Investment Fund.......................    88
            Contribution to the Asian Development Bank...........    88
            Limitation on Callable Capital Subscriptions.........    88
            Contribution to the Asian Development Fund...........    88
            Contribution to the African Development Bank.........    88
            Limitation on Callable Capital Subscriptions.........    89
            Contribution to the African Development Fund.........    89
            Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative..................    89
            Contribution to the International Fund for 
              Agricultural Development...........................    89
            United States Quota, International Monetary Fund.....    89
            Loans to International Monetary Fund.................    89
Title VI:
    Export and Investment Assistance:
        Export-Import Bank of the United States..................    91
            Inspector General....................................    91
            Administrative Expenses..............................    91
        Overseas Private Investment Corporation..................    91
            Noncredit Account....................................    91
            Administrative Expenses..............................    91
            Program Account......................................    91
        Trade and Development Agency.............................    92
Title VII: General Provisions....................................    93
Title VIII:
    Overseas Contingency Operations:
        Department of State:
            Administration of Foreign Affairs:
                Diplomatic and Consular Programs.................    95
                Conflict Stabilization Operations................    95
                Office of Inspector General......................    95
                Embassy Security, Construction, and Maintenance..    95
                Peacekeeping Response Mechanism..................    96
            International Organizations..........................    96
                Contributions to International Organizations.....    96
        United States Agency for International Development:
            Funds Appropriated to the President:
                Operating Expenses...............................    96
        Bilateral Economic Assistance:
            Funds Appropriated to the President:
                International Disaster Assistance................    96
                Crises Complex Fund..............................    96
                Economic Support Fund............................    96
        Department of State:
            Migration and Refugee Assistance.....................    97
    International Security Assistance:
        Department of State:
            Contributions for International Peacekeeping 
              Activities.........................................    97
            International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement..    97
            Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining, and 
              Related Programs...................................    97
            Peacekeeping Operations..............................    97
        Funds Appropriated to the President:
            Foreign Military Financing Program...................    97
    Multilateral Assistance:
        Funds Appropriated to the President:
            International Financial Institutions:
                Transition Fund..................................    98
    General Provisions...........................................    98
Compliance With Paragraph 7, Rule XVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the 
  Senate.........................................................    99
Compliance With Paragraph 7(c), Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules 
  of the Senate..................................................   100
Compliance With Paragraph 12, Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   100
Budgetary Impact of Bill.........................................   114
Comparative Statement of Budget Authority........................   115

                         PUBLIC LAW REFERENCES

    Public Law 113-76--Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014.
    Public Law 113-6--Consolidated and Further Continuing 
Appropriations Act, 2013.
    Public Law 113-4--Violence Against Women Reauthorization 
Act of 2014.
    Public Law 112-239--National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2014.
    Public Law 112-158--Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human 
Rights Act of 2012.
    Public Law 112-74--Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012.
    Public Law 112-25--Budget Control Act of 2011.
    Public Law 112-10--Department of Defense and Full-Year 
Continuing Appropriations Act, 2011.
    Public Law 111-212--Supplemental Appropriations, 2010.
    Public Law 111-172--Lord's Resistance Army Disarmament and 
Northern Uganda Recovery Act.
    Public Law 111-32--Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2009.
    Public Law 111-8--Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009.
    Public Law 110-293--Tom Lantos and Henry J. Hyde United 
States Global Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and 
Malaria Reauthorization Act of 2008.
    Public Law 110-252--Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2008.
    Public Law 110-246--Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 
2008.
    Public Law 110-161--Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008.
    Public Law 109-282--Federal Funding Accountability and 
Transparency Act.
    Public Law 109-121--Senator Paul Simon Water for the Poor 
Act of 2005.
    Public Law 108-25--United States Leadership Against HIV/
AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria Act of 2003.
    Public Law 107-228--Foreign Relations Authorization Act, 
Fiscal Year 2003.
    Public Law 106-113--Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2000.
    Public Law 106-87--Torture Victims Relief Reauthorization 
Act of 1999.
    Public Law 99-415--Anglo-Irish Agreement Support Act of 
1986.
    Public Law 99-177--Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
Control Act of 1985.

                              INTRODUCTION

                       Summary of Appropriations

    The Committee recommends total appropriations of 
$48,443,900,000 for the Department of State, foreign 
operations, and related programs for fiscal year 2015. Of this 
amount, $48,285,000,000, including $8,625,000,000 for Overseas 
Contingency Operations [OCO], is for discretionary programs, 
and $158,900,000 is for mandatory programs.
    The Committee's recommendations for fiscal year 2015, by 
title, compared to the budget request, are allocated in the 
following table:

                         APPROPRIATIONS BY TITLE
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Fiscal year 2015      Committee
               Title                     request         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Title I--Department of State and          14,790,547         11,936,641
 Related Agency...................
Title II--United States Agency for         1,503,916          1,355,467
 International Development........
Title III--Bilateral Economic             17,917,452         16,438,139
 Assistance.......................
Title IV--International Security           6,766,580          8,292,649
 Assistance.......................
Title V--Multilateral Assistance..         3,188,943          3,200,754
Title VI--Export and Investment           -1,352,100         -1,378,750
 Assistance.......................
Title VII--General Provisions.....             1,000            -26,000
Title VIII--Overseas Contingency           5,912,525          8,625,000
 Operations.......................
                                   -------------------------------------
      Total.......................    48,728,863,000     48,443,900,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                              INTRODUCTION

    The Committee notes that Governmentwide efforts to reduce 
the Federal deficit require cuts in operations and programs 
funded by this act. The Committee has also taken further steps 
to reduce wasteful and unnecessary spending in fiscal year 
2015.

                             Reducing Costs

    As in the past, the Federal agencies administering funds 
appropriated by this act are directed to regularly review all 
costs associated with operations and programs to determine 
their necessity, priority, and effectiveness. All programs, 
except for humanitarian relief and recovery purposes, should be 
designed to be sustained by host country governments or civil 
society, and include a cost-matching requirement, as 
appropriate. Programs that are failing to perform or meet 
sustainability guidelines, or that have required excessive 
overhead or security costs, should be modified or discontinued.
    The Committee directs the Department of State, the United 
States Agency for International Development [USAID] and other 
agencies to continue to achieve savings by reducing the cost of 
executive meetings, ceremonies, and conferences, and curtailing 
the purchase of commemorative and promotional items.
    Cost Savings and Efficiencies.--Not later than 45 days 
after enactment of this act, the Department of State's Office 
of Inspector General [OIG] shall provide the Committee a 
consolidated list of OIG recommendations for potential position 
reductions and office reductions or closures since October 1, 
2013, including cost savings, and the Department's responses to 
such recommendations.
    The Committee notes that the Government Accountability 
Office's [GAO] ``2015 Annual Report: Actions Needed to Reduce 
Fragmentation, Overlap and Duplication, and Achieve Other 
Financial Benefits'' (GAO-14-343SP) included a recommendation 
that the Secretary of State and the Chair of the United States 
Commission on International Religious Freedom [USCIRF] jointly 
define how to coordinate efforts to promote international 
religious freedom, including defining the ex-officio role of 
the Ambassador-at-Large for International Religious Freedom as 
a nonvoting Commission member. The report also provided updates 
on the status of implementation of recommendations in prior 
annual reports to reduce duplication, improve coordination, and 
achieve savings at the Department of State, USAID, and the 
Broadcasting Board of Governors [BBG]. The Committee directs 
the Secretary of State, the USCIRF Chair, the USAID 
Administrator, and the BBG to report to the Committee not later 
than 90 days after enactment of this act on the status of 
implementation of the GAO recommendations relevant to programs 
funded by this act.
    Energy Audits and Savings.--The Committee continues the 
directive in Senate Report 113-81 that each agency funded by 
this act submit a report to the Committee not later than 
September 30, 2015, detailing the findings of environmental 
assessments and water and energy audits of their overseas post 
operations, the steps taken to implement recommendations of 
such assessments and audits, and a comparison of such findings 
with the targets for Federal building energy efficiency and 
environmental sustainability.
    Executive Salaries and Compensation.--The Committee is 
concerned that, in a time of constrained budgets, the salary 
costs for non-Federal and quasi-Federal entities paid with 
funds appropriated by this act are not consistent with the 
salaries paid to senior Federal executives. Therefore, section 
7034(w) of the act limits the amount of appropriated funds that 
may be used for the salary costs of senior executives at non-
Federal and quasi-Federal organizations that receive direct 
appropriations from this act to level IV of the Executive 
Schedule, and directs such organizations to comply with section 
4505a of title 5, United States Code [U.S.C.] with respect to 
limitations on payment of performance-based cash awards. The 
Committee estimates that this limitation will save at least 
$700,000 in salary costs in fiscal year 2015, and directs that 
these savings be used instead for program costs.
    The Committee directs the Department of State, USAID, and 
other Federal agencies, as applicable, to submit to the 
Committee not later than 90 days after enactment of this act 
the compensation information reported in 2014 in compliance 
with the reporting requirements in Public Law 109-282, as 
amended by Public Law 110-252.
    Financial and Contract Management.--The Committee is 
concerned with OIG and independent auditor findings on 
weaknesses and shortcomings in financial and contract 
management at the Department of State, USAID, BBG, and other 
agencies funded by this act. The Committee expects the 
Department, USAID, and other agencies to continue efforts to 
improve financial management, contracting processes, and 
internal controls.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to conduct: 
(1) a sampling and verification of the completeness of the 
Department's contract files, including contract files 
maintained by contracting officers' representatives and other 
support personnel; and (2) an analysis of the adequacy of 
available resources including the 1 percent procurement fee for 
appropriate oversight of contracts during the reporting period. 
The Committee also directs that not later than 90 days after 
enactment of this act, the Secretary, in coordination with the 
Department of State's OIG, shall submit a report to the 
appropriate congressional committees detailing the status of 
each of the March 28, 2014, OIG Management Alert's 
recommendations.
    The Committee directs the BBG Chairman, in coordination 
with the OIG, to submit a report to the appropriate 
congressional committees detailing the status of the 
implementation of the OIG's recommendations, particularly to 
develop an action plan with measurable goals and milestones and 
to develop and implement enforcement mechanisms to assist in 
ensuring enhanced accountability for compliance with 
procurement regulations.
    Humanitarian Aid Cost-Effectiveness.--The Committee is 
concerned with the growing number and severity of humanitarian 
crises that cause widespread loss of life and property damage, 
and the burden they are placing on national budgets and 
international donors. The demand for humanitarian aid, 
associated costs, and budget constraints underline the need for 
improved efficiency and effectiveness in providing such aid.
    Current methods of evaluating and monitoring humanitarian 
aid, while adequate to ensure that funds are spent for their 
intended purposes, do not ensure cost-effectiveness. Section 
7034(q) of this act enhances the effectiveness of humanitarian 
aid through regular and accurate feedback data, which should 
include the use of mobile technology to facilitate real-time 
data. Such feedback will ensure that both aid agencies and 
donors have a clearer understanding of the perceptions of 
affected populations, whether the aid they receive is relevant 
to their needs, how much they trust the people helping them, 
and whether they believe it worthwhile to provide feedback. 
When reported to Congress and published, feedback of this kind 
provides the basis to compare and contrast the perceived 
performance of aid providers, is a tool for improving 
performance and an incentive to make practical improvements on 
the ground, and promotes cost savings.
    The Committee is aware of the challenges associated with 
obtaining real-time feedback from aid beneficiaries. In 
recognition of the need for donors and implementing partners to 
strengthen their capacity to listen and respond effectively to 
beneficiaries, the Committee does not prescribe specific 
feedback practices, but rather requires the Department of 
State, USAID, and their implementing partners to describe the 
methodology used to ensure that the feedback reported 
accurately reflects beneficiary views and the Department of 
State's and USAID's responses to such feedback.
    Redundant Services and Operations.--The Secretary of State, 
in consultation with the USAID Administrator, shall submit a 
report not later than 90 days after enactment of this act to 
the appropriate congressional committees describing redundant 
services and operations at diplomatic facilities abroad that 
have been eliminated since fiscal year 2012, and those proposed 
to be eliminated in fiscal year 2015.

            Congressional Budget Request and Justifications

    The Committee directs the Office of Management and Budget 
[OMB] to submit to the appropriate congressional committees a 
strategy for meeting emergency and unanticipated requirements 
in future fiscal years under Budget Function 150--International 
Affairs. The Committee notes that from fiscal years 2001 
through 2010, the Committee considered and enacted 15 emergency 
supplemental appropriations acts to meet overseas requirements.
    Timely budget information in the congressional budget 
justification [CBJ] that is clearly, concisely, and accurately 
presented must be a priority of the administration. The 
Committee expects the Department of State, USAID, and other 
agencies funded by this act to submit CBJs within 4 weeks of 
the release of the President's fiscal year 2016 budget request. 
The Committee also directs the Department of State, USAID, and 
other agencies to include detailed information on all 
reimbursable agreements and significant uses of the Economy 
Act.
    The Committee directs the Department of State, USAID, and 
any other agency that utilizes a Working Capital Fund [WCF] to 
include in the CBJ the total budgetary resources for each 
office that receives funds from a WCF. The CBJ shall also 
include a table on WCF resources that will serve as the 
baseline for reprogramming and transfer purposes.
    The Committee directs that CBJs include estimated savings 
from any proposed office or mission closing and actual prior 
year representation expenses for each department and agency 
that is authorized such expenses.

                              Definitions

    For purposes of Public Law 99-177, as amended, with respect 
to appropriations contained in this act the term ``program, 
project, and activity'' shall mean any item for which a dollar 
amount is specified in this report or this act. In addition, 
the definition of program, project, and activity in section 
7023 of this act shall apply to the accounts listed in that 
section.
    In carrying out any Presidential sequestration, the 
Department of State, USAID, and other agencies funded by this 
act shall conform to the definition of Program, Project, and 
Activity described above.
    The Committee includes language in this act making certain 
actions, such as obligations of funds, ``subject to the regular 
notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations.'' 
This language requires a separate notification to the Committee 
15 days prior to the proposed obligation of funds or other 
action that is the subject of this special notification 
requirement, regardless of what may be contained in an agency's 
CBJ or in the operating and spend plans required in section 
7064 of this act. Thus, such CBJs, operating and spend plans do 
not suffice as justification for purposes of satisfying the 
special notification requirement.
    Unless expressly provided to the contrary, the term 
``appropriate congressional committees'' as used in this act 
and report shall mean the Committees on Appropriations and 
Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committees on 
Appropriations and Foreign Affairs of the House of 
Representatives.

                        Reprogramming Guidelines

    The Committee directs the Department of State and other 
agencies funded by this act to notify the Committee of 
reprogrammings of funds as required by sections 7015 and 7019 
of this act at the most detailed level of either the CBJ, this 
act, or the report accompanying this act, and the Committee 
expects to be notified of any significant departure from the 
CBJ or of any commitment that will require significant funding 
in future years. The Committee directs that staffing levels and 
future year impacts of reprogrammings be included with such 
notifications.
    The Committee is concerned that the Department of State and 
other agencies funded by this act are not consistently 
submitting notifications of internal reorganizations as 
required by section 7015(a)(6) of this act. The Committee does 
not intend the term ``bureaus, centers, or offices'' to limit 
the notification requirement to only organizational units 
identified as such. The Committee expects to be notified of all 
reorganizations of organizational units, including branches, 
particularly if it reflects a change in program focus and 
priority.
    Section 7064 of this act requires operating and spend plans 
to be submitted not later than 45 days after enactment of this 
act, and states that the Committee will not consider any 
reprogramming that does not include the information required in 
subsection (a). Section 7064 also clarifies that any deviation 
in an operating plan from funding levels contained in this act 
or the report accompanying this act shall be subject to the 
regular notification procedures of the Committee.

                    Reporting Requirement Guidelines

    To save paper and printing costs, the Committee directs 
that one copy of reports, congressional notifications, and 
correspondence be jointly addressed to the chairs of the 
Committee and subcommittee, and one copy jointly addressed to 
the ranking members of the Committee and subcommittee. Reports 
required by the Committee may also be electronically 
transmitted and posted on the Department of State and USAID Web 
sites, as appropriate.
    The Committee directs that the Department of State, USAID, 
BBG, Millennium Challenge Corporation [MCC], U.S. African 
Development Foundation, and the Inter-American Foundation [IAF] 
no longer send to the Committee the quarterly, semi-annual, or 
annual reports from their respective OIG, as these documents 
are already received by the Committee directly from the OIG. 
Instead, the Committee directs these agencies to notify the 
Committee by email or letter that their OIG has sent such 
reports.
    Section 7073 of this act provides that reports required of 
Federal agencies receiving funds made available by this act 
shall be posted on the public Web site of the agency, with 
certain exceptions. Agencies are directed to consult with the 
Committee on compliance with this section not later than 30 
days after enactment of this act, including if the posting of 
any report or category of reports would be contrary to the 
national interest.

                    Issues and Countries of Concern

    Asia Maritime Disputes.--The Committee notes the 
detrimental impact of maritime disputes in Asia on regional 
security and stability, and encourages the Department of State 
and USAID to monitor and mitigate such disputes, to the extent 
possible. The Committee encourages all parties to resolve 
disputes peacefully, particularly the People's Republic of 
China [PRC] whose provocative actions can fuel nationalist 
responses.
    Asia Rebalancing Initiative.--Section 7043(a) of this act 
provides a framework for the President's Asia Rebalancing 
Initiative for Department of State, USAID, and other Federal 
agency operations and programs. The requirements of this 
subsection are intended to provide greater clarity in the 
conduct of activities in support of the Initiative, and the 
Committee supports funds for programs in Asia above the 
President's budget request.
    The Committee is concerned that the Department of State 
includes routine diplomatic operations in Asia in calculating 
amounts within the Asia Rebalancing Initiative, and that the 
funds requested for operations at diplomatic posts in East Asia 
and the Pacific are less than in fiscal year 2014. Therefore, 
section 7043(a)(4)(A) of the act requires the Secretary of 
State to submit a report to the Committee that includes the 
total amounts made available for the Initiative, the amount of 
increases for costs associated with Department of State and 
USAID personnel, and the funding for The Asia Foundation and 
the East-West Center beginning in fiscal year 2012. The 
Secretary is directed to consult with the Committee on 
operational costs associated with the Initiative prior to the 
fiscal year 2016 budget submission.
     Central African Republic.--The Committee recognizes that 
the conflict in Central African Republic [CAR] is a 
humanitarian crisis with an estimated half of the country's 
population in need of assistance. The Committee is concerned 
that if unchecked, the violence between Christian and Muslim 
communities could result in genocide. The Committee has 
increased humanitarian accounts above the President's request 
to address this crisis, and section 7042(a) of this act 
provides that funds shall be made available for reconciliation 
and peace-building programs in CAR, including activities to 
promote inter-faith dialogue at the national and local levels.
    Not later than 90 days after enactment of this act, the 
Secretary of State, in consultation with the heads of other 
relevant Federal agencies, shall submit a report to the 
appropriate congressional committees on an inter-agency 
strategy to help promote stability in the CAR, including 
funding estimates to support a political transition, and 
humanitarian and reconciliation programs.
    Central American Migration Prevention and Response.--The 
Committee is concerned with the unanticipated surge in 
unaccompanied, undocumented minors migrating from Central 
America to the United States which has put enormous strains on 
U.S. law enforcement and social service agencies. Responding to 
this sudden influx is primarily the responsibility of programs 
administered by the Departments of Homeland Security, Justice, 
and Health and Human Services, but there is also a need to do 
more to address the contributing causes in the countries of 
origin. Section 7045(a) of this act requires a joint Department 
of State/USAID strategy to address the key indicators of 
poverty, lack of education and employment opportunities, 
criminal gangs, narcotics and human trafficking, family 
dissolution, child abuse and neglect, and other contributing 
causes of such migration in countries in Central America, and 
to support the safe return and reintegration of such minors. In 
addition, the strategy shall address the need for family 
support, preservation, and reunification in countries of 
origin, as well as foster care and adoption programs. The 
Committee recommends not less than $100,000,000 (including OCO 
funds), in addition to other funds in this act and prior acts 
available for such purposes, to implement the strategy.
    Internet Freedom.--The Committee continues its support of 
Internet freedom programs in section 7050 of this act, and 
requires the GAO to conduct an assessment of such programs. The 
Committee recommends $35,000,000 for such programs.
    Iran.--The Committee condemns actions by the Government of 
Iran which contribute to instability in the Near East region, 
particularly in Syria and Lebanon. The Committee remains 
concerned with the danger Iran's pursuit of a nuclear weapon 
poses to the United States and regional allies. The act 
continues the terms and conditions of section 7041(b) of 
division K of Public Law 113-76 with modifications, and 
provides that funds appropriated under titles I and III of this 
act shall be made available to promote democracy and human 
rights in Iran.
    The Committee is concerned with Pastor Saeed Abedini who 
remains imprisoned in Tehran, Iran, and urges the Secretary of 
State to seek Pastor Abedini's release and to keep the 
Committee informed of his health and welfare.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit a 
report to the appropriate congressional committees not later 
than 180 days after enactment of this act detailing the steps 
taken by the Secretary and the U.S. Ambassador to the United 
Nations to implement section 415 of Public Law 112-158.
    Not later than 45 days after enactment of the act, and 
every 90 days thereafter until September 30, 2015, the 
President shall submit a report (in classified form as 
necessary) to the appropriate congressional committees on the 
interim agreement relating to Iran's nuclear program, including 
any successor to such agreement, including: verification that 
Iran is complying with such agreement; an assessment of the 
overall state of Iran's nuclear program and projected breakout 
time for Iran to have the necessary fuel for one weapon; an 
assessment of existing inspection and verification measures to 
detect Iran's ability to cheat on such agreement (including by 
acquiring nuclear capabilities from abroad); any plans 
considered or steps taken by the administration and the 
international community to improve such inspection and 
verification measures; and steps taken by the United States to 
strengthen the security of allies in the region.
    Iraq.--The Committee notes with concern the rapidly 
deteriorating situation in Iraq caused by the battlefield 
advances of Islamic extremists and ongoing conflict in Syria. 
The inability of the Government of Iraq to effectively counter 
extremism has resulted in large numbers of internally displaced 
persons [IDPs] in western and northern Iraq, fueling sectarian 
tensions and further exacerbating ethnic divides already 
strained by the policies of Prime Minister Nouri al-Malaki. The 
Committee recognizes the sovereignty of Iraq, but underscores 
that ongoing violence directly undermines the legitimacy of the 
Government of Iraq and the viability of the state.
    The Committee recommends up to $50,000,000 for assistance 
for Iraq under the Economic Support Fund [ESF] heading in 
titles III and VIII of this act, and up to $250,000,000 for 
assistance for Iraq under the Foreign Military Financing 
Program [FMF] heading in titles IV and VIII of this act. The 
Committee expects the Department of State to use these funds 
for humanitarian purposes in accordance with transfer authority 
in section 8003 of this act and reprogramming procedures, as 
necessary, should the Secretary of State determine that to do 
so is in the national interests of the United States, following 
consultation with the Committee.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to 
reprioritize previously appropriated assistance for Iraq to 
help mitigate this crisis, and recommends additional assistance 
in this act under the responsibility of the Chief of Mission to 
provide flexibility in responding to ongoing and future 
humanitarian and security challenges.
    The Secretary is also directed to take steps to ensure that 
any lethal assistance provided by this act and prior 
appropriations acts for Iraq is used for intended purposes in 
countering terrorism, and not abandoned to Islamic extremists.
    The Committee recognizes that a more permissive security 
and programmatic environment exists in Kurdistan than in 
central or southern Iraq, and expects the Department of State 
to take advantage of opportunities in this region to deepen 
security and economic relations.
    The Committee does not provide funding for the New 
Consulate Compound [NCC] in Basrah as no agreement has been 
reached on an appropriate site. However, the Committee notes 
the efforts of Consulate Basrah to operate as a consulate and 
not an isolated outpost, including engaging with local 
government officials, U.S. businesses, and other interests in 
southern Iraq. Funds requested for NCC Basrah remain under the 
heading Embassy Security, Construction, and Maintenance [ESCM] 
in title VIII of this act, and may be used for other security-
related purposes, or transferred to, and merged with, funds 
under the Diplomatic and Consular Programs [D&CP;] heading for 
Department of State operational purposes in Iraq, including to 
bolster local guard forces. The Committee directs the Secretary 
of State to consult with the Committee on the use of such 
funds, prior to transfer or obligation.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to include in 
the report on the resettlement plan for Iranian dissidents 
required by section 7041(c)(6) of this act: a description of 
measures taken to improve the security and welfare (including 
quality of life and access to medical care) of residents at 
Camp Liberty; an analysis of attacks against such dissidents 
since February 2009, including whether any weapons or training 
provided by the United States were used in the attacks, and 
safeguards to ensure that no such weapons or training are used 
in the future; and options for the resettlement of Iranian 
dissidents outside Iraq, including in the United States.
    The Committee continues to support programs to assist 
vulnerable Iraqi ethnic and religious minorities in the Nineveh 
Plains, and for the Iraqi Christian community. The Committee 
encourages the Department of State to support the Government of 
Iraq in its effort to establish the Nineveh Plains 
administrative province, and to provide assistance as necessary 
to support the successful conclusion of this process.
    Libya.--The Committee is concerned with the deteriorating 
situation in Libya. Section 7041(f) of this act provides that 
funds appropriated under specific accounts in this act and 
prior appropriations acts may be made available to strengthen 
democracy in Libya, including civil society; enhance key 
ministries necessary for maintaining security and stability; 
address immediate humanitarian needs arising from conflict; 
strengthen the rule of law; professionalize military personnel 
associated with the Libyan state; and counter extremist 
ideologies. Such funds shall be made available on a cost-
matching basis to the maximum extent practicable, and the 
Secretary of State shall ensure mechanisms are in place for 
adequate oversight.
    The act continues the certification requirement and 
limitation of funds in section 7041(f) of division K of Public 
Law 113-76. No funds appropriated by this act may be made 
available for assistance for the central Government of Libya 
unless the Secretary of State reports that such government is 
cooperating with U.S. Government efforts to investigate and 
bring to justice those responsible for the attack on U.S. 
personnel and facilities in Benghazi, Libya, in September 2012.
    Russian Federation.--Section 7070 of this act provides a 
framework for assistance for a U.S. response to Russian 
aggression in Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia, 
which should be coordinated with European and other allies in 
the region. The Committee expects the President to devise and 
implement a strategy to counter Russia's efforts to expand 
influence, and to submit a budget request to the Congress for 
fiscal year 2016 to support such a strategy.
    The Committee notes that increased tensions in bilateral 
relations with Russia may require modifications to operating 
procedures in countries and regions where Russian influence is 
significant. The Secretary of State is to consult with the 
Committee on additional security requirements in such countries 
and regions for personnel, information, and facilities, 
including areas of restricted access for new construction or 
significant upgrades.
    The Secretary of State shall consult with the appropriate 
congressional committees not less than 45 days prior to the 
conference to review implementation of the Treaty on Open Skies 
on the impact of Russian Federation aggression in Eastern 
Europe on U.S. security interests.
    South Sudan.--The continuation of conflict in South Sudan, 
exacerbated by floods and droughts, undermines international 
efforts to support stability in that country and creates 
additional humanitarian requirements. Currently more than 4 
million people are estimated to need assistance. The Committee 
directs that such assistance include food and emergency 
humanitarian services; investments in livelihood programs to 
create economic empowerment, resilience for vulnerable 
communities, and recovery; and local governance programs that 
support peace building, reconciliation, and civic education.
    Syria.--The conflict in Syria is complex and protracted, 
requiring significant resources from the United States for the 
foreseeable future to address the humanitarian needs of 
millions of displaced Syrians, and to ensure economic and 
political stability in neighboring countries. The Committee is 
aware that absent support for Syrian refugees and communities 
inside Syria that are not under the control of Damascus, a 
targeted response against Islamic extremists, and 
organizational and technical support for the moderate Syrian 
opposition, security and stability in neighboring countries 
could quickly erode.
    Section 7041(h) of this act provides a framework for 
assistance for Syria. The Committee strongly supports programs 
to address the needs of Syrian IDPs and refugees, particularly 
women and children and persons with disabilities. The Committee 
supports an integrated humanitarian and development approach to 
meet the requirements of refugees and host communities. The 
Committee directs the Department of State to ensure that women 
are included in negotiations to end the conflict, as 
appropriate. The Committee directs the Department of State and 
USAID, in cooperation with relevant United Nations [U.N.] 
agencies and organizations, to include mental health and 
psychosocial support services as a core component in programs 
addressing the needs of Syrian refugees, to be implemented 
according to Inter-Agency Standing Committee Guidelines on 
Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings.
    The Committee supports the efforts of the U.S. Senior 
Advisor for Assistance for Syria to coordinate the U.S. 
response to the crisis. The Committee expects offices and 
bureaus of the Department of State and USAID to follow the 
leadership and guidance of the Advisor, including for 
activities inside Syria. The Committee recognizes the 
limitations of oversight for assistance provided to Syrian 
civil society organizations operating inside Syria, but the 
efforts of these organizations are essential to enable a 
civilian political alternative to the current regime to emerge.
    The Committee directs the Department of State to develop 
and implement a policy to support accountability for crimes 
against humanity and other violations of human rights in Syria.
    Not later than 45 days after enactment of this act, the 
Secretary of State shall consult with the appropriate 
congressional committees on options for assisting Syrian 
refugees whose education has been disrupted by the conflict to 
continue their education, including completing degrees at 
regional universities and other institutions.

                                TITLE I

                 DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED AGENCY

                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE

                   Administration of Foreign Affairs

                    DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR PROGRAMS

                     (including transfer of funds)

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $7,996,810,000
    Enduring............................................   6,605,701,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................   1,391,109,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   8,336,468,000
    Enduring............................................   6,783,043,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................   1,553,425,000
Committee recommendation................................   7,811,975,000
    Enduring operations.................................   6,461,172,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................   1,350,803,000

    The Committee recommends $6,461,172,000 for Diplomatic and 
Consular Programs, of which up to $2,128,115,000 is for 
Worldwide Security Protection [WSP], including security costs 
in Iraq. An additional $1,350,803,000 in title VIII under this 
heading is designated for OCO.
    The Committee recommendation separates the functions funded 
under this heading to provide transparency in the uses of 
funds. However, the Department of State may reprogram funds as 
necessary, subject to prior consultation with the Committee.
    Human Resources.--The Committee recommends $2,270,036,000 
for all U.S. direct hire salaries at overseas and domestic U.S. 
diplomatic missions. With the exception of those specifically 
mentioned in this report, the Committee does not recommend 
funding for new positions, including for economic statecraft. 
If the Department intends to create new positions the Committee 
will consider reprogramming proposals, especially if funds for 
such purpose are derived from implementing pending OIG cost 
savings recommendations, or from the elimination of 
redundancies or inefficiencies.
 Overseas Programs.--The Committee recommends $1,595,805,000 
for the operational programs of the Department of State's 
regional bureaus, which are responsible for managing U.S. 
foreign policy through bilateral and multilateral 
relationships. Funds support U.S. Embassies, consulates, and 
other diplomatic posts worldwide, and provide myriad services 
to millions of U.S. citizens living, working, studying, and 
serving abroad, including those who are arrested and imprisoned 
in foreign countries.
    The Committee does not include funding for Embassy 
operations in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iraq under this 
heading in this title with the exception of diplomatic security 
costs including for the Worldwide Security Program. Funding for 
such purposes is included under title VIII of this act.
    The Committee recommends $23,500,000 for Conflict 
Stabilization Operations [CSO] salaries and administrative 
expenses. In addition, $15,000,000 in title VIII of this act 
under the heading Conflict Stabilization Operations is 
recommended for deployment costs.
    Section 7074 of this act requires the Secretary of State to 
develop and implement a process for determining whether U.S. 
citizens detained abroad are more likely than not detained 
arbitrarily and in violation of international law, and as such, 
deserve enhanced legal and diplomatic support.
    The Committee recognizes the invaluable contributions to 
the conduct of diplomacy by locally employed staff [LES] at 
missions abroad, and requests the Secretary of State to 
consider non-monetary recognition of exceptional and/or long 
term service for LES, including local guards. The Committee 
expects the Secretary to continue funding overseas inflation 
and LES wage increases through funds made available in the 
Buying Power Maintenance account.
    Diplomatic Policy and Support.--The Committee recommends 
$780,860,000 for the operational programs of the Department of 
State's functional bureaus to provide overall policy direction, 
coordination, and program management among U.S. missions 
abroad. The Committee recommends not less than $9,988,000 for 
salary and program costs of the Office for Global Women's 
Issues within the Office of the Secretary; not less than 
$31,358,000 for salary and program costs for the Bureau of 
Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor [DRL], including an 
additional 15 full-time equivalent positions for grants 
management, of which not less than $5,000,000 is for salary and 
program costs for human rights vetting; and not less than 
$37,762,000 is for salary and program costs for the Bureau of 
Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs.
    Security Programs.--The Committee recommends $1,813,938,000 
for the operation of security programs, including 
$1,796,230,000 for WSP to protect diplomatic personnel, 
overseas diplomatic missions, residences, and domestic 
facilities and information. An additional $331,885,000 is 
included within the Human Resources function for salaries for a 
total of $2,128,115,000 for WSP in this title. The Committee 
recommends an additional $989,706,000 for OCO costs for WSP. To 
more accurately reflect the full costs of security, the 
Committee has included in WSP the security costs for Iraq.
    The act provides the budget request for WSP. In addition, 
section 7004(f) of this act provides the Secretary of State 
with the necessary flexibility to transfer funds between the 
D&CP; and ESCM headings in titles I and VIII to prevent or 
respond to unforeseen security situations and requirements at 
diplomatic facilities abroad, following consultation with the 
Committee. This authority is in addition to any transfer 
authority otherwise made available under any provision of law.
    Section 7006 of this act provides authority for the 
Department of State to award local guard contracts on the basis 
of best value as determined by a cost-technical tradeoff 
analysis (as described in Federal Acquisition Regulation part 
15.101). This authority was previously extended only to high-
risk, high-threat posts.
     The Secretary of State shall submit an updated report to 
the appropriate congressional committees detailing the status 
of the Department of State's implementation of the 29 
recommendations to improve security at diplomatic facilities 
overseas in the Benghazi Accountability Review Board [ARB] 
report and relevant recommendations of previous ARBs. For any 
recommendation not fully implemented, the report shall include 
an estimated completion date and cost of implementation. The 
report shall be updated not later than 180 days after the first 
report is submitted.

