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                                                       Calendar No. 443
113th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 2nd Session                                                    113-198

======================================================================



 
       DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2015
                                _______
                                

                 June 26, 2014.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

          Ms. Landrieu, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                                 REPORT

                         [To accompany S. 2534]

     The Committee on Appropriations reports the bill (S. 2534) 
making appropriations for the Department of Homeland Security 
for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2015, and for other 
purposes, reports favorably thereon and recommends that the 
bill do pass.



Total obligational authority, fiscal year 2015

Total of bill as reported to the Senate\1\ \2\ \3\ \6\.. $47,226,793,000
Amount of 2014 appropriations\4\ \5\....................  46,583,386,000
Amount of 2015 budget estimate\1\ \2\ \6\...............  46,346,037,000
Bill as recommended to Senate compared to--
    2014 appropriations.................................    +643,407,000
    2015 budget estimate................................    +880,756,000

\1\Committee recommendation includes $731,093,000 in rescissions 
compared to $200,000,000 in proposed cancellations.
\2\Includes a permanent indefinite appropriation of $176,970,000 for the 
Coast Guard healthcare fund contribution.
\3\Includes $213,000,000 for the Coast Guard for the cost of overseas 
contingency operations.
\4\Includes rescissions totaling $693,426,000 pursuant to Public Law 
113-76. Includes permanent indefinite appropriation of $201,000,000 for 
the Coast Guard healthcare fund contribution. Includes $227,000,000 for 
the Coast Guard for the costs of overseas contingency operations.
\5\Includes $5,626,386,000 for the FEMA Disaster Relief Fund designated 
by Congress as disaster relief pursuant to Public Law 112-25.
\6\Includes $6,437,793,000 for the FEMA Disaster Relief Fund designated 
by Congress as disaster relief pursuant to Public Law 112-25.


                                CONTENTS

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Overview and Summary of the Bill.................................     4
Title I:
    Departmental Management and Operations:
        Office of the Secretary and Executive Management.........    11
        Office of the Under Secretary for Management.............    20
        Office of the Chief Financial Officer....................    23
        Office of the Chief Information Officer..................    27
        Analysis and Operations..................................    29
        Office of Inspector General..............................    30
Title II:
    Security, Enforcement, and Investigations:
        U.S. Customs and Border Protection:
            Salaries and Expenses................................    33
            Automation Modernization.............................    49
            Border Security Fencing, Infrastructure, and 
              Technology.........................................    50
            Air and Marine Operations............................    52
            Construction and Facilities Management...............    55
        U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement:
            Salaries and Expenses................................    57
            Automation Modernization.............................    65
            Construction.........................................    66
        Transportation Security Administration:
            Aviation Security....................................    67
            Surface Transportation Security......................    76
            Intelligence and Vetting.............................    77
            Transportation Security Support......................    79
        United States Coast Guard:
            Operating Expenses...................................    81
            Environmental Compliance and Restoration.............    87
            Reserve Training.....................................    88
            Acquisition, Construction, and Improvements..........    88
            Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation..........    93
            Retired Pay..........................................    94
        United States Secret Service:
            Salaries and Expenses................................    94
            Acquisition, Construction, Improvements, and Related 
              Expenses...........................................    97
Title III:
    Protection, Preparedness, Response, and Recovery:
        National Protection and Programs Directorate:
            Management and Administration........................    98
            Infrastructure Protection and Information Security...   100
            Federal Protective Service...........................   106
            Office of Biometric Identity Management..............   107
        Office of Health Affairs.................................   109
        Federal Emergency Management Agency:
            Salaries and Expenses................................   111
            State and Local Programs.............................   117
            Firefighter Assistance Grants........................   122
            Emergency Management Performance Grants..............   122
            Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program..........   123
            United States Fire Administration....................   124
            Disaster Relief Fund.................................   125
            Flood Hazard Mapping and Risk Analysis...............   126
            National Flood Insurance Fund........................   127
            National Predisaster Mitigation Fund.................   128
            Emergency Food and Shelter...........................   129
Title IV:
    Research and Development, Training, and Services:
        United States Citizenship and Immigration Services.......   130
        Federal Law Enforcement Training Center:
            Salaries and Expenses................................   133
            Acquisitions, Construction, Improvements, and Related 
              Expenses...........................................   133
        Science and Technology:
            Management and Administration........................   134
            Research, Development, Acquisition, and Operations...   134
        Domestic Nuclear Detection Office:
            Management and Administration........................   140
            Research, Development, and Operations................   141
            Systems Acquisition..................................   142
Title V: General Provisions......................................   144
Program, Project, and Activity...................................   150
Compliance With Paragraph 7, Rule XVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the 
  Senate.........................................................   151
Compliance With Paragraph 12, Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   151
Budgetary Impact of Bill.........................................   173
Comparative Statement of New Budget Authority....................   174

                    OVERVIEW AND SUMMARY OF THE BILL

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                       Fiscal year 2015
                                  Fiscal year 2015        Committee
                                 request\1\ \2\ \3\   recommendation\1\
                                                         \2\ \3\ \4\
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Title I--Departmental                $1,171,749,000       $1,033,363,000
 Management and Operations....
Title II--Security,                  31,404,277,000       32,519,823,000
 Enforcement, and
 Investigations...............
Title III--Protection,               12,048,420,000       12,417,695,000
 Preparedness, Response, and
 Recovery.....................
Title IV--Research and                1,770,591,000        1,760,905,000
 Development, Training, and
 Services.....................
Title V--General Provisions...          -49,000,000         -504,993,000
                               -----------------------------------------
      Total, new budget              46,346,037,000       47,226,793,000
       (obligational
       authority).............
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Committee recommendation includes $731,093,000 in rescissions
  compared to $200,000,000 in proposed cancellations.
\2\Includes a permanent indefinite appropriation of $176,970,000 for the
  Coast Guard healthcare fund contribution.
\3\Includes $6,437,793,000 for the FEMA Disaster Relief Fund designated
  by Congress as disaster relief pursuant to Public Law 112-25.
\4\Includes $213,000,000 for the Coast Guard for the cost of overseas
  contingency operations.

    The Committee recommends a total appropriation of 
$47,226,793,000 for the Department of Homeland Security [DHS] 
for fiscal year 2015, $880,756,000 more than the budget 
request. Of this amount, $45,650,793,000 is for discretionary 
programs, including $213,000,000 for Coast Guard overseas 
contingency operations and $6,437,793,000 for the FEMA Disaster 
Relief Fund designated by Congress as disaster relief pursuant 
to Public Law 112-25.
    The Committee recommends discretionary appropriations, 
excluding Coast Guard overseas contingency operations and the 
FEMA Disaster Relief Fund adjustment, of $39,000,000,000, 
$667,756,000 above the request. Even with this modest increase, 
discretionary appropriations for the DHS have declined by 8.3 
percent since fiscal year 2010.

                                Overview

    Homeland security refers to our national effort to prevent 
terrorist attacks within the United States, reduce the 
vulnerability of the United States to terrorism, and minimize 
the damage from attacks that do occur. Although we have been 
spared from terrorist attacks with the devastating consequences 
of September 11 for more than a decade, the Boston marathon 
bombing, which was conducted by home-grown extremists less than 
15 months ago, reminded us that complacency is not an option. 
The long war on terrorism is far from over. We face an 
increasing number of homegrown terror plots that originate 
within our own borders, in which one or more of the plotters 
are American citizens, legal permanent residents, or visitors 
radicalized in the United States. At the same time, individuals 
and terrorist groups abroad continue to focus on doing us harm. 
Our Nation is still threatened by al Qaeda affiliates from 
countries such as Yemen and Pakistan, as well as foreign 
fighters traveling to and from Syria. The threat today is 
rapidly evolving and diffuse, with al Qaeda affiliates in the 
Arabian Peninsula being the most active in plotting against our 
homeland. These terrorists, be they homegrown zealots or 
radical actors from abroad, seek sophisticated means of attack, 
including chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and 
explosive weapons, as well as cyber. While we continue to focus 
on these known threats, we must also be vigilant against new 
methods of recruitment and engage communities at risk of being 
targeted by terrorist recruiters. This bill provides adequate 
resources for us to keep pace with all of these threats. For 
example:
  --At U.S. Customs and Border Protection [CBP], the bill 
        recommends hiring 1,000 new CBP officers at our air and 
        sea ports of entry to facilitate the processing of 
        legitimate trade and travelers while preventing entry 
        of those who would do us harm.
  --At U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement [ICE], the 
        second largest investigative agency in the Government, 
        Homeland Security Investigations will use the 
        $1,775,269,000 included in the bill for its 6,400 
        criminal investigators to conduct transnational 
        criminal investigations to protect the United States 
        against terrorist and other criminal organizations that 
        threaten public safety and national security while 
        bringing to justice those seeking to exploit customs 
        and immigration laws worldwide. The bill provides 
        $5,000,000 above the request to ICE for human 
        trafficking and smuggling investigations as well as 
        investigations in commercial trade fraud.
  --At the Transportation Security Administration, the bill 
        includes $162,469,000 for explosives detection 
        technologies to screen passengers and their belongings 
        at airports and $99,569,000 for Secure Flight, which 
        matches passenger data against portions of the 
        Terrorist Screening Database.
  --The bill includes $425,552,000 for research and development 
        in innovative technology solutions and other 
        countermeasures to strengthen the homeland and outpace 
        our adversaries.
  --A total of $300,000,000 is included to complete 
        construction of the National Bio and Agro-Defense 
        Facility, which is being built to prevent the 
        accidental or intentional introduction of deadly animal 
        diseases into the United States.
  --A total of $306,342,000 for the Domestic Nuclear Detection 
        Office to detect illicit radiological material that has 
        fallen out of regulatory control, and deter our enemies 
        from using that material for nuclear terrorism. The 
        bill provides $7,000,000 above the request for the 
        Securing the Cities program, which helps State and 
        local governments develop nuclear detection 
        capabilities for high-density, high-threat urban areas.
  --A total of $162,991,000, the same amount as fiscal year 
        2014, is provided for first responder weapons of mass 
        destruction training.
  --A total of $26,024,000 is provided to strengthen the 
        Department's ability to safeguard and share classified 
        information with its Federal, State, and local 
        partners, and to help deter the unauthorized release of 
        such information. In the wake of past and recent public 
        disclosures of critical national security information, 
        such safeguards are vital to ensuring effective 
        controls are in place to prevent the illicit removal 
        and dissemination of classified information.
  --A total of $9,961,000 for the Office of Bombing Prevention 
        to advance training, analysis, and awareness.
    Terrorism is not the only threat we must be prepared for. 
We face a constant onslaught of cyber intrusions and attacks on 
our Government networks and critical infrastructure. According 
to the Internet security experts at Norton, we lose 
$114,000,000,000 each year to global cybercriminals, with 
another $274,000,000,000 in lost productivity due to time spent 
on cybercrime and its effects. That total eclipses the global 
black market in marijuana, cocaine, and heroin combined. In 
2013, there were over 63,000 security incidents and 1,367 
confirmed data breaches. These range from attacks that were 
carried out on media outlets like The New York Times and The 
Wall Street Journal, theft of personal information stolen from 
universities around the country, and the stealing of financial 
data from consumers who used payment card systems at several 
major retail companies. Verizon recently published a report 
using real world data gleaned from 50 organizations around the 
world, including DHS, which clearly showed that individuals, 
companies, and industries are all vulnerable to some type of 
cyber event/attack. Sadly, the data also showed that attackers 
are becoming more proficient, able to complete their attacks in 
days, and sometimes in a matter of minutes. Conversely, it 
often takes our cyber warriors--the good guys--over a month to 
discover and block an infiltration, and even longer to 
completely resolve the issue. This bill takes steps to decrease 
our vulnerability to cyber attacks and intrusions, stop the 
exfiltration of data, and help remediate the impacts of a cyber 
attack. Specifically,
  --The bill recommends a total of $757,340,000 for 
        cybersecurity protection of Federal networks and 
        incident response. This amount includes $15,810,000 for 
        cybersecurity education to train future cyber warriors.
  --The bill provides a total of $163,743,000 for ICE to 
        support 761 full-time equivalents in a variety of cyber 
        investigations including efforts to counter child 
        pornography as well as funding to operate the Cyber 
        Crimes Center.
  --A total of $103,937,000 for the United States Secret 
        Service for cyber investigations and to provide cyber 
        crime training to State and local law enforcement, 
        legal, and judicial professionals for computer 
        forensics and cyber investigations. In the last 4 
        years, the Secret Service's cyber investigations 
        affected over 4,900 arrests and avoided approximately 
        $1,370,000,000 in fraud losses.
    At the same time we are facing a constant barge of cyber 
intrusions and attacks, we are also facing a humanitarian 
crisis on our Southern border the likes of which we have never 
before experienced. More than 66,000 unaccompanied alien 
children will be apprehended at our border this fiscal year 
and, at the current rate, we can expect to apprehend 145,000 in 
fiscal year 2015. According to the Department of Health and 
Human Services [HHS], this is an 815 percent increase in child 
apprehensions by the end of this fiscal year compared to fiscal 
year 2011. There were 6,500 children apprehended in fiscal year 
2011 but in fiscal year 2013 that number rose to nearly 25,000 
unaccompanied children. Things have gotten so dire, that on 
June 2, 2014, the President appointed the FEMA Administrator to 
lead the Unified Coordination Group in response to this crisis.
    Unfortunately, while knowing of these increasing arrivals 
year after year, the budget request did not reflect additional 
resources for DHS or HHS to address this problem. After hearing 
bipartisan and bicameral cries of concern, the Office of 
Management and Budget acknowledged in a May 30, 2014, letter to 
the Committees on Appropriations that DHS needed $164,547,000 
more than it had requested in the budget to adequately address 
its fiscal year 2015 requirements. In response, this bill 
provides the following increased resources:
  --CBP is provided $76,942,000 above the request to provide 
        for initial processing, medical care, food, shelter, 
        and clothing for the children they encounter.
  --ICE is provided $87,605,000 above the request for 
        transportation--often via commercial or charter 
        aircraft--of these children from DHS custody to the 
        legally required shelters operated by the Office of 
        Refugee Resettlement within HHS.
  --Also, a detailed, multi-agency briefing is required to be 
        held not later than September 15, 2014, of the specific 
        steps each department--DHS, HHS, Justice, and State--is 
        taking to mitigate the crisis and reverse this rapidly 
        escalating trend line.
    While we improve our defenses against terrorists and cyber 
attacks, DHS must remain focused on other legacy and statutory 
missions, such as enforcing our immigration laws, facilitating 
legitimate travel and trade, protecting our currency, 
interdicting drugs and migrants, responding to oil and chemical 
spills, and rescuing those in need. This bill does so by 
refocusing resources on requirements that the Committee 
believes were underfunded in the fiscal year 2015 request and 
supplementing the request in key areas to address technological 
limitations. For example:
  --The recommendation for the Coast Guard includes several 
        increases above the request, including $25,000,000 and 
        231 positions to enhance drug and migrant interdiction 
        efforts, $208,000,000 to acquire new vessels 
        desperately needed to replace an aging fleet, 
        $24,500,000 for mid-life repairs and service life 
        extension projects on the existing fleet of vessels, 
        $6,000,000 to address the construction backlog for 
        military housing, and $4,967,000 above the request to 
        restore 300 reservists to active status, which will 
        enable the Coast Guard to retain the majority of the 
        first responders proposed for reduction.
  --The bill recommends a total of $1,500,000,000 for first 
        responder grants, $294,531,000 above the request to 
        provide for the protection of infrastructure and the 
        readiness of police, firefighters, public health 
        officials and emergency managers in States, urban 
        areas, ports, and transit systems.
  --The bill funds a minimum of 31,039 ICE detention beds, 
        which is 500 beds above the request. Funding reflects 
        the current cost of these bed contracts.
  --The bill begins funding the preliminary costs related to 
        candidate protection for the 2016 presidential campaign 
        and funds Secret Service agents who protect the First 
        Family and other individuals while also conducting 
        investigations into counterfeiting currency and 
        securing financial networks.
  --At CBP, the bill directs that not less than $10,000,000 be 
        used to sustain the traveler process enhancements, 
        including staffing at certain locations, as provided 
        for in last year's law.
  --And to assist people lawfully present in this country who 
        wish to become U.S. citizens, a total of $10,000,000 is 
        allocated for immigrant integration grants.
    In addition, the Nation must be resilient to all hazards 
and be able to quickly respond to and recover from all hazards 
that threaten our citizens, property, and way of life. While we 
have also been spared the devastation of a storm with the 
damaging effects of Hurricane Katrina and have proven we are a 
Nation better able to respond and recover quickly than we were 
before, within the last 3 years, each State has sought Federal 
assistance for disaster recovery. History tells us a 
catastrophic disaster will strike again in the future. We must 
be ready. This bill provides resources to continue recovery 
from disasters and get ready for future disasters.
  --A total of $7,033,464,494 for disaster relief, $812,556,400 
        above fiscal year 2014.
  --A total of $100,000,000 for flood hazard mapping, 
        $15,597,000 above the request. In the past 5 years, all 
        50 States have experienced floods or flash floods. 
        Accurate and useful flood maps help protect people and 
        property along our waterways on the coast and inland 
        against a known risk.
  --A total of $25,000,000 for predisaster mitigation grants. 
        These grants help officials plan for and build more 
        resilient communities to withstand the disasters they 
        are likely to face, ultimately saving money and lives 
        when the next disaster strikes. For example, smart 
        building also saves money--$4 for every $1 invested.
  --A total of $35,180,000 for urban search and rescue teams 
        for location, rescue, and initial medical care of 
        people in large scale disasters.
    These initiatives can only be undertaken with budgetary 
restraint in mind. In this austere fiscal climate, we cannot 
solve all of our homeland security challenges by spending more 
money. DHS must continue to root out fraud, waste, and abuse, 
while refocusing effort on programs that truly make a 
difference. In addition, the Department must make a concerted 
effort to strengthen relationships with other Federal, State, 
local, and international partners in order to maintain our 
national security and increase our resilience. DHS cannot 
achieve these broader objectives by operating in a vacuum. For 
fiscal year 2015, the Committee continues several major 
reforms, while instituting several new initiatives to 
strengthen and streamline the Department.
  --The bill allows for the decommissioning of eight Coast 
        Guard patrol boats that have become too expensive to 
        maintain, saving $6,053,000.
  --The bill includes funding for six critically needed Coast 
        Guard fast response cutters (instead of two requested). 
        Procuring six maximizes the production line and 
        generates cost savings of at least $5,000,000 per hull 
        for a total savings to the taxpayers of $30,000,000.
  --The bill calls for the Department to develop a strategy to 
        reduce the length of time it takes to hire new 
        employees, which is well above the Governmentwide 
        average and inhibiting efforts to select high-quality 
        candidates.
  --As DHS acquisition management remains on GAO's ``high 
        risk'' list, the bill requires GAO to evaluate select 
        acquisitions across the Department to ensure programs 
        are on track to meet cost, schedule, and capability 
        goals; and identify challenges the Department faces in 
        managing its large acquisition projects.
  --The bill requires CBP to submit an action plan for 
        expediting the travel experience at U.S. international 
        gateway airports through the use of innovative 
        technology and changed methodology. These include: 
        expanding the use of automated passport control kiosks 
        which greatly reduces a traveler's interaction with a 
        CBP officer; expanding the use of these kiosks to 
        travelers from visa waiver countries; taking advantage 
        of the creativity of individual airports, such as 
        expanding the use of ``1-Stop'' for express screening 
        of those passengers arriving with just carry-on luggage 
        and proper documentation; and reviewing how CBP 
        allocates its personnel at air ports of entry, to 
        include consideration of non-law enforcement personnel 
        to cover processing duties. All of these efforts should 
        streamline the U.S. entry process and minimize wait 
        times.
  --The bill continues a provision included in fiscal year 2014 
        which authorizes CBP to enter into public-private 
        partnerships to upgrade land ports of entry [POEs] and/
        or to pay overtime to CBP officers at POEs, expands the 
        number of eligible airports that can participate in 
        these pilots from five to seven a year.
  --The bill rejects the unauthorized National Preparedness 
        Grant proposal, waiting for the appropriate authorizing 
        committees to act.
  --The bill includes eight statutorily mandated expenditure 
        plans for robust congressional oversight. In addition, 
        there are another seven expenditure plans in the 
        report. The Committee encourages DHS to issue these 
        reports in an unclassified format so that they can be 
        available to the public, to the maximum extent 
        practicable.
  --The bill includes seven multiyear investment reports so 
        that the Committee can better track when acquisitions 
        and procurements are required for large capital 
        programs and anticipate their operations and 
        maintenance tails.
  --The bill requires all reports requested by the Committee to 
        be posted on the Department's Web site except for those 
        that may compromise homeland security or contain 
        proprietary information.
  --The bill continues annual and monthly reporting 
        requirements for expenditures from the Disaster Relief 
        Fund and directs FEMA to make these reports available 
        to the public no later than 5 days after the close of 
        each month.
  --The bill continues a monthly obligation, expenditure, and 
        staffing reporting requirement. Delivery of these 
        reports is required within 30 days after the end of the 
        month.
  --The bill continues long-standing provisions prohibiting the 
        use of first class travel and limits attendance at 
        international conferences.
    In conclusion, the recommendations contained in this bill 
sustain the Department's vital frontline security operations, 
while providing resources for the Department to nimbly react to 
emergent threats, be they man-made or naturally occurring. It 
also provides sufficient management and administrative 
oversight to ensure fiscal responsibility and wise investment 
of the taxpayers' money.

                               References

    This report refers to several Public Laws by short title as 
follows: the Budget Control Act of 2011, Public Law 112-25, is 
referenced as the BCA; Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 
Commission Act of 2007, Public Law 110-53, is referenced as the 
9/11 Act; and the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and 
Emergency Assistance Act, Public Law 93-288, is referenced as 
the Stafford Act.
    Any reference in this report to the Secretary shall be 
interpreted to mean the Secretary of Homeland Security.
    Any reference to the Department or DHS shall be interpreted 
to mean the Department of Homeland Security.
    Any reference in this report to a departmental component 
shall be interpreted to mean directorates, components, offices, 
or other organizations in the Department of Homeland Security.
    Any reference to FTE shall mean full-time equivalents.
    Any reference to PPA shall mean program, project, and 
activity.
    Any reference to HSPD shall mean Homeland Security 
Presidential Directive.
    Any reference to GAO shall mean Government Accountability 
Office.
    Any reference to the OIG shall mean the Office of Inspector 
General of the Department of Homeland Security.

                    DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

                                TITLE I

                 DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS

            Office of the Secretary and Executive Management

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $122,350,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     128,769,000
Committee recommendation................................     124,571,000

    The Office of the Secretary and Executive Management 
supports the Department by providing direction, management, and 
policy guidance to operating components. The specific 
activities funded by this account include: the Immediate Office 
of the Secretary; the Immediate Office of the Deputy Secretary; 
the Office of the Chief of Staff; the Office of the Executive 
Secretary; the Office of Policy; the Office of Public Affairs; 
the Office of Legislative Affairs; the Office of General 
Counsel; the Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties; the 
Citizenship and Immigration Services Ombudsman; the Office of 
Intergovernmental Affairs; and the Privacy Officer.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $124,571,000 for the Office of the 
Secretary and Executive Management. This is $4,198,000 below 
the amount requested and $2,221,000 above the amount provided 
in fiscal year 2014. Of this amount, the Committee recommends 
not to exceed $45,000 for official reception and representation 
expenses.
    The Committee includes $5,825,000 for the Citizenship and 
Immigration Services Ombudsman [CISOMB], including an 
additional $521,000 and five positions for employment-based 
case inquiries. During the 2014 reporting period (April 1, 2013 
to March 2014), CISOMB experienced a 33 percent increase in the 
number of employment-based immigration inquiries.
    The Committee recommends $37,559,000 for the Office of 
Policy, including $715,000 to strengthen the capabilities and 
requirements process to ensure that strategic guidance related 
to Departmental investments is turned into results. The Office 
of Policy, Office of the Chief Financial Officer, and Science 
and Technology Directorate are to keep the Committee apprised 
of these efforts.
    The request to restore other reductions taken to OSEM 
offices in prior years is denied due to an insufficient 
justification for the funds. Reductions made in prior years 
were not considered temporary and are a reflection of a 
declining discretionary funding base for DHS and the 
Committee's intent to focus limited resources on the 
Department's critical operational missions.
    The specific levels recommended by the Committee as 
compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget request levels are 
as follows:

                                OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY AND EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Immediate Office of the Secretary.........................             4,050             3,950             3,939
Immediate Office of the Deputy Secretary..................             1,750             1,751             1,740
Office of the Chief of Staff..............................             2,050             2,112             2,062
Executive Secretary.......................................             7,400             7,719             7,477
Office of Policy..........................................            36,500            38,470            37,559
Office of Public Affairs..................................             8,550             8,741             8,591
Office of Legislative Affairs.............................             5,350             5,583             5,403
Office of Intergovernmental Affairs.......................             2,250             2,429             2,273
Office of General Counsel.................................            19,750            21,310            19,950
Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties...............            21,500            22,003            21,719
Citizenship and Immigration Services Ombudsman............             5,250             6,428             5,825
Privacy Officer...........................................             7,950             8,273             8,033
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of the Secretary and Executive                   122,350           128,769           124,571
       Management.........................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                  THE CRISIS OF UNACCOMPANIED CHILDREN

    On May 30, 2014, the Committee received a missive from the 
Deputy Director of the Office of Management and Budget 
acknowledging the severe deficiencies in the President's fiscal 
year 2015 budget request to address the skyrocketing growth in 
apprehensions of unaccompanied alien children [UAC] on our 
southern border. Under the latest projections, OMB states DHS 
would require an additional $164,547,000 ``to expand base 
capabilities such as [CBP] overtime, contract services for care 
and support of UACs, and ICE transportation costs''.
    These children, ranging in age from 17 years to mere 
infants, are primarily coming from El Salvador, Guatemala, and 
Honduras. In many instances they are fleeing violence in their 
home countries, especially from armed criminal gangs, but in 
many others they are being sent for by a parent or guardian who 
is already present in the United States. Experts disagree, but 
the reality is that many of these children are being sent for 
by parents who may be resident in the United States without 
legal status but who have an expectation--real or perceived--
that some sort of immigration reform will be enacted and that 
they would be better off if the entire family were together in 
the United States to obtain the benefits of reform. However, 
U.S. Government officials, including the White House and the 
Secretary of DHS, have stressed that the children now arriving 
at our borders are not eligible for any immigration benefits 
under current or currently envisioned law. Indeed, they are 
placed into removal proceedings upon being processed and 
directed to appear before an immigration court.
    The journey through Central America and Mexico can take 1-2 
months and can be incredibly dangerous well before even 
reaching the U.S. border. Children travel alone, in groups, or 
accompanied by a guide or smuggler. Many children travel packed 
dangerously on tops of trains, nicknamed ``the beast.'' Many 
are physically abused by their guides or others along the way.
    Regardless of why these children are coming, the fact 
remains that they are--in ever increasing numbers. From 6,500 
UACs in fiscal year 2011, and 13,600 in fiscal year 2012, the 
number grew to 24,700 in fiscal year 2013. The most cautious 
estimates suggest 66,000 UACs will be encountered by the end of 
this fiscal year--and more than 145,000 could arrive here in 
fiscal year 2015. In May, the Secretary of Homeland Security 
declared a ``Level IV Condition of Readiness'' on the Southwest 
border indicating the current situation exceeds the manpower 
and resources of ICE and CBP, and that other agency resources 
are needed to address the problem. He appointed a Federal 
coordinator--the Deputy Chief of the Border Patrol--to 
coordinate a Governmentwide response. And on June 2, 2014, at 
the direction of the President, he appointed the FEMA 
Administrator as the Federal Coordinating Official of the 
Unified Coordination Group. He will oversee the ``whole-of-
government'' response to this crisis.
    In addition to the astronomical increase in unaccompanied 
children, the Border Patrol has seen a significant increase in 
apprehensions across the Southwest border this year over recent 
years. Approximately two thirds of those apprehensions are 
occurring in the Rio Grande Valley Sector. For fiscal year 2014 
to date (October 1, 2013, to June 1, 2014), the Rio Grande 
Valley Border Patrol Sector has apprehended over 162,000 
illegal aliens, a 73 percent increase over the same time period 
in fiscal year 2013. For the month of May 2014, the Rio Grande 
Valley averaged approximately 1,200 apprehensions per day. On 
average, 970 of them, or 81 percent, were other-than-Mexican 
nationals. The number of adult female apprehensions is up 93 
percent over last year, and the number of members crossing as 
family units is up even higher, more than 500 percent over last 
year.
    A number of Department of Defense and other government and 
private facilities are being used and/or considered for 
conversion into temporary shelters for these children--who have 
been placed into removal proceedings which will be reviewed by 
an immigration court--as they await proper placement with 
foster or other families by the Department of Health and Human 
Resources' Office of Refugee Resettlement [ORR].
    Border Patrol stations and land ports of entry were never 
designed for detaining and caring for children. It is in the 
best interests of the child to be held in such facilities for 
the shortest period of time possible. And the men and women who 
work at these facilities are trained law enforcement personnel, 
not social workers. They are trained to apprehend and hold 
often dangerous drug traffickers and human smugglers, or to 
process visitors and legal cargo entering our ports. Rather 
than using law enforcement professionals, who need to be on the 
frontlines protecting our borders, DHS is strongly encouraged 
to take advantage of the expertise of non-governmental and 
other organizations who are experts in the field of child and 
family services.
    While the administration has not submitted a budget 
amendment to address the overwhelming increase in UACs, the 
Committee has been able to find other resources to provide 
funding above the request to address this humanitarian issue. 
Included in the bill is an additional $87,605,000 to fund ICE's 
transportation costs of UACs to ORR at HHS. Additionally, there 
is $76,942,000 above the request for CBP to meet the costs 
identified by the administration for the care and feeding of 
these minors while they are in their custody.
    The Committee directs DHS, in conjunction with the 
Department of State and other U.S. Government departments and 
agencies, to work with the governments of Mexico, El Salvador, 
Guatemala, and Honduras to better make known the dangers of 
children coming to the United States.
    With regard to the governments of El Salvador, Guatemala, 
and Honduras, DHS shall also increase its efforts with the 
State Department to expand information campaigns better 
advertising the dangers of heading north and the fact that 
these children will not be eligible for any immigration 
benefits.
    DHS shall, through its ICE attache, work with the 
government of Mexico to further assist in breaking up the 
smuggling rings that bring these children to our borders.
    Finally, the Committee directs CBP and ICE to work with the 
consulates of El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Mexico to 
expedite the removal of children who are found ineligible to 
receive an immigration benefit or who voluntarily chose to 
repatriate to their home country. This would include more 
rapidly obtaining travel documents from the consulates.
    The Committee directs the Department, jointly with the 
Departments of State, Health and Human Services, Justice, and 
the Office of Management and Budget, to brief the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations not later than September 
15, 2014, on the U.S. Government's joint actions taken, and 
future actions to be taken, regarding this humanitarian crisis.
    The briefing shall also include the specific steps taken by 
each agency responsible for administering its responsibilities 
of the Prison Rape Elimination Act to adhere to the act as it 
affects unaccompanied children.
    Separately, DHS shall submit electronic reports on a 
biweekly basis on the number of UACs CBP encounters, the length 
of time they are in CBP's custody before transfer to ORR, and 
the cost estimates for CBP to care for UACs during each 
reporting period. The reports shall also include data from ICE 
on the transportation costs associated with UAC transfer to 
ORR, including how many UACs are being transported and by what 
means (vehicle, commercial air, charter, or via U.S. Government 
asset).
    In addition, given the overall increase in apprehensions, 
the Committee directs the Department to include operational 
statistics on all apprehensions when providing the Committee 
with data on UACs. The Department shall keep the Committee 
apprised of the impacts of increased apprehensions on border 
security and immigration enforcement activities and resource 
needs. For example, the Committee understands that the 
Department is seeking temporary solutions for detention of 
family units and directs the Department to report on the use of 
non-CBP/ICE facilities, such as the Federal Law Enforcement 
Training Center in Artesia, New Mexico, for family units, 
including the average length of stay in detention in these 
facilities, the removal status of these individuals, the impact 
of the facility's use on the local community, and the impact on 
the facility's primary mission. The Committee also directs the 
Department to communicate fully and transparently regarding 
their current and future plans for the new uses of non-CBP/ICE 
facilities with host States and communities. The Committee 
further urges the Department to avoid imposing financial 
burdens on those States and communities as a result of new uses 
of such facilities.
    Finally, a new general provision has been included in the 
bill directing OMB and DHS to ensure that budget documents 
submitted with the fiscal year 2016 budget include, among other 
items, estimates of UACs anticipated to be apprehended during 
the fiscal year and the number of agent or officer hours 
required to process, manage, and care for such children.

                ADMINISTRATIVELY UNCONTROLLABLE OVERTIME

    On January 27, 2014, the Secretary announced interim 
measures concerning administratively uncontrollable overtime 
[AUO]. He recognized the pervasive, and frequently 
inappropriate, use of overtime to supplement the basic pay of 
certain DHS employees, especially in the Border Patrol and the 
National Protection and Preparedness Directorate. As a follow-
up, on May 23, 2014, the Deputy Secretary charged the heads of 
a number of DHS components to improve AUO administration within 
their payroll and human resources systems and announced a DHS-
wide solution to the longstanding problem of inconsistent 
policies and procedures across the Department's components. The 
Committee expects to be regularly updated as this process moves 
forward.

                         REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

    The Committee is fully aware that congressionally required 
reports and expenditure plans can be time-consuming endeavors 
involving a commitment of personnel and leadership attention. 
However, the information contained in these documents is 
essential for the Committee to serve its role as overseer of 
the Federal purse and to ensure better management of government 
spending. While the Department has improved its overall 
performance in getting these documents to the Committee near 
their required due dates, some of the more high profile reports 
have been significantly delayed, or in certain cases, ignored 
completely. The Coast Guard's Capital Investment Plan, which 
was due with the submission of the fiscal year 2015 budget, was 
received by the Committee more than 3 months after it was due, 
the latest this information has ever been provided since it was 
first mandated in fiscal year 2006. Quarterly updates on Jones 
Act violations have not been received, nor has a report 
required in the fiscal year 2013 act examining the 
consolidation of offices focused on detecting weapons of mass 
destruction. Reports on ICE deportations and another on border 
security statistics were received 2 years after the required 
due date, minimizing the value of their contents. Whatever the 
causes are for the delays in getting required information to 
the Committee, the expectation is that the Department's 
performance will improve. In certain circumstances, a 
significant portion of a component's appropriation is withheld 
from obligation until the required report is submitted. Sadly, 
this seems to be the only measure that incentivizes the 
Department to improve upon its poor performance. In an effort 
to reduce the Department's burden on congressional reports, 
several requirements that are no longer necessary or redundant 
have been discontinued.

              QUARTERLY REPORTS OF OPERATIONAL STATISTICS

    The Committee continues its requirement that the Department 
submit quarterly Border Security Status and Detention and 
Removal Operations reports, as directed in prior years. In an 
era of supposed Government transparency, this data should be 
readily available to the Committee and the public. However, the 
Department has failed to meet any of these basic expectations. 
The Committee received the Border Security Status Report for 
the first quarter of fiscal year 2013 just 1 month ago--a 
report covering operational data for a period that closed 17 
months before and long after many of these same statistics had 
been published by DHS. This delay is unacceptable. The 
Committee expects the new Secretary to meet his commitment to 
Congress of timely responses to congressional reports and 
inquiries.
    The Committee expects the Department and all of its 
relevant components to support efforts to enhance migrant 
lifecycle data and the ability to report on illegal entrants 
from apprehension or arrest through final disposition, working 
with the Department of Justice's Executive Office for 
Immigration Review. The Department is encouraged to charter a 
working group to take a programmatic look at this issue. 
Additionally, the Committee encourages the Department, working 
with the Departments of Justice, State, and Health and Human 
Services, to study the ability of DHS information sharing 
systems, such as the DHS Data Framework and Homeland Security 
Information Network, to support this capability. The Committee 
directs the Department and all the relevant components to brief 
the Committee on its migrant lifecycle data effort and related 
efforts to improve its operational immigration and border 
security data reporting, including potential solution, cost and 
schedule considerations, not later than 90 days after the date 
of enactment of this act.

                   STRENGTHENING DHS UNITY OF EFFORT

    The Committee is supportive of the new Secretary's desire 
to improve the Department's planning, programming, budgeting, 
and execution process. To that end, the Secretary has 
identified several areas of emphasis for review, such as the 
management process for investments; strategy, planning, and 
analytical capability; and enhancement of coordinated 
operations. The Committee recognizes that this is an evolving 
effort, but expects frequent updates on progress and adoption 
of new policies, procedures, and guidelines.

                           EXPENDITURE PLANS

    The bill includes language directing the Secretary to 
submit expenditure plans to the Committee with the submission 
of the President's fiscal year 2016 budget request for the 
Offices of Policy, Intergovernmental Affairs, Civil Rights and 
Civil Liberties, Citizenship and Immigration Services 
Ombudsman, and Privacy. Each plan shall include details on: 
staffing by programmatic function area, expenses, contracts, 
obligations, funds by sub-offices (if appropriate), and how 
resources are aligned to specific activities and initiatives in 
fiscal year 2015 and proposed for fiscal year 2016.

                            EVOLVING THREATS

    The demands on the Department of Homeland Security continue 
to grow as the threats from terrorism persistently evolve. 
Whether it is homegrown terrorism; cyber intrusions; 
biological, chemical, or nuclear attacks; food tampering; 
surgically implanted explosives; animal diseases; or varying 
locations and means for crossing our borders (such as tunnels 
or ultra-light aircraft), the Department must be able to 
respond and adapt swiftly to interdict these threats at the 
earliest point possible. Further, naturally occurring events 
put our Nation at risk. Severe storms and wildfires are growing 
more frequent and larger, and earthquakes threaten major 
population areas, posing a risk to critical infrastructure. DHS 
is to continue quarterly threat briefings to the Committee on 
how it is addressing these evolving threats.

                          INTERNATIONAL COSTS

    A recent summary of the Department's DHS attache costs 
revealed an annual budget of $418,983,402 to support nearly 
1,500 positions in international locations. This is up from 
$357,429,275 and 1,200 positions in fiscal year 2014. While the 
Committee recognizes the importance of the Department's 
activities abroad, today's constrained budget environment and 
the growing costs imposed by the State Department demand a more 
critical look at its international footprint, including the 
costs necessary to support this work. The Committee directs the 
Department to examine these costs and develop a plan to reduce 
international costs by 10 percent in fiscal year 2015. The 
Department is to brief the Committee not later than 60 days 
after the date of enactment of this act on this plan including 
efforts to reduce unnecessary overlap and redundancies in its 
attache laydown while maintaining a strong presence 
internationally.

                     DEPARTMENTAL INTEGRITY EFFORTS

    The Committee maintains a strong interest in enhancing the 
investigative relationship between the OIG and CBP regarding 
corruption investigations. However, given the recent personnel 
changes in CBP's Office of Internal Affairs, the Committee 
directs the Deputy Secretary, jointly with the OIG, CBP, and 
ICE, to submit a status update report, not later than 60 days 
after the date of enactment of this act, outlining the specific 
steps being taken to further address the process for 
investigating cases of corruption of DHS employees, and outline 
the plan to address, as a unified DHS, the engagement of DHS 
with the Department of Justice's Border Corruption Task Forces.

                 RECEPTION AND REPRESENTATION EXPENSES

    Within the total amount recommended for the Office of the 
Secretary and Executive Management, up to $45,000 is included 
for reception and representation expenses. The Department is 
directed to submit quarterly reports to the Committee listing 
obligations for all DHS reception and representation expenses 
by purpose and dollar amount, at a level of detail provided in 
fiscal year 2014 and 2015, or in greater detail if that is 
required to explain how funds were used. In recognition of a 
more constrained budget environment and to limit opportunities 
for waste and abuse, the Committee maintains the 12 percent 
reduction implemented over the past two fiscal years for 
reception and representation expenses. The Department shall 
refrain from using funds available for reception and 
representation to purchase unnecessary collectables or 
memorabilia.

                             OVERHEAD COSTS

    The Department should continue to seek to reduce operating 
expenses by placing greater scrutiny on overhead costs and 
looking at creative ways to achieve efficiencies. For instance, 
risk-based security measures at TSA and the deployment of 
higher throughput screening technologies have begun to yield 
real savings in the agency's operational budget. The Department 
should be commended for this achievement and strive to 
streamline where it makes the most sense. For example, field 
personnel could take more advantage of mobile technology and 
automation to reduce labor-intensive and paper-based incident 
reporting. This would also have benefits to operations, such as 
facilitating a near real-time picture of operations for field 
and headquarters leadership. The Committee directs the 
Department to provide a briefing on the cost reductions 
achieved by the Department in fiscal year 2014 and its plan to 
reduce overhead costs within 60 days after the date of 
enactment of this act to include the areas identified in 
Executive Order 13589 as well as consolidating and reducing 
administrative support personnel, as appropriate; consolidating 
and reducing contractor support, as appropriate; taking 
advantage of mobile technology and automation to reduce certain 
support personnel needs; and better managing and reducing 
overtime costs.

               PUBLIC ACCESS TO FEDERALLY FUNDED RESEARCH

    In February 2013, the Office of Science and Technology 
Policy issued guidelines on increasing public access to the 
results of federally funded scientific research. Given the 
importance of the research funded by the Science and Technology 
Directorate and the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, the 
Committee encourages the Department to expeditiously comply. 
DHS is to brief the Committee not later than 30 days after the 
date of enactment of this act on its efforts and internal 
policies established to comply with these guidelines.

      ILLEGAL TRAFFICKING OF WILDLIFE AND OTHER NATURAL RESOURCES

    The Committee notes the recent increase of illegal trade in 
rhinoceros horns, elephant ivory from Africa, and illegally 
harvested timber, the large sums of money that these products 
command on the black market, and the linkages between illegal 
wildlife and natural resources trafficking and other 
transnational organized crimes (including trafficking in 
narcotics, arms, and humans). These activities threaten the 
stability and development of African countries and pose a 
threat to U.S. security interests. The Committee is pleased 
with the Department's membership on the Presidential Task Force 
on Wildlife Trafficking that was established by Executive order 
on July 1, 2013. The Committee agrees that the connections 
between trafficking in illegal wildlife and natural resources 
and financing of groups pose a threat to the United States. The 
Committee directs the Secretary to submit a status update 
report, not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of 
this act, outlining the specific steps being taken by the 
Department to further address wildlife trafficking and illegal 
natural resources trade, the engagement of DHS with the 
Presidential Task Force on Wildlife Trafficking, including 
steps to improve coordination with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service Office of Law Enforcement, steps taken by DHS to 
implement the National Strategy on Wildlife Trafficking, and 
what resources have been aligned to activities and initiatives 
to address wildlife and natural resources trafficking.

                  LIBERIAN DEFERRED ENFORCED DEPARTURE

    The Committee is aware that the current extension of 
Deferred Enforced Departure [DED] for Liberians displaced by 
that country's former armed conflict and widespread civil 
strife expires on September 30, 2014. The Department of 
Homeland Security is encouraged to work with the Executive 
Office of the President and the Department of State to move 
expeditiously on considering an extension of DED for qualifying 
Liberians.

                   TAX-BASED CITIZENSHIP RENUNCIANTS

    Under section 212(a)(10)(E) of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act, the Department of Homeland Security has the 
authority to deny admission to former U.S. citizens that are 
deemed to have expatriated for purposes of tax avoidance. In 
over a decade, the Department has not issued regulations nor 
has it undertaken any significant steps to enforce this 
provision. The Committee directs the Secretary to report within 
90 days on the steps the Department is undertaking to enforce 
this law, including a schedule for issuing guidance or 
regulations, if necessary.

                     COST SAVINGS ON VEHICLE PARTS

    The Committee encourages the Secretary to promote the use 
of remanufactured vehicle parts in place of new parts when they 
are the most cost effective alternative and when doing so would 
not delay vehicle repair or reduce performance quality.

                            TEXTILE PRODUCTS

    Section 604 of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act 
of 2009 (Public Law 111-5) contains restrictions on the 
Department's acquisition of certain foreign textile products. 
Consistent with the Department's conclusion that section 604 is 
permanent law, the Committee expects DHS to maintain compliance 
with its statutory requirements.

                                 CRIMEA

    The Committee remains concerned about the Russian 
aggression in Ukraine, Russia's illegal annexation of Crimea, 
and Russia's illegal and unacceptable efforts to exploit stolen 
Crimean resources, and urges that none of the funds in this act 
be used to recognize, or imply recognition, of the sovereignty 
of the Russian Federation over Crimea, its territory, airspace, 
or territorial waters.

                    STOLEN AND LOST TRAVEL DOCUMENTS

    The Committee is concerned that only a few countries use 
INTERPOL's Stolen/Lost Travel Document [SLTD] database to run 
against international airline passenger information. CBP is the 
world's largest user of this information, an effort that took 
several years to develop but which has had positive results. In 
fiscal year 2013, CBP issued nearly 500 ``no board'' 
recommendations based on stolen and lost document data for 
individuals seeking to board flights bound for the United 
States, including foreign nationals using lost or stolen U.S. 
passports. The Committee directs the Office of Policy, in 
conjunction with CBP and INTERPOL, to issue an annual report on 
use of the SLTD database.

                               AMMUNITION

    In fiscal year 2014, a general provision was included in 
Public Law 113-76 requiring the Secretary to report on the 
purchase and usage of ammunition by the Department with the 
submission of the President's budget. Because this is permanent 
law, this language has not been retained; however, the 
Committee expects receipt of this report with the fiscal year 
2016 request as required by section 569 of Public Law 113-76.

                          DISCONTINUED REPORTS

    The Committee no longer requires the Secretary to submit 
quarterly updates on user fees as originally directed in the 
conference report accompanying Public Law 111-83. Additionally, 
the Department is no longer required to report semiannually to 
the Committee on the current projects tasked to Federally 
Funded Research and Development Centers. The information 
contained in these reports may be requested of the Department 
as part of the Committee's normal oversight responsibilities.

              Office of the Under Secretary for Management

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $196,015,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     195,286,000
Committee recommendation................................     192,692,000

    The Under Secretary for Management oversees management and 
operations of the Department, including procurement and 
acquisition, human capital, and property management. The 
specific activities funded by this account include the 
Immediate Office of the Under Secretary for Management, the 
Office of the Chief Security Officer, the Office of the Chief 
Procurement Officer, the Office of the Chief Human Capital 
Officer, and the Office of the Chief Readiness Support Officer.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $192,692,000 for the Under 
Secretary for Management. This is $2,594,000 below the amount 
requested and $3,323,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2014. Of this amount, the Committee recommends not to 
exceed $2,250 for official reception and representation 
expenses. The Committee's recommendation includes funding for 
oversight of major acquisitions, recruitment and development of 
a skilled workforce, and security measures to safeguard DHS 
personnel, property, facilities, and information. The Committee 
supports the one-DHS concept, which can only be executed when 
such missions are appropriately funded. Effective government is 
not accomplished through excessive funding cuts for these 
essential capabilities.
    The recommendation provides $8,000,000 for the Human 
Resource Information Technology Program, $185,000 above the 
fiscal year 2014 enacted level and $1,878,000 below the 
request. The reduction below the request reflects available 
carryover balances for the program.
    The specific levels recommended by the Committee, as 
compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget request levels, are 
as follows:

                                  OFFICE OF THE UNDER SECRETARY FOR MANAGEMENT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Immediate Office of the Under Secretary for Management....             2,700             2,757             2,740
Office of the Chief Security Officer......................            64,000            63,597            63,391
Office of the Chief Procurement Officer...................            65,000            64,036            63,726
Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer:
    Salaries and Expenses.................................            22,000            21,253            21,156
    Human Resources Information Technology Program........             7,815             9,878             8,000
Office of the Chief Readiness Officer:
    Salaries and expenses.................................            30,000            29,272            29,186
    Nebraska Avenue Complex...............................             4,500             4,493             4,493
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of the Under Secretary for Management.           196,015           195,286           192,692
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

         COMPREHENSIVE AND QUARTERLY ACQUISITION STATUS REPORTS

    In order to obtain the information necessary for in-depth 
congressional oversight, statutory language is included in this 
act that requires a Comprehensive Acquisition Status Report to 
be included as part of the submission of the President's fiscal 
year 2016 budget, with quarterly updates to be submitted 45 
days after the completion of each quarter. The requirements for 
the reports are described in House Report 112-331.

                          PROCUREMENT PROCESS

    The Committee commends the Department for its renewed 
interest and efforts to formalize a joint requirements process 
and continue to provide greater rigor and oversight of major 
acquisitions. While that focus on requirements and major 
acquisitions is critical, it is clear that DHS is not 
effectively managing what should be more routine contract 
actions. The Committee consistently hears complaints and 
frustration from industry, DHS program managers, DHS contract 
officials, and DHS budget personnel about the lack of strategy 
associated with how DHS approaches many of its procurements; 
the bureaucratic issues that drive how procurements move or 
fail to move to award; the lack of communication among those 
involved in the process; and how unreliable DHS acquisition 
forecasts are. As a result, resources are wasted, good people 
leave DHS, and the mission suffers.
    In order to more effectively meet mission needs, as well as 
institute more transparent and streamlined procurement 
processes, the Committee directs the Under Secretary for 
Management to outline the entire procurement process from need 
identification to contract award, extension, or modification, 
including any protest actions or other delays. This effort 
shall include identifying the accountable program or contract 
personnel responsible for each step and setting goals for the 
time each step should take. The Under Secretary shall brief the 
Committee not later than 180 days after the date of enactment 
of this act on how DHS will approach this effort, including how 
the process will be segmented as well as the cost and schedule 
for this effort. The Committee believes that by shedding light 
on the procurement process, DHS can facilitate improvements 
that will reduce the cost overruns from delays, and 
uncertainty; give DHS programs, customers, suppliers, and 
industry better insight into DHS' needs and schedules; and 
deliver mission needs in a timely, efficient manner.
    The Department has made strides in designating component 
acquisition executives [CAE] to facilitate improvements in 
acquisition strategy across the Department. However, in many 
components, it appears that procurements are run separately 
from the organization where the CAE sits, which may limit the 
CAE's authority to address many of the procurement issues 
outlined above. The Committee directs the Under Secretary to 
consider the most effective use of the CAEs in instituting more 
transparent, streamlined procurement processes.
    The Committee encourages the Under Secretary for Management 
to examine whether level one acquisition programs within DHS 
are actually being managed by appropriately certified program 
managers and how this is impacting performance. The 180 day 
briefing by the Under Secretary on the contracting process 
shall include a discussion of this issue and what steps, if 
any, are being taken to address it.

         GAO REVIEW OF SELECTED DHS MAJOR ACQUISITION PROJECTS

    While DHS continues to make progress to improve oversight 
and accountability throughout the agency, acquisition 
management remains on the GAO ``high risk'' list. The Committee 
requests that GAO develop a plan for ongoing reviews of DHS' 
major acquisition projects. This plan should include an 
assessment of the extent to which the programs are on track to 
meet cost, schedule, and capability goals; the status of 
testing; and any common risks and challenges the Department 
faces in managing its large acquisition projects. The 
Department shall provide access to all necessary data, as 
determined by GAO, in order for the reviews to be completed and 
provided in a timely manner to the Committee. The Committee 
believes that these GAO reviews will be valuable in identifying 
cost overrun and schedule slippage problems early, so they can 
be addressed immediately.

                             HIRING DELAYS

    The Committee is concerned with the length of time it takes 
to hire an employee at several DHS components. According to 
information from the Office of Personnel Management, the 
average number of days to hire an employee at DHS was 146 days 
in 2013, while the Government-wide average was 90 days. Certain 
areas of concern are with the Department's law enforcement 
components such as CBP and the United States Secret Service 
where, on average, it takes 278 days and 327 days, 
respectively, to hire an employee. Non-law enforcement hires at 
the headquarters level take 106 days on average and 198 days 
for senior executive employees. The President's 2010 memorandum 
on improving the Federal Hiring and Recruitment process said 
that ``Americans must be able to apply for Federal jobs through 
a commonsense hiring process and agencies must be able to 
select high-quality candidates efficiently and quickly.'' 
Unless the Department improves upon its lengthy hiring process, 
the best and brightest candidates will more than likely choose 
other Federal agencies or opt for the private sector. DHS is to 
report to the Committees not later than 60 days after the date 
of enactment of this act on its strategy to decrease the number 
of days it takes to hire and report quarterly on time to hire 
statistics by component.

                       HEADQUARTERS CONSOLIDATION

    A general provision is included in the bill providing 
$48,600,000 for the ``Office of the Under Secretary for 
Management'' for costs associated with headquarters 
consolidation and mission support consolidation. The Under 
Secretary shall submit an expenditure plan no later than 90 
days after the date of enactment of this act detailing how 
these funds will be allocated, including a revised schedule and 
cost estimates for headquarters consolidation. Quarterly 
briefings are required on headquarters and mission support 
consolidation activities, including any deviation from the 
expenditure plan.

                 Office of the Chief Financial Officer

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $46,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      94,626,000
Committee recommendation................................      48,213,000

    The Office of the Chief Financial Officer is responsible 
for the fiscal management and financial accountability of the 
Department of Homeland Security. The Office of the Chief 
Financial Officer provides guidance and oversight of the 
Department's budget execution while ensuring that funds are 
allocated and expended in accordance with relevant laws and 
policies. This account funds the Budget Division, Office of 
Financial Operations, Office of Program Analysis and 
Evaluation, Office of Financial Management, Resource Management 
Transition Office, and the Office of the Government 
Accountability Office/Office of Inspector General Audit 
Liaison.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $48,213,000 for the Office of the 
Chief Financial Officer [OCFO]. This is $46,413,000 below the 
amount requested and $2,213,000 above the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2014.
    The recommendation includes $39,500,000 for Financial 
Systems Modernization as a general provision in title V of this 
act, $5,870,000 below the request. The reduction below the 
request is due to program delays that have occurred since the 
budget request was formulated.
    The recommendation reduces the request for personnel 
compensation right sizing by $847,000. Reductions made in prior 
years were not considered temporary and are a reflection of a 
declining discretionary funding base for DHS and the 
Committee's intent to focus limited resources on the 
Department's critical operational missions.
    The Committee includes the requested increase to improve 
the Department's capacity to evaluate capability gaps, 
prioritize mission needs, and inform tradeoffs in the 
allocation of program resources. The OCFO, with the Office of 
Policy and Science and Technology Directorate are to keep the 
Committee apprised of these efforts.

                       COST OF LIVING ADJUSTMENT

    The Committee assumes the cost of living adjustment for 
civilian employees across the Department will be absorbed 
within amounts appropriated in this act.

