S. Rept. 113-78 - 113th Congress (2013-2014)
July 18, 2013, As Reported by the Appropriations Committee

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Senate Report 113-78 - DEPARTMENTS OF COMMERCE AND JUSTICE, AND SCIENCE, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2014




[Senate Report 113-78]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]


                                                       Calendar No. 141
113th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 1st Session                                                     113-78

======================================================================



 
DEPARTMENTS OF COMMERCE AND JUSTICE, AND SCIENCE, AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                       APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2014

                                _______
                                

                 July 18, 2013.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

          Ms. Mikulski, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                                 REPORT

                         [To accompany S. 1329]

    The Committee on Appropriations reports the bill (S. 1329) 
making appropriations for the Departments of Commerce and 
Justice, Science, and Related Agencies for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2014, and for other purposes, reports 
favorably thereon and recommends that the bill do pass.



Total obligational authority, fiscal year 2014

Total of bill as reported to the Senate\1\.............. $62,563,972,000
Amount of 2013 appropriations\2\\3\.....................  60,137,573,000
Amount of 2014 budget estimate..........................  62,266,342,000
Bill as recommended to Senate compared to--
    2013 appropriations\2\\3\...........................  +2,426,399,000
    2014 budget estimate................................    +297,630,000

\1\This level does not include -$9,945,272,000 in adjustments that the 
Congressional Budget Office (CBO) scores to the bill. With these 
scorekeeping adjustments, the bill totals $52,271,700,000 in 
discretionary budget authority.
\2\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.
\3\Includes emergency funding of $363,250,000 in the Disaster Relief 
Appropriations Act, 2013 (division A of Public Law 113-2).


                                CONTENTS

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page

Purpose of the Bill..............................................     3
Summary of the Bill..............................................     3
Fighting Waste, Fraud, and Abuse.................................     4
Reprogrammings, Reorganizations, and Relocations.................     5
Congressional Budget Justifications..............................     7
Reductions-in-Force..............................................     7
Appropriations Liaisons..........................................     7
Title I: Department of Commerce..................................     8
Title II: Department of Justice..................................    51
Title III: Science...............................................   102
    Office of Science and Technology Policy......................   102
    National Aeronautics and Space Administration................   104
    National Science Foundation..................................   119
Title IV: Related Agencies.......................................   127
    Commission on Civil Rights...................................   127
    Equal Employment Opportunity Commission......................   128
    International Trade Commission...............................   130
    Legal Services Corporation...................................   130
    Marine Mammal Commission.....................................   131
    Office of the United States Trade Representative.............   132
    State Justice Institute......................................   132
Title V: General Provisions......................................   133
Compliance With Paragraph 7, Rule XVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the 
  Senate.........................................................   136
Compliance With Paragraph 7(c) Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   140
Compliance With Paragraph 12, Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   140
Budgetary Impact of Bill.........................................   143
Comparative Statement of Budget Authority........................   144

                          Purpose of the Bill

    The bill provides funding for: (1) the Department of 
Commerce [DOC]; (2) the Department of Justice [DOJ]; (3) 
several independent science agencies: the Office of Science and 
Technology Policy [OSTP], the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration [NASA], and the National Science Foundation 
[NSF]; and (4) several related commissions and agencies: the 
Commission on Civil Rights, the Equal Employment Opportunity 
Commission [EEOC], the International Trade Commission [ITC], 
the Legal Services Corporation [LSC], the Marine Mammal 
Commission, the U.S. Trade Representative [USTR], and the State 
Justice Institute [SJI].