                             PROGRAM ISSUES

    Afghanistan and Iraq Diplomatic Operations and 
Facilities.--The Committee requests the Secretary of State, in 
consultation with the USAID Administrator, to consult with the 
Committee on the anticipated footprint of diplomatic facilities 
in Afghanistan and Iraq. The Committee recognizes the 
uncertainty created by the drawdown of U.S. forces in 
Afghanistan and the deteriorating security situation in Iraq on 
diplomatic operations, and necessary flexibility is provided in 
the act for major adjustments. As the Committee did not fund 
the request for NCC Basrah, the Committee expects these funds 
to be used for Department of State operations and security in 
Iraq.
    American Victims of Libyan Terrorism.--The Committee notes 
the remaining balances of funds received by the United States 
and held by the U.S. Treasury, the work of the Foreign Claims 
Settlement Commission to adjudicate claims, and interest by all 
parties on the uses of such funds. The Committee requires the 
Secretary of State to submit a report to the appropriate 
congressional committees regarding outstanding claims filed 
with the Foreign Claims Settlement Commission and the process 
for their adjudication.
    The Arctic.--The Committee recognizes the strategic 
importance of the Arctic region to the long-term economic and 
national security interests of the United States and notes that 
the United States will assume the Chair of the Arctic Council 
in May 2015. The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for 
preparation and support for the chairmanship of the Arctic 
Council, and encourages the Department of State to increase the 
number of personnel assigned to Arctic Council issues. The 
Committee also encourages the Department of State to establish 
the position of U.S. Ambassador to the Arctic in order to 
enhance engagement with other Arctic nations.
    The Committee strongly supports the participation of 
American indigenous communities in the Arctic Council, and 
section 7034(t) of this act provides up to $500,000 for grants 
to support the application of science and technology to foreign 
policy issues in the Arctic region, including to facilitate the 
participation of indigenous communities in the Council.
    Atrocities Prevention Board.--The Committee recommends 
funding under this heading and the Operating Expenses heading 
for USAID to train relevant personnel at the Department of 
State and USAID in genocide and mass atrocities prevention and 
to support full participation in the interagency Atrocities 
Prevention Board [APB], including staff to carry out the 
responsibilities of the APB, in accordance with Presidential 
Study Directive 10.
    Centralization of Vouchers.--The Committee directs the 
Department to continue implementation of the centralization of 
voucher processing for overseas posts, as appropriate.
    Cultural Heritage.--The Committee recommends $5,750,000 for 
Cultural Heritage Programs, including for not less than five 
large-scale projects, and $1,000,000 for the Cultural 
Antiquities Task Force. The Committee recognizes the important 
public diplomacy role of this program, as well as its 
contribution in preserving some of the world's irreplaceable 
cultural antiquities. As in past years, the Department of State 
should consult with the Committee prior to the obligation of 
funds.
    Cyber Issues.--The Committee recommends not less than the 
President's budget request for the Office of the Coordinator 
for Cyber Issues.
    Not later than 120 days after enactment of this act, the 
Secretary of State, in consultation with the heads of other 
relevant U.S. Government agencies, shall submit a report to the 
appropriate congressional committees detailing the efforts of 
the Department of State to pursue cybercriminals responsible 
for data breaches against U.S. public and private interests 
through extradition agreements for such criminals.
    Export Control Reform Initiative.--The Committee supports 
the President's Export Control Reform Initiative to modernize 
and reform the U.S. export control system, and encourages the 
Secretary of State, in coordination with the Secretary of 
Commerce, to directly inform businesses, particularly small 
businesses, about any new rules and regulations.
    Foreign Affairs Security Training Center.--The Committee 
notes that for the past several years, Department of State 
efforts to establish the Foreign Affairs Security Training 
Center [FASTC] have been poorly conceived and executed. Cost 
estimates have been as unreliable as the identification of 
potential sites for the Center.
    No funds for FASTC are included in the President's budget 
request and none are provided in this act. While the Committee 
recognizes the importance of security training for diplomats, 
justification for the construction of a new facility at Fort 
Pickett instead of using existing law enforcement training 
centers requires clarification. Not later than 45 days after 
enactment of this act, the Secretary of State, in consultation 
with the heads of other relevant Federal agencies, shall submit 
to the appropriate congressional committees the financial data 
comparing options that were considered by OMB for FASTC, a 
determination of whether the expansion of existing facilities 
is necessary to meet long-term security training requirements 
for the Department of State, the plan for ensuring that current 
critical security training needs are met and the timeline for 
the transition to training at FASTC, and a description of the 
priority security training needs that will be met with the 
establishment of FASTC.
    Foreign Service Labor Officers.--The Committee directs the 
Secretary of State to review the role of the Department's 
foreign service labor officers, including where such officers 
are assigned, to identify opportunities to maximize the 
Department's efforts to improve labor standards worldwide.
    Human Rights Vetting.--The Committee recognizes the 
Department of State's efforts to strengthen its capacity to 
monitor U.S. military assistance for foreign security forces in 
accordance with section 620M of the Foreign Assistance Act of 
1961 [FAA], and provides not less than $5,000,000 for salaries 
and program expenses for this purpose. The vetting process 
applies to individuals who are candidates for U.S. training, to 
those individuals' units, and to units that receive U.S. 
equipment or other assistance, as required by law, and which is 
not intended to modify the current vetting procedures of the 
Department of State.
    International Parental Child Abduction.--The Committee 
directs the Secretary of State to develop, in coordination with 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation, a set of protocols to work 
with countries that are not signatories to the Convention on 
the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction to resolve 
international parental child abduction cases.
    Office of Terrorism Finance and Economic Sanctions 
Policy.--The Committee recommends not less than $4,100,000 for 
this office which develops strategies, in conjunction with 
other bureaus and agencies, for implementing sanctions regimes.
    Prevention of Discrimination and Abuse of Lesbian, Gay, 
Bisexual, and Transgender Individuals Abroad.--The Committee 
directs the Assistant Secretary of State for DRL, in 
consultation with the Assistant Administrator for Democracy, 
Conflict, and Humanitarian Assistance [DCHA], to submit a 
report not later than 90 days after enactment of this act on 
progress made implementing the strategy to prevent 
discrimination and abuse against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and 
transgender persons abroad, as required by the joint 
explanatory statement to Public Law 113-76, which incorporated 
by reference Senate Report 113-81, as well as the December 6, 
2011 Presidential Memorandum: International Initiatives to 
Advance the Human Rights of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and 
Transgender Persons.
    Representation Expenses.--The Committee does not include 
authorization for the Department of State to transfer up to 
$1,000,000 from the D&CP; heading to the Representation Expenses 
heading. To more accurately reflect the Department of State's 
estimate for representation expenses based on prior year 
actuals, the Committee has reduced the D&CP; account by $730,000 
and increased the funds appropriated under the Representation 
Expenses heading.
    Special Immigrant Visa Program.--This act does not include 
reauthorization for the Afghanistan Special Immigrant Visa 
[SIV] Program because such reauthorization is included in the 
fiscal year 2015 National Defense Authorization Act recently 
reported by the Senate Armed Services Committee. The Committee 
directs the Secretary of State to submit a plan, not later than 
90 days after enactment of this act, for the Afghanistan SIV 
program beyond September 30, 2015 and addressing the current 
and long-term local staffing needs, including for local guards, 
of the U.S. Embassy in Kabul.
    The Committee expects the Department of State to expedite 
refugee resettlement of the most vulnerable Afghans and Iraqis 
and to maximize the use of SIV processing while maintaining an 
effective screening process.
    Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan.--The 
Committee requests the Secretary of State to consult with the 
Committee on plans for winding down the Office of the Special 
Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan [SRAP]. The 
Committee supports the reincorporation of SRAP within the 
Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs.
    Special Representative and Policy Coordinator for Burma.--
The Committee recognizes that with the reestablishment of full 
diplomatic relations with Burma the position of Special 
Representative and Policy Coordinator for Burma, established 
pursuant to section 7 of Public Law 110-286, is obsolete, and 
the act requires this position to remain vacant following the 
expiration of the current term.
    Standards for Accessibility.--The Secretary of State, the 
Secretary of the Treasury, and the USAID Administrator shall 
seek to ensure that construction projects funded by this act 
are fully accessible to persons with disabilities and in 
compliance with the USAID Policy on Standards for Accessibility 
for the Disabled, the Americans with Disabilities Act Standards 
for Accessible Design, or other similarly rigorous 
accessibility standards.
    Tibet.--The Committee recommends not less than $1,000,000 
for the Office of the Special Coordinator for Tibetan Issues to 
carry out the responsibilities detailed in section 621(d) of 
Public Law 107-228, as well as for convening and coordinating 
meetings for appropriate Federal agencies, nongovernmental 
organizations [NGOs], and representatives of the Tibetan 
leadership in exile.
    Trade and Other Sanctions.--The Committee directs the 
Secretary of State to fulfill the consultation requirement 
under this heading in Senate Report 113-81 regarding Edward 
Snowden.
    Trafficking in Persons.--The Committee recommends a total 
of $55,534,000 in this act for Trafficking in Persons [TIP] 
programs, of which $6,290,000 is included under the D&CP; 
heading for the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in 
Persons [J/TIP] ($2,205,000 for programs and $4,085,000 for 
salaries). The Committee directs the Secretary of State to make 
publicly available an appropriate human trafficking hotline 
telephone number and Web site information in public waiting 
areas in all U.S. embassies and consulates in a timely manner.
    Visas.--Not later than 45 days after enactment of this act, 
the Secretary of State shall consult with the Committee on 
steps taken to investigate and address the increase in tourist 
visa rejection rates in Israel from 2009 to 2013, and in Poland 
from 2012 to 2013.

                        CAPITAL INVESTMENT FUND

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $76,900,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      56,400,000
Committee recommendation................................      56,400,000

    The Committee recommends $56,400,000 for Capital Investment 
Fund.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $119,056,000
    Enduring operations.................................      69,406,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................      49,650,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     130,300,000
    Enduring operations.................................      73,400,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................      56,900,000
Committee recommendation................................     130,300,000
    Enduring operations.................................      73,400,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................      56,900,000

    The Committee recommends $73,400,000 for Office of 
Inspector General, and an additional $56,900,000 in title VIII 
under this heading is designated for OCO.
    The Committee directs the Inspectors General of the 
Department of State and USAID and the Special Inspector General 
for Afghanistan Reconstruction [SIGAR] to coordinate audit 
plans and activities to minimize unnecessary duplication, 
ensure comprehensive oversight plans, and maximize the 
effective use of resources.

               EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $568,628,000
    Enduring operations.................................     560,000,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................       8,628,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     577,900,000
Committee recommendation................................     590,770,000

    The Committee recommends $590,770,000 for Educational and 
Cultural Exchange Programs.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of international 
exchanges and directs that programs funded under this heading 
will support U.S. foreign policy objectives.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to broaden 
participation of high priority groups that have been 
traditionally under-represented, such as youth and other 
individuals from rural and impoverished areas and minorities. 
The Committee also supports the Benjamin Gilman International 
Scholarship, International Visitor Leadership, Citizen Exchange 
youth programs, and educator programs. The Committee urges the 
Secretary to continue to give priority to critical language 
programs, programs providing overseas training in critical 
languages for American students, and exchange programs from 
countries with high national security importance, including 
those with significant Muslim populations.
    The Committee does not support the proposed $30,466,000 
reduction to the Fulbright Program, including the Humphrey 
Fellowship Program, and the act provides sufficient funds to 
avoid such reduction. The Committee notes that in recent years 
the Department of State has justified reductions to one-way 
exchanges with a specific regional focus on the grounds that 
the Fulbright Program offers bi-directional exchanges with 
greater flexibility and strong country and university support. 
Yet in the fiscal year 2015 budget request the Department 
proposes to reduce the Fulbright Program to fund region-
specific exchanges. This reversal indicates a lack of long-term 
planning.
    The Committee does not include the funding requested for 
the Rapid Response Fund under this title or under the D&CP; 
heading.
    The Committee recognizes that the Muskie Fellowship Program 
has helped individuals from Eurasia and Central Asia to promote 
mutual understanding, build democracy, and foster the 
transition to market economies, and the act requires that a 
portion of Fulbright awards from this region are designated as 
Edmund S. Muskie Fellowships.
    The Committee recommends $15,000,000 for the Young African 
Leaders Initiative [YALI] and $5,000,000 for the President's 
proposed Young Southeast Asian Leaders Initiative, which shall 
be made available on a cost-matching basis. The Committee 
expects that additional funds for YALI will be raised from 
private sources. The Secretary of State is directed to consult 
with the Committee on a sustainable funding mechanism for these 
programs.
    The Committee supports the Secretary of State's efforts to 
reduce the administrative costs of exchange programs and 
expects that savings from such efforts will be used to increase 
the number of participants.
    The Committee continues to recognize the value of virtual 
exchanges as a means to broaden understanding and engagement 
between U.S., Middle Eastern, and North African youth in a 
cost-effective manner, and intends that funds made available 
for such programs will be matched by sources other than the 
U.S. Government, including from private foundations, foreign 
governments, and the private sector, to the maximum extent 
practicable.
    Funds are allocated according to the following table and 
are subject to the provisions of section 7019 of this act:

               EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                         Program                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Academic Programs.......................................         331,245
    Fulbright Program: Students, Scholars, Teachers,             236,000
     Humphrey, Undergraduates...........................
    Global Academic Exchanges...........................          58,785
    Special Academic Exchanges..........................          36,460
Professional and Cultural Exchanges.....................         195,575
    International Visitor Program.......................          90,000
    Citizen Exchange Programs...........................         100,000
    Special Professional and Cultural Exchanges.........           5,575
Program and Performance Evaluation......................           4,250
Exchanges Support.......................................          59,700
                                                         ---------------
      Total, ECE........................................         590,770
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Changes to Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs.--The 
Committee clarifies that the third proviso under this heading 
in this act shall apply to changes to any exchange program, 
including the separate programs funded within the Fulbright 
Program.
     Summer Work Travel and High School Exchange Programs.--The 
Committee directs the Department of State to inform the 
Committee in a timely manner of any instances of coercion, 
exploitation, or other abuse associated with the Summer Work 
travel and High School exchange programs.
    A provision under this heading in this act permits 
participants in the Summer Work Travel program to be employed 
in seafood processing positions until September 30, 2015, if 
such placements comply with all requirements of the program. As 
with other positions, Summer Work Travel sponsors shall, upon 
request, provide evidence to the Department of State that such 
requirements are being met for seafood processing positions, 
and failure to provide such evidence will justify a compliance 
review of the sponsor.

                        REPRESENTATION EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................      $7,300,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................       7,679,000
Committee recommendation................................       8,030,000

    The Committee recommends $8,030,000 for Representation 
Expenses. The Committee provides the fiscal year 2014 level 
including the transfer of $730,000 from the D&CP; heading to 
this heading in fiscal year 2014. The Committee expects the 
Secretary of State to regularize funding for costs currently 
funded under this heading, instead of continuing the practice 
of transferring D&CP; funds each fiscal year.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit a 
semiannual report on the allotment and expenditure of 
representation funds.

              PROTECTION OF FOREIGN MISSIONS AND OFFICIALS

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $28,200,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      30,036,000
Committee recommendation................................      30,036,000

    The Committee recommends $30,036,000 for Protection of 
Foreign Missions and Officials.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to continue to 
submit a semiannual report on the number of claims for 
extraordinary protective services by eligible jurisdictions and 
certified as meeting program requirements, and the amount of 
unobligated funds available to pay such claims.
    The Committee is informed that outstanding eligible claims 
for the extraordinary protective services provided to foreign 
missions and officials from qualifying jurisdictions submitted 
to the Department of State will exceed $70,000,000 in fiscal 
year 2015. Section 7034(i) of this act authorizes the Secretary 
to transfer up to $50,000,000 in expired unobligated balances 
from the D&CP; heading to this account to be used for such 
certified eligible claims.

            EMBASSY SECURITY, CONSTRUCTION, AND MAINTENANCE

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $2,674,351,000
    Enduring operations.................................   2,399,351,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................     275,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   2,277,700,000
    Enduring operations.................................   2,016,900,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................     260,800,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,277,700,000
    Enduring operations.................................   2,016,900,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................     260,800,000

    The Committee recommends $2,016,900,000 for Embassy 
Security, Construction, and Maintenance, of which 
$1,217,500,000 is for worldwide security upgrades and 
$799,400,000 is for other construction, operations, and 
maintenance. An additional $260,800,000 in title VIII under 
this heading is designated for OCO. The total amount is equal 
to the budget request.
    Additional Transfer Authority.--Section 7004(f) of this act 
provides the Secretary of State with the necessary flexibility 
to transfer funds between the ESCM and D&CP; headings in titles 
I and VIII to prevent or respond to unforeseen security 
situations and requirements at diplomatic facilities abroad. 
This authority is in addition to any transfer authority 
otherwise made available under any provision of law.
    Art in Embassies Program.--Not later than 180 days after 
enactment of this act, the Secretary of State shall submit to 
the Committee an inventory list of art valued at more than 
$25,000 purchased and owned by the Department of State under 
the Art in Embassies program (including the estimated current 
value of such art), and a list of art loaned to the Department 
under the program over the past three fiscal years valued at 
more than $25,000 (including the estimated current value of 
such art).
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to include in 
notifications to the Committee of diplomatic facility 
construction projects that include funding for a major art 
purchase, a determination that such purchase is in the national 
interest of the United States. For major purchases of art that 
are not part of a diplomatic facility construction project, 
such determination shall be made and reported to the Committee 
prior to the obligation of funds made available by this act.
    Diplomatic Facilities and Representation Abroad.--The 
Committee appreciates the challenges the Department of State 
encounters in balancing the need for adequate security, new 
facility construction, and maintenance and rehabilitation for 
U.S. diplomatic facilities abroad. The Committee also supports 
a strong U.S. presence globally. However, fiscal constraints 
require the Department to periodically review where and how it 
conducts diplomacy. Not later than 180 days after enactment of 
this act, the Secretary of State shall submit to the 
appropriate congressional committees a feasibility study, to 
include potential cost savings, for consolidating: (1) 
consulates or consulates general within the Bureau of European 
and Eurasian Affairs, Department of State; (2) diplomatic 
missions within a specific region and establishing in lieu 
thereof a regional U.S. Embassy; and (3) multiple countries of 
accreditation under a single Washington-based diplomat of 
Ambassadorial rank in lieu of maintaining a physical presence 
in such countries.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to include in 
rightsizing reviews of overseas missions conducted after the 
date of enactment of this act a determination of whether, 
consistent with the national interests: the operational costs 
for the mission under review and its location justify 
maintaining a diplomatic presence; alternatives to such 
presence if the costs outweigh the benefits; and an analysis of 
potential future security or operational challenges that may 
significantly increase the cost of the mission. The 
determinations shall be submitted to the appropriate 
congressional committees.
     The Committee is concerned that the OIG's recommendation 
in fiscal year 2013 to close the Consulate in Casablanca, 
Morocco is still pending with the Department of State, and that 
the Department has obligated fiscal year 2013 funds to 
establish a Marine Security Guard contingent there. The 
Committee directs the Department to provide justification to 
the Committee for not implementing the OIG's recommendations 
regarding Consulate Casablanca prior to further expenditures 
related to facility upgrades or construction.
    Expeditionary, Interim and Temporary Facilities Abroad.--
Section 7004(e)(1) of this act maintains $25,000,000 to address 
security vulnerabilities at expeditionary, interim, and 
temporary facilities abroad, including physical security 
upgrades and local guard staffing. Section 7004(e)(2) of this 
act directs the Secretary of State to submit, not later than 90 
days after enactment of this act, a list of all expeditionary, 
interim, and temporary diplomatic facilities.
    Operating Plans.--Section 7064 of this act requires the 
Secretary of State to submit an operating plan for funds 
appropriated under this heading, which should include all 
resources available to the Department of State in fiscal year 
2015 for operations, maintenance, and construction, and an 
accounting of the actual and anticipated proceeds of sales for 
all projects in fiscal year 2014.

           EMERGENCIES IN THE DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR SERVICE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2014....................................      $9,242,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................       7,900,000
Committee recommendation................................       7,900,000

    The Committee recommends $7,900,000 for Emergencies in the 
Diplomatic and Consular Service. The Committee also authorizes 
the transfer of up to $10,000,000 under the D&CP; heading for 
emergency evacuations and rewards.
    The Committee directs that the quarterly reports required 
by section 124 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, 
fiscal years 1988 and 1989, as amended, include, by category, 
actual expenditures for the prior two fiscal years and 
cumulative totals for the current fiscal year of the funds 
available under this heading.

                   REPATRIATION LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2014....................................      $1,537,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................       1,300,000
Committee recommendation................................       1,300,000

    The Committee recommends $1,300,000 for the Repatriation 
Loans Program Account to support loans totaling up to 
$2,469,136. In addition, $751,000 for administrative expenses 
is provided by the Border Security Program.

              PAYMENT TO THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE IN TAIWAN

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $31,221,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      30,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      30,000,000

    The Committee recommends $30,000,000 for the American 
Institute in Taiwan and an additional $2,600,000 is provided 
from the Border Security Program. The Committee directs the 
director of the American Institute in Taiwan, in coordination 
with the Secretary of State, to continue to report in the CBJ 
the amount of fees estimated to be received from the Department 
of State for consular services.

     PAYMENT TO THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY FUND

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $158,900,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     158,900,000
Committee recommendation................................     158,900,000

    The Committee recommends $158,900,000 for the Foreign 
Service Retirement and Disability Fund.

                      International Organizations

              CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $1,340,162,000
    Enduring operations.................................   1,265,762,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................      74,400,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   1,517,349,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,514,924,000
    Enduring operations.................................   1,440,524,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................      74,400,000

    The Committee recommends $1,440,524,000 for Contributions 
to International Organizations [CIO]. An additional $74,400,000 
in title VIII under this heading is designated for OCO.
    Section 7064 of this act requires the Secretary of State to 
submit an operating plan for funds made available under this 
heading, which should include each international organization 
funded, a notation of any exchange rate fluctuations that 
occurred since such estimates were calculated for the fiscal 
year 2015 CBJ, and a description of any Tax Equalization Fund 
[TEF] credits applied.
    Capital Master Plan.--The Committee notes that the budget 
request did not include funding for the Capital Master Plan.
    Food and Agriculture Organization.--The Committee 
encourages the Food and Agriculture Organization [FAO] to work 
with land grant institutions of higher learning in the United 
States to meet global food security challenges.
    Organization of American States.--The Committee recognizes 
the important role of the Organization of American States [OAS] 
in addressing key issues, from human rights to regional 
cooperation on a range of social, economic, political, 
environmental, and other challenges. However, the Committee 
remains concerned that OAS personnel practices are not 
sufficiently transparent or merit-based and that in a time of 
severe budget constraints the OAS has not done enough to 
eliminate unnecessary costs. The Committee notes that the U.S. 
share represents 59.4 percent of the OAS budget, and has 
reduced funding under this heading for the OAS by 5 percent. 
The Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit a report 
not later than 120 days after enactment of this act detailing 
steps taken by the OAS to address these concerns.
    United Nations Budget and Voting Practices.--The Committee 
directs the Secretary of State, at the time of the submission 
of the President's budget to Congress, to transmit to the 
Committee the most recent biennial budget prepared by the 
United Nations for the operations of the United Nations.
    In considering assistance for a foreign government and the 
assessed and voluntary U.S. contributions for the United 
Nations, the Secretary of State should review, among other 
factors, the voting practices of such government at the United 
Nations in relation to U.S. strategic interests.
    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural 
Organization.--The Committee notes that the President's budget 
request did not include a U.S. contribution to UNESCO under 
this heading, which is prohibited by law, and none is provided.
    Report.--Section 7048(d) of the act requires the Secretary 
of State to report to the Committee on certain funds withheld 
from obligation.

        CONTRIBUTIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACEKEEPING ACTIVITIES

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $1,765,519,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   2,518,565,000
Committee recommendation................................................

    The Committee recommends funding for Contributions for 
International Peacekeeping Activities under titles IV and VIII 
of this act, as U.N. peacekeeping missions are a critical 
component of furthering U.S. security interests globally.

                       International Commissions


 INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $44,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      45,415,000
Committee recommendation................................      45,415,000

    The Committee recommends $45,415,000 for salaries and 
expenses of the International Boundary and Water Commission 
[IBWC], United States and Mexico.

                              CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $33,438,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      26,461,000
Committee recommendation................................      26,461,000

    The Committee recommends $26,461,000 for planning, 
preparation, and construction.

              AMERICAN SECTIONS, INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONS

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $12,499,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      12,311,000
Committee recommendation................................      12,561,000

    The Committee recommends $12,561,000 for American Sections, 
International Commissions, of which $7,663,000 is for the 
International Joint Commission, $2,525,000 is for the 
International Boundary Commission, United States and Canada, 
and $2,373,000 is for the Border Environment Cooperation 
Commission.
    American Sections, International Joint Commission.--The 
Committee recommends up to $250,000 for the International Joint 
Commission to proceed with the Plan of Study to address Souris 
River Basin water supply and flood control matters, pending 
final agreement with the Government of Canada to conduct the 
study. The Committee supports the $450,000 included in the 
budget request for the continued study of the causes and 
impacts of flooding in the Lake Champlain-Richelieu River 
watershed. In addition, the act provides that up to $500,000 
may be available until September 30, 2016.

                  INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES COMMISSIONS

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $35,980,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      31,446,000
Committee recommendation................................      37,180,000

    The Committee recommends $37,180,000 for International 
Fisheries Commissions which, with the exception of Great Lakes 
Fisheries Commission [GLFC] and the International Pacific 
Halibut Commission [IPHC], funds all the commissions at the 
budget request level. The Committee recommends $25,449,000 for 
GLFC, of which $3,500,000 is for sea lamprey control and water 
quality improvements in the Lake Champlain Basin and $2,034,000 
is for additional sea lamprey control and fishery research for 
the Great Lakes Basin. The Committee recommends $4,150,000 for 
the IPHC which includes $200,000 for facility rent costs.

                             RELATED AGENCY

                    Broadcasting Board of Governors

                 INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING OPERATIONS

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $725,480,000
    Enduring operations.................................     721,080,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................       4,400,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     716,460,000
Committee recommendation................................     716,460,000

    The Committee recommends $716,460,000 for International 
Broadcasting Operations [IBO].
    The Committee recommends $26,525,000 to be available until 
expended under IBO for satellite transmission lease costs and 
BBG's Internet freedom and circumvention programs. The 
Committee supports the use of satellite transmission lease 
costs savings for the BBG's surge programming to Ukraine and 
neighboring countries.
    Funds in this account are allocated according to the 
following table and are subject to the provisions of section 
7019 of this act:

                  INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING OPERATIONS
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                    Program/Activity                      recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Federal Entities........................................         472,213
    BBG/IBB Operations..................................          61,770
    International Broadcasting Bureau (IBB):
        Voice of America (VOA)..........................         209,825
        Broadcasting to Cuba (OCB)......................          23,130
        Office of Technology, Services, and Innovation..         177,488
            Internet Freedom (non-add)..................          12,500
Independent Grantee Organizations.......................         244,247
    Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL)............          98,640
    Radio Free Asia (RFA)...............................          38,255
    Middle East Broadcasting Networks (MBN).............         107,352
                                                         ---------------
      Total, International Broadcasting Operations......         716,460
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Authorizing Legislation Pending.--The Committee recognizes 
that congressional authorizing committees are working to enact 
legislation providing much needed BBG reforms. The Committee 
does not include specific reforms in this act, including those 
in the budget request, in order to enable such committees to 
complete their work.
    Program Changes and Proposed Reductions.--The Committee 
directs the BBG Chairman to submit a consolidated Voice of 
America [VOA]-Radio Free Asia [RFA] strategy for broadcasts to 
the South China Sea region prior to implementation of the VOA 
and RFA program increases to East and Southeast Asia, closure 
of the Poro transmitting station, and reductions to VOA 
Indonesian and transmissions to East and Southeast Asia. The 
Committee recommends that funding for BBG broadcasting to Iran 
continue at the fiscal year 2014 funding levels. The Committee 
does not support funding reductions to Radio Free Europe/Radio 
Liberty or VOA Balkan services. The Committee directs the BBG 
Chairman to submit a detailed plan for the proposed IBB 
personnel reduction of $11,220,000 prior to implementation of 
such reduction or the proposed digital media investment. The 
Committee will consider the proposed program increases after 
the above information is submitted.
    North Korea.--The Committee recommends the President's 
budget request for international broadcasting to North Korea.
    Strategic Priorities.--Not later than 90 days after 
enactment of this act, the BBG shall submit a report to the 
Committee describing how BBG's broadcast policy reflects input 
from the Department of State and other relevant agencies. BBG 
shall also include in subsequent CBJ submissions the linkage 
between broadcast and foreign policy priorities for any 
proposed language service changes. The Committee supports 
efforts by the BBG to develop programming that maximizes the 
strengths and efficiencies of VOA, Radio and TV Marti, and 
grantee organizations through shared or coordinated programs 
and facilities.
    VOA and RFA Tibetan Language Services.--The Committee 
supports the President's budget request for VOA and RFA Tibetan 
services and expects the BBG to continue broadcast programs at 
not less than fiscal year 2014 levels.

                   BROADCASTING CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS

Appropriations, 2014....................................      $8,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................       4,800,000
Committee recommendation................................       4,800,000

    The Committee recommends $4,800,000 for Broadcasting 
Capital Improvements.

                            RELATED PROGRAMS

                          The Asia Foundation

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $17,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      12,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      17,000,000

    The Committee recommends $17,000,000 for The Asia 
Foundation.
    Section 7034(w) of this act limits the basic pay of senior 
executive salaries from funds appropriated by this act to the 
rate payable for level IV of the Executive Schedule under 
section 5315 of title V, U.S.C. Non-appropriated funds may be 
used to exceed this limitation. The Committee directs that any 
savings in appropriated funds resulting from this limitation 
shall be used for program costs.