                    FINANCIAL SYSTEMS MODERNIZATION

    For the first time, the Department achieved an unmodified 
(clean) opinion on all of its financial statements in 2013. 
While this is a significant achievement that should be 
applauded, the Department's independent auditor identified 
several deficiencies, four of which were considered material 
weaknesses. That is why the Department must continue to improve 
the reliability and transparency of its financial data. The DHS 
OIG, in response to the independent audit recommended that OCFO 
``continue the Financial Systems Modernization initiative, and 
make necessary improvements to the Department's financial 
management systems and supporting IT security controls.'' In 
that regard, DHS is to maintain frequent communications with 
the Committee on financial management improvement plans 
necessary to support the Department's missions, including total 
resource requirements by fiscal year and a timeline for 
implementation with discrete milestones.

                           UNAUTHORIZED FEES

    The Committee has included a new general provision to 
address the executive branch's practice of submitting budgets 
that assume additional offsetting collections from unauthorized 
fee increases. This year, the budget assumes the collection of 
$570,000,000 in new aviation security fees that have not been 
authorized. As a result, the Committee is forced to offset 
these unauthorized fees with scarce discretionary budget 
authority. The Committee expects this practice to end and has 
included language prohibiting funding for personnel who prepare 
or submit appropriations language as part of the President's 
budget submission that assumes revenues or reflects a reduction 
from the previous year due to user fees proposals that have not 
been enacted into law prior to the submission of the budget 
unless the budget submission identifies which additional 
spending reductions should occur in the event the user fees 
proposals are not enacted prior to the convening of a committee 
bill or conference for the fiscal year 2016 appropriations act.

                               PAY REFORM

    The Department has proposed two changes to certain 
components' pay structures after the fiscal year 2014 bill was 
enacted. While the Committee recognizes that the Department has 
the authority to make these adjustments, it expects to be kept 
informed of these initiatives before they occur. Therefore, the 
bill includes a general provision prohibiting the obligation of 
funds for any new structural pay reform that affects more than 
100 employees or costs more than $5,000,000 in a single year 
without a 30-day notification period to the Committee.

                  BUDGET EXECUTION AND STAFFING REPORT

    The Committee continues a general provision requiring the 
Department to continue to submit to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations a monthly budget execution report 
showing the status of obligations and costs for all components 
of the Department and on-board staffing levels (Federal 
employees and contractors). The report shall include the total 
obligational authority appropriated (new budget authority plus 
unobligated carryover), undistributed obligational authority, 
amount allotted, current year obligations, unobligated 
authority (the difference between total obligational authority 
and current year obligations), beginning unexpended 
obligations, year-to-date costs, and ending unexpended 
obligations. This budget execution information is to be 
provided at the level of detail shown in the tables displayed 
at the end of this report for each departmental component and 
the Working Capital Fund. The report is to be submitted no 
later than 30 days after the close of each month.

                           EXPENDITURE PLANS

    The Committee continues requiring expenditure plans for 
specific DHS programs. These plans are intended to provide 
Congress with information to effectively oversee a particular 
program and hold the Department accountable for program 
results. Expenditure plans required by the Committee shall 
include, at a minimum: a description of how the plan satisfies 
any relevant legislative conditions; planned capabilities and 
benefits; cost and schedule commitments; measures of progress 
against commitments made in previous plans; how the program is 
being managed to provide reasonable assurance that the promised 
program capabilities, benefits, and cost and schedule 
commitments will be achieved; historical funding for the 
program, if applicable; and an obligation and outlay schedule.

                      ANNUAL BUDGET JUSTIFICATIONS

    The Chief Financial Officer is directed to ensure that 
fiscal year 2016 budget justifications for classified and 
unclassified budgets of all Department components are submitted 
on February 3, 2015, concurrent with the President's budget 
submission to Congress. The justifications shall include:
  --Detailed data and explanatory descriptions for each 
        appropriations request and for each PPA reflected in 
        the table accompanying this statement, including 
        offices that have been identified as PPAs. Information 
        regarding actual and planned accomplishments should be 
        in quantifiable terms and demonstrate a direct 
        relationship to funding;
  --Tables that reflect actual and estimated funding by PPA for 
        fiscal years 2015 and 2016; identify each increase, 
        decrease, transfer, and staffing change proposed in 
        fiscal year 2016; and explain such year-to-year changes 
        in terms that are clear and unambiguous, and exclude 
        nonspecific terms such as ``technical adjustment'' or 
        ``administrative savings'' unless accompanied by a 
        detailed explanation. To establish a common baseline 
        reference, the fiscal year 2015 discretionary data 
        shall tie to the fiscal year 2015 discretionary total 
        in the table accompanying this statement or have a 
        table identifying each change. Explanations of 
        adjustments to base funding, whether increases or 
        decreases, should be specific and compared to prior 
        year activity level not merely the entire PPA level, 
        and programmatic changes and initiatives should be 
        clearly identified and justified;
  --For each PPA that is comprised of acquisition and 
        procurement activity, the justification should address 
        all proposed spending using a zero-based budget 
        description;
  --Information by appropriations account and PPA on all 
        reimbursable agreements and significant uses of the 
        Economy Act for each fiscal year;
  --An accurate detailed table identifying the last year that 
        authorizing legislation was enacted into law for each 
        appropriation PPA, including the amount of the 
        authorization, when the authorization expires, and the 
        appropriation in the last year of authorization;
  --The text and citation of all Department appropriations 
        provisions enacted to date that are permanent law;
  --Explanations and justifications for all proposed 
        legislative language changes, whether they are new or 
        amend existing law, whether they are substantive or 
        technical in nature, with an annotated comparison of 
        proposed versus existing language; and
  --A report on the status of overdue Committee reports, plans, 
        and briefings for each of fiscal years 2014 and 2015.
    The Committee also expects the OCFO to monitor the overuse 
of funding realignments by the Transportation Security 
Administration and the National Protection and Programs 
Directorate. The annual budget restructuring by these 
components creates a budget maze that makes it difficult to 
maintain proper oversight of appropriations.

                 FUTURE YEARS HOMELAND SECURITY PROGRAM

    A statutory provision is included requiring the Secretary 
to submit a Future Years Homeland Security Program budget as 
part of the fiscal year 2016 budget justification. The report 
is to display funding by appropriation account and subordinate 
program, project, or activity. The report shall be in 
unclassified form so as to be accessible to the general public. 
Having a forward-looking budget forecast provides a reasonable 
understanding of future program and acquisition needs and the 
proportionate resources needed to execute the Department's 
mission of protection and defense of the homeland, as well as 
emergency planning and response.

                Office of the Chief Information Officer

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $257,156,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     256,343,000
Committee recommendation................................     254,001,000

    The Office of the Chief Information Officer is responsible 
for oversight of information technology [IT] development, 
oversight of IT acquisition, alignment of IT systems and 
infrastructure to the enterprise architecture to support the 
missions and activities of the Department.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $254,001,000, of which $95,078,000 
is for salaries and expenses, and $158,923,000 is to be 
available through fiscal year 2016 for Department-wide 
technology investments overseen by the Office of the Chief 
Information Officer [OCIO]. The recommendation is $2,342,000 
below the amount requested and $3,155,000 below the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2014.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                                     OFFICE OF THE CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Salaries and expenses.....................................           115,000            95,444            95,078
Information technology services...........................            34,000            38,627            38,627
Infrastructure and security activities....................            45,000            52,140            52,140
Homeland security data network............................            63,156            70,132            68,156
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of the Chief Information Officer......           257,156           256,343           254,001
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       MULTIYEAR INVESTMENT PLAN

    The Committee includes bill language requiring a multiyear 
investment plan be submitted to the Committees on 
Appropriations with the fiscal year 2016 budget submission to 
Congress. As the OCIO develops the fiscal year 2016 plan, it 
shall take proper stock of all IT investments and identify and 
adopt best practices, such as those identified by GAO in an 
October 2011 report, GAO-12-7, to encourage proper management 
of these investments.

                 INFRASTRUCTURE AND SECURITY ACTIVITIES

    The Committee recommendation includes $52,140,000, for 
development and acquisition of IT equipment, software, 
services, and related activities. The Committee believes the 
OCIO leads and manages efforts vital to the continued 
modernization of the Department's IT infrastructure.
    The Committee is pleased with the Department's leadership 
in data center consolidation. The Committee agrees with the 
Department's position that these efforts will lead to 
operational efficiencies, reduced geographic footprint, data 
sharing synergies, reduced energy consumption, and clarity of 
mission throughout the Department. The Committee understands 
that the Department has successfully consolidated 18 out of 42 
major data centers and has sufficient resources to complete all 
42. Although no funding is requested in fiscal year 2015 to 
continue the migration project, due to unanticipated 
efficiencies in migration, the Committee requests that the 
Department make it aware of any resources not yet provided but 
which are needed to complete the consolidation.

            SHARING AND SAFEGUARDING CLASSIFIED INFORMATION

    The recommendation includes $26,024,000 to implement 
information sharing and safeguarding measures to protect 
classified national security information. This is necessary in 
order to be compliant with measures resulting from Executive 
Order 13587--Structural Reforms to Improve the Security of 
Classified Networks and the Responsible Sharing and 
Safeguarding of Classified Information. The OCIO is to brief 
the Committee by April 15, 2015, on the implementation 
strategy, development schedule, and milestones for improving 
the protection of national security information held by the 
Department. The Committee also expects any structural reforms 
to be consistent with appropriate protections for privacy and 
civil liberties.

                            FEE-FOR-SERVICE

    The Committee understands that DHS has a plan for 
consolidation and adoption of shared services across the 
Department. The Committee recognizes that other Departments 
have established a Fee-for-Service Shared Services Center that 
offers software design, development, and sustainment for other 
Federal agencies, and State and local government. The Committee 
urges the DHS CIO to look into all possible shared service 
models, including the Fee-for-Service model, to garner all 
potential efficiencies and cost savings as it begins 
implementing shared services across the Department.

                       MAJOR IT PROJECT SPENDING

    The Committee continues to be concerned with several large 
DHS IT projects that have experienced lengthy delays, cost 
overruns, and bureaucratic bottlenecks. DHS has spent years 
attempting to improve major IT programs that are critical to 
the homeland security mission, such as FEMA's Logistics Supply 
Chain Management System, ICE's Student And Exchange Visitor 
Information System, and TECS modernization. However, despite 
the significant investment of taxpayer dollars in these 
efforts, the Department has been unable to produce timely 
results and millions of dollars have been wasted. These 
programs have suffered from improper requirements management, 
poor contractor performance, inadequate change management 
procedures, and poor coordination with stakeholders. The 
Committee directs the OCIO to be actively involved in either 
getting these projects back on track or finding a different 
solution. The OCIO is to brief the Committee not later than 60 
days after the date of enactment of this act on the plan 
forward to ensure these programs are meeting the operational 
needs of the Department in an efficient and cost-effective 
manner.

                        Analysis and Operations

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $300,490,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     302,268,000
Committee recommendation................................     295,269,000

    The account supports activities to improve the analysis and 
sharing of threat information, including activities of the 
Office of Intelligence and Analysis [I&A;] and the Office of 
Operations Coordination.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $295,269,000 for Analysis and 
Operations. This is $6,999,000 below the amount requested and 
$5,221,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2014. The 
details of these recommendations are included in a classified 
annex accompanying this report.

                   DHS INTELLIGENCE EXPENDITURE PLAN

    The Committee requires the Department's Chief Intelligence 
Officer to brief the Committee on the I&A; expenditure plan for 
fiscal year 2015 no later than 60 days after the date of 
enactment of this act. The plan shall include the following:
  --fiscal year 2015 expenditures and staffing allotted for 
        each program as compared to fiscal years 2013 and 2014;
  --all funded versus on-board positions, including Federal 
        FTE, contractors, and reimbursable and nonreimbursable 
        detailees;
  --a plan, including dates or timeframes for achieving key 
        milestones;
  --allocation of funding within each PPA for individual 
        programs and a description of the desired outcomes for 
        fiscal year 2015; and
  --actions taken to address the recommendations in GAO report 
        (GAO-14-397), ``Additional Actions Needed to Address 
        Analytic Priorities and Workforce Challenges''.

                     STATE AND LOCAL FUSION CENTERS

    The Committee directs I&A; to continue semiannual briefings 
on the State and Local Fusion Centers program.

                      Office of Inspector General

Appropriations, 2014\1\.................................    $115,437,000
Budget estimate, 2015\1\................................     121,457,000
Committee recommendation\1\.............................     118,617,000

\1\Excludes $24,000,000 made available from the FEMA Disaster Relief 
Fund.

    This account finances the Office of Inspector General's 
activities, including audits, inspections, investigations, and 
other reviews of programs and operations of the Department of 
Homeland Security to promote economy, efficiency, and 
effectiveness and to prevent and detect fraud, waste, and 
abuse.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $118,617,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General [OIG], $2,840,000 below the comparable amount 
requested and $3,180,000 above the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2014. In addition, the Committee includes bill language 
transferring $24,000,000 requested by the OIG for audits and 
investigations related to natural disasters from the Disaster 
Relief Fund [DRF]. The Committee supports the budget request 
for training and investments to upgrade the capabilities and 
morale of the OIG workforce. The Committee has reduced the 
level of OIG funding from the budget request due to the 
expiration of the 7-year comprehensive auditing period, 
directed by the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007, which required 
audits of every U.S. State and territory receiving grants under 
the Urban Area Security Initiative or the State Homeland 
Security Grant Programs.
    The Committee directs the Inspector General to submit a 
plan of expenditure for all funds no later than 30 days after 
the date of enactment of this act. For fiscal year 2016 and 
thereafter, OIG shall submit a detailed expenditure plan with 
its annual budget justification documents. The plan shall 
include: (1) expenditures of each office within the OIG, 
including the Offices of Audits, Integrity and Quality 
Oversight, Emergency Management Oversight, Investigations, 
Information Technology Audits, Management and Inspections; (2) 
the number of FTE on board; (3) the number of FTE vacancies and 
a timetable to fill those vacancies; (4) budget detail by 
function areas such as travel, rent, office supplies, and 
equipment costs; and (5) details on how resources are aligned 
to specific activities and initiatives in fiscal year 2015 as 
well as proposed for fiscal year 2016. Finally, the spend plan 
shall also include all DRF transfers (which shall satisfy the 
requirements for notification of DRF transfers under section 
503 of this act).

                              FEMA AUDITS

    The Committee notes the continuing process for FEMA and the 
OIG to identify preventative measures to eliminate waste, 
fraud, and abuse; and expects specific solutions and measurable 
results within fiscal year 2015.

                          INTEGRITY OVERSIGHT

    The Committee remains concerned about the potential for 
increased corruption due to the rapid hiring in CBP and ICE 
since fiscal year 2005. Incidents continue to highlight the 
need for integrity oversight. To avoid corruption and 
misconduct, it is imperative that all officers and agents, 
especially new hires, receive comprehensive training in ethics 
and public integrity. The OIG provides ethics training to all 
agencies and is in charge of investigating all allegations of 
criminal misconduct throughout the Department. It is essential 
that the OIG, CBP, and ICE work jointly and cooperatively to 
combat corruption. The Committee has made a deliberate effort 
in the past several appropriations acts to provide additional 
funding specifically for integrity investigations. The 
Committee directs OIG to submit an expenditure plan of 
integrity oversight funds in coordination with CBP and ICE, 
which shall be submitted along with its annual expenditure 
plan.

                     CONFERENCES AND SPECIAL EVENTS

    The Committee continues the requirement for OIG to report 
to the Committees not later than 30 days after the end of 
fiscal year 2015 on DHS spending on conferences, ceremonies, 
and similar events, based on quarterly reporting to OIG. The 
report shall substantiate DHS compliance with all applicable 
laws and regulations and describe in detail the total costs to 
the Government associated with events. It shall include the 
number of conferences held, the amount of funds obligated, and 
expenses by appropriation or other source of funding, including 
budget accounts and subaccounts used to pay for events.

                                TITLE II

               SECURITY, ENFORCEMENT, AND INVESTIGATIONS

                   U.S. Customs and Border Protection

                                SUMMARY

    U.S. Customs and Border Protection is responsible for 
enforcing laws regarding admission of foreign-born persons into 
the United States, and ensuring that all goods and persons 
entering and exiting the United States do so legally.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends total resources of 
$12,567,478,000, including direct appropriations of 
$10,683,584,000 and estimated fee collections of 
$1,883,894,000.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                               U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION--FUNDING SUMMARY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Appropriations:
    Salaries and expenses.................................         8,145,568         8,326,386         8,320,391
    Small airport user fee................................             5,000             9,000             9,000
    Automation modernization..............................           816,523           812,410           806,699
    Border Security Fencing, Infrastructure, and                     351,454           362,466           362,466
     Technology [BSFIT]...................................
    Air and Marine operations.............................           805,068           708,685           706,569
    Construction and facilities management................           456,278           482,205           478,459
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Appropriations...............................        10,579,891        10,701,152        10,683,584
                                                           =====================================================
Estimated fee collections:
    Immigration inspection user fee.......................           598,552           630,218           630,218
    Immigration enforcement fines.........................               773               752               752
    ESTA..................................................            55,168            54,929            54,929
    Land border inspection fee............................            42,941            43,931            43,931
    COBRA fee.............................................           500,134           482,501           482,501
    APHIS inspection fee..................................           355,216           464,514           464,514
    Global entry user fee.................................            34,835            91,192            91,192
    Puerto Rico Trust Fund................................            98,602            98,076            98,076
    Virgin Island fee.....................................            11,302            11,789            11,789
    Customs Unclaimed Goods...............................             5,992             5,992             5,992
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Estimated fee collections....................         1,703,515         1,883,894         1,883,894
                                                           =====================================================
      Total, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, available        12,283,406        12,585,046        12,567,478
       funding............................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $8,145,568,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   8,326,386,000
Committee recommendation................................   8,320,391,000

    The U.S. Customs and Border Protection [CBP] Salaries and 
Expenses appropriation provides funds for border security, 
immigration, customs, agricultural inspections, regulating and 
facilitating international trade, collecting import duties, and 
enforcing U.S. trade laws. In addition to directly appropriated 
resources, fee collections are available for the operations of 
CBP from the following sources:
    Immigration Inspection User Fee.--CBP collects user fees to 
fund the costs of international inspections activities at 
airports and seaports, as authorized by the Immigration and 
Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1356).
    Electronic System for Travel Authorization Fee.--CBP 
collects fees to cover the cost of operating and implementing a 
system to pre-screen visitors from countries participating in 
the Visa Waiver Program prior to their arrival in the United 
States to avoid security risks, as authorized by section 
711(h)(3)(B) of the 9/11 Act (Public Law 110-53).
    Immigration Enforcement Fine.--CBP collects fines from 
owners of transportation lines and persons for unauthorized 
landing of aliens, as authorized by the Immigration and 
Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1356).
    Land Border Inspection Fee.--CBP collects fees for 
processing applications for the Dedicated Commuter Lanes 
program, the Automated Permit Ports program, the Canadian 
Border Boat Landing program, and both Canadian and Mexican Non-
Resident Alien Border Crossing Cards, as authorized by the 
Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1356).
    Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act [COBRA] 
Fee.--CBP collects fees for inspection services involving 
customs-related functions. The COBRA user fee statutory 
authority (19 U.S.C. 58c) specifies the types of expenses to be 
reimbursed and the order for the reimbursement of these types 
of expenses.
    Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Inspection 
Fee.--CBP receives as a transfer a distribution of agriculture 
inspection fees collected by the United States Department of 
Agriculture. The user fees, as authorized by the Food, 
Agriculture, Conservation, and Trade Act of 1990 (21 U.S.C. 
136), are charged to offset costs for the services related to 
the importation, entry, or exportation of animals and animal 
products.
    Global Entry User Fee.--CBP collects fees to cover the cost 
of a registered traveler program to expedite screening and 
processing of international passengers as authorized under the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2008, section 565(3)(B).
    U.S. Virgin Islands Fee Fund.--The U.S. Virgin Islands 
[USVI] are an unincorporated territory of the United States and 
although a U.S. territory, the USVI is expressly excluded from 
the definition of customs territory of the United States. The 
importation of goods into the USVI is governed by Virgin 
Islands law. CBP collects duties on behalf of the USVI and 
deposits them into the USVI Fee Fund. The account is now known 
as the U.S. Virgin Islands Fees Fund, in which duties and taxes 
collected in the USVI are deposited. The account is managed 
annually as a reimbursable account with any remaining funds 
remitted back to the USVI at the conclusion of the fiscal year.
    Puerto Rico Trust Fund.--Customs duties, taxes, and fees 
collected in Puerto Rico by CBP are deposited in the Puerto 
Rico Trust Fund. After providing for the expenses of 
administering CBP activities in Puerto Rico, the remaining 
amounts are transferred to the Treasurer of Puerto Rico 
pursuant to 48 U.S.C. sections 740 and 795.
    Small Airport User Fee.--The User Fee Airports Program 
authorized under 19 U.S.C. 58b and administered under 19 U.S.C. 
58c(b)(9)(A)(i), authorizes inspection services to be provided 
to participating small airports on a fully reimbursable basis. 
The fees charged under this program are set forth in a 
memorandum of agreement between the small airport facility and 
the agency, and may be adjusted annually as costs and 
requirements change.
    Unclaimed Goods.--Any goods entered or un-entered 
merchandise (except merchandise under section 557 of the Tariff 
Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1557), but including 
merchandise entered for transportation in bond or for 
exportation) which remain in Customs custody for 6 months from 
the date of importation or a lesser period for special 
merchandise as provided by section 127.28(c), (d), and (h), and 
without all estimated duties and storage or other charges 
having been paid, shall be considered unclaimed and abandoned. 
This account represents the proceeds from the liquidation of 
that account.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $8,320,391,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses of U.S. Customs and Border Protection for fiscal year 
2015, including $3,274,000 from the Harbor Maintenance Trust 
Fund and, of which $2,313,000,000 is derived from the 
merchandise processing fee. This is $5,995,000 below the 
request and $174,823,000 above the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2014.
    The Committee includes bill language making available up to 
$150,000 for payment for rental space for preclearance 
operations and $1,000,000 for payments to informants. The 
Committee also includes bill language placing a $35,000 annual 
limit on overtime paid to any employee and capping official 
reception and representation expenses at $34,425. A general 
provision is included to allow CBP to access collections 
associated with the U.S.-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement 
Implementation Act, Public Law 112-42. A new general provision 
is included adjusting the Immigration User Fee to fund the 
hiring of 1,000 new CBP officers.
    The Committee does not include the proposed $1,500,000 
reduction for continued development of the Customs-Trade 
Partnership against Terrorism web portal, but includes the 
other proposed reductions as detailed in the Congressional 
justifications. Additionally, the bill reduces the ``Border 
security and control'' PPA by $15,000,000 due to clearer 
management direction on the appropriate use of administratively 
uncontrollable overtime.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                            U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION--SALARIES AND EXPENSES
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Salaries and expenses:
    Headquarters, management, and administration:
        Commissioner......................................            23,656            27,245            27,151
        Chief Counsel.....................................            42,921            45,663            45,483
        Congressional Affairs.............................             2,466             2,514             2,504
        Internal Affairs..................................           149,061           140,141           139,493
        Public Affairs....................................            11,934            13,064            13,009
        Training and Development..........................            76,082            71,926            71,892
        Technology Innovation, Acquisition................            22,788            25,374            25,277
        Intelligence/Investigative Liaison................            60,747            61,512            61,235
        Administration....................................           403,473           386,793           382,819
        Rent..............................................           405,802           409,490           409,490
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Headquarters, management, and                  1,198,930         1,183,722         1,178,353
           administration.................................
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
    Border security inspections and trade facilitation:
        Inspections, trade, and travel facilitation at             2,856,573         2,830,872         2,806,224
         ports of entry...................................
        Harbor maintenance fee collection (Trust Fund)....             3,274             3,274             3,274
        International cargo screening.....................            67,461            69,173            68,902
        Other international programs......................            24,000            25,706            25,548
        Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism [C-               40,912            40,841            42,119
         TPAT]............................................
        Trusted Traveler Programs.........................             5,811             5,811             5,811
        Inspection and detection technology investments...           112,004           123,866           117,811
        National Targeting Center.........................            65,106            70,592            70,123
        Training..........................................            40,703            33,906            33,880
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Border security inspections and trade          3,215,844         3,204,041         3,173,692
           facilitation...................................
                                                           =====================================================
Border security and control between ports of entry:
    Border security and control...........................         3,675,236         3,882,015         3,911,955
    Training..............................................            55,558            56,608            56,391
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Border security and control between ports          3,730,794         3,938,623         3,968,346
       of entry...........................................
                                                           =====================================================
      Total, Salaries and expenses........................         8,145,568         8,326,386         8,320,391
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      UNACCOMPANIED ALIEN CHILDREN

    Nowhere in the Federal Government is the UAC burden being 
felt more deeply than within U.S. Customs and Border Protection 
[CBP]. For more than 5 years, the women and men of the Border 
Patrol and the Office of Field Operations working along the 
Southwest border on a daily basis have been dealing with 
apprehending, caring for, processing, and transporting 
unaccompanied alien children [UAC]. Annually about 5,000-6,000 
UACs were encountered, until fiscal year 2012, when the trickle 
became a torrent. There has been a more than doubling of UAC 
encounters year after year. Nearly 25,000 were encountered in 
fiscal year 2013 and estimates for this fiscal year are 
approaching 70,000. While initially estimating 127,000 UACs 
next year, the number has risen to 145,000. This growth cannot 
be sustained.
    The burden falls on CBP because it is the frontline 
encountering these children. Previously, the majority of the 
UACs were teenaged boys between 14-17 years of age. The more 
recent--and more troubling--trend is younger children and many 
more young girls. One can only imagine the horrific events they 
encountered trekking from Central America to South Texas. 
Because of the growth in the more diverse and tender aged 
population, special care is required--care that is not part of 
a law enforcement officer's training. These men and women's 
time should be spent protecting the border and arresting 
smugglers and dangerous contraband.
    As the budget request did not include funding for this 
influx of UACs, the Committee has worked with the Department 
and OMB, and the Department has identified requirements for CBP 
above the request of $76,942,000. Of this amount, $600,000 is 
for the Office of Field Operations response to UACs and 
remainder is for the Border Patrol. These funds will address 
shortfalls in overtime, contract services for local 
transportation and guard services, child care, medical 
services, increased waste removal and janitorial services, food 
service contracts, and temporary shelters. The Committee 
directs the Department to keep it regularly informed of any 
changes in both UAC encounters and/or cost requirements to 
respond to this humanitarian crisis. Bill language is also 
included providing additional flexibility to move resources to 
ensure the care and transport of UACs.

                             FINANCIAL PLAN

    To help facilitate congressional oversight, CBP is directed 
to submit to the Committee within 60 days after the date of 
enactment of this act, a financial plan reflecting a detailed 
breakout of funding by office for each PPA in the ``Salaries 
and Expenses'' appropriation. This financial plan shall include 
a comparison by office to the prior year plan amount and actual 
expenditures for fiscal year 2014 and planned expenditures for 
fiscal year 2015.

                   PORT OF ENTRY STAFFING AND HIRING

    CBP's Office of Field Operations [OFO] operates 329 ports 
of entry [POEs] 24 hours a day and 7 days a week, welcoming to 
the U.S. almost 1 million people daily by air, land, and sea. 
In addition to CBP's primary security mission, CBP is the 
second-largest government revenue generator for the United 
States, after the Internal Revenue Service. On average, OFO 
collects $116,000,000 a day in fees, duties, and tariffs. In 
fiscal year 2013, OFO processed $2,380,000,000,000 worth of 
trade through U.S. POEs.
    Visitor volume in 2014 is expected to increase 3.5 percent 
and reach 72.2 million visitors who stay one or more nights in 
the United States. This growth would build on the 4.7 percent 
increase in arrivals in 2013, which resulted in a record 69.8 
million visitors. According to the current forecast, the United 
States would see 3.4 percent to 4.1 percent annual growth rates 
in visitor volume over the 2014-2018 timeframe.
    The overall proportion of CBP's salaries and expenses [S&E;] 
has been growing steadily, thus squeezing other priorities. In 
fiscal year 2009, S&E; accounted for 55.5 percent of the total 
``Salaries and Expenses'' account, but in fiscal year 2015 it 
will be approximate 71.7 percent. Cost drivers for the growing 
payroll include healthcare, retirement benefits (for the first 
time the Office of Management and Budget requires appropriated 
funds be used to cover retirement costs), decreasing attrition 
rates, and changing grade profiles. CBPOs average General 
Service [GS] grade level was GS-11 in fiscal year 2010. In 
fiscal year 2015 the average will be GS-12. For the Border 
Patrol it was GS-10 in fiscal year 2010 and will be GS-12 in 
fiscal year 2015. Officer and agent payroll costs have 
increased by $299,900,000 in fiscal year 2015 compared to 
fiscal year 2014.
    CBP's workload staffing model indicates a shortfall of 
2,373 CBP officers [CBPOs] by the end of fiscal year 2015. 
While the model needs further refinement, it is the best tool 
yet designed to assist in officer placement decisions based on 
traveler volume, wait times, expanded facilities, and increased 
cargo throughput. The model also takes into consideration the 
reduction in staffing requirements due to innovation and 
technology improvements.
    This Committee took the initial steps to begin hiring new 
CBPOs in the Senate version of the fiscal year 2014 Homeland 
Security appropriations bill through a combination of direct 
appropriations and a slight increase in the Immigration User 
Fee [IUF]. Ultimately, due to outside pressure, the fee 
proposal was dropped in conference with the House. By making 
cuts to other DHS activities, direct appropriations were 
cobbled together to hire 2,000 new CBPOs. These officers will 
be hired, trained, and placed at their new duty stations 
through fiscal year 2015.
    But CBP cannot rely on additional appropriated dollars to 
hire itself out of its officer deficit hole. The taxpayer 
expects its government to do more--more service, more 
efficiency, more protection--with fewer dollars. The Committee 
believes CBP can achieve the goal of expedited cargo 
inspections; a faster, more pleasant entry experience for 
travelers to our country; and appropriate level of security 
through a mix of more people, innovative use of technology, a 
more streamlined hiring process, and expansion of creative 
public-private partnerships.
    People.--The IUF was established in 1987 to be used to hire 
additional inspectors at air and sea ports of entry and cover 
the actual costs of inspecting commercial air and sea 
passengers upon arrival. The fare has been set at $7 since 
2001. If the fee had been allowed to adjust for inflation it 
would now be $12.31. In fiscal year 2013, CBP recovered only 76 
percent of the inspection costs in the air environment and 43 
percent in the sea environment. The remainder of those costs 
have been covered using direct appropriations. The Committee 
includes a general provision increasing the IUF by $2 for 
arriving commercial air and sea passengers. This is the same 
provision included in the fiscal year 2014 Senate Committee-
reported Homeland Security appropriations bill. This increase 
will fund the hiring of 1,000 additional CBPOs through fiscal 
year 2016. Additionally, the bill includes a new proviso 
directing that the funds generated by this fee adjustment be 
used solely for the hiring of new CBPOs to be placed at air and 
sea ports of entry. These funds cannot be directed for other 
CBP activities. This only allows the hiring of half of the new 
CBPOs requested in the budget. Absent this provision, there are 
no additional funds for the hiring of additional CBPOs.
    Technology.--CBP has made steady advancements in the use of 
mobile technology which permits officers to move to where the 
arriving passengers are located to expedite the inspection 
process. It has partnered with 15 airports in placing Automated 
Passport Control kiosks to segregate arriving U.S. citizens 
from those foreign visitors who might need more time to be 
processed. It has also made great strides in enrolling frequent 
travelers in the Global Entry program. Participation in the 
program has grown to over 1.4 million individuals, with another 
nearly 900,000 NEXUS members who also get the benefits of 
Global Entry.
    Hiring Process.--When asked directly, DHS and CBP officials 
concede the CBP hiring process is too cumbersome and agree that 
modifications need to be made. It should not take as long to 
hire and train trade specialists or mission support personnel 
as it does a weapon-carrying, law enforcement officer or agent. 
The Committee recognizes CBP must maintain a rigorous hiring 
process, including the use of polygraphs, to ensure bad actors 
or those who have been or could become compromised by drug 
traffickers and the like are not inadvertently employed. But 
CBP must take a fresh look at its hiring and training 
practices.
    Additional CBPOs are required at short-staffed ports of 
entry now, not a year from now. The Committee directs CBP, 
working with the Deputy Secretary and the Chief Human Capital 
Officer, to develop a plan to expedite the hiring of CBP 
personnel while maintaining the proper level of security. On 
average, it currently takes CBP 278 days to hire its personnel 
when the Office of Personnel Management [OPM] standard is 90 
days. CBP must strive to meet the OPM standard and, at a 
maximum, reduce its average to 120 days. The plan shall be 
submitted to the Committee not later than 90 days after the 
date of enactment of this act.
    Public-Private Partnerships.--The bill extends the two-
pronged public-private partnership program initiated in the 
fiscal year 2014 DHS Appropriations Act. This provision permits 
CBP to enter into up to 7 agreements with State, local, or 
private entities to reimburse CBP for services at air, land, or 
sea ports of entry and also permits CBP and/or the General 
Services Administration to accept donations or gifts of real 
property for enhancements to POEs. CBP is encouraged to provide 
greater transparency on its staffing procedures to its partners 
and to take into consideration the potential for the growth in 
international tourism when reviewing applications submitted 
under this provision.
    The Committee has heard concerns from the maritime industry 
regarding CBP's potential use of this authority or other long-
standing authorities regarding the costs for purchase, 
installation, operations, and/or maintenance of inspection and 
detection equipment by the port authorities or the terminal 
operators. CBP shall brief the Committee not later than 60 days 
after the date of enactment of this act on its statutory 
authority in this area and on its negotiations with maritime 
entities on equipment costs.

                         LAND BORDER WAIT TIMES

    In July 2013, GAO issued a report (GAO-13-603) outlining 
flaws in CBP's commercial vehicle wait time collection process. 
Specifically, GAO found that publicly reported wait time data 
is collected using unreliable and inconsistent methods, and 
cannot effectively measure trade facilitation goals or inform 
CBP management decisions across border crossings. Not later 
than 60 days after the date of enactment of this act, CBP shall 
brief the Committee and other committees of jurisdiction on its 
efforts to improve wait time collection and trade facilitation 
at land POEs.

                           IMMIGRATION REFORM

    This appropriations bill for the Department of Homeland 
Security makes numerous funding recommendations for various 
border security and immigration enforcement activities. It is 
not intended to be an immigration reform vehicle. The Committee 
received numerous requests for inclusion of immigration-related 
policies already reflected in the immigration reform 
legislation passed by the Senate on June 27, 2013. As they were 
already considered and included in the appropriate authorizing 
legislation, they are not repeated in this appropriations bill 
and report.

                  IMPACT OF FEES ON AIRPORT ACTIVITIES

    To ensure the maximum level of transparency is provided to 
justify these increases, the Committee directs CBP to provide a 
quarterly electronic report to the general public and 
interested stakeholders, posted on its Web site, on the amount 
of fee-funded activity that occurred over the preceding fiscal 
year at airports. This report shall include all fees, such as 
APHIS, IUF, COBRA, and the Small Airport User Fee. The report 
will also provide annual average wait time data for high volume 
port locations receiving additional IUF fee resources, 
demonstrating a direct connection between service levels and 
resources. It is important for CBP to deploy CBPOs at critical 
international arrivals airports which experience the greatest 
delays and longest processing times.

           EXPEDITING TRAVELERS AND EXPANDING/GROWING TOURISM

    The number of international travelers to the United States 
has grown by 12 percent from 55 million visitors in 2009 to 70 
million in 2013. Each overseas visitor spends on average $4,500 
in our restaurants, hotels, shopping malls, and attractions. 
And the growth in these visitors has created more than 175,000 
American jobs over the past 5 years. On May 22, 2014, the 
President announced a series of new steps to improve the entry 
process to welcome more international travelers to our country. 
Additionally, he charged DHS Secretary Johnson and Commerce 
Secretary Pritzker to work with industry to develop a goal to 
improve the entry process, reduce wait times, and build out 
implementation plans starting with the 15 largest airports for 
international arrivals.
    The Committee wholeheartedly supports this effort to 
develop creative and responsible solutions to provide 
international travelers with reasonable wait times and an 
efficient entry process. The Committee urges DHS and the 
Department of Commerce to start by ensuring that international 
business travelers and tourists alike have a good arrival 
experience. Because CBP officers are the first face of America 
for these arriving passengers, it is incumbent on CBP to train 
its frontline personnel to be welcoming, as well as 
professional, as they determine the eligibility of the traveler 
for entry into the United States.
    And, as discussed above, wait times must be reduced. The 
Committee understands that Chicago's O'Hare International and 
Dallas/Fort Worth [DFW] International airports have had the 
greatest success at reducing wait times in the past year or so. 
Both airports were early supporters of the automated passport 
control program, which now is used in 15 airports. These kiosks 
provide modern touch screen technology that allows passengers 
to scan their passports and enter their customs declaration 
information. Provided through public-private partnership with 
airport authorities, these kiosks expedite air passenger 
inspection for U.S. and Canadian citizens at participating 
airports. They reduce officer interaction to approximately 30 
seconds from 55 seconds while increasing security by allowing 
officers to focus on the passenger instead of the paperwork. 
Since installing the kiosks, both O'Hare and DFW have 
experienced reductions in average wait times of 30 percent or 
more. CBP should work in tandem with other airports and expand 
the APC program to 10 additional airports by the end of 2014. 
Also, CBP should encourage use of the enhanced, multi-lingual 
APC kiosks, which permits their use by the passengers from the 
38 member countries of the Visa Waiver Program further reducing 
international passenger processing times.
    Additionally, CBP should take advantage of the creativity 
of individual airports. For instance, George Bush 
Intercontinental Airport in Houston was the first airport to 
pilot a ``one stop'' program to facilitate passengers traveling 
with only carry-on luggage through entry processing. Chicago 
O'Hare also launched its ``1-Stop'' program last year at 
International Terminal 5. Informational signage in seven 
languages is posted in the secure corridor leading to the CBP's 
passport control area. The signage guides eligible travelers to 
enter designated lanes for entry processing. Travelers make 
``one-stop'' at a booth with a CBP officer, then move on to an 
``express corridor'' that bypasses baggage claim and CBP Exit 
Control inspection areas. The new initiative streamlines the 
U.S. entry process and minimizes wait times.
    The Committee also understands CBP is developing a new web 
and mobile application (``app'') that can be added to a 
passenger's smartphone so that arriving passengers can fill 
their Customs declaration on the plane prior to deplaning. 
Advances like these will be especially useful for business 
travelers and other frequent flyers, and the Committee urges 
expeditious rollout of this new ``app''.
    The Committee encourages CBP to open additional enrollment 
centers across the Nation for all DHS Trusted Traveler 
Programs, including Global Entry and NEXUS. To the extent that 
Global Entry can be expanded to passengers from other 
countries, CBP is encouraged to do so. The more enrollees in 
these programs, the faster arriving passengers can be processed 
upon arrival. And CBP should consider expanding Global Entry to 
large and medium-sized international hub airports, especially 
those which do not have a permanent CBP presence.
    The Committee understands CBP, working with travel industry 
associations and an outside source, has been conducting annual 
traveler satisfaction surveys. The surveys ask arriving 
passengers such questions as if their arrival process was 
welcoming, if the process was understandable, and if their wait 
time was reasonable. CBP could benefit from getting reactions 
from passengers on a more regular basis because results from an 
annual survey do not allow for rapid responses to a growing 
problem, especially at the largest gateway airports.
    The Committee recognizes the need for CBP to work with 
airports as it designs its future work spaces and operations 
centers. It recommends that CBP streamline the required non-
disclosure agreements [NDAs] for discussions and collaboration 
to include only those NDAs that pertain to truly sensitive 
information.
    Finally, CBP must review how it allocates its personnel at 
air ports of entry. There are creative ways CBP can work with 
its employees and the host airport to place appropriate law 
enforcement personnel at the inspection booths while other, 
non-law enforcement or mission support personnel can cover 
other processing duties.
    The Committee directs CBP to submit an action plan to the 
Committee not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of 
this act on the specific steps it will take to implement each 
of the proposed activities listed above. This plan shall 
include the timeline for implementing each activity and, to the 
extent there are other activities planned or underway, they 
shall be included in this plan.
    Additionally, of the total amount provided for CBP Salaries 
and Expenses, $10,000,000 shall be used for sustaining the 
traveler process enhancements, including CBP officers at 
existing preclearance locations, as discussed in Senate Report 
113-77 and directed in Public Law 113-76.
    The Committee continues a general provision regarding 
limitations on expanding overseas preclearance operations to 
additional locations. The Committee notes that the fiscal year 
2014 DHS Appropriations Act requires the Commissioner to 
develop metrics that support the goal of reducing passenger 
processing times at air, land, and sea POEs. Additionally, he 
is required to develop and implement operational work plans to 
meet the goal just listed at the POEs with the highest 
passenger volume and longest wait times. The Committee reminds 
the Commissioner that he shall consult with appropriate 
stakeholders, including but not limited to, airlines and 
airport operators, port authorities, and importers. The 
Committee also encourages the Commissioner to consider the 
economic impact of these activities on U.S. air carriers. These 
work plans and metrics shall be developed and briefed to the 
Committee no later than September 15, 2014.

                     NORTHERN BORDER PORT STAFFING

    The fiscal year 2014 DHS Appropriations Act funded the 
hiring of 2,000 additional CBP officers and notes some of the 
new officers are to be allotted to Northern border POEs. The 
Committee remains concerned, however, about CBP officer 
staffing levels on the Northern Border. As trade and tourism 
increase along the U.S.-Canadian border, additional resources 
should be provided as appropriate.
    The Committee believes that many of the concerns about 
Northern Border staffing could be allayed by more complete 
reporting and transparency to Congress about CBP's Northern 
Border staffing plans. The Committee directs CBP to submit an 
updated resource allocation model with the fiscal year 2016 
budget detailing specific staffing and funding for, and 
implementation of, planned Northern Border enforcement 
initiatives by port of entry. The Committee also directs CBP to 
provide a briefing to the Committee not later than December 1, 
2014, on the CBP officer staffing requirements on the Northern 
Border based on increased trade flows, the current threat 
environment, and the workload staffing model.

                  TRAINING REGARDING HUMAN TRAFFICKING

    CBP plays a critical role in identifying potential human 
trafficking victims as they enter the United States. The 
Committee encourages DHS to continue to work with appropriate 
nonprofit organizations and victim service providers to improve 
the training of DHS personnel in the field to assist in the 
identification of human trafficking victims, especially 
children, and provide appropriate referrals to victim service 
organizations. Further, the Committee encourages the 
Commissioner to post the National Human Trafficking Resource 
Center hotline, email address, and Web site information in all 
U.S. POEs.

                         LAND BORDER FEE STUDY

    The Committee continues a general provision prohibiting CBP 
from conducting any studies for establishing and collecting any 
new land border fee. This provision does not affect any 
existing trusted traveler program such as FAST, NEXUS, SENTRI, 
and the like.

              ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICES

    The Committee encourages CBP to work with the Animal and 
Plant Health Inspection Service on the revised regulations 
released on April 22, 2014, to ensure that the final 
regulations reflect prevailing overtime pay rates for CBP 
Agriculture inspectors in order to enable reimbursement by non-
Federal entities.

                          CROSS-BORDER TUNNELS

    Tunnels along the United States-Mexico border remain an 
attractive alternative to overland drug smuggling because of 
increased security measures and aggressive enforcement activity 
on traditional cross-border routes. The Committee supports the 
ongoing efforts of the DHS Tunnel Task Force to detect and 
respond to new tunnels, encourages CBP to dedicate sufficient 
resources to continue detecting, responding to, and remediating 
tunnels as they are encountered. The Committee drops the 
reporting requirement and instead directs an annual briefing on 
cross-border tunnels not later than 120 days after the date of 
enactment of this act.

                    CONDUCT AND INTEGRITY OVERSIGHT

    Since Congress initiated the rapid increase in CBP and ICE 
staffing in 2005, the Committee has been concerned about the 
potential for increased corruption by CBP and ICE personnel. 
The Committee remains committed to addressing this problem. The 
Committee fully funds the request for CBP to continue to expand 
integrity training for its officers, conduct investigations, 
reduce the backlog of reviews and polygraphs, and meet the 
requirements of the Anti-Border Corruption Act of 2011 (Public 
Law 111-338). The Committee directs the Deputy Secretary to 
continue to oversee the coordination of the OIG, CBP, and ICE 
on program integrity issues.

                          BORDER PATROL AGENTS

    The number of Border Patrol agents has grown from 9,800 in 
2001 to 21,370 today. Border Patrol apprehensions have 
increased from 327,577 in fiscal year 2011 to 414,397 in fiscal 
year 2013. As of April 30, 2014, apprehensions for this fiscal 
year were 262,880. Clearly more people are attempting to cross 
our border without authorization. Included in the amount 
recommended by the Committee for Border Security and Control is 
a total of $3,968,346,000 for hiring, paying, equipping, and 
training Border Patrol agents. Bill language is included 
mandating a floor of not less than 21,370 Border Patrol agents 
on-board throughout fiscal year 2015. With the funds in this 
act, there will continue to be 21,370 Border Patrol agents on 
duty, more than double the Agents on board at the end of fiscal 
year 2002.

                              REPATRIATION

    The Committee urges CBP and ICE to repatriate removable 
migrants in a manner that protects deportee safety. Whenever 
possible and based on mutually agreed arrangements determined 
in the field, DHS should limit deportations to daylight hours 
and avoid locations that are determined to have high indices of 
crime and violence, except in cases justified by compelling 
government interest or the informed consent of the adult being 
removed. DHS officials should notify their Mexican counterparts 
in advance of repatriating pregnant women or individuals with 
medical or other special needs and take all reasonable and 
appropriate steps to ensure their safe repatriation. To the 
extent practicable, in the development and renegotiation of 
agreements with the Government of Mexico regarding arrangements 
for the deportation or removal of apprehended individuals, 
appropriate hours for conducting deportations and removals, and 
identifying safety concerns at deportation and removal sites, 
DHS is encouraged to consult with non-governmental social 
service providers and faith-based organizations that provide 
services to returned migrants in order to ensure that 
deportations occur at times and in locations where shelter and 
other assistance is available.
    The Committee directs CBP and ICE to review their existing 
repatriation arrangements with the Government of Mexico and 
brief the Committee not later than 120 days after the date of 
enactment of this act on the results of the review.

                      BORDER PATROL STAFFING MODEL

    The Committee understands that CBP is developing a staffing 
allocation model for Border Patrol that would provide insight 
into the amount of time it takes for an agent to perform tasks 
and support more informed decisionmaking regarding deployment 
and use of resources. The Committee supports this effort and 
directs CBP to brief the Committee not later than 180 days 
after the date of enactment of this act on its progress in 
developing and using the model.

                       USE OF FORCE POLICY REVIEW

    The Committee strongly supports the actions taken by the 
Commissioner in reviewing, revising, and making public CBP's 
``Use of Force Policy, Guidelines and Procedures Handbook''. 
After years of allegations expressed by certain communities 
about excessive use of force, primarily by Border Patrol 
agents, the Commissioner responded transparently with a 
thorough review of CBP's training policies and procedures and 
released the results of the review on May 30, 2014. As he 
states in his opening to the Handbook, ``A respect for human 
life and the communities we serve shall guide all employees in 
the performance of their duties . . . The use of excessive 
force by CBP law enforcement personnel is strictly 
prohibited.'' The Committee stresses that these policies must 
be adhered to so as to ensure the confidence of the American 
people in these law enforcement officers is retained.

                           TRADE ENFORCEMENT

    The Committee directs CBP to dedicate $3,000,000 to further 
consolidate single transaction bonds [STBs] in order to improve 
duty collection, as recommended by GAO. These funds would 
improve the collection of revenue owed to the Federal 
Government by enabling CBP to develop an automated system for 
STBs. Currently, STBs are submitted and maintained on paper at 
all of the CBP port locations. Automation would allow a 
centralized office to oversee and administer the STB program 
and to develop the necessary expertise to verify the adequacy 
of the STBs.
    CBP analysis has found strong evidence to conclude that 
trade fraud and evasion is widespread in many commodity 
sectors--particularly for goods from China, which account for 
46 percent of the anti-dumping and countervailing duties 
collected. The Committee remains focused on the need for all 
Federal Government agencies involved in international trade to 
aggressively enforce existing trade laws. It has become clear 
that there are specific actions that CBP and ICE, together with 
the Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State and the United 
States Trade Representative, can take without the need for 
additional legislation. According to CBP's own statistics, more 
than $1,600,000,000 of the $1,790,000,000 in unpaid antidumping 
and countervailing duties involve imports from China. To help 
combat this problem, CBP has created a multi-disciplinary 
Reengineering Dumping Team to review the antidumping and 
countervailing duty [AD/CVD] process and to develop enforcement 
solutions. To the extent these duties are unable to be 
collected, CBP shall issue a statement as to the reasons why.
    Additionally, for CBP's AD/CVD enforcement, the Centers of 
Excellence and Expertise [CEEs] also centralize AD/CVD 
functions for the industries and importers covered by the 
respective CEE. The CEEs help increase uniformity and expertise 
across CBP for administration of AD/CVD entries and AD/CVD 
enforcement. The Committee commends CBP for taking these 
actions and directs it to brief the Committee annually on its 
efforts to improve the enforcement and collection process.
    CBP can benefit from hearing a variety of voices when it 
comes to AD/CVD enforcement. CBP is directed to review the 
Advisory Committee on Commercial Operations membership and 
consider adding domestic industries that are affected to sit on 
the Trade Enforcement subcommittee to provide advice through 
the antidumping working group. CBP shall keep the Committee 
updated on its review.

        ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTY ENFORCEMENT REPORTS

    The Committee has ensured that, within the amounts provided 
in this account, there will be sufficient funds to administer 
the ongoing requirements of section 754 of the Tariff Act of 
1930 (19 U.S.C. 1675c), referenced in subtitle F of title VII 
of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-171; 120 
Stat. 154).
    The Committee directs CBP to continue to work with the 
Departments of Justice and the Treasury (and all other relevant 
agencies) to increase collections, and provide a public report 
on an annual basis within 30 days of each year's distributions 
under the law. The report should summarize CBP's efforts to 
collect past due amounts and increase current collections, 
particularly with respect to cases involving unfairly traded 
United States imports from China. The report shall provide the 
same level of detail as required under this section in Senate 
Report 112-169.
    The Committee further directs the Secretary and the 
Commissioner to work with the Secretary of Commerce to identify 
opportunities for the Department of Commerce to improve the 
timeliness, accuracy, and clarity of liquidation instructions 
sent to CBP. Increased attention and interagency coordination 
in these areas could help ensure that steps in the collection 
of duties are completed in a more expeditious manner. The 
Commissioner is directed to report within 180 days after the 
date of enactment of this act on the steps that have been taken 
in conjunction with the Department of Commerce to address these 
issues. Consistent with section 691a of Public Law 103-182, the 
North American Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act of 1993, 
the Committee directs the Commissioner to submit to Congress 
before the 60th day of each fiscal year a report regarding the 
collection of duties imposed under the AD/CVD laws during the 
preceding fiscal year.
    Separately, CBP is directed to report to the Committee on 
collection of the outstanding $1,079,000,000 in AD/CVD duties, 
including the number of claims, the value of each claim, the 
stage of collection for each claim and the date on which the 
claim was referred for further action to either the CBP Chief 
Counsel or Department of Justice. This report shall be 
submitted to the Committee not later than 180 days after the 
date of enactment of this act. This report will include the 
steps that have been taken to recover funds and will also 
include the challenges that prevent collection. CBP shall 
publish on its Web site a version of this report that provides 
appropriate privacy and trade sensitivity protections.
    The Committee further directs CBP to provide the Committee 
with a separate report that includes information concerning 
each AD/CVD order for which more than $25,000,000 in assessed 
AD/CVD duties secured by single entry bonds accepted by CBP 
pursuant to 19 U.S.C. 1675(a)(2)(B)(iii) remains uncollected 
more than 2 years after the dates of liquidation of the secured 
entries. This report shall be submitted to the Committee not 
later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this act. 
For each relevant AD/CVD order, the report shall include the 
bond's identification number, the date of the entry secured by 
the bond, and the bond's face value. It shall also include the 
liquidation status of each entry, and if applicable, the date 
of liquidation, the amount of bond principal received by CBP, 
the amount of interest received by CBP, and the amount of any 
offer in compromise accepted by CBP. Further, the report shall 
include information about whether CBP has demanded performance 
on the bond or has withdrawn or abandoned its demand due to one 
or more defects in the bond, CBP's inability to locate the 
bond, or expiration of the applicable statute of limitations. 
For each relevant AD/CVD order for which CBP has demanded 
performance on the bond, the report shall detail whether CBP's 
demand for bond performance was protested, and if applicable, 
the date on which the protest was filed, whether CBP has issued 
a decision on the protest, whether a subsequent appeal has been 
filed by the protesting party, and if applicable, the status of 
the appeal including whether a court summons has been issued, 
the date on which the summons was issued, and the amount of 
funds being held by CBP pursuant to 28 U.S.C. 2637(a). The 
report shall also include a detailed strategy, including a 
specific series of actions and corresponding deadlines for 
completing those actions, to collect under the bond the 
antidumping or countervailing duties that remain uncollected.
    The Committee directs CBP, in consultation with the 
Department of Commerce and the Department of Treasury, to 
report to the Committee on how requiring cash deposits of 
estimated AD/CVD during new shipper reviews (in statute) would 
strengthen the administration of the Nation's AD/CVD laws. 
Under current law, the Department of Commerce is required to 
allow importers to bond for cash deposits of estimated AD/CVD 
during new shipper reviews. The Committee urges the United 
States Trade Representative to include in the principal 
negotiating objectives of the United States the objectives of 
preventing evasion of the trade remedy laws of the United 
States through information exchanges and site visits for any 
trade agreements under negotiation as of the date of this 
report or future trade agreement negotiations.

                 TRADE COMPLIANCE--INFORMATION SHARING

    The Committee understands that current law may 
unintentionally prohibit the Department of Commerce from 
sharing proprietary information with CBP vital to determining 
violations or claims with respect to any provision of the 
Tariff Act of 1930. The Committee urges the Department to 
coordinate jointly with the Department of Commerce on a 
legislative proposal to amend the appropriate section of the 
United States Code to remove any legal barriers to the sharing 
of appropriate and necessary information between these prime 
Federal trade compliance and enforcement agencies.