                          Summary of the Bill

    The bill continues the Committee's longstanding commitment 
to funding activities that save lives, keep America safe from 
terrorism and violent crime, and promote scientific research 
and technology development to foster job creation. The ability 
of the departments and agencies supported by this bill to 
fulfill these responsibilities is made more difficult by the 
pressure put on levels of discretionary spending due to the 
national debate on Federal spending, revenues, and the size of 
the public debt.
    In the category of investments that save lives, the 
Committee's recommendations include funding for State and local 
law enforcement to fight crime and violence in America's 
neighborhoods. The bill provides funding for programs and 
activities that assist State and local law enforcement in 
preventing and prosecuting crime. The Committee's 
recommendations also provide resources for Federal law 
enforcement agents, investigators, and prosecutors who track 
down terrorists, thwart gangs and drug dealers, bust white 
collar criminals, shut down cyber thieves, and root out 
scammers and schemers. Tragic events of the past year--most 
notably, the shootings in Newtown, Connecticut, and Aurora, 
Colorado, the bombings at the Boston Marathon, and the 
destruction of Superstorm Sandy--serve as stark reminders of 
the importance of providing our Federal, State, and local law 
enforcement with the tools and resources they need to respond 
and keep Americans safe.
    The National Weather Service saves lives and protects 
property by providing timely and accurate warnings about severe 
weather so that Americans can secure their property and get out 
of harm's way before dangerous storms strike. In 2012, America 
endured 11 major weather and climate disasters that caused 
$110,000,000,000 in damage, making 2012 the second most 
expensive year for weather-related disasters in our history. 
The Committee's recommendations prioritize resources to ensure 
that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [NOAA] 
has the staff and technology needed to provide timely and 
accurate warnings.
    The Committee's recommendations also focus on promoting 
scientific research and technology development to foster job 
creation in the private sector. The bill supports scientific 
research and development in labs at colleges and universities, 
in the ocean, and in outer space. This fundamental research 
fuels the innovation that creates new ideas, new products, and 
ultimately new jobs. The bill also funds trade promotion and 
enforcement and patent protection ensuring that Americans can 
profit from their good ideas.
    The bill continues to face the pressure to fund growing 
programs that, while not mandatory for budget purposes, are not 
truly discretionary--the NOAA satellite program and the 
incarceration of prisoners through the Bureau of Prisons [BOP] 
and Federal Prisoner Detention--which together amount to more 
than $10,500,000,000, an increase of nearly $471,000,000 above 
the fiscal year 2013 enacted level. We must have NOAA 
satellites to save American lives by providing accurate 
warnings, but the cost of replacing those satellites is 
staggering. The cost of NOAA's polar satellites alone will 
approach $11,900,000,000 for two satellites. The bill also must 
provide adequate funding to ensure that prison guards and 
communities are safe and that prisoners are housed securely. In 
the last 6 years, the BOP's inmate population has increased 
more than 13 percent. The Committee has taken action to rein in 
costs of satellite procurement and is calling on the Department 
of Justice to address the growing prison population from 
keeping people out of jail to ensuring that when they get out, 
they do not commit crimes again and need to go back behind 
bars. Nonetheless, these programs threaten to crowd out other 
important activities supported by the bill in future years as 
downward pressure on domestic discretionary spending continues.