                    United States Institute of Peace

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $37,000,000
    Enduring operations.................................      30,984,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................       6,016,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      35,300,000
Committee recommendation................................      37,000,000

    The Committee recommends $37,000,000 for the United States 
Institute of Peace [USIP] and directs that renovation, 
operations, and maintenance costs of buildings located within 
the Potomac Annex for USIP training activities shall not be 
paid with appropriated funds.
     Section 7034(w) of this act limits the basic pay of senior 
executive salaries from funds appropriated by this act to the 
rate payable for level IV of the Executive Schedule under 
section 5315 of title V, U.S.C. Non-appropriated funds may be 
used to exceed this limitation. The Committee directs that any 
savings in appropriated funds resulting from this limitation 
shall be used for program costs.

         Center for Middle Eastern-Western Dialogue Trust Fund

Appropriations, 2014....................................         $90,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................          83,000
Committee recommendation................................          83,000

    The Committee recommends $83,000 from interest and earnings 
from the Center for Middle Eastern-Western Dialogue Trust Fund.
    The Committee notes that the actual interest earned 
continues to be significantly lower than in the past and 
directs the Department of State and the Center for Middle 
Eastern-Western Dialogue Trust Fund to leverage existing funds 
to secure contributions from private and other public sources, 
to the maximum extent practicable. The Committee supports the 
Department's oversight of the annual grant to the Center but 
directs that the Department not require prior approval of 
program participants.

                 Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Program

Appropriations, 2014....................................        $400,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................         400,000
Committee recommendation................................         400,000

    The Committee recommends $400,000 from interest and 
earnings from the Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Program Trust 
Fund.
    Section 7034(w) of this act limits the basic pay of senior 
executive salaries from funds appropriated by this act to the 
rate payable for level IV of the Executive Schedule under 
section 5315 of title V, U.S.C. Non-appropriated funds may be 
used to exceed this limitation. The Committee directs that any 
savings in appropriated funds resulting from this limitation 
shall be used for program costs.

                    Israeli Arab Scholarship Program

Appropriations, 2014....................................         $13,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................          26,000
Committee recommendation................................          26,000

    The Committee recommends $26,000 from interest and earnings 
from the Israeli Arab Scholarship Endowment Fund.

                            East-West Center

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $16,700,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      10,800,000
Committee recommendation................................      16,700,000

    The Committee recommends $16,700,000 for the East-West 
Center.
    Section 7034(w) of this act limits the basic pay of senior 
executive salaries from funds appropriated by this act to the 
rate payable for level IV of the Executive Schedule under 
section 5315 of title V, U.S.C. Non-appropriated funds may be 
used to exceed this limitation. The Committee directs that any 
savings in appropriated funds resulting from this limitation 
shall be used for program costs.

                    National Endowment for Democracy

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $135,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     103,450,000
Committee recommendation................................     135,000,000

    The Committee recommends $135,000,000 for the National 
Endowment for Democracy [NED], of which $100,000,000 shall be 
allocated in the traditional and customary manner, as in prior 
fiscal years, to include the core institutes.
    Section 7034(w) of this act limits the basic pay of senior 
executive salaries from funds appropriated by this act to the 
rate payable for level IV of the Executive Schedule under 
section 5315 of title V, U.S.C. Non-appropriated funds may be 
used to exceed this limitation. The Committee directs that any 
savings in appropriated funds resulting from this limitation 
shall be used for program costs.
    The Committee recognizes the comparative advantages of the 
NED in the promotion of democracy and human rights abroad, 
particularly given its status as an NGO and its extensive 
experience conducting programs in hostile political 
environments. In many circumstances, the Committee recognizes 
the NED as a more appropriate and effective mechanism to 
promote democracy and human rights abroad than either the 
Department of State or USAID. Additional funds above the budget 
request are recommended for programs in the following 
countries:

                    NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR DEMOCRACY
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                         Country                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Burma...................................................           6,000
China/Tibet.............................................           7,500
Democratic Republic of the Congo........................           3,000
Egypt...................................................           1,500
Iraq....................................................           1,050
North Korea.............................................           2,500
Russia..................................................           7,000
Venezuela/Bolivia/Ecuador...............................           3,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expects the NED, DRL, and USAID to regularly 
consult and coordinate democracy and human rights activities. 
However, funds appropriated under this heading shall not be 
subject to prior approval by the Department of State or USAID, 
or to administrative or managerial surcharges, and the NED 
should not be precluded from competitively bidding on other 
grant solicitations.
    The President of the NED shall submit a report on the uses 
of funds under this heading on a regional and country basis not 
later than 45 days after enactment of this act.

                           OTHER COMMISSIONS


      Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................        $690,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................         644,000
Committee recommendation................................         644,000

    The Committee recommends $644,000 for the Commission for 
the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad. The Committee 
also provides for 1 year the expanded procurement authority 
included in the budget request and directs the Chairman of the 
Commission to consult with the Committee prior to implementing 
such authority.

      United States Commission on International Religious Freedom

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................      $3,500,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................       3,500,000
Committee recommendation................................       3,500,000

    The Committee recommends $3,500,000 for the United States 
Commission on International Religious Freedom, including not 
more than $4,000 for representation expenses.

            Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................      $2,579,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................       2,579,000
Committee recommendation................................       2,579,000

    The Committee recommends $2,579,000 for the Commission on 
Security and Cooperation in Europe.

  Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's Republic of China

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................      $2,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................       2,000,000
Committee recommendation................................       2,000,000

    The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for the Congressional-
Executive Commission on the People's Republic of China.

      United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................      $3,500,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................       3,500,000
Committee recommendation................................       3,500,000

    The Committee recommends $3,500,000 for the United States-
China Economic and Security Review Commission.

                                TITLE II

           UNITED STATES AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

                  Funds Appropriated to the President

                           OPERATING EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $1,140,229,000
    Enduring operations.................................   1,059,229,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................      81,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   1,383,816,000
    Enduring operations.................................   1,318,816,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................      65,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,342,199,000
    Enduring operations.................................   1,170,614,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................     171,585,000

    The Committee recommends $1,170,614,000 for Operating 
Expenses. An additional $171,585,000 in title VIII under this 
heading is designated for OCO.
    Funds in this account are allocated according to the 
following table and are subject to the provisions of section 
7019 of this act:

                        USAID OPERATING EXPENSES
               [Budget Authority in Thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                        Program                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
USAID Forward Agency Reforms...........................           5,000
    Support for Local Sustainable Development Officers.           5,000
Overseas Operations....................................         641,915
Frontline Overseas Operations..........................  ...............
Washington Operations..................................         410,000
    Office of Security.................................          18,270
Central Support........................................         246,507
Less other sources.....................................        (132,808)
                                                        ----------------
      Subtotal, USAID Operating Expenses...............       1,170,614
                                                        ----------------
OCO for Frontline States...............................         171,585
                                                        ================
      Total, USAID Operating Expenses..................       1,342,199
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Democracy Programs.--Section 7032(c)(2)(A) of this act 
restricts USAID's use of democracy assistance in countries 
where the government is politically repressive, USAID does not 
have direct-hire staff in country, the government has rejected 
U.S. assistance, and the level of political repression requires 
protection of beneficiaries or recognition of USAID's role. The 
USAID Administrator shall consult with the Committee on the 
number of countries and positions that may be impacted by this 
restriction, and plans for using impacted personnel for other 
programs and activities.
    Local Sustainable Development Officers.--The Committee is 
concerned that many USAID Foreign Service Officers [FSOs] who 
joined the agency expecting to apply their expertise to engage 
with local partners to help produce lasting improvements in 
people's lives, are occupied with reading contractor reports 
and reporting on contractor performance, for which results are 
often measured in terms of quantity rather than sustainability. 
USAID has sought to address this problem by revising 
procurement policies and practices, but there is a need to 
provide incentives for FSOs to engage directly with local 
nongovernmental and governmental entities on a sustained basis. 
The Committee includes a new FSO category in section 7057(j) of 
this act, to encourage current USAID personnel to work more 
directly and collaboratively with local partners to design and 
implement small-scale, sustainable programs, projects, and 
activities. In order to ensure the ongoing availability of 
USAID FSOs for this purpose, permanent FSO positions shall be 
designated as Local Sustainable Development Officers by 
offering to current FSOs the opportunity to convert to such 
officers, and by so designating not less than half of annual 
FSO attritions. The USAID Administrator is directed to consult 
with the Committee on the plan required by this act for 
implementing this initiative.
    Disability Training.--The Committee directs the USAID 
Administrator to develop and implement training for staff at 
overseas missions to promote the full inclusion and equal 
participation of persons with disabilities in developing 
countries, including Haiti.
    Global Development Lab.--The Committee supports the goal of 
USAID's Global Development Lab to collaborate with U.S. 
entrepreneurs, corporations, NGOs, universities, and science 
and research institutions to find innovative solutions to some 
of the world's development challenges faster, cheaper, and more 
sustainably. Buy-in from countries the Lab seeks to benefit 
will be necessary for the success of this initiative, and the 
Committee directs the USAID Administrator to regularly consult 
with and ensure the participation of nongovernmental and 
governmental entities in developing countries at all stages of 
the Lab's activities. The Committee further directs the 
Administrator to submit a report to the Committee not later 
than April 1, 2015, detailing the Lab's projects and local 
partners since October 1, 2013.
    Mission Closings.--The Committee again requests the USAID 
Administrator to consult with the appropriate congressional 
committees when the closure of a USAID Mission abroad has been 
discussed with a foreign government.
    Overseas Representation and Residence Expenses.--The 
Committee expects USAID to utilize, to the maximum extent 
possible, U.S.-owned foreign currencies for overseas 
representation and official residence expenses.
    Procurement Reform.--The Committee recognizes the need to 
protect taxpayer dollars from waste, fraud, and abuse, and at 
the same time curtail practices that are inefficient, 
unnecessarily costly, and unsustainable. USAID's procurement 
reform initiative is intended to help build capacity of local 
NGOs and governments and streamline the agency's procurement 
procedures to reach a wider range of smaller, local partners 
and increase competition, but results to date are mixed. USAID 
remains heavily reliant on large contracts and grants 
administered by large U.S.-based contractors and grantees. 
Local subcontractors and subgrantees often provide the labor 
but are only marginally involved in the choice of project or 
design. The Committee urges the USAID Administrator to continue 
to pursue procurement reform, including by instituting 
incentives for USAID personnel to become more directly involved 
in the development process.
    Recruitment.--The Committee directs the USAID Administrator 
to submit a report to the Committee, not later than 90 days 
after enactment of this act, on the number of U.S. military 
veterans currently employed by USAID to include direct hires 
and personal service contractors. The report should include 
hiring trend data, steps USAID is taking to recruit and hire 
veterans, and specific recommendations for increasing the 
hiring of veterans, as appropriate.
    The Committee directs the USAID Administrator to report to 
the Committee not later than 45 days after enactment of this 
act on the extent to which USAID has implemented the 
recruitment strategy referenced in section 7059(l) of division 
H of Public Law 111-8.
    U.S. Small Business.--The Committee directs the USAID 
Administrator to set regional and worldwide goals for overseas 
contracts and subcontracts with U.S. small businesses, and to 
require small business indicators and annual targets be 
included in each overseas USAID mission annual plan. Not later 
than 90 days after enactment of this act, the USAID 
Administrator shall submit a report to the Committee on the 
dollar amount and percentage of awards to large prime 
contractors and small business contractors for fiscal year 2014 
awards made under USAID indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity 
contracts. The Committee also directs the USAID Administrator 
to provide to the Committee USAID's policy on the use of 
General Service Administration's Mission Oriented Business 
Integrated Services [MOBIS]--schedule 874, including for 
development programs, and a description of whether the policy 
is based on Federal procurement regulations and is consistent 
with the use of MOBIS by other Federal agencies.

                        CAPITAL INVESTMENT FUND

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $117,940,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     130,815,000
Committee recommendation................................     130,815,000

    The Committee recommends $130,815,000 for Capital 
Investment Fund.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $55,038,000
    Enduring operations.................................      45,000,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................      10,038,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      54,285,000
Committee recommendation................................      54,038,000

    The Committee recommends $54,038,000 for Office of 
Inspector General.

                               TITLE III

                     BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

                  Funds Appropriated to the President

Appropriations, 2014.................................... $17,622,774,000
    Enduring operations.................................  15,012,964,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................   2,609,810,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................  17,152,878,000
    Enduring operations.................................  14,839,478,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................   2,313,400,000
Committee recommendation................................  17,105,021,000
    Enduring operations.................................  13,992,139,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................   3,112,882,000

                           SECTOR ASSISTANCE

    This act directs funding for sectors in the amounts 
allocated in the following table which are subject to the 
requirements of section 7019 of this act:

                         PROGRAMMATIC DIRECTIVES
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                         Sectors                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Basic Education.........................................         534,291
Higher Education........................................         249,592
Small Grants Program....................................          45,000
Environment Programs....................................       1,167,250
Food Security and Agricultural Development..............       1,000,600
Microenterprise and Microfinance........................         210,302
Reconciliation Programs.................................          25,000
Trafficking in Persons..................................          55,534
Water and Sanitation....................................         400,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         GLOBAL HEALTH PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $8,439,450,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   8,050,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   8,139,000,000

    The Committee recommends $8,139,000,000 for Global Health 
Programs, including disaster preparedness to safeguard public 
health.
    Funds in this account are allocated according to the 
following table and are subject to the provisions of section 
7019 of this act:

                         GLOBAL HEALTH PROGRAMS
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                    Program/Activity                      recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Maternal and Child Health...............................         700,000
    Polio (non-add).....................................          51,500
    The GAVI Alliance (non-add).........................         200,000
Nutrition [USAID].......................................         111,000
    Micronutrients (non-add)............................          33,000
        Vitamin A (non-add).............................          22,500
    Iodine Deficiency Disorder (non-add)................           2,500
Vulnerable Children [USAID].............................          22,000
    Blind Children (non-add)............................           2,500
HIV/AIDS [USAID]........................................         330,000
    Microbicides (non-add)..............................          45,000
HIV/AIDS (Department of State)..........................       5,370,000
    Global Fund (non-add)...............................       1,350,000
    UNAIDS (non-add)....................................          45,000
Family Planning/Reproductive Health [USAID].............         539,000
Other Infectious Diseases [USAID].......................       1,067,000
    Pandemic Preparedness (non-add).....................          72,500
    Malaria (non-add)...................................         669,500
    Tuberculosis (non-add)..............................         225,000
        Global TB Drug Facility (non-add)...............          15,000
    Neglected Tropical Diseases (non-add)...............         100,000
                                                         ---------------
      Total, Global Health Programs.....................       8,139,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expands the uses of funds appropriated by 
titles III and IV of this act for bilateral assistance for 
global health programs in section 7058(a) of this act, 
notwithstanding any other provision of law except provisions 
under the GHP heading and section 7018 of this act and Public 
Law 110-293, as amended. The Committee does not intend such 
funds to be used in contravention of prohibitions on the use of 
abortion as a method of family planning. The Committee also 
expands the availability of funds for the HIV/AIDS Working 
Capital Fund for other global health and child survival 
activities in section 7034(r) of this act, and does not intend 
such funds to be used in contravention of such prohibitions.

                       MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH

    The Committee recommends $700,000,000 for maternal and 
child health activities under this heading.
    Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus.--The Committee recognizes 
the importance of low-cost vaccines for women of childbearing 
age in preventing tetanus in newborn children and the role of 
public-private partnerships in delivering such vaccines, and 
urges USAID to support efforts to eliminate maternal and 
neonatal tetanus.
    Pediatric Screening.--The Committee encourages USAID to 
consider support for mobile outreach programs to expand and 
improve access to pediatric eye screening for children in the 
West Bank and East Jerusalem in a manner that delivers the 
maximum amount of funds to the field.
    Polio.--The Committee recommends a total of not less than 
$59,000,000 in this act for polio eradication efforts, 
including not less than $7,500,000 under the ESF heading for 
programs in Pakistan and Afghanistan. The additional funds 
above the President's budget request are to support a multi-
donor effort to eliminate the disease.
    Uterine Prolapse.--The Committee directs USAID to support 
efforts to prevent and treat uterine prolapse in Nepal, a 
debilitating disease that afflicts thousands of poor women.
    Vaccines and Immunizations.--The Committee recommends 
$200,000,000 for the GAVI Alliance and directs the USAID 
Administrator to provide details on the planned uses of funds 
prior to making the contribution.
    Vulnerable Children.--The Committee recommends $22,000,000 
for the Office of Displaced Children and Orphans Fund [DCOF] to 
support programs and activities that address the needs of 
vulnerable children, of which not less than $9,500,000 shall be 
used to implement the U.S. Government Action Plan on Children 
in Adversity in pilot countries which embrace an integrated 
approach to fully implementing the three objectives of the 
plan, and which shall be administered under the direction of 
the USAID Senior Coordinator for Children in Adversity. The 
head of DCOF and the Senior Coordinator are directed to consult 
with the Committee prior to the obligation of funds.
    The Committee recommends not less than $2,500,000 for 
assistance for blind children, in addition to funds otherwise 
made available by this act for such purposes, which USAID 
should administer in a manner that delivers the maximum amount 
of funds to the field. The Committee directs USAID to submit a 
report to the Committee detailing the uses of funds for blind 
children in fiscal year 2014 and planned uses of such funds in 
fiscal year 2015, including implementing partners, services 
provided, objectives of the program, and number of 
beneficiaries.
    The Committee recommends support for programs that address 
autism spectrum disorders, including treatment and the training 
of healthcare workers to better diagnose such disorders.

                               NUTRITION

    The Committee recommends $111,000,000 for nutrition 
programs under this heading, to be made available through 
USAID.
    The Committee notes the development of USAID's ``Multi-
Sectoral Nutrition Strategy: 2014-2025'', particularly its 
guiding principles, including: linkages to other U.S. 
Government policies, strategies, and initiatives; reliance on 
country-led policies; focus on gender equality and female 
empowerment; evidence-based programming; coordinated multi-
sectoral approaches; and engagement with the private sector. 
The Committee requests the USAID Administrator, in consultation 
with the heads of other relevant agencies, to provide 
additional details regarding the Strategy, including countries 
receiving nutrition assistance from sources other than USAID, 
and the estimated costs for implementing the Strategy in 
subsequent fiscal years for USAID and the Department of State. 
The Committee notes the total number of global health countries 
receiving USAID nutrition assistance totals 24.
    The Committee supports the inclusion of nutrition 
activities in water, sanitation and hygiene, global health, and 
humanitarian programs.
    The Committee is concerned with the high incidence of 
malnutrition among children in Laos and recommends $5,000,000, 
in addition to funds otherwise made available by this act, to 
address this need.
    Micronutrients.--The Committee recommends not less than 
$33,000,000 for micronutrients, of which not less than 
$22,500,000 is to address vitamin A deficiencies. The Committee 
recommends that nutrition programs, including micronutrients, 
also be funded by the Department of State and USAID within 
programs to combat Human Immune Deficiency/Acquired Immune 
Deficiency [HIV/AIDS]. The Committee recommends not less than 
$2,500,000 for the USAID/United Nations Children's Fund 
[UNICEF] Iodine Deficiency Disorder program to prevent 
intellectual disability in children.

                  FAMILY PLANNING/REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH

    The Committee recommends a total of $644,300,000 from all 
accounts in this act for family planning and reproductive 
health programs, including $539,000,000 under this heading, 
$67,800,000 under the ESF heading, and $37,500,000 for the 
United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA].
    The Committee recognizes the need to accelerate research 
and development of contraceptives that are more effective, 
affordable, and easier to deliver and may also prevent sexually 
transmitted diseases. The Committee directs USAID to increase 
funding for the Office of Population and Reproductive Health to 
support the expansion of such efforts, and encourages 
partnerships and cost-sharing with USAID's Office of HIV/AIDS 
and National Institutes of Health. The Committee directs USAID 
to consult with the Committee on funding for such purposes.

                                HIV/AIDS

    The Committee recommends a total of $5,700,000,000 for 
programs and activities to combat HIV/AIDS, of which 
$5,370,000,000 is for the Department of State and $330,000,000 
is for USAID.
    Global Fund.--The Committee recommends not less than 
$1,350,000,000 for a U.S. contribution to the Global Fund to 
Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria, which may not exceed 33 
percent of the total amount of funds contributed to the Global 
Fund from all sources.
    Microbicides.--The Committee recommends $45,000,000 for 
research on, and development of, microbicides to prevent HIV.
    President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief.--The Committee 
recognizes that the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief 
[PEPFAR] plays a key role in HIV/AIDS prevention, care, and 
treatment globally.
    The Committee encourages the Office of the U.S. Global Aids 
Coordinator [OGAC] to increase efforts to expand pediatric 
treatment programs to meet the targets included in Public Law 
108-25, and recommends that OGAC include expanded testing of 
high risk pediatric populations for early diagnosis and 
initiation of anti-retroviral therapy for infants and children 
as a priority in country operating plans.
    The Committee notes that current law requires 10 percent of 
total PEPFAR program funds to be allocated for programs focused 
on orphans and vulnerable children. The Committee directs that 
of this amount, $20,000,000 be made available for programs 
designed to identify such children who are living outside 
family care and to find safe, permanent and nurturing families. 
The Committee urges OGAC to seek civil society and government 
partners to achieve the goal of decreasing the number of 
children living outside of family care. Such programs should 
follow the guidelines of the U.S. Government Action Plan for 
Children in Adversity. The Committee directs OGAC to consult 
with the appropriate congressional committees prior to 
obligating funds for such programs.
    The Committee directs USAID and OGAC to consult with the 
Committee on the impact of anti-homosexuality legislation, in 
Africa and elsewhere, on the distribution of HIV/AIDS 
prevention, treatment, counseling and related services.
    UNAIDS.--The Committee recommends $45,000,000 for a U.S. 
contribution to UNAIDS.
    Vaccine.--The Committee recommends that, among other 
methods for preventing the transmission of HIV, USAID should 
continue to support research and development of a vaccine to 
combat the AIDS virus.

                       OTHER GLOBAL HEALTH ISSUES

    Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia.--The Committee is 
concerned with the mounting global health and economic costs 
associated with Alzheimer's disease and dementia, and urges the 
Department of State, in coordination with USAID, to work with 
the Department of Health and Human Services and other relevant 
Federal agencies, the United Nations, and foreign governments, 
to begin the process of establishing a Global Alzheimer's and 
Dementia Action Plan. The Committee directs the Department of 
State to report to the Committee on these efforts not later 
than 180 days after enactment of this act.
    Malaria.--The Committee recommends $669,500,000 for 
programs to combat malaria and encourages USAID to continue to 
support public-private partnerships; research and development; 
diagnostic and vector control tools; access and delivery of 
anti-malarial medicines, including new, effective pediatric 
formulations and alternatives to artemisinin combination 
therapies to counter resistance; and to continue efforts to 
develop new insecticides and a malaria vaccine.
    The Committee supports the work of Federal agencies and 
higher education institutions in addressing the health, 
economic, and security impacts of malaria and other parasitic 
diseases, and in seeking improvements in Food and Drug 
Administration approved drugs for malaria prevention.
    The Committee reaffirms its support for the Coordinator of 
U.S. Government Activities to Combat Malaria Globally as 
established in Public Law 110-293, and expects section 304 of 
such law to be implemented by all relevant Federal agencies.
    Neglected Tropical Diseases.--The Committee recommends 
$100,000,000 for continued support for USAID's integrated 
Neglected Tropical Disease [NTD] program to eliminate 
intestinal parasites, schistosomiasis, lymphatic filariasis, 
onchocerciasis, trachoma, and leprosy which afflict hundreds of 
millions of people in tropical countries. The Committee also 
notes the essential contributions of the private sector in 
research and development and product innovation to improve 
diagnostic and therapeutic tools to treat patients with NTDs.
    Pandemic Influenza and Other Emerging Threats.--The 
Committee recommends $72,500,000 to combat pandemic influenza 
and other highly virulent viruses and emerging diseases, and 
remains concerned with the continuing health risks to humans 
from outbreaks of the Middle East respiratory syndrome 
coronavirus, including travel-associated cases in Asia, Europe 
and North America, and Ebola hemorrhagic fever in Guinea, 
Liberia and Sierra Leone.
    Research and Development.--The Committee supports 
investments in new global health technologies to address 
ongoing global health challenges.
    Tuberculosis.--The Committee recommends $225,000,000 for 
programs to combat tuberculosis and directs USAID to prioritize 
the use of U.S.-based entities for this purpose, consistent 
with the FAA.

                         DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $2,507,001,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   2,619,984,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,421,964,000

    The Committee recommends $2,421,964,000 for Development 
Assistance.
    The Committee directs that relevant USAID bureaus and 
offices that support cross-cutting development programs shall 
coordinate such programs on a regular basis.

               FOOD SECURITY AND AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee recommends $1,000,600,000 for food security 
and agricultural development programs from all accounts in this 
act. The Committee supports Feed the Future's [FtF] goal of 
creating long term solutions to food insecurity and 
malnutrition. The Committee recognizes the importance of 
integrating women as key recipients of agricultural and 
technical assistance, and intends that programs are prioritized 
for women farmers, small-holder farmers, and other vulnerable 
populations.
    Feed the Future Collaborative Research Innovation Lab.--The 
Committee recommends not less than $32,000,000 for the FtF 
Collaborative Research Innovation Lab, formerly known as the 
Collaborative Research Support Program, and supports efforts to 
improve agricultural productivity, nutritional quality and 
security, and innovative research to prevent malnutrition.
    Global Crop Diversity Trust.--The Committee recommends 
$12,000,000 for the Global Crop Diversity Trust's endowment, 
which seeks to ensure the viability of agriculture worldwide by 
conserving and making available collections of crop diversity. 
The Committee notes that authorization for the Trust was 
extended through 2018 and that its mission has expanded 
significantly to include the management of all major seed 
banks.
    Land Grant Institutions.--The Committee supports the work 
of land grant institutions of higher learning, and encourages 
USAID to continue partnering with such institutions with 
specialized capability in agriculture research to assist 
developing countries improve food production. The Committee 
encourages agricultural linkages between small-holder women 
farmers and such institutions through local partners, and by 
utilizing wireless technology, as appropriate.
    Sustainable Agriculture.--The Committee encourages USAID to 
support programs that train farmers in sustainable agricultural 
techniques and methods that increase productivity, particularly 
in sub-Saharan Africa.

                          ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    Cooperative Development.--The Committee has long recognized 
the important role that U.S. cooperatives and credit unions 
play in overseas programs as a means to lift people out of 
poverty by mobilizing equity and savings for community-based 
economic growth. The Committee recommends $11,000,000 for the 
Cooperative Development Program managed by USAID's Bureau for 
Economic Growth, Education, and Environment.
    Microenterprise and Microfinance Development Programs.--The 
Committee recommends $210,302,000 in this act for microfinance 
and microenterprise development programs. USAID is directed to 
consult with the Committee and other interested stakeholders on 
ways to maximize the use of microenterprise and microfinance 
assistance to benefit the poorest people. The Committee is 
concerned with the lack of reliable poverty measurement tools 
to demonstrate that USAID has met the requirement of targeting 
half of microfinance and microenterprise funds to the very 
poor, defined as those living on less than $1.25 a day. The 
Committee encourages USAID to prioritize the use of reliable 
metrics for measuring poverty.
    Public-Private Partnerships.--The Committee directs the 
Secretary of State and the USAID Administrator to develop and 
apply a common definition of public-private partnerships, and 
to post on the Foreign Assistance Dashboard Web site data on 
support for such partnerships.
    Trade Capacity Building.--The Committee recommends not less 
than $10,000,000 under this heading and an additional 
$10,000,000 under the ESF heading for labor and environmental 
capacity building activities relating to free trade agreements 
with countries of Central America, Peru, the Dominican 
Republic, and Colombia. In light of free trade agreements now 
in force and other free trade agreements under negotiation, and 
as a complement to enforceable labor and environment chapters, 
trade capacity building efforts should be extended to Malaysia, 
Mexico, and Vietnam to help level the playing field for U.S. 
workers and businesses.

                               EDUCATION

    Basic Education.--The Committee notes that as of March 31, 
2014, the pipeline for basic education assistance exceeds 
$1,488,000,000, excluding fiscal years 2013 and 2014 
unobligated balances for such programs. Section 7060(a) of this 
act therefore provides that up to $534,291,000 under title III 
of this act may be made available for basic education 
assistance if the USAID Administrator certifies upon enactment 
of this act that prior appropriated balances for basic 
education assistance that remain unobligated and unexpended do 
not exceed $534,291,000. If the Administrator is unable to make 
the certification, $334,291,000 under title III shall be 
transferred to, and merged with, funds under the IDA, CCF, and 
MRA headings, and $200,000,000 shall be made available for 
programs other than basic education under the DA and ESF 
headings, following consultation with the Committees on 
Appropriations.
    Global Partnership for Education.--The Committee recommends 
up to $35,000,000 for the Global Partnership for Education 
[GPE], and directs the USAID Administrator to consult with the 
Committee on GPE's efforts to improve monitoring and 
evaluation, and on the effectiveness and sustainability of 
programs.
    Higher Education.--The Committee recommends not less than 
$249,592,000 in this act for higher education programs, 
including $35,000,000 for such programs in Africa of which 
$20,000,000 is for partnerships between higher education 
institutions in Africa and the United States. USAID should 
support new higher education partnerships between U.S. 
universities and universities in developing countries focused 
on technology to improve the quality of, and increase access 
to, higher education.
    The Committee supports the work of land grant institutions 
of higher learning with specialized capabilities and encourages 
USAID to partner with such organizations.
    The Committee supports cost-effective programs that offer 
educational opportunities at U.S. community colleges for 
students from underserved populations including from indigenous 
populations, and persons with disabilities and women.
    The Committee directs USAID to post all funding 
opportunities for higher education institutions on its Web 
site. Partners should be selected through a competitive 
process.
    Education for Blind Persons.--The Committee recognizes that 
the world's highest rates of blindness are in developing 
countries, and the act requires that not less than $15,000,000 
of basic and higher education funds be made available for such 
assistance for persons who are blind. USAID is directed to 
consult with the Committee on a multi-year plan focused on 
supporting local schools for the blind in the poorest 
countries.
    American Schools and Hospitals Abroad Program.--The 
Committee recommends $23,000,000 for the ASHA program. Grants 
shall be awarded through a competitive process and in 
accordance with all applicable rules and regulations.