                               JONES ACT

    CBP is charged with enforcement of U.S. cabotage laws. The 
Jones Act provides for the national and economic security of 
the United States by supporting a strong U.S. merchant marine. 
By virtue of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, as amended 
by Public Law 106-580, the coastwise laws apply to marine 
transportation between points and places in the United States, 
including the Outer Continental Shelf. U.S. vessels, mariners, 
and shipyards have been negatively impacted and underutilized 
as a result of lax enforcement and prior rulings inconsistent 
with congressional intent. The Committee urges the Department 
to levy penalties for previously documented violations, 
continue working with the Offshore Marine Service Association 
in order to investigate future potential violations, and 
dedicate adequate resources to vigorously enforce the Jones Act 
on the Outer Continental Shelf. While there have been only a 
handful of waiver requests in the past 2 years, the Committee 
remains focused on the issue of waivers of the Jones Act.
    The Committee is also concerned about the lack of 
transparency in issuing these waivers. A general provision is 
included prohibiting funds from being used to issue future 
waivers related to a release from the Strategic Petroleum 
Reserve until the Secretary has consulted with the Departments 
of Energy and Transportation and representatives of the United 
States flag maritime industry and taken adequate steps to 
ensure the use of United States flag vessels. The Secretary 
shall notify the Congress within 2 business days of any request 
for a waiver, not solely waivers requested to transport oil 
released from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve.
    The Committee directs CBP to develop a system to track the 
status of all Jones Act violations, from the time they are 
reported until assessed penalties have been collected or there 
is a finding of no violation and the charges are dismissed. The 
Committee also directs CBP to make information available to the 
public and the Committees, on a quarterly basis, about specific 
Jones Act violations, findings of fact, parties determined to 
be at fault, amount of penalty assessments, and status of 
collections.

                              EXIT POLICY

    DHS is required by law to implement a comprehensive entry-
exit system, including biometric exit, for our Nation's 
security as well as the integrity of our immigration system. 
CBP, with support from other Department components, is 
executing a plan toward that end which includes enhancements to 
biographic entry and exit data, as well as enforcement of data 
requirements on air carriers and other data providers. Specific 
to biometric exit, CBP is working with the DHS Science and 
Technology [S&T;] directorate on the Air Entry/Exit Re-
Engineering [AEER] project to analyze, develop, test, pilot, 
and evaluate integrated approaches to biometrically confirm the 
departure of non-U.S. citizens at U.S. airports. The S&T; 
investment is $7,500,000 a year since fiscal year 2013. CBP and 
S&T; should consider the implications of the project's results 
for land and sea ports in both urban and rural environments. 
Further, the project should examine the integration of new 
technologies with the Department's backend biometric system, 
IDENT, to produce the highest match rate possible and 
accelerate passenger throughput. Not later than 90 days after 
the date of enactment of this act, the Department shall report 
to the Committee on the status of the AEER project and other 
entry-exit system enhancements.
    The Committee recognizes that CBP has made significant 
technology enhancements through the Land Border Integration 
program and its predecessor program. CBP should continue to 
utilize this program to improve entry-exit processes and 
activities.

                          U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS

    The Committee understands CBP and its legacy agencies have 
been performing both statutorily required services as well as 
additional services requested by the Government of the U.S. 
Virgin Islands [USVI] on a fully reimbursable basis, for nearly 
100 years. A 1994 Memorandum of Agreement [MOA] between CBP and 
the USVI memorializes operational details regarding services 
requested by the USVI and the financing of those services. The 
Committee further understands that, due to fiscal constraints 
in recent years, CBP has been implementing cost savings 
measures without reducing services in the territory and is 
pursuing a new MOA with the Government of the USVI. The 
Committee directs CBP to report to the Committee on the scope 
of services performed, their financing, and the steps taken 
toward a new MOA with the USVI.

                        ADVANCED TRAINING CENTER

    CBP has one of the Nation's largest cadres of armed Federal 
law enforcement personnel and having a full-scale advanced 
training facility focused on the agency's specialized missions 
is critical. Included in the amount recommended by the 
Committee is $64,500,000, as proposed in the budget, for 
programmatic expenses (including salaries and benefits) and the 
National Training Plan at the Advanced Training Center [ATC]. 
The ATC is providing advanced firearms, tactical, and 
leadership training to CBP officers and agents across the 
country, as well as other Federal and law enforcement agencies. 
With the establishment of the Advanced Training Center 
Revolving Fund [ATCRF], pursuant to the fiscal year 2012 DHS 
Appropriations Act, the Committee directs CBP to continue to 
utilize ATCRF funds in addition to any funds appropriated 
annually by the Congress. The Committee notes the ATCRF is 
intended only to offset operating costs of the ATC and should 
not be considered the sole appropriations vehicle for funding 
of the ATC enterprise.
    Pursuant to Public Law 106-246, the training to be 
conducted at the Center shall be configured in a manner so as 
to not duplicate or displace any Federal law enforcement 
program of the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center [FLETC]. 
Training currently being conducted at a FLETC facility shall 
not be moved to the Center.

                     FOREIGN MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE

    The Committee recognizes that trucks carrying foreign 
municipal solid waste entering the United States from Canada 
represent potential homeland security and environmental threats 
to our Nation. The Committee is also aware of successful 
efforts to address this threat, which have resulted in a 
significant reduction in municipally managed waste shipments to 
the United States. However, nearly 350 trash trucks still cross 
U.S. borders every day. The Committee urges DHS, in conjunction 
with CBP, to work with the Finance Committee--the appropriate 
authorizing committee--to consider proposing to raise the 
current Customs User Fee for trucks carrying foreign municipal 
solid waste into the United States and include any such 
proposal in the fiscal year 2016 budget through the appropriate 
authorizing mechanism.

                        AUTOMATION MODERNIZATION

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $816,523,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     812,410,000
Committee recommendation................................     806,699,000

    The automation modernization account includes funds for 
major information technology systems and services for U.S. 
Customs and Border Protection, including the Automated 
Commercial Environment [ACE] and the International Trade and 
Data System projects, and connectivity of and integration of 
existing systems.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $806,699,000, of which 
$445,575,000 is to be available until September 30, 2017, for 
automation modernization. This is $5,711,000 below the amount 
requested and $9,824,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2014. The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                                            AUTOMATION MODERNIZATION
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Information technology....................................           358,655           365,700           361,124
Automated Targeting Systems...............................           116,932           109,273           109,230
Automated Commercial Environment/International Trade Data            140,762           141,061           140,970
 System [ITDS]............................................
Current operations protection and processing support                 200,174           196,376           195,375
 [COPPS]..................................................
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Automation modernization.....................           816,523           812,410           806,699
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                               TARGETING

    The Committee staunchly supports CBP's targeting 
capabilities and the enhancements provided over the years for 
the Automated Targeting System [ATS]. ATS has proven an 
invaluable tool in identifying and countering terrorist travel 
and other illicit activity in the global travel and trade 
systems. The Committee recommends $109,230,000, as requested, 
and encourages CBP to effectively maintain and enhance this 
critical capability to meet mission needs.

                         REPORTS AND BRIEFINGS

    The Committee expects to continue receiving the ACE reports 
on a semi-annual basis. CBP is directed to brief the Committees 
immediately on the plan to decommission the Automated 
Commercial System [ACS], the updated program plan for ACE, how 
the ACS decommission plan is integrated into the program plan, 
and the updated master schedule for ACE development.

                           TECS MODERNIZATION

    TECS is an information technology system in place since the 
1980s that provides border security and law enforcement 
personnel information about people who are inadmissible or may 
pose a threat to the security of the United States. Over time, 
however, it has become increasingly difficult and expensive to 
maintain because of technology obsolescence and its inability 
to support new mission requirements. As a result, in 2008 DHS 
initiated TECS Modernization [TECS Mod] to upgrade the existing 
system functionality, address known capability gaps, and move 
the program's infrastructure to DHS's new data centers. TECS 
Mod is managed as two separate programs working in parallel: 
CBP and ICE are each modernizing existing functionality 
specific to their respective roles and missions. Both programs 
had planned to be fully operational by September 2015.
    A recent GAO report (GAO-14-342T) noted that TECS Mod has 
continued to experience schedule and cost changes. While CBP's 
$724,000,000 modernization effort intends to upgrade 
functionality, data, and aging infrastructure and move it to 
DHS's data centers by 2016, the agency has had to revisit the 
schedule twice. Regarding ICE's $818,000,000 TECS Mod program, 
it is redesigning and replanning its program, after determining 
that its initial solution was not viable and could not support 
ICE's needs. The Department's CIO has expressed concern about 
the problematic nature of this modernization effort. As a 
result, CBP and ICE shall continue to conduct the semiannual 
joint briefings on the status of this modernization effort for 
the Committee.

        BORDER SECURITY FENCING, INFRASTRUCTURE, AND TECHNOLOGY

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $351,454,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     362,466,000
Committee recommendation................................     362,466,000

    The Border Security, Fencing, Infrastructure, and 
Technology account funds the capital procurement and total 
operations and maintenance costs associated with fencing, 
infrastructure, sensors, surveillance, and other border 
security technology.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $362,466,000 for Border Security 
Fencing, Infrastructure, and Technology, the same as the 
request, and $11,012,000 above the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2014.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                             BORDER SECURITY FENCING, INFRASTRUCTURE, AND TECHNOLOGY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Development and deployment................................           160,435           110,594           110,594
Operations and maintenance................................           191,019           251,872           251,872
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Border security fencing, infrastructure, and            351,454           362,466           362,466
       technology.........................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT DELAYS

    Since fiscal year 2005, the Committee has been a strong and 
active supporter of the efforts to secure our Southwest border 
through a strategic combination of fencing, tactical 
infrastructure, and technology, combined with a doubling of the 
size of the Border Patrol. These funds have been used to 
construct the 651 miles of fencing and border infrastructure 
mandated by the Secure Fence Act, as amended, and they have 
been used to bring more technology and capability to Border 
Patrol agents than has ever been available.
    On April 6, 2012, the Department issued a request for 
proposals to build and deploy the next set of integrated fixed 
towers [IFTs] for cameras and radars within Arizona. CBP 
initially estimated that the contract would be awarded in the 
first quarter of 2014, but the award was not made until 
February 26, 2014, and a protest against the award was filed on 
March 31, 2014, by one of the non-successful bidders. The 
protest could delay initial delivery of the first tower until 
the end of this fiscal year or later. While the Committee is 
encouraged there appears to be proper oversight of contracts 
and that contractors are being held to fulfilling their 
obligations for use of taxpayer dollars, this program has now 
been delayed for over 3 years. Additionally, the Committee 
remains concerned about concurrent deployment of these systems 
before it has been proven that they actually work in real-life 
situations and included language in the fiscal year 2014 act 
prohibiting concurrent deployment of IFTs. The Department has 
indicated that approximately $387,000,000 remains available in 
unobligated prior year balances for border technology 
development and deployment as of April 30, 2014. Given these 
strong concerns, the Committee rescinds $27,300,000 in 
unobligated balances from this account that are not required 
for fiscal year 2015.
    The Committee notes that the recent Government 
Accountability Office [GAO] report titled ``Arizona Border 
Surveillance Technology Plan: Additional Actions Needed to 
Strengthen Management and Assess Effectiveness'' suggests that 
DHS can better manage scheduling, cost-estimating, and 
documentation for certain aspects of the Arizona Plan. DHS did 
not concur with the specifics of some GAO recommendations based 
on concerns those recommendations would compromise the 
potential benefits of the DHS approach. The Committee directs 
CBP and GAO to continue to work to understand how best 
practices can best be applied to an innovative acquisition 
approach without inhibiting the innovation.

                            NORTHERN BORDER

    Included in the Committee's recommendation is $12,200,000, 
as requested, for enhancing low-flying aircraft surveillance, 
maritime detection, and other technology along the Northern 
Border.
    The Committee recognizes that incidents of drug smuggling 
along our Northern border remain widespread and that more steps 
need to be taken to address this growing problem. To better 
uncover and combat the smuggling of drugs by low-flying 
aircraft in the future, the Committee urges DHS, through 
partnerships with the Department of Defense [DOD] and other 
government and private sector stakeholders, to use military 
radar and/or other technologies to the fullest extent possible 
in its comprehensive plan to combat narcotics smuggling and 
detect other changes along the Northern border.

                           TETHERED AEROSTATS

    The Committee recommends $35,600,000, as requested, for 
operation and maintenance of the tethered aerostat radar 
systems [TARS] in CBP's inventory. The TARS program is a multi-
mission capability that supports both counter-narcotics 
enforcement and air domain awareness. The program has assisted 
CBP with interdicting suspect aircraft for over 20 years.

                              BORDER ROADS

    The Committee urges CBP to work with counties along the 
United States-Mexico border to identify unimproved county roads 
which are predominantly used by the Border Patrol and that 
provide critical access to the border region for the purpose of 
maintaining border security. The Committee directs CBP to 
provide a briefing on the extent to which these roads are used, 
their impact on daily border security operations, and the 
feasibility of incorporating the maintenance and repair of any 
identified high-priority access roads into its Tactical 
Infrastructure Maintenance and Repair program not later than 90 
days after the date of enactment of this act.

                       AIR AND MARINE OPERATIONS

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $805,068,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     708,685,000
Committee recommendation................................     706,569,000

    The U.S. Customs and Border Protection Air and Marine 
Operations [AMO] account funds the capital procurement and 
total operations and maintenance costs of the CBP air and 
marine program and provides support to other Federal, State, 
and local agencies.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $706,569,000 for Air and Marine 
Operations, of which $415,669,000 is to remain available until 
September 30, 2017. This is a decrease of $2,116,000 below the 
request and $98,499,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2014.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                                            AIR AND MARINE OPERATIONS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Salaries and expenses.....................................           286,818           293,016           290,900
Operations and maintenance................................           392,000           362,669           362,669
Procurement...............................................           126,250            53,000            53,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Air and Marine Operations....................           805,068           708,685           706,569
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee strongly supports CBP's continued efforts to 
recapitalize its air and marine assets. Working with the Office 
of Air and Marine, the Committee has provided resources to meet 
the Department's border security requirements in the air, 
coastal, and riverine environments as delineated by the CBP Air 
and Marine Recapitalization Plan. Resources to address some of 
these requirements are provided in this bill. The Committee 
notes the lengthy period of time it takes to procure certain 
types of aircraft and other air systems because the bulk of the 
systems are being acquired by DOD and CBP is fitting into DOD's 
production lines. At the same time, these are mobile border 
security assets, able to be transferred rapidly to respond to 
actual and emerging threats.

                      EFFECTIVE USE OF AIR ASSETS

    The Committee has robustly supported Air and Marine 
Operations as essential to border security, despite years of 
budget requests that would undercut these investments. This 
support includes funding sensors and cameras to enhance 
situational awareness and communications capabilities to 
transmit this data for strategic planning and operational 
response. While recognizing that additional requirements remain 
in this area, the Committee is concerned that CBP has not 
optimally integrated its air assets and capabilities into a 
strategy for situational awareness or its day-to-day 
operations. CBP should be able to effectively manage mission 
needs against a routine maintenance program and have a complete 
picture of ready air crew, available aircraft, and the right 
capabilities for the mission. Further, Border Patrol leaders in 
the field need to appreciate these broader considerations by 
providing requirements rather than requesting assets.
    CBP is directed to brief the Committee, not later than 
December 1, 2014, on CBP's approach to ensuring optimal 
utilization of air assets. The briefing shall outline any 
policy, process, and structural challenges or changes involved 
in this effort. CBP shall also consider the extent to which the 
Coast Guard or other agencies can provide software 
applications, standard operating procedures, or other 
capabilities as a model or for reuse.
    Additionally, the Committee directs CBP to ensure optimal 
utilization of unmanned aerial systems to facilitate 
situational awareness and border security. The Committee is 
concerned that CBP has not maintained the necessary equipment, 
training, and other requirements to take full advantage of 
these highly capable assets.

                STRATEGIC RECAPITALIZATION REQUIREMENTS

    The budget request includes funding to purchase two 
additional multirole enforcement aircraft [MEAs] and additional 
sensor upgrades. It also reduces funding for flight hours by 
$29,249,000 which will result in flying only 73,474 hours, the 
fiscal year 2013 level. While the Committee strongly supports 
increased flight hours in support of the CBP and other DHS 
missions, unfortunately, CBP was unable to take advantage of 
the additional funds provided by the fiscal year 2014 DHS 
Appropriation Act to achieve a level of 107,000 flight hours 
during this fiscal year due to a number of natural and man-made 
obstacles. Due to the inability to execute these additional 
funds, the bill rescinds $8,000,000 from this account.
    The Committee was surprised that no funds were requested to 
complete the service life extension program for the P-3 
aircraft. The P-3 patrol aircraft have been conducting counter 
drug missions in the source, transit, and arrival zones of the 
Caribbean and Eastern Pacific for years, and in fiscal year 
2013 disrupted shipments of over 119,000 pounds of bulk cocaine 
transiting from South America to Mexico and the United States. 
The Committee directs CBP to complete this program using 
currently available funding.

                    UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS USAGE

    The Committee directs the Department to report annually, 
submitting the first report not later than 3 months after the 
date of enactment of this act, on the number of times that CBP 
unmanned aircraft systems are used in response to a specific 
request to support State, local, and/or tribal law enforcement 
entities in the prior fiscal year. The first report shall cover 
fiscal years 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013. Such report shall 
identify the requesting State, local, or tribal entity; include 
a general description of the geographical locations of such 
uses; and provide the purpose and justification for such uses. 
Such report shall also include any crash or other significant 
accident involving an unmanned aircraft system operated by the 
Department and provide details concerning the circumstances and 
cause of such crash or accident.

                            NORTHERN BORDER

    The Committee directs the Department to conduct a State-by-
State assessment of the Northern Border States to determine the 
appropriate level of OAM personnel, airframes, and 
technological assets necessary to maintain situational 
awareness and keep the Northern Border secure and brief the 
Committee on the results of its review.

                            GENERAL AVIATION

    The Committee is encouraged by the Commissioner's 
commitment to conduct a comprehensive review of law enforcement 
actions for general aviation flights that have never crossed a 
U.S. border or have no nexus to the border. The Committee is 
aware that CBP is taking action and also considering ways to 
curtail overzealous encounters with law-abiding general 
aviation pilots and aircraft. The Committee directs the 
Commissioner of CBP to provide his report to the Committee upon 
completion of the review. Furthermore, the Committee recommends 
that CBP continue to work cooperatively with the general 
aviation pilot community, through organizations such as the 
Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and others, to ensure 
open communication regarding efforts involving general aviation 
law enforcement activities.

                 CONSTRUCTION AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $456,278,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     482,205,000
Committee recommendation................................     478,459,000

    This appropriation provides funding to plan, construct, 
renovate, equip, and maintain buildings and facilities 
necessary for the administration and enforcement of the laws 
relating to immigration, customs, and alien registration.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $478,459,000, for construction and 
facilities management activities of U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection, to remain available until September 30, 2019. This 
is $3,746,000 below the amount requested and $22,181,000 above 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2014. The recommendation 
provides $4,100,000 of the requested increase for upgrading 
Border Patrol facilities, as well as an increase of $3,563,000 
to re-activate the old McAllen Border Patrol Station to address 
the escalating need to process unaccompanied alien children.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                                     CONSTRUCTION AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Facility construction and sustainment.....................           375,398           385,137           383.900
Program oversight and management..........................            80,880            97,068            94,559
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Construction and facilities management.......           456,278           482,205           478,459
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                ADDITIONAL LAND BORDER PORT REQUIREMENTS

    Once again, the President's budget proposes to transfer 
from GSA to CBP--via a delegation of authority--the operation, 
maintenance, and repair of LPOEs. GSA retains the authority 
over major construction (including funding, contracting, and 
oversight). The Committee supports this recommendation. Not 
later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this act, 
CBP and GSA jointly shall brief the Committee on implementation 
of the delegation of authority.
    Additionally, the Committee notes its continued interest in 
CBP exploring alternate options for funding POE construction 
and improvements, including expanded use of public-private 
partnerships, and was pleased to see such a proposal included 
in the President's budget request. The Committee includes a 
modified version of this proposal as a general provision in 
title V.

                        5-YEAR CONSTRUCTION PLAN

    The Committee reminds CBP that the fiscal year 2012 
Department of Homeland Security Act made permanent the 
requirement that a 5-year plan for all Federal land border 
ports of entry shall be submitted annually with the President's 
budget request. The Committee directs the Department to 
continue to work with the GSA on its nationwide strategy to 
prioritize and address the infrastructure needs at land border 
POEs and to comply with the requirements of the Public 
Buildings Act of 1959 (40 U.S.C. 3301) and seek necessary 
funding.
    The Committee further directs the Department to encourage 
the use of small businesses in all phases of the contracting 
process for construction and renovation of POEs.
    The bill includes a general provision repealing section 605 
of division E of Public Law 110-161 (6 U.S.C. 1404). CBP is no 
longer required to conduct these land border port of entry 
technology demonstration projects. However, CBP is encouraged 
to conduct technology demonstration projects as it sees fit in 
order to meet the CBP mission.

                          DETENTION STANDARDS

    The Committee recognizes that CBP is responding to a 
humanitarian crisis on our Southwest border given the dramatic 
influx in encounters of unaccompanied alien children. It is 
working with a number of U.S. Government agencies and other 
entities to locate appropriate facilities for the processing 
and sheltering of these children. In this process, CBP must 
remain cognizant that these temporary facilities must meet all 
appropriate standards of care for this special population.
    Additionally, the Committee understands that CBP is 
currently revising its current short-term detention and hold 
room policy and expects CBP to be compliant with the Prison 
Rape Elimination Act, which became effective on May 6, 2014. No 
later than 90 days after enactment, the Committee directs CBP 
and ICE ERO to brief on its short-term detention and hold room 
policies and implementation with specific attention given to 
the amount of time detainees spend in CBP custody.

                U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement


                                SUMMARY

    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement [ICE] is 
responsible for enforcing immigration and customs laws and 
detaining and removing deportable or inadmissible aliens.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends total resources of $5,507,957,000, 
including direct appropriations of $5,162,957,000, and 
estimated fee collections of $345,000,000.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                            U.S. IMMIGRATION AND CUSTOMS ENFORCEMENT--FUNDING SUMMARY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Appropriations:
    Salaries and expenses.................................         5,229,461         4,988,065         5,136,957
    Automation modernization..............................            34,900            26,000            26,000
    Construction..........................................             5,000  ................  ................
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Appropriations...............................         5,269,361         5,014,065         5,162,957
                                                           =====================================================
Estimated Fee Collections:
    Immigration inspection user fee.......................           135,000           135,000           135,000
    Breached bond/detention fund..........................            65,000            65,000            65,000
    Student exchange and visitor fee......................           145,000           145,000           145,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Estimated fee collections....................           345,000           345,000           345,000
                                                           =====================================================
      Total, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.....         5,614,361         5,359,065         5,507,957
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $5,229,461,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   4,988,065,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,136,957,000

    The ICE Salaries and Expenses account provides funds for 
the enforcement of immigration and customs laws, intelligence, 
and detention and removals. In addition to directly 
appropriated resources, funding is derived from the following 
offsetting collections:
    Immigration Inspection User Fee.--ICE derives funds from 
user fees to support the costs of detention and removals in 
connection with international inspections activities at 
airports and seaports, as authorized by the Immigration and 
Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1356).
    Student Exchange Visitor Program Fee.--ICE collects fees 
from foreign students, exchange visitors, and schools and 
universities to certify and monitor participating schools, and 
to conduct compliance audits.
    Immigration Breached Bond/Detention Fund.--ICE derives 
funds from the recovery of breached cash and surety bonds in 
excess of $8,000,000 as authorized by the Immigration and 
Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1356); and from a portion of fees 
charged under section 245(i) of the Immigration and Nationality 
Act to support the cost of the detention of aliens.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $5,136,957,000, for Salaries and 
Expenses of ICE for fiscal year 2015. This is $148,892,000 
above the request and $92,504,000 below the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2014. The Committee includes bill language placing 
a $35,000 limit on overtime paid to any employee; making up to 
$10,000,000 available for special operations; making up to 
$2,000,000 available for the payment of informants; making up 
to $11,216,000 available to reimburse other Federal agencies 
for the costs associated with the care, maintenance, and 
repatriation of smuggled illegal aliens; making not less than 
$305,000 available for promotion of public awareness of the 
child pornography tipline and activities to counter child 
exploitation; making not less than $5,400,000 available to 
facilitate agreements consistent with section 287(g) of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act; limiting the use of funds for 
facilitating agreements consistent with section 287(g) of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act to the same activities funded 
in fiscal year 2005; making $15,770,000 available for 
activities to enforce laws against forced child labor, of which 
$6,000,000 shall remain available until expended; making up to 
$11,475 available for official reception and representation 
expenses; and making a total of $30,535,000 available until 
September 30, 2016 for the Visa Security Program [VSP] and 
international operations postings. Of this amount, $15,734,000 
is for VSP and $14,801,000 is for international postings.
    The Committee recognizes that ICE has had to make difficult 
budget savings and downward adjustments to its base funding. 
However, included in the amount recommended by the Committee is 
$5,700,000 to annualize the special agent and support positions 
funded in the fiscal year 2014 act.
    As discussed in greater detail below, the Committee 
recommends increases for domestic investigations, detention 
beds, and transportation and removal for unaccompanied alien 
children.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                         U.S. IMMIGRATION AND CUSTOMS ENFORCEMENT--SALARIES AND EXPENSES
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Headquarters, management, and administration:
    Personnel compensation and benefits, services, and               191,909           198,602           197,002
     other costs..........................................
    Headquarters-managed IT investment....................           143,808           150,927           150,419
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Headquarters, management, and                        335,717           349,529           347,421
       administration.....................................
Legal proceedings.........................................           205,584           214,731           212,893
Investigations:
    Domestic investigations...............................         1,672,220         1,644,552         1,642,811
    International operations..............................            99,741           101,228           100,730
    Visa Security Program.................................            31,541            31,854            31,728
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Investigations............................         1,803,502         1,777,634         1,775,269
Intelligence..............................................            74,298            77,045            76,479
Detention and removal operations:
    Custody operations....................................         1,993,770         1,791,913         1,870,444
    Fugitive operations...................................           128,802           131,591           130,515
    Criminal Alien Program................................           294,155           322,407           327,040
    Alternatives to detention.............................            91,444            94,106            94,106
    Transportation and Removal Program....................           276,925           229,109           302,790
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Detention and removal operations..........         2,785,096         2,569,126         2,724,895
Secure Communities........................................            25,264  ................  ................
                                                           =====================================================
        Total, Salaries and expenses......................         5,229,461         4,988,065         5,136,957
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      UNACCOMPANIED ALIEN CHILDREN

    As discussed earlier in this report, both CBP and ICE have 
become overwhelmed by the vastly increasing numbers of 
unaccompanied alien children being encountered along our 
southwest border. While CBP processes, temporarily holds, and 
cares for these children, ICE often transports them to an 
Office of Refugee Resettlement location. Frequently this 
requires commercial or chartered air transport. Transporting a 
child by air requires two ICE law enforcement personnel to 
accompany the child. This is an increasing expense which also 
results in the officers being pulled from their frontline 
positions for days at a time. ICE spent approximately 
$1,800,000 in fiscal year 2013 on commercial or charter 
repatriations. However, the budget request proposes to severely 
cut transportation and removal funding by 17.3 percent from the 
fiscal year 2014 level. Recognizing the principal role ICE 
plays in transporting UACs, the Committee recommends a total of 
$87,605,000 above the request, of which $66,831,000 is for the 
transportation and removal program, $12,317,000 is for the 
criminal alien program, and $8,457,000 is for custody 
operations. Bill language is also included providing additional 
flexibility to move available resources for the transportation 
of UACs.

                             INVESTIGATIONS

    The Committee recommends a total of $1,642,811,000 for 
Homeland Security domestic investigations. Within the total is 
$5,700,000 above the request to sustain positions funded in 
2014, and $5,000,000 above the request for additional 
investigations. The Committee directs that these additional 
funds, when combined with base investigative resources, should 
focus on antidumping and countervailing duty investigations, 
especially into illegally dumped seafood; human smuggling and 
trafficking investigations; counterproliferation; anti-gang; 
and drug smuggling investigations. ICE shall submit an 
expenditure plan breaking out how it proposes to allocate all 
resources provided in this act for domestic investigations not 
later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this act. 
This plan shall detail both financial resources as well as the 
personnel dedicated to each mission area and shall be at the 
same level of detail as the quarterly investigations activities 
report.

                           HUMAN TRAFFICKING

    ICE plays a critical role in combating severe forms of 
human trafficking in the United States and is therefore one of 
the first lines of defense in stopping this heinous crime. In 
2013, ICE Homeland Security Investigations [HSI] reported 
investigating 1,720 cases possibly involving human trafficking, 
an increase from 1,382 cases investigated in fiscal year 2012. 
This was a 24 percent increase in investigations in just 1 
year. Additional resources are needed to continue to expand 
investigations against suspected human traffickers and help 
reduce the incidents of trafficking and forced labor in the 
United States.
    Within funds made available within the domestic 
investigations account, the Committee recommends not less than 
$10,000,000 for investigations into severe forms of human 
trafficking and to expand investigations against suspected 
human traffickers. Congress called on ICE to take a more active 
role in pursuing investigations of human trafficking under 
section 113(i) of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act [TVPA] 
of 2000, as amended by the TVPRA of 2005, the TVPRA of 2008, 
and the TVPRA of 2013. ICE is one of the first lines of defense 
in combating this crime.

                  TRAINING REGARDING HUMAN TRAFFICKING

    ICE plays a critical role in investigating criminal 
organizations which traffic individuals into the United States. 
The Committee encourages ICE to work with appropriate nonprofit 
organizations and victim service providers to improve the 
training of ICE officers in the field to assist in the 
identification of human trafficking victims, especially 
children, and provide appropriate referrals to victim service 
organizations. The Committee also encourages ICE to examine its 
policies regarding granting Continued Presence to eligible 
human trafficking victims identified by law enforcement.
    Relatedly, the Committee is concerned that online 
classifieds Web sites like Backpage.com can be used to 
facilitate human trafficking, and in particular the sexual 
exploitation and sex trafficking of minors. Criminal gangs are 
increasingly finding human trafficking to be more lucrative 
than other traditional forms of revenue generation. The 
Committee directs ICE, as part of its briefings on 
investigations, to provide information on instances where an 
online classifieds site is determined to be the conduit for 
exploiting trafficked persons, especially minors, and the 
actions ICE is taking to shut down these sites.

                        HERO CHILD RESCUE CORPS

    In April 2013, ICE, entered into a partnership with U.S. 
Special Operations Command and the National Association to 
Protect Children [PROTECT] to launch the ``Human Exploitation 
Rescue Operative [HERO] Child Rescue Corps'' program. The 12-
month internship program is a highly competitive, highly 
selective, non-paid internship, designed for wounded, injured, 
and ill Special Operations Forces to receive training in high-
tech computer forensics and law enforcement skills to assist 
HSI and law enforcement in their efforts to combat child sexual 
exploitation. Upon successful completion of the training, HERO 
participants are embedded into computer forensic analyst 
positions within HSI offices to receive on-the-job training 
experience. The Committee commends ICE for its participation in 
this innovative program. The Committee expects the Department 
to allocate $1,000,000 in available funds to hire, train, and 
equip wounded, ill, or injured veterans as digital forensic 
analysts or investigators to support child exploitation 
investigations. The Committee directs a briefing on ICE's 
efforts in this regard be provided not later than 180 days 
after the date of enactment of this act.

                           CHILD EXPLOITATION

    ICE is directed to maintain its relationship with the 
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in regards 
to its ongoing support for investigations and other child 
exploitation activities.

                                 GANGS

    Additionally, the Committee supports the work of the 
National Gang Unit and encourages the Department and ICE to 
continue these aggressive investigations, specifically of gangs 
of national significance which are perpetuating much of the 
violence in our major urban areas while also engaging in a 
variety of illicit activity including international drug, gun, 
and human trafficking.

                    TRADE COMPLIANCE AND ENFORCEMENT

    The Committee notes that Intellectual Property Rights [IPR] 
violations are a significant revenue source for transnational 
criminal organizations including Mexican drug cartels. 
According to officials at the IPR Coordination Center, these 
violations are a low-risk/high-profit type of crime. The Center 
sees more organized crime groups engaging in these types of 
illegal activities because of the high-dollar value to them.
    The Committee fully funds the request for trade enforcement 
activities and directs that not less than $15,000,000 support 
intellectual property rights and commercial trade fraud 
investigations, including undercover equipment, translation and 
transcription of court-ordered wiretaps, commercial fraud 
training, and outreach at the IPR Center. The Committee urges 
ICE to prioritize investigations involving illicit trade of 
dangerous goods that could be harmful to the public, including 
counterfeit pharmaceuticals, synthetic drugs, and tainted food.

                     LAW ENFORCEMENT SUPPORT CENTER

    The Committee provides funding of $34,500,000 for resources 
and full-time law enforcement personnel at the Law Enforcement 
Support Center [LESC] which serves a critical function in the 
Federal Government's immigration enforcement efforts. Further, 
in order to promote efficiency, the Committee recommends that 
ICE take steps to ensure that current operations being carried 
out at the LESC remain centralized at the LESC facility and are 
not unnecessarily duplicated in other parts of the country.

                      INTERNATIONAL INVESTIGATIONS

    The Committee recommends $100,730,000 for international 
operations and $31,728,000 for the Visa Security Program [VSP]. 
Of the total amount provided for VSP, $15,734,000 is available 
for obligation through September 30, 2016. Additionally, due 
the lengthy period of time it takes to negotiate with the 
Department of State on placing ICE personnel abroad, 
$14,801,000 of the total for international investigations is 
available until September 30, 2016, for international postings.

                        IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT

    The role of the Appropriations Committee is to provide the 
resources necessary to enforce enacted laws and administration 
policy. The Committee takes seriously its role with regard to 
providing sufficient resources within constrained budgets to 
effectively and efficiently enforce immigration laws.
    Maintaining an adequate number of detention beds is 
critical to ensuring the integrity of our entire immigration 
enforcement system, including border enforcement. In fiscal 
year 2013, ICE removed a total of 368,644 aliens, including 
216,810 convicted criminal aliens, compared with 175,106 
removed in fiscal year 2004. During the first half of the 
current fiscal year, ICE had removed 155,199 aliens, including 
91,721 convicted criminals. It is imperative that sufficient 
detention bed space be maintained so that aliens who pose the 
greatest threat to the community or who are required to be 
detained by current law can be detained. As of mid-fiscal year 
2014, ICE's detention population consisted of over 90 percent 
mandatory and criminal aliens. The number of aliens in 
detention spike at certain periods during the fiscal year. For 
instance, on May 2, 2014, there were 34,233 aliens in detention 
beds nationwide, but this figure has increased to 38,096 as of 
June 2, 2014. However, the yearly average still remains well 
below the fiscal year 2014 statutory bed requirement of 34,000. 
It is incumbent on ICE to manage its detention bed resources to 
ensure there are sufficient detention beds as these 
fluctuations occur during the year.
    The Committee directs ICE to take appropriate measures to 
reduce the daily bed rate charged to the Federal Government 
through a competitive process in contracting for or otherwise 
obtaining detention beds while ensuring that the most recent 
applicable detention standards, including health standards, are 
met. The Committee notes that detention beds are generally 
cheaper to obtain in remote and/or rural areas; however the 
trade-off to this reduced cost is that detainees may benefit 
from improved legal access and family visitation when housed 
near an urban center. In reviewing its bed space contracting 
process, ICE should also provide consideration to the needs of 
family units. The Committee is aware that currently ICE does 
not have enough bed space to shelter family units based on the 
current influx of families trying to cross our border.
    Recognizing that the funds requested in the request are 
insufficient to support the requested bed level, much less the 
requirement for additional beds and the need for detention of 
family units, the Committee recommends $1,870,444,000, for a 
minimum of 31,039 detention beds, 500 beds above the level 
requested, and $28,000,000 above the request for a family 
detention facility which will have approximately 450 beds. The 
increased funding also reflects more than $30,000,000 above the 
request due to the fact that the budget request assumed an 
artificially low daily cost rate per bed. Absent this 
additional funding, ICE would be unable to sustain the bed 
level throughout the fiscal year. Bill language is also 
included permitting the Secretary to propose to reprogram funds 
necessary to ensure the detention of aliens prioritized for 
removal, subject to the reprogramming guidelines contained in 
section 503.

                        SPECIAL NEED POPULATIONS

    The increase in border apprehensions, particularly in the 
Rio Grande Valley, includes a growing number of UACs and family 
groups, both of which have special vulnerabilities and needs. 
This dramatic increase in border apprehensions is not currently 
matched by an increase in program resources, particularly staff 
FTEs, to provide case management to the detention population. 
Additionally, more immigration judges and resources from the 
Executive Office of Immigration Review [EOIR] are required to 
reduce the length of time it takes to complete a detained 
proceeding, so that detention bed space is freed up for new 
cases. The Committee notes that the Senate Appropriations bill 
for Commerce, Justice and Science includes over $5,800,000, as 
requested, to improve EOIR reviews related to UACs. These funds 
may help free up needed ICE detention bed space more rapidly.

                              COURTHOUSES

    In testimony before the House Judiciary Committee on May 
29, 2014, when asked about locations of immigration enforcement 
actions, the Secretary stated that ``Courthouses are special. 
We ought to have a special policy with regard to courthouses.'' 
As the Secretary indicated he would take a look at the issue, 
the Committee encourages the Secretary to develop new 
guidelines regarding enforcement actions at courthouses and 
directs a briefing be provided on this effort not later than 
120 days after the date of enactment of this act.

                      DETENTION OF PREGNANT WOMEN

    The Performance-Based National Detention Standards 2011 
Section 2.15 Use of Force, issued by ICE, specifically 
prohibits the use of restraints on pregnant women or women in 
post-delivery recuperation when they do not present a flight 
risk or a danger to their own life or the lives of others 
absent ``extraordinary circumstances'' as specified in 
subsection ``F''. The Committee expects ICE to make certain 
that all detention or other contracts and agreements ensure 
that the Use of Force exception for pregnant women is fully 
implemented for all women held under an ICE detainer.

                       ALTERNATIVES TO DETENTION

    The Committee recommends $94,106,000 for the Alternatives 
to Detention [ATD] program. This is the same level as the 
request and $2,662,000 above the enacted level. While the 
Committee remains very supportive of the ATD program, in the 
past few years ICE has not effectively maximized the use of 
this program.
    The Committee directs ICE to provide greater transparency 
on its use of the program--including providing quarterly 
briefings on the results of any evaluations of the program by 
field offices. ICE should post on its Web site any contractor 
evaluations and OIG reports related to the ATD program.

            SECURE COMMUNITIES IN THE CRIMINAL ALIEN PROGRAM

    The Committee continues its support of the Secure 
Communities program as it has been merged into the Criminal 
Alien Program [CAP]. The Committee recommends $327,040,000 for 
the CAP program, $4,633,000 above the amount requested and 
$32,855,000 above the amount provided in 2014.
    The Committee continues a provision, as requested, ensuring 
that all illegal aliens encountered when enforcing our 
immigration laws are apprehended.

IMPACTS OF IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT ON U.S. CITIZEN CHILDREN OF REMOVED 
                                 ALIENS

    It is important for ICE to institute appropriate policies 
and measures to ensure that U.S. citizen children of illegal 
aliens receive all necessary and appropriate treatment 
throughout the immigration enforcement process. The Committee 
is aware that the Urban Institute and others are conducting a 
study, funded by the Department of Health and Human Services, 
focused on all aspects of this issue including the number of 
children affected by the detention and removal of a parent, the 
impact of family separation and loss of income on the well-
being of children, and the short, intermediate, and long-term 
economic, health, and social service needs of these children. 
The final report is due to be released in early 2015. The 
Committee directs ICE to provide all appropriate assistance to 
those conducting the study and to implement any recommendations 
from the report. ICE shall keep the Committee regularly updated 
on activities affecting these U.S. citizen children.
    The Committee directs ICE to continue to submit the 
semiannual report on ``Deportation of Parents of U.S.-Born 
Citizens''.

                                 GANGS

    The Committee remains concerned about increasing gang 
violence and criminal activity in many parts of our Nation. Not 
later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this act, 
the Committee directs ICE to submit a report to the Committee 
regarding the detention and removal of gang members. This 
report should include: (1) a State by State breakdown of the 
number of gang members detained, removed, or both detained and 
removed; and (2) the number of gang members detained, removed, 
or both detained and removed in the 10 largest metropolitan 
areas in the United States.

                    DETENTION AND REMOVAL REPORTING

    ICE is directed to continue to provide quarterly detention 
and removal reports at the same level of detail as directed in 
Senate Report 112-74.

            STUDENT AND EXCHANGE VISITOR INFORMATION SYSTEM

    The Student and Exchange Visitor Information System [SEVIS] 
was launched in 2002 to mitigate critical vulnerabilities 
exploited by the 9/11 hijackers. While adjustments have been 
made to the system over the years, it has been clear that the 
initial system would require replacement to meet many important 
user needs and security interests. ICE has had a SEVIS II 
modernization program since 2007, though the program has moved 
glacially. The Committee directs ICE to assess the current 
vulnerabilities of SEVIS, the requirements for modernization or 
system upgrades, and a path forward for the program. ICE shall 
brief the Committee no later than October 1, 2014.

                         LICENSE PLATE READERS

    A general provision is included directing that any 
solicitation or request for proposal of a National License 
Plate Recognition database or other similar project be 
postponed indefinitely.

                        AUTOMATION MODERNIZATION

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $34,900,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      26,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      26,000,000

    The Automation Modernization account provides funds for 
major information technology [IT] projects for U.S. Immigration 
and Customs Enforcement, including modernization of TECS, 
modernization of Detention and Removal Operations' IT systems 
for tracking detainees (DRO Modernization), electronic health 
records, and other systems.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends a total of $26,000,000, the same 
as the request and $8,900,000 below the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2014. These funds are to remain available until 
September 30, 2017.
    The Committee recommends $5,000,000, as requested, for the 
Consolidated ICE Financial Solution [CIFS]. The Committee 
understands CIFS will allow ICE to replace the legacy core 
financial system that it owns and operates by acquiring 
financial services from a Shared Service Provider which will 
host and operate the core financial system for ICE and its 
customers. ICE shall provide a briefing on the progress with 
CIFS not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of 
this act.

                                            AUTOMATION MODERNIZATION
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Automation modernization:
    IT investment.........................................             8,400  ................  ................
    TECS modernization....................................            23,000  ................  ................
    Electronic health records.............................             3,500  ................  ................
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal............................................            34,900            26,000            26,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                           TECS MODERNIZATION

    TECS is an information technology system in place since the 
1980s that provides border security and law enforcement 
personnel information about people who are inadmissible or may 
pose a threat to the security of the United States. Over time, 
however, it has become increasingly difficult and expensive to 
maintain because of technology obsolescence and its inability 
to support new mission requirements.
    A recent GAO report (GAO-14-342T) noted that TECS Mod has 
continued to experience schedule and cost changes. Regarding 
ICE's $818,000,000 TECS Mod program, it is redesigning and 
replanning its program, after determining that its initial 
solution was not viable and could not support ICE's needs. The 
Department's CIO has expressed concern about the problematic 
nature of this modernization effort. As a result, CBP and ICE 
shall to continue to conduct the semiannual joint briefings on 
the status of this modernization effort for the Committee.

                              CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2014....................................      $5,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................................
Committee recommendation................................................

    This appropriation provides funding to plan, construct, 
renovate, equip, and maintain buildings and facilities 
necessary for the administration and enforcement of the laws 
relating to immigration, detention, and alien registration.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends no funds, as requested. Any 
carryover funds available within the Construction account will 
be used for emergency repairs and alterations, especially those 
focused on life and safety.

                 Transportation Security Administration

    The Transportation Security Administration [TSA] is charged 
with ensuring security across U.S. transportation systems, 
including aviation, railways, highways, pipelines, and 
waterways, and safeguarding the freedom of movement of people 
and commerce. Separate appropriations are provided for the 
following activities within TSA: aviation security including 
Federal Air Marshals; surface transportation security; 
intelligence and vetting; and transportation security support.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends a total program level of 
$7,233,967,000 and a net of $4,824,362,000 for the activities 
of TSA for fiscal year 2015.
    The request includes several funding realignments within 
and, in some cases, between appropriations accounts. For fiscal 
year 2015, TSA requests over 25 different realignments between 
appropriation accounts and PPAs. This practice has become all 
too common over the last few years and, as a result, making 
general comparisons to prior year funding has become a 
budgetary Rubik's cube. In order to preserve an orderly 
accounting of budgetary resources from one year to the next and 
to maintain proper oversight of appropriations, TSA is 
discouraged from continuing the seemingly unending funding 
realignments in future fiscal years.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                                     TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                           Fiscal year 2015
                                                         Fiscal year 2014       budget            Committee
                                                              enacted         request\1\      recommendations\1\
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Aviation Security......................................         4,982,735         5,683,304           5,634,710
Aviation Security Capital Fund (mandatory).............           250,000           250,000             250,000
Surface Transportation Security........................           108,618           127,637             126,749
Intelligence and Vetting (direct appropriations).......           176,489           232,526             219,166
Intelligence and Vetting (fee-funded programs).........            66,000            79,605              79,605
Transportation Security Support........................           962,061           932,026             923,737
Federal Air Marshals...................................           818,607  ................  ...................
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Transportation Security Administration             7,364,510         7,305,098           7,233,967
       (gross).........................................
Offsetting Fee Collections--current law................        -2,120,000        -2,080,000          -2,080,000
Offsetting Fee Collections--proposed passenger fee       ................          -190,000  ...................
 increase..............................................
Offsetting Fee Collections--proposed aviation security   ................          -380,000  ...................
 infrastructure fee reinstatement......................
Aviation Security Capital Fund (mandatory).............          -250,000          -250,000            -250,000
Fee Accounts [TTAC]....................................           -66,000           -79,605             -79,605
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Transportation Security Administration             4,928,510         4,325,493           4,824,362
       (net)...........................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Funding for Federal Air Marshals included in Aviation Security.

                           AVIATION SECURITY

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $4,982,735,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   5,683,304,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,634,710,000

    The Aviation Security account provides for Federal aviation 
security, including screening of all passengers and baggage, 
deployment of on-site law enforcement, continuation of a 
uniform set of background requirements for airport and airline 
personnel, and deployment of explosives detection technology.
    The aviation security activities include funding for: 
Federal transportation security officers [TSOs] and private 
contract screeners; air cargo security; procurement, 
installation, and maintenance of explosives detection systems 
[EDS]; checkpoint technologies and support; airport management 
and support; Federal air marshals and other aviation regulation 
and enforcement activities.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $5,634,710,000 for aviation 
security activities. This is $48,594,000 below the amount 
requested. Of this amount, the Committee recommends not to 
exceed $7,650 for official reception and representation 
expenses.
    The Committee has streamlined the Aviation Security 
Appropriation budget structure by maintaining existing PPAs, 
but eliminating outdated sub-appropriations. The PPA 
descriptions provide a clear description of budgetary authority 
per activity. The new structure also includes the Federal Air 
Marshals as a PPA under Aviation Security instead of a stand-
alone appropriation. As a result, all operational aviation 
security activities are now consolidated under the same 
appropriation.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                                                AVIATION SECURITY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Screening Partnership Program.............................           158,190           154,572           160,226
Screening Personnel, Compensation, and Benefits...........         3,033,526         2,952,868         2,947,939
Screener Training and Other...............................           226,857           226,290           225,707
Checkpoint Support........................................           103,309           103,469            88,469
EDS Procurement and Installation..........................            73,845            84,075            74,000
Screening Technology Maintenance..........................           298,509           294,509           294,509
Aviation Regulation and Other Enforcement.................           354,437           348,653           338,653
Airport Management and Support............................           587,000           591,734           588,864
FFDO and Flight Crew Training.............................            24,730            20,000            20,000
Air Cargo.................................................           122,332           106,920           106,343
Federal Air Marshals......................................  ................           800,214           790,000
Aviation Security Capital Fund (mandatory)................         (250,000)         (250,000)         (250,000)
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Aviation Security............................         4,982,735         5,683,304         5,634,710
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         AVIATION SECURITY FEES

    The Congressional Budget Office [CBO], in its analysis of 
the President's budget, has re-estimated discretionary 
offsetting collections from aviation security fees to be 
$2,080,000,000 under existing law. CBO estimates another 
$250,000,000 in mandatory collections will be collected and 
dedicated to the Aviation Security Capital Fund and 
$1,440,000,000 to deficit reduction pursuant to the Bi-Partisan 
Budget Agreement of 2013. CBO also estimates that an additional 
$190,000,000 in discretionary offsetting receipts would be 
collected as a result of the administration's proposal to 
modify aviation passenger fees in fiscal year 2015 by 
increasing the current law passenger fee of $5.60 per one-way 
trip to $6 per one-way trip and $380,000,000 through the 
reinstatement of the Aviation Security Infrastructure Fee. 
While the reasoning behind the proposed increases has merit, 
the Committee believes the proposals should be channeled 
through the appropriate legislative committees. A general 
provision has been added prohibiting funds for the salaries and 
expenses of personnel who prepare or submit legislative 
proposals as part of the President's budget submission that 
assumes revenues that have not been enacted into law.
    The Administrator is directed to brief the Committee no 
later than 180 days from enactment on the financial impact of 
the Aviation Passenger Security Fee on air passengers from 
Alaska and Hawaii as compared to the contiguous 48 States where 
travel originates in comparable airports that service rural 
communities. The Committee encourages TSA to examine the cost 
difference to passengers for the July 1, 2014, fee increase and 
the difference in per capita enplanements for rural communities 
in Alaska and Hawaii.

                     SCREENING PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends $160,226,000 for the Screening 
Partnership Program [SPP]. This is $5,654,000 above the amount 
requested and $2,036,000 above the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2014. The recommendation provides the necessary funds for 
security at airports where private screening contracts are in 
place, including four airports recently added to the program.
    TSA shall adjust its PPA line items, and notify the 
Committee within 10 days, to account for any changes in private 
screening contracts, including new awards under the SPP, or the 
movement from privatized screening into Federal screening. TSA 
shall also notify the Committee if the agency expects to spend 
less than the appropriated amount due to situations where no 
additional airports express interest in converting to 
privatized screening, or where airports currently using 
privatized screening convert to using Federal screeners. The 
Committee also expects to be briefed on any proposed changes 
being considered for the SPP program.
    In the explanatory statement accompanying division F of 
Public Law 113-76, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014, 
TSA was directed to conduct an independent study of the 
performance of federalized screening to privatized screening, 
and to provide a copy of the study to GAO for its review. TSA 
is directed to take the necessary steps to ensure the study is 
completed, along with a copy presented to GAO, no later than 
January 15, 2015. Should the study not be completed by that 
date, or should TSA fail to provide a copy of the completed 
study to GAO for its review, TSA shall inform the Committee by 
the deadline to explain why it has not compiled with these 
directives and when it expects to do so.

             SCREENER PERSONNEL, COMPENSATION, AND BENEFITS

    The Committee recommends $2,947,939,000 for Screener 
Personnel, Compensation, and Benefits. This is $4,929,000 below 
the amount requested and $85,587,000 below the amount provided 
in fiscal year 2014. The recommendation includes reductions 
related to risk based security [RBS] efficiencies, reduced 
playbook operations, in-line systems savings, and a shift to 
the SPP PPA reflecting new privatized screening contracts. As a 
result of TSA's continued expansion of risk based initiatives 
and more travelers being eligible for expedited screening, 
higher savings are being realized in fiscal year 2014 and 
fiscal year 2015 than originally anticipated. Because of this 
development, the recommendation includes a rescission of funds 
for fiscal year 2014 and a reduction below the request for 
fiscal year 2015.
    The Committee bill does not include a statutory cap on TSA 
screening personnel as FTE levels are declining by more than 
3,186 in fiscal year 2015 and are well below the ceiling set in 
the fiscal year 2014 DHS Appropriations Act. TSA should be 
commended for achieving personnel savings as a result of its 
risk-based approach to passenger screening and the deployment 
of improved screening technologies.

                      SCREENER TRAINING AND OTHER

    The Committee recommends $225,707,000 for Screener Training 
and Other. This is $583,000 below the amount requested and 
$1,150,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2014. The 
recommendation includes the requested reductions associated 
with RBS efficiencies, reduced Playbook operations, and savings 
from more efficient in-line checked baggage systems. Funds are 
provided to support training of TSOs and other direct costs 
associated with TSO operations, such as: consumable supplies, 
checkpoint janitorial services, travel for the National 
Deployment Force, uniform allowances, hazardous materials 
disposal, and a model workforce program. The recommendation 
reflects the requested realignment of funding from other 
accounts to better align programmatic activities.
    The Committee expects TSA to make the appropriate resources 
available from this PPA to carry out the TSO training 
recommendations made in TSA's after action report following the 
tragic shooting at the Los Angeles International Airport in 
November 2013.

                           CHECKPOINT SUPPORT

    The Committee recommends $88,469,000 for Checkpoint 
Support. This is $15,000,000 below the amount requested and 
$14,840,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2014. 
Funds are provided to field test and deploy equipment for 
passenger screening, carry-on baggage screening, checkpoint 
reconfiguration, electronic surveillance of checkpoints, and 
operational integration of systems. As stated in the budget 
request, currently deployed technologies include walk-through 
metal detectors, explosives trace detection, bottled liquid 
scanners, chemical analysis devices, advanced technology 
systems, and Advanced Imaging Technology [AIT]. The budget also 
indicates that credential authentication technology, which 
digitally validates the ID used by the traveling public, will 
begin deployment in fiscal year 2015.
    The reduction below the request is to be offset by an 
identical amount in unobligated balances for checkpoint 
technologies that have remained unspent for over 7 years. The 
Committee cannot support appropriations for new funding when 
prior year balances continue to languish in TSA's coffers.
    The Committee understands TSA is working to create a 
Technology Roadmap for all screening technologies in order to 
have a better understanding of technological advancements being 
considered, clear timelines for completion, and the level of 
investment necessary to reach maturity. TSA plans to complete 
the Roadmap first for AIT followed by other passenger screening 
technologies before the end of this fiscal year. TSA is to 
provide the Committee with the Technology Roadmap upon its 
completion and brief the Committee on its conclusions.

               ADVANCED INTEGRATED SCREENING TECHNOLOGIES

    Pursuant to a statutory requirement in the bill, TSA is to 
continue providing a report on advanced integrated passenger 
screening technologies for the most effective security of 
passengers and baggage not later than 90 days after the date of 
enactment of this act. The report provides a useful description 
of existing and emerging equipment capable of detecting threats 
concealed on passengers and in baggage as well as projected 
funding levels for the next five fiscal years for each 
technology discussed in the report.
    In order to leverage and maximize the capabilities of the 
aviation security industrial base, TSA needs to provide ongoing 
guidance related to screening technology requirements. To that 
end, TSA recently posted its first Strategic Capabilities 
Investment Plan to FedBizOpps.gov in an effort to share its 
plans with its industry partners. The Committee is encouraged 
by this development and expects the plan to be followed by 
frequent engagement with industry to communicate evolving 
aviation security requirements.