                    ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends not less than $1,167,250,000 in 
this act for bilateral and multilateral environment and energy 
programs.
    Funds for environment and energy programs are allocated 
according to the following table and are subject to the 
provisions of section 7019 of this act:

                     ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY PROGRAMS
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                    Program/activity                      recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Adaptation and Mitigation...............................         193,300
Biodiversity............................................         250,000
    Andean Amazon (non-add).............................          20,000
    Brazilian Amazon (non-add)..........................          10,000
    Wildlife poaching and trafficking (non-add).........          55,000
    Lacey Act (non-add).................................           2,000
    CARPE (non-add).....................................          39,400
        [of which, USAID]...............................          21,900
        [of which, United States Fish and Wildlife                17,500
         Service [USFWS]]...............................
    United States Forest Service (non-add)..............           5,000
    USFWS (non-add).....................................           5,000
    Mayan Biosphere/Department of the Interior (non-add)           1,000
Sustainable Landscapes..................................         123,500
Clean Energy............................................         189,450
Toxic Chemicals.........................................           5,000
Waste Recycling.........................................           5,000
Contributions to Multilateral Environment Funds.........         401,000
    Climate Investment Funds (non-add)..................         264,437
        Strategic Climate Fund (non-add)................          63,184
        Clean Technology Fund (non-add).................         201,253
    Global Environment Facility (non-add)...............         136,563
                                                         ---------------
      Total, Environment and Energy Programs............       1,167,250
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Adaptation and Mitigation.--The Committee recommends 
assistance through the Department of State and USAID to help 
developing countries adapt to decreases in agricultural 
productivity, water scarcity, and rising temperatures and sea 
levels, and to mitigate contributors to climate change.
    The act also provides authority for contributions to 
multilateral environment funds and facilities, such as the 
Least Developed Countries Fund, the Green Climate Fund, the 
Forest Carbon Partnership Facility, and others to support 
adaptation and mitigation activities.
    Biodiversity and Sustainable Landscapes.--The Committee 
recommends $123,500,000 in this act for programs to protect 
sustainable landscapes, and an additional $250,000,000 for 
biodiversity conservation programs, including not less than 
$2,000,000 to implement and enforce section 8204 of Public Law 
110-246, $20,000,000 for the Initiative for Conservation in the 
Andean Amazon, and $10,000,000 for the Brazilian Amazon.
    The Committee recommends assistance to support efforts by 
Brazilian and Andean indigenous groups to protect their 
territories from illegal loggers, miners, ranchers, and other 
encroachment.
    The Committee recommends $39,400,000 for the Central 
African Regional Program for the Environment [CARPE], of which 
up to $21,900,000 is for USAID programs and not less than 
$17,500,000 is for the United States Fish and Wildlife Service 
[USFWS]. The Committee emphasizes that CARPE depends on 
building the capacity of governments in Central Africa to 
professionally manage and protect their countries' resources. 
Memoranda of understanding and cooperative agreements should be 
used to provide a roadmap, with benchmarks for measuring 
progress, to carry out environmental impact assessments, social 
and environmental management plans, fisheries management, and 
training of law enforcement for wildlife protection and park 
management. Buy-in by governments, in coordination with 
implementing partners, is essential to make CARPE an effective, 
sustainable program. The Committee notes the efforts of the 
Government of Gabon as illustrative of what can be achieved 
with leadership and modest resources to significantly reduce 
illegal logging and fishing, and wildlife poaching and 
trafficking, and to conserve tropical forest and marine 
environments.
    The Committee recommends $1,000,000 to be apportioned 
directly to the Department of the Interior for continued 
support for biodiversity and archaeological conservation in 
Guatemala's Mayan Biosphere Reserve, to include governance and 
law enforcement.
    The Committee recognizes the technical expertise of the 
USFWS and the U.S. Forest Service [USFS] and recommends not 
less than $5,000,000 for other USFWS international programs 
including the Multinational Species Conservation Funds, and not 
less than $5,000,000 for USFS international programs to protect 
wildlife, biodiversity, and forests in Brazil, Nepal, Ukraine, 
and elsewhere in addition to funds otherwise made available by 
this act for USFS through USAID missions.
    The Committee recognizes USAID's support for programs to 
protect great apes in Central Africa, orangutans in Indonesia, 
and wildlife in South Sudan and Niger, and recommends continued 
funding for these and other programs to assist developing 
countries in protecting species that are endangered due to 
habitat destruction and wildlife poaching and trafficking.
    The act provides a total of $55,000,000, including 
$25,000,000 under the International Narcotics Control and Law 
Enforcement [INCLE] heading, for programs to combat wildlife 
poaching and trafficking. The poaching crisis is decimating 
African elephant and rhinoceros populations and providing 
illicit revenue to traffickers, illegal armed groups, and other 
criminal enterprises. The Committee recommends not less than 
$10,000,000 to combat rhinoceros poaching in southern Africa, 
and supports the professionalization of park guards and other 
law enforcement officials. The Committee recognizes the role of 
the United States Africa Command [AFRICOM] in addressing the 
poaching crisis.
    The Committee remains concerned with the rapid 
deforestation and loss of biodiversity in the Atlantic Forest 
region of Paraguay, and supports funding to help address this 
problem.
    The Committee is increasingly concerned with the loss of 
biodiversity, particularly in the Amazon Basin, Central 
America, Central Africa, and Indonesia, due to agricultural 
conversion, industrial-scale logging, mining, other extractive 
industries, and large hydroelectric dams that displace local 
people and cause irreparable harm to the environment. The 
Committee does not support the use of funds appropriated by 
this act for such activities or the construction of roads or 
other infrastructure to facilitate such activities, or for the 
cultivation or processing of African oil palm, if doing so 
would contribute to significant loss of native species, disrupt 
or contaminate natural water sources, reduce local food 
security, or cause the forced displacement of local people.
    Clean Energy.--The Committee recommends that not less than 
$189,450,000 under the Development Assistance [DA] heading be 
made available for USAID clean energy programs to promote the 
sustainable use of renewable energy and energy efficiency 
technologies, and to support other efforts to reduce, mitigate, 
and/or sequester greenhouse gases and other unhealthy 
emissions.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State, not later 
than 180 days after enactment of this act and in coordination 
with other relevant Federal agencies including the Department 
of Energy, to submit a report assessing the potential for 
renewable energy development in Ukraine including the technical 
and other assistance necessary to promote such development.
    Coal-Fired Powerplants.--Limitations on the use of funds 
made available by this act to finance coal-fired powerplants 
are included under the headings Export-Import Bank of the 
United States (Ex-Im Bank), Program Account and Overseas 
Private Investment Corporation [OPIC], Program Account in title 
VI of this act.
    Large Dams.--The Committee directs the Secretary of the 
Treasury, when evaluating a proposal by an international 
financial institution [IFI] to finance construction of a large 
dam, to apply the Department's usual due diligence process, 
including reviewing for full compliance with IFI policies and 
legislative voting mandates. The Secretary shall also consider 
the dam policies of relevant Federal agencies, and best 
practice frameworks including the World Commission on Dams. The 
Secretary shall instruct the United States executive directors 
to the IFIs to vote against such projects unless the Secretary, 
after consulting with USAID technical personnel, certifies and 
reports to the appropriate congressional committees that the 
following conditions have been met, and to encourage the IFIs 
to adopt these practices in relevant strategy and policy 
reviews:
  --Risk Assessment.--Projects are selected based on 
        comprehensive and participatory Integrated Resource 
        Plans and River Basin Plans. Planning processes include 
        a thorough, objective assessment of social and 
        environmental impacts (including cumulative impacts), 
        life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions, and economic risks 
        and returns.
  --Sustainability.--Based on the comprehensive risk assessment 
        described above, projects shall safeguard river basin 
        ecosystems, including through sound environmental flow 
        regimes and by protecting critical natural habitats.
  --Citizens' Rights.--Demonstrable public acceptance of all 
        key decisions is achieved through transparent, good 
        faith negotiations with full participation of affected 
        people in the catchment, reservoir and downstream 
        areas. Decisions affecting indigenous people require 
        their free, prior informed consent. Affected people 
        shall have full access to grievance mechanisms and 
        judicial recourse.
  --Public Oversight.--The project has been developed 
        transparently, with timely public access to key 
        documents including environmental and social impact 
        assessments and management plans, feasibility studies, 
        economic and risk analyses, and revenue management 
        plans.
  --Management.--The country has in place sound dam management 
        practices, or, where necessary, commits to appropriate 
        and timely capacity building. Outstanding operational 
        problems with existing dams in the same river basin 
        have been addressed before investments in new dams.
  --Independent Monitoring.--The project includes environmental 
        and social mitigation measures to be funded and 
        implemented throughout the life of the project, based 
        on a compliance plan. Progress on these mitigation 
        measures is regularly monitored and publicly reported.
    Marine Protection.--The Committee is aware that emissions 
from fossil fuels and deforestation are changing the acidity of 
the ocean in ways that threaten fish and other ocean species on 
which many humans depend for survival, and encourages the 
Department of State and the Department of the Treasury to 
coordinate with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration in supporting global efforts to address this 
problem.
    The Committee recognizes that scientific exchanges between 
U.S. and Cuban scientists could help protect the Gulf of Mexico 
and U.S. shorelines from environmental harm caused by oil and 
gas exploration, as well as promote scientific advances 
beneficial to both countries and the region, and encourages the 
Secretary of State to work with the Secretary of the Treasury 
and the Secretary of Commerce to explore options for increased 
engagement with Cuban scientists on these issues.
    Mekong River Basin.--The Committee is aware that the PRC 
intends to build additional dams along the Upper Mekong River 
that may have serious, adverse impacts on the people, economy, 
and environment in countries along the Lower Mekong River, and 
that other countries plan to build dams on the Lower Mekong and 
on the river's tributaries. The Committee recommends support 
for the Mekong River Commission to prevent or mitigate the 
adverse impacts of large hydroelectric projects.
    Toxic Chemicals.--The Committee recommends not less than 
$5,000,000 for small grants to support initiatives to eliminate 
threats to human health and the environment from toxic 
chemicals, to be awarded on a competitive basis after 
consultation with the Committee.
    Tropical Forest Alliance.--The Committee remains concerned 
with the conversion of tropical forest to agricultural use and 
supports the Tropical Forest Alliance which aims to eliminate 
deforestation from beef, soy, palm oil, and paper supply chains 
by 2020. The Committee directs the Secretary of State, in 
consultation with the Secretary of Agriculture, the U.S. Trade 
Representative, and the heads of other relevant Federal 
agencies, to: (1) redirect production onto already deforested 
lands; (2) increase supply-chain tracking and transparency; (3) 
negotiate forest protections in trade agreements; (4) advance 
deforestation-free procurement; (5) increase private sector 
investments in deforestation-free agriculture; and (6) prevent 
importation of products produced on illegally deforested lands.
    Waste Recycling.--The Committee recommends not less than 
$5,000,000 for small grants to support initiatives to recycle 
waste which threatens human health and the environment and 
which, if recycled, could generate income, improve agriculture, 
and produce energy, to be awarded on a competitive basis after 
consultation with the Committee.

                            GENDER EQUALITY

    The Committee supports the budget request of $1,840,415,000 
in this act for gender programs, to promote women's political 
leadership, implement a multiyear strategy to respond to 
gender-based violence, and support implementation of the U.S. 
National Action Plan on Women, Peace, and Security.
    The Committee directs the Department of State guided by the 
Office of Global Women's Issues, and USAID guided by the Office 
of Gender Equality and Women's Empowerment, to mainstream a 
focus throughout U.S. diplomatic and development efforts on 
raising the status, increasing participation, and protecting 
the rights of women and girls worldwide, and to post on 
respective Web sites specific steps taken to accomplish these 
objectives. The Committee recommends funding for the Full 
Participation Fund to support the integration of gender in 
operations, diplomacy, and programming.
    The Committee directs that U.S. diplomatic and development 
efforts promote gender equality worldwide consistent with the 
activities enumerated in the Gender Equality and Female 
Empowerment Policy and U.S. Strategy to Prevent and Respond to 
Gender-Based Violence Globally.
    Child Marriage.--The Committee recommends not less than 
$10,000,000 for programs that reduce the incidence of child 
marriage consistent with section 1207 of Public Law 113-4, and 
directs the Secretary of State to consult with the Committee 
prior to the obligation of funds.
    Political Participation.--The Committee directs that funds 
appropriated under this and the ESF, Democracy Fund [DF], 
Complex Crises Fund, and INCLE headings be made available for 
programs to increase women's participation in the political 
process, including political parties, elections, and leadership 
positions in local and national governments. Funds should be 
awarded on a competitive basis and in accordance with section 
7059(b) of this act.
    Reports.--The Committee directs the Secretary of State and 
the USAID Administrator to submit a report to the Committee not 
later than 45 days after enactment of this act describing the 
amounts and uses of funds for programs to promote gender 
equality, disaggregated by country.
    The Committee directs that not later than 90 days after the 
enactment of this act, the Ambassador-at-Large for Global 
Women's Issues and the Senior Coordinator for Gender Equality 
and Women's Empowerment shall jointly submit a report on the 
allocation of funds for gender-related programs and activities 
for the previous fiscal year, and to post such report on their 
respective agency Web sites.

                            GLOBAL PROGRAMS

    Clean Cookstoves.--The Committee is aware that exposure of 
an estimated 3 billion people in developing countries to smoke 
from traditional cookstoves causes nearly 2 million premature 
deaths, primarily of women and young children, annually, and 
contributes to deforestation, erosion, and drought, and the 
women and children who collect firewood face daily hardship and 
security risks. The Committee recommends funding for cookstoves 
that sustainably reduce fuel consumption and exposure to 
harmful smoke.
    Disability Programs.--The Committee recommends $7,000,000 
for disability programs, of which $3,000,000 should be made 
available for programs and activities administered by USAID 
through foreign missions to address the needs and protect and 
promote the rights of persons with disabilities in developing 
countries.
    The Committee recommends $1,500,000 to support capacity 
building of disabled persons organizations in Latin America and 
the Caribbean in order to increase accessibility of persons 
with disabilities to infrastructure and programs in individual 
countries; and $1,500,000 to develop, support, and strengthen 
sports programs and other activities for persons with 
disabilities in developing countries. Funds are to be awarded 
on a competitive basis.
    The Committee directs that not less than 25 percent of 
USAID mission funds for disability programs be dispersed in 
small grants.
    Indigenous Peoples.--The Committee recognizes that 
indigenous peoples face increasing threats to their territory 
and cultures due to growing population pressures and the 
expansion of mechanized agriculture, mining, logging and other 
extractive industries. The act provides not less than 
$5,000,000 for grants to build the capacity of indigenous 
peoples organizations to protect their rights and territories, 
and directs that not later than 90 days after the enactment of 
this act the USAID Administrator shall submit a strategy for 
the use of such funds.
    Partner Vetting.--The Committee supports a partner vetting 
system [PVS] that safeguards against the inadvertent 
disbursement of funds by the Department of State or USAID to a 
terrorist or terrorist organization, while preserving important 
and sensitive relationships with grantees and contractors. 
USAID and the Department of State should refrain from 
implementing similar vetting systems in countries outside the 
designated PVS pilot program until the report evaluating the 
pilot is complete and appropriate congressional committees have 
reviewed the report. USAID and the Department of State shall 
make a direct vetting option available. All individuals and 
organizations being vetted should be provided with full 
disclosure of how information will be stored and used by the 
U.S. Government, including how information regarding a 
``positive match'' will be handled and how to appeal such a 
match. There should also be a provision for waiving the vetting 
requirements to prevent delay in responding to humanitarian 
crises in failing or failed countries. The Committee expects 
that other Federal agencies conducting foreign assistance 
programs, including for security sector reform, will utilize 
vetting procedures similar to those devised by USAID and the 
Department of State, including in Afghanistan.
    Patrick Leahy War Victims Fund.--The Committee recommends 
$12,000,000 for the Leahy War Victims Fund, administered by 
USAID, which assists persons who are severely disabled as a 
result of armed conflict.
    Victims of Torture.--The Committee recommends not less than 
$11,750,000 under this heading for programs and activities that 
address the needs of victims of torture and trauma resulting 
from violent conflict, and support for centers for victims of 
torture that provide services consistent with the goals of 
Public Law 106-87. An additional $6,500,000 is recommended for 
the U.N. Voluntary Fund for Victims of Torture under the 
International Organizations and Programs heading.
    Water and Sanitation.--The Committee recommends not less 
than $400,000,000 in this act for sustainable water and 
sanitation projects pursuant to Public Law 109-121, of which 
not less than $145,000,000 is for programs and activities in 
sub-Saharan Africa. The Committee intends these funds to be 
used for programs to provide safe drinking water and sanitation 
for rural and urban communities where water scarcity or 
contamination poses serious risks to human health, with an 
emphasis on drought prone regions of Africa. These funds are in 
addition to other funds in this act to protect and sustainably 
manage water resources.
    The Committee supports USAID's recent efforts to address 
the shortcomings identified in GAO report ``U.S. Water and 
Sanitation Aid'' (GAO-10-957), specifically regarding a lack of 
measurable goals, benchmarks, and timetables included in U.S. 
water and sanitation programming. The Committee recommends that 
a portion of funds appropriated by this act for water and 
sanitation projects be used for monitoring and evaluation in 
accordance with section 7 of Public Law 109-121, and USAID's 
Water and Development Strategy, and to support the development 
and dissemination of best practices in sustainable water and 
sanitation programming.
    The Committee recognizes that sexual and other assaults 
against women and girls often occur outside at night when they 
are vulnerable due to the lack of safe and accessible latrines 
in many developing countries. USAID is directed to consult with 
the Committee on a multi-year plan focused on the poorest 
countries in Africa and Asia to design and build safe public 
latrines for women and girls. The act provides not less than 
$15,000,000 for this purpose.
    Wheelchairs.--The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for 
wheelchair programs in developing countries, allocated through 
an open and competitive process. The Committee supports funding 
that provides quality, low-cost wheelchairs that can be 
produced and maintained locally using appropriate technologies.

                               COUNTRIES

    Bangladesh.--The Committee directs the Secretary of State 
to prioritize assistance for labor programs in Bangladesh and 
recommends $3,000,000 for grants to improve labor conditions in 
the ready-made garment, shrimp and fish export sectors, through 
an open and competitive process. The Committee expects the 
Department of State and USAID to provide training for workers 
on understanding and asserting their rights, including by 
improving the capacity of independent worker organizations. The 
Department of State, USAID, and the Department of Labor should 
coordinate efforts and work in consultation with the Government 
of Bangladesh and the International Labor Organization on an 
integrated approach.
    The Committee urges the Department of State to develop a 
coordinated interagency effort to promote free and fair 
elections in Bangladesh. The Committee is also concerned with 
extrajudicial killings and disappearances in Bangladesh 
documented in the Department's 2013 Country Reports on Human 
Rights.
    Indonesia.--The Committee notes the significant impact of 
U.S. foreign direct investment in Indonesia, estimated at 
$65,000,000,000 between 2004 and 2012, and encourages the 
Department of State to increase support for trade and economic 
promotion initiatives, which are in the strategic interests of 
the United States and Indonesia.
    The Committee recommends not less than $350,000 for grants 
for capacity building of Indonesian human rights organizations, 
including in Papua.
    Nepal.--The Committee recommends a total of not less than 
$33,000,000 under this heading and the ESF heading for 
assistance for Nepal, including for training and other 
assistance to enhance the participation and leadership of 
Dalits and other minority groups in political and economic 
decisionmaking.
    Rwanda.--The Committee recommends support for local and 
international NGOs to conduct oversight of the trade in 
conflict minerals out of Eastern Democratic Republic of the 
Congo [DRC] and to strengthen border controls with the DRC.
    Sri Lanka.--The Committee remains concerned with 
authoritarianism in Sri Lanka and repression of ethnic and 
religious minorities, journalists, and human rights defenders. 
USAID, DRL, and NED should increase assistance for civil 
society organizations that support tolerance and democratic 
principles, including programs that support journalists, human 
rights defenders, religious freedom, and reconciliation.
    Uganda.--The Committee is concerned with the deterioration 
of democracy in Uganda, including restrictions on expression, 
association, and assembly. The Committee also remains concerned 
with the lack of transparency and potential for corruption in 
the oil sector, and directs the Department of State and USAID 
to urge the Government of Uganda to promote transparency in the 
management of oil revenues and bidding process, including 
public disclosure of receipts and expenditures, consistent with 
section 7031(b) of this act.
    Vietnam.--The Committee recommends $7,500,000 for 
assistance for Vietnam under this heading for health/disability 
programs in areas sprayed with Agent Orange or otherwise 
contaminated by dioxin. These funds are intended to address the 
mobility, psycho-social, vocational, and other needs of persons 
with severe upper and lower body mobility impairment and/or 
cognitive or developmental disabilities.

                   INTERNATIONAL DISASTER ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $1,801,000,000
    Enduring operations.................................     876,828,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................     924,172,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   1,300,000,000
    Enduring operations.................................     665,000,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................     635,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,895,000,000
    Enduring operations.................................     660,000,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................   1,235,000,000

    The Committee recommends $660,000,000 for International 
Disaster Assistance. An additional $1,235,000,000 in title VIII 
under this heading is designated for OCO.
    Section 7034(q) of this act provides for the monitoring and 
evaluation of assistance appropriated under this heading and 
the Migration and Refugee Assistance heading by obtaining real-
time feedback directly from beneficiaries for the purpose of 
maximizing cost effectiveness. Feedback collected by the 
Department of State and USAID shall be summarized and posted on 
respective Web sites in a timely manner.

                         TRANSITION INITIATIVES

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $57,600,000
    Enduring operations.................................      48,177,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................       9,423,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      67,600,000
Committee recommendation................................      67,000,000

    The Committee recommends $67,000,000 for Transition 
Initiatives.
    The Committee notes that these funds are available for 
programs in Syria. The Committee directs USAID's Office of 
Transition Initiatives [OTI] to submit a report at the end of 
the fiscal year summarizing new, ongoing, and completed country 
programs implemented by OTI in fiscal year 2015.

                          COMPLEX CRISES FUND

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $40,000,000
    Enduring operations.................................      20,000,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................      20,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      30,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     242,882,000
    Enduring operations.................................      25,000,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................     217,882,000

    The Committee recommends $25,000,000 for the Complex Crises 
Fund. An additional $217,882,000 in title VIII under this 
heading is designated for OCO.
    The USAID Administrator shall have responsibility for the 
use of funds appropriated under this heading, in consultation 
with the Secretary of State, and the Secretary shall have 
responsibility for the use of funds appropriated under this 
heading in title VIII of this act.

                      DEVELOPMENT CREDIT AUTHORITY

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

                            PROGRAM ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $40,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      40,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      40,000,000

                        ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................      $8,041,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................       8,200,000
Committee recommendation................................       8,200,000

    The Committee recommends a ceiling of $40,000,000 for funds 
that may be transferred from other programs in this title to 
the Development Credit Program, and recommends $8,200,000 for 
administrative expenses.

                         ECONOMIC SUPPORT FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $4,639,182,000
    Enduring operations.................................   2,982,967,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................   1,656,215,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   5,077,094,000
    Enduring operations.................................   3,398,694,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................   1,678,400,000
Committee recommendation................................   4,200,475,000
    Enduring operations.................................   2,540,475,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................   1,660,000,000

    The Committee recommends $2,540,475,000 for Economic 
Support Fund. An additional $1,660,000,000 in title VIII under 
this heading is designated for OCO.

                                 AFRICA

    Africa Pilot Programs.--Section 7042(i) of the act 
continues a program to empower U.S. Ambassadors in Africa to 
address regional health, development, and economic engagement 
and trade opportunities, and security challenges.
    Counterterrorism in Africa.--The Committee recommends a 
total of $65,000,000 in this act for the Trans-Sahara 
Counterterrorism Partnership program, and $11,000,000 for the 
Partnership for Regional East Africa Counterterrorism program. 
The Committee directs that an additional $10,000,000 be made 
available for programs among vulnerable populations that are 
susceptible to terrorist influence, to be managed by USAID and 
coordinated with other Federal agencies.
    Democratic Republic of the Congo.--The Committee recommends 
funding for programs to demilitarize the mining sector in 
Eastern DRC, enhance independent monitoring of the development 
of responsible mining and related supply chains, protect the 
rights of mine laborers, build local oversight and regulatory 
capacity to combat the illicit trade in minerals, wildlife and 
other contraband, and assist victims of sexual violence.
    The Committee supports conflict mitigation efforts to avert 
violence and human rights violations including sexual and 
gender-based violence, as well as programs to improve health, 
education, agriculture, infrastructure and capacity building 
for governing institutions. The Committee recommends that funds 
also be used for rule of law programs and to support democratic 
elections.
    Djibouti.--The Committee remains concerned with the high 
incidence of extreme poverty in Djibouti, a country of 
strategic importance to the United States, and directs USAID to 
develop and implement a multi-year social, economic, and 
democratic development strategy to improve the quality of life 
and expand employment opportunities for the people of Djibouti. 
The Committee directs that not less than $5,000,000 under this 
heading be made available for this purpose, following 
consultation with the Committee on the uses of such funds.
    Liberia.--The Committee supports the budget request for 
assistance for Liberia, and urges the Department of State and 
USAID to prioritize good governance and transparency in the 
forest, industrial-scale agriculture, oil, and mining sectors, 
including promoting community forest management and supporting 
policies that recognize customary land ownership. Assistance 
should be provided to enhance enforcement of natural resource 
laws, implement the Liberian Extractive Industry Transparency 
Initiative Act, and to support civil society organizations that 
monitor the management and use of natural resources.
    Nigeria.--The Committee condemns the abduction by Boko 
Haram of hundreds of Nigerian school girls, and its repeated 
massacres of civilians and destruction of villages. Section 
7042(h) of this act provides funds for programs for women and 
girls who are targeted by Boko Haram.
    Power Africa.--The Committee supports the goal of Power 
Africa to provide electricity to millions of people who 
currently have no access to power, many of whom live in rural 
areas that are off the grid. The Committee recommends that 
priority be given to appropriate technology, sustainable 
solutions for such areas, including renewable biomass heat and 
electrical power technology at the community level. The 
Committee directs the USAID Administrator to submit a report to 
the Committee not later than 90 days after enactment of this 
act describing the objectives of Power Africa; criteria and 
metrics for measuring progress; and steps taken to promote 
reforms in energy governance, energy efficiency, leverage 
private sector resources, and increase energy access with 
distributed, mini, and off-grid and related energy options.
    Somalia.--The Committee recognizes that peace, stability 
and prosperity in Somalia depend on reconciliation and 
effective governance. Section 7042(j) of this act provides 
funds to promote dialogue and reconciliation between the 
central government and Somali regions, and for programs that 
strengthen the rule of law and government institutions, support 
civil society organizations involved in peace building, and 
support other development priorities, including education and 
employment.
    The Committee is concerned that despite successes against 
al-Shabaab which has been designated by the Department of State 
as a Foreign Terrorist Organization and Specially Designated 
Global Terrorist organization, the group continues to benefit 
financially from the export of charcoal from Somalia. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of State, after consultation 
with the Secretary of the Treasury, to submit a report to the 
Committee not later than 90 days after the enactment of this 
act on the effectiveness of current U.N. export restrictions 
against trade with al-Shabaab, a list of countries that import 
Somali charcoal, and recommendations for reducing the export of 
al-Shabaab-taxed charcoal from Somalia.
    The Committee is aware of the critical role of monetary 
remittances from the Somali diaspora in helping Somalis meet 
basic needs and fueling Somalia's fragile economy, and is 
concerned that Somali money transfer operators are having 
increasing difficulties accessing banking services to transmit 
remittances. The Committee directs the Secretary of State to 
work with the Secretary of the Treasury to avoid a disruption 
of this important legal channel of assistance.
    The Committee directs the Department of State, in 
coordination with USAID, to consult with the Committee not 
later than 90 days after enactment of this act on a multi-year 
strategy to reduce poverty, develop credible, transparent, and 
representative government institutions, and enable the eventual 
transfer of security operations to Somali security forces 
capable of providing security while respecting human rights.
    South Sudan.--The Committee is concerned with the dramatic 
deterioration of security in South Sudan, as well as widespread 
corruption and violations of human rights. Section 7042(k) of 
this act requires the Secretary of State, prior to the 
obligation of assistance for the central Government of South 
Sudan, to certify that such government is implementing policies 
to: provide access for humanitarian organizations; support a 
cessation of hostilities agreement; protect freedoms of 
expression, association, and assembly; reduce corruption 
related to the extraction of natural resources; end the use of 
child soldiers; and establish democratic institutions.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State and USAID 
Administrator to prioritize assistance for South Sudan for the 
humanitarian and recovery needs of vulnerable communities, 
including women and girls; political and ethnic reconciliation, 
including negotiation processes such as those conducted by the 
Intergovernmental Authority on Development; and strengthening 
the rule of law, democracy, governance, and civil society.
    Sudan.--The Committee supports assistance for Sudanese 
civil society organizations and political parties working for 
peaceful democratic change, including through technical 
assistance and capacity building programs, to be implemented by 
DRL.
    War Crimes in Africa.--The Committee continues to support 
efforts by the United States, United Nations, African Union 
[AU], and governments in Central Africa to capture Joseph Kony 
and other top commanders of the Lord's Resistance Army [LRA], 
and to assist victims of the LRA's crimes. Section 7042(g) of 
this act provides not less than $10,000,000 to implement Public 
Law 111-172, including for programs to improve physical access, 
for telecommunications infrastructure and early-warning 
mechanisms, and to support the disarmament, demobilization, and 
reintegration of former LRA combatants, especially child 
soldiers. The Committee notes that USAID's ``Secure, Empowered, 
and Connected Communities'' program may reduce civilian 
vulnerability to LRA attacks and increase LRA defections.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State, following 
consultation with the Secretary of Defense and the USAID 
Administrator, to submit a strategy to the Committee not later 
than 90 days after enactment of this act, including an 
assessment of challenges to economic development in areas of 
Central Africa impacted by the LRA, to support the recovery of 
such areas in coordination with the AU, the United Nations, and 
other donors on security and economic development.
    The Committee supports efforts of the Residual Special 
Court for Sierra Leone to bring to justice individuals 
responsible for war crimes and crimes against humanity in a 
timely manner.
    Zimbabwe.--The Committee is concerned that U.S. sanctions 
on Zimbabwean entities are being circumvented by indirect 
imports of diamonds extracted in Zimbabwe that are cut and 
polished in intermediary countries before being shipped to the 
United States. The Committee directs the Department of State in 
coordination with the Department of the Treasury, to seek to 
ensure that U.S. companies carry out supply chain due diligence 
according to Organization for Economic Cooperation and 
Development Guidance to prevent such indirect imports of 
Zimbabwean diamonds.

                       EAST ASIA AND THE PACIFIC

    Burma.--The Committee condemns human rights violations 
against the Rohingya in Rakhine state, and directs the 
Secretary of State to make the resolution of this crisis a 
priority in bilateral relations. Continuing violence against 
the Rohingya and Kachin undermines prospects for meaningful 
progress on ceasefire negotiations with ethnic groups in Burma, 
which is a prerequisite for a full democratic transition.
    The Committee notes that political and economic reforms in 
Burma are fragile and reversible, particularly if national 
elections are not free and fair. The Committee expects the 
Department of State, USAID, and IFIs to make programmatic 
decisions in Burma on the basis of objective analysis, and to 
apply adequate safeguards and oversight to ensure that such 
programs do not benefit corrupt and authoritarian interests.
    Not later than 90 days after enactment of this act, the 
Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit a report to 
the appropriate congressional committees on the status of the 
United States G-8 Partnership with Myanmar on Extractives, 
including an assessment of progress in achieving agreed 
objectives.
    Cambodia.--The Committee continues restrictions, similar to 
current law, regarding assistance for Cambodia. The Committee 
directs that the reporting requirement in section 7043(c)(5) of 
division K of Public 113-76 continue in the manner described 
until September 30, 2015, except such report shall also include 
a description of steps taken by the Asian Development Bank 
[ADB] to provide appropriate redress for persons who were 
harmed by the Rehabilitation of the Railway of Cambodia 
project, as determined by an ADB Compliance Review panel 
report.
    The Committee recommends $16,000,000 in this act for 
democracy programs in Cambodia, which shall not include the 
costs associated with a U.S. contribution to a Khmer Rouge 
Tribunal, to be made available only a grant or cooperative 
agreement basis. The Committee notes that no funds are 
requested under the FMF heading, and none are provided by this 
act.
    North Korea.--Section 7043(d) of this act prohibits funds 
appropriated under this heading for assistance for the 
Government of North Korea.
    People's Republic of China.--The Committee recommends not 
less than $15,000,000 under this heading for U.S. institutions 
of higher education and NGOs for democracy, governance, rule of 
law, and environment programs in the PRC, to be awarded on a 
competitive basis. No funds under this heading may be made 
available for assistance for the central government of the PRC, 
with the exception of funds for programs to detect, prevent, 
and treat infectious diseases, pandemics and other emerging 
health threats.
    Thailand.--Funds appropriated by this act that are 
available for assistance for Thailand may only be made 
available if the Secretary of State makes the certification 
requirement in section 7008 of this act regarding the 
restoration of democracy in Thailand. The Committee notes that 
funds to promote democracy are excluded from this limitation.
    Tibet.--The Committee recommends not less than $7,900,000 
for activities implemented by NGOs to preserve cultural 
traditions and promote sustainable development and 
environmental conservation in Tibetan communities in the 
Tibetan Autonomous Region, and in other Tibetan communities in 
the PRC. Funds should be awarded on a competitive basis. The 
Special Coordinator for Tibetan Issues should play an active 
role in the allocation of funds for programs and activities in 
Tibet, as authorized by Public Law 107-228.
    In addition, section 7043(a)(6)(C) of the act provides not 
less than $6,000,000 under the GHP, DA, ESF, and Migration and 
Refugee Assistance [MRA] headings for programs to promote and 
preserve Tibetan culture and the resilience of Tibetan 
communities in India and Nepal, and to assist in the education 
and development of the next generation of Tibetan leaders from 
such communities. Funds shall be awarded on a competitive 
basis.
    Vietnam.--The Committee recommends not less than 
$15,000,000 for environmental remediation of dioxin 
contamination at the Bien Hoa Airport, and not less than 
$7,500,000 under the DA heading for health/disability programs 
in areas sprayed with Agent Orange or otherwise contaminated by 
dioxin, for a total of $22,500,000 in this act for these 
activities. In order to minimize administrative costs and 
maximize impact in the field, the Committee intends that, to 
the maximum extent practicable, health/disability funds shall 
be implemented by Vietnamese organizations and entities. The 
Committee urges the Administration to request funds for fiscal 
year 2016 for such environmental remediation costs under Budget 
Function 050--National Defense, and directs the Department of 
State, in consultation with the Department of Defense and 
USAID, to submit, not later than 120 days after enactment of 
this act, a multi-year strategy for such activities in Vietnam.
    The Committee notes that 2015 marks the 40th anniversary of 
the end of the Vietnam war, and reiterates its support for 
forensic and other assistance to help locate and identify 
remains of missing Vietnamese without regard to whether they 
were civilians or combatants or which side they supported 
during the war.
    The Committee is aware that the 2015 Inter-Parliamentary 
Union Assembly is to be held in Vietnam. The Committee 
recognizes this as a timely opportunity to focus international 
attention on a wide range of issues of concern in the Southeast 
Asia and Pacific region, and supports the participation of a 
U.S. delegation to the Assembly for these reasons and because 
of the unique history of United States-Vietnam relations.

               EUROPE, EURASIA AND SOUTH AND CENTRAL ASIA

    Afghanistan.--Section 7044(a) of this act continues 
restrictions on assistance for Afghanistan similar to current 
law. The Committee requests the Secretary of State to consult 
with the appropriate congressional committees on the Department 
of State's transition plan in Afghanistan, and program 
adjustments that may arise from a smaller diplomatic footprint.
    The Committee recommends up to $961,433,000 for assistance 
for Afghanistan in this act.
    The Committee is concerned with the impact of the U.S. 
military withdrawal on the political, social, and economic 
gains of Afghan women. The Committee expects that gender-
related programs and activities will remain a top U.S. 
Government priority during the transition, particularly those 
that prioritize women's inclusion in political and security 
processes well as efforts to prevent and respond to gender-
based violence. In addition, the Committee supports the direct 
participation of women in any reconciliation negotiations and 
reintegration efforts.
    To protect the legacy of U.S. support for Afghan women and 
girls, section 7044(a)(7) of this act provides authority for 
the establishment of an endowment to empower women and girls in 
that country. The Department of State and USAID, as 
appropriate, shall consult with the Committee on the specific 
requirements and parameters of such endowment.
    The Committee notes the work of the Afghanistan 
Reconstruction Trust Fund and its National Solidarity Program 
in helping to build the capacity of Afghan communities to 
participate in and manage their own development projects. The 
Committee encourages sufficient funding for these programs.
    The Committee intends a substantial and increasing portion 
of USAID assistance for Afghanistan to be made available 
through grants and cooperative agreements to support 
sustainable, community-based development in rural areas.
    Bangladesh.--The Committee is concerned that the Bangladesh 
International Crimes Tribunal does not meet international fair 
trial and due process norms, and encourages the Secretary of 
State to work with the United Nations and the Government of 
Bangladesh to address this issue.
    Belarus.--The Committee recommends assistance for Belarus 
above the President's budget request for democracy and human 
rights programs in coordination with the European Union, and 
for youth and higher education programs that support critical 
thinking and academic freedom.
    Ireland.--The Committee recommends $2,500,000 to support 
the economic and social development and reconciliation goals of 
Public Law 99-415.
    Nagorno-Karabakh.--The Committee recommends assistance for 
victims of the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict in amounts consistent 
with prior years, and for ongoing needs related to the 
conflict. The Committee urges a peaceful resolution of the 
conflict.
    North Caucasus.--The Committee recommends funding for 
programs to address immediate and long-term needs of conflict-
affected populations in the North Caucasus.
    Pakistan.--Section 7044(d) of this act continues 
restrictions on assistance for Pakistan similar to current law. 
The Committee recognizes an improvement in bilateral relations 
following elections in Pakistan, and encourages continued 
commitment to shared security and development goals.
    The Committee recommends up to $816,000,000 for assistance 
for Pakistan in this act.
    The Committee directs that programs in Pakistan target 
unemployment, illiteracy, and disenfranchisement among the most 
impoverished individuals and communities. The Committee 
supports programs that provide transparency and accountability 
of funds and encourage local communities to address development 
needs.
    The Committee recognizes Malala Yousafzai's courageous 
advocacy for girls' education. Section 7044(d)(4) of this act 
provides $3,000,000, in addition to funds otherwise available 
for such purposes, to increase the number of scholarships under 
the Merit and Needs-Based Scholarship Program. Not less than 50 
percent of the scholarships should be awarded to Pakistani 
women.
    The Committee directs that no funds under this heading may 
be used to support, directly or indirectly, the development or 
execution of contracts for energy projects between the 
Government of Pakistan and the Government of Iran.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State, in 
consultation with the heads of other relevant Federal agencies, 
to make the release of Warren Weinstein, who was kidnapped by 
extremists in Lahore, Pakistan in 2011, a priority in the 
bilateral relationship with Pakistan.
    Serbia and Kosovo.--The Committee supports not less than 
the President's budget request for assistance for Serbia and 
Kosovo in this act.

                               NEAR EAST

    Bahrain.--The Committee directs that not less than 
$3,500,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading be made 
available for programs and activities to promote 
reconciliation, democratic reform, and adherence to 
international human rights and labor rights standards in 
Bahrain.
    Egypt.--Section 7041(a) of this act continues restrictions 
on ESF assistance for Egypt similar to current law. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of State to request that the 
Government of Egypt make publicly available a list of 
individuals detained since July 3, 2013, their place of 
detention, the charges against them, and provide access to 
detainees for international humanitarian organizations.
    The Committee condemns the treatment of women and girls in 
Egypt, and expects the newly elected Government of Egypt to 
make protection of women and girls a priority. The Committee 
also expects such government to protect the rights of religious 
minorities.
    The Committee requests the USAID Administrator to consult 
with the Committee on a demonstration project to combat 
hepatitis-C, on a cost matching basis from sources other than 
the U.S. Government.
    The Committee is concerned with the potential impact of 
politically motivated prosecutions and convictions of U.S. NGO 
personnel in Egypt, which could unjustly tarnish their 
reputations and complicate future work and travel if they were 
required to report, without exception, criminal records that 
were fundamentally flawed or illegitimate. The Committee 
directs the Department of State to take all available 
administrative steps to protect such individuals, and to 
consult with the Committee on such steps including ways to 
assist other U.S. NGO or contractor personnel in similar 
circumstances in other countries.
    Not later than 90 days after enactment of this act, the 
Secretary of State shall submit to the appropriate 
congressional committees a comprehensive, multi-year strategic 
review of military assistance for Egypt and a comprehensive, 
multi-year strategic review of economic assistance for Egypt.
    Jordan.--Section 7041(d) of this act provides a total of 
$1,000,000,000 for assistance for Jordan. The Committee 
supports the renegotiation of the memorandum of understanding 
[MOU] with Jordan at levels of funding that reflect the costs 
related to instability in the region, including border security 
requirements, budget support, and energy dependence. The 
Committee continues support for humanitarian assistance under 
the MRA heading for Syrian and other refugees in Jordan.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of the Red Sea-Dead 
Sea water project for Jordan, and requests the Secretary of 
State to consult with the Committee on the feasibility of a 
U.S. contribution, from funds under this heading that are 
available for assistance for Jordan, to a portion of the 
project to help leverage contributions from other international 
donors and financial institutions.
    Lebanon.--The Committee recognizes the economic and social 
strains caused by Syrian refugees in Lebanon at the national 
and local levels. Section 7041(e) of this act continues 
restrictions in current law on assistance for Lebanon, and 
funds under the INCLE and FMF headings may be made available to 
address security and stability requirements in areas affected 
by the conflict in Syria.
    The Committee recommends that of the assistance 
appropriated under this heading for Lebanon, $12,000,000 be 
made available for scholarships for students in Lebanon with 
high financial need to attend not-for-profit educational 
institutions in Lebanon that meet standards comparable to those 
required for American accreditation. All students should be 
eligible for scholarships based on need, academic record, and 
potential to contribute to the long-term political, economic, 
and social development of Lebanon.
     Middle East Partnership Initiative and Middle East 
Regional Cooperative.--The Committee recommends the President's 
budget request for MEPI and the fiscal year 2014 level for 
MERC.
    MENA Initiative.--The Committee directs the Secretary of 
State to consult with the Committee on the parameters of the 
MENA Initiative prior to the obligation of funds.
    MEPI Scholarships.--The Committee recommends $10,000,000 to 
continue scholarships for students in countries with 
significant Muslim populations at not-for-profit institutions 
of higher education, in a manner consistent with prior fiscal 
years and the awarding of funds should be through an open and 
competitive process.
    West Bank.--The Committee directs the Secretary of State to 
submit a report to the Committee prior to the initial 
obligation of funds under this heading, detailing and assessing 
the capabilities of the Palestinian Authority to manage and 
conduct effective oversight of U.S. assistance in accordance 
with section 7040(f) of this act.
    The Secretary of State shall consult with the appropriate 
congressional committees should circumstances preclude direct 
and meaningful negotiations pursuant to section 
7041(i)(2)(B)(ii) of this act.

                           WESTERN HEMISPHERE

    Colombia.--The Committee recommends not less than 
$133,000,000 apportioned directly to USAID for alternative 
development/institution building and local governance programs 
in Colombia, including $6,500,000 for human rights activities.
    The Committee directs that if a peace agreement is signed 
ending the armed conflict in Colombia, the Department of State, 
USAID, and other relevant agencies shall review U.S. assistance 
programs for Colombia and redirect funds appropriated under 
this heading and the INCLE and FMF headings to support the 
implementation of such agreement, particularly relating to 
demobilization and reintegration of former combatants, 
demining, transitional justice, victims reparations, the 
recuperation of communities most affected by violence, and the 
recovery and productive use of land in former conflict zones.
    The Committee recommends not less than $15,000,000 for 
Afro-Colombian and indigenous communities for projects 
developed in consultation with such communities, many of which 
have experienced increases in violence, including 
assassinations of social activists, poverty, and displacement. 
The Committee is concerned with the rapid expansion of 
government sanctioned, as well as illegal, mining and other 
extractive operations in or adjacent to these communities. The 
Committee directs the Department of State and USAID to work 
with the Government of Colombia to address these issues as a 
priority, and expects to be informed of any IFI financing 
proposed for mining operations in Colombia.
    The Committee recommends not less than $3,500,000 for 
biodiversity conservation programs.
    The Committee recommends $500,000 for community-based 
programs to address the needs of civilians disabled by 
landmines and other causes related to the violence.
    Cuba.--The act provides up to $10,000,000 for programs in 
Cuba, and an additional $5,000,000 may be made available for 
USAID programs to provide technical and other assistance to 
support the development of private Cuban businesses.
    The Committee remains concerned with the welfare of Alan 
Gross, a former USAID subcontractor imprisoned in Cuba since 
December 3, 2009. The Committee urges the Secretary of State to 
act expeditiously to take whatever steps are in the national 
interest to obtain his release.
    Haiti.--In accordance with section 7045(e) of this act, 
funds under this heading may be obligated for assistance for 
the Government of Haiti only if the Secretary of State 
certifies and reports to the Committee that such government:
  --has held free and fair parliamentary elections and a new 
        Haitian Parliament has been seated;
  --is selecting judges in a transparent manner and respecting 
        the independence of the judiciary;
  --is combating corruption, including implementing the anti-
        corruption law by prosecuting corrupt officials;
  --is improving governance and implementing financial 
        transparency and accountability requirements for 
        government institutions; and
  --is making necessary reforms to improve the investment 
        climate.
    The Committee directs that assistance be made available, to 
the maximum extent practicable, in a manner that emphasizes the 
participation of Haitian NGOs and directly improves the 
security, economic and social well-being, and political status 
of Haitian women and girls. The Committee expects the 
Government of Haiti, USAID, and other donors to communicate 
directly and regularly with Haitian community leaders and civil 
society organizations about U.S. programs and plans.
    The Committee recommends $25,000,000 to implement market-
based reforestation programs in Haiti in accordance with 
USAID's 2007 report, ``Environmental Vulnerability in Haiti.'' 
To ensure sustainability, programs require the involvement of 
local communities, income generating mechanisms, and the 
support of the Government of Haiti. Up to $5,000,000 of such 
funds may be made available to support such programs along the 
border with the Dominican Republic. Not later than 90 days 
after enactment of this act, the Committee directs the USAID 
Administrator to submit to the Committee a plan for the use of 
these funds and a summary of the uses of funds for 
reforestation programs in Haiti since the 2010 earthquake.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to continue to 
submit the report on supplemental assistance for Haiti required 
by chapter 10, section 1003(b) of Public Law 111-212 every 180 
days until such funds are expended, as recommended in GAO's 
``Haiti Reconstruction'' report (GAO-13-558), and to post the 
report on the Department of State's Web site. The Committee 
further directs the Secretary, in consultation with the USAID 
Administrator, to include in the report a description of those 
items required under this heading in Senate Report 113-81, 
appropriately updated from the most recent report submitted.

                            GLOBAL PROGRAMS

    Forensic Assistance.--The Committee recommends not less 
than $2,500,000 under this heading for forensic anthropology 
programs in Central and South America, including Guatemala and 
Peru, where armed conflicts resulted in large numbers of human 
remains that have yet to be exhumed and/or identified, delaying 
justice and fostering impunity. These funds are to be 
administered by DRL.
    Institutions of Higher Education.--The Committee supports 
continued funding of institutions of higher education in the 
Middle East and South Asia, including through funds made 
available by title VIII of this act.
    International Child Abductions.--The Committee remains 
concerned with the failure of certain governments to comply 
with Federal and State court orders concerning child custody 
and visitation or with the Convention on the Civil Aspects of 
International Child Abduction (done at The Hague on October 25, 
1980).
    Journalists.--The Committee notes that journalists and 
social and labor rights activists in Ecuador, Mexico, Honduras, 
Colombia, and other Central and South American countries have 
been threatened and assassinated, and recommends increased 
support for programs to protect them.
    Media Programs.--The Committee recommends funding under 
this and the DF heading for Department of State and USAID 
programs which support the development of independent media, 
including in Burma, Afghanistan, and Pakistan and through radio 
broadcasting.
    Reconciliation Programs.--The Committee recommends not less 
than $25,000,000 under this heading and the DA heading for 
reconciliation programs and activities which bring together and 
facilitate direct communication between individuals of 
different ethnic, religious and political backgrounds in 
countries affected by civil strife and war, including in the 
Middle East and North Africa. Funds should be leveraged to 
obtain contributions from other donors and governments to the 
maximum extent practicable.
    Rule of Law.--The Committee recognizes that the rule of law 
is fundamental to democracy and sustainable development, 
including by strengthening independent judiciaries, protecting 
human rights, combating human trafficking and corruption, and 
increasing public accountability and access to justice. The 
Committee supports continued funding for such programs that 
advance the rule of law worldwide.
    Scholar Rescue.--Section 7032(c) of this act provides 
authority to use funds for programs to rescue scholars from 
Iraq, Syria, and other countries denying freedom of expression, 
and the Committee's expectation is that such scholars would 
leave their country only temporarily and return home when 
conditions permit.
    Slavery.--The Committee is aware of the continuing practice 
of slavery in Mauritania, Mali, and Senegal, and recommends not 
less than $3,000,000 for social, educational, and vocational 
programs implemented by local organizations in such countries 
to assist former slaves in reintegrating into society.

                             DEMOCRACY FUND

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $130,500,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................................
Committee recommendation................................     130,500,000

    The Committee recommends $130,500,000 for Democracy Fund, 
of which $80,500,000 is for DRL's Human Rights and Democracy 
Fund [HRDF] and $50,000,000 is for USAID's Center of Excellence 
for Democracy, Human Rights, and Governance. The Committee 
notes that the increase for the HRDF above the President's 
budget request is offset by an equivalent decrease in the 
request for democracy programs.
    The Committee directs the Assistant Secretary for DRL to 
consult with the Committee on the proposed allocation of funds 
within the HRDF prior to the initial obligation of funds.
    Conduct of Democracy Programs.--Given fiscal constraints, 
the Committee directs the Secretary of State, in consultation 
with the USAID Administrator, to review the conduct of 
democracy programs supported by funds made available under this 
heading and the DA and ESF headings to determine whether costs 
for the conduct of such programs are lower using grants and 
cooperative agreements instead of contracts, and which 
mechanisms are most effective in meeting or exceeding 
programmatic objectives. The results of this review should be 
the basis for the development of new guidelines for the conduct 
of democracy programs globally, following consultation with the 
appropriate congressional committees.
    The Committee recognizes the commitment and achievements of 
U.S. NGOs in promoting democracy abroad, including in 
challenging political environments, and supports the people-to-
people relationships and networks that have been established 
over the long-term.
    Coordination.--The Committee expects the recommendations to 
improve coordination and communication among democracy 
implementers to be conducted in the manner prescribed under 
this heading in Senate Report 113-81. Section 7032(c)(2)(B) of 
this act requires the submission of a report to the Committee 
clarifying the respective roles and responsibilities of the 
Department of State and USAID in the promotion of democracy 
abroad, which shall be reviewed by GAO.
    Labor Rights.--The Committee encourages DRL to continue to 
promote labor rights as a means of advancing U.S. interests and 
values. DRL and USAID's Center of Excellence should continue to 
support economic reforms that promote safe working conditions 
and include working people in decisions that affect their jobs 
and their futures. USAID should continue to fund its global 
labor strengthening programs.
    North Korea Database.--The Committee recommends continued 
funding for the maintenance of a database of prisons and gulags 
in North Korea, in accordance with section 7032(i) of division 
K of Public Law 113-76.
    Prison Conditions.--The Committee recommends not less than 
$5,000,000 under this heading to eliminate inhumane prison 
conditions. The Committee is aware that millions of people 
suffer inhumane conditions in prisons and other detention 
facilities in developing countries that are overcrowded, 
unsanitary, and unsafe. Eliminating such conditions would 
strengthen the rule of law, protect human rights, and save 
lives.
    USAID Limitation.--Section 7032(c)(2) of this act prohibits 
the use of funds for USAID democracy programs in countries 
where the USAID Administrator, in consultation with the 
Secretary of State, determines certain repressive and 
constraining conditions exist. The Committee believes that 
USAID's strength as a development agency is linked to 
perceptions of its transparency and accountability, and 
therefore USAID should not be conducting democracy programs in 
politically repressive countries in which it has no direct hire 
presence.

                          Department of State

                    MIGRATION AND REFUGEE ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $3,059,000,000
    Enduring operations.................................   1,774,645,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................   1,284,355,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   2,047,374,000
    Enduring operations.................................   1,582,374,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................     465,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,951,000,000
    Enduring operations.................................   1,039,000,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................   1,912,000,000

    The Committee recommends $1,039,000,000 for Migration and 
Refugee Assistance. An additional $1,912,000,000 in title VIII 
under this heading is designated for OCO.
    Children in Disaster and Conflict.--The Committee 
recognizes the need for enhanced protection of children 
separated from their families as a result of man-made or 
natural disasters and encourages USAID's Office of Foreign 
Disaster Assistance and the Department of State's Bureau of 
Population, Refugees and Migration to support rapid 
registration and family tracing to determine the number and 
needs of separated children. Programs should focus on finding 
safe, permanent, and nurturing families for such children as 
quickly as possible, through family reunification, permanent 
guardianship, or adoption.
    Colombia.--The Committee recommends funding under this 
heading at not less than the fiscal year 2014 level for 
Colombian IDPs and refugees.
    Israel.--The Committee recommends $10,000,000 for refugee 
resettlement in Israel, to be awarded through a competitive 
process.
    North Korea.--The Committee supports assistance for North 
Korean refugees, including in the PRC. The Committee condemns 
the forced repatriation of North Korean refugees, and supports 
the involvement of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees and 
other international humanitarian agencies in protecting the 
rights of such refugees.
    Report.--The Committee directs the Secretary of State to 
fulfill the reporting requirement relating to UNRWA under the 
Protracted Refugee Situations subheading in Senate Report 112-
172, as referenced under the MRA heading in Senate Report 113-
81, in a timely manner.
    Tibetan Refugees.--The Committee remains concerned with the 
situation of Tibetans in Nepal, including new arrivals and the 
long-staying population. The Committee is aware that Nepalese 
officials have handed over Tibetan refugees to Chinese border 
authorities, in contravention of Nepal's international 
obligations to protect refugees fleeing persecution. The 
Committee urges the Government of Nepal to respect the rights 
of, and provide legal protections to, Tibetans residing in 
Nepal. The Committee encourages the Department of State to 
continue to engage the Government of Nepal on durable 
solutions, including enactment of a refugee law, providing 
status to undocumented Tibetan refugees, and resettlement of 
Tibetan refugees in the United States.

     UNITED STATES EMERGENCY REFUGEE AND MIGRATION ASSISTANCE FUND

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $50,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      50,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      50,000,000

    The Committee recommends $50,000,000 for United States 
Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund.

                          Independent Agencies

                              PEACE CORPS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $379,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     380,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     380,000,000

    The Committee recommends $380,000,000 for Peace Corps.
    This act continues language prohibiting the use of funds to 
pay for abortions, but an exception is included consistent with 
section 614 of division C of Public Law 112-74, as proposed in 
the President's budget request.
    The Peace Corps Director is directed to submit a spend plan 
not later than 45 days after enactment of this act on the 
proposed uses of funds under this heading.
    Funds appropriated under this heading are subject to the 
terms of section 7064 of this act.

                    MILLENNIUM CHALLENGE CORPORATION

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $898,200,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   1,000,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     901,000,000

    The Committee recommends $901,000,000 for Millennium 
Challenge Corporation [MCC]. The Committee notes that despite 
support for the MCC's mission, funding constraints within the 
current allocation, which is below the President's budget 
request, limits the ability to appropriate funds at the request 
for this account.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State, the USAID 
Administrator, and the MCC Chief Executive Officer [CEO] to 
jointly assess and report, for each compact supported with 
funds appropriated by this act, on the extent to which the 
compact is aligned with U.S. strategic interests and with other 
U.S. assistance programs and the sustainability of the MCC's 
investment by the host country government. The MCC CEO shall 
further report to the Committee on progress in rigorously 
applying the Control of Corruption indicator.
    Funds in this account are subject to the requirements of 
section 7064 of this act.

                       INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $22,500,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      18,100,000
Committee recommendation................................      22,500,000

    The Committee recommends $22,500,000 for Inter-American 
Foundation.

              UNITED STATES AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $30,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      24,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      30,000,000

    The Committee recommends $30,000,000 for United States 
African Development Foundation.

                       Department of the Treasury

               INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $23,500,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      23,500,000
Committee recommendation................................      23,500,000

    The Committee recommends $23,500,000 for International 
Affairs Technical Assistance.

                                TITLE IV

                   INTERNATIONAL SECURITY ASSISTANCE

                          Department of State

        CONTRIBUTIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACEKEEPING ACTIVITIES

Appropriations, 2014....................................................
Budget estimate, 2015...................................................
Committee recommendation................................  $2,518,565,000
    Enduring operations.................................   1,962,555,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................     556,010,000

    The Committee recommends $1,962,555,000 for Contributions 
for International Peacekeeping Activities [CIPA]. An additional 
$556,010,000 in title VIII under this heading, which is for 
missions in Africa, is designated for OCO.
    The Committee recommends funding under this heading as U.N. 
peacekeeping missions are a critical component of furthering 
U.S. strategic interests globally. The Committee recognizes the 
necessity of U.N. peacekeeping missions in countries where 
ethnic, religious, and political violence threaten regional 
stability and the safety of civilian populations.
    The Committee continues certain requirements for U.S. 
support for such missions, and section 7064 of this act 
requires submission of an operating plan not later than 45 days 
after enactment of this act, which should include each 
peacekeeping mission funded and a description of any credits 
applied.

          International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $1,350,000,000
    Enduring operations.................................   1,005,610,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................     344,390,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   1,117,911,000
    Enduring operations.................................     721,911,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................     396,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,000,000,000
    Enduring operations.................................     708,000,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................     292,000,000

    The Committee recommends $708,000,000 for International 
Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement. An additional 
$292,000,000 in title VIII under this heading is designated for 
OCO.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to notify the 
Committee in writing within 5 days of exercising authority 
allowing funds made available under this heading to be spent 
notwithstanding any other provision of law, and such 
notification shall include a justification for such activities.
    Afghanistan.--The Committee is concerned with the 
sustainability, effectiveness, and ability to monitor U.S. 
counter-narcotics efforts in Afghanistan as the United States 
and international military presence decreases and phases out. 
Not later than 90 days after enactment of this act, the 
Secretary of State shall submit a report to the Committee on 
counter-narcotics efforts in Afghanistan, including: if and how 
such efforts can be sustained given the shrinking U.S. military 
footprint; if and how such efforts can be monitored to prevent 
waste, fraud, and abuse given the limitations on oversight; and 
the goals and objectives for measuring progress.
    Central America Regional Security Initiative/Caribbean 
Basin Security Initiative.--The Committee supports the use of 
Central America Regional Security Initiative [CARSI] and 
Caribbean Basin Security Initiative [CBSI] to address 
narcotics-related violence and corruption in Central America 
through law enforcement reform and economic and social programs 
that provide alternatives to criminal gangs. The Committee 
remains concerned that corrupt and abusive police and military 
forces, impunity, and a lack of political will to address these 
problems have limited the effectiveness of these programs. 
CARSI and CBSI assistance should be made available only for 
governments that the Secretary of State determines demonstrate 
a clear and convincing commitment to punishing corruption and 
reforming their security forces.
    Colombia.--The Committee recommends $117,000,000 for 
Colombia under this heading which is equal to the budget 
request, including not less than $10,000,000 for the human 
rights unit of the Office of the Attorney General to be 
administered by the Department of State and the Department of 
Justice.
    The Committee recognizes the increasing support by the 
Government of Colombia for licit crop substitution programs in 
lieu of aerial eradication, and encourages the use of funds 
made available by this act for this purpose. The Committee 
directs that in assessing the risks of aerial spraying of 
chemical herbicides to humans and the environment, the 
Secretary of State shall consult with the Administrator of the 
Environmental Protection Agency and the Secretary of Health and 
Human Services. As in past years, funds may not be used for 
aerial spraying in Colombia's national parks or reserves unless 
the Secretary of State submits a report to the Committee, prior 
to the use of funds for such purpose, that there are no 
effective alternatives and the spraying is in accordance with 
Colombian laws and regulations.
    Combat Piracy of U.S. Copyright Materials.--The act 
provides $5,000,000 to combat piracy of U.S. copyright 
materials, in a manner consistent with prior fiscal years.
    Consular Notification Compliance.--Section 7071 of this act 
facilitates compliance with Article 36 of the Vienna Convention 
on Consular Relations, done at Vienna April 24, 1963, and any 
comparable provision of a bilateral international agreement 
addressing consular notification and access, and provides a 
limited but important remedy for certain previous violations.
    Demand Reduction.--The Committee supports the budget 
request for the Demand Reduction Program.
    Guatemala.--The Committee recommends $4,000,000 for the 
International Commission Against Impunity in Guatemala [CICIG] 
and requests to be consulted prior to the obligation of funds.
    The Committee encourages USAID and the Department of State 
to give priority to strengthening the capacity of tribunals of 
high risk in Guatemala which handle cases involving organized 
crime, narco-trafficking, violations of human rights, money 
laundering, and other such crimes that threaten peace and 
security.
    The Committee recommends up to $3,000,000 for the sexual 
assault units of the Guatemalan police, and expects such 
assistance to target areas of highest prevalence of such 
assaults in order to increase the capacity of such units to 
protect women and children from such crimes.
    International Police Peacekeeping Operations Support 
Program.--The Committee directs that, to the maximum extent 
practicable, funds made available for the International Police 
Peacekeeping Operations Support Program be made available on a 
cost-matching basis from sources other than the U.S. 
Government.
     Mexico.--The Committee supports the prioritization of 
reform of national, state, and local judicial institutions and 
police forces, and cooperation between the United States and 
Mexico to combat organized crime and narcotics and human 
trafficking along the border.
    Pakistan.--The Committee notes the Department of State's 
efforts, in cooperation with the Government of Pakistan, to 
support civilian law enforcement agencies in combating 
extremism in Pakistan, particularly the police in Khyber 
Pakhtunkhwa, the Federally Administered Tribal Areas, and Sindh 
Province. Programs to upgrade facilities, increase mobility, 
and train and equip the police help to strengthen the rule of 
law and governance in Pakistan at the local level. The 
Committee recommends not less than the fiscal year 2014 funding 
level for such programs.
    The Committee directs that priority be given to the 
recruitment, retention, and professionalization of women in 
Pakistan's police forces. Funds should be focused on investing 
in targeted female recruitment initiatives, providing 
appropriate equipment for female police officers, strengthening 
policewomen networks and associations, improving policewomen's 
access to training in specialized policing skills, and 
promoting gender-sensitive training of all police forces.
    Rule of Law Programs.--The Committee notes that fair and 
transparent judicial systems are critical to the administration 
of justice advancing the rule of law, particularly in countries 
confronting organized crime and narcotics trafficking. The 
Committee directs that funds be made available to continue 
programs that strengthen and promote independent judiciaries 
worldwide.
    Sentencing Reform.--The Committee recommends that the 
Secretary of State formulate a policy consistent with the 
policy of the Department of Justice on the sentencing of drug 
offenders, and to direct Department of State personnel involved 
in overseas police training, judicial reform, corrections, and 
related programs to advise foreign partners of the benefits of 
not expending scarce criminal justice resources on the 
prosecution and incarceration of nonviolent, low-level drug 
offenders.
    Southeast Asia Maritime Security Law Enforcement 
Initiative.--The Committee supports funding for this initiative 
which seeks to address regional maritime law enforcement 
challenges such as human, narcotics, and wildlife trafficking, 
at levels comparable to fiscal year 2014.
    Trafficking in Persons.--The Committee supports DRL's 
efforts to combat human trafficking and exploitative labor 
practices overseas.
    The Committee directs the USAID Administrator to report to 
the Committee not later than 90 days after enactment of this 
act on the obligation and expenditure of all USAID funds to 
combat human trafficking and forced labor in fiscal year 2014. 
The report shall indicate funding amounts by program, project, 
and activity and describe USAID's management structure for 
obligating funds for these purposes. The Committee urges the 
Administrator to include in future budget requests detailed 
information on all anti-trafficking and anti-slavery programs 
and expenditures.
    Trafficking in Wildlife.--The Committee recommends 
$25,000,000 under this heading for programs to counter wildlife 
poaching and trafficking.
    War Crimes, Crimes Against Humanity, and Genocide.--Section 
7047(b) of this act provides that funds appropriated by this 
act may be made available, consistent with section 2015 of the 
American Service-Members Protection Act, for certain assistance 
to the International Criminal Court in support of international 
judicial investigations, apprehensions, prosecutions, and 
adjudications of genocide, crimes against humanity, and war 
crimes, excluding nationals of the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization [NATO] and major non-NATO allies. The Committee 
intends any such funds to be targeted toward Joseph Kony, Omar-
al Bashir, Bashir al-Assad and other high profile foreign 
nationals who are accused of such crimes.