                      ADVANCED IMAGING TECHNOLOGY

    TSA is to continue its frequent briefings on AIT, which is 
used to screen passengers for metallic and non-metallic 
threats, including weapons, explosives, and other objects 
concealed under layers of clothing. The briefings are to 
include: procurement details; cost; schedule; associated 
staffing requirements; utilization rates; deployments; 
throughput rates; progress on the development of AIT-2 and 
software improvements to enable the machines to detect smaller 
threat masses; and any changes to requirements for full 
operating capability. Finally, as recommended by GAO, TSA is to 
work toward collecting real time AIT operational data on a 
continuing basis so TSA management can better understand how 
false alarm rates impact operational costs. TSA is to inform 
the Committee when it has met this recommendation.

                    RISK-BASED SECURITY INITIATIVES

    TSA should be commended for streamlining screening 
procedures for Pre3TM travelers, children under 12, 
senior citizens, flight attendants, and active duty military 
personnel. These expedited screening measures are beginning to 
yield security, budgetary, and economic benefits to both the 
agency and the flying public.
    The Committee remains interested in having TSA expand its 
RBS efforts, specifically TSA Pre3TM. To help the 
Committee understand more specifically what populations are 
being processed through TSA Pre3TM lanes, bill 
language is included requiring a semiannual report to the 
Committees on TSA's efforts to expand the number of passengers 
receiving expedited screening.
    The Committee commends TSA for establishing a new senior 
level position in the agency that is focused on coordinating 
and driving all external marketing and communication 
initiatives. It is critical that TSA improve its process for 
communicating the benefits of Pre3TM and other 
expedited screening programs to the traveling public. To that 
end, TSA should explore public-private partnerships to leverage 
private sector funding to increase enrollment in 
Pre3TM. TSA should brief the Committee not later 
than 60 days after the date of enactment of this act on its 
strategic communications campaign for Pre3TM.

                           EXIT LANE SECURITY

    The recommendation includes funding as requested to 
continue monitoring airport exit lanes consistent with section 
603 of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013. With regard to 
remodeling and modernization efforts undertaken by an airport 
at an existing exit lane for which TSA was responsible for 
monitoring on December 1, 2013, TSA shall continue to be 
responsible for monitoring the exit lane after the remodeling 
or modernization effort is completed.
    The Committee is aware of the potential benefits of 
technological solutions that in the future will provide TSA 
with the flexibility to reassign exit lane staff to other 
priority areas of the airport and reduce overall costs at each 
airport. The Committee is aware that TSA has developed an exit 
lane security ``toolbox'' to support decision-making and 
deployment of technological solutions for exit lane monitoring. 
TSA, in coordination with its airport partners, shall continue 
to evaluate advancements in technology to realize efficiencies 
in exit lane security and, as part of this effort, brief the 
Committee periodically on utilization of the ``toolbox.'' The 
Committee encourages TSA to evaluate the costs of exit lane 
monitoring by TSOs and develop a longer term strategy for 
managing this activity using low-cost technological solutions, 
working with the airports to look at law enforcement 
reimbursement, or other approaches.

                      EXPLOSIVES DETECTION SYSTEMS

    The Committee recommends $74,000,000 for Explosives 
Detection Systems procurement and installation. This is 
$10,075,000 below the amount requested and $155,000 above the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2014. An additional $250,000,000 
in mandatory spending will be available from Aviation Security 
Capital Fund [ASCF] fee collections. The total discretionary 
and mandatory funding will allow TSA to purchase and install 
approximately 109 EDS units and 250 Explosives Trace Detection 
[ETD] units in fiscal year 2015. The Committee directs TSA to 
include its EDS recapitalization plans within the congressional 
budget justification for fiscal year 2016 including detailed 
information on expected unit replacements.
    The recommendation does not include the request to restore 
the reduction taken in fiscal year 2014. The requested increase 
can be accommodated by using unobligated balances for EDS 
procurement and installation that have remained unspent for 
over 7 years. The Committee cannot support appropriations for 
increased funding when prior year balances continue to languish 
in TSA's coffers.
    Section 44923 of title 49 requires that the $250,000,000 in 
annual mandatory funding deposited into the ASCF is to be 
available for airport security improvement projects, such as 
facility modifications. However, procurement and installation 
of EDS equipment associated with these projects is not 
permitted. With a diminishing base of airport applications 
seeking large improvement projects and the need to replace 
aging EDS machines currently deployed at airports, the 
recommendation continues bill language, as requested, to permit 
ASCF funding to be used to procure and install EDS equipment 
during fiscal year 2015. This will allow TSA to more 
effectively, economically, and expeditiously plan and implement 
the acquisition and replacement of existing EDS units.

              TESTING EVALUATION AND INSTALLATION PLANNING

    The Committee continues to be concerned by the length of 
time it takes for EDS and other security technology to proceed 
through the TSA Test & Evaluation [T&E;] process before being 
deployed. The Committee is aware of TSA efforts to collaborate 
with industry to shorten the T&E; process, while ensuring the 
technology meets the stringent security requirements necessary 
to secure the Nation's transportation systems. The Committee 
directs TSA to continue this collaboration with industry to 
reduce the amount of iterations and retesting conducted, 
explore trade-off analyses, establish permanent operational 
test beds, and evaluate third party testing opportunities that 
accelerate the deployment of state-of-the-art technology to the 
field. Additionally, the Committee encourages TSA to include 
cost, length of time, and benefits when making decisions on 
additional testing of equipment. TSA is to brief the Committee 
not later than 30 days after the date of enactment of this act 
on improvements adopted to accelerate the deployment of these 
critical technologies.

            HIGH SPEED EDS TESTING AND INSTALLATION PLANNING

    With regard to high speed EDS, the Committee is aware that 
larger airports may want to avail themselves of high speed 
explosive detection systems for checked baggage to enhance 
security, improve efficiency and ultimately lower operational 
costs. Therefore, the Committee urges TSA to complete and issue 
reports on candidate systems concurrently with the completion 
of each phase of testing rather than waiting until a test phase 
is done, as the latter can cause considerable delays in a high 
speed system moving into the next phase of testing for ultimate 
listing on the federally qualified products list. In addition, 
the Committee expects TSA to make clear to airport managers 
that there is no restriction on them undertaking discussions 
with entities whose high speed systems are compliant with TSA's 
planning guidelines and design standards and are awaiting the 
completion of tests to be placed on the qualified products 
list. The Committee directs TSA to outline how it intends to 
overcome these obstacles when it briefs the Committee on its 
EDS expenditure plan.

                 EDS/CHECKPOINT TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENTS

    Not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this 
act, TSA is to brief the Committee on its fiscal year 2015 
investment plans for checkpoint security and EDS refurbishment, 
procurement, and installations on an airport-by-airport basis. 
The briefing shall include specific technologies for purchase, 
program schedules and major milestones, a schedule for 
obligation of the funds, recapitalization priorities, status of 
operational testing for each passenger screening technology 
under development, and a table detailing actual versus 
anticipated unobligated balances at the close of the fiscal 
year. The briefing shall also include details on passenger 
screening pilot programs that are in progress or being 
considered for implementation in fiscal year 2015. Information 
in this section is to include a summary of the pilot program 
describing what the program is attempting to achieve; potential 
capabilities and benefits of the program; the airports where 
the pilots will be operating; funding commitments; and plans 
for future expansion. The Committee expects the briefing to 
include detailed program schedules for passenger screening 
technologies. Schedules should include all milestones from the 
issuance of a request for proposal to deployment.

   INSTALLATION OF OPTIMAL BAGGAGE SCREENING SYSTEMS AND FTE SAVINGS

    The Committee no longer requires a separate report on the 
savings achieved and anticipated by fiscal year from the 
installation of new in-line systems. This information is now 
contained as part of the Advanced Integrated Screening 
Technologies Report.

 AIRPORTS THAT HAVE INCURRED ELIGIBLE COSTS FOR IN-LINE BAGGAGE SYSTEM 
                               DEPLOYMENT

    As required by the 9/11 Act, TSA is to give funding 
consideration to airports that incurred eligible costs for EDS 
and that were not recipients of funding agreements. The fiscal 
year 2015 EDS expenditure plan shall identify airports eligible 
for funding pursuant to section 1604(b)(2) of Public Law 110-53 
and funding, if any, allocated to reimburse those airports.

             SCREENING TECHNOLOGY MAINTENANCE AND UTILITIES

    The Committee recommends $294,509,000 for Screening 
Technology Maintenance and Utilities. This is the same amount 
as requested and $4,000,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2014. The reduction below fiscal year 2014 reflects 
contract efficiencies and reduced equipment levels.

               AVIATION REGULATION AND OTHER ENFORCEMENT

    The Committee recommends $338,653,000 for Aviation 
Regulation and Other Enforcement. This is $10,000,000 below the 
amount requested and $15,784,000 below the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2014. The recommended amount provides for law 
enforcement and regulatory activities at airports to: ensure 
compliance with required security measures, respond to security 
incidents, and provide international support for worldwide 
security requirements. A reduction below the request is made 
due to a large gap between funded FTE and on-board personnel.
    The recommendation consolidates all funding for the 
National Canine Program within this PPA, as requested, which 
helps support 985 teams in fiscal year 2015. TSA funded canine 
teams have proven to be a reliable, effective, and efficient 
way to screen for explosive devices. Since the beginning of 
fiscal year 2007, Congress has provided funding to double the 
total number of canine teams for multi-modal explosives 
detection purposes.
    The recommendation also reflects the consolidation of all 
funding for the Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response 
[VIPR] program in the Surface Transportation Appropriation.
    The after action report following the tragic shooting at 
the Los Angeles International Airport recommended increased law 
enforcement presence at high traffic locations within the 
airport such as peak travel times at checkpoints and ticket 
counters. TSA is to brief the Committees not later than 30 days 
after the date of enactment of this act on the implementation 
of this recommendation and if the intended benefit of a visible 
deterrence and quicker incident response time has been 
achieved.

                     AIRPORT MANAGEMENT AND SUPPORT

    The Committee recommends $588,864,000 for Airport 
Management and Support. This is $2,870,000 below the amount 
requested and $1,864,000 above the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2014. Funds are provided for: the workforce to support TSA 
Federal security directors; Bomb Appraisal Officers; Explosives 
Security Specialists; the Transportation Security Operations 
Center; airport rent and furniture; a vehicle fleet; airport 
parking; and employee transit benefits.
    The recommendation includes the requested realignments and 
reductions associated with RBS efficiencies, reduced Playbook 
operations, and savings from more efficient in-line checked 
baggage systems.

     FEDERAL FLIGHT DECK OFFICER AND FLIGHT CREW TRAINING PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $20,000,000 for the Federal Flight 
Deck Officer [FFDO] and Flight Crew Training programs. This is 
the same amount as requested and $4,730,000 below the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2014. Funds are provided to deputize 
qualified airline pilots who volunteer to be Federal law 
enforcement officers and to provide initial and recurrent law 
enforcement training. Funds are also provided for the Crew 
Member Self-Defense Training program for the purpose of 
teaching crew members basic self-defense concepts and 
techniques.
    The recommended level is sufficient to meet the operational 
needs of the program and will not result in a degradation of 
the training curriculum or decrease the number of FFDO's 
trained per year. The reduction from fiscal year 2014 reflects 
realization of program efficiencies and the creation of an 
inactive reserve force. The inactive reserve force represents a 
percentage of the deputized FFDOs that are unable to fly under 
``FFDO status'' as their flight schedule is solely 
international.

                               AIR CARGO

    The Committee recommends $106,343,000 for Air Cargo 
security. This is $577,000 below the amount requested and 
$15,989,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2014. 
Funds are provided to secure the air cargo supply chain, 
conveyances, and people. The reduction below the request 
reflects the consolidation of the National Canine Program in 
the Aviation Regulation and Other Enforcement PPA.
    Not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this 
act, TSA is to brief the Committee on its fiscal year 2015 
investment plans for air cargo security, including carryover 
balances. The briefing documents shall be in the same format as 
expenditure plans submitted in prior years and include detailed 
information related to 100 percent screening of domestic and 
international inbound air cargo.

                           PERIMETER SECURITY

    The recent breach of a perimeter fence at the San Jose 
International Airport underscores the importance of strong 
airport perimeter security plans. The Committee is aware that 
some airports are employing technological solutions to detect 
security breaches of perimeter fences and access points, and 
therefore strongly encourages TSA to work with airport 
authorities to explore technology options to improve perimeter 
security; validate promising technology solutions; and update 
airport security plans, as appropriate, to improve the 
perimeter security posture of airports.

                          FEDERAL AIR MARSHALS

    The Committee recommends $790,000,000 for Federal Air 
Marshals. This is $10,214,000 below the amount requested and 
$28,607,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2014. 
Funding is provided for the Federal Air Marshals [FAMs] to 
protect the air transportation system against terrorist 
threats, sabotage, and other acts of violence.
    This funding decrease reflects the consolidation of all 
funding for the Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response 
[VIPR] program in the Surface Transportation Appropriation and 
other administrative cost adjustments.
    A recent study of FAMs operations and staffing by the 
Homeland Security Studies and Analysis Institute included 
several recommendations related to CONOPS, training, and risk 
analysis. Not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of 
the act, FAMs is to brief the Committee on its efforts to 
implement these recommendations.
     The Committee directs TSA to continue to submit quarterly 
reports on mission coverage, staffing levels, and hiring rates 
as in prior years.

                    SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $108,618,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     127,637,000
Committee recommendation................................     126,749,000

    Surface transportation security provides funding for 
personnel and operational resources to assess the risk of a 
terrorist attack on nonaviation modes of transportation, 
standards and procedures to address those risks, and to ensure 
compliance with established regulations and policies.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $126,749,000 for Surface 
Transportation Security. This is $888,000 below the amount 
requested and $18,131,000 above the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2014. Funds are available to assess the risk of terrorist 
attacks for all non-aviation transportation modes, issue 
regulations to improve the security of those modes, and enforce 
regulations to ensure the protection of the transportation 
system. The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                                         SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Staffing and operations...................................            35,262            29,375            29,230
Surface transportation security inspectors and VIPR.......            73,356            98,262            97,519
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Surface Transportation Security..............           108,618           127,637           126,749
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

        SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY STAFFING AND OPERATIONS

    The Committee recommends $29,230,000 for Surface 
Transportation Security Staffing and Operations. This is 
$145,000 below the amount requested and $6,032,000 below the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2014.

          SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY INSPECTORS AND VIPR

    The Committee recommends $97,519,000 for Surface 
Transportation Security Inspectors and VIPR. This is $743,000 
below the amount requested and $24,163,000 above the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2014. As requested, the recommendation 
includes the consolidation of all VIPR teams within this PPA 
and the consolidation of all canine assets under the Aviation 
Regulation and Other Enforcement PPA in Aviation Security.
    TSA is to brief the Committee no later than 90 days after 
the date of enactment of this act on its surface transportation 
technology pilot programs and initiatives. The briefing shall 
include a summary of all technology pilot programs and 
initiatives TSA will have operating or has planned for fiscal 
year 2015; what each program/initiative is attempting to 
achieve; potential capabilities and benefits of the program/
initiative; locations of each program/initiative; and plans for 
future expansion.

                        INTELLIGENCE AND VETTING

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $176,489,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     232,526,000
Committee recommendation................................     219,166,000

    Intelligence and Vetting (formerly known as Transportation 
Threat Assessment and Credentialing) includes several programs 
that are intended to identify known or suspected terrorists 
threats working in or seeking access to the Nation's 
transportation system.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $219,166,000 for Intelligence and 
Vetting. This is $13,360,000 below the amount requested and 
$42,677,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2014. In 
addition, an estimated $79,605,000 in fee collections is 
available for these activities in fiscal year 2015, as proposed 
in the budget.
    As requested, the Intelligence PPA is transferred to this 
appropriation from Transportation Security Support in order to 
combine intelligence and vetting functions to better inform 
daily operations.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                                            INTELLIGENCE AND VETTING
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Direct Appropriations:
    Intelligence..........................................  ................            51,801            51,545
    Secure Flight.........................................            93,202           112,543            99,569
    Other Vetting Programs................................            83,287            68,182            68,052
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, direct appropriations.....................           176,489           232,526           219,166
Fee Collections:
    Transportation worker identification credential.......            36,700            34,832            34,832
    Hazardous materials...................................            12,000            12,000            12,000
    General aviation at DCA...............................               350               350               350
    Commercial aviation and airports......................             6,500             6,500             6,500
    Other security threat assessments.....................                50                50                50
    Air cargo/certified cargo screening program...........             5,400             7,173             7,173
    Pre3TM................................................  ................            13,700            13,700
    Alien flight school...................................             5,000             5,000             5,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, fee collections...........................            66,000            79,605            79,605
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                              INTELLIGENCE

    The Committee recommends $51,545,000 for Intelligence. This 
is $256,000 below the amount requested and $6,984,000 above the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2014.

                             SECURE FLIGHT

    The Committee recommends $99,569,000 for Secure Flight. 
This is $12,974,000 below the amount requested and $6,367,000 
above the amount provided in fiscal year 2014. As recommended 
by the 9/11 Commission and mandated by the Intelligence Reform 
Act, this program transferred the responsibility of airline 
passenger watch list matching from the air carriers to the 
Federal Government.
    The Committee recommendation includes $6,300,000 realigned 
from the Other Vetting Programs PPA to continue the 
implementation of RBS initiatives. Due to delays in 
implementing the Large Aircraft and Charter Screening Program, 
the request for increased funding is not provided.

                         OTHER VETTING PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $68,052,000 for Crew and Other 
Vetting Programs. This is $130,000 below the amount requested 
and $15,235,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2014.
    The Committee supports TSA's efforts to modernize its 
vetting and credentialing infrastructure, which is currently 
made up of disconnected and duplicative systems. This has 
resulted in high-system complexity and lengthy adjudication 
processes due to manual reviews. TSA has begun to modernize its 
system with initial operational capability being achieved for 
the maritime vetting population, which is to be followed by 
full nationwide rollout in the late summer timeframe. In fiscal 
year 2015, TSA will complete development for other surface 
populations and begin preparations for the aviation community. 
The Committee includes $38,300,000 in discretionary funds, as 
requested, for this effort in fiscal year 2015 and directs TSA 
to brief the Committee on its efforts not later than 30 days 
after the date of enactment of this act.

         TRANSPORTATION WORKER IDENTIFICATION CREDENTIAL [TWIC]

    The Committee has noted a weakness in the TWIC Program 
where TSA does not conduct any additional criminal background 
checks on applicants who are eligible and receive a TWIC with 
an expiration date of 5 years. Not later than 90 days after the 
date of the enactment of this act, the Secretary of Homeland 
Security, in coordination with the Administrator of the 
Transportation Security Administration and the Director of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, shall develop a plan to 
strengthen the background check system used by the TWIC Program 
by improving access to meaningful databases for recurring 
criminal history records checks. Such plan will include cost 
estimates for providing additional or recurring criminal 
history records checks over the 5-year validity period of a 
TWIC card to ensure that disqualifying criminal activity that 
occurs after the initial award of a TWIC card is taken under 
review over the 5-year duration of the TWIC card's validity.

                    TRANSPORTATION SECURITY SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $962,061,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     932,026,000
Committee recommendation................................     923,737,000

    The Transportation Security Support account supports the 
operational needs of TSA's extensive airport/field personnel 
and infrastructure. Transportation Security Support includes: 
headquarters' personnel, pay, benefits, and support; mission 
support centers; human capital services; and information 
technology support.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $923,737,000 for Transportation 
Security Support. This is $8,289,000 below the amount requested 
and $38,324,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2014.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                                         TRANSPORTATION SECURITY SUPPORT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Headquarters administration...............................           272,250           275,891           274,619
Information technology....................................           441,000           451,920           446,498
Human capital services....................................           204,250           204,215           202,620
Intelligence..............................................            44,561  ................  ................
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Transportation Security Support..............           962,061           932,026           923,737
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      HEADQUARTERS ADMINISTRATION

    The Committee recommends $274,619,000 for Headquarters 
Administration. This is $1,272,000 below the amount requested 
and $2,369,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2014.
    TSA shall continue semiannual briefings on covert testing 
activities, to include the latest metrics gathered from recent 
tests and resulting mitigating factors.
    In September 2013, the Department of Homeland Security's 
Office of Inspector General released a report entitled: 
``Transportation Security Administration Office of Inspection's 
Efforts To Enhance Transportation Security'' (OIG-13-123). The 
report, which primarily concerned the effectiveness and 
efficiency of TSA's Office of Inspection [OOI], provided a 
number of recommendations to TSA including to ``conduct an 
objective workforce analysis of the office.'' The Committee 
understands that OOI is in the process of executing this 
workforce analysis and that the office can expect the results 
of this study in early fiscal year 2015. The Committee requests 
the findings of this study be made available to the OIG as soon 
as practicable, but no later than 30 days from completion by 
the vendor. The Department is to brief the Committee as soon as 
practicable, but no later than 30 days from completion by the 
vendor, on any actions TSA plans as a result of this analysis.

                         INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

    The Committee recommends $446,498,000 for Information 
Technology. This is $5,422,000 below the amount requested and 
$5,498,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2014. The 
increase above fiscal year 2014 is related to HSPD-12 
implementation and enterprise license agreement costs.

                         HUMAN CAPITAL SERVICES

    The Committee recommends $202,620,000 for Human Capital 
Services. This is $1,595,000 below the amount requested and 
$1,630,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2014.

                       United States Coast Guard


                                SUMMARY

    The Coast Guard's primary responsibilities are the 
enforcement of all applicable Federal laws on the high seas and 
waters subject to the jurisdiction of the United States; 
promotion of safety of life and property at sea; assistance to 
navigation; protection of the marine environment; and 
maintenance of a state of readiness to function as a 
specialized service in the Navy in time of war, as authorized 
by sections 1 and 2 of title 14, United States Code.
    The Commandant of the Coast Guard reports directly to the 
Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The President's fiscal year 2015 discretionary budget 
request proposes to reduce funding for the Coast Guard by 4.3 
percent, including the reduction of 700 military billets, the 
movement of 600 reservists to inactive status, the 
decommissioning of critical operational assets, and a 21 
percent reduction in capital expenditures. If enacted, the 
proposed reductions would permanently reduce cutter, boat, and 
aircraft hours right at the time the Coast Guard is recovering 
from harmful operational cutbacks experienced under sequester, 
when cocaine seizures dropped by 18 percent, marijuana seizures 
dropped by 35 percent, and migrant interdictions dropped by 28 
percent.
    Despite warnings from the outgoing Commandant of a coming 
``death spiral'' for legacy assets, the request also continues 
to propose harmful reductions to the Coast Guard's capital 
budget. The Coast Guard operates one of the oldest naval fleets 
in the world, yet the request cuts cutter and aircraft 
acquisitions in fiscal year 2015 that are critical to the 
agency's future. The request also has the impact of cutting 
over 1,000 jobs from important shipbuilding and aviation 
acquisition programs. The country is not best served by having 
the Coast Guard operate assets that are nearing 50 years of age 
and reaching obsolescence.
    The recommended level provided for in this bill includes 
targeted increases above the President's request to ensure that 
Coast Guard personnel serving on the front lines have the 
resources and assets to fulfill their many missions in fiscal 
year 2015 and in the future.
    The Committee recommends a total program level of 
$10,213,625,000 for the activities of the Coast Guard for 
fiscal year 2015. When costs for overseas contingency 
operations are excluded, the recommendation for the Coast Guard 
is $272,963,000 and 231 positions above the request. The 
recommendation also restores 300 reservist positions to active 
status. The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                                          COAST GUARD--FUNDING SUMMARY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                           Fiscal year 2015
                                                         Fiscal year 2014       budget            Committee
                                                            enacted\1\        request\2\      recommendations\3\
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operating Expenses.....................................         7,011,807         6,749,733           6,984,618
Environmental Compliance and Restoration...............            13,164            13,214              13,197
Reserve Training.......................................           120,000           109,605             114,572
Acquisition, Construction, and Improvements............         1,375,635         1,084,193           1,330,376
Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation............            19,200            17,947              17,892
Health Care Fund Contribution (Permanent Indefinite               201,000           176,970             176,970
 Appropriations).......................................
Retired Pay............................................         1,460,000         1,576,000           1,576,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Coast Guard...............................        10,200,806         9,727,662          10,213,625
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes $227,000,000 for overseas contingency operations.
\2\Excludes a permissive transfer of $213,000,000 from ``Operations and Maintenance, Navy'' for overseas
  contingency operations.
\3\Includes $213,000,000 for overseas contingency operations.

    The Coast Guard will pay an estimated $176,970,000 in 
fiscal year 2015 to the Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care 
Fund for the costs of military Medicare-eligible health 
benefits earned by its uniformed service members. The 
contribution is funded by permanent indefinite discretionary 
authority pursuant to the National Defense Authorization Act 
for fiscal year 2005 (Public Law 108-375).

                           OPERATING EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014\1\.................................  $7,011,807,000
Budget estimate, 2015\2\................................   6,749,733,000
Committee recommendation\3\.............................   6,984,618,000

\1\Includes $227,000,000 for overseas contingency operations.
\2\Excludes a permissive transfer of $213,000,000 from ``Operations and 
Maintenance, Navy'' for overseas contingency operations.
\3\Includes $213,000,000 for overseas contingency operations.

    The Operating Expenses appropriation provides funds for the 
operation and maintenance of multipurpose vessels, aircraft, 
and shore units strategically located along the coasts and 
inland waterways of the United States and in selected areas 
overseas. The program activities of this appropriation fall 
into the following categories:
    Search and Rescue.--As one of its earliest and most 
traditional missions, the Coast Guard maintains a nationwide 
system of boats, aircraft, cutters, and rescue coordination 
centers on 24-hour alert.
    Aids to Navigation.--To help mariners determine their 
location and avoid accidents, the Coast Guard maintains a 
network of manned and unmanned aids to navigation along the 
Nation's coasts and on its inland waterways. In addition, the 
Coast Guard operates radio stations in the United States that 
serve the domestic and international needs of the armed 
services, marine and air commerce.
    Marine Safety.--The Coast Guard ensures compliance with 
Federal statutes and regulations designed to improve safety in 
the merchant marine industry and operates a recreational 
boating safety program.
    Marine Environmental Protection.--The primary objectives of 
the marine environmental protection program are to minimize the 
dangers of marine pollution and to assure the safety of ports 
and waterways.
    Enforcement of Laws and Treaties.--The Coast Guard is the 
principal maritime enforcement agency with regard to Federal 
laws on the navigable waters of the United States and the high 
seas, including fisheries, drug smuggling, illegal immigration, 
and hijacking of vessels.
    Ice Operations.--In the Arctic and Antarctic, Coast Guard 
icebreakers escort supply ships, support research activities 
and Department of Defense operations, survey uncharted waters, 
and collect scientific data. The Coast Guard also assists 
commercial vessels through ice-covered waters.
    Defense Readiness.--During peacetime, the Coast Guard 
maintains an effective state of military preparedness to 
operate as a service in the Navy in time of war or national 
emergency at the direction of the President. As such, the Coast 
Guard has primary responsibility for the security of ports, 
waterways, and navigable waters up to 200 miles offshore.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $6,984,618,000 for Coast Guard 
Operating Expenses, including $24,500,000 from the Oil Spill 
Liability Trust Fund and $553,000,000 for Coast Guard defense-
related activities, of which $213,000,000 is for Overseas 
Contingency Operations. Of this amount, the Committee 
recommends not to exceed $15,300 for official reception and 
representation expenses.
    The recommendation level is $234,885,000 above the amount 
requested and $27,189,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2014. The Committee's recommendation is $21,885,000 above 
the comparable net request for Coast Guard Operating Expenses 
when excluding funds provided for overseas contingency 
operations.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                                               OPERATING EXPENSES
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                           Fiscal year 2015
                                                         Fiscal year 2014       budget            Committee
                                                            enacted\1\        request\2\      recommendations\3\
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Military pay and allowances............................         3,416,580         3,433,594           3,441,282
Civilian pay and benefits..............................           782,874           787,372             781,517
Training and recruiting................................           205,928           197,800             198,279
Operating funds and unit level maintenance.............         1,034,650           991,919           1,004,119
Centrally managed accounts.............................           319,135           335,262             335,556
Intermediate and depot level maintenance...............         1,012,840         1,003,786           1,010,865
St. Elizabeths support costs...........................            12,800  ................  ...................
Overseas contingency operations........................           227,000  ................             213,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Operating Expenses........................         7,011,807         6,749,733           6,984,618
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes $227,000,000 for overseas contingency operations.
\2\Excludes a permissive transfer of $213,000,000 from ``Operations and Maintenance, Navy'' for overseas
  contingency operations.
\3\Includes $213,000,000 for overseas contingency operations.

                    OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS

    The Committee provides $213,000,000 for Coast Guard 
operations in support of overseas contingency operations. While 
funding for these activities is requested in the Department of 
Defense budget for the Navy, the Committee adopted a practice 
beginning in the fiscal year 2009 Supplemental Appropriations 
Act to appropriate these amounts directly to the Coast Guard. 
The Committee continues this practice and urges the 
administration to budget for Coast Guard overseas contingency 
operations under the Department of Homeland Security in future 
budget requests. The Coast Guard shall brief the Committee no 
later than 30 days after the date of enactment of this act on 
any changes expected during fiscal year 2015 or projected 
transition costs expected in fiscal year 2016 to support 
overseas contingency operations.

                        OPERATIONAL ENHANCEMENTS

    High Endurance Cutters.--The budget request proposes to 
decommission two high endurance cutters [HECs] and 368 
associated billets. These cutters are nearing 50 years in age 
on average and have become increasingly unreliable. The 
Committee, however, is concerned that the decommissioning of 
two cutters in fiscal year 2015 would result in a significant 
cutter hour gap before new National Security Cutters [NSCs] are 
delivered to replace them. Historically, HECs provide the 
greatest resource hour contribution to the counterdrug mission, 
both in the Eastern Pacific and Western Hemisphere. Over the 
last 5 years, the Coast Guard has seized over a million pounds 
of cocaine with a street value of over $17,000,000. The 
proposed reduction of two HECs with only one operational NSC 
delivered in fiscal year 2015 will result in a diminished 
presence and fewer opportunities for interdictions and 
apprehensions. In addition to the counter drug effort, living 
marine resource enforcement operations would be reduced in the 
Bering Sea, Gulf of Alaska, and Pacific Ocean. Therefore, the 
recommendation includes an additional $7,800,000 and 184 
positions to maintain one of the two HECs proposed to be 
decommissioned in the request, saving 1,665 major cutter hours 
(3,330 hours annualized) that otherwise would have been cut 
throughout the year.
    Operational Hours.--The budget request proposes a reduction 
in cutter, boat, and aircraft hours that will reduce resources 
required for fuel and necessary maintenance. The Coast Guard's 
recent experience with operational hour reductions during 
sequester had an unfortunate impact on overall mission 
performance. When operational hours were cut back during 
sequestration, cocaine seizures dropped from 27 metric tons in 
fiscal year 2012 to 19 metric tons in fiscal year 2013. 
Marijuana removals dropped 35 percent from the previous year, 
and migrant interdiction decreased by 28 percent. A reduction 
in operations also challenges crews from getting the sea and in 
air time experience necessary to become masters of their craft. 
With sequestration lifted in fiscal year 2015, the Coast Guard 
should not be limited by such an arbitrary cut. Therefore, the 
Committee includes an additional $15,000,000 to restore 
operational resources for cutter, boat, and aircraft hours as 
well as critical depot level maintenance on Coast Guard legacy 
assets.
    Fixed Wing Bravo-Zero Requirement.--The recommendation 
includes $2,200,000 to maintain the Coast Guard's Fixed Wing 
Aircraft ``Bravo-0'' readiness requirement, which means 
aircraft will be ready for launch within 30 minutes of a search 
and rescue [SAR] case. The Committee disagrees with the Coast 
Guard's proposed reduction, which would impact rotary-wing 
operations further offshore by eliminating fixed wing cover and 
communications support. The Coast Guard has long maintained a 
``layered'' SAR response strategy and eliminating fixed-wing 
Bravo-0 support would be a penny wise pound foolish endeavor.

                     FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT

    The bill includes $39,500,000 under the Office of the Chief 
Financial Officer for financial systems modernization efforts 
in fiscal year 2015. A portion of the funds are intended for 
Coast Guard migration activities to new financial system. The 
Coast Guard, in tandem with the Office of the Chief Financial 
Officer, shall continue to brief the Committee on its efforts 
to carry out this migration.

                                HOUSING

    The Committee directs the Coast Guard to include with the 
congressional budget justification for fiscal year 2016 
information detailing how deficiencies identified in the Coast 
Guard's National Housing Assessment report have been resolved 
or plan to be resolved in the upcoming year. The information 
shall include progress made in: resolving housing identified as 
inadequate from a health and safety concern; right-sizing the 
housing inventory; the development of regional maintenance 
contracts; and addressing the need for new housing. Finally, 
the report shall also identify how operational maintenance 
funds for divested housing are being reinvested into the most 
critical housing needs in the remaining inventory.

                            POLAR ICEBREAKER

    The Committee is concerned about the lack of icebreakers 
available for the Coast Guard's missions. No later than July 
31, 2015, the Coast Guard is directed to brief the Committee on 
the Operational Requirements Document and Alternatives Analysis 
with respect to initial funding, timeline, and vessel 
specifications related to the construction of a new Polar-class 
icebreaker. The Coast Guard will further brief the Committee on 
the Department's plans to ensure deployment of a new heavy 
icebreaker prior to decommissioning of the Polar Star and Polar 
Sea. In assessing needs for an Arctic-capable fleet, the 
Secretary is encouraged to focus on the Coast Guard's statutory 
missions, including search and rescue, ice operations, law 
enforcement, aids to navigation, marine safety, marine 
environmental protection, living marine resources, ports, 
waterways and coastal security, defense readiness, migrant 
interdiction, and drug interdiction.

                       MINOR SHORE INFRASTRUCTURE

    The bill includes long-standing bill language to allow 
funds from the ``Operating Expenses'' appropriation to be used 
for the sustainment, repair, replacement and maintenance of 
shore infrastructure, including projects to correct 
deficiencies for code compliance or that threaten life, health, 
or safety to an amount not exceeding 50 percent of a building's 
or structure's replacement value. Additionally, ``Operating 
Expenses'' funds are allowed to be used for contingent, 
emergent, or other unspecified minor construction projects, 
which includes new construction, procurement, development, 
conversion, rebuilding, improvement, or an extension of any 
facility not exceeding $1,000,000 in total costs at any 
location for planned or unplanned operational needs.
    Minor construction projects funded from the ``Operating 
Expenses'' appropriation can be combined with depot level 
maintenance projects for the sake of administrative and 
economic efficiency. The Coast Guard is to provide a report to 
the Committee not later than 45 days after the date of 
enactment of this act detailing such projects and any 
sustainment, repair, replacement, or maintenance projects over 
$1,000,000 for fiscal year 2015. For fiscal year 2016, such 
information shall be included in the congressional budget 
justification.

                              SMALL BOATS

    A total of $2,740,000 is included above the request to 
address an anticipated shortfall in small boat purchases in 
fiscal year 2015.
    The bill includes long-standing bill language to allow 
funds from the ``Operating Expenses'' appropriation to be used 
for the purchase or lease of small boats for contingent and 
emergent requirements (at a unit cost of no more than $700,000) 
and repairs and end-of-service-life replacements. The annual 
cost of these activities is capped at $31,000,000. Unlike major 
procurements requested for the ``Acquisition, Construction, and 
Improvements'' appropriation, the Coast Guard's annual request 
for the ``Operating Expenses'' appropriation includes minimal 
information about the budget for small boat activities. In 
order to gain more clarity on these matters, the Coast Guard is 
to provide a report to the Committee no later than 30 days 
after the date of enactment of this act detailing planned small 
boat purchases, leases, repairs, and service life replacements 
for fiscal year 2015. For fiscal year 2016, such information 
shall be included in the congressional budget justification. 
The Committee was disappointed with the plan submitted for 
fiscal years 2014 and 2015, as it lacked routine information 
the Committee expects to receive. The expenditure plans for 
fiscal years 2015 and 2016 shall, at a minimum, include the 
following: the type and quantity of boats to be purchased and 
associated cost; the sectors and stations the boats planned for 
purchase will be deployed to; an explanation as to why the 
purchases are necessary; historical funding for the program; 
and an obligation and outlay schedule. Additionally, the 
Committee directs the Coast Guard to work with industry 
partners to outline annual small boat requirements and work 
with the industry to understand the cost implications of 
indefinite purchase requirements.

                   FACILITY SECURITY OFFICER TRAINING

    The Committee remains concerned that the Department has 
taken minimal steps to establish training standards for 
waterfront federal security officers [FSOs] which will lead to 
Federal certification of FSOs. The Committee notes that the 
Coast Guard has started working on the establishment of 
requirements internally, however, the Coast Guard needs to 
further address the implementation by working together with 
FEMA to ensure the curriculum is developed and implemented 
under the provision of Section 821 of the Coast Guard 
Authorization Act of 2010 (Public Law 111-281). The Committee 
directs Coast Guard and FEMA to jointly brief the Committee 
with their plan for implementation of section 821 not later 
than 60 days after the date of enactment of this act.

                            COAST GUARD YARD

    The Coast Guard Yard located at Curtis Bay, Maryland, is 
recognized as a critical component of the Coast Guard's core 
logistics capability which directly supports fleet readiness. 
The Committee is concerned with the service life and condition 
of the Yard's drydock facilities, which may impact the critical 
in-service vessel sustainment [ISVS] project over the next 10 
years. Therefore, the Coast Guard is directed to provide the 
Committee with a report no later than 90 days after the date of 
enactment of this act on the condition of all drydock 
facilities, and associated cranes and industrial equipment. 
This report shall include an assessment of equipment service 
life and specify drydock requirements and resources necessary 
to complete all ISVS work projected in the latest Capital 
Investment Plan report to Congress, along with all planned 
repair work over the same period, including the future needs to 
accommodate the Offshore Patrol Cutter.

                   EXECUTIVE TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT

    The Coast Guard is directed to notify the Committee prior 
to making any changes in the type or number of the command and 
control aircraft.

  ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS PERSONNEL TO OPERATING 
                                EXPENSES

    The Coast Guard's request includes funding for 440 military 
positions and 458 civilian positions in the Acquisition, 
Construction, and Improvements [AC&I;] appropriation whereas the 
large majority of Coast Guard personnel are funded through the 
Operating Expenses [OE] appropriation. The Committee directs 
the Coast Guard to examine whether realigning AC&I; personnel to 
the Operating Expenses appropriation could improve the Coast 
Guard's ability to efficiently manage, oversee and administer 
the AC&I; Personnel account without degrading the Coast Guard's 
ability to provide AC&I; workforce details to the Committee. If, 
after examining a potential realignment of funds, the Coast 
Guard determines that a realigned structure improves the 
stewardship of Federal tax dollars, the Committee encourages 
the Coast Guard to propose realigning AC&I; personnel to the OE 
appropriation in the fiscal year 2016 budget request.

                     OIL SPILL RESPONSE ACTIVITIES

    No later than 30 days after the date of enactment of this 
act, the Coast Guard is to provide the Committee with a summary 
of all oil response activities related to discharge from a 
production platform in the Gulf of Mexico that are ongoing or 
completed within the prior 3 years.

                ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE AND RESTORATION

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $13,164,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      13,214,000
Committee recommendation................................      13,197,000

    The Environmental Compliance and Restoration account 
provides funds to address environmental problems at former and 
current Coast Guard units as required by applicable Federal, 
State, and local environmental laws and regulations. Planned 
expenditures for these funds include major upgrades to 
petroleum and regulated substance storage tanks, restoration of 
contaminated ground water and soils, remediation efforts at 
hazardous substance disposal sites, and initial site surveys 
and actions necessary to bring Coast Guard shore facilities and 
vessels into compliance with environmental laws and 
regulations.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $13,197,000 for Environmental 
Compliance and Restoration activities. This is $17,000 below 
the amount requested and $33,000 above the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2014.
    The Coast Guard is directed to include in its annual budget 
justification a listing of the activities projected to be 
funded by the amount requested under this heading and an 
updated backlog report for Environmental Compliance and 
Restoration projects, with an explanation of how the amount 
requested will impact this documented backlog.

                            RESERVE TRAINING

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $120,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     109,605,000
Committee recommendation................................     114,572,000

    The Reserve Training appropriation provides for the 
training of qualified individuals who are available for Active 
Duty in time of war or national emergency or to augment regular 
Coast Guard forces in the performance of peacetime missions.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $114,572,000 for Reserve Training. 
This is $4,967,000 above the amount requested and $5,428,000 
below the amount provided in fiscal year 2014.
    The budget request includes a reduction of $10,395,000 and 
the transfer of 600 drilling Selected Reservist positions to 
the Inactive Ready Reserve. This is the second year in a row 
the Coast Guard has proposed such a draconian cut. If enacted, 
the reduction would impact the Coast Guard's ability to respond 
to major events, such as a hurricane, mass migration, oil 
spill, or earthquake. At the requested funding levels, certain 
specialized reserve forces would not be able to drill as 
frequently, impacting proficiency. Therefore, the Committee 
recommendation includes $5,000,000 above the request to restore 
300 reservists to active status, which will enable the Coast 
Guard to retain the majority of the first responders proposed 
for reduction, such as boat coxswains, law enforcement 
personnel, and pollution response technicians.

              ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $1,375,635,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   1,084,193,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,330,376,000

    Funding in this account supports the Acquisition, 
Construction, and Improvement of vessels, aircraft, information 
management resources, shore facilities, aids to navigation, and 
military housing required to execute the Coast Guard's missions 
and achieve its performance goals.
    Vessels.--The vessel program provides funding to 
recapitalize and/or improve the Coast Guard's fleet of aging 
boats and cutters.
    Aircraft.--The aircraft program is the primary 
recapitalization and sustainment effort for the Coast Guard's 
aging aircraft.
    Other Equipment.--The Coast Guard invests in numerous 
management information and decision support systems that will 
result in increased efficiencies.
    Shore Facilities and Aids to Navigation.--The Coast Guard 
invests in the acquisition, construction, rebuilding, and 
improvement of shore facilities, aids to navigation, and 
related equipment.
    Military Housing.--The Coast Guard invests in Military 
Housing facilities to ensure military members have access to 
housing in areas where there is a lack of affordable 
accommodations.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,330,376,000 for Acquisition, 
Construction, and Improvements, including $20,000,000 from the 
Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund. This is $246,183,000 above the 
amount requested and $45,259,000 below the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2014.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                                   ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Vessels:
    Survey and Design--Vessel and Boats...................             1,000               500               500
    Response Boat Medium..................................            10,000  ................  ................
    In-Service Cutter Sustainment.........................            21,000            24,500            49,000
    National Security Cutter..............................           629,000           638,000           638,000
    Offshore Patrol Cutter................................            23,000            20,000            20,000
    Fast Response Cutter..................................           310,000           110,000           318,000
    Cutter Small Boats....................................             3,000             4,000             4,000
    Polar Icebreaking Vessel..............................             2,000             6,000             6,000
    Polar Icebreaking Preservation........................  ................  ................             8,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Vessels...................................           999,000           803,000         1,043,500
Aircraft:
    HC-144 Conversion/Sustainment.........................             9,200            15,000            15,000
    HC-27J Conversion /Sustainment........................            24,900            15,000            15,000
    HC-130J Acquisition/Conversion/Sustainment............           129,210             8,000             8,000
    HH-65 Conversion/Sustainment..........................            12,000            30,000            30,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Aircraft..................................           175,310            68,000            68,000
Other Acquisition Programs:
    Program Oversight and Management......................            10,000            18,000            18,000
    Systems Engineering and Integration...................               204  ................  ................
    C4ISR.................................................            40,226            36,300            36,300
    CG-Logistics Information Management System  [CG-LIMS].             1,500             3,000             3,000
    National Automatic Identification System..............            13,000  ................  ................
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Other Acquisition Programs................            64,930            57,300            57,300
Shore Facilities and Aids to Navigation:
    Major Construction, ATON, and Survey and Design.......             2,000            19,580            19,580
    Major Acquisition Systems Infrastructure..............  ................            16,000            16,000
    Minor Shore...........................................             3,000             5,000             5,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Shore Facilities and Aids to Navigation...             5,000            40,580            40,580
Military Housing..........................................            18,000  ................             6,000
Personnel and Related Support:
    Direct Personnel Costs................................           112,956           115,313           114,996
    Core Acquisition Costs................................               439  ................  ................
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Personnel and Related Support.............           113,395           115,313           114,996
                                                           =====================================================
      Total, Acquisition, Construction, and Improvements..         1,375,635         1,084,193         1,330,376
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                        CAPITAL INVESTMENT PLAN

    The Capital Investment Plan [CIP] is essential for the 
Committee to carry out its oversight function of the Coast 
Guard, especially at a time when recapitalization of aging 
assets has become so critical for the service. All of the 
information required by the Committee is in accordance with the 
Coast Guard's Major Systems Acquisition Manual and applicable 
DHS management directives. The fiscal year 2016-2019 plan is to 
be submitted with the fiscal year 2016 congressional budget 
justification. The Committee is extremely displeased that it 
received the 2015-2019 CIP on June 13, 2014, over 3 months 
after it was due. This tardiness renders the plan unusable by 
the Committee when formulating its fiscal year 2015 
recommendations. As a result, $125,000,000 is withheld from the 
Headquarters Directorate of the Coast Guard until the fiscal 
year 2016-2020 plan is submitted. The Committee again directs 
the Coast Guard to ensure that the CIP clearly explains any 
deviations in cost, performance parameters, schedule, or 
estimated date of completion from the original acquisition 
program to the current plan. The Coast Guard needs to make 
every effort to clearly identify which procurements will be 
delayed or scaled back, which ones will be canceled, which ones 
will remain on track, and the impact these decisions have on 
extending the service life of the Coast Guard's already aging 
and unreliable fleet and shore facilities. The Committee 
expects this level of transparency in the CIP accompanying the 
fiscal year 2016 budget request.

                    ANALYSIS OF MISSION REQUIREMENTS

    To ensure the out-year CIP adequately meets Coast Guard 
operational needs, the Coast Guard shall conduct an analysis of 
mission requirements. This analysis should assume that the 
Coast Guard needs the capability to continue to carry out all 
of its 11 statutory missions. In this analysis, the Coast Guard 
should also outline options for acquisition plans that consider 
reasonable combinations of alternative capabilities of surface 
assets (including an icebreaker) and air assets to determine 
the most cost effective method of executing mission needs as 
determined in the analysis described above.

                    QUARTERLY ACQUISITION BRIEFINGS

    The Coast Guard is to continue quarterly briefings on all 
major acquisitions. In addition to the information normally 
provided for each asset, these briefings shall include: the top 
five risks for each acquisition, if applicable, consistent with 
those on the risk watch list in quarterly program manager 
reports, and if the risks have future budget implications; the 
objective for operational hours the Coast Guard expects to 
achieve; the gap between that objective, current capabilities, 
and stated mission requirements; and how the acquisition of the 
specific asset closes the gap. The information presented at 
these briefings shall also include a discussion of how the 
Coast Guard calculated the operational hours, an explanation on 
risks to mission performance associated with the current 
shortfall, and the operational strategy to mitigate such risks. 
Finally, the briefings are to include a status chart on all 
shore construction projects that have not been completed. For 
each construction project, the chart is to include the funding 
status, design status, and procurement and construction status.

                     IN-SERVICE CUTTER SUSTAINMENT

    The bill includes $49,000,000, to continue in-service 
sustainment efforts for the 140-foot icebreaking tugs, mid-life 
service sustainment of the 225-foot ocean-going buoy tender, 
and fund the second of four phases of the CGC EAGLE service 
life extension. Given the success of the Mission Effectiveness 
Projects for the medium endurance cutters and the 110-foot 
patrol boats at the Coast Guard Yard, the Committee expects the 
Coast Guard to direct sustainment work on all aging vessels 
there when geographically feasible.

                        NATIONAL SECURITY CUTTER

    The Committee recommendation includes $638,000,000, as 
requested, for NSC-8. The Coast Guard operates a fleet of 378-
foot high endurance cutters [HECs] that are over 46 years old 
on average, and are increasingly unreliable and expensive to 
maintain. By comparison, the average Navy ship is 20 years old. 
The Coast Guard's program of record is to acquire 8 national 
security cutters [NSCs] to replace 12 HECs (of which 5 have 
been decommissioned with the arrival of the first 3 NSCs). To 
date, approximately $4,365,744,000 has been appropriated for 
seven NSCs and long lead time materials [LLTM] for NSC-8. Three 
NSCs have been delivered to the Coast Guard, the fourth is 
expected to be delivered in late fiscal year 2014, the fifth in 
late fiscal year 2015, the sixth in fiscal year 2017, the 
seventh in fiscal year 2018, and the eighth in fiscal year 
2019.

                          FULL FUNDING POLICY

    The Committee is concerned that the Administration's 
current acquisition policy requires the Coast Guard to attain 
total acquisition cost for a vessel, including long lead time 
materials, production costs, and post-production costs, before 
a production contract can be awarded. This has the potential to 
create shipbuilding inefficiencies, force delayed obligation of 
production funds, and require post-production funds far in 
advance of when they will be used. As an example of such 
inefficiency, the fiscal year 2013 budget request proposed a 
rescission and reappropriation of $25,000,000 in funds 
previously appropriated for NSC-4 post-production that would 
have expired before they could be spent. The Department should 
be in a position to acquire vessels in the most efficient 
manner within the guidelines of strict governance measures. 
Therefore, the Committee includes language in the bill 
specifying that funds made available by this act shall be 
immediately available and allotted to contract for production 
of the eighth and final NSC notwithstanding the availability of 
funds for post-production costs. The Committee expects the 
Administration to adopt a similar policy for the acquisition of 
the Offshore Patrol Cutter [OPC].

                          FAST RESPONSE CUTTER

    The Committee recommends $318,000,000 for the Coast Guard's 
Fast Response Cutter [FRC]. This funding will allow the Coast 
Guard to acquire six FRC hulls (31-36). Procuring six FRCs in 
fiscal year 2015 will maximize the production line and generate 
cost savings of at least $5,000,000 per hull for a total 
savings to the taxpayers of $30,000,000. Funding six boats 
instead of two will also allow the Coast Guard to advance the 
replacement of the aging 110-foot Island Class Patrol Boats, 
which are already beyond the end of their projected service 
lives and very expensive to maintain. Each FRC will provide 
2,500 annual operating hours and improved sea keeping ability, 
resulting in better habitability and full mission capability in 
higher sea states.

                         OFFSHORE PATROL CUTTER

    The recommendation includes $20,000,000 for the OPC, as 
requested. Funding is provided to support technical reviews of 
preliminary and contract designs for the OPC class, which is 
intended to replace the Coast Guard's aging fleet of medium 
endurance cutters.
    The Committee approves of the steps taken by the Coast 
Guard to implement Phase I of the OPC procurement. Going 
forward, the Committee encourages the Coast Guard to continue 
aggressively pursuing the timeline necessary to field the 
required fleet of OPCs by moving to Phase II of the OPC 
acquisition in the previously outlined twenty four month 
timeframe. The Committee supports the Coast Guard's efforts in 
this procurement.

                            POLAR ICEBREAKER

    The recommendation includes $6,000,000, as requested, to 
continue survey and design activities for a new Coast Guard 
polar icebreaker.
    The Coast Guard's High Latitude Study calls for a minimum 
of three new heavy icebreakers to address increased activity in 
the Arctic region, protect our national interests, and provide 
search and rescue in emergency maritime situations. Currently, 
the Coast Guard operates one medium service icebreaker, the 
Healy, which is used primarily for scientific missions in the 
Arctic and one heavy polar icebreaker, the Polar Star, which 
was recently reactivated in 2013 and is estimated to remain 
operational for a total of 7-10 years. The service's other 
heavy polar icebreaker, the Polar Sea, is out of service based 
on its mechanical state. Based on the Coast Guard's projected 
acquisition timeline for a new heavy polar icebreaker, the 
earliest date in which a fully operational vessel can be 
deployed is 2026-2028, which leaves a potential gap of time 
where no heavy polar icebreaker will be available. Therefore, 
the Committee recommendation includes $8,000,000 to preserve 
the material condition of the Polar Sea in anticipation of 
future reactivation. Not later than 30 days after the date of 
enactment of this act, the Coast Guard is to brief the 
Committee on all expenditures and associated timelines to 
perform the work associated with vessel preservation.

                       UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS

    The Committee expects the Coast Guard to continue its long-
standing plan to conduct vertical take-off and landing unmanned 
aircraft systems [UAS] flight demonstrations. The Coast Guard 
has reported to the Committee that this system would enhance 
the service's surveillance capabilities of the NSC and 
estimates a significant increase in the number of prosecutions 
achieved by the cutter. The Committee continues to be very 
supportive of the use of vertical take-off UAS aboard Coast 
Guard cutters and strongly encourages the Coast Guard to ensure 
that the acquisition schedule is not delayed for this enhanced 
surveillance capability. The Committee is pleased with the 
Coast Guard's plans for cutter based testing and evaluation 
scheduled for late fall or early winter.
    The Coast Guard continues to also pursue a small UAS [sUAS] 
capability for the NSC. Demonstrations in 2014 have proven 
successful and the Coast Guard has entered into initial stages 
of acquisition planning. The Coast Guard is to keep the 
Committee apprised of its efforts for vertical take-off UAS, 
sUAS, and land-based UAS development.

                      TRANSITION OF C-27J AIRCRAFT

    The Committee is pleased that DHS, the Department of 
Defense and the Forest Service were able to agree upon an 
excess aircraft divestiture plan that will ultimately save the 
Coast Guard $500,000,000 in acquisition costs and equip the 
Forest Service with heavy air-tankers to combat wildfires. The 
Committee looks forward to being supportive during the 
transition and implementation of aircraft to each agency's 
inventory.

                SHORE FACILITIES AND AIDS TO NAVIGATION

    The Committee recommends $40,580,000 for shore facilities 
and aids to navigation, as requested. The Coast Guard's CIP for 
fiscal year 2016-2019 shall include a better explanation of the 
construction projects identified for funding, including: 
identification of each project to be funded in each fiscal 
year; an estimate for construction, design, planning, and 
project management for each project; and a schedule to complete 
the project.

                      COAST GUARD MILITARY HOUSING

    The Committee provides $6,000,000 above the request for the 
recapitalization, improvement, and acquisition of housing to 
support military families. The Coast Guard shall provide an 
expenditure plan to the Committee for these funds in the shore 
facilities report required 45 days after the date of enactment 
of this act.