    NONPROLIFERATION, ANTI-TERRORISM, DEMINING AND RELATED PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $700,000,000
    Enduring operations.................................     630,000,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................      70,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     605,400,000
Committee recommendation................................     679,000,000
    Enduring operations.................................     593,775,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................      85,225,000

    The Committee recommends $593,775,000 for Nonproliferation, 
Anti-terrorism, Demining and Related Programs. An additional 
$85,225,000 in title VIII under this heading is designated for 
OCO.
    Funds in this account are allocated, unless otherwise 
noted, according to the following table, and are subject to the 
provisions of section 7019 of this act:

     NONPROLIFERATION, ANTI-TERRORISM, DEMINING AND RELATED PROGRAMS
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                        Programs                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Nonproliferation Programs...............................         278,075
    Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund (non-add).....          25,000
    Export Control and Related Border Security                    56,990
     Assistance (non-add)...............................
    Global Threat Reduction (non-add)...................          65,140
    Weapons of Mass Destruction Terrorism (non-add).....           4,750
    International Atomic Energy Agency/Voluntary                  95,000
     Contribution (non-add).............................
    CTBT International Monitoring System (non-add)......          31,095
    CTBTO Prepatory Commission-Special Contributions                 100
     (non-add)..........................................
Antiterrorism Programs..................................         211,925
    Antiterrorism Assistance (non-add)..................         165,834
    Terrorist Interdiction Program (non-add)............          25,091
    CT Engagement with Allies (non-add).................           6,000
    Counterterrorism Financing (non-add)................          15,000
Conventional Weapons Destruction........................         189,000
    Humanitarian Demining (non-add).....................         169,000
        [of which, UXO Laos]............................          13,000
        [of which, additional UXO South East Asia and             15,000
         Pacific Islands]...............................
                                                         ---------------
      Total, Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining          679,000
       and Related Programs.............................
                                                         ===============
          of which, OCO/GWOT............................          85,225
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Countering Violent Extremism.--Section 7060(b) of this act 
provides a framework for the conduct of programs to counter 
violent extremism, including a definition that the Department 
of State and USAID shall use when developing and notifying the 
Committee of such programs. The Committee is concerned with the 
significant growth in programs to counter violent extremism, 
and an inter-agency framework and definition will serve to 
better manage such programs, including to measure program 
effectiveness.
    USAID vocational training programs targeting youth 
unemployment as a mechanism for preventing violent conflict 
should be supported consistent with section 7060(b) of this 
act, including to build social cohesion across inter-communal 
divides and increase opportunities for civic engagement and 
access to justice.
    International Atomic Energy Agency.--The Committee 
recommends $95,000,000 for a U.S. contribution to the IAEA to 
support enhanced nuclear monitoring and inspections.
    Stolen/Lost Travel Documents.--The Committee encourages the 
Department of State to incorporate in its law enforcement, 
border security and anti-terrorism programs, as appropriate, 
information regarding access and use of INTERPOL's Stolen/Lost 
Travel Documents [SLTD] database to increase security at 
airports and other points of entry abroad. The Committee 
directs the Secretary of State to consider options for 
incorporating a country's use of the SLTD database in the 
Department of State's travel alerts and warnings.
    Syria.--The Committee directs the Secretary of State to 
consult with the Committee prior to obligating funds for 
programs in Syria.
    Unexploded Ordnance Clearance.--The Committee supports a 
multi-year strategy to expand unexploded ordnance [UXO] 
clearance in Southeast Asia and the Pacific islands, and 
provides not less than $15,000,000 to implement the strategy 
which is in addition to other funds made available by this act 
for such purposes. Priority should be given to the clearance of 
landmines and other unexploded ordnance in areas where such 
ordnance was caused by the United States, and not less than 
$13,000,000 shall be made available for UXO clearance in Laos.

                        PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $435,600,000
    Enduring operations.................................     235,600,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................     200,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     336,150,000
    Enduring operations.................................     221,150,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................     115,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     345,395,000
    Enduring operations.................................     120,000,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................     225,395,000

    The Committee recommends $120,000,000 for Peacekeeping 
Operations. An additional $225,395,000 in title VIII under this 
heading is designated for OCO.
    Global Peace Operations Initiative.--The Committee directs 
the Secretary of State to consult with the Committee prior to 
obligating funds for this initiative.
    Multilateral Force and Observers.--The Committee recommends 
$28,000,000 for the MFO mission in the Sinai, including 
$6,000,000 to address force protection enhancements from this 
and prior acts.

                  Funds Appropriated to the President

             INTERNATIONAL MILITARY EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $105,573,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     107,474,000
Committee recommendation................................     104,674,000

    The Committee recommends $104,674,000 for International 
Military Education and Training [IMET].
    Burma.--In accordance with section 7043(b)(4) of this act, 
funds appropriated under this heading may be obligated for 
Expanded-IMET assistance for Burma only if the Secretary of 
State certifies and reports to the appropriate congressional 
committees that the Government of Burma is implementing 
security sector reforms, including taking steps to place the 
armed forces of Burma under civilian control; and the armed 
forces of Burma has terminated its policy of violence against 
the people of Burma, is taking steps to arrest and prosecute 
violators of human rights, and has ceased military cooperation 
with North Korea.
    The act does not restrict the use of funds made available 
to continue consultations with the armed forces of Burma on 
human rights and disaster response. The Committee notes that 
this limitation applies only to funds made available by this 
act.
    Cambodia.--The Committee does not support IMET assistance 
for Cambodia until the Secretary of State certifies to the 
Committee that the requirements of section 7043(c)(1) of this 
act have been met. The Committee remains concerned that the 
vetting procedures required by section 620M of the FAA may not 
be consistently applied in Cambodia.
    Program Evaluation.--The Committee is concerned that data 
on the assignments and conduct of recipients of IMET assistance 
that would permit program evaluation is not gathered and shared 
with appropriate agencies in a systematic manner. In 2011, the 
GAO noted in its report ``International Military Education and 
Training: Agencies Should Emphasize Human Rights Training and 
Improve Evaluations'' (GAO 12-123) that the Departments of 
State and Defense ``do not measure how IMET training 
contributes to long-term program outcomes--such as the extent 
to which IMET graduates apply training skills or knowledge on 
the job,'' and recommended that the agencies ``build on current 
efforts toward a more systematic collection of performance 
information--at multiple points in time, over several years, 
and for a set of objective performance measures.'' The 
Committee directs the Department of State to establish 
procedures for systematic collection of data on the assignment 
and performance of recipients of training funded with IMET and 
FMF assistance, consistent with GAO's recommendation, and to 
submit a report to the Committee detailing such procedures not 
later than 90 days after enactment of this act.
    Report on Uses of Funds.--The Committee directs the 
Secretary of State to submit a report, not later than 45 days 
after enactment of this act, on the proposed uses of funds 
under this heading on a country basis, including a detailed 
description of proposed activities.
    Saudi Arabia.--The Committee is concerned with the 
continued detention of blogger and journalist Hamza Kashgari in 
Saudi Arabia, who was arrested in February 2012.
    Thailand.--The Committee does not recommend IMET assistance 
for Thailand until the Secretary of State certifies to the 
Committee that a democratically elected government has taken 
office, consistent with section 7008 of this act.
    Training Report.--The Committee notes that the report on 
foreign military training required by section 656 of the FAA is 
to include the units of operation of military personnel who 
receive training. The Committee directs that such units should 
be specified at the battalion or equivalent level.

                   FOREIGN MILITARY FINANCING PROGRAM

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $5,919,280,000
    Enduring operations.................................   5,389,280,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................     530,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   5,647,645,000
    Enduring operations.................................   5,110,645,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................     537,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,310,645,000
    Enduring operations.................................   4,803,645,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................     507,000,000

    The Committee recommends $4,803,645,000 for Foreign 
Military Financing Program. An additional $507,000,000 in title 
VIII under this heading is designated for OCO.
    Bahrain.--The Committee notes the importance of Bahrain to 
the security interests of the United States and allies in the 
region. However, the Committee remains concerned that actions 
by the Government of Bahrain to limit freedoms of expression, 
association and assembly, and reports of excessive force, 
unfair trials, and mistreatment of prisoners negatively impact 
bilateral relations. The Committee intends that no crowd 
control items shall be provided to Bahrain during fiscal year 
2015, and notes that none are included in the President's 
budget request. The Committee directs that the report required 
by section 7010 of this act shall include a description of any 
such items provided to foreign security forces.
    Baltic Countries.--The Committee intends a portion of the 
funds made available under this heading to be used to augment 
and support the Baltic Air Policing mission as a deterrent 
against Russian aggression in these countries.
    Colombia.--The Committee supports efforts by the Government 
of Colombia to negotiate a peace agreement with the 
Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia [FARC] which would end a 
costly, protracted armed conflict. The Committee condemns 
continuing attacks by the FARC, including against civilians.
    The Committee is concerned with constitutional reforms 
which may result in impunity for crimes against humanity by the 
FARC and the Colombian military, and the transfer of crimes 
such as ``false positives'' from civilian prosecutors to 
military jurisdiction which lacks independence.
    The Committee recommends assistance under this heading for 
Colombia in accordance with the requirements of section 
7045(b)(2) of this act. Of this amount, 25 percent may be 
obligated only if the Secretary of State consults with, and 
subsequently certifies and reports to the Committee that:
  --cases involving members of the Colombian military who have 
        been credibly alleged to have violated human rights are 
        subject only to civilian jurisdiction, judicial 
        proceedings in such cases are making substantial 
        progress, and threats against witnesses are being 
        investigated;
  --the Government of Colombia is upholding its international 
        obligations by investigating, prosecuting, and 
        punishing persons responsible for crimes against 
        humanity, war crimes, and other gross violations of 
        human rights, and is not offering amnesty to such 
        persons; and
  --the Government of Colombia is making substantial progress 
        in dismantling illegal armed groups, in prosecuting 
        attacks against human rights defenders, journalists, 
        and trade unionists, and in protecting the rights and 
        territory of indigenous and Afro-Colombian communities 
        including protecting them from forced displacement, 
        killings, and other violations.
    Counter-Terrorism Partnership Funds.--The Committee does 
not include funds for this new Presidential initiative, as none 
were included in the budget request. The Committee expects the 
administration to provide a detailed description of this 
initiative, by account, to the appropriate congressional 
committees in a timely manner, to include whether funds will be 
subject to the requirements of this and prior appropriations 
acts, as appropriate, and section 620M of the FAA.
    Crowd Control Items.--Section 7034(m) of this act continues 
restrictions on the provision of crowd control items for 
foreign security forces that use excessive force to repress 
peaceful expression and association in countries undergoing 
democratic transition. The Committee notes that section 620M of 
the FAA prohibits such assistance to any unit of a foreign 
security force that has committed a gross violation of human 
rights.
    Egypt.--Section 7041(a) of this act includes restrictions 
on assistance for Egypt made available under this heading.
    Ethiopia.--The Committee remains concerned with the use of 
anti-terrorism laws to imprison journalists, political 
opponents, and others calling for free and fair elections and 
political and human rights. The Committee urges the Departments 
of State and Defense to apply a consistent policy to engagement 
with the Ethiopian military and police, to help ensure the 
protection of these rights.
    Guatemala.--The Committee recognizes and supports the 
efforts of the Government of Guatemala and the communities 
affected by the Chixoy Hydroelectric Dam to reach agreement on 
the legal framework and financing for implementation of an 
agreed plan based on the content of the Reparations Plan for 
Damages Suffered by the Communities Affected by the 
Construction of the Chixoy Hydroelectric Dam (April 2010). In 
accordance with section 7045(c) of this act, the Secretary of 
the Treasury shall instruct the U.S. executive directors of the 
World Bank and the Inter-American Development Bank to vote 
against any loan, credit, grant, or guarantee for Guatemala, 
except to meet basic human needs, unless the Secretary of State 
certifies and reports to the Committee that the Government of 
Guatemala is supporting such framework and financing for 
implementation of the Reparations Plan.
    In addition, funds under this heading may be obligated for 
assistance for the Guatemalan army only if the Secretary of 
State certifies and reports to the Committee that:
  --the Government of Guatemala is implementing a credible plan 
        to build a professional, accountable police force and 
        end the army's involvement in internal law enforcement;
  --the Government of Guatemala is taking steps to prevent acts 
        of intimidation, including threats, false arrests and 
        prosecutions, against social activists and human rights 
        defenders and is removing police officers and 
        prosecutors who engage in such acts; and
  --civilian judicial authorities are investigating and 
        prosecuting current and retired army personnel who are 
        credibly alleged to have committed gross violations of 
        human rights, and the Guatemalan army is fully 
        cooperating with such cases, with the Inter-American 
        Commission for Human Rights [IACHR], and with CICIG, 
        including by providing timely access for investigators 
        to witnesses, documents (including archival documents), 
        forensic evidence, and other relevant information.
    Honduras.--The Committee remains concerned with high rates 
of violence and corruption in Honduras involving drug-
traffickers, other criminal organizations, large landowners, 
peasant groups, militias, and Honduran police and military 
forces. Assassinations of human rights defenders, journalists, 
and social activists are common and perpetrators are rarely 
brought to justice. In accordance with section 7045(f) of this 
act, 50 percent of the funds under INCLE and FMF headings that 
are available for assistance for the Honduran army and police 
may be obligated only if the Secretary of State certifies and 
reports to the Committee that:
  --the Government of Honduras is reducing corruption including 
        by prosecuting corrupt officials and removing them from 
        office;
  --the Government of Honduras is complying with agreements 
        between the United States and Honduras concerning 
        counter-narcotics operations, including assistance for 
        innocent victims of such operations;
  --the Government of Honduras is implementing policies to 
        protect freedoms of expression, association, and 
        assembly, and due process of law, including in the Bajo 
        Aguan Valley;
  --the Government of Honduras is taking steps to prevent acts 
        of intimidation, including threats, false arrests and 
        prosecutions, against social activists and human rights 
        defenders and is removing police officers and 
        prosecutors who engage in such acts;
  --Honduran judges are selected in a transparent manner; and
  --Honduran civilian judicial authorities are investigating 
        and prosecuting army and police personnel who are 
        credibly alleged to have violated human rights, 
        including forced evictions, or to have aided or abetted 
        armed groups involved in such acts, and judicial 
        proceedings in such cases are making substantial 
        progress.
    Indonesia.--The Committee notes the progress the Government 
of Indonesia is making in strengthening democracy, but military 
reform, particularly accountability for past crimes, continues 
to lag behind.
    Not later than 90 days after enactment of this act, the 
Secretary of State shall submit a report to the Committee on 
steps taken by the Government of Indonesia, including the 
military, during the previous 12 months to:
  --deny promotion, suspend from active service, and/or 
        prosecute and punish military officers who have 
        violated human rights, and to refine further the 
        military's mission and develop an appropriate defense 
        budget to carry out that mission;
  --cooperate with civilian judicial authorities to resolve 
        cases of violations of human rights;
  --implement reforms that increase the transparency and 
        accountability of the military's budget and operations, 
        and achieve divestment of military businesses; and
  --allow unimpeded access to Papua, respect due process and 
        freedom of expression, association, and assembly in 
        Papua, and release Papuans and Moluccans imprisoned for 
        peaceful political activity.
    Israel.--The act provides $3,100,000,000 for assistance for 
Israel under this heading, which is equal to the budget 
request.
    Kenya.--The Committee is concerned that Kenyan military and 
police personnel have been implicated in gross violations of 
human rights in Mandera district in September 2012, Eastleigh 
between November 2012 and January 2013, Mombasa in November 
2012, and Eastleigh and Mombasa in April and May 2014. The 
Committee notes that section 620M of the FAA applies to 
assistance for Kenya.
    Jordan.--Section 7041(d) of this act provides $300,000,000 
for assistance for Jordan under this heading, and the Secretary 
of State shall consult with the Committee on additional FMF 
assistance that may be provided under title VIII of this act. 
In addition, the Secretary of State shall consult with the 
Committee on additional funding requirements that may arise 
from a further deterioration of regional stability caused by 
the situation in Syria.
    Lebanon.--Section 7041(e) of this act continues 
restrictions on assistance for Lebanon under this heading, and 
encourages the use of funds to expand the presence of the 
Lebanese Armed Forces and police in communities with 
significant Syrian refugee populations. The Secretary of State 
shall consult with the Committee on additional funding 
requirements that may arise from a further deterioration of 
regional stability caused by the situation in Syria.
    Mexico.--The Committee supports joint U.S.-Mexican efforts 
to strengthen judicial and law enforcement capacity to address 
narcotics trafficking and other organized crime and corruption 
in Mexico, and remains concerned with impunity among Mexican 
military and police forces for violations of human rights. In 
accordance with section 7045(g) of this act, 15 percent of the 
funds under the INCLE and FMF headings that are available for 
assistance for the Mexican army and police may be obligated 
only if the Secretary of State reports to the Committee that:
  --the Government of Mexico is investigating and prosecuting 
        violations of human rights in civilian courts;
  --the Government of Mexico is enforcing prohibitions against 
        torture and the use of testimony obtained through 
        torture;
  --the Mexican military and police are immediately 
        transferring detainees to the custody of civilian 
        judicial authorities, in accordance with Mexican law, 
        and are cooperating with such authorities in such 
        cases; and
  --the Government of Mexico is searching for the victims of 
        disappearances and prosecuting those responsible for 
        such crimes.
    Morocco.--The Committee notes that Morocco is a strategic 
ally in North Africa where the United States has an interest in 
preventing terrorism and promoting democracy. The Committee 
directs the Secretary of State to update the report required by 
section 7041(g) of division I of Public Law 112-74, to include 
steps taken during the previous 12 months by the Government of 
Morocco to release political prisoners and support a human 
rights monitoring and reporting role for the U.N. Mission in 
Western Sahara in cooperation with the U.N. High Commissioner 
for Human Rights. Funds in this act may not be used to procure 
defense articles or services for use in the territory of the 
Western Sahara.
    Nepal.--The Committee remains concerned that, despite 
numerous violations of human rights and the laws of war during 
the period 1995 to 2005, the Nepal army continues to shield 
itself from punishment and has promoted officers accused of 
such crimes. The Committee is further concerned with efforts by 
the Government of Nepal to provide amnesty to former combatants 
on both sides of the conflict who have been implicated in 
crimes against humanity, which could impede future U.S. 
assistance.
    Nigeria.--The Committee is concerned that the Nigerian army 
has been ineffective in countering violent extremism, including 
that conducted by Boko Haram, and has a history of corruption, 
killings, rape, and other abuses of civilians, and a lack of 
accountability. The Committee supports efforts to punish army 
personnel who are culpable of such misconduct, and to train and 
equip army units that are not associated with such crimes to 
carry out operations to protect Nigerian civilians from further 
attacks by Boko Haram.
    Philippines.--The Committee recommends assistance under 
this heading for the Philippines to enhance maritime security. 
The Committee notes that the Government of the Philippines has 
stated that it is taking steps to reduce extra-judicial 
executions by military officers and militias, but new cases 
have been reported and impunity for these crimes remains a 
concern. In accordance with section 7043(f) of this act, funds 
under this heading may be obligated for assistance for the 
Philippine army only if the Secretary of State certifies and 
reports to the Committee that the Government of the Philippines 
is:
  --investigating and prosecuting army personnel who are 
        credibly alleged to have committed, or aided or 
        abetted, extra-judicial executions, forced 
        disappearances, and other gross violations of human 
        rights, and strengthening government institutions 
        working to eliminate such crimes;
  --implementing a policy of promoting army personnel who 
        demonstrate professionalism and respect for human 
        rights;
  --taking steps to ensure that the Philippine army and 
        paramilitary groups under its control are not engaging 
        in acts of intimidation or violence against journalists 
        or human rights defenders.
    Security Force Accountability Assistance.--The Committee 
supports the use of funds under this heading and the INCLE 
heading to encourage and support foreign governments in 
investigating, prosecuting, and punishing military and police 
personnel who are credibly alleged to have committed gross 
violations of human rights, in accordance with section 620M(c) 
of the FAA. The Committee directs the Secretary of State to 
develop and implement a strategy to provide: (1) technical 
assistance in support of such investigations and prosecutions; 
(2) assistance to strengthen the internal accountability 
mechanisms and technical capacity of foreign governments to 
bring such personnel to justice; and (3) support for NGOs that 
monitor and document gross violations. The strategy should 
focus on providing assistance beyond traditional uses of funds 
for judicial and law enforcement capacity building in order to 
enhance internal accountability for, and oversight of, military 
and police conduct, and should include a plan for using a 
portion of funds appropriated under such headings for this 
purpose. The Committee directs the Secretary of State to 
consult with the Committee not less than 180 days after 
enactment of this act on progress in implementing such 
strategy.
    Security Sector Reform.--The Committee directs that funds 
appropriated by this act for security sector reform shall be 
implemented in a manner consistent with the roles, 
responsibilities and guiding principles of the February 2009 
``Security Sector Reform'' paper prepared jointly by USAID, the 
Department of Defense, and the Department of State.
    Somalia.--The Committee does not support lethal assistance 
for the Somali army and notes that none was included in the 
President's budget request. The Committee supports reform of 
Somali security forces to ensure they are clan and regionally 
representative, demonstrate a commitment to respect human 
rights and the rule of law, have a clear command and control 
structure, and do not use child soldiers.
    Sri Lanka.--The Committee continues restrictions on 
assistance, export licenses, sales and transfers of equipment 
for the Sri Lankan military unless, in accordance with section 
7044(e) of this act, the Secretary of State certifies and 
reports to the Committee that the Government of Sri Lanka is:
  --conducting credible, thorough investigations of war crimes 
        and violations of international humanitarian law by 
        government forces and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil 
        Eelam;
  --bringing to justice individuals who have been credibly 
        alleged to have committed such violations;
  --supporting and cooperating with any U.N. investigation of 
        war crimes and violations of international humanitarian 
        law;
  --implementing policies to protect judicial independence; 
        freedom of expression, association, assembly, and 
        religion; the right of political parties, civil society 
        organizations, and journalists to operate without 
        harassment or interference; and due process of law, 
        including ending arrest and detention under emergency-
        type regulations;
  --providing access to detainees by humanitarian 
        organizations; and
  --implementing policies to promote reconciliation and justice 
        including the demilitarization of public administration 
        and development activities in the north, and devolution 
        of power.
    Uzbekistan.--The Committee notes the cooperation of the 
Government of Uzbekistan in the transport of supplies and 
equipment in and out of Afghanistan. The Committee is 
concerned, however, that the Government of Uzbekistan continues 
to repress its own citizens, and urges the Department of State 
to encourage the Government of Uzbekistan to cooperate with 
U.N. human rights monitors, guarantee freedom of expression and 
of the media, implement conventions against child labor, and 
fully align its election processes with the Organization for 
Security Cooperation in Europe guidelines.
    The Committee is concerned with political prisoners in 
Uzbekistan, including Salijon Abdurakhmanov, Dilmurod Sayid, 
and Akzam Turgunov, and urges the Secretary of State to seek 
their release.

                                TITLE V

                        MULTILATERAL ASSISTANCE

                  Funds Appropriated to the President

                INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $344,020,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     303,439,000
Committee recommendation................................     351,000,000

    The Committee recommends $351,000,000 for International 
Organizations and Programs.
    Organization of American States.--The Committee recognizes 
the essential role of the IACHR in providing justice for 
victims of human rights violations and protecting fundamental 
freedoms in many Latin American countries whose justice systems 
are weak and influenced by corruption. The Committee recommends 
$2,000,000 for a U.S. voluntary contribution to the IACHR, of 
which not less than $500,000 is for the Office of the Special 
Rapporteur for Freedom of Expression. The Committee remains 
concerned with actions by several governments in the region to 
persecute independent journalists and curtail freedom of the 
press, and supports efforts of the Special Rapporteur to defend 
the rights of journalists.
    United Nations.--The Committee directs the Secretary of 
State to continue to post U.S. voluntary contributions under 
this heading which are provided to the United Nations and its 
affiliated agencies on the Department of State's Web site in a 
timely manner.
    The Committee recommends $5,830,000 for a U.S. voluntary 
contribution to the UNHCHR, including to support UNHCHR offices 
in Honduras, Colombia, and Mexico.
    The Committee recommends up to $700,000 for the World 
Heritage Fund.
    The Committee encourages the FAO to work with land grant 
institutions of higher learning in the United States to meet 
global food security challenges, including through aquatic food 
production.
    The Committee is concerned that the census conducted in 
Burma, which was developed and implemented with assistance from 
UNFPA, exacerbated ethnic tensions and violence, particularly 
within Rohingya populations. The Committee notes that no U.S. 
funds were used for the census.
    Funds in this account are allocated according to the 
following table and are subject to the provisions of section 
7019 of this act:

                INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND PROGRAMS
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                        Programs                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
International Civil Aviation Organization...............             800
International Conservation Programs.....................           7,900
International Development Law Organization..............             600
International Maritime Organization.....................             360
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change/U.N. Framework          11,700
 Convention on Climate Change...........................
International Chemicals and Toxin Programs..............           3,610
Montreal Protocol Multilateral Fund.....................          25,500
OAS Development Assistance Programs.....................           3,000
OAS Fund for Strengthening Democracy....................           4,500
Inter-American Commission on Human Rights...............           2,000
Regional Cooperation Agreement on Combating Piracy and                50
 Armed Robbery Against Ships in Asia....................
U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs           3,000
U.N. Voluntary Fund for Technical Cooperation in the               1,250
 Field of Human Rights..................................
U.N. Women..............................................           7,500
U.N. Human Settlements Program..........................           1,400
U.N. Capital Development Fund...........................             900
U.N. Democracy Fund.....................................           4,200
U.N. Development Program................................          80,000
U.N. Environment Program................................           7,550
World Heritage Fund.....................................             700
U.N. Children's Fund....................................         132,000
U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights.................           5,830
U.N. Population Fund....................................          37,500
U.N. Voluntary Fund for Victims of Torture..............           6,500
World Meteorological Organization.......................           1,650
World Trade Organization Technical Assistance...........           1,000
                                                         ---------------
      Total, International Organizations and Programs...         351,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                  INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $2,616,729,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   2,885,504,159
Committee recommendation................................   2,854,754,000
    Enduring operations.................................   2,849,754,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................       5,000,000

    The Committee recommends $2,849,754,000 for contributions 
to the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development 
[IBRD], the International Development Association [IDA] and the 
IDA Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative [MDRI], the Global 
Environment Facility, the Clean Technology Fund, the Strategic 
Climate Fund, the Inter-American Development Bank, the 
Multilateral Investment Fund [MIF], the Asian Development Bank 
[ADB], the Asian Development Fund [ADF], the African 
Development Bank [AfDB], the African Development Fund [AfDF] 
and the AfDF Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative, the 
International Fund for Agricultural Development [IFAD], and the 
International Monetary Fund [IMF]. An additional $5,000,000 in 
title VIII under this heading is designated for OCO.
    The President's budget request did not include funding for 
the Global Agriculture and Food Security Program [GAFSP]. The 
Committee does not recommend additional funds for GAFSP as 
sufficient funds made available in prior appropriations acts 
exist to meet the U.S. pledge.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of the Treasury to 
inform the Committee in a timely manner of any proposal for 
financing by any such IFI for infrastructure projects or other 
activities that would cause irreparable harm to the 
environment, forced displacement of local people, or other 
violations of human rights.
    The Secretary of the Treasury shall apply sections 7029(c) 
and (d) of division K of Public Law 113-76 to funds made 
available under this title, as appropriate.

                      GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT FACILITY

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $143,750,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     136,563,000
Committee recommendation................................     136,563,000

    The Committee recommends $136,563,000 for the Global 
Environment Facility.

                            TRANSITION FUND

Appropriations, 2014....................................................
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      $5,000,000
Committee recommendation................................       5,000,000
    Enduring operations.................................................
    Overseas contingency operations.....................       5,000,000

    The Committee does not recommend $5,000,000 for Transition 
Fund, a multi-donor trust fund established to assist Arab 
countries in transition, including Egypt, Tunisia, Jordan, 
Morocco, Libya, and Yemen, in this title as requested. The 
Committee recommends $5,000,000 in title VIII under Transition 
Fund for these purposes.

       CONTRIBUTION TO THE INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $1,355,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   1,290,600,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,285,000,000

                  MULTILATERAL DEBT RELIEF INITIATIVE

Appropriations, 2014....................................................
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     $78,900,000
Committee recommendation................................      78,900,000

    The Committee recommends $1,285,000,000 for Contribution to 
the International Development Association, for the first of 
three annual payments to the 17th replenishment of IDA [IDA-
17]. In addition, the Committee recommends $78,900,000 for 
payment to the Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative.
    The Committee notes that the World Bank is reviewing its 
environmental and social safeguard policies. The Committee 
supports mandatory, enforceable requirements to maximize 
development results, and the Committee will continue to assess 
the Bank's progress in adopting effective safeguard policies. 
Such policies should require for all Bank actions (including 
policy and program based lending, borrower systems, country 
assistance strategies, and public-private partnerships) public 
availability of an assessment of environmental, social and 
human rights impacts at least 120 days prior to Board 
consideration of any proposed action which could have a 
significant environmental, social or human rights impact.
    The Committee is concerned with the impact of Bank actions 
on persons with disabilities, and notes that the World Bank's 
current safeguard policies do not expressly address the special 
needs of persons with disabilities and children at risk of 
exploitative labor. The Committee directs the Secretary of the 
Treasury to seek protections to prevent children from being 
exploited economically and to promote access for persons with 
disabilities during the Bank's safeguard policy review.

     CONTRIBUTION TO THE INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND 
                              DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $186,957,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     192,920,689
Committee recommendation................................     192,920,689

    The Committee recommends $192,920,689 for Contribution to 
the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, 
$117,420,689 for the fourth of five installments to the World 
Bank's General Capital Increase [GCI] and $3,700,000 toward the 
prior GCI installment for arrears, which fund the IBRD, 
$69,600,000 for the third of four payments to the World Bank's 
selective capital increase [SCI], and $2,200,000 toward the 
prior SCI installment for arrears.

              LIMITATION ON CALLABLE CAPITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS

    The Committee recommends a limitation on the amount that 
the U.S. Governor of the IBRD may subscribe to the callable 
portion of the U.S. share of the GCI in an amount not to exceed 
$2,928,990,899 in fiscal year 2015.

               CONTRIBUTION TO THE CLEAN TECHNOLOGY FUND

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $184,630,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     201,253,000
Committee recommendation................................     201,253,000

    The Committee recommends $201,253,000 for Contribution to 
the Clean Technology Fund.

               CONTRIBUTION TO THE STRATEGIC CLIMATE FUND

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $49,900,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      63,184,000
Committee recommendation................................      63,184,000

    The Committee recommends $63,184,000 for Contribution to 
the Strategic Climate Fund.

          CONTRIBUTION TO THE INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $102,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     102,020,448
Committee recommendation................................     102,020,448

    The Committee recommends $102,020,448 for Contribution to 
the Inter-American Development Bank, which is for the fourth of 
five U.S. paid-in capital contributions to the IDB's ninth GCI.

              LIMITATION ON CALLABLE CAPITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS

    The Committee recommends a limitation on the amount that 
the U.S. Governor of the IDB may subscribe to the callable 
portion of the U.S. share of the ninth GCI in an amount not to 
exceed $4,098,794,833 in fiscal year 2015.

CONTRIBUTION TO THE ENTERPRISE FOR THE AMERICAS MULTILATERAL INVESTMENT 
                                  FUND

Appropriations, 2014....................................      $6,298,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................................
Committee recommendation................................      10,000,000

    The Committee recommends $10,000,000 for Contribution to 
the Enterprise for the Americas Multilateral Investment Fund. 
The Committee supports the MIF and its track record of 
assisting low-income populations in Latin America and the 
Caribbean through grants and debt and equity financing, and is 
concerned that the proposed restructuring of the MIF may 
diminish its effectiveness. The Committee recommends 
$10,000,000 to continue to pay down the $29,200,000 in arrears 
owed by the United States to the MIF, subject to prior 
consultation with the Committees on Appropriations.

               CONTRIBUTION TO THE ASIAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $106,586,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     112,194,435
Committee recommendation................................     112,194,435

    The Committee recommends $112,194,435 for Contribution to 
the Asian Development Bank, $106,594,435 for the last of five 
scheduled U.S. paid-in capital contributions to the ADB's fifth 
GCI and $5,600,000 for arrears from prior year commitments.

              LIMITATION ON CALLABLE CAPITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS

    The Committee recommends a limitation on the amount that 
the U.S. Governor of the ADB may subscribe to the callable 
portion of the U.S. share of the GCI-V in an amount not to 
exceed $2,558,048,769 in fiscal year 2015.