                             AC&I; PERSONNEL

    The Committee provides $114,996,000 for personnel and 
related support, as requested.

                          UNFUNDED PRIORITIES

    The Committee directs the Commandant to provide to the 
Congress, at the time of the President's budget submission, a 
list of approved but unfunded Coast Guard priorities and the 
funds needed for each.

              RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $19,200,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      17,947,000
Committee recommendation................................      17,892,000

    The Coast Guard's Research and Development program develops 
techniques, methods, hardware, and systems that directly 
contribute to increasing the productivity and effectiveness of 
the Coast Guard's operating missions. This account provides 
funds to operate and maintain the Coast Guard Research and 
Development Center.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $17,892,000 for the Coast Guard's 
Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation activities. This is 
$55,000 below the amount requested and $1,308,000 below the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2014.

                              RETIRED PAY

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $1,460,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   1,576,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,576,000,000

    This account provides for the retired pay of military 
personnel of the Coast Guard and Coast Guard Reserve, members 
of the former Lighthouse Service, and for annuities payable to 
beneficiaries of retired military personnel under the retired 
serviceman's family protection plan (10 U.S.C. 1431-1446) and 
survivor benefit plan (10 U.S.C. 1447-1455); payments for 
career status bonuses under the National Defense Authorization 
Act; and payments for medical care of retired personnel and 
their dependents under the Dependents Medical Care Act (10 
U.S.C., ch. 55).

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,576,000,000 for Retired Pay. 
This is the same amount as requested and $116,000,000 above the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2014.

                      United States Secret Service


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $1,533,497,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   1,585,970,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,585,360,000

    The United States Secret Service's [USSS's] Salaries and 
Expenses appropriation provides funds for the security of the 
President, the Vice President, and other dignitaries and 
designated individuals; for enforcement of laws relating to 
obligations and securities of the United States and laws 
relating to financial crimes, that include, but are not limited 
to, access device fraud, financial institution fraud, identity 
theft, and computer fraud; and computer-based attacks on 
financial, banking, and telecommunications infrastructure; and 
for protection of the White House and other buildings within 
the Washington, DC, metropolitan area. The agency also provides 
support for investigations related to missing and exploited 
children.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,585,360,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses. This is $610,000 below the amount requested and 
$51,863,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2014.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                               UNITED STATES SECRET SERVICE--SALARIES AND EXPENSES
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                   Fiscal year
                                                                   Fiscal year     2015 budget      Committee
                                                                  2014 enacted       request     recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Protection:
    Protection of persons and facilities.......................         848,263         874,885          867,685
    Protective intelligence activities.........................          67,165          68,234           67,536
    National Special Security Event Fund.......................           4,500           4,500            4,500
    Presidential candidate nominee protection..................  ..............          25,500           25,500
                                                                ------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Protection.....................................         919,928         973,119          965,221
                                                                ================================================
Investigations:
    Domestic field operations..................................         329,291         332,395          332,795
    International field office administration, operations, and           30,811          34,361           34,195
     train-  ing...............................................
    Support for missing and exploited children.................           8,366  ..............            8,366
                                                                ------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Investigations.................................         368,468         366,756          375,356
                                                                ================================================
Headquarters, management, and administration...................         188,964         189,191          188,380
Rowley Training Center.........................................          55,118          55,868           55,378
Information Integration and Technology Transformation..........           1,019           1,036            1,025
                                                                ------------------------------------------------
      Total, Salaries and expenses.............................       1,533,497       1,585,970        1,585,360
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       SECRET SERVICE ACTIVITIES

    The Committee fully funds the request for protection of 
persons and facilities, protective intelligence, and 
investigations. The $21,500,000 request to begin preparation 
and training for the 2016 presidential campaign, including the 
campaign protective vehicles and communications technology, as 
well as the $4,000,000 request to establish the protective 
detail for the next former President, are also fully funded.
    The request reduces funding for the operational mission 
support program by $16,594,000 from the fiscal year 2014 level. 
The program is responsible for protective activities related to 
further securing the White House complex and other facilities. 
Regrettably, the Committee is unable to provide additional 
funding for this multi-year enhancement program. The Committee 
urges that robust funding for this critical, multi-faceted 
program be included in the President's fiscal year 2016 budget 
request.

                  STATE AND LOCAL CYBERCRIME TRAINING

    Last year, the Committee provided resources in continued 
support of the National Computer Forensics Institute [NCFI] 
which trains State and local law enforcement, legal, and 
judicial professionals in computer forensics and cyber 
investigations. This training is critical to bolster State and 
local cyber resources while similarly acting to support the 
Secret Service's Electronic Crimes Task Forces. Since opening 
in 2008, more than 3,300 State and local officials, including 
more than 2,300 police investigators, 840 prosecutors, and 234 
judges from all 50 States and three U.S. territories have been 
trained through NCFI. The Committee recommends a total of 
$7,500,000 to continue this activity, within the Secret 
Service, which will ensure training requests continue to be 
met. Further, the Committee directs the Secret Service to 
continue coordinating with the National Protection and Programs 
Directorate as the subject matter experts to ensure the 
curriculum is sound and consistent with current risk and 
threat, and to avoid duplication and ensure efficiency.

                          CYBER INVESTIGATIONS

    The Committee is encouraged by consistent progress made by 
the Secret Service in the realm of cyber investigations. In the 
last 4 years, the Secret Service has affected over 4,900 
arrests associated with approximately $1,370,000,000 in fraud 
losses. The Secret Service is working to train its entire 
workforce through its Critical Systems Protection program while 
similarly building a force multiplier in State and local law 
enforcement through the NCFI. The Committee funds a total of 
$103,937,000 for the Secret Service's various cyber activities.

           NATIONAL CENTER FOR MISSING AND EXPLOITED CHILDREN

    The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, 
[NCMEC] was created in 1984 to serve as the Nation's resource 
on missing and sexually exploited children. For more than two 
decades, the Secret Service has provided funding for grants as 
well as computer forensic support to NCMEC. In fiscal year 
2013, the $6,000,000 in grant funds provided to NCMEC 
constituted 11 percent of the Center's budget. Since 1997, the 
Secret Service has assisted NCMEC by opening 3,656 
investigative cases throughout the Secret Services field 
offices. These cases resulted in 1,384 arrests of child 
predators and others, helped parents fingerprint and/or 
photograph more than 114,500 children through its Operation 
Safe Kids program, and completed 2,835 forensic/computer 
examinations for investigations involving missing and exploited 
children.
    For fiscal year 2015, the Committee recommends $6,000,000 
for grants in support of missing and exploited children and 
expects the USSS to sustain forensic support at the fiscal year 
2014 level of $2,366,000.

                    NATIONAL SPECIAL SECURITY EVENTS

    The Committee recommends $4,500,000, as requested, for 
support to currently planned and unanticipated National Special 
Security Events [NSSEs] for fiscal year 2015. The Committee 
directs the USSS to provide semiannual briefings on the use of 
these funds, with the first briefing to occur not later than 
March 31, 2015. Also included in the bill is a general 
provision that states that none of the funds in this act may be 
used to reimburse any Federal department or agency for its 
participation in an NSSE.

                        REPROGRAMMING THRESHOLDS

    Statutory language is included in the bill setting a higher 
threshold for the reprogramming of funds in section 503 of this 
act to accommodate unanticipated shifts in funding requirements 
for protection and investigation activities.

     ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, IMPROVEMENTS, AND RELATED EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $51,775,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      49,935,000
Committee recommendation................................      49,935,000

    This appropriation provides funding for security upgrades 
of existing facilities; for information integration and 
technology transformation [IITT]; to continue development of 
the current master plan; to maintain and renovate existing 
facilities, including the James J. Rowley Training Center 
(Center); and to ensure efficient and full utilization of the 
Center.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $49,935,000, as requested, for 
infrastructure improvements, IITT, and other activities. This 
is $1,840,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2014. Of 
this amount, $5,380,000 is for facilities and $44,555,000 is 
for information integration and technology transformation.
    The Secret Service is directed to submit a multiyear 
investment and management plan for its IITT program for fiscal 
years 2015 through 2018.

                               TITLE III

            PROTECTION, PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND RECOVERY

              National Protection and Programs Directorate

    The National Protection and Programs Directorate aims to 
foster better integration of national approaches between 
strategic homeland security programs, facilitate infrastructure 
protection, ensure broad emergency communications capabilities, 
and ensure the protection of Federal buildings and facilities.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                                  NATIONAL PROTECTION AND PROGRAMS DIRECTORATE
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Management and administration.............................            56,499            65,910            64,565
Infrastructure protection and information security:
    Infrastructure protection.............................           263,246           271,145           274,947
    Cybersecurity.........................................           792,291           746,444           757,340
    Communications........................................           131,463           179,977           180,713
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Infrastructure protection and information          1,187,000         1,197,566         1,213,000
       security...........................................
Federal Protective Service................................         1,301,824         1,342,606         1,342,606
Office of Biometric Identity Management...................           227,108           251,584           249,142
                                                           =====================================================
      Total, National Protection and Programs Directorate          2,772,431         2,857,666         2,869,313
       (gross)............................................
Offsetting fee collections................................        -1,301,824        -1,342,606        -1,342,606
                                                           =====================================================
      Total, National Protection and Programs Directorate          1,470,607         1,515,060         1,526,707
       (net)..............................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                     MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $56,499,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      65,910,000
Committee recommendation................................      64,565,000

    This account funds salaries and expenses for the Office of 
the Under Secretary, which oversees all activities of the 
National Protection and Programs Directorate [NPPD]. This 
account also funds business operations and information 
technology support services.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $64,565,000 for Management and 
Administration, $1,345,000 below the amount requested and 
$8,066,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2014. This 
amount supports the full annualization of positions in 
management functions that were provided in fiscal year 2014. 
Further, the Committee notes the request includes a transfer of 
$2,914,000 and 18 FTE from the Office of Biometric Identity 
Management [OBIM] Director in an effort to align all NPPD 
leadership offices in NPPD Management and Administration. The 
recommendation includes the $2,914,000 transfer from OBIM for 
18 FTE but instead of realigning the Director's office, NPPD is 
directed to realign business support FTE. Transferring the 
business support FTE will allow better utilization of staff in 
OBIM to support NPPD-wide activities creating efficiency 
instead of simply realigning leadership offices. NPPD is 
directed to continue implementation of recent clearer 
management direction on the appropriate use of administratively 
uncontrollable overtime.
    The Committee supported the necessary growth of NPPD 
Management and Administration by 11 percent in fiscal year 
2014, and another 12 percent increase with this recommendation. 
These actions are taken to prevent the Directorate from being 
at severe risk for failing to complete effective acquisition, 
efficient information technology procurement, timely hiring, 
and proper oversight of privacy, civil rights, and civil 
liberties for serious missions such as cybersecurity, law 
enforcement, and infrastructure protection. The Committee 
directs NPPD to take stock of its current resource alignment to 
properly complete management functions and to clearly identify 
in the fiscal year 2016 congressional budget justification the 
success in addressing these issues. The budget justification 
shall also clearly describe how the FTE transferred from OBIM 
support NPPD-wide activity and explain any additional requested 
resources or adjustments.
    Finally, the Committee notes that since its creation in 
2007, NPPD has experienced significant change in its 
responsibilities combined with addressing dynamic threats, 
creating a chaotic budgeting environment. Nonetheless, it is 
imperative that budget requests and appropriations provided for 
all NPPD accounts and PPAs can be compared year to year to 
effectively evaluate if resources are aligned with outcomes. 
For example, proposed this year were 20 balance workforce 
initiatives, 4 technical adjustments, 7 acquisition 
adjustments, 18 transfers, and 5 salary realignments. Since 
2010, the Committee has expressed concern that NPPD is at risk 
of falling subject to a culture of chasing the latest whim 
which does not allow for the maturity needed in proper 
budgeting. Making a sport of rearranging resources hints at 
more of a shell game than a serious attempt to align funding. 
The Committee's attempt with NPPD leadership to cajole 
stabilization has not produced results. In a new attempt to 
impose budget discipline, a provision is included requiring 
NPPD to submit its fiscal year 2016 budget request by office 
and by PPA. Each office shall provide (1) budget detail by 
object classification; (2) the number of full-time equivalents 
on board; (3) the number of full-time equivalent vacancies; and 
(4) the appropriations account(s) used to support the office 
and the programs used by the office. This information shall be 
provided for the previously enacted year and the requested year 
on the day the budget justification is received. NPPD and 
Office of Management and Budget [OMB] staff are encouraged to 
work with the Committee on the format of the presentation.
    The Committee recognizes that NPPD has proposed a PPA 
restructuring in an addendum to the budget for the last 3 
years, only to later reconsider the proposal causing it not to 
be acted on. Should NPPD settle on a new mission based PPA 
restructuring that will also resolve the issues discussed 
above, it is encouraged to submit a report to the Committee 
realigning resources in the new structure using the funding 
levels provided by the Appropriations Committees to date for 
potential use for congressional action. The report shall also 
include a 5-year history reflecting the realignment which will 
further assist the Committee in transparently demonstrating 
resources provided.
    The Committee included several requirements in Senate 
report 113-77 aimed at closer collaboration between NPPD and 
FEMA on preparedness activities, mitigation efforts, and 
response and recovery from disasters and attacks. The 
Department's responses to these requirements further solidified 
the Committee's position that this collaboration is essential 
to resilience and efficient, effective use of resources. The 
Committee directs NPPD and FEMA to jointly brief on continued 
coordination no later than 90 days after the date of enactment 
of this act.

           INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION AND INFORMATION SECURITY

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $1,187,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................   1,197,566,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,213,000,000

    Infrastructure Protection and Information Security [IPIS] 
programs assist the entities and people responsible for 
securing the Nation's critical infrastructure assets. In 
addition, IPIS supports collaborative efforts with State, 
local, public, private, and international entities to secure 
cyberspace and U.S. cyber assets, and reduce the vulnerability 
of the Nation's telecommunications and information technology 
infrastructures.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends total appropriations of 
$1,213,000,000 for Infrastructure Protection and Information 
Security programs, $15,434,000 above the amount requested and 
$26,000,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2014. The 
following table summarizes the Committee's recommendations as 
compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget request levels:

                               INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION AND INFORMATION SECURITY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Infrastructure protection and information security:
    Infrastructure Protection:
        Infrastructure Analysis and Planning..............            63,134            63,999            68,373
        Sector Management and Governance..................            62,562            63,136            62,961
        Regional Field Operations.........................            56,550            57,034            56,886
        Infrastructure Security Compliance................            81,000            86,976            86,727
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Infrastructure Protection.............           263,246           271,145           274,947
Cybersecurity and Communications:
    Cybersecurity:
        Cybersecurity Coordination........................             4,320             4,330             4,311
        US-Computer Incident Response Team [US-CERT]                 102,000            98,794            98,573
         Operations.......................................
        Federal Network Security..........................           199,725           171,500           171,418
        Network Security Deployment.......................           382,252           377,690           377,567
        Global Cybersecurity Management...................            25,892            17,613            25,893
        Critical Infrastructure Cyber Protection and                  73,013            70,963            74,054
         Awareness........................................
        Business Operations...............................             5,089             5,554             5,524
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Cybersecurity.........................           792,291           746,444           757,340
Communications:
    Office of Emergency Communications....................            37,450            36,480            37,335
    Priority Telecommunications Services..................            53,372            53,381            53,324
    Next Generation Networks..............................            21,158            69,571            69,559
    Programs to Study and Enhance Telecommunications......            10,074            10,106            10,092
    Critical Infrastructure Protection Programs...........             9,409            10,439            10,403
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Communications............................           131,463           179,977           180,713
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Cybersecurity and Communications..........           923,754           926,421           938,053
                                                           =====================================================
      Total, Infrastructure Protection and Information             1,187,000         1,197,566         1,213,000
       Secur-  ity........................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION

    The Committee recommends $274,947,000 for Infrastructure 
Protection, $3,802,000 above the amount requested and 
$11,701,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2014.
    National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center.--Of 
the total amount provided for Infrastructure Protection, 
$18,650,000, the same amount as fiscal year 2014, is for the 
National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center.
    Bombing Prevention.--The Office of Bombing Prevention [OBP] 
shall be funded at $9,961,000, which is $1,546,000 above the 
request and $543,000 below the fiscal year 2014 level. The 
funds will sustain needed training, information sharing, and 
awareness for State, local, and private sector entities 
regarding how terrorists use explosives, in addition to needed 
analysis of counter-explosives requirements, capabilities, and 
gaps. The Committee is aware of OBP's efforts to work with the 
National Guard on training and encourages the Office to analyze 
efficiencies that could be gained through coordination with the 
National Guard mission. The Committee further encourages OBP to 
continue to work with the Department of Defense on capabilities 
related to counter explosives, including the possible transfer, 
equipping, and storage of electronic countermeasures. The 
Office should continue to explore applicable capabilities from 
defense programs that comply with domestic policies and 
protections, such as privacy.
    The Committee supports the efforts of the OBP to counter 
the threat and mitigate the impact of an incident using an 
improvised explosive device by building capabilities among 
State, local, tribal and territorial partners, the private 
sector, and the public. The Committee encourages further 
cooperation through the interagency Joint Program Office for 
Countering Improvised Explosive Devices to ensure that 
capabilities from the Departments of Defense and Justice, such 
as the Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization, 
Terrorist Explosive Device Analytical Center, and National 
Center for Explosives Training and Research are leveraged in 
support of DHS efforts. The Committee also encourages further 
work among OBP, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and 
Federal Law Enforcement Training Center to meet preparedness 
goals in a systematic manner.
    Vulnerability Assessments.--Of the total amount provided, 
$17,006,000 is for vulnerability assessments, as requested. The 
Committee notes that in conducting assessments on risks to 
critical infrastructure and key resources, interdependencies on 
associated infrastructure--including cyber--are often 
discovered. The Committee encourages NPPD to ensure this 
information is shared regionally to maximize the benefits of 
the assessments and facilitate planning for restoration of 
services post-disaster.
    Large Venue Safety.--The Committee directs NPPD to fully 
fund training of safety and security professionals charged with 
public protection at large venues with large crowds. The 
Committee encourages the Department to continue strengthening 
existing partnerships with institutions and centers that have 
well-developed training programs for security personnel to meet 
safety and security requirements at large venues, including 
those that host professional, collegiate, and amateur sporting 
events. Such entities should possess unique resources, 
research, and programs that can be combined to enhance 
dissemination of effective security techniques to sports safety 
venue professionals.
    Fuel Hubs.--The Committee notes NPPD's efforts to review 
petroleum transportation and distribution systems in the 
aftermath of Hurricane Sandy and directs the Directorate to 
make information on the analysis available to affected States.
    Sensing Technologies.--NPPD is directed to provide a 
briefing on the development and use of sensing technologies to 
enhance building security and resilience no later than 60 days 
after the date of enactment of this act.
    Sector Management and Governance.--In a recent report 
entitled, ``Critical Infrastructure Protection: Observations on 
Key Factors in DHS's Implementation of Its Partnership 
Approach'' (GAO-14-464T), GAO found that DHS still has work to 
do regarding several key factors that are important to 
implement its partnership approach with industry to protect 
critical infrastructure. For example, a systematic approach to 
gathering feedback from industry owners and operators and 
measuring the results of these efforts is still lacking. The 
Committee is perplexed that, given the need to update 
processes, the budget request includes an 11 percent increase 
in salaries and expenses and a 5 percent decrease for 
programmatic funding. NPPD shall reassess its budget priorities 
to ensure the most critical issues are addresses first.
    Chemical Security.--The Committee recommends $86,727,000 
for Infrastructure Security Compliance, $249,000 below the 
request and $5,727,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 
2014. The Under Secretary of NPPD is directed to provide a 
report on the implementation of the Chemical Facility Anti-
Terrorism Standards [CFATS] program to the Committee on a 
semiannual basis that includes the number of: facilities 
covered, inspectors, completed inspections, inspections 
completed by region, pending inspections, days inspections are 
overdue, enforcements resulting from inspections, and 
enforcements overdue for resolution. This data should be 
delineated by tier. The first report shall be submitted no 
later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this act.
    On June 6, 2014, the White House released a report required 
in Executive Order 13650 entitled Improving Chemical Facility 
Safety and Security with specific recommendations to enhance 
the safety and security of chemical facilities and reduce risks 
associated with hazardous chemicals to facility workers, 
communities, and first responders. NPPD is directed to brief 
the Committee on the progress of fulfilling the recommendations 
and the progress being made to improve coordination among 
Federal agencies on chemical security and safety no later than 
90 days after the date of enactment of this act. The 
requirement included in previous fiscal years for a semiannual 
report from the Deputy Secretary on coordination efforts within 
the Department is discontinued in light of the new Federal 
effort, including the convened working group.
    The Committee recognizes NPPD's continued and needed focus 
on evolving CFATS into a program that balances the need for 
security with the need of efficient chemical management by 
companies. As its approach to chemical security develops and 
matures, the Committee urges NPPD to find the best possible 
path to ensure safety while not overburdening the industry with 
excessive regulatory requirements. In particular it is 
imperative that NPPD work with industry on a viable solution to 
personnel surety.
    The Committee remains concerned about the capabilities 
available to first responders, chemical facility workers, and 
the general population to protect themselves in the event of 
exposure to hazardous chemicals. NPPD is encouraged to consider 
chemical neutralization technologies when creating 
comprehensive and integrated standard operating procedures for 
a unified Federal approach for identifying and responding to 
risks in chemical facilities as detailed in Executive Order 
13650.
    The Committee finds the use of administratively 
uncontrollable overtime [AUO] by NPPD personnel has been 
excessive, particularly by chemical security inspectors. Since 
fiscal year 2010, nearly all of the chemical security 
inspectors have reached the maximum cap on AUO pay at 25 
percent each year--in two of those years, every inspector was 
paid the maximum. As outlined in the Deputy Secretary's May 23, 
2014, memorandum entitled ``Improving AUO Administration within 
the Department of Homeland Security,'' positions eligible for 
AUO are positions ``in which the hours of duty cannot be 
controlled administratively, and which require substantial 
amounts of irregular, unscheduled overtime duty.'' The 
Committee acknowledges that inspectors, in the course of 
business, may need to extend their generally scheduled 
inspections due to concerning and irregular circumstances. 
However, the Committee directs NPPD to consider the eligibility 
of these employees for AUO consistent with the Deputy 
Secretary's memorandum and future policies and procedures. NPPD 
shall keep the Committee apprised of developments in this area.

                             CYBERSECURITY

    The Committee recommends $757,340,000 for Cybersecurity 
programs, $10,896,000 above the budget request and $34,951,000 
below the fiscal year 2014 level.
    Federal Network Security.--Of the total amount for 
cybersecurity, the Committee recommends $171,418,000 for 
Federal Network Security, of which $140,525,000 is to provide 
continuous monitoring and diagnostics for the civilian Federal 
computer network to detect malicious activity on Government 
networks. DHS has made great strides in implementing the 
continuous monitoring and diagnostics program by putting 
contract vehicles in place and signing agreements with 108 
departments and agencies; however, the actual purchase and 
deployment of capabilities has been slow. The Committee expects 
DHS and all departments and agencies to move forward with 
deliberate haste, given the cyber threat. The Committee notes 
the promise of continuous monitoring and diagnostics in 
revamping Federal Information Security Management Act 
requirements to get timely, accurate, and actionable results.
    While NPPD is leading the effort for continuous monitoring 
and diagnostics and funds are provided for standardizing and 
improving this capability across the Federal enterprise, the 
responsibility for information technology management, including 
security, remains with each Federal agency. As such, each 
agency must continue to plan and budget for security needs 
consistent with current law and policies as well as emerging 
threats and needs. NPPD shall provide its expertise and 
capabilities to supplement, but not supplant, the budget and 
responsibilities of other agencies. A general provision, first 
enacted in fiscal year 2013, requiring reports on the progress 
of the implementation of this effort is included but modified 
to reduce the frequency of the reports to semiannual.
    Network Security Deployment.--The National Cybersecurity 
Protection System [NCPS], known as Einstein, was deployed in 
2004, and has been upgraded in stages to address the evolving 
threat through technological advances. As required in the 
explanatory statement accompanying the Department of Homeland 
Security Appropriations Act, 2014, GAO is currently conducting 
a comprehensive review of the Einstein program's effectiveness. 
The Committee expects NPPD will act upon reasonable 
recommendations without delay.
    Cybersecurity Personnel Nationwide.--NPPD is directed to 
conduct a review of the availability and benefit (including 
cost savings and security) of using cybersecurity personnel and 
facilities outside of the National Capital Region [NCR] to 
serve the Federal and national need. Findings of this review 
shall be reported to Congress no later than 120 days after the 
date of enactment of this act. Further, should DHS gain special 
hiring authority for cybersecurity personnel, the authority 
shall not be used in any case unless consideration has first 
been given to using personnel and facilities outside the NCR.
    Enhanced Cybersecurity Services.--The Committee supports 
NPPD's efforts to make available Enhanced Cybersecurity 
Services [ECS] and urges NPPD to begin working with State and 
local governments on risks to government systems and to 
critical infrastructure in their communities. Since these 
governments oversee the safety of, and in some cases directly 
operate, elements of the electrical grid, water utilities, 
public transportation, communications systems, and other key 
assets it is critical that they have access to the latest tools 
in this fiscal year. Further, NPPD shall report to the 
Committee, no later than 60 days after the date of enactment of 
this act, on the current size and expected growth of the State 
and local government need for ECS protection services. The 
report shall include the number of entities utilizing ECS 
today, the anticipated need for ECS use in the next 2 years, 
and NPPD's plan for expanding use of ECS, including an 
articulation of any barriers to ECS use by particular types of 
users and how NPPD will assist in overcoming those barriers.
    Cybersecurity Education.--The Committee recommends 
$25,893,000 for Global Cybersecurity Management, of which no 
less than $15,810,000 is for cybersecurity education. The 
Committee rejects the administration's proposal to reduce 
funding for cybersecurity education. A reduction will delay the 
stated goal of educating 1.7 million students by 2021 which is 
the determined need to keep pace with the cyber threat. This is 
unacceptable. If the Department chooses to reassess the overall 
need for cybersecurity education, NPPD shall provide a report 
to the Committee on the methodology and metrics the 
administration uses to determine the new need and demonstrate 
how it is consistent with the goals established in the National 
Initiative for Cybersecurity Education. Further, to have an 
effective workforce development program it is imperative that 
DHS establish clear and specific requirements which define 
types of cybersecurity personnel. For example, the Department 
of Defense has specific guidance and procedures for the 
training, certification, and management of all government 
employees who conduct information assurance functions in 
assigned duty positions (referred to as DoDD 8570). This 
discipline will establish a measurable goal for a properly 
skilled workforce. NPPD is directed to brief the Committee no 
later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this act on a 
specific timeline by which workforce development requirements 
will be precisely defined.
    National Cybersecurity Review.--The Committee looks forward 
to receiving the biannual National Cybersecurity Review in a 
timely fashion and notes that it provides critical information 
regarding the Nation's resilience against and readiness for a 
cyber incident used by Federal agencies and the private sector.

                             COMMUNICATIONS

    The Committee recommends $180,713,000 for communications 
programs, $736,000 above the amount requested and $49,250,000 
above the amount provided in fiscal year 2014.
    Emergency Communications.--Of the total amount recommended, 
$37,335,000 is for the Office of Emergency Communications 
[OEC], $855,000 above the amount requested, and $115,000 below 
the fiscal year 2014 level. The Committee provides additional 
funding to ensure OEC can maintain the same level of training 
and exercise support to State, tribal, and local governments as 
in fiscal year 2014.
    The Committee remains committed to ensuring Federal funding 
for interoperability is used to enhance communications among 
local, State, and Federal first responders, consistent with 
each community's needs. The Committee directs OEC to work with 
FEMA to ensure that applicable Department fiscal year 2015 
guidance for first responder communications grant programs 
includes appropriate guidance based on factors including 
effectiveness, risk, and affordability for newer capabilities 
as they come online, such as multi-band land mobile radios and 
terminals.
    Next Generation Networks.--Of the total amount recommended, 
$69,559,000 is for the Next Generation Networks Program, 
$12,000 below the request and $48,401,000 above fiscal year 
2014. This funding provides the next significant increment to 
ensure priority calls can be placed on the most current 
technology during disasters and emergencies.

                       FEDERAL PROTECTIVE SERVICE

Appropriations, 2014\1\.................................  $1,301,824,000
Budget estimate, 2015\1\................................   1,342,606,000
Committee recommendation\1\.............................   1,342,606,000

\1\Fully funded by offsetting collections paid by General Services 
Administration tenants and credited directly to this appropriation.

    The Federal Protective Service [FPS] is responsible for the 
security and protection of Federal property under the control 
of the General Services Administration [GSA]; and for the 
enforcement of laws for the protection of persons and property, 
the prevention of breaches of peace, and enforcement of any 
rules and regulations made and promulgated by the GSA 
Administrator and/or the Secretary. The FPS authority can also 
be extended by agreement to any area with a significant Federal 
interest. The FPS account provides funds for the salaries, 
benefits, travel, training, and other expenses of the program, 
offset by collections paid by GSA tenants and credited to the 
account.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,342,606,000, as requested, for 
salaries and expenses of the Federal Protective Service for 
fiscal year 2015. This amount is fully offset by collections of 
security fees.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                                           FEDERAL PROTECTIVE SERVICE
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Basic security............................................           271,540           275,763           275,763
Building-specific Security................................           509,056           600,615           600,615
Reimbursable Security Fees (Contract Guard Services)......           521,228           466,228           466,228
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Protective Service...................         1,301,824         1,342,606         1,342,606
Offsetting Fee Collections................................        -1,301,824        -1,342,606        -1,342,606
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Federal Protective Service is funded through fees 
assessed to participating agencies by the OMB. The Secretary of 
Homeland Security is directed to certify that FPS is 
sufficiently funded to support the requested 1,371 FTE, 
including no less than 1,007 police officers, inspectors, area 
commanders, and special agents by December 31, 2014.
    A provision was included in the Department of Homeland 
Security Appropriations Acts of 2012, 2013, and 2014 requiring 
FPS to submit a strategic human capital plan that aligns fee 
collections to personnel requirements based on a current threat 
assessment. FPS submitted its first full Strategic Human 
Capital Plan on March 12, 2014. Based on direction in the 
Explanatory Statement accompanying the fiscal year 2014 Act, 
GAO is now required to evaluate the plan and provide a report 
on its effectiveness. FPS shall brief the Committee on its 
implementation of GAO recommendations upon receiving them. The 
provision to submit a strategic plan is retained for one 
additional year pending GAO's findings.
    For over 2 years FPS has been providing quarterly briefings 
on its efforts to link operations, performance, and cost data. 
The Committee expects the FPS proposed resource allocation, 
including the fee design, for fiscal year 2016 to be based on 
these efforts and to demonstrate a clear metric based on risk. 
The quarterly briefings are no longer required.

                OFFICE OF BIOMETRIC IDENTITY MANAGEMENT

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $227,108,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     251,584,000
Committee recommendation................................     249,142,000

                                MISSION

    The mission of the Office of Biometric Identity Management 
[OBIM] is to collect, maintain, and share biometric data with 
authorized DHS, Federal, State, tribal, local law enforcement 
agencies, and strategic foreign partners. As the agency 
responsible for maintaining the Automated Biometric 
Identification System [IDENT] and a biometric center of 
expertise, OBIM provides an invaluable capability to ensure 
national security, public safety and the integrity of the 
Nation's immigration system. OBIM is charged with fostering 
full interoperability and real-time data sharing among the 
Homeland Security, Justice, and Defense Departments' biometric 
identity management systems. OBIM also must ensure that 
biometrics can be used as the means to link associated 
biographic information such that individuals can be uniquely 
identified, serving its customers' security, facilitation, and 
customer service needs.

                             RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $249,142,000 for OBIM, including 
$25,382,000 for system improvements to the Automated Biometric 
Identification System [IDENT]. This is $2,442,000 below the 
request and $22,034,000 above the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2014. The Committee strongly supports IDENT modernization; 
though given budget constraints, the recommended level will 
support only half the proposed purchase of 10-print biometric 
matching devices. OBIM is encouraged to apply any cost savings 
during the fiscal year to modernization efforts.
    In addition, as specified under ``National Protection and 
Programs Directorate, Management and Administration'' 18 FTE 
are transferred from OBIM to NPPD as requested and modified. 
NPPD shall brief the Committee on the specific business support 
FTE. This recommendation does not alter the funding level 
proposed for these FTE in the M&A; PPA or the OBIM account.
    Language is included in the bill requiring a multi-year 
investment and management plan be submitted with the 
President's budget request that justifies current and future 
requirements for OBIM. The Committee directs OBIM to continue 
efforts to identify efficiencies under this new structure 
through reassessing its staffing, travel, and contractor 
support requirements.

                          SEMIANNUAL BRIEFINGS

    OBIM is directed to continue briefing the Committee on a 
semiannual basis on its workload and service levels, staffing, 
modernization efforts, and other operations.

                        FOCUSED CUSTOMER SERVICE

    OBIM is expected to continue its strong coordination with 
DHS and interagency partners to ensure appropriate focus on 
customer needs and service through regular, informal means of 
communication as well as through the official mechanism of the 
OBIM Executive Stakeholder Board.
    OBIM shall continue efforts to enroll into IDENT TSA's 
special vetted populations as well as departmental employees 
and contractors, which has been a priority for a number of 
years. These populations and other potential future populations 
would enable better security and improve customer service. 
Consequently, OBIM is directed to include the status of these 
projects in its semiannual briefings.

                           IDENTITY SERVICES

    DHS is encouraged to work cooperatively with the 
Departments of Justice, Defense, and State to standardize and 
share biometric information. The Committee directs OBIM to 
continue semi-annual briefings on progress toward integrating 
the various systems, including Unique Identity, to describe 
existing capability gaps and a methodology by which to close 
them. Further, the Committee encourages OBIM to continue its 
data sharing and connectivity improvement efforts with the 
Intelligence Community.

                        OFFICE OF HEALTH AFFAIRS

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $126,763,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     125,767,000
Committee recommendation................................     124,618,000

    The Office of Health Affairs [OHA], headed by the Chief 
Medical Officer who also serves as the Assistant Secretary for 
Health Affairs, leads the Department on medical issues related 
to natural and man-made disasters; serves as the principal 
advisor to the Secretary on medical and public health issues; 
coordinates biodefense activities within the Department; and 
serves as the Department's primary contact with other 
Departments and State, local, and tribal governments on medical 
and public health issues.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends total appropriations of 
$124,618,000, $1,149,000 below the request and $2,145,000 below 
the fiscal year 2014 level, for Office of Health Affairs 
programs. The Committee denies the requests to consolidate the 
BioWatch Program and the National Biosurveillance Integration 
Center into one PPA, and create a second PPA by combining 
Planning and Coordination and the Chemical Defense Program. In 
order to maintain proper oversight of expenditures, the fiscal 
year 2014 PPA structure for OHA is retained. This will allow 
the Committee to compare year to year appropriations uniformly. 
The following table summarizes the Committee's recommendations 
as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget request levels:

                                            OFFICE OF HEALTH AFFAIRS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
BioWatch..................................................            85,277            84,651            84,651
National Biosurveillance Integration Center...............            10,000             8,000             8,000
Chemical Defense Program..................................               824               824               824
Planning and Coordination.................................             4,995             4,995             4,995
Salaries and Expenses.....................................            25,667            27,297            26,148
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of Health Affairs.....................           126,763           125,767           124,618
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                BIOWATCH

    The Committee recommends $84,651,000 for the BioWatch 
Program, the same amount as requested and $626,000 below the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2014. This funding sustains 
current operations.
    OHA has recently announced the cancellation of the 
autonomous detection technology acquisition, also known as the 
BioWatch Generation 3 Program. While the request has been 
granted for a $626,000 reduction from the BioWatch Program by 
extending the timeline for full replacement and capitalization 
of laboratory equipment in the currently used Generation 1 and 
2 models, the Committee remains supportive of the pursuance of 
next generation biodetection technology. OHA is directed to 
brief the Committee no later than 60 days after the date of 
enactment of this act to address the impact of the delayed 
replacement of laboratory equipment on the BioWatch Program, 
along with the next steps forward on further technological 
advancement within this program.

              NATIONAL BIOSURVEILLANCE INTEGRATION CENTER

    The Committee recommends $8,000,000 for the National 
Biosurveillance Integration Center [NBIC], the same amount as 
requested and $2,000,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2014.
    The Committee notes a strategic plan for NBIC to promote 
early warning and share situational awareness of biological 
events was published in November 2012. The plan establishes 
initiatives that may be measured and validated to ensure 
specific goals are accomplished, including dissemination of 
timely, useful, integrated Federal information related to 
incidents and threats. In addition, as part of the NBIC 
strategy, pilot projects are completed to demonstrate new 
capabilities for operational implementation. OHA is directed to 
brief the Committee on the progress of the implementation of 
the strategic plan and the specific outcomes of the pilot 
projects no later than 60 days after the date of enactment of 
this act. The briefing shall include identification of 
obstacles to the implementation of the strategic plan and the 
timeframe for completion of the pilot programs. The ongoing 
costs and new needs for pilot projects should be identified in 
the brief. Pilot projects shall be competitively awarded in 
fiscal year 2015.

                        CHEMICAL DEFENSE PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends $824,000 for the Chemical Defense 
Program, the same as requested and the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2014.
    OHA has selected four cities across the United States in 
which to perform demonstration projects aimed at developing a 
comprehensive chemical defense framework. OHA is directed to 
brief the Committee no later than 60 days after the date of 
enactment of this act to provide an update on the demonstration 
projects underway in the selected cities.

                       PLANNING AND COORDINATION

    The Committee recommends $4,995,000 for Planning and 
Coordination, the same as requested and the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2014. OHA is directed to brief the Committee 
regarding how mission capability has been maintained, within 
the resources requested and provided, no later than 60 days 
after the date of enactment of this act.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $26,148,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses, $1,149,000 below the amount requested and $481,000 
above the amount provided in fiscal year 2014. The reduction 
from the request is justified due to vacancies.

             UNACCOMPANIED ALIEN CHILDREN HEALTH SCREENING

    The medical triage of aliens apprehended on the Southwest 
border and being taken into CBP and ICE custody has been an 
ongoing challenge, though the crisis of unaccompanied alien 
children has made this issue even more acute. Breakouts of 
chicken pox, scabies, and other communicable diseases among the 
detained population and those who come in contact with them, 
such as Border Patrol agents, are becoming more common. OHA has 
been assisting CBP and ICE in developing better policies and 
procedures for medical triage and, given the current crisis, 
has deployed medical professionals to assist by giving 
vaccinations and performing examinations. The Committee notes 
that direct care is not the intended use of OHA personnel, as 
such, OHA shall support CBP and ICE in developing a better 
medium- and long-term solution for engaging these critical 
services.

                  Federal Emergency Management Agency

    The primary mission of the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency [FEMA] is to reduce the loss of life and property and 
protect the Nation from all hazards, including natural 
disasters, acts of terrorism, and other manmade disasters, by 
leading and supporting the Nation in a risk-based, 
comprehensive emergency management system of preparedness, 
protection, response, recovery, and mitigation. The following 
table summarizes the Committee's recommendations as compared to 
the fiscal year 2014 and budget request levels:

                                       FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Fiscal year 2014   Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                              enacted         budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Salaries and Expenses..................................           946,982            924,664            935,720
State and Local Programs...............................         1,500,000       \1\2,225,469          1,500,000
Firefighter Assistance Grants..........................           680,000               (\2\)           680,000
Emergency Management Performance Grants................           350,000               (\2\)           350,000
Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program............            -1,272             -1,815             -1,815
United States Fire Administration......................            44,000             41,407             44,000
Disaster Relief Fund:
    Base...............................................           594,522            595,672            595,672
    Disaster Relief Category...........................         5,626,386          6,437,793          6,437,793
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Disaster Relief Fund...................         6,220,908          7,033,465          7,033,465
Flood Hazard Mapping and Risk Analysis.................            95,202             84,403            100,000
National Flood Insurance Fund\3\.......................          (176,300)          (179,294)          (179,294)
National Predisaster Mitigation Fund...................            25,000   .................            25,000
Emergency food and shelter.............................           120,000            100,000            100,000
                                                        ========================================================
        Total, Federal Emergency Management Agency.....         9,980,820         10,407,593         10,766,370
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes $670,000,000 proposed for Firefighter Assistance Grants and $350,000,000 proposed for Emergency
  Management Performance Grants, which continue to be funded in separate appropriations.
\2\Funding proposed under State and Local Programs.
\3\Fully offset by fee collection.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $946,982,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     924,664,000
Committee recommendation................................     935,720,000

    Funding for FEMA Salaries and Expenses provides for the 
development and maintenance of an integrated, nationwide 
capability to prepare for, mitigate against, respond to, and 
recover from the consequences of major disasters and 
emergencies, regardless of cause, in partnership with Federal 
agencies, State, local, and tribal governments, volunteer 
organizations, and the private sector. The Salaries and 
Expenses account supports FEMA's programs by coordinating 
between headquarters and regional offices the policy, 
managerial, resource, and administrative actions.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends total appropriations of 
$935,720,000 for FEMA Salaries and Expenses, which is 
$11,056,000 above the request and $11,262,000 below fiscal year 
2014. The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                                              SALARIES AND EXPENSES
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Fiscal year 2014   Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                              enacted         budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Administrative and Regional Offices....................           249,855            245,218            244,183
    Office of National Capital Region Coordination.....            (3,400)  .................            (3,400)
Preparedness and Protection............................           173,406            185,000            184,659
Response...............................................           178,692            167,376            174,586
    Urban Search and Rescue Response Systems...........           (35,180)           (27,513)           (35,180)
Recovery...............................................            55,121             56,030             55,789
Mitigation.............................................            27,858             25,782             27,738
Mission Support........................................           151,744            141,809            145,316
Centrally Managed Accounts.............................           110,306            103,449            103,449
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Salaries and Expenses.....................           946,982            924,664            935,720
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                           PROGRAM ACTIVITIES

    Since fiscal year 2012, FEMA Salaries and Expenses have 
been reduced by 9.3 percent. Much of the reduction is 
attributed to prudent decision-making about out-of-date 
contract services, strategic workforce management, and 
streamlining functions by transferring them to the regional 
offices from headquarters. Other less desirable reductions have 
been proposed in deferral of maintenance to training 
facilities, reduction to long view programs such as mitigation 
programs, and under investment in technology improvements. The 
Committee expects that FEMA will strive to strike a reasonable 
balance between needed reductions in the short term and 
investing in long view programs to reduce future risk which 
saves money and lives. The fiscal year 2016 budget 
justification should clearly identify FEMA's strategy in 
developing budget trade-offs.
    Of the total amount made available, $33,862,000 is included 
for Mount Weather capital improvements and operations, as 
requested.
    Of the total amounts provided, not less than: $2,000,000 is 
for the Emergency Management Assistance Compact under the 
Preparedness and Protection PPA; $4,199,515 is for the National 
Hurricane Program under the Response PPA; $8,500,000 is for the 
National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program and $9,100,000 is 
for the National Dam Safety Program under the Mitigation PPA. 
Funding levels for each of these programs are maintained at 
fiscal year 2014 levels. The Committee is perplexed by the 
proposed reduction to EMAC since funds facilitate mutual aid 
among States and local governments, thereby reducing the burden 
to the Federal Government. The proposed 43 percent cut which 
would reduce training, upgrades to the Mutual Aid Support 
System, and readiness activities is rejected.
    The Committee provides $8,516,000 for evaluations and 
assessments, as requested, in the Preparedness and Protection 
PPA. In previous years the Committee included funding for 
evaluations and assessments in the Administrative and Regional 
Offices PPA in hopes that FEMA leadership would take a FEMA-
wide approach to evaluating programs for State, tribal, local 
governments. Given the need to maintain focus on preparedness 
programs, the proposed reduction in funds, and the direction 
throughout this report to do evaluations in other programs, the 
Committee includes the funds as requested in the Preparedness 
and Protection PPA. FEMA is encouraged to, nonetheless, take a 
comprehensive approach to program evaluation including 
preparedness, response, and recovery creating more useful 
evaluations and reducing the burden on partners.
    The Committee is disappointed in the delayed release of the 
third annual National Preparedness Report [NPR]. The report is 
an important opportunity to continue to hone the alignment of 
preparedness needs with investments through the resources of 
Federal, State, tribal, and local governments. Additionally, 
the NPR should begin to include information this year garnered 
from the Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessments 
[THIRA] being completed at all levels of government. The 
Committee is concerned that momentum to continue improving 
efforts like THIRA and then align them with reporting 
mechanisms is waning. This will lead to yet another attempted 
but not completed approach to put performance metrics in place. 
A continued discombobulated approach to assess readiness puts 
limited resources at risk from being invested in the most 
worthy projects. The Committee expects the NPR to be delivered 
without delay. Further, FEMA is directed to brief the Committee 
no later than 30 days after the NPR is published on the 
development of a measurement system that will assess the 
Nation's risk, readiness, and the specific gaps in 
capabilities, including the incorporation of any THIRA 
information.
    The Committee urges FEMA to continue efforts through 
demonstration projects to ensure the latest technologies are 
available for use by people who are deaf, blind, or non-English 
speaking so they may receive emergency alert notifications.

                        AUTOMATION MODERNIZATION

    The Committee provides $4,000,000 above the total amount 
requested to continue FEMA's automation modernization program, 
the same level as fiscal year 2014. The funding and the report 
required in this and previous Appropriations Acts provide the 
means and structure for FEMA to modernize its systems for 
better performance and future costs savings. FEMA shall 
continue to include the DHS CIO in planning efforts to ensure 
compatibility with other departmental systems where 
practicable. The Committee commends the FEMA Chief Information 
Officer for embarking on a capital planning and investment 
review of the over 600 systems FEMA operates and expects the 
results of the review to be helpful in evaluating the current 
modernization strategy.

             OFFICE OF NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION COORDINATION

    The Committee recommends $3,400,000 for the Office of 
National Capital Region Coordination [ONCRC], the same level as 
the request and the amount provided in fiscal year 2014. The 
Committee recognizes the unique responsibilities of the Office 
in coordinating emergency preparedness and response activity in 
a high-population area, where the workforce is made up of many 
independently operating Federal agencies and the District of 
Columbia, and where National leaders and foreign dignitaries 
are ever present.
    The Committee notes that FEMA has reconsidered its 
realignment of the ONCRC which was proposed on July 2, 2013. 
After consultation with stakeholders and a refocusing on the 
legislated mission, it appears FEMA has charted a new way 
forward for the ONCRC to best serve the needs of this unique 
area. FEMA is directed to conduct an exercise, in cooperation 
with State and local governments, to demonstrate how the 
updated proposal for execution of the ONCRC mission will 
function and how authorities will be used during an incident. 
The exercise will ensure the concept is tested and the roles 
and responsibilities are clearly understood and agreed upon at 
all levels of government. If during the exercise, high priority 
activities for the ONCRC are reevaluated, FEMA shall brief the 
Committee on the new priorities including the timeframe for 
execution. Previously prioritized activities include aligning 
Federal building emergency plans and evacuation procedures to 
facilitate an orderly evacuation for no-notice events and 
facilitating daily data sharing across local, State, and the 
plethora of Federal sources for situational awareness.
    A permanent provision included in the Department of 
Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2013, requires inclusion 
of the Governors of the State of West Virginia and the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in the National Capital Region 
decision-making process for mass evacuations. FEMA is directed 
to include officials from the counties and municipalities that 
contain the evacuation routes and their tributaries in the 
planning process.

                URBAN SEARCH AND RESCUE RESPONSE SYSTEM

    The Committee recommends $35,180,000 for the Urban Search 
and Rescue Response System, $7,667,000 above the request and 
the same amount as provided in fiscal year 2014. Funding will 
sustain the existing system and additional chemical, 
biological, nuclear, radiological, and explosives capabilities 
gained in fiscal year 2012.

                          BUDGET PRESENTATION

    The Committee directs FEMA to submit its fiscal year 2016 
budget request, including justification materials, by office. 
Each office and FEMA region shall include (1) budget detail by 
object classification; (2) the number of FTE on-board; (3) the 
number of FTE vacancies; and (4) the appropriations account(s) 
used to support the office and the programs managed by the 
office. The level of detail provides improved transparency and 
refined tracking of actual spending.
    The Committee commends FEMA for making the budget request 
in the same PPA structure, with minor exceptions under the 
State and Local Programs appropriation, in which funds are 
appropriated instead of continuing the previous practice of 
presenting the budget solely in a new format, making program 
and activity comparison over fiscal years an exercise in 
frustration.
    The Committee also notes that FEMA included an addendum 
proposing to combine the Response and Recovery PPAs into a 
single PPA. This request is denied. The Committee feels 
strongly that maintaining a known level of funding in both 
response and recovery will ensure that spending is not subject 
to the response issue of the day and thereby putting at risk 
funding recovery activities that have a longer term need. The 
separate PPAs were established to ensure transparency in level 
of effort between the two functions due to the concern over 
complaints of FEMA's ability to assist in an efficient and 
effective recovery. For example, FEMA's ability to support 
recovery after Hurricane Katrina suffered severely in no small 
part due to antiquated and convoluted recovery policies. 
Further, the Committee has not been provided with specific 
examples of how separate PPAs are inhibiting FEMA's ability to 
perform. Should FEMA supply further convincing evidence of the 
need for unification of the PPAs and demonstrate a way to 
ensure long view issues will not suffer from the demands of 
urgent matters of the day, the unification could be 
reconsidered.

                       OFFICE OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

    Pursuant to the Explanatory Statement accompanying the 
Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2014, the 
Committee has been briefed on the implementation of plans to 
improve accuracy and timeliness of FEMA's communications with 
Congress and the public. The Committee expects communications 
going forward will be greatly improved.

                     SANDY RECOVERY IMPROVEMENT ACT

    The Committee commends FEMA for developing a task force and 
schedule of work to implement all provisions of the Sandy 
Recovery Improvement Act, which was enacted on January 29, 2013 
(Public Law 113-2, division B). In order to hasten recovery and 
augment mitigation efforts in areas affected by Hurricane Sandy 
and other disasters throughout the country, FEMA is directed to 
remain focused on this effort and provide the necessary 
resources to continue it in earnest. Further, FEMA is directed 
to continue documenting the savings in time and costs, and the 
expedited recovery opportunities afforded communities due to 
the change in authorities. This information should be made 
available to Congress periodically.

                         CHILDREN AND DISASTERS

    The National Commission on Children and Disasters 
highlighted the unique disaster-related needs of America's 73 
million children. The Committee notes the progress that 
focusing on these unique needs has caused in recent disaster 
response and recovery. The Committee directs FEMA to sustain 
its ongoing efforts to address children's disaster-related 
needs both in headquarters and regional offices. Further, FEMA 
is directed to provide an updated report, not later than 120 
days after the date of enactment of this act, on grant 
expenditures related to ensuring the needs of children are met, 
including all sources of FEMA grants, such as preparedness and 
mitigation. The Committee also encourages FEMA to coordinate 
with the Department of Health and Human Services to better 
collect information as it pertains to child care services 
provided by the Child Care Development Block Grant and provide 
a briefing to the Committee on the results of the coordination 
within 120 days after the date of enactment of this act.

                          WILDFIRE MITIGATION

    Since 1980, wildfires have caused over $28,000,000,000 in 
economic losses across the United States and fire suppression 
costs have risen sharply over that time as wildfire seasons 
have gradually worsened. Wildfire mitigation efforts not only 
reduce the costs of wildfires to the economy and Federal 
Government, but also save lives. As required in Senate Report 
113-77, FEMA provided the ``Fire Mitigation: Fiscal Year 2014 
Report to Congress.'' The report reveals that the majority of 
FEMA funds are directed toward wildfire suppression through the 
Fire Management Assistance Grant [FMAG] program, which does not 
allocate funding for wildfire prevention. FEMA does make 
mitigation funds available through the Hazard Mitigation Grant 
Program [HMGP] in response to a major disaster declaration; 
however, since very few wildfires achieve this categorization 
wildfire prevention is not a focus of this program. The 
Predisaster Mitigation [PDM] Program is the only significant 
FEMA program devoted entirely to the mitigation and prevention 
of natural disasters, and based on the report, over the past 5 
years, 15 PDM wildfire-related projects for under $11,000,000 
have been awarded. By contrast, FEMA spent over $290,000,000 
during that time period through FMAG for wildfire suppression 
and response, and other Federal agencies spent well in excess 
of $10,000,000,000 suppressing and responding to wildfires. In 
light of these figures, FEMA's efforts regarding mitigation and 
repeated attempts to eliminate funding for PDM by the 
administration are puzzling. The Committee directs FEMA, in 
conjunction with the Forest Service and the Department of 
Interior, to provide a strategy to better mitigate wildfire 
impacts on urban and residential areas no later than 120 days 
after the date of enactment of this act. The strategy should 
include ways for FEMA to partner with the Forest Service and 
Department of Interior in their wildfire prevention and 
mitigation efforts, and also ways for FEMA to partner with 
State and local governments at risk for wildfires on 
cooperative efforts in the coming years.

              DISASTER DECLARATIONS FOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS

    The Committee urges FEMA to continue implementing Section 
1110 of the Sandy Recovery Improvement Act (Public Law 113-2, 
division B) which provides authority to make disaster 
declarations directly to Tribal governments. FEMA is directed 
to provide semiannual briefings to the Committee, and the 
authorizing committees of jurisdiction, regarding the progress 
made in implementing this provision, including FEMA resources 
and personnel dedicated to the program.

                               RESILIENCE

    The Committee notes that many policy documents, such as the 
National Mitigation Framework, have been produced in recent 
years but FEMA's budget proposals have yet to demonstrate a 
change in the commitment to supporting mitigation projects and 
in leading an effort to promote resilient communities. FEMA is 
directed to clearly articulate a funding strategy that supports 
and promotes mitigation and resilience in the fiscal year 2016 
congressional budget justification. The description shall 
articulate how each of the hazards have been prioritized and 
what, if any, risk weights have been assigned to particular 
types of disasters. Further, FEMA shall brief the Committee on 
the method by which not only current hazards but future 
threats, such as evolving terrorist methods, technological 
incidents, and extreme weather events, are incorporated into 
the cost benefit calculation for mitigation projects, including 
for projects in rural communities, no later than 60 days after 
the date of enactment of this act.

                        COMPONENT COLLABORATION

    The Committee included several requirements in Senate 
report 113-77 aimed at closer collaboration between FEMA and 
the National Protection and Programs Directorate [NPPD] on 
preparedness activities, mitigation efforts, and response and 
recovery from disasters and attacks. The Department's responses 
to these requirements further solidified the Committee's 
position that this collaboration is essential to resilience and 
efficient, effective use of resources. The Committee expects 
FEMA and NPPD to jointly brief on continued coordination no 
later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this act.

                        STATE AND LOCAL PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $1,500,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015\1\................................   2,225,469,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,500,000,000

\1\Includes $670,000,000 proposed for Firefighter Assistance Grants and 
$350,000,000 proposed for Emergency Management Performance Grants, which 
continue to be funded in separate appropriations.

    Funding for State and Local Programs provides grants for 
training, equipment, planning, and exercises to improve 
readiness for potential disasters.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,500,000,000 for State and Local 
Programs, $294,531,000 above the amount requested in comparable 
programs and the same level as fiscal year 2014. The following 
table summarizes the Committee's recommendations as compared to 
the fiscal year 2014 and budget request levels:

                                            STATE AND LOCAL PROGRAMS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                               enacted        budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grants:
    National Preparedness Grant Program.................  .................         1,043,200  .................
    State Homeland Security Grant Program...............           466,346   ................           467,000
        Operation Stonegarden...........................           (55,000)  ................           (55,000)
    Urban Area Security Initiative......................           600,000   ................           600,000
        Nonprofit Security Grants.......................           (13,000)  ................           (13,000)
    Public Transportation Security/Railroad Security/Bus           100,000   ................           100,000
     Assistance.........................................
        Amtrak..........................................           (10,000)  ................           (10,000)
    Port Security Grants................................           100,000   ................           100,000
    First Responder Assistance Programs:
        Emergency Management Performance Grants.........              (\1\)           350,000              (\1\)
        Firefighter Assistance Grants...................              (\1\)           670,000              (\1\)
        Training Partnership Grants.....................  .................            60,000  .................
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, First Responder Assistance Programs.  .................         1,080,000  .................
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Grants..............................         1,266,346          2,225,469         1,267,000
Education, Training, and Exercises:
    Emergency Management Institute......................            20,569             19,438            20,569
    Center for Domestic Preparedness....................            64,991             62,912            64,991
    National Domestic Preparedness Consortium...........            98,000   ................            98,000
    National Exercise Program...........................            21,094             19,919            19,919
    Continuing training.................................            29,000   ................            29,521
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Education, Training, and Exercises......           233,654            102,269           233,000
                                                         =======================================================
      Total, State and Local Programs...................         1,500,000          2,225,469         1,500,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Funds appropriated under a separate account.

                              GRANT REFORM

    The Committee notes that the budget request includes a 
conceptual proposal for grant reform, similar to the fiscal 
year 2013 and 2014 requests. This year, in addition to the 
concept presented in the request, a legislative proposal was 
submitted to the authorizing committees of jurisdiction on 
March 4, 2014, that would enact the necessary authorities to 
carry out the reform. The proposal needs to be fully vetted 
before it can be acted on by Congress. The Committee therefore 
includes funds in accordance with current law and provides 
funding in the same manner as fiscal year 2014. Should 
authorizing legislation be completed before enactment of fiscal 
year 2015 appropriations, adjustments could be considered. FEMA 
is directed to evaluate the effects of the grant reform on 
small and rural communities and make information available to 
Congress as the legislation is debated. A general provision is 
continued prohibiting the implementation of grant reform until 
congressional action on the matter has occurred.

                           GRANTS MANAGEMENT

    The Committee includes specific timeframes for grant dollar 
distribution. For each of the grant programs, funding 
opportunity announcements shall be issued in 60 days, 
applicants shall apply within 80 days after announcements are 
made, and FEMA shall act on the application within 65 days 
after applications are due.
    The Department is encouraged to require State and local 
governments to address child care services and facilities in 
response and recovery plans, exercises, and training. 
Additionally, the Committee is concerned that State and local 
cybersecurity issues are not receiving the needed resources and 
attention, and the Department is encouraged to require State 
and local governments to include their Chief Information 
Officers in planning efforts. Further, serious consideration 
shall be given to eligible applications to protect networks 
against cyber attacks. The Committee is concerned that drinking 
water and sanitation security needs, especially related to 
emergency response initiatives, are not adequately addressed. 
FEMA is also encouraged to require State and local governments 
to include rural water associations in planning efforts. FEMA 
is encouraged to consider the need for technologies to improve 
communication and speed transmission of images and real-time 
video to underserved trauma centers when evaluating grant 
applications. FEMA is urged to prioritize eligible grant 
applications that use existing broadcast infrastructure systems 
for emergency alerts. FEMA is urged to prioritize eligible 
projects for early warning systems, such as for earthquakes, 
and sirens when considering grant applications.
    FEMA is directed to work with grantees, particularly Urban 
Area Security Initiative recipients, on planning and 
sustainment of resources needed for preparedness to ensure that 
if Federal funding fluctuates, gains in preparedness can be 
sustained.

                 STATE HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends $467,000,000 for the State 
Homeland Security Grant Program [SHSGP], of which $55,000,000 
shall be for Operation Stonegarden. Activities previously 
funded under Metropolitan Medical Response System, Citizens 
Corps, Regional Catastrophic Preparedness, Emergency Operations 
Centers, Driver's Licenses Security Program, Buffer Zone 
Protection Program, and the Interoperable Emergency 
Communication Grant Programs in fiscal year 2011 are eligible 
for funding under SHSGP.
    Operation Stonegarden grants shall continue to be 
competitively awarded and shall not be restricted to any 
particular border. As in previous years, FEMA is directed to 
ensure all border States shall be eligible to apply in fiscal 
year 2015.

                     URBAN AREA SECURITY INITIATIVE

    The Committee recommends $600,000,000 for the Urban Areas 
Security Initiative [UASI], of which $13,000,000 shall be for 
nonprofit entities determined to be at high risk by the 
Secretary. Eligibility for nonprofit entities shall not be 
limited to UASI communities. Activities previously funded under 
Metropolitan Medical Response System, Citizens Corps, Regional 
Catastrophic Preparedness, Buffer Zone Protection Program, 
Emergency Operations Centers, and the Interoperable Emergency 
Communication Grant Programs in fiscal year 2011 are eligible 
for funding under UASI.
    The Committee notes that the 9/11 Act requires FEMA to 
conduct a risk assessment for the 100 most populous 
metropolitan areas annually. All such areas are eligible for 
UASI funding based on threat, vulnerability, and consequence.

              LAW ENFORCEMENT TERRORISM PREVENTION PROGRAM

    In accordance with section 2006 of the Homeland Security 
Act of 2002, the Law Enforcement Terrorism Prevention Program 
[LETPP] is funded through a required set aside of 25 percent of 
the funds appropriated through the SHSGP and UASI programs. The 
Committee directs FEMA to provide clear guidance to States and 
urban areas to ensure that the intent of LETPP is fully 
realized. FEMA is directed to provide an update of the report 
on expenditures for prevention activities, as required in 
Senate Report 113-77, no later than 120 days after the date of 
enactment of this act.

     PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ASSISTANCE, RAILROAD SECURITY 
         ASSISTANCE, AND OVER-THE-ROAD BUS SECURITY ASSISTANCE

    The Committee recommends $100,000,000 for Public 
Transportation Security Assistance, Railroad Security 
Assistance and Over-the-Road Bus Security Assistance. Of the 
recommended amount, no less than $10,000,000 is for Amtrak 
security needs.

                          PORT SECURITY GRANTS

    The Committee recommends $100,000,000 for the Port Security 
Grant Program.

                   EDUCATION, TRAINING, AND EXERCISES

    The Committee recommends $233,000,000 for Education, 
Training, and Exercises.
    Of this amount, the Committee recommends $64,991,000 for 
the Center for Domestic Preparedness [CDP] and notes a 
permanent provision in the Department of Homeland Security 
Appropriations Act, 2013, regarding training conducted at the 
CDP. The Center for Domestic Preparedness provides specialized 
all-hazards preparedness training to State, local, and tribal 
emergency responders on skills tied to national priorities, 
particularly those related to terrorist attacks using weapons 
of mass destruction [WMD] and mass casualty events. It is the 
Nation's only live-agent training facility for civilian 
responders, and it offers a unique environment that enables 
them to train using toxic nerve agents and live biological 
agents in safety. The funding provided will allow CDP to 
maximize its capacity to train the Nation's first responders 
including: prepare mobile training teams, enhance training 
realism by incorporating lifelike training scenarios into 
courses, establish and support training partnerships with other 
Government agencies and academic institutions, develop and 
deliver new WMD and other mass casualty courses, and increase 
responder outreach through facilitation of State emergency 
preparedness training curricula. A provision is included 
permitting the Administrator to use the funds provided under 
paragraph (5) under this heading to acquire real property for 
the purpose of establishing or appropriately extending the 
security buffer zones for FEMA-owned training facilities. 
Funding used for such purpose shall only come from funds 
specifically appropriated to the facility for which the 
property is acquired.
    Within the total, the Committee includes $98,000,000 for 
the National Domestic Preparedness Consortium, instead of the 
$60,000,000 for Training Partnership Grants, as proposed in the 
budget which combines and reduces current first responder 
training. The Consortium, authorized by the 9/11 Act, has 
conducted training in all 50 States and each U.S. territory. 
Over 2,100,000 first responders have been trained to date. The 
existing Consortium members have proven to be an effective 
delivery system for this important training. Dismantling the 
current program and replacing proven instructional bodies with 
an undefined system of providers would diminish the quality and 
consistency of training available to first responders. Funding 
shall be distributed in accordance with the 9/11 Act and as in 
previous years.
    The Committee includes $29,521,000 for Continuing Training 
Grants, instead of $60,000,000 for Training Partnership Grants, 
as proposed in the budget which combines and reduces current 
first responder training. The Committee supports full funding 
of programs that deliver homeland security curricula in the 
form of executive education programs and accredited master's 
degree education. The Committee notes that hazardous materials 
training is as critical as ever for response to events such as 
chemical incidents and rail incidents. To prevent unnecessary 
loss of life, of the total amount provided for continuing 
training grants, no less than $2,000,000 shall be for hazardous 
materials training for first responders. Also, FEMA shall 
consider the training needs of State, tribal, and local first 
responders in preparedness and response to cybersecurity 
attacks and incidents. The Committee recognizes that detecting 
and mitigating major cyber attacks that create man-made 
disasters will require a speedy and coordinated response across 
all levels of government. FEMA is urged to continue use of 
existing training partners for the delivery of preparedness 
training to ensure first responder readiness for cybersecurity 
attacks and incidents, exercise tool development, and exercises 
emphasizing cooperation between Federal response capabilities 
and State and local response capabilities, including rural 
communities.
    The Committee notes officials from the National 
Transportation Safety Board have recognized that rail cars 
shipping crude oil and ethanol function like a moving pipeline 
across the Nation, and the Committee expects FEMA will adjust 
training needs for first responders accordingly.
    The Committee includes $20,569,000 for the Emergency 
Management Institute [EMI], $1,131,000 above the request and 
the same amount as the fiscal year 2014 level. The Committee 
notes EMI's requirement to deliver training for a wide number 
of homeland security response scenarios. The Committee 
understands that technical assistance partners have been used 
where particular expertise is needed to meet this requirement. 
The Committee therefore encourages EMI to continue these 
partnerships, particularly with academic institutions that have 
proven track records of providing FEMA, EMI, and other 
comparable entities with technical expertise.
    The Committee notes FEMA is undergoing a review of all of 
its training programs to assess if the programs are best 
meeting the needs of emergency managers and first responders. 
FEMA is directed to brief the Committee on the results of the 
review when it is completed. The briefing shall include 
information regarding how effective the courses are in 
addressing the needs documented in State emergency plans and 
Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessments.
    The Committee includes $19,919,000 for the National 
Exercise Program.

                     FIREFIGHTER ASSISTANCE GRANTS

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $680,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015\1\................................................
Committee recommendation................................     680,000,000

\1\Budget request proposes $670,000,000 under State and Local Programs.

    Firefighter assistance grants, as authorized by section 33 
of the Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974 (15 
U.S.C. 2229), assist local firefighting departments for the 
purpose of protecting the health and safety of the public and 
firefighting personnel, including volunteers and emergency 
medical service personnel, against fire and fire-related 
hazards.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $680,000,000 for firefighter 
assistance grants, including $340,000,000 for firefighter 
assistance grants, and $340,000,000 for firefighter staffing 
grants, to remain available until September 30, 2016. This is 
$10,000,000 above the amount requested under the State and 
Local Programs appropriation and the same amount as provided in 
fiscal year 2014.
    The Committee directs the Department to continue the 
present practice of funding applications according to local 
priorities and those established by the United States Fire 
Administration, and to continue direct funding to fire 
departments and the peer review process. The Committee expects 
that the rural fire department funding level will be consistent 
with the previous 5-year history, and FEMA shall brief the 
Committee no later than 30 days after the date of enactment of 
this act if there is an anticipated fluctuation.
    The Committee notes recent efforts to ensure lessons 
learned through grant programs in one community support better 
decision making in another. Recent examples of such efforts 
include successes in volunteer recruitment and avoiding injury 
or death by documenting department's ``near misses'' and 
sharing the information so other departments can practice 
better safety.

                EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE GRANTS

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $350,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015\1\................................................
Committee recommendation................................     350,000,000

    \1\Budget requests proposes $350,000,000 under State and Local 
Programs.

    Funding requested in this account provides support to the 
Nation's all-hazards emergency management system and helps to 
build State and local emergency management capability.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $350,000,000 for Emergency 
Management Performance Grants [EMPG], which is the same amount 
as requested under the State and Local Programs appropriation 
and as provided in fiscal year 2014. The Committee directs FEMA 
to retain EMPG as a separate grant program, and not to combine 
its funding with any other grant allocation or application 
process.
    The Committee notes the purpose of EMPG is to sustain an 
all-hazards emergency capability at the State and local level. 
It should be noted, FEMA capabilities are only used when a 
State is overwhelmed in its ability to support a disaster and 
the President declares Federal assistance is needed. While 
there were 65 presidentially declared disasters in fiscal year 
2013, there were also thousands of disasters that did not need 
Federal support but which were supported using EMPG funded 
staff or assets: 205 gubernatorial emergencies; 18,673 events 
that required State assistance; and 30,902 local and tribal 
events, according to the National Emergency Management 
Association and the U.S. Council of the International 
Association of Emergency Managers. This level of activity and 
the requirement for all levels of government to work together 
for unexpected disasters demonstrates the criticality of 
sustaining a nationwide capability. The Federal contribution 
through EMPG, which is a little over $1 per citizen, is matched 
by over 50 percent from State and local governments. This 
system enables an efficient response and assists in reducing 
costs to the Disaster Relief Fund. FEMA is directed to take 
into account the unique purpose of EMPG, as defined in the 
Stafford Act, when developing grant guidance.

              RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PROGRAM

Appropriations, 2014....................................     -$1,272,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      -1,815,000
Committee recommendation................................      -1,815,000

    The Radiological Emergency Preparedness [REP] program 
assists State and local governments in the development of off-
site radiological emergency preparedness plans within the 
emergency planning zones of commercial nuclear power facilities 
licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission [NRC]. The fund 
is financed from fees assessed and collected from the NRC 
licensees to recover the amounts anticipated to be obligated in 
the next fiscal year for expenses related to REP program 
activities.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee provides for the receipt and expenditure of 
fees collected, as authorized by Public Law 105-276. The budget 
estimates fee collections to exceed expenditures by $1,815,000 
in fiscal year 2015.
    Through implementation of the REP program, FEMA has 
developed not only specialists in the field, but also a 
capacity for a wide range of radiation responses. A successful 
execution of the 2015 planned exercises is expected and a more 
coordinated Federal message of response and recovery to a 
radiological event shall be completed.

                   UNITED STATES FIRE ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $44,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      41,407,000
Committee recommendation................................      44,000,000

    The mission of the United States Fire Administration [USFA] 
is to reduce losses, both economic and human, due to fire and 
other emergencies through training, research, coordination and 
support. USFA also prepares the Nation's first responder and 
healthcare leaders through ongoing, and when necessary, 
expedited training regarding how to evaluate and minimize 
community risk, improve protection to critical infrastructure, 
and be better prepared to react to all hazard and terrorism 
emergencies.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $44,000,000 for the USFA, which is 
$2,593,000 above the amount requested and the same amount 
provided in fiscal year 2014. The amount included above the 
request will allow for the continued development of the 
National Fire Incident Reporting System [NFIRS], programs that 
promote fire safety and fire prevention in the wildland urban 
interface, and support for the National Fallen Firefighters 
Memorial.
    The Committee is concerned that NFIRS has failed to reach 
full usefulness due to its slow progress in development, lack 
of ease of use, and inadequate data sets. USFA is directed to 
brief the Committee no later than 60 days after the date of 
enactment of this act on specific steps that can be taken to 
address issues with NFIRS and ensure it fulfills its critical 
role of providing actionable information for fire departments. 
USFA shall work with stakeholders to develop the 
recommendations and identify clearly who is responsible for 
implementation.
    USFA, in cooperation with FEMA, is directed to continue its 
traditional funding for the congressionally mandated National 
Fallen Firefighters Memorial and related activities, which 
support the needs of survivors after the loss of a firefighter 
in the line of duty. Full USFA funding, combined with a grant 
from the Department of Justice and private sector support, is 
critical to sustain these services.
    A concept proposed in the budget request permitting State 
fire academies to compete for Firefighter Assistance Grants is 
denied. Instead the recommendation retains resources and 
authority to fully fund the State Fire Training Grant program 
within USFA, as in previous years, to ensure consistency and 
continuity of the program.

                          DISASTER RELIEF FUND

                     (including transfer of funds)

Appropriations, 2014\1\.................................  $6,220,908,000
Budget estimate, 2015\2\................................   7,033,464,494
Committee recommendation\2\.............................   7,033,464,494

\1\Includes disaster relief category funding of $5,626,386,000.
\2\Includes disaster relief category funding of $6,437,792,622.

    Through the Disaster Relief Fund [DRF], the Department 
provides a significant portion of the total Federal response to 
victims in presidentially declared major disasters and 
emergencies. Major disasters are declared when a State requests 
Federal assistance and proves that a given disaster is beyond 
the local and State capacity to respond. Under the DRF, FEMA 
will continue to operate the primary assistance programs, 
including Federal assistance to individuals and households; and 
public assistance, which includes the repair and reconstruction 
of State, local, and nonprofit infrastructure. The post-
disaster hazard mitigation set-aside to States, as part of the 
DRF, works as a companion piece to the National Predisaster 
Mitigation Fund.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    As requested, the Committee recommends $7,033,464,494 for 
the Disaster Relief Fund, of which $6,437,792,622 is provided 
under the disaster relief adjustment pursuant to Public Law 
112-25. The Committee is pleased the Department has requested 
amounts for the Disaster Relief Fund that more accurately 
reflect, based on documented claims and historic evidence, the 
disaster needs that are likely to arise during this fiscal 
year, including the costs of previously designated disasters.
    The Committee includes bill language requiring an 
expenditure plan and semiannual reports (reduced from the 
previous quarterly requirement) for disaster readiness and 
support costs; and a monthly report on disaster relief 
expenditures. The Committee recommends bill language 
transferring $24,000,000 to the Department of Homeland Security 
Office of Inspector General for audits and investigations.
    The Committee understands the importance of quickly 
processing claims filed by disaster survivors. FEMA is directed 
to provide a report to the Committee, and other relevant 
committees of jurisdiction, on the impact of the length of the 
claims adjustment process on the administrative costs of 
disasters no later than 120 days after the date of enactment of 
this act. The report shall also identify any issues associated 
with the availability of claims adjustors.
    In a September 2012 report entitled ``Improved Criteria 
Needed to Assess a Jurisdiction's Capability to Respond and 
Recover on Its Own'' (GAO-12-838), GAO found that FEMA relies 
primarily on a single criterion, the per capita damage 
indicator, when recommending to the President whether public 
assistance funding should be provided after a disaster. 
Further, GAO found that the indicator is artificially low since 
it has not been fully adjusted for the rise in per capita 
income or for inflation. In response to the report, FEMA 
concurred with the GAO recommendation to develop and implement 
a methodology that provides a more comprehensive assessment of 
a jurisdiction's need for Federal assistance. However, evidence 
that the criteria has been reviewed and updated is not apparent 
and the Committee is concerned about the lack of transparency 
regarding disaster declaration criteria. FEMA is directed to 
conduct a comprehensive review of its methodology to determine 
if Federal assistance is warranted and brief the Committee, and 
the authorizing committees of jurisdiction, on its findings no 
later than 120 days after the date of enactment of this act. 
The review shall include an evaluation of how to assess a 
community's preparedness level and fiscal capacity (including 
alternatives for how to assess such capacity) as well as an 
examination of how to account for severity of the disaster, per 
the GAO findings. Further, FEMA is directed to initiate 
rulemaking to update disaster declaration criteria, including 
adjustments for inflation while also considering the need for 
affected communities to adjust to the change. The Committee 
expects rulemaking will be completed in a timely fashion and 
shall report to Congress if rulemaking cannot be completed by 
January 1, 2016.
    Further, given the rise in the frequency and severity of 
all hazards, the Committee is adamant that States, as well as 
tribal and local governments, must plan ahead for unexpected 
costs. Not only will these governments need to have funds to 
respond to the increasing number of disasters and incidents 
that do not meet the criteria for Federal assistance, but they 
also must meet cost share requirements for Presidentially 
declared disasters. FEMA is directed to make recommendations 
regarding steps State, local, and tribal governments can take 
to better prepare for disasters financially. The 
recommendations shall include methodologies for calculating the 
amount that should be set aside and best practices related to 
how governments can accomplish establishing disaster relief 
funds.
    The Committee notes the continuing process for FEMA and the 
OIG to identify preventative measures to eliminate waste, 
fraud, and abuse; and expects specific solutions and measurable 
results within fiscal year 2015.
    The Committee notes safe room construction is an eligible 
expense under HMGP and under PDM and early warning systems are 
an eligible expense under HMGP. FEMA is expected to give 
serious consideration to eligible applications.

                 FLOOD HAZARD MAPPING AND RISK ANALYSIS

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $95,202,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      84,403,000
Committee recommendation................................     100,000,000

    This appropriation supports the functions necessary to 
develop, and keep current, flood risk information and flood 
maps. The flood maps are used to determine appropriate risk-
based premium rates for the National Flood Insurance Program, 
to complete flood hazard determinations required of the 
Nation's lending institutions, and to develop appropriate 
disaster response plans for Federal, State, and local emergency 
management personnel.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $100,000,000 for Flood Hazard 
Mapping and Risk Analysis, $15,597,000 above the amount 
requested and $4,798,000 above the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2014. In total, the bill provides $221,271,000 for flood 
mapping when combined with $121,271,000 in fee funded mapping 
activity and the amounts provided under this heading that 
reject the administration's proposed reduction.
    According to the Association of State Floodplain Managers, 
in order to maintain proper maps, including refreshing data in 
dynamic areas every 5 years, $275,000,000 is needed annually. 
While flood maps do not prevent floods, they are an essential 
tool in educating communities about flood risk and minimizing 
the loss of life and property at the local level. Yet, the 
Committee notes that many flood risk maps have not yet been 
updated with new engineering and hydrologic data and some lower 
risk areas have never been mapped. FEMA is directed to brief 
the Committee on the strategic plan to maintain the Nation's 
flood maps no later than 90 days after the date of enactment of 
this act. The briefing shall include information regarding the 
scientific process and timeline for updating flood maps, annual 
costs (including an analysis of the Association of State 
Floodplain Managers estimate), and estimated savings in costs 
and in loss of life that can be gained through better mapping.
    In order to better understand the progress in producing 
accurate, up-to-date flood maps, the Committee directs FEMA to 
report within 90 days of the date of enactment of this act on 
the status of valid map data as reflected in the Coordinated 
Needs Management Strategy [CNMS] data base. FEMA should include 
in this report information on metrics used to define progress 
in updating engineering data as recorded in the CNMS data base.
    The Committee understands that FEMA aims to have the 
Technical Mapping Advisory Committee [TMAC] commenced this 
summer as soon as members have completed the vetting process. 
FEMA is directed to provide a report to the Committee no later 
than 120 days after the commencement of the TMAC outlining the 
scope of its activities, timeframe for implementation of such 
activities, and any costs associated.
    FEMA is directed to expedite accreditation of re-certified 
Army Corps of Engineers flood control projects as much as 
practicable.

                     NATIONAL FLOOD INSURANCE FUND

Appropriations, 2014\1\.................................    $176,300,000
Budget estimate, 2015\1\................................     179,294,000
Committee recommendation\1\.............................     179,294,000

\1\Fully offset by fee collection.

    The National Flood Insurance Fund is a fee-generated fund 
which provides funding for the National Flood Insurance 
Program. This program enables property owners to purchase flood 
insurance otherwise unavailable in the commercial market. The 
National Flood Insurance Act of 1968 authorizes the Federal 
Government to provide flood insurance on a national basis. This 
insurance is available to communities which enact and enforce 
appropriate floodplain management measures and covers virtually 
all types of buildings and their contents.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $179,294,000, as proposed in the 
budget, for National Flood Insurance Fund [NFIP] activities 
related to floodplain management, flood mapping and mitigation, 
and flood insurance operations. A provision is included 
providing $5,000,000 to establish the Flood Insurance Advocate.
    The Committee notes that the Community Assistance Program 
provides resources to States to assist and monitor NFIP 
participating communities which is essential to effective 
implementation of the NFIP. This program provides funding to 
States who then provide technical assistance to communities in 
the NFIP and evaluate community performance in implementing 
NFIP floodplain management activities. Unlike competitive grant 
programs for projects, its purpose is to build capacity through 
providing knowledge and expertise and ensure compliance with a 
Federal program.
    The Committee is pleased that the Cooperating Technical 
Partners effort within the mapping budget contributes to 
supporting the mapping activities and fosters local confidence 
in map products. Community buy-in on flood maps often leads to 
local public and private risk reduction actions. This 
cooperative fiscal approach benefits all levels of government.

                  NATIONAL PREDISASTER MITIGATION FUND

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $25,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................................
Committee recommendation................................      25,000,000

    The National Predisaster Mitigation [PDM] Fund provides 
grants to States, communities, territories, and Indian tribal 
governments for hazard mitigation planning and implementing 
mitigation projects prior to a disaster event. PDM grants are 
awarded on a competitive basis. This program operates 
independent, but in concert with, the Hazard Mitigation Grant 
Program, funded through the Disaster Relief Fund, which 
provides grants to a State in which a disaster has been 
declared.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $25,000,000 for PDM, $25,000,000 
above the amount requested and the same amount as provided in 
fiscal year 2014. The Committee continues to support 
predisaster mitigation, and recognizes the importance of 
coordinating predisaster mitigation projects with projects 
being completed through the post-disaster Hazard Mitigation 
Grant Program. The Committee is concerned that eliminating 
funding for PDM, as the Administration requested, will leave 
some States with no mitigation planning or project funding. The 
Committee finds it ironic that the Administration proposed to 
eliminate $25,000,000 in PDM funding in the DHS budget request 
and yet proposed $400,000,000 in the Opportunity, Growth, and 
Security Initiative which is proposed to be funded through 
means outside of the Committee's jurisdiction. Either 
mitigation is a valued investment, or it is not. The Committee 
expects that future requests for DHS will recognize that for 
every $1 invested in mitigation, $4 are saved.
    FEMA is urged to give serious consideration to eligible 
mitigation projects especially related to drought, flooding, 
wildfires, and earthquakes.
    The Committee encourages FEMA to continue supporting State-
based approaches to damage prevention including cost-effective 
measures of securing homes to their foundations through all 
mitigation programs.

                       EMERGENCY FOOD AND SHELTER

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $120,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     100,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     100,000,000

    This appropriation funds grants to nonprofit and faith-
based organizations at the local level to supplement their 
programs for emergency food and shelter to provide for the 
immediate needs of the homeless.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $100,000,000 for Emergency Food 
and Shelter, which is the same amount as requested and 
$20,000,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2014. The 
Committee recognizes the Emergency Food and Shelter Program is 
one program, in conjunction with other Federal programs, that 
serves those in immediate need of food and shelter assistance.
    A provision is included permitting the transfer of this 
program to the Department of Housing and Urban Development. 
According to the administration, the transfer would facilitate 
coordination among all programs that support the needs of those 
at risk of homelessness which will maximize the benefit of each 
program. While the Committee includes the permissive transfer 
language, it also notes that this program is not duplicative of 
other HUD programs and therefore it shall retain its original 
purpose and shall not be combined with other HUD programs.

                                TITLE IV

            RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, TRAINING, AND SERVICES

           United States Citizenship and Immigration Services

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $113,889,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     134,755,000
Committee recommendation................................     124,435,000

    United States Citizenship and Immigration Services [USCIS] 
funds expenses necessary for the administration of laws and the 
provision of services related to people seeking to enter, 
reside, work, and naturalize in the United States. In addition 
to directly appropriated resources, fee collections are 
available for the operations of USCIS.
    Immigration Examinations Fees.--USCIS collects fees from 
persons applying for immigration benefits to support the 
adjudication of applications, as authorized by the Immigration 
and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1356).
    H1-B and L Fraud Prevention and Detection Fees.--USCIS 
collects fees from petitioners seeking a beneficiary's initial 
grant of H1-B or L nonimmigrant classification or those 
petitioners seeking to change a beneficiary's employer within 
those classifications (Public Law 108-447).
    H1-B Nonimmigrant Petitioner Fees.--USCIS collects fees 
from petitioners using the H1-B program (Public Law 108-447).

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends total resources of $3,381,810,000 
including direct appropriations of $124,435,000 and estimated 
fee collections of $3,257,375,000. This is $121,925,000 above 
the amount requested reflecting revised fee collections and 
$165,168,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2014.
    The following table, which includes appropriations and 
estimated fee collections, summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                       UNITED STATES CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION SERVICES--PROGRAM SUMMARY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Appropriations:
    E-Verify..............................................           113,889           124,755           124,435
    Immigrant integration programs........................  ................            10,000  ................
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Appropriations...............................           113,889           134,775           124,435
Fee collections:
    Adjudication services (fee account):
        District operations...............................         1,544,380         1,539,859         1,594,400
        Service Center operations.........................           578,393           542,449           614,851
        Asylum, Refugee and international operations......           236,710           238,755           232,374
        Records operations................................            94,039            93,209           110,035
        Business transformation...........................           183,464           184,923           194,923
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Adjudication services.................         2,636,986         2,599,195         2,746,583
Information and customer services (fee account):                      96,409            98,868           109,416
 Information and customer services........................
Administration (fee account): Operation expenses..........           339,421           342,308           376,553
SAVE (fee account)........................................            29,937            30,259            24,823
    H1-B Visa Fee Account:
        Adjudication Services:
            Service Center operations.....................  ................            13,500  ................
    H1-B and L Fraud Prevention Fee Account:
        Adjudication Services:
            District Operations...........................  ................            26,044  ................
            Asylum and Refugee Operating Expenses.........  ................               310  ................
            Service Center operations.....................  ................            14,646  ................
                                                           =====================================================
              Total, fee collections......................         3,102,753         3,125,130         3,257,375
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                E-VERIFY

    The Committee recommends $124,435,000 for the E-Verify 
program. This is $320,000 below the amount requested and 
$10,546,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2014. The 
Committee is supportive of the Department's efforts to improve 
E-Verify's ability to automatically verify those who are work 
authorized, detect identity fraud, and detect system misuse and 
discrimination. E-Verify is both a tool for employers committed 
to maintaining a legal workforce and a deterrent to illegal 
immigration. The Committee notes progress continues to be made 
on reducing the mismatch rate.
    The growth in E-Verify use by employers has significantly 
increased from fewer than 25,000 employers in fiscal year 2007 
to more than 526,600 as of April 2014, with an average of more 
than 1,600 new employers enrolling per week. E-Verify processed 
25 million cases in fiscal year 2013, a more than six-fold 
increase from the 4 million cases processed in fiscal year 
2007. So far in fiscal year 2014, E-Verify processed more than 
15 million cases.
    USCIS shall update the Committee on its efforts to create a 
mobile application and other available smart-phone technologies 
for employers using E-Verify so as to encourage small employers 
to use the system.

                      IMMIGRANT INTEGRATION GRANTS

    The Committee recommends $10,000,000 be made available via 
fees for Immigrant Integration Grants. The grants shall be 
available to assist individuals who are legally authorized to 
be present in the United States. The Committee believes it is 
important to assist individuals following the law and working 
to become citizens.
    In that vein, the Committee believes it is in our country's 
best interest to encourage and assist individuals who are 
eligible and eager to become citizens to apply for citizenship 
and to understand the rights and responsibilities of American 
citizenship. As USCIS undertakes the review of its fee 
structure, the Committee urges the agency to recognize the 
important benefit that naturalization confers on our nation, 
and maintain naturalization fees at an appropriate level.

                           E-B5 VISA PROGRAM

    In fiscal year 2014, USCIS was directed to provide a report 
to the Committee on the E-B5 visa program within 90 days of the 
date of enactment of Public Law 113-76, and every 180 days 
thereafter. This report was to include the number of 
applications pending, the period of time each application has 
been under review, benchmark review periods for the economic 
evaluation of projects and suitability of petitioners, a 
description of any additional resources necessary to 
efficiently administer the program, and the number of 
applications that are approved or denied each period with an 
accompanying explanation of their disposition. This first 
report is overdue. The Committee expects prompt receipt of this 
report and for USCIS to meet the twice yearly reporting 
requirement in the future.

                      FIELD OFFICE FACILITY MODELS

    The Committee appreciates the report provided to Congress 
on the Field Office Facility Model and encourages the 
Department to proceed with planning and dedication of resources 
towards the co-location of Service Centers into their original 
locations.

                           GAO ASYLUM REPORTS

    In 2008, the GAO issued two reports related to the asylum 
process: ``Agencies Have Taken Actions to Help Ensure Quality 
in the Asylum Adjudication Process but Challenges Remain'' 
(GAO-08-935) and ``The U.S. Asylum System: Significant 
Variation Existed in Asylum Outcomes across Immigration Courts 
and Judges'' (GAO-08-940). The Committee directs GAO to update 
these reports to reflect the implementation status of their 
original recommendations, to include any new recommendations 
for improving the asylum process, and to incorporate relevant 
information from any investigative findings or after actions 
reports concerning the Boston Marathon bombing. The GAO will 
brief the Committee on its initial findings within 180 days.

             TEMPORARY PROTECTED STATUS FOR THE PHILIPPINES

    In the wake of Typhoon Haiyan which struck the Philippines 
on November 8, 2013, 20 Senators sent a letter to DHS asking 
the Secretary to consider granting Temporary Protected Status 
[TPS] to eligible Filipinos. On December 13, 2013, the 
Philippine Embassy in Washington, DC, formally requested a TPS 
designation. On June 17, 2014, 7 months after the initial 
request from interested Senators, the Deputy Secretary sent a 
letter to inquiring Senators stating that the Department 
continues to assess whether the Philippines meets the statutory 
requirements for TPS designation. While DHS has taken other 
steps to assist Filipinos affected by the disaster, officials 
have failed to explain the lengthy delay in determining whether 
to extend TPS. The Committee directs DHS to brief the Committee 
no later than August 1, 2014, on its assessment of the request 
for TPS designation and whether its delay in designating the 
Philippines for TPS has adversely affected Filipino nationals 
in the United States who may have been affected by the typhoon.

                Federal Law Enforcement Training Center


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $227,845,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     231,754,000
Committee recommendation................................     230,797,000

    The Federal Law Enforcement Training Center [FLETC] 
Salaries and Expenses appropriation provides funds for basic 
and some advanced training to Federal law enforcement personnel 
from more than 90 agencies. This account also allows for 
research of new training methodologies; provides for training 
delivered to certain State, local, and foreign law enforcement 
personnel on a space-available basis; and accreditation of 
Federal law enforcement training programs.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $230,797,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses, $957,000 below the amount requested and $2,952,000 
above the amount provided in fiscal year 2014. Within the funds 
provided is $1,289,000 for the Federal Law Enforcement Training 
Accreditation Board. The amount includes a one-time increase of 
$16,214,000 to train the remaining 1,200 new CBP officers added 
in 2014. The Committee expects the Director to maintain 
training at or near capacity before entering into new leases 
with private contractors or establishing new partnerships with 
training organizations.

     ACQUISITIONS, CONSTRUCTION, IMPROVEMENTS, AND RELATED EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $30,885,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      27,841,000
Committee recommendation................................      27,841,000

    This account provides for the acquisition and related costs 
for expansion and maintenance of facilities of the Federal Law 
Enforcement Training Center. This includes construction and 
maintenance of facilities and environmental compliance. The 
environmental compliance funds ensure compliance with 
Environmental Protection Agency and State environmental laws 
and regulations.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $27,841,000 for Acquisition, 
Construction, Improvements, and Related Expenses, the same 
level as requested, and $3,044,000 below the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2014.

                         Science and Technology


                                SUMMARY

    The mission of Science and Technology [S&T;] is to conduct, 
stimulate, and enable homeland security research, development, 
and testing, and to facilitate the timely transition of 
capabilities to Federal, State, local, and tribal end-users.

                     MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $129,000,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     130,147,000
Committee recommendation................................     129,555,000

    The Management and Administration account funds salaries 
and expenses related to the Office of the Under Secretary for 
Science and Technology, and headquarters.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $129,555,000 for Management and 
Administration of programs and activities carried out by S&T.; 
This is $592,000 below the amount requested and $555,000 above 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2014. Of this amount, the 
Committee recommends not to exceed $7,650 for official 
reception and representation expenses.

           RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, ACQUISITION, AND OPERATIONS

Appropriations, 2014....................................  $1,091,212,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     941,671,000
Committee recommendation................................     941,935,000

    Science and Technology supports the mission of DHS through 
basic and applied research, fabrication of prototypes, and 
research and development to mitigate the effects of weapons of 
mass destruction, as well as acquiring and field testing 
equipment.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $941,935,000 for Research, 
Development, Acquisition, and Operations of S&T.; This is 
$264,000 above the amount requested and $149,277,000 below the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2014.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                   SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, ACQUISITION, AND OPERATIONS[
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Research, Development, and Innovation.....................           462,000           433,788           425,552
Laboratory Facilities (operations and construction).......           547,785           435,180           435,180
Acquisition and Operations Support........................            41,703            41,703            41,703
University Programs.......................................            39,724            31,000            39,500
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Research, Development, Acquisition and                1,091,212           941,671           941,935
       Operations.........................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                   DISCONTINUED REPORTING REQUIREMENT

    S&T; is no longer required to submit a report on amounts de-
obligated from projects during the prior fiscal year and to 
what projects these funds were subsequently obligated.

                  RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FLEXIBILITY

    The threats facing Homeland Security are constantly 
evolving. The new Secretary and new Under Secretary for Science 
and Technology must have flexibility to shift resources, if 
necessary, between research activities. In some instances, 
research activity may straddle several different missions and 
thrust areas such as in the successful APEX programs. In 
today's constrained fiscal environment, S&T; and the Department 
must prioritize the research budget to focus on areas with the 
greatest promise for delivering material improvements in 
capability and/or efficiency and making tangible contributions 
to homeland security missions. Therefore, in order to provide 
additional flexibility to facilitate this effort, the Committee 
does not break out the RD&I; budget in thrust areas that would 
become unnecessarily restrictive PPAs.
    However, it remains important for accountability and 
visibility into the S&T; research program that a more detailed 
tracking of research activity be available. Therefore, S&T; is 
directed to brief the Committee 30 days after the date of 
enactment of this act on the allocation of funds by project and 
thrust area. Quarterly status briefings are to be provided on 
the plan, including any changes from the original allocation.
    In conjunction with the President's fiscal year 2016 budget 
request, S&T; is to report on results of its research and 
development for the prior fiscal year to include all 
technologies, technology improvements, or capabilities 
delivered to front line users.

                                APEX R&D;

    The recommendation continues to fund S&T;'s Apex Research 
and Development program, which is focused on high-priority and 
high-value projects needed in a short turn-around for DHS 
components. Unlike other S&T; research initiatives, Apex 
projects are collaborative efforts between DHS component heads 
and the Under Secretary for S&T.; The Committee is supportive of 
the Apex concept, especially since it is focused on expediting 
technology solutions to the field. The Committee encourages S&T; 
to invest a greater percentage of its resources in this effort 
so that more of the R&D; portfolio is funded to achieve high 
impact success in priority areas. The APEX program should: 
maintain the multi-disciplinary team approach that focuses on 
complex operational issues of strategic importance to 
leadership; increase emphasis on cross-cutting, multi-Component 
efforts that advance the state-of-the-art for the Department; 
and focus on final product delivery in less than 5 years with 
scheduled interim deliverables. S&T; is directed to brief the 
Committee no later than 30 days after the date of enactment of 
this act on: the funding allocation by project; and progress 
made to field improved technologies in an APEX environment.

                           COMPONENT LIAISONS

    S&T; is encouraged to increase opportunities for its staff 
to gain first-hand understanding of DHS operations through the 
establishment of a liaison program that embeds technical 
subject matter experts in the field with the operational 
elements of Components. S&T; should also explore the utility of 
having detailees from the field-elements of the Components come 
into S&T; to enrich the requirements generation process. Within 
60 days after the date of enactment of this act, S&T; shall 
submit a plan to this Committee that outlines how the liaison 
program will be structured.

                   HOMELAND SECURITY INDUSTRIAL BASE

    S&T;'s mission is to develop innovative technologies and 
capabilities to improve the Department's mission effectiveness. 
The private sector, particularly small business, is the life 
blood of innovation. S&T; must have a method and process to 
inform the private sector on S&T;'s R&D; plans and encourage the 
private sector to provide solutions. This can only be done if 
industry has a clear path for input to S&T.; This could include 
proven methods such as technology demonstration days, industry 
days, an easy to use web-based tool, and technology roadmaps. 
S&T; is directed to brief the Committee no later than 90 days 
after the date of enactment of this act on the plan to improve 
input from the private sector and help build the homeland 
security industrial base.

                    INNOVATIVE FUNDING PARTNERSHIPS

    The mission of S&T; is to develop and deploy technologies 
and capabilities to secure the U.S. homeland. It is imperative 
that S&T; use all means available to find innovative, high 
payoff, revolutionary, unique ideas for technology solutions 
and to reach all types of performers. S&T; retains authority for 
other transactional authority [OTA] for innovative or unusual 
procurement and is encouraged to expand the use of OTA to gain 
access to unique technology providers that are not available 
through traditional avenues. The Committee is pleased prize 
authority has been delegated to S&T.; Competitions have proven 
to generate unique solutions for other agencies. It is 
essential that S&T; realize the potential for acquiring novel 
technologies through this mechanism. DHS should fully support 
the use of innovative ways to bring new technology into the 
Department as a means to improve capability and efficiency. S&T; 
is encouraged to hold at least one competition using its prize 
authority delegation during fiscal year 2015.

            SITUATIONAL AWARENESS OF ILLEGAL BORDER ACTIVITY

    Situational awareness of illegal activity between ports of 
entry along the Southwest border is required to accurately 
determine the effectiveness of border security operations and 
enable operational control. Today, illegal activity continues 
along the Southwest border to an unknown extent. Technology is 
a critical force multiplier and enabler in determining the most 
effective and cost efficient means of gaining necessary 
situational awareness. S&T; shall consult with CBP, ICE, and the 
United States Coast Guard [USCG] to fully develop a strategy 
and plan for situational awareness of illegal border activity 
between ports of entry along the Southwest border. The 
Committee recommends a review be jointly conducted by CBP, ICE, 
USCG, and S&T; on current situational awareness gaps, what 
technical capabilities are being planned for acquisition by 
CBP, ICE, and USCG, and future technologies and resources that 
will be needed for achieving situational awareness to enable 
operational control. CBP, ICE, USCG, and S&T; are directed to 
submit to the Committee within 180 days after the date of 
enactment of this act, the results of the technical review and 
a draft plan for improved situational awareness to enable 
operational control of the Southwest Border between Ports of 
Entry.

                          SCREENING INNOVATION

    The Committee is aware of the initiative undertaken by S&T; 
to expedite the development of new flat panel screening 
technologies. This effort holds significant promise for 
multiple applications in screening environments offering 
substantial cost and operational efficiencies coupled with 
enhanced detection capabilities. Current projections from the 
Department indicate the technology will be available for pilot 
testing in fiscal year 2015 and is expected to be a meaningful 
option for current acquisition plans. The Committee encourages 
the Department and S&T; to continue to manage this initiative in 
a manner that expedites the realization of near-term detection 
improvements and efficiencies.

                             CYBERSECURITY

    The Committee believes that sophisticated cyber attacks, 
such as those launched against major retailers, energy cyber-
physical systems, and other critical infrastructures both in 
the United States and around the world have devastating 
consequences. Critical infrastructures depend on the digital 
transmission of data for ongoing operation, and disrupting the 
confidentiality, integrity, or availability of market 
transactions or other information can have catastrophic and 
cascading economic effects. Such a disruption of, or intrusion 
into United States critical infrastructure could result in a 
renewed global economic downturn. The Committee encourages S&T; 
to expand the simulation based cyber war gaming tool for the 
financial sector into additional critical infrastructure 
sectors.
    The Committee recognizes the cyber threats to the Nation's 
electric grid and the other control systems vital to our 
security and economy. In order to address this challenge, the 
Committee encourages S&T;, in collaboration with NPPD, to 
establish operational cybersecurity research initiatives. These 
initiatives should involve collaboration among academic 
institutions, existing Federal research and development 
organizations, and the private sector. Therefore, the Committee 
encourages S&T; to pursue competitive awards for these 
initiatives.
    The Committee understands that strategic investments in 
cybersecurity research and development through information 
assurance programs are necessary to develop the next generation 
of cybersecurity experts and strengthen information protection 
for mobile devices. A DHS Capacity Building Program is a vital 
component in preparing the workforce to combat cybercrimes, 
protect the Nation's critical infrastructure, and ensure the 
integrity of information contained on mobile devices. The 
Committee recommends that DHS provide funding for capacity 
building to Centers of Excellence that deliver, and additional 
funding to students that take information assurance and 
cybersecurity for critical infrastructure protection 
undergraduate education tracks focused on mobile devices, cyber 
engineering, and data management.
    The Committee is also aware that collaboration with cyber 
accelerators has the potential to help transition innovative 
cybersecurity technologies into commercial use. S&T; may 
consider the use of cyber accelerators as is practicable.

                  TESTING OF UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS

    The Committee notes that the Federal Aviation 
Administration recently designated six national test sites to 
conduct research aimed at integrating unmanned aircraft systems 
[UAS] into the national airspace system [NAS]. The Committee 
encourages the Department to use the FAA's six test sites to 
meet its goal of enabling and enhancing small UAS access to the 
NAS and to ensure that new technologies developed through the 
Department's air based technology research meet the operational 
and safety standards the FAA will develop at the test sites.

                         SUPPLY CHAIN SECURITY

    The Committee recognizes the importance of enhancing cargo 
supply chain security through emerging technologies. Such 
efforts are critical to securing the global maritime supply 
chain. The Committee, therefore, encourages S&T; to continue 
examination of next-generation cargo container technology. S&T; 
is also encouraged to work with the Department of Defense in 
this area, including through the use of its Defense Production 
Act authorities.

        INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION ON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee supports S&T;'s efforts to work cooperatively 
with international governments on a variety of R&D; activities 
in the homeland security mission space. For example, the 
Committee is aware of the agreement with the State of Israel 
and encourages S&T; to consider additional collaboration on 
aviation security, explosive detection, border security, 
emergency responder and emergency services projects that would 
benefit both nations.

                       TEST AND EVALUATION [T&E;]

    Within the amount provided for the Acquisition and 
Operations Support PPA, sufficient funding shall be allotted 
for S&T; to establish policies and procedures for and to 
coordinate and monitor the T&E; activities across the DHS 
acquisition framework. Testing and evaluation of new 
technologies prior to their acquisition and deployment will, in 
the long-run, save money through the prevention of wasteful 
spending.
    S&T; is directed to continue to provide quarterly briefings 
to the Committee on the test and evaluation status of all level 
1 acquisitions.
    The Secretary, working through the Under Secretary for 
Science and Technology should establish policies and procedures 
to coordinate and monitor the T&E; activities across the DHS 
acquisition framework including Developmental Test and 
Evaluation [DT&E;]. The Committee remains concerned that 
acquisition programs continue to falter across the Department 
and that S&T; is not as engaged as it should be across the 
spectrum of T&E; activities. It is the Committee's expectation 
that S&T; be involved in all aspects of T&E; including setting 
policy and guidance for and overseeing DT&E;, approving the DT&E; 
plan supporting the decision to begin initial productions, and 
the integration of DT&E; with operational T&E.;
    The Committee is supportive of the Department's efforts to 
strengthen the capabilities and requirements process to ensure 
that strategic guidance related to Departmental investments is 
turned into results. S&T;, along with the Office of Policy and 
the Office of the Chief Financial Officer are to keep the 
Committee apprised of these efforts.

                         LABORATORY FACILITIES

    The Committee recommendation includes $435,180,000 for 
Laboratory Facilities, the same level as requested. A total of 
$300,000,000 is provided for the National Bio-Agro Defense 
Facility [NBAF] as requested for construction of the facility 
and to fully leverage the funding contributions by the State of 
Kansas. NBAF will support the complimentary missions of DHS and 
the United States Department of Agriculture and serve as the 
Nation's primary research facility to counter foreign animal 
diseases. The Committee directs S&T; to submit a detailed update 
of its NBAF construction plan and schedule, to include an 
updated plan for the expenditure of funds, not later than 30 
days after the date of enactment of this act.
    A total of $15,000,000 is provided for infrastructure 
upgrades to the Plum Island Animal Disease Center [PIADC]. 
While NBAF will replace PIADC, it will not become operational 
for several years. As a result, it is imperative to make 
critical upgrades at PIADC in order for scientists to continue 
research on contagious animal diseases that have the potential 
to impact America's food and livestock industries.

                          UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommendation includes $39,500,000 for 
University Programs, $8,500,000 above the amount requested and 
$224,000 below fiscal year 2014. The Office of University 
Programs supports critical homeland security-related research 
and education at U.S. colleges and universities to address 
high-priority DHS-related issues and to enhance homeland 
security capabilities over the long term. The increase above 
the request is for the University Centers of Excellence 
program, including support for existing centers and the new 
center funded in fiscal year 2014 and expected to be awarded in 
fiscal year 2015.

                   Domestic Nuclear Detection Office


                                SUMMARY

    The Domestic Nuclear Detection Office [DNDO] is responsible 
for development of technologies to detect and report attempts 
to import, possess, store, develop, or transport nuclear and 
radiological material.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $306,342,000 for activities of 
DNDO for fiscal year 2015. This is $1,919,000 above the amount 
requested and $21,087,000 above the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2014.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                                        DOMESTIC NUCLEAR DETECTION OFFICE
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Management and Administration.............................            37,353            37,494            37,339
Research, Development, and Operations.....................           205,302           199,068           196,400
Systems Acquisition.......................................            42,600            67,861            72,603
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Domestic Nuclear Detection Office............           285,255           304,423           306,342
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                     MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $37,353,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      37,494,000
Committee recommendation................................      37,339,000

    The Management and Administration account funds salaries, 
benefits, and expenses for DNDO.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $37,339,000 for Management and 
Administration of programs and activities carried out by DNDO. 
This is $155,000 below the amount requested and $14,000 below 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2014. Of this amount, the 
Committee recommends not to exceed $2,250 for official 
reception and representation expenses.

                     STRATEGIC PLAN OF INVESTMENTS

    In lieu of providing a report updating the Department's 
strategic plan of investments, the Director shall brief the 
Committee annually on DNDO's efforts to implement the 
Department's responsibilities under the domestic component of 
the Global Nuclear Detection Architecture. The briefing shall 
identify:
  --the various elements of the domestic architecture and the 
        roles and responsibilities of each Departmental entity;
  --investments being made in fiscal year 2015 and planned for 
        2016 to secure pathways (sea, land, and air) into the 
        United States;
  --investments necessary to close known vulnerabilities and 
        gaps, including associated costs and timeframes, and 
        estimates of feasibility and cost effectiveness; and
  --how R&D; funding is furthering the implementation of the 
        domestic architecture.
    The briefing shall also include a discussion on DNDO's 
ability to surge capabilities in concert with Federal, State, 
and local level assets to respond to suspected radiological 
threats.

                 RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND OPERATIONS

Appropriations, 2014....................................    $205,302,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................     199,068,000
Committee recommendation................................     196,400,000

    The Research, Development and Operations account funds the 
development of nuclear detection systems and the integration 
and advancement of national nuclear forensics capabilities.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $196,400,000 for Research, 
Development and Operations. This is $2,668,000 less than the 
amount requested and $8,902,000 below the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2014.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                                      RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND OPERATIONS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Systems Engineering and Architecture......................            21,000            17,924            17,000
Systems Development.......................................            21,000            22,000            21,400
Transformational Research and Development.................            71,102            69,500            69,000
Assessments...............................................            39,300            38,079            38,000
Operations Support........................................            30,200            31,565            31,000
National Technical Nuclear Forensics Center...............            22,700            20,000            20,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Research, Development, and Operations........           205,302           199,068           196,400
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          SEMIANNUAL BRIEFINGS

    DNDO shall continue semiannual program update briefings and 
provide periodic updates on any new threats, research, studies 
and assessments related to the Global Nuclear Detection 
Architecture. Semiannual program briefings shall also cover 
emergent technology solutions being explored by DNDO. One of 
these semiannual briefings may be combined with the more 
comprehensive annual brief on the strategic plan of 
investments.

                 RADIATION PORTAL MONITORS IMPROVEMENTS

    Radiation Portal Monitors [RPMs] that were deployed in the 
field over the past decade will start reaching the end of their 
useful life in the coming years, and DNDO anticipates an 
increase in obsolescence. In addition to exploring system 
renewal and service life extension options, the Committee 
encourages DNDO, in conjunction with CBP, to test new radiation 
detection technologies that would address the need to replace 
RPMs nearing the end of their service life, and significantly 
improve screening efficiency at our Nation's ports. DNDO is to 
brief the Committee on its acquisition strategy for replacing 
or extending the service life of RPMs no later than 120 days 
after the date of enactment of this act. This briefing shall 
include relevant service life extension program activities such 
as software upgrades, hardware replacement, and obsolescence 
solutions, as well as any CONOPS changes.

                          TEST AND EVALUATION

    Within the funding provided, the Department is expected to 
continue a testing program to validate the potential benefits 
of commercial systems that can detect shielded nuclear material 
and have the potential to reduce the overall cost and time it 
takes to scan incoming cargo for hazardous materials. Such 
systems may be beneficial in addressing the 100 percent cargo 
scanning requirement.