               CONTRIBUTION TO THE ASIAN DEVELOPMENT FUND

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $109,854,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     115,250,000
Committee recommendation................................     100,100,000

    The Committee recommends $100,100,000 for Contribution to 
the Asian Development Fund, $89,900,000 for the first of four 
contributions under the 10th replenishment of the ADF [AsDF-XI] 
and $10,200,000 for arrears from prior year commitments.

              CONTRIBUTION TO THE AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $32,418,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      34,118,587
Committee recommendation................................      34,118,587

    The Committee recommends $34,118,587 for Contribution to 
the African Development Bank, $32,418,587 for the fourth of 
eight installments of the U.S. paid-in capital subscription to 
the AfDB's sixth GCI and $1,700,000 to repurchase shares that 
were forfeited due to the payment shortfall in fiscal year 
2013.

              LIMITATION ON CALLABLE CAPITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS

    The Committee recommends a limitation on the amount that 
the U.S. Governor of the AfDB may subscribe to the callable 
portion of the U.S. share of the sixth GCI in an amount not to 
exceed $507,860,808 in fiscal year 2015.

              CONTRIBUTION TO THE AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FUND

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $176,336,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     195,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     175,000,000

                  MULTILATERAL DEBT RELIEF INITIATIVE

Appropriations, 2014....................................................
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     $13,500,000
Committee recommendation................................      13,500,000

    The Committee recommends $175,000,000 for Contribution to 
the African Development Fund, for the first of three 
installments to the 13th replenishment of the AfDF [AfDF-13]. 
In addition, the Committee recommends $13,500,000 for payment 
to the MDRI.

  CONTRIBUTION TO THE INTERNATIONAL FUND FOR AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $30,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      30,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      30,000,000

    The Committee recommends $30,000,000 for Contribution to 
the International Fund for Agricultural Development for the 
third of three installments for the ninth replenishment of 
IFAD.

                    INTERNATIONAL MONETARY PROGRAMS

            UNITED STATES QUOTA, INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND

Appropriations, 2014....................................................
Budget estimate, 2015...................................    $315,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     315,000,000

                  LOANS TO INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND

                    (INCLUDING RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2014....................................................
Budget estimate, 2015\1\................................ -$1,261,000,000
Committee recommendation\1\.............................  -1,261,000,000

\1\Rescinds funding appropriated in the Supplemental Appropriations Act 
of 2009 (Public Law 111-32).

    The Committee recommends $315,000,000 to increase the U.S. 
quota at the International Monetary Fund by 40,871,800,000 
Special Drawing Rights [SDRs], and rescinds $1,261,000,000 from 
funds appropriated in Public Law 111-32 to reduce the U.S. 
participation in the New Arrangements to Borrow [NAB] by an 
equal amount of SDRs. The Committee notes that the increase in 
SDRs in the U.S. quota to the IMF and the simultaneous decrease 
in SDRs in the U.S. contribution to the NAB will not change the 
overall U.S. commitment to the IMF.
    Section 7071(d) of this act authorizes the decrease in SDRs 
in the U.S. participation in the NAB, the United States to 
accept an amendment to the IMF Articles of Agreement that will 
change the composition of the IMF Executive Board while 
preserving the U.S. seat on the Board, and the increase in SDRs 
to the U.S. quota.

                                TITLE VI

                    EXPORT AND INVESTMENT ASSISTANCE

                Export-Import Bank of the United States

                           INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2014....................................      $5,100,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................       5,750,000
Committee recommendation................................       5,750,000

                        ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $115,500,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     117,650,000
Committee recommendation................................     107,500,000

    The Committee recommends $5,750,000 for the Inspector 
General and $107,500,000 for administrative expenses for the 
Ex-Im Bank, of which $2,000,000 is to increase Ex-Im Bank's 
underwriting staff to support small business financing, export 
expansion to Sub-Saharan Africa, and Power Africa, and not less 
than $2,000,000 is to further improve Ex-Im Bank's risk 
management process.
    The act includes a provision directing that not less than 
$23,000,000 of the funds made available under this heading in 
this act be used to support personnel and other costs directly 
related to small business transactions.

                Overseas Private Investment Corporation

                           NONCREDIT ACCOUNT

                        ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $62,574,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      71,800,000
Committee recommendation................................      63,000,000

                            PROGRAM ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $27,371,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      25,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      25,000,000

    The Committee recommends $63,000,000 for administrative 
expenses and $25,000,000 for program account for the subsidy 
costs of direct and guaranteed loans for OPIC.
    The Committee supports the implementation of a memorandum 
of understanding between OPIC and the USAID OIG, and directs 
the OPIC president to implement a fiscal year 2015 agreement, 
including an inspection/audit plan, as authorized, and allocate 
adequate funding to support the mutually agreed upon plan in 
fiscal year 2015 to reimburse the USAID OIG for costs related 
to oversight and audit functions.
    The Committee encourages OPIC to consult with relevant 
Federal agencies and civil society organizations on the 
advisability of adopting an investment policy that supports the 
export of nuclear energy products and services, while 
safeguarding nuclear materials, to countries that are 
developing or expanding their nuclear energy program. U.S. 
participation in global nuclear development could enhance 
nuclear powerplant safety and reliability, increase influence 
over nuclear nonproliferation policy, and create American jobs. 
The Committee recognizes, however, that such an investment 
policy would raise serious nonproliferation issues needing 
thorough consideration, as many countries lack the ability to 
safeguard nuclear material.
    The Committee encourages OPIC to use its existing budget 
and statutory authorities to support small businesses and 
cooperatives in connection with OPIC's overseas cooperative 
development programs. Such programs should include food 
security, credit, housing, agribusiness, technology transfer, 
rural telecommunications and electrification, private 
enterprise development, and healthcare.
    The Committee recommends that of the funds available to 
finance and insure energy projects in sub-Saharan Africa, not 
less than 50 percent be allocated to support localized, 
distributive, grid connected and off-grid electricity 
generation programs. The Committee recognizes that renewable 
energy is important to increasing energy access in sub-Saharan 
Africa, particularly in rural communities and in urban areas 
where renewable energy can serve as a bridge to, or component 
of, on-grid power solutions, and directs OPIC to maintain its 
commitment to renewable energy projects at 2013 levels or 
greater.

                      TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT AGENCY

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $55,073,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      67,700,000
Committee recommendation................................      60,000,000

    The Committee recommends $60,000,000 for the Trade and 
Development Agency.

                               TITLE VII

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 7001. Allowances and Differentials
    Sec. 7002. Unobligated Balances Report
    Sec. 7003. Consulting Services
    Sec. 7004. Diplomatic Facilities
    Sec. 7005. Personnel Actions
    Sec. 7006. Local Guard Contracts
    Sec. 7007. Prohibition Against Direct Funding for Certain 
Countries
    Sec. 7008. Coups d'Etat
    Sec. 7009. Transfer Authority
    Sec. 7010. Military Assistance Reports
    Sec. 7011. Availability of Funds
    Sec. 7012. Limitation on Assistance to Countries in Default
    Sec. 7013. Prohibition on Taxation of United States 
Assistance
    Sec. 7014. Reservations of Funds
    Sec. 7015. Notification Requirements
    Sec. 7016. Notification on Excess Defense Equipment
    Sec. 7017. Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
International Organizations and Programs
    Sec. 7018. Prohibition on Funding for Abortions and 
Involuntary Sterilization
    Sec. 7019. Allocations
    Sec. 7020. Representation and Entertainment Expenses
    Sec. 7021. Prohibition on Assistance to Governments 
Supporting International Terrorism
    Sec. 7022. Authorization Requirements
    Sec. 7023. Definition of Program, Project, and Activity
    Sec. 7024. Authorities for the Peace Corps, Inter-American 
Foundation and United States African Development Foundation
    Sec. 7025. Commerce, Trade and Surplus Commodities
    Sec. 7026. Separate Accounts
    Sec. 7027. Eligibility for Assistance
    Sec. 7028. Local Competition
    Sec. 7029. International Financial Institutions
    Sec. 7030. Debt-for-Development
    Sec. 7031. Financial Management and Budget Transparency
    Sec. 7032. Democracy Programs
    Sec. 7033. Multi-Year Pledges
    Sec. 7034. Special Provisions
    Sec. 7035. Arab League Boycott of Israel
    Sec. 7036. Palestinian Statehood
    Sec. 7037. Restrictions Concerning the Palestinian 
Authority
    Sec. 7038. Prohibition on Assistance to the Palestinian 
Broadcasting Corporation
    Sec. 7039. Assistance for the West Bank and Gaza
    Sec. 7040. Limitation on Assistance for the Palestinian 
Authority
    Sec. 7041. Middle East and North Africa
    Sec. 7042. Africa
    Sec. 7043. East Asia and the Pacific
    Sec. 7044. South and Central Asia
    Sec. 7045. Western Hemisphere
    Sec. 7046. Prohibition of Payments to United Nations 
Members
    Sec. 7047. War Crimes Tribunals
    Sec. 7048. United Nations
    Sec. 7049. Community-based Police Assistance
    Sec. 7050. Global Internet Freedom
    Sec. 7051. International Conferences
    Sec. 7052. Aircraft Transfers and Coordination
    Sec. 7053. Parking Fines and Real Property Taxes Owed By 
Foreign Governments
    Sec. 7054. Landmines and Cluster Munitions
    Sec. 7055. Prohibition on Publicity or Propaganda
    Sec. 7056. Limitation of Residence Expenses
    Sec. 7057. United States Agency for International 
Development Management
    Sec. 7058. Global Health Activities
    Sec. 7059. Gender Equality
    Sec. 7060. Sector Allocations
    Sec. 7061. Uzbekistan
    Sec. 7062. Requests for Documents
    Sec. 7063. United Nations Population Fund
    Sec. 7064. Budget Documents
    Sec. 7065. International Prison Conditions
    Sec. 7066. Prohibition on Use of Torture
    Sec. 7067. Extradition
    Sec. 7068. Commercial Leasing of Defense Articles
    Sec. 7069. Independent States of the Former Soviet Union
    Sec. 7070. Russia
    Sec. 7071. International Monetary Fund
    Sec. 7072. Prohibition on First Class Travel
    Sec. 7073. Public Posting of Report
    Sec. 7074. Assistance for United States Citizens and 
Nationals Wrongly Detained Abroad
    Sec. 7075. Arms Trade Treaty
    Sec. 7076. Overseas Private Investment Corporation
    Sec. 7077. Special Defense Acquisition Fund
    Sec. 7078. Use of Funds in Contravention of this Act
    Sec. 7079. Disability Programs
    Sec. 7080. Impact on Jobs in the United States
    Sec. 7081. Authority for Replenishments
    Sec. 7082. Rescission of Funds
    Sec. 7083. Border Crossing Card Fee for Minors
    Sec. 7084. Small Grants Program
    Sec. 7085. Consular Notification Compliance
    Sec. 7086. Fulbright University Vietnam
    Sec. 7087. Assistance for Foreign Nongovernmental 
Organizations

                               TITLE VIII

                    OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS

    The Committee recommends a total of $8,625,000,000 for OCO 
for the Department of State, USAID, and related agency and 
programs.

                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE

                   Administration of Foreign Affairs

                    DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends $1,350,803,000 for Diplomatic and 
Consular Programs, of which $989,706,000 is for Worldwide 
Security Protection, including for security costs in Iraq. The 
amount provided is for the extraordinary costs of operations in 
Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq, and areas of unrest, and is 
designated for OCO.
    The Committee directs that the spend plan required by 
section 7064 of this act include a detailed description of 
designated amounts by category, breakout costs of operations by 
location, and staffing levels for each location and provincial 
area, where applicable. In addition, with respect to funds 
transferred to other agencies in support of Afghanistan 
operations, the spend plan should include projected transfer 
amounts and the number of staff supported by each agency.

                   CONFLICT STABILIZATION OPERATIONS

    The Committee recommends $15,000,000 for Conflict 
Stabilization Operations for deployment costs, including to 
Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Syria, and is designated for OCO.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends $56,900,000 for Office of 
Inspector General, which is for SIGAR for the extraordinary 
costs of program oversight in Afghanistan, and is designated 
for OCO.
    Section 7064 of this act requires the relevant department, 
agency, or organization to submit to the Committee a spend plan 
for funds appropriated in titles I and II of this act. The 
Committee expects SIGAR to submit such plan not later than 30 
days after enactment of this act.

            EMBASSY SECURITY, CONSTRUCTION, AND MAINTENANCE

    The Committee recommends $260,800,000 for Embassy Security, 
Construction, and Maintenance which is equal to the budget 
request, and is designated for OCO.

                    PEACEKEEPING RESPONSE MECHANISM

    The Committee does not recommend $150,000,000 requested by 
the President for Peacekeeping Response Mechanism. However, the 
Committee recommends additional funding for CCF under this 
title and provides transfer authority to address increasing and 
unanticipated peacekeeping requirements.

                      International Organizations

              CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

    The Committee recommends $74,400,000 for Contributions to 
International Organizations for the extraordinary costs of 
operations in Afghanistan and Iraq, and is designated for OCO.

           UNITED STATES AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

                  Funds Appropriated to the President

                           OPERATING EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $171,585,000 for Operating 
Expenses for the extraordinary costs of operations in 
Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iraq and is designated for OCO.

                     BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

                  Funds Appropriated to the President

                   INTERNATIONAL DISASTER ASSISTANCE

    The Committee recommends $1,235,000,000 for International 
Disaster Assistance for the extraordinary costs of the U.S. 
response to humanitarian crises resulting from conflict, 
including in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, 
Jordan, Yemen, and countries in Africa, and is designated for 
OCO.

                          COMPLEX CRISES FUND

    The Committee recommends $217,882,000 for Complex Crises 
Fund for the extraordinary costs of responding to humanitarian 
and security crises and political transitions globally, 
including in the Middle East and North Africa, and Central 
America, and is designated for OCO. Section 8003 of this act 
provides authority to transfer such funds to, and merge with, 
funds under the PKO and CIPA headings under this title.

                         ECONOMIC SUPPORT FUND

    The Committee recommends $1,660,000,000 for Economic 
Support Fund for the extraordinary costs of operations in 
Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq, Jordan, Syria, and Central 
America, and is designated for OCO.

                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE

                    Migration and Refugee Assistance

    The Committee recommends $1,912,000,000 for Migration and 
Refugee Assistance for the extraordinary costs of the U.S. 
response to humanitarian crises, including in the Middle East, 
South Asia, and Africa, and is designated for OCO.

                   INTERNATIONAL SECURITY ASSISTANCE

                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE

        CONTRIBUTIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACEKEEPING ACTIVITIES

    The Committee recommends $556,010,000 for Contributions for 
International Peacekeeping Activities for the extraordinary 
costs of peacekeeping operations in Somalia, Central African 
Republic, and Mali, and is designated for OCO.

          International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

    The Committee recommends $292,000,000 for International 
Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement for the extraordinary 
costs of contingency operations, including in Afghanistan, 
Pakistan, Iraq, Syria, the Middle East, Africa, Central 
America, and for counterterrorism programs, and is designated 
for OCO.

    Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining and Related Programs

    The Committee recommends $85,225,000 for Nonproliferation, 
Anti-terrorism, Demining, and Related Programs for the 
extraordinary costs of contingency operations, including in 
Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq, Syria, and for counterterrorism 
programs, and is designated for OCO.

                        Peacekeeping Operations

    The Committee recommends $225,395,000 for Peacekeeping 
Operations for the extraordinary costs of contingency 
operations in Somalia, peacekeeping operations in Mali, Central 
African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo, South Sudan, 
and for the Trans-Sahara Counterterrorism Partnership, and is 
designated for OCO.

                  Funds Appropriated to the President

                   FOREIGN MILITARY FINANCING PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends $507,000,000 for the Foreign 
Military Financing Program for the extraordinary costs of 
contingency operations in Pakistan and Iraq, and is designated 
for OCO.

                        MULTILATERAL ASSISTANCE

                  Funds Appropriated to the President

                  International Financial Institutions

                            TRANSITION FUND

    The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for Transition Fund, a 
new multi-donor trust fund for extraordinary costs to assist 
Arab countries in transition, including Egypt, Tunisia, Jordan, 
Morocco, Libya, and Yemen.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 8001. Additional Appropriations.
    Sec. 8002. Extension of Authorities and Conditions.
    Sec. 8003 Transfer Authority. Subsection (b)(2) authorizes 
transfer of not more than $25,000,000 from INCLE, PKO, and FMF 
to the Global Security Contingency Fund.

  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Rule XVI, paragraph 7 requires that every report on a 
general appropriation bill filed by the Committee must identify 
each recommended amendment, with particularity, which proposes 
an item of appropriation which is not made to carry out the 
provisions of an existing law, a treaty stipulation, or an act 
or resolution previously passed by the Senate during that 
session.
    The Committee is filing an original bill, which is not 
covered under this rule, but reports this information in the 
spirit of full disclosure.
    Items providing funding for fiscal year 2015 which lack 
authorization are as follows:
    Administration of Foreign Affairs;
    International Organizations;
    International Commissions;
    Department of State and Related Programs;
    Broadcasting Board of Governors;
    USAID Operating Expenses;
    USAID Operating Expenses, Office of Inspector General;
    USAID Capital Investment Fund;
    Global Health Programs;
    Development Assistance;
    International Disaster Assistance;
    Transition Initiatives;
    Development Credit Authority;
    Economic Support Fund;
    Assistance for Europe, Eurasia, and Central Asia;
    Inter-American Foundation;
    African Development Foundation;
    Peace Corps;
    Millennium Challenge Corporation;
    Democracy Fund;
    International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement;
    Migration and Refugee Assistance;
    Complex Foreign Crises Fund;
    Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining and Related 
Assistance;
    International Affairs Technical Assistance;
    Debt Restructuring;
    International Military Education and Training;
    Foreign Military Financing Program;
    Peacekeeping Operations;
    International Organizations and Programs;
    Clean Technology Fund;
    Strategic Climate Fund; and
    Global Security Contingency Fund.

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(c), RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, on June 19, 2014, 
the Committee ordered favorably reported an original bill (S. 
2499) making appropriations for the Department of State, 
foreign operations, and related programs for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2015, and for other purposes, provided 
that the bill be subject to amendment and that the bill be 
consistent with the subcommittee funding guidance, by a 
recorded vote of 25-5, a quorum being present. The vote was as 
follows:
        Yeas                          Nays
Chairwoman Mikulski                 Mr. Shelby
Mr. Leahy                           Mr. Cochran
Mr. Harkin                          Mr. McConnell
Mrs. Murray                         Mr. Alexander
Mrs. Feinstein                      Mr. Hoeven
Mr. Durbin
Mr. Johnson (SD)
Ms. Landrieu
Mr. Reed
Mr. Pryor
Mr. Tester
Mr. Udall
Mrs. Shaheen
Mr. Merkley
Mr. Begich
Mr. Coons
Ms. Collins
Ms. Murkowski
Mr. Graham
Mr. Kirk
Mr. Coats
Mr. Blunt
Mr. Moran
Mr. Johanns
Mr. Boozman

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of rule XXVI requires that the Committee 
report on a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any 
statute or part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the 
statute or part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and 
(b) a comparative print of that part of the bill or joint 
resolution making the amendment and of the statute or part 
thereof proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through 
type and italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate 
typographical devices the omissions and insertions which would 
be made by the bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form 
recommended by the Committee.''
    In compliance with this rule, the following changes in 
existing law proposed to be made by the bill are shown as 
follows: existing law to be omitted is enclosed in black 
brackets, new matter is printed in italic, and existing law in 
which no change is proposed is shown in roman.

              TITLE 22--FOREIGN RELATIONS AND INTERCOURSE


           CHAPTER 7--INTERNATIONAL BUREAUS, CONGRESSES, ETC.


         Subchapter XIII--International Development Association


Sec. 284x. Sixteenth replenishment

    (a) The United States Governor of the International 
Development Association is authorized to contribute on behalf 
of the United States $4,075,500,000 to the sixteenth 
replenishment of the resources of the Association, subject to 
obtaining the necessary appropriations.
    (b) In order to pay for the United States contribution 
provided for in subsection (a), there are authorized to be 
appropriated, without fiscal year limitation, $4,075,500,000 
for payment by the Secretary of the Treasury.

SEC. 28. SEVENTEENTH REPLENISHMENT.

    (a) The United States Governor of the International 
Development Association is authorized to contribute on behalf 
of the United States $3,871,800,000 to the seventeenth 
replenishment of the resources of the Association, subject to 
obtaining the necessary appropriations.
    (b) In order to pay for the United States contribution 
provided for in subsection (a), there are authorized to be 
appropriated, without fiscal year limitation, $3,871,800,000 
for payment by the Secretary of the Treasury.

SEC. 29. MULTILATERAL DEBT RELIEF.

    (a) The Secretary of the Treasury is authorized to 
contribute, on behalf of the United States, not more than 
$565,020,000 to the International Development Association for 
the purpose of funding debt relief costs under the Multilateral 
Debt Relief Initiative incurred in the period governed by the 
seventeenth replenishment of resources of the International 
Development Association, subject to obtaining the necessary 
appropriations and without prejudice to any funding 
arrangements in existence on the date of the enactment of this 
section.
    (b) In order to pay for the United States contribution 
provided for in subsection (a), there are authorized to be 
appropriated, without fiscal year limitation, not more than 
$565,020,000 for payment by the Secretary of the Treasury.
    (c) In this section, the term ``Multilateral Debt Relief 
Initiative' means the proposal set out in the G8 Finance 
Ministers'' Communique entitled ``Conclusions on Development,'' 
done at London, June 11, 2005, and reaffirmed by G8 Heads of 
State at the Gleneagles Summit on July 8, 2005.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                 Subchapter XIV--Asian Development Bank


Sec. 285dd. Ninth replenishment

    (a) The United States Governor of the Bank is authorized to 
contribute, on behalf of the United States, $461,000,000 to the 
ninth replenishment of the resources of the Fund, subject to 
obtaining the necessary appropriations.
    (b) In order to pay for the United States contribution 
provided for in subsection (a), there are authorized to be 
appropriated, without fiscal year limitation, $461,000,000 for 
payment by the Secretary of the Treasury.

SEC. 35. TENTH REPLENISHMENT.

    (a) The United States Governor of the Bank is authorized to 
contribute, on behalf of the United States, $359,600,000 to the 
tenth replenishment of the resources of the Fund, subject to 
obtaining the necessary appropriations.
    (b) In order to pay for the United States contribution 
provided for in subsection (a), there are authorized to be 
appropriated, without fiscal year limitation, $359,600,000 for 
payment by the Secretary of the Treasury.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Subchapter XV--International Monetary Fund and Bank for Reconstruction 
                            and Development

Sec. 286e-2. Loans to Fund

(a) Limitations

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

(b) Authorization of appropriations; repayments available for 
            loans to Fund

    (1) For the purpose of making loans to the International 
Monetary Fund pursuant to subsection (a)(1) of this section, 
there is authorized to be appropriated 6,712,000,000 Special 
Drawing Rights, except that prior to activation, the Secretary 
of the Treasury shall certify whether supplementary resources 
are needed to forestall or cope with an impairment of the 
international monetary system and that the Fund has fully 
explored other means of funding, to remain available until 
expended to meet calls by the International Monetary Fund. Any 
payments made to the United States by the International 
Monetary Fund as a repayment on account of the principal of a 
loan made under this section shall continue to be available for 
loans to the International Monetary Fund only to the extent 
that such amounts are not subject to cancellation.
    (2) For the purpose of making loans to the International 
Monetary Fund pursuant to subsection (a)(2) of this section, 
there is hereby authorized to be appropriated not to exceed the 
dollar equivalent of 75,000,000,000 Special Drawing Rights, in 
addition to any amounts previously authorized under this 
section, except that prior to activation, the Secretary of the 
Treasury shall report to Congress on whether supplementary 
resources are needed to forestall or cope with an impairment of 
the international monetary system and whether the Fund has 
fully explored other means of funding, to remain available 
until expended to meet calls by the Fund. Any payments made to 
the United States by the Fund as a repayment on account of the 
principal of a loan made under this section shall continue to 
be available for loans to the Fundonly to the extent that such 
amounts are not subject to cancellation.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Sec. 286vv. Capital stock increases

(a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

(b) * * *
    (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (4) Of the amount authorized to be appropriated under 
paragraph (3), $278,370,088 shall be for paid in shares of the 
Bank, and $4,361,131,378 shall be for callable shares of the 
Bank.

SEC. 71. ACCEPTANCE OF AMENDMENTS TO THE ARTICLES OF AGREEMENT OF THE 
                    FUND.

    The United States Governor of the Fund may accept the 
amendments to the Articles of Agreement of the Fund as proposed 
in resolution 66-2 of the Board of Governors of the Fund.

SEC. 72. QUOTA INCREASE.

    (a) In General.--The United States Governor of the Fund may 
consent to an increase in the quota of the United States in the 
Fund equivalent to 40,871,800,000 Special Drawing Rights.
    (b) Subject to Appropriations.--The authority provided by 
subsection (a) shall be effective only to such extent or in 
such amounts as are provided in advance in appropriations Acts.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                Subchapter XX--World Health Organization


Sec. 290g-20. Twelfth replenishment

    (a) The United States Governor of the Fund is authorized to 
contribute on behalf of the United States $585,000,000 to the 
twelfth replenishment of the resources of the Fund, subject to 
obtaining the necessary appropriations.
    (b) In order to pay for the United States contribution 
provided for in subsection (a), there are authorized to be 
appropriated, without fiscal year limitation, $585,000,000 for 
payment by the Secretary of the Treasury.

SEC. 223. THIRTEENTH REPLENISHMENT.

    (a) The United States Governor of the Fund is authorized to 
contribute on behalf of the United States $585,000,000 to the 
thirteenth replenishment of the resources of the Fund, subject 
to obtaining the necessary appropriations.
    (b) In order to pay for the United States contribution 
provided for in subsection (a), there are authorized to be 
appropriated, without fiscal year limitation, $585,000,000 for 
payment by the Secretary of the Treasury.

SEC. 224. MULTILATERAL DEBT RELIEF.

    (a) The Secretary of the Treasury is authorized to 
contribute, on behalf of the United States, not more than 
$54,620,000 to the African Development Fund for the purpose of 
funding debt relief costs under the Multilateral Debt Relief 
Initiative incurred in the period governed by the thirteenth 
replenishment of resources of the African Development Fund, 
subject to obtaining the necessary appropriations and without 
prejudice to any funding arrangements in existence on the date 
of the enactment of this section.
    (b) In order to pay for the United States contribution 
provided for in subsection (a), there are authorized to be 
appropriated, without fiscal year limitation, not more than 
$54,620,000 for payment by the Secretary of the Treasury.
    (c) In this section, the term ``Multilateral Debt Relief 
Initiative'' means the proposal set out in the G8 Finance 
Ministers' Communique entitled ``Conclusions on Development,'' 
done at London, June 11, 2005, and reaffirmed by G8 Heads of 
State at the Gleneagles Summit on July 8, 2005.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                     CHAPTER 32--FOREIGN ASSISTANCE


                Subchapter I--International Development


  PART I--DECLARATION OF POLICY; DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE AUTHORIZATIONS

Sec. 2151b-4. Assistance to combat malaria

(a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

(d) Coordination
    In carrying out this section, the President shall 
coordinate with the World Health Organization, the Global Fund 
to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria, the Department of 
Health and Human Services (the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention and the National Institutes of Health), and other 
organizations with respect to the development and 
implementation of a comprehensive malaria control program.

SEC. 104D. ELIGIBILITY FOR ASSISTANCE.

    Notwithstanding any other provision of law, regulation, or 
policy, in determining eligibility for assistance authorized 
under sections 104, 104A, 104B, and 104C--
            (1) a foreign nongovernmental organization shall 
        not be ineligible for such assistance solely on the 
        basis of health or medical services, including 
        counseling and referral services, provided by such 
        organization with non-United States Government funds if 
        such services are permitted in the country in which 
        they are being provided and would not violate United 
        States law if provided in the United States; and
            (2) a foreign nongovernmental organization shall 
        not be subject to requirements relating to the use of 
        non-United States Government funds for advocacy and 
        lobbying activities other than those that apply to 
        United States nongovernmental organizations receiving 
        assistance under this part.
                                ------                                


      FOREIGN OPERATIONS, EXPORT FINANCING, AND RELATED PROGRAMS 
              APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 1990, PUBLIC LAW 101-167


       ESTABLISHING CATEGORIES OF ALIENS FOR PURPOSES OF REFUGEE 
                             DETERMINATIONS

    Sec. 599D. (a) In General.-- * * *
    (b) Establishment of Categories.--
            (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (3) Within the number of admissions of refugees 
        allocated for each of fiscal years 1990, 1991, and 1992 
        for refugees who are nationals of the Soviet Union 
        under section 207(a)(3) of the Immigration and 
        Nationality Act and within the number of such 
        admissions allocated for each of fiscal years 1993, 
        1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 
        2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 [and 
        2014] 2014, and 2015 for refugees who are nationals of 
        the independent states of the former Soviet Union, 
        Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania under such section, 
        notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
        President shall allocate one thousand of such 
        admissions for such fiscal year to refugees who are 
        within the category of aliens described in paragraph 
        (2)(B).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (e) Period of Application.--
            (1) Subsections (a) and (b) shall take effect on 
        the date of the enactment of this Act [Nov. 21, 1989] 
        and shall only apply to applications for refugee status 
        submitted before June 1, [2014] 2015.
            (2) Subsection (c) shall apply to decisions made 
        after the date of the enactment of this Act and before 
        June 1, [2014] 2015.
            (3) Subsection (d) shall take effect on the date of 
        the enactment of this Act and shall only apply to 
        reapplications for refugee status submitted before June 
        1, [2014] 2015.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


    ADJUSTMENT OF STATUS FOR CERTAIN SOVIET AND INDOCHINESE PAROLEES

    Sec. 599E. (a) In General.-- * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (b) Aliens Eligible for Adjustment of Status.--The benefits 
provided in subsection (a) shall only apply to an alien who--
            (1) * * *
            (2) was inspected and granted parole into the 
        United States during the period beginning, on August 
        15, 1988, and ending or September 30, [2014] 2015, 
        after being denied refugee status.
                                ------                                


  OMNIBUS CONSOLIDATED AND EMERGENCY SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 
                       1999 (PUBLIC LAW 105-277)


            DIVISION A--OMNIBUS CONSOLIDATED APPROPRIATIONS


           TITLE IV--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED AGENCIES


                            RELATED AGENCIES


      General Provisions--Department of State and Related Agencies

    Sec. 410. (a)(1)(A) Notwithstanding any other provision of 
law and subject to subparagraph (B), the Secretary of State and 
the Attorney General shall impose, for the processing of any 
application for the issuance of a machine readable combined 
border crossing card and nonimmigrant visa under section 
101(a)(15)(B) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, [a fee of 
$13] a fee equal to one-half the fee that would otherwise apply 
for processing a machine readable combined border crossing 
identification card and nonimmigrant visa (for recovery of the 
costs of manufacturing the combined card and visa) in the case 
of any alien under 15 years of age where the application for 
the machine readable combined border crossing card and 
nonimmigrant visa is made in Mexico by a citizen of Mexico who 
has at least one parent or guardian who has a visa under such 
section or is applying for a machine readable combined border 
crossing card and nonimmigrant visa under such section as well.
                                ------                                


   DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 1999, PUBLIC LAW 106-113


                         APPENDIX G--H.R. 3427


         TITLE VII--INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND COMMISSIONS


                 Subtitle B--United Nations Activities


SEC. 721. UNITED NATIONS POLICY ON ISRAEL AND THE PALESTINIANS.

    (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    [(c) Annual Reports.--On January 15 of each year, the 
Secretary of State shall submit a report to the appropriate 
congressional committees (in classified or unclassified form as 
appropriate) on--
            [(1) actions taken by representatives of the United 
        States to encourage the nations of the Western Europe 
        and Others Group (WEOG) to accept Israel into their 
        regional bloc;
            [(2) other measures being undertaken, and which 
        will be undertaken, to ensure and promote Israel's full 
        and equal participation in the United Nations; and
            [(3) steps taken by the United States under 
        subsection (b) to secure abolition by the United 
        Nations of groups described in that subsection.]
                                ------                                


       CONSOLIDATED APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2001, PUBLIC LAW 106-554


                         APPENDIX D--H.R. 5666


                               DIVISION B


           TITLE II--VIETNAM EDUCATION FOUNDATION ACT OF 2000


SEC. 201. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the ``Vietnam Education 
Foundation Act of 2000''.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 203. DEFINITIONS.