                          SYSTEMS ACQUISITION

Appropriations, 2014....................................     $42,600,000
Budget estimate, 2015...................................      67,861,000
Committee recommendation................................      72,603,000

    The Systems Acquisition account funds the acquisition of 
equipment for front line users across the Department.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $72,603,000 for Systems 
Acquisition. This is $4,742,000 above the amount requested and 
$30,003,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2014.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2014 and budget 
request levels:

                                               SYSTEMS ACQUISITION
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2014  Fiscal year 2015      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Radiation Portal Monitor Program..........................             7,000             5,000             5,000
Securing the Cities.......................................            22,000            12,000            19,000
Human Portable Radiation Detection Systems................            13,600            50,861            48,603
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Systems Acquisition..........................            42,600            67,861            72,603
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       RADIATION PORTAL MONITORS

    The Committee recommendation includes $5,000,000 for the 
Radiation Portal Monitor program, as requested. Funds are 
provided to acquire and deploy radiation portal monitors to 
ports of entry as prioritized by CBP and DNDO.

                          SECURING THE CITIES

    The Committee recommendation includes $19,000,000 for 
Securing the Cities, $7,000,000 above the amount requested.

               HUMAN PORTABLE RADIATION DETECTION SYSTEMS

    The Committee recommendation includes $48,603,000 for the 
Human Portable Radiation Detection Systems program to support 
the purchase of basic handhelds, backpacks, and personal 
radiation detectors for CBP, TSA, and the Coast Guard. DNDO is 
to provide the Committee with a multiyear procurement forecast 
and deployment schedule for these funds with the budget 
submission.

                                TITLE V

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

                    (INCLUDING RESCISSIONS OF FUNDS)

    Section 501. The bill includes a provision that no part of 
any appropriation shall remain available for obligation beyond 
the current fiscal year unless expressly provided.
    Section 502. The bill includes a provision that unexpended 
balances of prior appropriations may be merged with new 
appropriations accounts and used for the same purpose, subject 
to reprogramming guidelines.
    Section 503. The bill includes a provision that provides 
authority to reprogram appropriations within an account and to 
transfer up to 5 percent between appropriations accounts with 
15-day advance notification of the Committees on 
Appropriations. A detailed funding table identifying each 
congressional control level for reprogramming purposes is 
included at the end of this statement. These reprogramming 
guidelines shall be complied with by all departmental 
components funded by this act.
    The Committee expects the Department to submit 
reprogramming requests on a timely basis, and to provide 
complete explanations of the reallocations proposed, including 
detailed justifications of the increases and offsets, and any 
specific impact the proposed changes will have on the budget 
request for the following fiscal year and future-year 
appropriations requirements. Each request submitted to the 
Committees should include a detailed table showing the proposed 
revisions at the account, program, project, and activity level 
to the funding and staffing (full-time equivalent) levels for 
the current fiscal year and to the levels required for the 
following fiscal year. The Committee has been disappointed by 
the quality, level of detail, and timeliness of the 
Department's proposed reprogrammings.
    The Committee expects the Department to manage its programs 
and activities within the levels appropriated. The Committee 
reminds the Department that reprogramming or transfer requests 
should be submitted only in the case of an unforeseeable 
emergency or situation that could not have been predicted when 
formulating the budget request for the current fiscal year. 
When the Department submits a reprogramming or transfer request 
to the Committees on Appropriations and does not receive 
identical responses from the House and Senate, it is the 
responsibility of the Department to reconcile the House and 
Senate differences before proceeding, and if reconciliation is 
not possible, to consider the reprogramming or transfer request 
unapproved.
    The Department shall not propose a reprogramming or 
transfer of funds after June 30 unless there are extraordinary 
circumstances, which place human lives or property in imminent 
danger. To the extent any reprogramming proposals are required; 
the Department is strongly encouraged to submit them well in 
advance of the June 30 deadline.
    The Committee did not include a provision requested in the 
budget related to the use of unobligated funds for disaster 
response since the authority already rests with the President.
    Section 504. The bill includes a provision relating to the 
Department's Working Capital Fund [WCF] that: extends the 
authority of the Department's WCF in fiscal year 2015; 
prohibits funds appropriated or otherwise made available to the 
Department from being used to make payments to the WCF, except 
for the activities and amounts allowed in the President's 
fiscal year 2015 budget; makes WCF funds available until 
expended; ensures departmental components are only charged for 
direct usage of each WCF service; makes funds provided to the 
WCF available only for purposes consistent with the 
contributing component; requires the WCF to be paid in advance 
or reimbursed at rates which will return the full cost of each 
service; and subjects the WCF to the requirements of section 
503 of this act. The WCF table included in the Department's 
congressional justification accompanying the President's fiscal 
year 2015 budget shall serve as the control level for quarterly 
execution reports submitted to the Committee not later than 30 
days after the end of each quarter. These reports shall 
identify any activity added or removed from the fund.
    Section 505. The bill includes a provision that not to 
exceed 50 percent of unobligated balances recorded not later 
than June 30 from appropriations made for salaries and expenses 
in fiscal year 2015 shall remain available through fiscal year 
2016, subject to reprogramming.
    Section 506. The bill includes a provision providing that 
funds for intelligence activities are specifically authorized 
during fiscal year 2015 until the enactment of an act 
authorizing intelligence activities for fiscal year 2015.
    Section 507. The bill includes a provision requiring 
notification to the Committees 3 business days before any grant 
allocation, grant award, contract award (including Federal 
Acquisition Regulation-covered contracts), other transaction 
agreement, a task or delivery order on a DHS multiple award 
contract, letter of intent, or public announcement of the 
intention to make such an award totaling in excess of 
$1,000,000. If the Secretary determines that compliance would 
pose substantial risk to health, human life, or safety, an 
award may be made without prior notification but the Committees 
shall be notified within 5 full business days after such award 
or letter is issued. Additionally, FEMA is required to brief 
the Committees 5 full business days prior to announcing 
publicly the intention to make an award under State and Local 
programs. The 3-day notification also pertains to task or 
delivery order awards greater than $10,000,000 from multiyear 
DHS funds as well as for any sole-source grant awards.
    Section 508. The bill includes a provision that no agency 
shall purchase, construct, or lease additional facilities for 
Federal law enforcement training without the advance approval 
of the Committees on Appropriations.
    Section 509. The bill includes a provision that none of the 
funds may be used for any construction, repair, alteration, or 
acquisition project for which a prospectus, if required under 
chapter 33 of title 40, United States Code, has not been 
approved. The bill excludes funds that may be required for 
development of a proposed prospectus.
    Section 510. The bill includes a provision that 
consolidates, continues, and modifies by reference prior-year 
statutory bill language into one provision. These provisions 
concern contracting officers' training and Federal building 
energy performance. The provision strikes a permanent 
requirement for a report related to Sensitive Security 
Information.
    Section 511. The bill includes a provision that none of the 
funds may be used in contravention of the Buy American Act.
    Section 512. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds to be used to amend the oath of allegiance required by 
section 337 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 
1448).
    Section 513. The bill includes a provision requiring the 
Chief Financial Officer to submit monthly budget execution and 
staffing reports within 30 days after the close of each month.
    Section 514. The bill includes a provision that directs 
that any funds appropriated or transferred to TSA ``Aviation 
Security'', ``Administration'', and ``Transportation Security 
Support'' in fiscal years 2004 and 2005, which are recovered or 
deobligated shall be available only for procurement or 
installation of explosive detection systems, air cargo, 
baggage, and checkpoint screening systems, subject to 
notification. Semiannual reporting on these funds is required.
    Section 515. The bill includes a provision regarding 
competitive sourcing for United States Citizenship and 
Immigration Services.
    Section 516. The bill includes a provision requiring any 
funds appropriated to Coast Guard for 110-123 foot patrol boat 
conversions that are recovered, collected, or otherwise 
received as a result of negotiation, mediation, or litigation, 
shall be available until expended for the Fast Response Cutter 
program.
    Section 517. The bill includes a provision classifying the 
functions of instructor staff at FLETC as inherently 
governmental for purposes of the Federal Activities Inventory 
Reform Act of 1998.
    Section 518. The bill includes a provision requiring the 
Secretary to submit a report to the OIG listing all grants or 
contracts awarded by any means other than full and open 
competition. The OIG is required to review the report to assess 
Departmental compliance with applicable laws and regulations 
and report the results to the Committees on Appropriations no 
later than February 15, 2016.
    Section 519. The bill includes a provision that precludes 
DHS from using funds in this act to carry out reorganization 
authority. This prohibition is not intended to prevent the 
Department from carrying out routine or small reallocations of 
personnel or functions within components of the Department, 
subject to section 503 of this act. A requested provision 
exempting certain activities from reorganization is not 
included. If DHS could better execute its mission through a 
reorganization, it should be proposed and justified to 
Congress.
    Section 520. The bill includes a provision prohibiting the 
Secretary of Homeland Security from reducing operations within 
the Coast Guard's Civil Engineering Program except as 
specifically authorized by a statute enacted after the date of 
enactment of this act.
    Section 521. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funding to grant an immigration benefit to any individual 
unless the results of background checks required by statute to 
be completed prior to the grant of a benefit have been received 
by DHS.
    Section 522. The bill includes a provision extending other 
transactional authority for DHS through fiscal year 2015.
    Section 523. The bill includes a provision requiring the 
Secretary to link all contracts that provide award fees to 
successful acquisition outcomes.
    Section 524. The bill includes a provision regarding 
waivers of the Jones Act.
    Section 525. The bill includes a provision contained in 
Public Laws 109-295, 110-161, 110-329, 111-83, 112-10, 112-74, 
113-6, and 113-76 related to prescription drugs.
    Section 526. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds from being used to reduce the Coast Guard's Operations 
Systems Center mission or its government-employed or contract 
staff.
    Section 527. The bill includes a provision requiring the 
Secretary of Homeland Security, in conjunction with the 
Secretary of the Treasury, to notify the Committees on proposed 
transfers of surplus balances from the Department of the 
Treasury Forfeiture Fund to any agency within the Department of 
Homeland Security.
    Section 528. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds from being used to plan, test, pilot, or develop a 
national identification card.
    Section 529. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds to be used to conduct or implement the results of a 
competition under Office of Management and Budget Circular A-76 
with respect to the Coast Guard National Vessel Documentation 
Center.
    Section 530. The bill includes a provision requiring the 
posting of damage assessment information used to determine 
whether to declare a major disaster on the FEMA Web site.
    Section 531. The bill includes a provision directing that 
any official required by this act to report or certify to the 
Committees on Appropriations may not delegate such authority 
unless expressly authorized to do so in this act.
    Section 532. The bill includes a provision extending the 
risk-based security standards for chemical facilities cited in 
section 550 of Public Law 109-295, as amended, for 1 year.
    Section 533. The bill includes a provision extending 
current law concerning individuals detained at the Naval 
Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
    Section 534. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds in this act to be used for first-class travel.
    Section 535. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds to be used to employ workers in contravention of section 
274A(h)(3) of the Immigration and Nationality Act.
    Section 536. The bill includes a provision on the proper 
disposal of personal information collected through the 
Registered Traveler program.
    Section 537. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds appropriated or otherwise made available by this act to 
pay for award or incentive fees for contractors with below 
satisfactory performance or performance that fails to meet the 
basic requirements of the contract.
    Section 538. The bill includes language that requires the 
Secretary to ensure screening of passengers and crews for 
transportation and national security purposes are consistent 
with applicable laws, regulations, and guidance on privacy and 
civil liberties.
    Section 539. The bill includes a provision allocating 
$10,000,000 in Immigration Examination Fees for the purpose of 
providing immigrant integration grants in fiscal year 2015.
    Section 540. The bill provides a total of $48,600,000 for 
consolidation of a new DHS headquarters at St. Elizabeths and 
consolidation of mission support.
    Section 541. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds appropriated or otherwise made available by this act for 
DHS to enter into a Federal contract unless the contract meets 
requirements of the Federal Property and Administrative 
Services Act of 1949 or chapter 137 of title 10 U.S.C., and the 
Federal Acquisition Regulation, unless the contract is 
otherwise authorized by statute without regard to this section.
    Section 542. The bill provides $39,500,000 for financial 
system modernization and includes a provision allowing the 
Secretary to transfer funds made available by this act between 
appropriations for the same purpose after notifying the 
Committees 15 days in advance.
    Section 543. The bill includes a provision providing some 
flexibility to the Department for financing a response to an 
immigration emergency.
    Section 544. The bill includes a provision permitting the 
Department to sell ICE-owned detention facilities and use the 
proceeds from any sale for improvement to other facilities. ICE 
is required to notify the Committees on Appropriations 15 days 
prior to announcing any sale.
    Section 545. The bill includes language directing DHS CIO, 
CBP, ICE, United States Secret Service, and the Office of 
Biometric Identity Management to submit multiyear investment 
and management plans for all information technology programs 
and procurements at the time the President's budget proposal is 
submitted.
    Section 546. The bill includes language stating that the 
Secretary shall ensure enforcement of all immigration laws.
    Section 547. The bill includes a provision regarding 
Federal network security.
    Section 548. The bill includes a provision regarding 
restrictions on electronic access to pornography, except for 
law enforcement purposes.
    Section 549. The bill includes a provision regarding the 
transfer of an operable firearm by a Federal law enforcement 
officer to an agent of a drug cartel.
    Section 550. The bill includes a provision prohibiting any 
funds from this or any other Act to be used for creation of the 
National Preparedness Grant Program or any successor grant 
program unless explicitly authorized by Congress.
    Section 551. The bill modifies a general provision in 
Public Law 113-76 permitting CBP to enter into up to seven 
reimbursable agreements with airports and clarifies the gift 
donation authority between the Commissioner of CBP and the 
Administrator of General Services.
    Section 552. The bill includes language regarding the 
number of employees permitted to attend international 
conferences.
    Section 553. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds made available by this act to reimburse any Federal 
department or agency for its participation in a NSSE.
    Section 554. The bill includes a provision relating to air 
preclearance operations.
    Section 555. The bill provides the Secretary with 
discretion to waive certain requirements of the Federal Fire 
Prevention and Control Act of 1974, including a provision which 
allows grants to be used to retain firefighters, instead of 
only for increasing the number of firefighters. The Committee 
expects that the Secretary will take into consideration 
economic hardship when exercising the waiver authority.
    Section 556. The bill includes a provision that prohibits 
the collection of new land border fees or the study of the 
imposition of such border fee.
    Section 557. The bill includes a provision pertaining to 
the temporary re-employment of administrative law judges for 
arbitration dispute resolution.
    Section 558. The bill includes a provision clarifying that 
fees collected pursuant to the Colombia Free Trade Agreement 
are available until expended.
    Section 559. The bill includes a provision related to the 
immigration user fee.
    Section 560. The bill includes a provision related to user 
fee proposals that have not been enacted into law prior to 
submission of the budget.
    Section 561. The bill includes a provision on structural 
pay reform that affects more than 100 full-time positions or 
costs more than $5,000,000 in a single year.
    Section 562. The bill includes a provision directing the 
Department to post on a public Web site reports required by the 
Committees on Appropriations unless public posting compromises 
homeland or national security or contains proprietary 
information.
    Section 563. The bill includes a prohibition on 
establishment of a national license plate recognition database 
or other similar project.
    Section 564. The bill repeals section 605 of Public Law 
110-161 related to land border port of entry technology 
demonstration projects.
    Section 565. The bill includes a provision regarding a 
transfer to the Disaster Relief Fund from the Disaster 
Assistance Direct Loan Program. The transfer has no impact on 
ongoing loan determinations.
    Section 566. The bill includes reporting requirements 
pertaining to unaccompanied alien children.
    Section 567. The bill includes a provision deeming a 
Transportation Security Officer, who was killed in the line of 
duty on November 13, 2013, as having been a public safety 
officer for the purposes of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe 
Streets Act of 1968.
    Section 568. The bill includes a provision modifying the 
Visa Waiver Program to permit the entry of additional member 
countries based on adjusting the criteria for visa refusal 
rates if a country has a low visa overstay rate while 
maintaining the security requirements of the Visa Waiver 
Program.
    Section 569. The bill rescinds unobligated balances from 
prior year appropriations from Customs and Border Protection, 
Transportation Security Administration, Coast Guard, and 
Science and Technology.
    Section 570. The bill rescinds $200,000,000 from the 
unobligated balances in the Department of the Treasury 
Forfeiture Fund.
    Section 571. The bill includes a rescission of legacy 
funding still unobligated from when the Department was formed.
    Section 572. The bill rescinds unobligated balances of 
prior year appropriations in the Disaster Relief Fund for non-
major disaster programs due to the significant balances carried 
over from fiscal years 2013 and 2014, and amounts recovered 
from previous disasters during project closeouts. The 
rescission of funds will have no impact on FEMA's ability to 
aid in recovery from past disasters or respond to future 
disasters.
    Section 573. The bill includes a provision related the 
Federal Management Assistance Grant Program.

                     PROGRAM, PROJECT, AND ACTIVITY

    In fiscal year 2015, for purposes of the Balanced Budget 
and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-177), 
as amended, the following information provides the definition 
of the term ``program, project, and activity'' for the 
components of the Department of Homeland Security under the 
jurisdiction of the Homeland Security Subcommittee of the 
Committee on Appropriations. The term ``program, project, and 
activity'' shall include the most specific level of budget 
items identified in the Department of Homeland Security 
Appropriations Act, 2015, the House and Senate Committee 
reports, and the conference report and the accompany joint 
explanatory statement of the managers of the committee of 
conference.
    If a percentage reduction is necessary, in implementing 
that reduction, components of the Department of Homeland 
Security shall apply any percentage reduction required for 
fiscal year 2015 to all items specified in the justifications 
submitted to the Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives in support of the fiscal year 2015 
budget estimates, as amended, for such components, as modified 
by congressional action.

  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 7 of rule XVI requires that Committee reports 
accompanying general appropriations bills identify each 
recommended amendment which proposes an item of appropriation 
which is not made to carry out the provisions of an existing 
law, a treaty stipulation, or an act or resolution previously 
passed by the Senate during that session.
    The Committee recommends funding for the following programs 
or activities which currently lack authorization for fiscal 
year 2015:
    Analysis and Operations.
    U.S. Customs and Border Protection: Salaries and Expenses; 
Automation Modernization; and Air and Marine Operations.
    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement: Salaries and 
Expenses.
    Transportation Security Administration: Aviation Security; 
Surface Transportation Security; Transportation Threat 
Assessment and Credentialing; and Federal Air Marshals.
    Coast Guard: Operating Expenses; Environmental Compliance 
and Restoration; Reserve Training; Acquisition, Construction, 
and Improvements; Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation; 
and Retired Pay.
    National Protection and Programs Directorate: 
Infrastructure Protection and Information Security.
    Federal Emergency Management Agency: Salaries and Expenses; 
State and Local Programs; Emergency Management Performance 
Grants; National Predisaster Mitigation Fund, and Emergency 
Food and Shelter.

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of rule XXVI requires that Committee reports 
on a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any statute 
or part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the statute or 
part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and (b) a 
comparative print of that part of the bill or joint resolution 
making the amendment and of the statute or part thereof 
proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through type and 
italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate typographical 
devices the omissions and insertions which would be made by the 
bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form recommended by 
the committee.''
    In compliance with this rule, changes in existing law 
proposed to be made by the bill are shown as follows: existing 
law to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets; new matter is 
printed in italic; and existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman.

                       TITLE 6--DOMESTIC SECURITY


               CHAPTER 1--HOMELAND SECURITY ORGANIZATION


   SUBCHAPTER II--INFORMATION ANALYSIS AND INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION


Sec. 121. Information and Analysis and Infrastructure Protection

                              Regulations

    Pub. L. 109-295, title V, Sec. 550, Oct. 4, 2006, 120 Stat. 
1388, as amended by Pub. L. 110-161, div. E, title V, Sec. 534, 
Dec. 26, 2007, 121 Stat. 2075; Pub. L. 111-83, title V, 
Sec. 550, Oct. 28, 2009, 123 Stat. 2177; Pub. L. 112-10, div. 
B, title VI, Sec. 1650, Apr. 15, 2011, 125 Stat. 146; Pub. L. 
112-74, div. D, title V, Sec. 540, Dec. 23, 2011, 125 Stat. 
976; Pub. L. 113-6, div. D, title V, Sec. 537, Mar. 26, 2013, 
127 Stat. 373, provided that:
    ``(a) * * *
    ``(b) Interim regulations issued under this section shall 
apply until the effective date of interim or final regulations 
promulgated under other laws that establish requirements and 
standards referred to in subsection (a) and expressly supersede 
this section: Provided, That the authority provided by this 
section shall terminate [on October 4, 2013] on October 4, 
2015.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


  Subchapter VIII--Coordination With Non-Federal Entities; Inspector 
 General; United States Secret Service; Coast Guard; General Provisions


Sec. 391. Research and development projects

(a) Authority

    [Until September 30, 2014,] Until September 30, 2015, and 
subject to subsection (d), the Secretary may carry out a pilot 
program under which the Secretary may exercise the following 
authorities:

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

(c) Additional requirements

    (1) In general

            The authority of the Secretary under this section 
        shall terminate [September 30, 2014,] September 30, 
        2015, unless before that date the Secretary--
                                ------                                


                    TITLE 8--ALIENS AND NATIONALITY


                CHAPTER 12--IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY


                       SUBCHAPTER II--IMMIGRATION


    Part II--Admission Qualifications For Aliens; Travel Control of 
                          Citizens and Aliens


Sec. 1187. Visa waiver program for certain visitors

(a) Establishment of program

    The [Attorney General] Secretary of Homeland Security and 
the Secretary of State are authorized to establish a program 
(hereinafter in this section referred to as the ``program'') 
under which the requirement of paragraph (7)(B)(i)(II) of 
section 1182(a) of this title may be waived by the [Attorney 
General] Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with 
the Secretary of State and in accordance with this section, in 
the case of an alien who meets the following requirements:

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

        (1) Seeking entry as tourist for 90 days or less

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

        (4) Executes immigration forms

            The alien before the time of such admission 
        completes such immigration form as the [Attorney 
        General] Secretary of Homeland Security shall 
        establish.

        (5) Entry into the United States

            If arriving by sea or air, the alien arrives at the 
        port of entry into the United States on a carrier, 
        including any carrier conducting operations under part 
        135 of title 14, Code of Federal Regulations, or a 
        noncommercial aircraft that is owned or operated by a 
        domestic corporation conducting operations under part 
        91 of title 14, Code of Federal Regulations\1\ which 
        has entered into an agreement with the [Attorney 
        General] Secretary of Homeland Security pursuant to 
        subsection (e) of this section. The [Attorney General] 
        Secretary of Homeland Security is authorized to require 
        a carrier conducting operations under part 135 of title 
        14, Code of Federal Regulations, or a domestic 
        corporation conducting operations under part 91 of that 
        title, to give suitable and proper bond, in such 
        reasonable amount and containing such conditions as the 
        [Attorney General] Secretary of Homeland Security may 
        deem sufficient to ensure compliance with the 
        indemnification requirements of this section, as a term 
        of such an agreement.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\So in original. Probably should be followed by a comma.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
        (8) Round-trip ticket

            The alien is in possession of a round-trip 
        transportation ticket (unless this requirement is 
        waived by the [Attorney General] Secretary of Homeland 
        Security under regulations or the alien is arriving at 
        the port of entry on an aircraft operated under part 
        135 of title 14, Code of Federal Regulations, or a 
        noncommercial aircraft that is owned or operated by a 
        domestic corporation conducting operations under part 
        91 of title 14, Code of Federal Regulations).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

        (10) Electronic transmission of identification informa-
              tion

            Operators of aircraft under part 135 of title 14, 
        Code of Federal Regulations, or operators of 
        noncommercial aircraft that are owned or operated by a 
        domestic corporation conducting operations under part 
        91 of title 14, Code of Federal Regulations, carrying 
        any alien passenger who will apply for admission under 
        this section shall furnish such information as the 
        [Attorney General] Secretary of Homeland Security by 
        regulation shall prescribe as necessary for the 
        identification of any alien passenger being transported 
        and for the enforcement of the immigration laws. Such 
        information shall be electronically transmitted not 
        less than one hour prior to arrival at the port of 
        entry for purposes of checking for inadmissibility 
        using the automated electronic database.

(c) Designation of program countries

        [(1) In general

            [The [Attorney General] Secretary of Homeland 
        Security, in consultation with the Secretary of State, 
        may designate any country as a program country if it 
        meets the requirements of paragraph (2).]
            (1) Authority to designate; definitions.--
                    (A) Authority to designate.--The Secretary 
                of Homeland Security, in consultation with the 
                Secretary of State, may designate any country 
                as a program country if that country meets the 
                requirements under paragraph (2).
                    (B) Definitions.--In this subsection:
                            (i) Appropriate congressional 
                        committees.--The term ``appropriate 
                        congressional committees'' means--
                                    (I) the Committee on 
                                Appropriations, the Committee 
                                on Foreign Relations, the 
                                Committee on Homeland Security 
                                and Governmental Affairs, and 
                                the Committee on the Judiciary 
                                of the Senate; and
                                    (II) the Committee on 
                                Appropriations, the Committee 
                                on Foreign Affairs, the 
                                Committee on Homeland Security, 
                                and the Committee on the 
                                Judiciary of the House of 
                                Representatives.
                            (ii) Overstay rate.--
                                    (I) Initial designation.--
                                The term ``overstay rate'' 
                                means, with respect to a 
                                country being considered for 
                                designation in the program, the 
                                ratio of--
                                            (aa) the number of 
                                        nationals of that 
                                        country who were 
                                        admitted to the United 
                                        States on the basis of 
                                        a nonimmigrant visa 
                                        under section 
                                        101(a)(15)(B) whose 
                                        periods of authorized 
                                        stay ended during a 
                                        fiscal year but who 
                                        remained unlawfully in 
                                        the United States 
                                        beyond such periods; to
                                            (bb) the number of 
                                        nationals of that 
                                        country who were 
                                        admitted to the United 
                                        States on the basis of 
                                        a nonimmigrant visa 
                                        under section 
                                        101(a)(15)(B) whose 
                                        periods of authorized 
                                        stay ended during that 
                                        fiscal year.
                                    (II) Continuing 
                                designation.--The term 
                                ``overstay rate'' means, for 
                                each fiscal year after initial 
                                designation under this section 
                                with respect to a country, the 
                                ratio of--
                                            (aa) the number of 
                                        nationals of that 
                                        country who were 
                                        admitted to the United 
                                        States under this 
                                        section or on the basis 
                                        of a nonimmigrant visa 
                                        under section 
                                        101(a)(15)(B) whose 
                                        periods of authorized 
                                        stay ended during a 
                                        fiscal year but who 
                                        remained unlawfully in 
                                        the United States 
                                        beyond such periods; to
                                            (bb) the number of 
                                        nationals of that 
                                        country who were 
                                        admitted to the United 
                                        States under this 
                                        section or on the basis 
                                        of a nonimmigrant visa 
                                        under section 
                                        101(a)(15)(B) whose 
                                        periods of authorized 
                                        stay ended during that 
                                        fiscal year.
                                    (III) Computation of 
                                overstay rate.--In determining 
                                the overstay rate for a 
                                country, the Secretary of 
                                Homeland Security may utilize 
                                information from any available 
                                databases to ensure the 
                                accuracy of such rate.
                            (iii) Program country.--The term 
                        ``program country'' means a country 
                        designated as a program country under 
                        subparagraph (A).

        (2) Qualifications

            Except as provided in subsection (f) of this 
        section, a country may not be designated as a program 
        country unless the following requirements are met:

                [(A) Low nonimmigrant visa refusal rate

                    [Either--

                            [(i) the average number of refusals 
                        of nonimmigrant visitor visas for 
                        nationals of that country during--
                                    [(I) the two previous full 
                                fiscal years was less than 2.0 
                                percent of the total number of 
                                nonimmigrant visitor visas for 
                                nationals of that country which 
                                were granted or refused during 
                                those years; and
                                    [(II) either of such two 
                                previous full fiscal years was 
                                less than 2.5 percent of the 
                                total number of nonimmigrant 
                                visitor visas for nationals of 
                                that country which were granted 
                                or refused during that year;
                            [(ii) such refusal rate for 
                        nationals of that country during the 
                        previous full fiscal year was less than 
                        3.0 percent.]
                    (A) General numerical limitations.--
                            (i) Low nonimmigrant visa refusal 
                        rate.--The percentage of nationals of 
                        that country refused nonimmigrant visas 
                        under section 101(a)(15)(B) during the 
                        previous full fiscal year was not more 
                        than 3 percent of the total number of 
                        nationals of that country who were 
                        granted or refused nonimmigrant visas 
                        under such section during such year.
                            (ii) Low nonimmigrant overstay 
                        rate.--The overstay rate for that 
                        country was not more than 3 percent 
                        during the previous fiscal year.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                (C) Law enforcement and security interests

                    The [Attorney General] Secretary of 
                Homeland Security, in consultation with the 
                Secretary of State--
                            (i) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                            (iii) submits a written report to 
                        the [Committee on the Judiciary and the 
                        Committee on International Relations of 
                        the House of Representatives and the 
                        Committee on the Judiciary and the 
                        Committee on Foreign Relations of the 
                        Senate] appropriate congressional 
                        committees regarding the country's 
                        qualification for designation that 
                        includes an explanation of such 
                        determination.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

        [(3) Continuing and subsequent qualifications

            [For each fiscal year after the initial period--

                [(A) Continuing qualification

                    [In the case of a country which was a 
                program country in the previous fiscal year, a 
                country may not be designated as a 
                programcountry unless the sum of--
                            [(i) the total of the number of 
                        nationals of that country who were 
                        denied admission at the time of arrival 
                        or withdrew their application for 
                        admission during such previous fiscal 
                        year as a nonimmigrant visitor, and
                            [(ii) the total number of nationals 
                        of that country who were admitted as 
                        nonimmigrant visitors during such 
                        previous fiscal year and who violated 
                        the terms of such admission, was less 
                        than 2 percent of the total number of 
                        nationals of that country who applied 
                        for admission as nonimmigrant visitors 
                        during such previous fiscal year.

                [(B) New countries

                    [In the case of another country, the 
                country may not be designated as a program 
                country unless the following requirements are 
                met:

                        [(i) Low nonimmigrant visa refusal rate 
                        in pre-
                              vious 2-year period

                            [The average number of refusals of 
                        nonimmigrant visitor visas for 
                        nationals of that country during the 
                        two previous full fiscal years was less 
                        than 2 percent of the total number of 
                        nonimmigrant visitor visas for 
                        nationals of that country which were 
                        granted or refused during those years.
                            [(ii) Low nonimmigrant visa refusal 
                        rate in each of the 2 previous years 
                        The average number of refusals of 
                        nonimmigrant visitor visas for 
                        nationals of that country during either 
                        of such two previous full fiscal years 
                        was less than 2.5 percent of the total 
                        number of nonimmigrant visitor visas 
                        for nationals of that country which 
                        were granted or refused during that 
                        year.]
            (3) Qualification criteria.--After designation as a 
        program country under section 217(c)(2), a country may 
        not continue to be designated as a program country 
        unless the Secretary of Homeland Security, in 
        consultation with the Secretary of State, determines, 
        pursuant to the requirements under paragraph (5), that 
        the designation will be continued.
            [(4) Initial period.--For purposes of paragraphs 
        (2) and (3), the term ``initial period'' means the 
        period beginning at the end of the 30-day period 
        described in subsection (b)(1) of this section and 
        ending on the last day of the first fiscal year which 
        begins after such 30-day period.]

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

        (5) Written reports on continuing qualification; 
        designa-
              tion terminations

                (A) Periodic evaluations

                        (i) In general

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                                    (I) * * *
                                    [(II) shall determine, 
                                based upon the evaluation in 
                                subclause (I), whether any such 
                                designation ought to be 
                                continued or terminated under 
                                subsection (d) of this 
                                section;]
                                    (II) shall determine, based 
                                upon the evaluation in 
                                subclause (I), whether any such 
                                designation under subsection 
                                (d) or (f), or probation under 
                                subsection (f), ought to be 
                                continued or terminated;
                                    (III) shall submit a 
                                written report to the 
                                [Committee on the Judiciary, 
                                the Committee on Foreign 
                                Affairs, and the Committee on 
                                Homeland Security, of the House 
                                of Representatives and the 
                                Committee on the Judiciary, the 
                                Committee on Foreign Relations, 
                                and the Committee on Homeland 
                                Security and Governmental 
                                Affairs of the Senate] 
                                appropriate congressional 
                                committees regarding the 
                                continuation or termination of 
                                the country's designation that 
                                includes an explanation of such 
                                determination andthe effects 
                                described in subclause (I); and

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

        [(6) Computation of visa refusal rates

            [For purposes of determining the eligibility of a 
        country to be designated as a program country, the 
        calculation of visa refusal ratesshall not include any 
        visa refusals which incorporate any procedures based 
        on, or are otherwise based on, race, sex, or 
        disability, unlessotherwise specifically authorized by 
        law or regulation. No court shall have jurisdiction 
        under this paragraph to review any visa refusal,the 
        denial of admission to the United States of any alien 
        by the [Attorney General] Secretary of Homeland 
        Security, the Secretary's computation of the visa 
        refusal rate, or the designation or nondesignation of 
        any country.]
            (6) Computation of visa refusal rates and judicial 
        review.--
                    (A) Computation of visa refusal rates.--For 
                purposes of determining the eligibility of a 
                country to be designated as a program country, 
                the calculation of visa refusal rates shall not 
                include any visa refusals which incorporate any 
                procedures based on, or are otherwise based on, 
                race, sex, or disability, unless otherwise 
                specifically authorized by law or regulation.
                    (B) Judicial review.--No court shall have 
                jurisdiction under this section to review any 
                visa refusal, the Secretary of State's 
                computation of a visa refusal rate, the 
                Secretary of Homeland Security's computation of 
                an overstay rate, or the designation or 
                nondesignation of a country as a program 
                country.

        (7) Visa [waiver information.--] waiver information.--
        In refusing

                (A) * * *

                

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
                [(B) Reporting requirement

                    [On May 1 of each year, for each country 
                under consideration for inclusion in the visa 
                waiver program, the Secretary of State shall 
                provide to the appropriate congressional 
                committees--
                            [(i) the total number of nationals 
                        of that country that applied for United 
                        States visas in that country during the 
                        previous calendar year;
                            [(ii) the total number of such 
                        nationals who received United States 
                        visas during the previous calendar 
                        year;
                            [(iii) the total number of such 
                        nationals who were refused United 
                        States visas during the previous 
                        calendar year;
                            [(iv) the total number of such 
                        nationals who were refused United 
                        States visas during the previous 
                        calendar year under each provision of 
                        this chapter under which the visas were 
                        refused; and
                            [(v) the number of such nationals 
                        that were refused under section 1184(b) 
                        of this title as a percentage of the 
                        visas that were issued to such 
                        nationals.

                [(C) Certification

                    [Not later than May 1 of each year, the 
                United States chief of mission, acting or 
                permanent, to each country under consideration 
                for inclusion in the visa waiver program shall 
                certify to the appropriate congressional 
                committees that the information described in 
                subparagraph (B) is accurate and provide a copy 
                of that certification to those committees.

                [(D) Consideration of countries in the visa 
                waiver 
                      program

                    [Upon notification to the [Attorney 
                General] Secretary of Homeland Security that a 
                country is under consideration for inclusion in 
                the visa waiver program, the Secretary of State 
                shall provide all of the information described 
                in subparagraph (B) to the [Attorney General] 
                Secretary of Homeland Security.

                [(E) Definition

                    [In this paragraph, the term ``appropriate 
                congressional committees'' means the Committee 
                on the Judiciary and the Committee on Foreign 
                Relations of the Senate and the Committee on 
                the Judiciary and the Committee on 
                International Relations of the House of 
                Representatives.]

        [(8) Nonimmigrant visa refusal rate flexibility

                [(A) Certification

                        [(i) In general

                            [On the date on which an air exit 
                        system is in place that can verify the 
                        departure of not less than 97 percent 
                        of foreign nationalswho exit through 
                        airports of the United States and the 
                        electronic travel authorization system 
                        required under subsection (h)(3) is 
                        fully operational, the Secretary of 
                        Homeland Security shall certify to 
                        Congress that such air exit system and 
                        electronic travel authorization system 
                        are in place.

                        [(ii) Notification to Congress

                            [The Secretary shall notify 
                        Congress in writing of the date on 
                        which the air exit system under clause 
                        (i) fully satisfies the biometric 
                        requirements specified in subsection 
                        (i).

                        [(iii) Temporary suspension of waiver 
                        authority

                            [Notwithstanding any certification 
                        made under clause (i), if the Secretary 
                        has not notified Congress in accordance 
                        with clause (ii) by June 30, 2009, the 
                        Secretary's waiver authority under 
                        subparagraph (B) shall be suspended 
                        beginning on July 1, 2009, until such 
                        time as the Secretary makes such 
                        notification.

                        [(iv) Rule of construction

                            [Nothing in this paragraph shall be 
                        construed as in any way abrogating the 
                        reporting requirements under subsection 
                        (i)(3).

                [(B) Waiver

                    [After certification by the Secretary under 
                subparagraph (A), the Secretary, in 
                consultation with the Secretary of State, may 
                waive the application of paragraph (2)(A) for a 
                country if--
                            [(i) the country meets all security 
                        requirements of this section; (ii) the 
                        Secretary of Homeland Security 
                        determines that the totality of the 
                        country's security risk mitigation 
                        measures provide assurance that the 
                        country's participation in the program 
                        would not compromise the law 
                        enforcement, security interests, or 
                        enforcement of the immigration laws of 
                        the United States;
                            [(ii) the Secretary of Homeland 
                        Security determines that the totality 
                        of the country's security risk 
                        mitigation measures provide assurance 
                        that the country's participation in the 
                        program would not compromise the law 
                        enforcement, security interests, or 
                        enforcement of the immigration laws of 
                        the United States;
                            [(iii) there has been a sustained 
                        reduction in the rate of refusals for 
                        nonimmigrant visas for nationals of the 
                        country and conditionsexist to continue 
                        such reduction;
                            [(iv) the country cooperated with 
                        the Government of the United States on 
                        counterterrorism initiatives, 
                        information sharing, and preventing 
                        terrorist travel before the date of its 
                        designation as a program country, and 
                        the Secretary of Homeland Security and 
                        the Secretary of State determine that 
                        such cooperation will continue;and
                            [(v)(I) the rate of refusals for 
                        nonimmigrant visitor visas for 
                        nationals of the country during the 
                        previous full fiscal year was not more 
                        than ten percent; or
                            [(II) the visa overstay rate for 
                        the country for the previous full 
                        fiscal year does not exceed the maximum 
                        visa overstay rate, once such rate is 
                        established under subparagraph (C).

                [(C) Maximum visa overstay rate

                        [(i) Requirement to establish

                            [After certification by the 
                        Secretary under subparagraph (A), the 
                        Secretary and the Secretary of State 
                        jointly shall use informationfrom the 
                        air exit system referred to in such 
                        subparagraph to establish a maximum 
                        visa overstay rate for countries 
                        participating in the program pursuant 
                        to a waiver under subparagraph (B). The 
                        Secretary of Homeland Security shall 
                        certify to Congress that such rate 
                        would not compromise the law 
                        enforcement, security interests, or 
                        enforcement of the immigration laws of 
                        the United States.

                        [(ii) Visa overstay rate defined In 
                        this paragraph the term ``visa overstay 
                        rate'' means, with respect to a 
                        country, the ratio of--
                                [(I) the total number of 
                                nationals of that country who 
                                were admitted to the United 
                                States on the basis of a 
                                nonimmigrant visa whose periods 
                                of authorized stays ended 
                                during a fiscal year but who 
                                remained unlawfully in the 
                                United States beyond such 
                                periods; to
                                [(II) the total number of 
                                nationals of that country who 
                                were admitted to the United 
                                States on the basis of a 
                                nonimmigrant visa during that 
                                fiscal year.

                        [(iii) Report and publication

                            [The Secretary of Homeland Security 
                        shall on the same date submit to 
                        Congress and publish in the Federal 
                        Register information relating to the 
                        maximum visa overstay rate established 
                        under clause (i). Not later than 60 
                        days after such date, the Secretary 
                        shall issue a final maximum visa 
                        overstay rate above which a country may 
                        not participate in the program.]
            (8) Waiver authority.--The Secretary of Homeland 
        Security, in consultation with the Secretary of State, 
        may waive the application of paragraph (2)(A)(i) for a 
        country if--
                    (A) the country meets all other 
                requirements of paragraph (2);
                    (B) the Secretary of Homeland Security 
                determines that the totality of the country's 
                security risk mitigation measures provide 
                assurance that the country's participation in 
                the program would not compromise the law 
                enforcement, security interests, or enforcement 
                of the immigration laws of the United States;
                    (C) there has been a general downward trend 
                in the percentage of nationals of the country 
                refused nonimmigrant visas under section 
                101(a)(15)(B);
                    (D) the country consistently cooperated 
                with the Government of the United States on 
                counterterrorism initiatives, information 
                sharing, preventing terrorist travel, and 
                extradition to the United States of individuals 
                (including the country's own nationals) who 
                commit crimes that violate United States law 
                before the date of its designation as a program 
                country, and the Secretary of Homeland Security 
                and the Secretary of State assess that such 
                cooperation is likely to continue;
                    (E) the percentage of nationals of the 
                country refused a nonimmigrant visa under 
                section 101(a)(15)(B) during the previous full 
                fiscal year was not more than 10 percent of the 
                total number of nationals of that country who 
                were granted or refused such nonimmigrant 
                visas; and
                    (F) Effective period.--The amendments made 
                by this subsection shall be in effect during 
                the period beginning on the date of enactment 
                of this Act and ending on December 31, 2017.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

(e) Carrier agreements

        (1) In general

            The agreement referred to in subsection (a)(4) of 
        this section is an agreement between a carrier 
        (including any carrier conducting operations under part 
        135 of title 14, Code of Federal Regulations) or a 
        domestic corporation conducting operations under part 
        91 of that title and the [Attorney General] Secretary 
        of Homeland Security under which the carrier (including 
        any carrier conducting operations under part 135 of 
        title 14, Code of Federal Regulations) or a domestic 
        corporation conducting operations under part 91 of that 
        title agrees, in consideration of the waiver of the 
        visa requirement with respect to a nonimmigrant visitor 
        under the program--
                (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                (C) to be subject to the imposition of fines 
                resulting from the transporting into the United 
                States of a national of a designatedcountry 
                without a passport pursuant to regulations 
                promulgated by the [Attorney General] Secretary 
                of Homeland Security, and

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

        (2) Termination of agreements

            The [Attorney General] Secretary of Homeland 
        Security may terminate an agreement under paragraph (1) 
        with five days' notice to the carrier (including any 
        carrier conducting operations under part 135 of title 
        14, Code of Federal Regulations) or a domestic 
        corporation conducting operations under part 91 of that 
        title for the failure by a carrier (including any 
        carrier conducting operations under part 135 of title 
        14, Code of Federal Regulations) or a domestic 
        corporation conducting operations under part 91 of that 
        title to meet the terms of such agreement.

        (3) Business aircraft requirements

                (A) In general

                    For purposes of this section, a domestic 
                corporation conducting operations under part 91 
                of title 14, Code of Federal Regulations\2\ 
                that owns or operates a noncommercial aircraft 
                is a corporation that is organized under the 
                laws of any of the States of the United States 
                or the District of Columbia and is accredited 
                by or a member of a national organization that 
                sets business aviation standards. The Attorney 
                General shall prescribe by regulation the 
                provision of such information as the [Attorney 
                General] Secretary of Homeland Security deems 
                necessary to identify the domestic corporation, 
                its officers, employees, shareholders, its 
                place of business, and its business activities.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \2\So in original. Probably should be followed by a comma.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                (B) Collections

                    In addition to any other fee authorized by 
                law, the [Attorney General] Secretary of 
                Homeland Security is authorized to charge and 
                collect, on a periodic basis, an amount from 
                each domestic corporation conducting operations 
                under part 91 of title 14, Code of Federal 
                Regulations, for nonimmigrant visa waiver 
                admissions on noncommercial aircraft owned or 
                operated by such domestic corporation equal to 
                the total amount of fees assessed for issuance 
                of nonimmigrant visa waiver arrival/departure 
                forms at land border ports of entry. All fees 
                collected under this paragraph shall be 
                deposited into the Immigration User Fee Account 
                established under section 1356(h) of this 
                title.
[(f) Duration and termination of designation

        [(1) In general

                [(A) Determination and notification of 
                disqualifica-
                      tion rate

                    [Upon determination by the [Attorney 
                General] Secretary of Homeland Security that a 
                program country's disqualification rate is 2 
                percent or more, the Attorney General shall 
                notify the Secretary of State.

                [(B) Probationary status

                    [If the program country's disqualification 
                rate is greater than 2 percent but less than 
                3.5 percent, the [Attorney General] Secretary 
                of Homeland Security shall place the program 
                country in probationary status for a period not 
                to exceed 2 full fiscal yearsfollowing the year 
                in which the determination under subparagraph 
                (A) is made.

                [(C) Termination of designation

                    [Subject to paragraph (3), if the program 
                country's disqualification rate is 3.5 percent 
                or more, the [Attorney General] Secretary of 
                Homeland Security shall terminate the country's 
                designation as a program country effective at 
                the beginning of the second fiscal year 
                following the fiscal year in which the 
                determination under subparagraph (A) is made.

        [(2) Termination of probationary status

                [(A) In general

                    If the [Attorney General] Secretary of 
                Homeland Security determines at the end of the 
                probationary period described in paragraph 
                (1)(B) that the program country placed in 
                probationary status under such paragraph has 
                failed to develop a machine-readable passport 
                program as required by section\3\ (c)(2)(C) of 
                this section, or has a disqualification rate of 
                2 percent or more, the [Attorney General] 
                Secretary of Homeland Security shall terminate 
                the designation of the country as a program 
                country. If the [Attorney General] Secretary of 
                Homeland Security determines that the program 
                country has developed a machine-readable 
                passport program and has a disqualification 
                rate of less than 2 percent, the [Attorney 
                General] Secretary of Homeland Security shall 
                redesignate the country as a program country.]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \3\So in original. Probably should be ``subsection''.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    (f) Termination of Designation; Probation.--
            (1) Definitions.--In this subsection:
                    (A) Probationary period.--The term 
                ``probationary period'' means the fiscal year 
                in which a probationary country is placed in 
                probationary status under this subsection.
                    (B) Program country.--The term ``program 
                country'' has the meaning given that term in 
                subsection (c)(1)(B).
            (2) Determination, notice, and initial probationary 
        period.--
                    (A) Determination of probationary status 
                and notice of noncompliance.--As part of each 
                program country's periodic evaluation required 
                by subsection (c)(5)(A), the Secretary of 
                Homeland Security shall determine whether a 
                program country is in compliance with the 
                program requirements under subparagraphs 
                (A)(ii) through (F) of subsection (c)(2).
                    (B) Initial probationary period.--If the 
                Secretary of Homeland Security determines that 
                a program country is not in compliance with the 
                program requirements under subparagraphs 
                (A)(ii) through (F) of subsection (c)(2), the 
                Secretary of Homeland Security shall place the 
                program country in probationary status for the 
                fiscal year following the fiscal year in which 
                the periodic evaluation is completed.
            (3) Actions at the end of the initial probationary 
        period.--At the end of the initial probationary period 
        of a country under paragraph (2)(B), the Secretary of 
        Homeland Security shall take 1 of the following 
        actions:
                    (A) Compliance during initial probationary 
                period.--If the Secretary determines that all 
                instances of noncompliance with the program 
                requirements under subparagraphs (A)(ii) 
                through (F) of subsection (c)(2) that were 
                identified in the latest periodic evaluation 
                have been remedied by the end of the initial 
                probationary period, the Secretary shall end 
                the country's probationary period.
                    (B) Noncompliance during initial 
                probationary period.--If the Secretary 
                determines that any instance of noncompliance 
                with the program requirements under 
                subparagraphs (A)(ii) through (F) of subsection 
                (c)(2) that were identified in the latest 
                periodic evaluation has not been remedied by 
                the end of the initial probationary period--
                            (i) the Secretary may terminate the 
                        country's participation in the program; 
                        or
                            (ii) on an annual basis, the 
                        Secretary may continue the country's 
                        probationary status if the Secretary, 
                        in consultation with the Secretary of 
                        State, determines that the country's 
                        continued participation in the program 
                        is in the national interest of the 
                        United States.
            (4) Actions at the end of additional probationary 
        periods.--At the end of all probationary periods 
        granted to a country pursuant to paragraph (3)(B)(ii), 
        the Secretary shall take 1 of the following actions:
                    (A) Compliance during additional period.--
                The Secretary shall end the country's 
                probationary status if the Secretary determines 
                during the latest periodic evaluation required 
                by subsection (c)(5)(A) that the country is in 
                compliance with the program requirements under 
                subparagraphs (A)(ii) through (F) of subsection 
                (c)(2).
                    (B) Noncompliance during additional 
                periods.--The Secretary shall terminate the 
                country's participation in the program if the 
                Secretary determines during the latest periodic 
                evaluation required by subsection (c)(5)(A) 
                that the program country continues to be in 
                non-compliance with the program requirements 
                under subparagraphs (A)(ii) through (F) of 
                subsection (c)(2).
            (5) Effective date.--The termination of a country's 
        participation in the program under paragraph (3)(B) or 
        (4)(B) shall take effect on the first day of the first 
        fiscal year following the fiscal year in which the 
        Secretary determines that such participation shall be 
        terminated. Until such date, nationals of the country 
        shall remain eligible for a waiver under subsection 
        (a).
            (6) Treatment of nationals after termination.--For 
        purposes of this subsection and subsection (d)--
                    (A) nationals of a country whose 
                designation is terminated under paragraph (3) 
                or (4) shall remain eligible for a waiver under 
                subsection (a) until the effective date of such 
                termination; and
                    (B) a waiver under this section that is 
                provided to such a national for a period 
                described in subsection (a)(1) shall not, by 
                such termination, be deemed to have been 
                rescinded or otherwise rendered invalid, if the 
                waiver is granted prior to such termination.
            (7) Consultative role of the secretary of state.--
        In this subsection, references to subparagraphs (A)(ii) 
        through (F) of subsection (c)(2) and subsection 
        (c)(5)(A) carry with them the consultative role of the 
        Secretary of State as provided in those provisions.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

(h) Use of information technology systems

        (1) Automated entry-exit control system

                (A) System

                    Not later than October 1, 2001, the 
                [Attorney General] Secretary of Homeland 
                Security shall develop and implement a fully 
                automated entry and exit control system that 
                will collect a record of arrival and departure 
                for every alien who arrives and departs by sea 
                or air at a port of entry into the United 
                States and is provided a waiver under the 
                program.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                        (i) Data collection by carriers

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                        (ii) Data provision by carriers

                            Not later than October 1, 2002, no 
                        waiver may be provided under this 
                        section to an alien arriving by sea or 
                        air at a port ofentry into the United 
                        States on a carrier unless the carrier 
                        is electronically transmitting to the 
                        automated entry and exit control system 
                        passenger data determined by the 
                        [Attorney General] Secretary of 
                        Homeland Security to be sufficient to 
                        permit the [Attorney General] Secretary 
                        of Homeland Security to carry out this 
                        paragraph.

                        (iii) Calculation

                            The system shall contain sufficient 
                        data to permit the [Attorney General] 
                        Secretary of Homeland Security to 
                        calculate, for each program country and 
                        each fiscal year, the portion of 
                        nationals of that country who are 
                        described in subparagraph (A) and for 
                        whom no record of departure exists, 
                        expressed as a percentage of the total 
                        number of such nationals who are so 
                        described.

                (C) Reporting

                        (i) Percentage of nationals lacking 
                        departure 
                              record

                            As part of the annual report 
                        required to be submitted under section 
                        1365a(e)(1) of this title, the 
                        [Attorney General] Secretary of 
                        Homeland Security shall include a 
                        section containing the calculation 
                        described in subparagraph (B)(iii) for 
                        each program country for the previous 
                        fiscal year, together with an analysis 
                        of that information.

                        (ii) System effectiveness

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                                    (I) The conclusions of the 
                                [Attorney General] Secretary of 
                                Homeland Security regarding the 
                                effectiveness of the automated 
                                entry and exit control system 
                                to be developed and implemented 
                                under this paragraph.
                                    (II) The recommendations of 
                                the [Attorney General] 
                                Secretary of Homeland Security 
                                regarding the use of the 
                                calculation described in 
                                subparagraph (B)(iii) as a 
                                basis for evaluating whether to 
                                terminate or continue the 
                                designation of a country as a 
                                program country.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

        (2) Automated data sharing system

                (A) System

                    The [Attorney General] Secretary of 
                Homeland Security and the Secretary of State 
                shall develop and implement an automated data 
                sharing system that will permit them to share 
                data in electronic form from their respective 
                records systems regarding the admissibility of 
                aliens who are nationals of a program country.

                (B) Requirements

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                        (i) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                        (ii) Supplying photographs of 
                        inadmissible aliens

                            The system shall permit the 
                        [Attorney General] Secretary of 
                        Homeland Security electronically to 
                        obtain any photograph contained in the 
                        records of the Secretary of State 
                        pertaining to an alien who is a 
                        national of a program country and has 
                        been determined to be ineligible to 
                        receive a visa.
                                ------                                


                TITLE 42--THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELFARE


                 Chapter 46--Justice System Improvement


   Subchapter VII--FBI Training of State and Local Criminal Justice 
                               Personnel


Sec. 3771. Training and manpower development

(a) Functions, powers, and duties of Director of Federal Bureau 
            of Investigation

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


  Employment of Annuitants by Federal Law Enforcement Training Center

    Pub. L. 107-206, title I, Sec. 1202, Aug. 2, 2002, 116 
Stat. 887, as amended by Pub. L. 109-295, title IV, Oct. 4, 
2006, 120 Stat. 1374; Pub. L. 110-161, div. E, title IV, Dec. 
26, 2007, 121 Stat. 2068; Pub. L. 110-329, div. D, title IV, 
Sept. 30, 2008, 122 Stat. 3677; Pub. L. 111-83, title IV, Oct. 
28, 2009, 123 Stat. 2166; Pub. L. 112-74, div. D, title IV, 
Dec. 23, 2011, 125 Stat. 966, provided that:
    (a) The Federal Law Enforcement Training Center may, for a 
period ending not later than [December 31, 2016] December 31, 
2017, appoint and maintain a cadre of up to 350 Federal 
annuitants: (1) without regard to any provision of title 5, 
United States Code, which might otherwise require the 
application of competitive hiring procedures; and (2) who shall 
not be subject to any reduction in pay (for annuity allocable 
to the period of actual employment) under the provisions of 
section 8344 or 8468 of such title 5 or similar provision of 
any other retirement system for employees. A reemployed Federal 
annuitant as to whom a waiver of reduction under paragraph (2) 
applies shall not, for any period during which such waiver is 
in effect, be considered an employee for purposes of subchapter 
III of chapter 83 or chapter 84 of title 5, United States Code, 
or such other retirement system (referred to in paragraph (2)) 
as may apply.
                                ------                                


DEPARTMENTS OF COMMERCE, JUSTICE, AND STATE, THE JUDICIARY, AND RELATED 
          AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2002, PUBLIC LAW 107-77


TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



               General Provisions--Department of Justice

    Sec. 101. * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    Sec. 109. Section 286 of the Immigration and Nationality 
Act (8 U.S.C. 1356), as amended, is further amended as follows:
            (1) by striking in subsection (d) ``$6'', and 
        inserting ``[$7] $9'';
                                ------                                


     CONSOLIDATED APPROPRIATIONS RESOLUTION, 2003, PUBLIC LAW 108-7


 DIVISION B--COMMERCE, JUSTICE, AND STATE, THE JUDICIARY, AND RELATED 
                     AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS, 2003


TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



               General Provisions--Department of Justice

    Sec. 101. * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    Sec. 108. Section 286(e) of the Immigration and Nationality 
Act is amended by striking paragraph (3) and replacing it with 
the following:
            ``(3) The Attorney General shall charge and collect 
        [$3] $5 per individual for the immigration inspection 
        or pre-inspection of each commercial vessel passenger 
        whose journey originated in the United States or in any 
        place set forth in paragraph (1): Provided, That this 
        requirement shall not apply to immigration inspection 
        at designated ports of entry of passengers arriving by 
        ferry, or by Great Lakes vessels on the Great Lakes and 
        connecting waterways when operating on a regular 
        schedule. For the purposes of this paragraph, the term 
        `ferry' means a vessel, in other than ocean or 
        coastwise service, having provisions only for deck 
        passengers and/or vehicles, operating on a short run on 
        a frequent schedule between two points over the most 
        direct water route, and offering a public service of a 
        type normally attributed to a bridge or tunnel.''.
                                ------                                


       CONSOLIDATED APPROPRIATIONS, ACT, 2008, PUBLIC LAW 110-161


  DIVISION E--DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2008


                                TITLE VI


           BORDER INFRASTRUCTURE AND TECHNOLOGY MODERNIZATION

    [Sec. 605. Port of Entry Technology Demonstration Program. 
(a) Establishment.--The Secretary, acting through the 
Commissioner, shall carry out a technology demonstration 
program to test and evaluate new port of entry technologies, 
refine port of entry technologies and operational concepts, and 
train personnel under realistic conditions.
    [(b) Technology Tested.--Under the demonstration program, 
the Commissioner shall test technologies that enhance port of 
entry operations, including those related to inspections, 
communications, port tracking, identification of persons and 
cargo, sensory devices, personal detection, decision support, 
and the detection and identification of weapons of mass 
destruction.
    [(c) Demonstration Sites.--
            [(1) Number.--The Commissioner shall carry out the 
        demonstration program at not less than three sites and 
        not more than five sites.
            [(2) Location.--Of the sites selected under 
        subsection (c)--
                    [(A) at least one shall be located on the 
                northern border of the United States; and
                    [(B) at least one shall be located on the 
                southern border of the United States.
            [(3) Selection criteria.--To ensure that one of the 
        facilities selected as a port of entry demonstration 
        site for the demonstration program has the most up-to-
        date design, contains sufficient space to conduct the 
        demonstration program, has a traffic volume low enough 
        to easily incorporate new technologies without 
        interrupting normal processing activity, and can 
        efficiently carry out demonstration and port of entry 
        operations, one port of entry selected as a 
        demonstration site may--
                    [(A) have been established not more than 15 
                years before the date of the enactment of this 
                Act;
                    [(B) consist of not less than 65 acres, 
                with the possibility of expansion onto not less 
                than 25 adjacent acres; and
                    [(C) have serviced an average of not more 
                than 50,000 vehicles per month during the 12 
                months preceding the date of the enactment of 
                this Act.
    [(d) Relationship With Other Agencies.--The Secretary, 
acting through the Commissioner, shall permit personnel from 
appropriate Federal agencies to utilize a demonstration site 
described in subsection (c) to test technologies that enhance 
port of entry operations, including those related to 
inspections, communications, port tracking, identification of 
persons and cargo, sensory devices, personal detection, 
decision support, and the detection and identification of 
weapons of mass destruction.
    [(e) Report.--
            v(1) Requirement.--Not later than 1 year after the 
        date of the enactment of this Act, and annually 
        thereafter, the Secretary shall submit to the 
        Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and the 
        House of Representatives, the Senate Committee on 
        Environment and Public Works, the Senate Committee on 
        Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, the House 
        Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, and the 
        House Committee on Homeland Security a report on the 
        activities carried out at each demonstration site under 
        the technology demonstration program established under 
        this section.
            [(2) Content.--The report shall include an 
        assessment by the Commissioner of the feasibility of 
        incorporating any demonstrated technology for use 
        throughout U.S. Customs and Border Protection.]
                                ------                                


        CONSOLIDATED APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2014, PUBLIC LAW 113-76


  DIVISION F--DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2014


                                TITLE V


                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 559. (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (e) * * *
            (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (3) Limitations.--
                    (A) * * *
                    [(B) For certain costs.--The authority 
                found in this subsection may not be used at 
                U.S. Customs and Border Protection-serviced air 
                ports of entry to enter into reimbursable fee 
                agreements for costs other than payment of 
                overtime.]
                    [(C)] (B) The authority found in this 
                subsection may not be used to enter into new 
                preclearance agreements or begin to provide 
                U.S. Customs and Border Protection services 
                outside of the United States.
                    [(D)] (C) The authority found in this 
                subsection shall be limited with respect to 
                U.S. Customs and Border Protection-serviced air 
                ports of entry to [five] seven pilots per year.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (f) * * *
            (1) * * *
            [(2) Allowable uses of donations.--The Commissioner 
        and the Administrator, with respect to any donation 
        provided pursuant to paragraph (1), may--
                    [(A) use such donation for necessary 
                activities related to the construction, 
                alteration, operation, or maintenance of an 
                existing port of entry facility under the 
                jurisdiction, custody, and control of the 
                Commissioner, including expenses related to--
                            [(i) land acquisition, design, 
                        construction, repair and alteration;
                            [(ii) furniture, fixtures, and 
                        equipment;
                            [(iii) the deployment of technology 
                        and equipment; and
                            [(iv) operations and maintenance; 
                        or
                    [(B) transfer such property or services to 
                the Administrator for necessary activities 
                described in subparagraph (A) related to a new 
                or existing port of entry under the 
                jurisdiction, custody, and control of the 
                Administrator, subject to chapter 33 of title 
                40, United States Code.]
            (2) Allowable uses of donations.--
                    (A) Donations accepted by the Commissioner 
                may--
                            (i) be utilized for necessary 
                        activities related to constructing, 
                        altering, operating, maintaining, or 
                        equipping a new or existing port of 
                        entry under the jurisdiction, custody 
                        and control of the Commissioner, 
                        including but not limited to expenses 
                        related to--
                                    (I) land acquisition, 
                                design, construction, repair 
                                and alteration;
                                    (II) furniture, fixtures, 
                                equipment, and technology, 
                                including installation and 
                                deployment thereof; and
                                    (III) operations and 
                                maintenance; or
                            (ii) be utilized for activities 
                        related to altering, operating, 
                        maintaining, or equipping a new or 
                        existing port of entry under the 
                        jurisdiction, custody, and control of 
                        the Administrator, including but not 
                        limited to expenses related to--
                                    (I) design, repair and 
                                alteration;
                                    (II) furniture, fixtures, 
                                equipment, and technology, 
                                including installation and 
                                deployment thereof; and
                                    (III) operations and 
                                maintenance.
                    (B) Donations accepted by the Administrator 
                may--
                            (i) be utilized for activities 
                        related to constructing, altering, 
                        operating, maintaining, or equipping a 
                        new or existing port of entry facility 
                        under the jurisdiction, custody and 
                        control of the Administrator, including 
                        but not limited to expenses related 
                        to--
                                    (I) land acquisition, 
                                design, construction, repair 
                                and alteration;
                                    (II) furniture, fixtures, 
                                equipment, and technology, 
                                including installation and 
                                deployment thereof; and
                                    (III) operations and 
                                maintenance.
                    (C) For purposes of subsection 
                (f)(2)(A)(i)(II)-(III), the term ``new or 
                existing port of entry under the jurisdiction, 
                custody and control of the Commissioner'' 
                includes any sea or air port of entry at which 
                U.S. Customs and Border Protection provides or 
                will provide services.
            (3) * * *
                    (A) * * *
                            (i) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                                    (I) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                                    (III) how each donation 
                                helped facilitate the 
                                construction, alternation, 
                                operation, or maintenance of a 
                                new or existing [land] port of 
                                entry.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (h) * * *
            (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (3) the term ``Administrator'' means the 
        Administrator of General Services.
            (4) The term ``new or existing port of entry 
        facility under the jurisdiction, custody and control of 
        the Administrator'' includes any port of entry facility 
        or property interest leased by the Administrator.
    [(i) Role of General Services Administration.--Under this 
section, collaboration with the Administrator of General 
Services is required only with respect to partnerships at land 
ports of entry.]
    (i) Role of Administrator.--Under this section, the role 
and involvement of the Administrator of General Services is 
required only with respect to donations made pursuant to 
subsection (f) at land ports of entry under the jurisdiction, 
custody, and control of the Administrator.

                        BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL


  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS
                                                     AMENDED
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               Budget authority                 Outlays
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee    Amount  in     Committee    Amount  in
                                                           allocation       bill       allocation       bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with the subcommittee
 allocation for 2015: Subcommittee on Homeland Security:
    Mandatory...........................................        1,576         1,576         1,580      \1\1,580
    Discretionary.......................................       39,000        45,651        45,522     \1\44,612
        Security........................................        1,629         1,842            NA            NA
        Nonsecurity.....................................       37,371        43,809            NA            NA
Projections of outlays associated with the
 recommendation:
    2015................................................  ............  ............  ............    \2\26,637
    2016................................................  ............  ............  ............        9,713
    2017................................................  ............  ............  ............        5,947
    2018................................................  ............  ............  ............        2,860
    2019 and future years...............................  ............  ............  ............        2,046
Financial assistance to State and local governments for            NA         5,733            NA           332
 2015...................................................

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\2\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

NA: Not applicable.

NOTE.--Consistent with the funding recommended in the bill for disaster funding and overseas contingency
  operations and in accordance with subparagraphs (A)(ii) and (D) of section 251(b)(2) of the BBEDCA of 1985,
  the Committee anticipates that the Budget Committee will provide a revised 302(a) allocation for the Committee
  on Appropriations reflecting an upward adjustment of $6,651,000,000 in budget authority plus associated
  outlays.


  COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2014 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL
                                                                        YEAR 2015
                                                                [In thousands of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                         Senate Committee recommendation
                                                                                                                             compared with (+ or -)
                                Item                                       2014       Budget estimate     Committee    ---------------------------------
                                                                      appropriation                     recommendation        2014
                                                                                                                         appropriation   Budget estimate
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

          TITLE I--DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS

                      Departmental Operations

Office of the Secretary and Executive Management:
    Immediate Office of the Secretary..............................           4,050            3,950            3,939             -111              -11
    Immediate Office of the Deputy Secretary.......................           1,750            1,751            1,740              -10              -11
    Office of the Chief of Staff...................................           2,050            2,112            2,062              +12              -50
    Executive Secretary............................................           7,400            7,719            7,477              +77             -242
    Office of Policy...............................................          36,500           38,470           37,559           +1,059             -911
    Office of Public Affairs.......................................           8,550            8,741            8,591              +41             -150
    Office of Legislative Affairs..................................           5,350            5,583            5,403              +53             -180
    Office of Intergovernmental Affairs............................           2,250            2,429            2,273              +23             -156
    Office of General Counsel......................................          19,750           21,310           19,950             +200           -1,360
    Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties....................          21,500           22,003           21,719             +219             -284
    Citizenship and Immigration Services Ombudsman.................           5,250            6,428            5,825             +575             -603
    Privacy Officer................................................           7,950            8,273            8,033              +83             -240
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         122,350          128,769          124,571           +2,221           -4,198

Office of the Under Secretary for Management:
    Immediate Office of the Under Secretary for Management.........           2,700            2,757            2,740              +40              -17
    Office of the Chief Security Officer...........................          64,000           63,597           63,391             -609             -206
    Office of the Chief Procurement Officer........................          65,000           64,036           63,726           -1,274             -310
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         131,700          130,390          129,857           -1,843             -533

    Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer:
        Salaries and Expenses......................................          22,000           21,253           21,156             -844              -97
        Human Resources Information Technology.....................           7,815            9,878            8,000             +185           -1,878
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................          29,815           31,131           29,156             -659           -1,975

    Office of the Chief Readiness Support Officer:
        Salaries and Expenses......................................          30,000           29,272           29,186             -814              -86
        Nebraska Avenue Complex [NAC]..............................           4,500            4,493            4,493               -7   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................          34,500           33,765           33,679             -821              -86
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Office of the Under Secretary for Management...         196,015          195,286          192,692           -3,323           -2,594

DHS Headquarters Consolidation:
    Mission support................................................  ...............          15,300   ...............  ...............         -15,300
    St. Elizabeths.................................................  ...............          57,700   ...............  ...............         -57,700
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, DHS Headquarters Consolidation........................  ...............          73,000   ...............  ...............         -73,000
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Office of the Chief Financial Officer..............................          46,000           94,626           48,213           +2,213          -46,413

Office of the Chief Information Officer:
    Salaries and Expenses..........................................         115,000           95,444           95,078          -19,922             -366
    Information Technology Services................................          34,000           38,627           38,627           +4,627   ...............
    Infrastructure and Security Activities.........................          45,000           52,140           52,140           +7,140   ...............
    Homeland Secure Data Network...................................          63,156           70,132           68,156           +5,000           -1,976
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         257,156          256,343          254,001           -3,155           -2,342

Analysis and Operations............................................         300,490          302,268          295,269           -5,221           -6,999
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Departmental Operations...............................         922,011        1,050,292          914,746           -7,265         -135,546
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Office of Inspector General:
    Operating Expenses.............................................         115,437          121,457          118,617           +3,180           -2,840
    (By transfer from Disaster Relief).............................         (24,000)         (24,000)         (24,000)  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of Inspector General...........................         139,437          145,457          142,617           +3,180           -2,840
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title I, Departmental Management and Operations.......       1,037,448        1,171,749        1,033,363           -4,085         -138,386
      (By transfer)................................................         (24,000)         (24,000)         (24,000)  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
        TITLE II--SECURITY, ENFORCEMENT, AND INVESTIGATIONS

                 U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Salaries and Expenses:
    Headquarters, Management, and Administration:
        Commissioner...............................................          23,656           27,245           27,151           +3,495              -94
        Chief Counsel..............................................          42,921           45,663           45,483           +2,562             -180
        Congressional Affairs......................................           2,466            2,514            2,504              +38              -10
        Internal Affairs...........................................         149,061          140,141          139,493           -9,568             -648
        Public Affairs.............................................          11,934           13,064           13,009           +1,075              -55
        Training and Development...................................          76,082           71,926           71,892           -4,190              -34
        Tech, Innovation, Acquisition..............................          22,788           25,374           25,277           +2,489              -97
        Intelligence/Investigative Liaison.........................          60,747           61,512           61,235             +488             -277
        Administration.............................................         403,473          386,793          382,819          -20,654           -3,974
        Rent.......................................................         405,802          409,490          409,490           +3,688   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................       1,198,930        1,183,722        1,178,353          -20,577           -5,369

    Border Security Inspections and Trade Facilitation:
        Inspections, Trade, and Travel Facilitation at Ports of           2,856,573        2,830,872        2,806,224          -50,349          -24,648
         Entry.....................................................
        Harbor Maintenance Fee Collection (trust fund).............           3,274            3,274            3,274   ...............  ...............
        International Cargo Screening..............................          67,461           69,173           68,902           +1,441             -271
        Other International Programs...............................          24,000           25,706           25,548           +1,548             -158
        Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism [C-TPAT].......          40,912           40,841           42,119           +1,207           +1,278
        Trusted Traveler Programs..................................           5,811            5,811            5,811   ...............  ...............
        Inspection and Detection Technology Investments............         112,004          123,866          117,811           +5,807           -6,055
        National Targeting Center..................................          65,106           70,592           70,123           +5,017             -469
        Training...................................................          40,703           33,906           33,880           -6,823              -26
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................       3,215,844        3,204,041        3,173,692          -42,152          -30,349

    Border Security and Control Between Ports of Entry:
        Border Security and Control................................       3,675,236        3,882,015        3,911,955         +236,719          +29,940
        Training...................................................          55,558           56,608           56,391             +833             -217
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................       3,730,794        3,938,623        3,968,346         +237,552          +29,723
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Salaries and Expenses..........................       8,145,568        8,326,386        8,320,391         +174,823           -5,995
              Appropriations.......................................      (8,142,294)      (8,323,112)      (8,317,117)       (+174,823)         (-5,995)
              Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund........................          (3,274)          (3,274)          (3,274)  ...............  ...............

Small Airport User Fee (permanent indefinite discretionary                    5,000            9,000            9,000           +4,000   ...............
 appropriation)....................................................

Automation Modernization:
    Information Technology.........................................         358,655          365,700          361,124           +2,469           -4,576
    Automated Targeting Systems....................................         116,932          109,273          109,230           -7,702              -43
    Automated Commercial Environment/International Trade Data               140,762          141,061          140,970             +208              -91
     System [ITDS].................................................
    Current Operations Protection and Processing Support [COPPS]...         200,174          196,376          195,375           -4,799           -1,001
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         816,523          812,410          806,699           -9,824           -5,711

Border Security Fencing, Infrastructure, and Technology [BSFIT]:
      Development and Deployment...................................         160,435          110,594          110,594          -49,841   ...............
      Operations and Maintenance...................................         191,019          251,872          251,872          +60,853   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal...................................................         351,454          362,466          362,466          +11,012   ...............

Air and Marine Operations:
    Salaries and Expenses\1\.......................................         286,818          293,016          290,900           +4,082           -2,116
    Operations and Maintenance\1\..................................         392,000          362,669          362,669          -29,331   ...............
    Procurement....................................................         126,250           53,000           53,000          -73,250   ...............
    AMOC...........................................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         805,068          708,685          706,569          -98,499           -2,116

Construction and Facilities Management:
    Facilities Construction and Sustainment........................         375,398          385,137          383,900           +8,502           -1,237
    Program Oversight and Management...............................          80,880           97,068           94,559          +13,679           -2,509
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         456,278          482,205          478,459          +22,181           -3,746
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, U.S. Customs and Border Protection Direct                   10,579,891       10,701,152       10,683,584         +103,693          -17,568
       Appropriations..............................................
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Fee Accounts:
    Immigration Inspection User Fee................................        (598,552)        (630,218)        (630,218)        (+31,666)  ...............
    Immigration Enforcement Fines..................................            (773)            (752)            (752)            (-21)  ...............
    Electronic System for Travel Authorization Fee.................         (55,168)         (54,929)         (54,929)           (-239)  ...............
    Land Border Inspection Fee.....................................         (42,941)         (43,931)         (43,931)           (+990)  ...............
    COBRA Passenger Inspection Fee.................................        (500,134)        (482,501)        (482,501)        (-17,633)  ...............
    APHIS Inspection Fee...........................................        (355,216)        (464,514)        (464,514)       (+109,298)  ...............
    Global Entry User Fee..........................................         (34,835)         (91,192)         (91,192)        (+56,357)  ...............
    Puerto Rico Collections........................................         (98,602)         (98,076)         (98,076)           (-526)  ...............
    Virgin Island Fee..............................................         (11,302)         (11,789)         (11,789)           (+487)  ...............
    Customs Unclaimed Goods........................................          (5,992)          (5,992)          (5,992)  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Fee Accounts.......................................      (1,703,515)      (1,883,894)      (1,883,894)       (+180,379)  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, U.S. Customs and Border Protection....................      12,283,406       12,585,046       12,567,478         +284,072          -17,568
          Appropriations...........................................     (10,579,891)     (10,701,152)     (10,683,584)       (+103,693)        (-17,568)
          Fee Accounts.............................................      (1,703,515)      (1,883,894)      (1,883,894)       (+180,379)  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
              U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Salaries and Expenses:
    Headquarters Management and Administration:
        Personnel Compensation and Benefits, Services and Other             191,909          198,602          197,002           +5,093           -1,600
         Costs.....................................................
        Headquarters Managed IT Investment.........................         143,808          150,927          150,419           +6,611             -508
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................         335,717          349,529          347,421          +11,704           -2,108

    Legal Proceedings..............................................         205,584          214,731          212,893           +7,309           -1,838
    Investigations:
        Domestic Investigations....................................       1,672,220        1,644,552        1,642,811          -29,409           -1,741
        International Investigations:
            International Operations...............................          99,741          101,228          100,730             +989             -498
            Visa Security Program..................................          31,541           31,854           31,728             +187             -126
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal.............................................         131,282          133,082          132,458           +1,176             -624
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Investigations.............................       1,803,502        1,777,634        1,775,269          -28,233           -2,365

    Intelligence...................................................          74,298           77,045           76,479           +2,181             -566
    Enforcement and Removal Operations:
        Custody Operations.........................................       1,993,770        1,791,913        1,870,444         -123,326          +78,531
        Fugitive Operations........................................         128,802          131,591          130,515           +1,713           -1,076
        Criminal Alien Program.....................................         294,155          322,407          327,040          +32,885           +4,633
        Alternatives to Detention..................................          91,444           94,106           94,106           +2,662   ...............
        Transportation and Removal Program.........................         276,925          229,109          302,790          +25,865          +73,681
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................       2,785,096        2,569,126        2,724,895          -60,201         +155,769

    Secure Communities.............................................          25,264   ...............  ...............         -25,264   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Salaries and Expenses..............................       5,229,461        4,988,065        5,136,957          -92,504         +148,892

Automation Modernization:
    Automation modernization.......................................  ...............          26,000           26,000          +26,000   ...............
    IT Investment..................................................           8,400   ...............  ...............          -8,400   ...............
    TECS Modernization.............................................          23,000   ...............  ...............         -23,000   ...............
    Electronic Health Records......................................           3,500   ...............  ...............          -3,500   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................          34,900           26,000           26,000           -8,900   ...............

Construction.......................................................           5,000   ...............  ...............          -5,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Direct              5,269,361        5,014,065        5,162,957         -106,404         +148,892
       Appropriations..............................................
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Fee Accounts:
    Immigration Inspection User Fee................................        (135,000)        (135,000)        (135,000)  ...............  ...............
    Breached Bond/Detention Fund...................................         (65,000)         (65,000)         (65,000)  ...............  ...............
    Student Exchange and Visitor Fee...............................        (145,000)        (145,000)        (145,000)  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         345,000          345,000          345,000   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement..............       5,614,361        5,359,065        5,507,957         -106,404         +148,892
          Appropriations...........................................      (5,269,361)      (5,014,065)      (5,162,957)       (-106,404)       (+148,892)
          Fee Accounts.............................................        (345,000)        (345,000)        (345,000)  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
               Transportation Security Administration

Aviation Security:
    Screening Operations:
        Screener Workforce:
            Privatized Screening...................................         158,190   ...............  ...............        -158,190   ...............
            Screener Personnel, Compensation, and Benefits.........       3,033,526   ...............  ...............      -3,033,526   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal.............................................       3,191,716   ...............  ...............      -3,191,716   ...............

        Screener Training and Other................................         226,857   ...............  ...............        -226,857   ...............
        Checkpoint Support.........................................         103,309   ...............  ...............        -103,309   ...............
        EDS/ETD Systems:
            EDS Procurement and Installation.......................          73,845   ...............  ...............         -73,845   ...............
            Screening Technology Maintenance.......................         298,509   ...............  ...............        -298,509   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal.............................................         372,354   ...............  ...............        -372,354   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Screening Operations.......................       3,894,236   ...............  ...............      -3,894,236   ...............

    Aviation Security Direction and Enforcement:
        Aviation Regulation and Other Enforcement..................         354,437   ...............  ...............        -354,437   ...............
        Airport Management and Support.............................         587,000   ...............  ...............        -587,000   ...............
        Federal Flight Deck Officer and Flight Crew Training.......          24,730   ...............  ...............         -24,730   ...............
        Air Cargo..................................................         122,332   ...............  ...............        -122,332   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................       1,088,499   ...............  ...............      -1,088,499   ...............

    Aviation Security Capital Fund (mandatory).....................        (250,000)  ...............  ...............       (-250,000)  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Aviation Security (gross).............................       4,982,735   ...............  ...............      -4,982,735   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Aviation Security Fees (offsetting collections)....................      -2,120,000   ...............  ...............      +2,120,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Aviation Security (net, discretionary)................       2,862,735   ...............  ...............      -2,862,735   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Aviation Security:
    Screening Partnership Program..................................  ...............         154,572          160,226         +160,226           +5,654
    Screener Personnel, Compensation, and Benefits.................  ...............       2,952,868        2,947,939       +2,947,939           -4,929
    Screener Training and Other....................................  ...............         226,290          225,707         +225,707             -583
    Checkpoint Support.............................................  ...............         103,469           88,469          +88,469          -15,000
    EDS Procurement/Installation...................................  ...............          84,075           74,000          +74,000          -10,075
    Screening Technology Maintenance...............................  ...............         294,509          294,509         +294,509   ...............
    Aviation Regulation and Other Enforcement......................  ...............         348,653          338,653         +338,653          -10,000
    Airport Management and Support.................................  ...............         591,734          588,864         +588,864           -2,870
    Federal Flight Deck Officer and Flight Crew Training...........  ...............          20,000           20,000          +20,000   ...............
    Air Cargo......................................................  ...............         106,920          106,343         +106,343             -577
    Federal Air Marshals...........................................  ...............         800,214          790,000         +790,000          -10,214
    Aviation Security Capital Fund (mandatory).....................  ...............        (250,000)        (250,000)       (+250,000)  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Aviation Security (gross).............................  ...............       5,683,304        5,634,710       +5,634,710          -48,594
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Aviation Security Fees (offsetting collections)....................  ...............      -2,080,000       -2,080,000       -2,080,000   ...............
Additional Offsetting Collections (leg. proposal)..................  ...............        -570,000   ...............  ...............        +570,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Aviation Security (net, discretionary)................  ...............       3,033,304        3,554,710       +3,554,710         +521,406
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Surface Transportation Security:
    Staffing and Operations........................................          35,262           29,375           29,230           -6,032             -145
Surface Transportation Security Inspectors and VIPR................          73,356           98,262           97,519          +24,163             -743
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         108,618          127,637          126,749          +18,131             -888

Intelligence and Vetting:
    Intelligence...................................................  ...............          51,801           51,545          +51,545             -256
    Secure Flight..................................................          93,202          112,543           99,569           +6,367          -12,974
    Other Vetting Programs.........................................          83,287           68,182           68,052          -15,235             -130
    TWIC Fee.......................................................         (36,700)         (34,832)         (34,832)         (-1,868)  ...............
    Hazardous Material Fee.........................................         (12,000)         (12,000)         (12,000)  ...............  ...............
    General Aviation at DCA Fee....................................            (350)            (350)            (350)  ...............  ...............
    Commercial Aviation and Airport Fee............................          (6,500)          (6,500)          (6,500)  ...............  ...............
    Other Security Threat Assessments Fee..........................             (50)             (50)             (50)  ...............  ...............
    Air Cargo/Certified Cargo Screening Program Fee................          (5,400)          (7,173)          (7,173)         (+1,773)  ...............
    TSA Precheck Application Program Fee...........................  ...............         (13,700)         (13,700)        (+13,700)  ...............
    Alien Flight School Fee........................................          (5,000)          (5,000)          (5,000)  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         242,489          312,131          298,771          +56,282          -13,360

          Direct Appropriations....................................        (176,489)        (232,526)        (219,166)        (+42,677)        (-13,360)
          Fee Funded Programs......................................         (66,000)         (79,605)         (79,605)        (+13,605)  ...............

Transportation Security Support:
    Headquarters Administration....................................         272,250          275,891          274,619           +2,369           -1,272
    Information Technology.........................................         441,000          451,920          446,498           +5,498           -5,422
    Human Capital Services.........................................         204,250          204,215          202,620           -1,630           -1,595
    Intelligence...................................................          44,561   ...............  ...............         -44,561   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         962,061          932,026          923,737          -38,324           -8,289

Federal Air Marshals:
    Management and Administration..................................         708,004   ...............  ...............        -708,004   ...............
    Travel and Training............................................         110,603   ...............  ...............        -110,603   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         818,607   ...............  ...............        -818,607   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Transportation Security Administration................       7,364,510        7,305,098        7,233,967         -130,543          -71,131
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Offsetting Collections.............................................     (-2,120,000)     (-2,650,000)     (-2,080,000)        (+40,000)       (+570,000)
Aviation Security Capital Fund (mandatory).........................        (250,000)        (250,000)        (250,000)  ...............  ...............
Fee Funded Programs................................................         (66,000)         (79,605)         (79,605)        (+13,605)  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Transportation Security Administration (net)..........       4,928,510        4,325,493        4,824,362         -104,148         +498,869
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                            Coast Guard

Operating Expenses:
    Military Pay and Allowances....................................       3,416,580        3,433,594        3,441,282          +24,702           +7,688
    Civilian Pay and Benefits......................................         782,874          787,372          781,517           -1,357           -5,855
    Training and Recruiting........................................         205,928          197,800          198,279           -7,649             +479
    Operating Funds and Unit Level Maintenance.....................       1,034,650          991,919        1,004,119          -30,531          +12,200
    Centrally Managed Accounts.....................................         319,135          335,262          335,556          +16,421             +294
    Intermediate and Depot Level Maintenance.......................       1,012,840        1,003,786        1,010,865           -1,975           +7,079
    St. Elizabeths Support.........................................          12,800   ...............  ...............         -12,800   ...............
    Overseas Contingency Operations/ Global War on Terrorism.......         227,000   ...............         213,000          -14,000         +213,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................       7,011,807        6,749,733        6,984,618          -27,189         +234,885
          (Defense)................................................        (567,000)        (340,000)        (553,000)        (-14,000)       (+213,000)
          (Nondefense).............................................      (6,444,807)      (6,409,733)      (6,431,618)        (-13,189)        (+21,885)

Environmental Compliance and Restoration...........................          13,164           13,214           13,197              +33              -17
Reserve Training...................................................         120,000          109,605          114,572           -5,428           +4,967

Acquisition, Construction, and Improvements:
    Vessels:
        Survey and Design--Vessel and Boats........................           1,000              500              500             -500   ...............
        Response Boat--Medium......................................          10,000   ...............  ...............         -10,000   ...............
        In-Service Vessel Sustainment..............................          21,000           24,500           49,000          +28,000          +24,500
        National Security Cutter...................................         629,000          638,000          638,000           +9,000   ...............
        Offshore Patrol Cutter.....................................          23,000           20,000           20,000           -3,000   ...............
        Fast Response Cutter.......................................         310,000          110,000          318,000           +8,000         +208,000
        Cutter Small Boats.........................................           3,000            4,000            4,000           +1,000   ...............
        Polar Ice Breaking Vessel..................................           2,000            6,000            6,000           +4,000   ...............
        Polar Icebreaker preservation..............................  ...............  ...............           8,000           +8,000           +8,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................         999,000          803,000        1,043,500          +44,500         +240,500

    Aircraft:
        HH-60 Airframe Replacement.................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
        HC-144 Conversion/Sustainment..............................           9,200           15,000           15,000           +5,800   ...............
        HC-27J Conversion/Sustainment..............................          24,900           15,000           15,000           -9,900   ...............
        HC-130J Acquisition/Conversion/Sustainment.................         129,210            8,000            8,000         -121,210   ...............
        HH-65 Conversion/Sustainment...............................          12,000           30,000           30,000          +18,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................         175,310           68,000           68,000         -107,310   ...............

    Other Acquisition Programs:
        Program Oversight and Management...........................          10,000           18,000           18,000           +8,000   ...............
        Systems Engineering and Integration........................             204   ...............  ...............            -204   ...............
        C4ISR......................................................          40,226           36,300           36,300           -3,926   ...............
        CG-Logistics Information Management System.................           1,500            3,000            3,000           +1,500   ...............
        Nationwide Automatic Identification System.................          13,000   ...............  ...............         -13,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................          64,930           57,300           57,300           -7,630   ...............

    Shore Facilities and Aids to Navigation:
        Major Construction; Housing; ATON; and Survey and Design...           2,000           19,580           19,580          +17,580   ...............
        Major Acquisition Systems Infrastructure...................  ...............          16,000           16,000          +16,000   ...............
        Minor Shore................................................           3,000            5,000            5,000           +2,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................           5,000           40,580           40,580          +35,580   ...............

Military Housing...................................................          18,000   ...............           6,000          -12,000           +6,000
    Personnel and Related Support:
        Direct Personnel Costs.....................................         112,956          115,313          114,996           +2,040             -317
        Core Acquisition Costs.....................................             439   ...............  ...............            -439   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................         113,395          115,313          114,996           +1,601             -317
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Acquisition, Construction, and Improvements....       1,375,635        1,084,193        1,330,376          -45,259         +246,183

Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation........................          19,200           17,947           17,892           -1,308              -55
Health Care Fund Contribution (permanent indefinite discretionary           201,000          176,970          176,970          -24,030   ...............
 appropriation)....................................................
Retired Pay (mandatory)............................................       1,460,000        1,576,000        1,576,000         +116,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Coast Guard...........................................      10,200,806        9,727,662       10,213,625          +12,819         +485,963
          Appropriations...........................................      (9,973,806)      (9,727,662)     (10,000,625)        (+26,819)       (+272,963)
          Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism..        (227,000)  ...............        (213,000)        (-14,000)       (+213,000)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                    United States Secret Service

Salaries and Expenses:
    Protection:
        Protection of Persons and Facilities.......................         848,263          874,885          867,685          +19,422           -7,200
        Protective Intelligence Activities.........................          67,165           68,234           67,536             +371             -698
        National Special Security Event Fund.......................           4,500            4,500            4,500   ...............  ...............
        Presidential Candidate Nominee Protection..................  ...............          25,500           25,500          +25,500   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................         919,928          973,119          965,221          +45,293           -7,898

    Investigations:
        Domestic Field Operations..................................         329,291          332,395          332,795           +3,504             +400
        International Field Office Administration, Operations and            30,811           34,361           34,195           +3,384             -166
         Training..................................................
        Support for Missing and Exploited Children.................           8,366   ...............           8,366   ...............          +8,366
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................         368,468          366,756          375,356           +6,888           +8,600

    Headquarters, Management and Administration....................         188,964          189,191          188,380             -584             -811
    Rowley Training Center.........................................          55,118           55,868           55,378             +260             -490
    Information Integration and Technology Transformation..........           1,019            1,036            1,025               +6              -11
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Salaries and Expenses..............................       1,533,497        1,585,970        1,585,360          +51,863             -610

Acquisition, Construction, Improvements, and Related Expenses:
    Facilities.....................................................           5,380            5,380            5,380   ...............  ...............
    Information Integration and Technology Transformation..........          46,395           44,555           44,555           -1,840   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................          51,775           49,935           49,935           -1,840   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, United States Secret Service..........................       1,585,272        1,635,905        1,635,295          +50,023             -610
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title II, Security, Enforcement, and Investigations...      32,563,840       31,404,277       32,519,823          -44,017       +1,115,546
          Appropriations...........................................     (32,336,840)     (31,404,277)     (32,306,823)        (-30,017)       (+902,546)
          Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism..        (227,000)  ...............        (213,000)        (-14,000)       (+213,000)
      (Fee Accounts)...............................................      (2,114,515)      (2,308,499)      (2,308,499)       (+193,984)  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
    TITLE III--PROTECTION, PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND RECOVERY

            National Protection and Programs Directorate

Management and Administration:
    Administrative Activities......................................          56,499           65,910           64,565           +8,066           -1,345

Infrastructure Protection and Information Security:
    Infrastructure Protection:
        Infrastructure Analysis and Planning.......................          63,134           63,999           68,373           +5,239           +4,374
        Sector Management and Governance...........................          62,562           63,136           62,961             +399             -175
        Regional Field Operations..................................          56,550           57,034           56,886             +336             -148
        Infrastructure Security Compliance.........................          81,000           86,976           86,727           +5,727             -249
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Infrastructure Protection......................         263,246          271,145          274,947          +11,701           +3,802

    Cybersecurity and Communications:
        Cybersecurity:
            Cybersecurity Coordination.............................           4,320            4,330            4,311               -9              -19
            US Computer Emergency Readiness Team [US-CERT]                  102,000           98,794           98,573           -3,427             -221
             Operations............................................
            Federal Network Security...............................         199,725          171,500          171,418          -28,307              -82
            Network Security Deployment............................         382,252          377,690          377,567           -4,685             -123
            Global Cybersecurity Management........................          25,892           17,613           25,893               +1           +8,280
            Critical Infrastructure Cyber Protection and Awareness.          73,013           70,963           74,054           +1,041           +3,091
            Business Operations....................................           5,089            5,554            5,524             +435              -30
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Cybersecurity..............................         792,291          746,444          757,340          -34,951          +10,896

        Communications:
            Office of Emergency Communications.....................          37,450           36,480           37,335             -115             +855
            Priority Telecommunications Services...................          53,372           53,381           53,324              -48              -57
            Next Generation Networks...............................          21,158           69,571           69,559          +48,401              -12
            Programs to Study and Enhance Telecommunications.......          10,074           10,106           10,092              +18              -14
            Critical Infrastructure Protection Programs............           9,409           10,439           10,403             +994              -36
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Communications.............................         131,463          179,977          180,713          +49,250             +736
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Cybersecurity and Communications...........         923,754          926,421          938,053          +14,299          +11,632
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Infrastructure Protection and Information         1,187,000        1,197,566        1,213,000          +26,000          +15,434
               Security............................................

Federal Protective Service:
    Basic Security.................................................         271,540          275,763          275,763           +4,223   ...............
    Building-specific Security.....................................         509,056          600,615          600,615          +91,559   ...............
    Reimbursable Security Fees (Contract Guard Services)...........         521,228          466,228          466,228          -55,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Federal Protective Service.........................       1,301,824        1,342,606        1,342,606          +40,782   ...............

    Offsetting Collections.........................................      -1,301,824       -1,342,606       -1,342,606          -40,782   ...............
Office of Biometric Identity Management............................         227,108          251,584          249,142          +22,034           -2,442
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Protection and Programs Directorate (gross)..       2,772,431        2,857,666        2,869,313          +96,882          +11,647

          Offsetting Collections...................................     (-1,301,824)     (-1,342,606)     (-1,342,606)        (-40,782)  ...............
            Total, National Protection and Programs Directorate           1,470,607        1,515,060        1,526,707          +56,100          +11,647
             (net).................................................
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                      Office of Health Affairs

BioWatch...........................................................          85,277           84,651           84,651             -626   ...............
National Biosurveillance Integration Center........................          10,000            8,000            8,000           -2,000   ...............
Chemical Defense Program...........................................             824              824              824   ...............  ...............
Planning and Coordination..........................................           4,995            4,995            4,995   ...............  ...............
Salaries and Expenses..............................................          25,667           27,297           26,148             +481           -1,149
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of Health Affairs..............................         126,763          125,767          124,618           -2,145           -1,149
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                Federal Emergency Management Agency

Salaries and Expenses:
    Administrative and Regional Offices............................         249,855          245,218          244,183           -5,672           -1,035
        Office of National Capital Region Coordination.............          (3,400)  ...............          (3,400)  ...............         (+3,400)
    Preparedness and Protection....................................         173,406          185,000          184,659          +11,253             -341
    Response.......................................................         178,692          167,376          174,586           -4,106           +7,210
        Urban Search and Rescue Response System....................         (35,180)         (27,513)         (35,180)  ...............         (+7,667)
    Recovery.......................................................          55,121           56,030           55,789             +668             -241
    Response and Recovery..........................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
    Mitigation.....................................................          27,858           25,782           27,738             -120           +1,956
    Mission Support................................................         151,744          141,809          145,316           -6,428           +3,507
    Centrally Managed Accounts.....................................         110,306          103,449          103,449           -6,857   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Salaries and Expenses..............................         946,982          924,664          935,720          -11,262          +11,056
          (Defense)................................................         (74,000)         (76,000)         (76,000)         (+2,000)  ...............
          (Nondefense).............................................        (872,982)        (848,664)        (859,720)        (-13,262)        (+11,056)

Grants and Training:
    State and Local Programs:
        State Homeland Security Grant Program......................         466,346   ...............         467,000             +654         +467,000
            Operation Stonegarden..................................         (55,000)  ...............         (55,000)  ...............        (+55,000)
        Urban Area Security Initiative.............................         600,000   ...............         600,000   ...............        +600,000
            Nonprofit Security Grants..............................         (13,000)  ...............         (13,000)  ...............        (+13,000)
        Public Transportation Security Assistance and Railroad              100,000   ...............         100,000   ...............        +100,000
         Security Assistance.......................................
            Amtrak Security........................................         (10,000)  ...............         (10,000)  ...............        (+10,000)
            Over-Road Bus Security.................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
        Port Security Grants.......................................         100,000   ...............         100,000   ...............        +100,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Discretionary Grants...........................       1,266,346   ...............       1,267,000             +654       +1,267,000

        Education, Training, and Exercises:
            Emergency Management Institute.........................          20,569   ...............          20,569   ...............         +20,569
            Center for Domestic Preparedness.......................          64,991   ...............          64,991   ...............         +64,991
            National Domestic Preparedness Consortium..............          98,000   ...............          98,000   ...............         +98,000
            National Exercise Program..............................          21,094   ...............          19,919           -1,175          +19,919
            Continuing Training....................................          29,000   ...............          29,521             +521          +29,521
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal.............................................         233,654   ...............         233,000             -654         +233,000

        National Preparedness Grant Program........................  ...............       1,043,200   ...............  ...............      -1,043,200
        First Responder Assistance Program:
            Emergency Management Performance Grants................  ...............         350,000   ...............  ...............        -350,000
            Fire Grants............................................  ...............         335,000   ...............  ...............        -335,000
            Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response        ...............         335,000   ...............  ...............        -335,000
             [SAFER] Act Grants....................................
            Training Partnership Grants............................  ...............          60,000   ...............  ...............         -60,000
            Education, Training and Exercises......................  ...............         102,269   ...............  ...............        -102,269
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, First Responder Assistance Program.........  ...............       1,182,269   ...............  ...............      -1,182,269
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, State and Local Programs...................       1,500,000        2,225,469        1,500,000   ...............        -725,469
            (Defense)..............................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
            (Nondefense)...........................................      (1,500,000)      (2,225,469)      (1,500,000)  ...............       (-725,469)

    Firefighter Assistance Grants:
        Fire Grants................................................         340,000   ...............         340,000   ...............        +340,000
        Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response [SAFER]           340,000   ...............         340,000   ...............        +340,000
         Act Grants................................................
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................         680,000   ...............         680,000   ...............        +680,000

    Emergency Management Performance Grants........................         350,000   ...............         350,000   ...............        +350,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Grants and Training................................       2,530,000        2,225,469        2,530,000   ...............        +304,531

Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program........................          -1,272           -1,815           -1,815             -543   ...............
United States Fire Administration..................................          44,000           41,407           44,000   ...............          +2,593

Disaster Relief Fund:
    Base Disaster Relief...........................................         594,522          595,672          595,672           +1,150   ...............
    Disaster Relief Category.......................................       5,626,386        6,437,793        6,437,793         +811,407   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Disaster Relief Fund...............................       6,220,908        7,033,465        7,033,465         +812,557   ...............

Flood Hazard Mapping and Risk Analysis Program.....................          95,202           84,403          100,000           +4,798          +15,597

National Flood Insurance Fund:
    Salaries and Expenses..........................................          22,000           23,759           23,759           +1,759   ...............
    Flood Plain Management and Mapping.............................         154,300          155,535          155,535           +1,235   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         176,300          179,294          179,294           +2,994   ...............

    Offsetting Fee Collections.....................................        -176,300         -179,294         -179,294           -2,994   ...............

National Predisaster Mitigation Fund...............................          25,000   ...............          25,000   ...............         +25,000
Emergency Food and Shelter.........................................         120,000          100,000          100,000          -20,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Emergency Management Agency...................       9,980,820       10,407,593       10,766,370         +785,550         +358,777
          (Appropriations).........................................      (4,354,434)      (3,969,800)      (4,328,577)        (-25,857)       (+358,777)
          (Disaster Relief Category)...............................      (5,626,386)      (6,437,793)      (6,437,793)       (+811,407)  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title III, Protection, Preparedness, Response and           11,578,190       12,048,420       12,417,695         +839,505         +369,275
       Recovery Directorate........................................
          Appropriations...........................................      (5,951,804)      (5,610,627)      (5,979,902)        (+28,098)       (+369,275)
          Disaster Relief Category.................................      (5,626,386)      (6,437,793)      (6,437,793)       (+811,407)  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      TITLE IV--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TRAINING, AND SERVICES

         United States Citizenship and Immigration Services

Appropriations:
    E-Verify Program...............................................         113,889          124,755          124,435          +10,546             -320
    Immigrant Integration Programs.................................  ...............          10,000   ...............  ...............         -10,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         113,889          134,755          124,435          +10,546          -10,320

Fee Accounts:
    Adjudication Services:
        District Operations........................................      (1,544,380)      (1,539,859)      (1,594,400)        (+50,020)        (+54,541)
            (Immigrant Integration Grants).........................          (7,500)  ...............  ...............         (-7,500)  ...............
        Service Center Operations..................................        (578,393)        (542,449)        (614,851)        (+36,458)        (+72,402)
        Asylum, Refugee and International Operations...............        (236,710)        (238,755)        (232,374)         (-4,336)         (-6,381)
        Records Operations.........................................         (94,039)         (93,209)        (110,035)        (+15,996)        (+16,826)
        Business Transformation....................................        (183,464)        (184,923)        (194,923)        (+11,459)        (+10,000)
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................       2,636,986        2,599,195        2,746,583         +109,597         +147,388

    Information and Customer Services:
        Operating Expenses.........................................         (96,409)         (98,868)        (109,416)        (+13,007)        (+10,548)
    Administration:
        Operating Expenses.........................................        (339,421)        (342,308)        (376,553)        (+37,132)        (+34,245)
    Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlements [SAVE]..........         (29,937)         (30,259)         (24,823)         (-5,114)         (-5,436)
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Fee Accounts.......................................       3,102,753        3,070,630        3,257,375         +154,622         +186,745

H1-B Visa Fee Account:
    Adjudication Services:
        Service Center Operations..................................  ...............         (13,500)  ...............  ...............        (-13,500)

H1-B and L Fraud Prevention Fee Account:
    Adjudication Services:
        District Operations........................................  ...............         (26,044)  ...............  ...............        (-26,044)
        Asylum and Refugee Operating Expenses......................  ...............            (310)  ...............  ...............           (-310)
        Service Center Operations..................................  ...............         (14,646)  ...............  ...............        (-14,646)
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................  ...............          41,000   ...............  ...............         -41,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Total, Fee Accounts......................................       3,102,753        3,125,130        3,257,375         +154,622         +132,245
                                                                    ====================================================================================
          Total, United States Citizenship and Immigration Services      (3,216,642)      (3,259,885)      (3,381,810)       (+165,168)       (+121,925)
          Appropriations...........................................        (113,889)        (134,755)        (124,435)        (+10,546)        (-10,320)
          Fee Accounts.............................................      (3,102,753)      (3,125,130)      (3,257,375)       (+154,622)       (+132,245)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
(Immigration Examination Fee Account)..............................      (3,048,753)      (3,070,630)      (3,202,875)       (+154,122)       (+132,245)
(H1-B Visa Fee Account)............................................         (13,000)         (13,500)         (13,500)           (+500)  ...............
(H1-B and L Fraud Prevention Fee Account)..........................         (41,000)         (41,000)         (41,000)  ...............  ...............

              Federal Law Enforcement Training Center

Salaries and Expenses:
    Law Enforcement Training.......................................         198,317          202,122          201,364           +3,047             -758
    Management and Administration..................................          28,228           28,337           28,144              -84             -193
    Accreditation..................................................           1,300            1,295            1,289              -11               -6
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         227,845          231,754          230,797           +2,952             -957

Acquisitions, Construction, Improvements, and Related Expenses.....          30,885           27,841           27,841           -3,044   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Law Enforcement Training Center...............         258,730          259,595          258,638              -92             -957
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                       Science and Technology

Management and Administration......................................         129,000          130,147          129,555             +555             -592

Research, Development, Acquisition, and Operations:
    Research, Development, and Innovation..........................         462,000          433,788          425,552          -36,448           -8,236
    Laboratory Facilities..........................................         547,785          435,180          435,180         -112,605   ...............
    Acquisition and Operations Support.............................          41,703           41,703           41,703   ...............  ...............
    University Programs............................................          39,724           31,000           39,500             -224           +8,500
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................       1,091,212          941,671          941,935         -149,277             +264
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Science and Technology................................       1,220,212        1,071,818        1,071,490         -148,722             -328
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                 Domestic Nuclear Detection Office

Management and Administration......................................          37,353           37,494           37,339              -14             -155

Research, Development, and Operations:
    Systems Engineering and Architecture...........................          21,000           17,924           17,000           -4,000             -924
    Systems Development............................................          21,000           22,000           21,400             +400             -600
    Transformational Research and Development......................          71,102           69,500           69,000           -2,102             -500
    Assessments....................................................          39,300           38,079           38,000           -1,300              -79
    Operations Support.............................................          30,200           31,565           31,000             +800             -565
    National Technical Nuclear Forensics Center....................          22,700           20,000           20,000           -2,700   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         205,302          199,068          196,400           -8,902           -2,668

Systems Acquisition:
    Radiation Portal Monitor Program...............................           7,000            5,000            5,000           -2,000   ...............
    Securing the Cities............................................          22,000           12,000           19,000           -3,000           +7,000
    Human Portable Radiation Detection Systems.....................          13,600           50,861           48,603          +35,003           -2,258
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................          42,600           67,861           72,603          +30,003           +4,742
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Domestic Nuclear Detection Office.....................         285,255          304,423          306,342          +21,087           +1,919
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title IV, Research and Development, Training, and            1,878,086        1,770,591        1,760,905         -117,181           -9,686
       Services....................................................
      (Fee Accounts)...............................................      (3,102,753)      (3,125,130)      (3,257,375)       (+154,622)       (+132,245)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                    TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS

Financial Systems Modernization....................................          29,548   ...............          39,500           +9,952          +39,500
Columbia Free Trade Act Collections................................         110,000          138,000          138,000          +28,000   ...............
U.S. Coast Guard AC&I; (rescission) (Public Law 112-10).............         -35,500   ...............          -2,550          +32,950           -2,550
U.S. Coast Guard AC&I; (rescission) (Public Law 112-74).............         -79,300   ...............         -11,980          +67,320          -11,980
U.S. Coast Guard AC&I; (rescission) (Public Law 113-6)..............         -19,879   ...............          -9,469          +10,410           -9,469
CBP OAM (rescission) (Public Law 113-76)...........................  ...............  ...............          -8,000           -8,000           -8,000
TSA Aviation Security (rescission) (Public Law 113-76).............  ...............  ...............        -102,000         -102,000         -102,000
U.S. Coast Guard AC&I; (rescission) (Public Law 113-76).............  ...............  ...............         -16,500          -16,500          -16,500
Science and Technology, Research, Development, Acquisition, and      ...............  ...............         -14,000          -14,000          -14,000
 Operations, Account 70x0800 (rescission)..........................
Treasury Asset Forfeiture Fund (rescission)........................        -100,000   ...............        -200,000         -100,000         -200,000
Rescission of Legacy Funds.........................................          -4,657   ...............          -1,494           +3,163           -1,494
FEMA unobligated balances (rescission).............................        -300,522         -200,000         -310,000           -9,478         -110,000
U-Visa immigration proposal........................................  ...............          13,000   ...............  ...............         -13,000
COBRA Passenger Inspection Fee (leg. proposal).....................  ...............        (212,000)  ...............  ...............       (-212,000)
IUF Fee (leg. proposal)............................................  ...............        (229,000)        (196,000)       (+196,000)        (-33,000)
U.S. Coast Guard AC&I; (rescission) (Public Law 111-83).............         -14,500   ...............  ...............         +14,500   ...............
DHS Consolidated Headquarters Project..............................          35,000   ...............          48,600          +13,600          +48,600
Data Center Migration..............................................          42,200   ...............  ...............         -42,200   ...............
USCIS Immigrant Integration Grants.................................           2,500   ...............  ...............          -2,500   ...............
TSA Aviation Security (rescission) (Public Law 113-6)..............         -35,000   ...............  ...............         +35,000   ...............
TSA Aviation Security (70x0550) (rescission).......................          -2,000   ...............         -15,300          -13,300          -15,300
TSA Surface Transportation Security (rescission) (Public Law 113-6)         -20,000   ...............  ...............         +20,000   ...............
CBP construction and facilities management (rescission)............  ...............  ...............         -12,500          -12,500          -12,500
TSA Research and Development (rescission)..........................            -977   ...............  ...............            +977   ...............
CBP BSFIT unobligated balance (rescission).........................         -67,498   ...............         -27,300          +40,198          -27,300
Rescission of Unobligated Balances (nondefense)....................         -13,593   ...............  ...............         +13,593   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title V, General Provisions...........................        -474,178          -49,000         -504,993          -30,815         -455,993
          Fee Accounts.............................................  ...............        (441,000)        (196,000)       (+196,000)       (-245,000)
          Appropriations...........................................        (219,248)        (151,000)        (226,100)         (+6,852)        (+75,100)
          Rescissions..............................................       (-693,426)       (-200,000)       (-731,093)        (-37,667)       (-531,093)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Grand Total..................................................      46,583,386       46,346,037       47,226,793         +643,407         +880,756
          Appropriations...........................................     (41,423,426)     (40,108,244)     (41,307,093)       (-116,333)     (+1,198,849)
          Rescissions..............................................       (-693,426)       (-200,000)       (-731,093)        (-37,667)       (-531,093)
          Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism..        (227,000)  ...............        (213,000)        (-14,000)       (+213,000)
          Disaster Relief Category.................................      (5,626,386)      (6,437,793)      (6,437,793)       (+811,407)  ...............
(Fee Funded Programs)..............................................      (5,217,268)      (5,874,629)      (5,761,874)       (+544,606)       (-112,755)
(By transfer)......................................................         (24,000)         (24,000)         (24,000)  ...............  ...............
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\1\Includes fiscal year 2014 enacted and fiscal year 2015 request for AMOC