    In this title:
            (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (3) Institution of higher education.--The term 
        ``institution of higher education'' has the meaning 
        given the term in section 101(a) of the Higher 
        Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1001(a)).
            (4) Fulbright university vietnam.--The term 
        ``Fulbright University Vietnam'' means an independent, 
        not-for-profit academic institution to be established 
        in the Socialist Republic of Vietnam.
            (5) Trust for university innovation in vietnam.--
        The term ``Trust for University Innovation in Vietnam'' 
        means a not-for-profit organization founded in 2012, 
        which is engaged in promoting institutional innovation 
        in Vietnamese higher education.
            [(4)] (6) United states-vietnam debt agreement.--
        The term ``United States-Vietnam debt agreement'' means 
        the Agreement Between the Government of the United 
        States of America and the Government of the Socialist 
        Republic of Vietnam Regarding the Consolidation and 
        Rescheduling of Certain Debts Owed to, Guaranteed by, 
        or Insured by the United States Government and the 
        Agency for International Development, dated April 7, 
        1997.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 207. VIETNAM DEBT REPAYMENT FUND.

    (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (c) Availability of the Funds.--
            (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            [(3) Transfer of excess funds to miscellaneous 
        receipts.-- Beginning with fiscal year 2002, and each 
        subsequent fiscal year through fiscal year 2018, the 
        Secretary of the Treasury shall withdraw from the Fund 
        and deposit in the Treasury of the United States as 
        miscellaneous receipts all moneys in the Fund in excess 
        of amounts made available to the Foundation under 
        paragraph (1).]
            (3) Use of excess funds for fulbright university 
        vietnam.--During each of the fiscal years 2014 through 
        2018, amounts deposited into the Fund, in excess of the 
        amounts made available to the Foundation under 
        paragraph (1), shall be made available by the Secretary 
        of the Treasury, upon the request of the Secretary of 
        State, for grants to the Trust for University 
        Innovation in Vietnam for the purpose of supporting the 
        establishment of Fulbright University Vietnam.

SEC. 210. TERMINATION.

    (a) In General.--The Foundation may not award any new 
fellowship, or extend any existing fellowship, after September 
30, 2016.
    (b) Abolishment.--Effective 120 days after the expiration 
of the last fellowship in effect under this title, the 
Foundation is abolished.

SEC. 211. FULBRIGHT UNIVERSITY VIETNAM.

    (a) Grants Authorized.--The Secretary of State may award 1 
or more grants to the Trust for University Innovation in 
Vietnam, which shall be used to support the establishment of 
Fulbright University Vietnam.
    (b) Application.--In order to receive 1 or more grants 
pursuant to subsection (a), Trust for University Innovation in 
Vietnam shall submit an application to the Secretary of State 
at such time, in such manner, and accompanied by such 
information as the Secretary may reasonably require.
    (c) Minimum Standards.--As a condition of receiving grants 
under this section, Trust for University Innovation in Vietnam 
shall ensure that Fulbright University Vietnam--
            (1) achieves standards comparable to those required 
        for accreditation in the United States;
            (2) offers graduate and undergraduate level 
        teaching and research programs in a broad range of 
        fields, including public policy, management, and 
        engineering; and
            (3) establishes a policy of academic freedom and 
        prohibits the censorship of dissenting or critical 
        views.
    (d) Annual Report.--Not later than 90 days after the last 
day of each fiscal year, the Secretary of State shall submit a 
report to the appropriate congressional committees that 
summarizes the activities carried out under this section during 
such fiscal year.
                                ------                                


ENHANCED BORDER SECURITY AND VISA ENTRY REFORM ACT OF 2002, PUBLIC LAW 
                                107-173


                        TITLE III--VISA ISSUANCE

SEC. 304. TERRORIST LOOKOUT COMMITTEES.

    (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    [(f) Reports to Congress.--The Secretary of State shall 
submit a report on a quarterly basis to the appropriate 
committees of Congress on the status of the committees 
established under subsection (a).]
                                ------                                


                  SUDAN PEACE ACT, PUBLIC LAW 107-245


[SEC. 8. REPORTING REQUIREMENT.

    [Not later than 6 months after the date of the enactment of 
this Act, and annually thereafter, the Secretary of State shall 
prepare and submit to the appropriate congressional committees 
a report regarding the conflict in Sudan. Such report shall 
include--
            [(1) a description of the sources and current 
        status of Sudan's financing and construction of 
        infrastructure and pipelines for oil exploitation, the 
        effects of such financing and construction on the 
        inhabitants of the regions in which the oil fields are 
        located, and the ability of the Government of Sudan to 
        finance the war in Sudan with the proceeds of the oil 
        exploitation;
            [(2) a description of the extent to which that 
        financing was secured in the United States or with 
        involvement of United States citizens;
            [(3) the best estimates of the extent of aerial 
        bombardment by the Government of Sudan, including 
        targets, frequency, and best estimates of damage; and
            [(4) a description of the extent to which 
        humanitarian relief has been obstructed or manipulated 
        by the Government of Sudan or other forces.]

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


[SEC. 11. INVESTIGATION OF WAR CRIMES.

    [(a) In General.--The Secretary of State shall collect 
information about incidents which may constitute crimes against 
humanity, genocide, war crimes, and other violations of 
international humanitarian law by all parties to the conflict 
in Sudan, including slavery, rape, and aerial bombardment of 
civilian targets.
    [(b) Report.--Not later than 6 months after the date of the 
enactment of this Act and annually thereafter, the Secretary 
ofState shall prepare and submit to the appropriate 
congressional committees a detailed report on the information 
that the Secretary of State has collected under subsection (a) 
and any findings or determinations made by the Secretary on the 
basis of that information. The report under this subsection may 
be submitted as part of the report required under section 8.
    [(c) Consultations With Other Departments.--In preparing 
the report required by this section, the Secretary of State 
shall consult and coordinate with all other Government 
officials who have information necessary to complete the 
report. Nothing contained in this section shall require the 
disclosure, on a classified or unclassified basis, of 
information that would jeopardize sensitive sources and methods 
or other vital national security interests.]
                                ------                                


               CLEAN DIAMOND TRADE ACT, PUBLIC LAW 108-19


[SEC. 12. REPORTS.

    [(a) Annual Reports.--Not later than 1 year after the date 
of the enactment of this Act and every 12 months thereafter for 
such period as this Act is in effect, the President shall 
transmit to the Congress a report--
            [(1) describing actions taken by countries that 
        have exported rough diamonds to the United States 
        during the preceding 12-month period to control the 
        exportation of the diamonds through the Kimberley 
        Process Certification Scheme;
            [(2) describing whether there is statistical 
        information or other evidence that would indicate 
        efforts to circumvent the Kimberley Process 
        Certification Scheme, including cutting rough diamonds 
        for the purpose of circumventing the Kimberley Process 
        Certification Scheme;
            [(3) identifying each country that, during the 
        preceding 12-month period, exported rough diamonds to 
        the United States and was exporting rough diamonds not 
        controlled through the Kimberley Process Certification 
        Scheme, if the failure to do so has significantly 
        increased the likelihood that those diamonds not so 
        controlled are being imported into the United States; 
        and
            [(4) identifying any problems or obstacles 
        encountered in the implementation of this Act or the 
        Kimberly Process Certification Scheme.
    [(b) Semiannual Reports.--For each country identified in 
subsection (a)(3), the President, during such period as this 
Act is in effect, shall, every 6 months after the initial 
report in which the country was identified, transmit to the 
Congress a report that explains what actions have been taken by 
the United States or such country since the previous report to 
ensure that diamonds the exportation of which was not 
controlled through the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme 
are not being imported from that country into the United 
States. The requirement to issue a semiannual report with 
respect to a country under this subsection shall remain in 
effect until such time as the country is controlling the 
importation and exportation of rough diamonds through the 
Kimberley Process Certification Scheme.]
                                ------                                


 EMERGENCY SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR DEFENSE, THE GLOBAL WAR ON 
          TERROR, AND TSUNAMI RELIEF, 2005, PUBLIC LAW 109-13


DIVISION A--EMERGENCY SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS ACT FOR DEFENSE, THE 
             GLOBAL WAR ON TERROR, AND TSUNAMI RELIEF, 2005

                               CHAPTER 2


                 DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED AGENCY


                         REPORTING REQUIREMENT

    [Sec. 2104. The Secretary of State shall submit to the 
Committees on Appropriations not later than 30 days after 
enactment, and prior to the initial obligation of funds 
appropriated under this chapter, a report on the proposed uses 
of all funds on a project-by-project basis, for which the 
obligation of funds is anticipated: Provided, That up to 15 
percent of funds appropriated under this chapter may be 
obligated before the submission of the report subject to the 
normal notification procedures of the Committees on 
Appropriations: Provided further, That the report shall be 
updated and submitted to the Committees on Appropriations every 
six months and shall include information detailing how the 
estimates and assumptions contained in previous reports have 
changed: Provided further, That any new projects and increases 
in funding of ongoing projects shall be subject to the prior 
approval of the Committees on Appropriations: Provided further, 
That the Secretary of State shall submit to the Committees on 
Appropriations, not later than 210 days following enactment of 
this Act and annually thereafter, a report detailing on a 
project-by-project basis the expenditure of funds appropriated 
under this chapter until all funds have been fully expended.]
                                ------                                


                 SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2008


    TITLE I--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, VETERANS AFFAIRS, INTERNATIONAL 
              AFFAIRS, AND OTHER SECURITY-RELATED MATTERS


         CHAPTER 4--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND FOREIGN OPERATIONS


             SUBCHAPTER C--GENERAL PROVISIONS, THIS CHAPTER

    Sec. 1405.  (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    [(c) Notifications and Reports.--
            [(1) Congressional notification.--The President 
        shall notify the appropriate congressional committees 
        in writing not later than 15 days before exercising the 
        waiver authority under subsection (a).
            [(2) Annual report.--Not later than January 31, 
        2009, and annually thereafter, the President shall 
        submit to the appropriate congressional committees a 
        report that--
                    [(A) lists all waivers issued under 
                subsection (a) during the preceding year;
                    [(B) describes in detail the progress that 
                is being made in the implementation of the 
                commitment undertaken by North Korea, in the 
                Joint Statement of September 19, 2005, to 
                abandon all nuclear weapons and existing 
                nuclear programs as part of the verifiable 
                denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula;
                    [(C) discusses specifically any 
                shortcomings in the implementation by North 
                Korea of that commitment; and
                    (D) lists and describes the progress and 
                shortcomings, in the preceding year, of all 
                other programs promoting the elimination of the 
                capability of North Korea to develop, deploy, 
                transfer, or maintain weapons of mass 
                destruction or their delivery systems.
            [(3) Report on verification measures relating to 
        north korea's nuclear programs.--
                    [(A) In general.--Not later than 15 days 
                after the date of enactment of this Act, the 
                Secretary of State shall submit to the 
                appropriate congressional committees a report 
                on verification measures relating to North 
                Korea's nuclear programs under the Six-Party 
                Talks Agreement of February 13, 2007, with 
                specific focus on how such verification 
                measures are defined under the Six-Party Talks 
                Agreement and understood by the United States 
                Government.
                    [(B) Matters to be included.--The report 
                required under subsection (A) shall include, 
                among other elements, a description of--
                            [(i) how the United States will 
                        confirm that North Korea has ``provided 
                        a complete and correct declaration of 
                        all of its nuclear programs'';
                            [(ii) how the United States will 
                        maintain a high and ongoing level of 
                        confidence that North Korea has fully 
                        met the terms of the Six-Party Talks 
                        Agreement relating to its nuclear 
                        programs;
                            [(iii) any diplomatic agreement 
                        with North Korea regarding verification 
                        measures relating to North Korea's 
                        nuclear programs under the Six-Party 
                        Talks Agreement (other than 
                        implementing arrangements made during 
                        on-site operations); and
                            [(iv) any significant and 
                        continuing disagreement with North 
                        Korea regarding verification measures 
                        relating to North Korea's nuclear 
                        programs under the Six-Party Talks 
                        Agreement.
                    [(C) Form.--The report required under 
                subsection (A) shall be submitted in 
                unclassified form, but may include a classified 
                annex.]
                                ------                                


                           PUBLIC LAW 112-192


                                 An Act

   To provide flexibility with respect to United States support for 
assistance provided by international financial institutions for Burma, 
                        and for other purposes.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
the United States of America in Congress assembled,
SECTION 1. INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS.
    Upon a determination by the President that it is in the 
national interest of the United States to support assistance 
for Burma, the Secretary of the Treasury may instruct the 
United States Executive Director at any international financial 
institution to vote in favor of the provision of assistance for 
Burma by the institution, notwithstanding any other provision 
of law. The President shall provide the appropriate 
congressional committees with a written notice of any such 
determination.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

SEC. 3. DEFINITIONS.
    In this Act:
            (1) The term ``appropriate congressional 
        committees'' means the Committees on Foreign Relations, 
        Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, and Appropriations 
        of the Senate, and the Committees on Financial 
        Services, Foreign Affairs, and Appropriations of the 
        House of Representatives.
            (2) The term ``assistance'' means any loan or 
        financial or technical assistance, or any other use of 
        funds.
            (3) The term ``international financial 
        institution'' shall have the same meaning as contained 
        in section 7029(d) of division I of Public Law 112-74 
        and shall also include, subject to the certification 
        required in subsection 7043(c)(5) of the Department of 
        State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs 
        Appropriations Act, 2015, as reported by the Committee 
        on Appropriations of the United States Senate on June 
        19, 2014, the Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency.

                        BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL


  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS
                                                     AMENDED
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               Budget authority                 Outlays
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee    Amount  in     Committee    Amount  in
                                                           allocation       bill       allocation       bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with the subcommittee
 allocation for 2015: Subcommittee on State, Foreign
 Operations, and Related Programs:
    Mandatory...........................................          159           159           159        \1\159
    Discretionary.......................................       39,660        48,285        44,719     \1\46,150
        Security........................................  ............  ............  ............  ............
        Nonsecurity.....................................       39,660        48,285            NA            NA
Projections of outlays associated with the
 recommendation:
    2015................................................  ............  ............  ............    \2\18,130
    2016................................................  ............  ............  ............       12,122
    2017................................................  ............  ............  ............        7,589
    2018................................................  ............  ............  ............        4,741
    2019 and future years...............................  ............  ............  ............        5,013
Financial assistance to State and local governments for            NA   ............           NA   ............
 2015...................................................

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\2\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

NA: Not applicable.

NOTE.--Consistent with the funding recommended in the bill for overseas contingency operations and in accordance
  with section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the BBEDCA of 1985, the Committee anticipates that the Budget Committee will
  provide a revised 302(a) allocation for the Committee on Appropriations reflecting an upward adjustment of
  $8,625,000,000 in budget authority plus associated outlays.


  COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2014 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL
                                                                        YEAR 2015
                                                                [In thousands of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                        Senate Committee recommendation
                                                                                                                            compared with (+ or -)
                             Item                                     2014         Budget estimate      Committee    -----------------------------------
                                                                  appropriation                      recommendation         2014
                                                                                                                        appropriation    Budget estimate
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED AGENCY

                      Department of State

               Administration of Foreign Affairs

Diplomatic and consular programs..............................        4,738,450         4,654,395         4,332,524          -405,926          -321,871
    Worldwide security protection.............................        1,867,251         2,128,115         2,128,115          +260,864   ................
    International Center......................................  ................              533               533              +533   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Diplomatic and consular programs.................        6,605,701         6,783,043         6,461,172          -144,529          -321,871
                                                               =========================================================================================
Capital investment fund.......................................           76,900            56,400            56,400           -20,500   ................
Office of Inspector General...................................           69,406            73,400            73,400            +3,994   ................
Educational and cultural exchange programs....................          560,000           577,900           590,770           +30,770           +12,870
Representation allowances.....................................            7,300             7,679             8,030              +730              +351
Protection of foreign missions and officials..................           28,200            30,036            30,036            +1,836   ................
Embassy security, construction, and maintenance...............          785,351           799,400           799,400           +14,049   ................
    Worldwide security upgrades...............................        1,614,000         1,217,500         1,217,500          -396,500   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Embassy security.................................        2,399,351         2,016,900         2,016,900          -382,451   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
Emergencies in the diplomatic and consular service............            9,242             7,900             7,900            -1,342   ................

Repatriation Loans Program Account:
    Direct loans subsidy......................................            1,537             1,300             1,300              -237   ................
Payment to the American Institute in Taiwan...................           31,221            30,000            30,000            -1,221   ................
Payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and Disability Fund.          158,900           158,900           158,900   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Administration of Foreign Affairs................        9,947,758         9,743,458         9,434,808          -512,950          -308,650
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  International Organizations

Contributions to international organizations, current year            1,265,762         1,517,349         1,440,524          +174,762           -76,825
 assessment...................................................
Contributions for international peacekeeping activities,              1,765,519         2,518,565   ................       -1,765,519        -2,518,565
 current year assessment......................................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, International Organizations......................        3,031,281         4,035,914         1,440,524        -1,590,757        -2,595,390
                                                               =========================================================================================
                   International Commissions

International Boundary and Water Commission, United States and
 Mexico:
    Salaries and expenses.....................................           44,000            45,415            45,415            +1,415   ................
    Construction..............................................           33,438            26,461            26,461            -6,977   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Boundary and Water Commission....................           77,438            71,876            71,876            -5,562   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
American sections, international commissions..................           12,499            12,311            12,561               +62              +250
International fisheries commissions...........................           35,980            31,446            37,180            +1,200            +5,734
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, International commissions........................          125,917           115,633           121,617            -4,300            +5,984
                                                               =========================================================================================
                        Related Agency

                Broadcasting Board of Governors

International broadcasting operations.........................          721,080           716,460           716,460            -4,620   ................
Broadcasting capital improvements.............................            8,000             4,800             4,800            -3,200   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Broadcasting Board of Governors..................          729,080           721,260           721,260            -7,820   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                       Related Programs

The Asia Foundation...........................................           17,000            12,000            17,000   ................           +5,000
United States Institute of Peace, Operating expenses..........           30,984            35,300            37,000            +6,016            +1,700
Center for Middle Eastern-Western dialogue....................               90                83                83                -7   ................
Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship program........................              400               400               400   ................  ................
Israeli Arab scholarship program..............................               13                26                26               +13   ................
East-West Center..............................................           16,700            10,800            16,700   ................           +5,900
National Endowment for Democracy..............................          135,000           103,450           135,000   ................          +31,550
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Related programs.................................          200,187           162,059           206,209            +6,022           +44,150
                                                               =========================================================================================
                       Other Commissions

 Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad

Salaries and expenses.........................................              690               644               644               -46   ................

         Commission on International Religious Freedom

Salaries and expenses.........................................            3,500             3,500             3,500   ................  ................

       Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe

Salaries and expenses.........................................            2,579             2,579             2,579   ................  ................Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's Republic of
                             ChinaSalaries and expenses.........................................            2,000             2,000             2,000   ................  ................  United States-China Economic and Security Review CommissionSalaries and expenses.........................................            3,500             3,500             3,500   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, title I, Department of State and Related Agency..       14,046,492        14,790,547        11,936,641        -2,109,851        -2,853,906
                                                               =========================================================================================
        TITLE II--ADMINISTRATION OF FOREIGN ASSISTANCE              Funds Appropriated to the President       U.S. Agency for International Development [USAID]Operating expenses, USAID.....................................        1,059,229         1,318,816         1,170,614          +111,385          -148,202
Capital Investment Fund.......................................          117,940           130,815           130,815           +12,875   ................
Office of Inspector General, USAID............................           45,000            54,285            54,038            +9,038              -247
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, title II, Administration of Foreign Assistance...        1,222,169         1,503,916         1,355,467          +133,298          -148,449
                                                               =========================================================================================
           TITLE III--BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE              Funds Appropriated to the PresidentGlobal Health Programs:
    U.S. Agency for International Development.................        2,769,450         2,680,000         2,769,000              -450           +89,000
    Department of State.......................................        5,670,000         5,370,000         5,370,000          -300,000   ................
        (Global fund contribution)............................       (1,650,000)       (1,350,000)       (1,350,000)        (-300,000)  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Total, Global Health Programs.......................        8,439,450         8,050,000         8,139,000          -300,450           +89,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
Development assistance........................................        2,507,001         2,619,984         2,421,964           -85,037          -198,020International disaster assistance.............................          876,828           665,000           660,000          -216,828            -5,000
Transition initiatives........................................           48,177            67,600            67,000           +18,823              -600
Complex Crises fund...........................................           20,000            30,000            25,000            +5,000            -5,000Development Credit Authority:
    (By transfer).............................................          (40,000)          (40,000)          (40,000)  ................  ................
    Administrative expenses...................................            8,041             8,200             8,200              +159   ................Economic Support Fund.........................................        2,982,967         3,398,694         2,540,475          -442,492          -858,219Democracy Fund................................................          130,500   ................          130,500   ................         +130,500                      Department of StateMigration and refugee assistance..............................        1,774,645         1,582,374         1,039,000          -735,645          -543,374
United States Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund.           50,000            50,000            50,000   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Department of State..............................        1,824,645         1,632,374         1,089,000          -735,645          -543,374
                                                               =========================================================================================
                     Independent AgenciesPeace Corps...................................................          379,000           380,000           380,000            +1,000   ................
Millenium Challenge Corporation...............................          898,200         1,000,000           901,000            +2,800           -99,000
Inter-American Foundation.....................................           22,500            18,100            22,500   ................           +4,400
African Development Foundation................................           30,000            24,000            30,000   ................           +6,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Independent Agencies.............................        1,329,700         1,422,100         1,333,500            +3,800           -88,600
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  Department of the TreasuryInternational Affairs Technical Assistance....................           23,500            23,500            23,500   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Department of the Treasury.......................           23,500            23,500            23,500   ................  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, title III, Bilateral economic assistance.........       18,190,809        17,917,452        16,438,139        -1,752,670        -1,479,313
          Appropriations......................................      (18,190,809)      (17,917,452)      (16,438,139)      (-1,752,670)      (-1,479,313)
      (By transfer)...........................................          (40,000)          (40,000)          (40,000)  ................  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
          TITLE IV--INTERNATIONAL SECURITY ASSISTANCE                      Department of StateInternational narcotics control and law enforcement...........        1,005,610           721,911           708,000          -297,610           -13,911
Nonproliferation, anti-terrorism, demining and related                  630,000           605,400           593,775           -36,225           -11,625
 programs.....................................................
Peacekeeping operations.......................................          235,600           221,150           120,000          -115,600          -101,150              Funds Appropriated to the PresidentInternational Military Education and Training.................          105,573           107,474           104,674              -899            -2,800Foreign Military Financing Program:
    Grants:
        Israel................................................        3,100,000         3,100,000         3,100,000   ................  ................
        Egypt.................................................        1,300,000         1,300,000         1,000,000          -300,000          -300,000
        Other.................................................          989,280           710,645           703,645          -285,635            -7,000
            Limitation on Administrative Expenses.............          (60,000)          (63,945)          (63,945)          (+3,945)  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Total, Foreign Military Financing Program.......        5,389,280         5,110,645         4,803,645          -585,635          -307,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
Contributions for international peacekeeping activities,        ................  ................        1,962,555        +1,962,555        +1,962,555
 current year assessment......................................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, title IV, Security assistance....................        7,366,063         6,766,580         8,292,649          +926,586        +1,526,069
                                                               =========================================================================================
               TITLE V--MULTILATERAL ASSISTANCE              Funds Appropriated to the PresidentInternational Organizations and Programs......................          344,020           303,439           351,000            +6,980           +47,561             International Financial Institutions                       World Bank GroupClean Technology Fund.........................................          184,630           201,253           201,253           +16,623   ................
Strategic Climate Fund........................................           49,900            63,184            63,184           +13,284   ................The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development
 [IBRD]:
    Contribution to the IBRD paid in capital..................          186,957           192,921           192,921            +5,964   ................
    (Limitation on callable capital)..........................       (2,928,991)       (2,928,991)       (2,928,991)  ................  ................
    Global Environment Facility...............................          143,750           136,563           136,563            -7,187   ................
    Middle East and North Africa Transition Fund..............  ................            5,000   ................  ................           -5,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, IBRD..........................................          330,707           334,484           329,484            -1,223            -5,000Contribution to the International Development Association.....        1,355,000         1,290,600         1,285,000           -70,000            -5,600
Multilateral debt relief initiative...........................  ................           78,900            78,900           +78,900   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, World Bank Group.................................        1,920,237         1,968,421         1,957,821           +37,584           -10,600
                                                               =========================================================================================
Contribution to the Enterprise for the Americas Multilateral              6,298   ................           10,000            +3,702           +10,000
 Investment Fund..............................................Contribution to the Inter-American Development Bank paid in             102,000           102,020           102,020               +20   ................
 capital......................................................
    (Limitation on callable capital)..........................       (4,098,795)       (4,098,795)       (4,098,795)  ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Inter-American Development Bank..................          102,000           102,020           102,020               +20   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
Contribution to the Asian Development Fund....................          109,854           115,250           100,100            -9,754           -15,150Asian development bank paid in capital........................          106,586           112,194           112,194            +5,608   ................
    (Limitation on callable capital)..........................       (2,558,049)       (2,558,049)       (2,558,049)  ................  ................Contribution to the African Development Bank:
    Paid in capital...........................................           32,418            34,119            34,119            +1,701   ................
    (Limitation on callable capital)..........................         (507,861)         (507,861)         (507,861)  ................  ................
    Contribution to the African Development Fund..............          176,336           195,000           175,000            -1,336           -20,000
    Multilateral debt relief initiative.......................  ................           13,500            13,500           +13,500   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, African Development Bank.........................          208,754           242,619           222,619           +13,865           -20,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
Contribution to the International Fund for Agricultural                  30,000            30,000            30,000   ................  ................
 Development..................................................
Global agriculture and food security program..................          133,000   ................  ................         -133,000   ................
International Monetary fund quota increase....................  ................          315,000           315,000          +315,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, International Financial Institutions.............        2,616,729         2,885,504         2,849,754          +233,025           -35,750
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, title V, Multilateral assistance.................        2,960,749         3,188,943         3,200,754          +240,005           +11,811
          (Limitation on callable capital)....................      (10,093,696)      (10,093,696)      (10,093,696)  ................  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
          TITLE VI--EXPORT AND INVESTMENT ASSISTANCE            Export-Import Bank of the United StatesAdministrative expenses.......................................          105,000           117,650           107,500            +2,500           -10,150
Administrative expenses--Headquarters renovation..............           10,500   ................  ................          -10,500   ................
Inspector General.............................................            5,100             5,750             5,750              +650   ................
Offsetting collections........................................       -1,090,000        -1,290,000        -1,290,000          -200,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Export-Import Bank of the United States..........         -969,400        -1,166,600        -1,176,750          -207,350           -10,150
                                                               =========================================================================================
            Overseas Private Investment CorporationNoncredit account:
    Administrative expenses...................................           62,574            71,800            63,000              +426            -8,800
    Insurance fees and other offsetting collections...........         -323,000          -350,000          -350,000           -27,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................         -260,426          -278,200          -287,000           -26,574            -8,800Program account...............................................           27,371            25,000            25,000            -2,371   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Overseas Private Investment Corporation..........         -233,055          -253,200          -262,000           -28,945            -8,800
                                                               =========================================================================================
              Funds Appropriated to the PresidentTrade and Development Agency..................................           55,073            67,700            60,000            +4,927            -7,700
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, title VI, Export and investment assistance.......       -1,147,382        -1,352,100        -1,378,750          -231,368           -26,650
                                                               =========================================================================================
                 TITLE VII--GENERAL PROVISIONSExport Import Bank--Unexpended (Rescission) (Sec. 7082).......  ................  ................          -30,000           -30,000           -30,000
Special immigrant visa proposal sec. 7034(o)..................            1,000             1,000   ................           -1,000            -1,000
IMF Quota rescission from Public Law 111-32 (emergency).......  ................       -1,261,000        -1,261,000        -1,261,000   ................Death gratuity and other benefits (Sec. 7082(d)(3))...........           23,000   ................  ................          -23,000   ................
Export-Import Bank (Sec. 7082(d)(3)) (rescission).............          -23,000   ................  ................          +23,000   ................
Fulbright University Vietnam (Sec. 7086)......................  ................  ................            4,000            +4,000            +4,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, title VII, General Provisions....................            1,000        -1,260,000        -1,287,000        -1,288,000           -27,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
       TITLE VIII--OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS [OCO]Diplomatic and consular programs [OCO]........................        1,391,109         1,553,425         1,350,803           -40,306          -202,622
    (Worldwide security protection) [OCO].....................         (900,274)         (989,706)         (989,706)         (+89,432)  ................
    (Transfer to other agencies)..............................        (-100,000)        (-100,000)         (-35,000)         (+65,000)         (+65,000)
    Rescission [OCO]..........................................         -427,296   ................  ................         +427,296   ................
Conflict stabilization operations [OCO].......................            8,500   ................           15,000            +6,500           +15,000
Office of Inspector General [OCO].............................           49,650            56,900            56,900            +7,250   ................
Education and cultural exchange programs [OCO]................            8,628   ................  ................           -8,628   ................
Embassy security, construction, and maintenance [OCO].........          275,000           260,800           260,800           -14,200   ................
Contributions to int'l organizations [OCO]....................           74,400   ................           74,400   ................          +74,400
Broadcasters board of governors [OCO].........................            4,400   ................  ................           -4,400   ................
United States Institute of Peace [USIP] [OCO].................            6,016   ................  ................           -6,016   ................
Operating expenses of USAID [OCO].............................           81,000            65,000           171,585           +90,585          +106,585
Operating expenses of USAID OIG [OCO].........................           10,038   ................  ................          -10,038   ................
International Disaster Assistance [OCO].......................          924,172           635,000         1,235,000          +310,828          +600,000
Transition Initiatives [OCO]..................................            9,423   ................  ................           -9,423   ................
Complex Crises fund [OCO].....................................           20,000   ................          217,882          +197,882          +217,882
Economic Support Fund [OCO]...................................        1,656,215         1,678,400         1,660,000            +3,785           -18,400
Migration and Refugee assistance (MRA) [OCO]..................        1,284,355           465,000         1,912,000          +627,645        +1,447,000
International narcotics control and law enforcement [OCO].....          344,390           396,000           292,000           -52,390          -104,000
Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining and Related                   70,000   ................           85,225           +15,225           +85,225
 programs [NADR] [OCO]........................................
Peacekeeping Operations [PKO] [OCO]...........................          200,000           115,000           225,395           +25,395          +110,395
Foreign Military Financing program [OCO]......................          530,000           537,000           507,000           -23,000           -30,000
Peacekeeping Response Mechanism [OCO].........................  ................          150,000   ................  ................         -150,000
Middle East and North Africa incentive Fund [OCO].............  ................  ................            5,000            +5,000            +5,000
Contributions for International Peacekeeping Activities,        ................  ................          556,010          +556,010          +556,010
 current year assessment [OCO]................................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, Title VIII, Overseas Contingency Operations......        6,520,000         5,912,525         8,625,000        +2,105,000        +2,712,475
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Grand total.............................................       49,159,900        47,467,863        47,182,900        -1,977,000          -284,963
          Appropriations......................................      (42,662,900)      (42,816,338)      (39,848,900)      (-2,814,000)      (-2,967,438)
          Overseas contingency operations.....................       (6,520,000)       (5,912,525)       (8,625,000)      (+2,105,000)      (+2,712,475)
          Rescissions.........................................         (-23,000)  ................         (-30,000)          (-7,000)         (-30,000)
      (By transfer)...........................................          (40,000)          (40,000)          (40,000)  ................  ................
      (Limitation on callable capital)........................      (10,093,696)      (10,093,696)      (10,093,696)  ................  ................
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