                    Fighting Waste, Fraud, and Abuse

    The departments, agencies, boards, and commissions funded 
in this bill can and should continue to reduce operating 
expenses by placing greater scrutiny on overhead costs. Savings 
can and should be achieved by reducing non-essential travel, 
office supply, rent, and utility costs. The Committee directs 
each department, agency, board, and commission funded in this 
bill to develop a plan to reduce such costs by at least 10 
percent in fiscal year 2014. Plans to achieve these savings in 
fiscal year 2014 should be submitted to the Committee no later 
than 30 days after enactment of this act except that the 
Department of Justice shall submit its plan in 45 days. The 
Committee commends the departments, agencies, boards, and 
commissions funded in this bill for their ongoing efforts to 
reduce costs. For example, DOJ has saved or avoided more than 
$122,500,000 in costs since June 2010 through common sense 
measures like consolidating wireless and information technology 
contracts, using digital x-rays in the BOP, streamlining its 
prisoner detention and transportation operations, and 
discontinuing obsolete phone lines. The Committee also calls on 
departments, agencies, boards, and commissions funded in this 
bill to continue to achieve savings by lowering travel 
contractor costs related to air fares, as directed in fiscal 
year 2013.
    The Committee has also reduced official reception and 
representation funds by 25 percent since fiscal year 2011. 
Modest representation funds are provided for agency executives 
to provide necessary courtesies to our diplomatic partners and 
out of respect for fallen officers, or to mark historic 
occasions such as space exploration missions or stunning 
discoveries. However, savings can and should be achieved by 
reducing the costs of executive meetings, receptions, 
ceremonies, and conferences, and purchasing fewer promotional 
items such as t-shirts, hats, mugs, key chains, and other 
similar items.
    The Committee is extremely concerned about the persistent 
pattern of cost overruns and schedule slippages on major 
projects and missions carried out by the agencies within this 
bill. In addition, reports have exposed a culture within many 
agencies that exhibits a lack of accountability and oversight 
of grant funding.
    Therefore, the Committee has continued three bill-wide 
provisions to ensure greater oversight and fiscal 
responsibility of taxpayer dollars.
    First, the bill requires each agency to notify the 
Committee immediately upon identification of program cost 
overruns greater than 10 percent.
    Second, the bill requires the Inspectors General of the 
Departments of Commerce and Justice, NASA, NSF, and the Legal 
Services Corporation to conduct reviews of grant and contract 
funds to ensure funds are being spent appropriately.
    Third, the bill requires each department, agency, board, 
and commission funded in this act to report spending on large 
conferences, with costs in excess of $20,000 each, to the 
inspectors general for audit.
    Finally, the Committee intends to continue to work with the 
Government Accountability Office [GAO] to review selected 
large-scale acquisition and construction projects. 
Specifically, the Committee requests that GAO develop a plan 
for ongoing reviews of such projects, with reports to the 
Committee on a biannual basis. Agencies shall provide access to 
all necessary data, as determined by GAO, in order for the 
reviews to be completed and provided in a timely manner to the 
Committee. The Committee believes that these project status 
reports are valuable in identifying cost overrun and schedule 
slippage problems early, so they can be addressed immediately.

            Reprogrammings, Reorganizations, and Relocations

    Section 505 contained in the ``General Provisions'' of 
title V provides procedures for the reprogramming of funds. To 
reprogram is to change the use of funds from the specific 
purposes provided for in the act and the accompanying report 
or, in the absence of direction from the Committee, from the 
specific purposes provided for in the administration's budget 
request. Each title of the bill has also traditionally included 
separate provisions that define permissible transfers of 
resources between appropriation accounts. These transfer 
authority provisions are also pursuant to section 505, and were 
initiated in the early 1990s to provide additional flexibility 
to the agencies under the subcommittee's jurisdiction.
    The Committee expects each department and agency closely to 
follow the reprogramming procedures listed in section 505. 
These procedures apply to funds provided under this act, or 
provided under previous appropriations acts that remain 
available for obligation or expenditure in fiscal year 2014, or 
provided from any accounts in the Treasury available to the 
agencies funded by this act. Section 505 requires that the 
Committee on Appropriations be notified by letter, at least 15 
days prior to reprogramming of funds, whether permanent or 
temporary, in excess of $500,000 or 10 percent, whichever is 
less, between programs, projects or activities. This provision 
is also applicable in cases where several activities are 
involved with each receiving less than $500,000. In addition, 
the Committee is to be notified of reprogramming actions which 
are less than these amounts if such actions would have the 
effect of: committing the agency to significant funding 
requirements in future years; increasing funds or personnel by 
any means for any project or activity for which funds have been 
previously denied or restricted by Congress; creating new 
programs, offices, agencies or commissions or substantially 
augmenting existing programs, offices, agencies or commissions; 
relocating offices or employees; or reorganizing offices, 
programs, or activities.
    The Committee also expects that any items that are subject 
to interpretation will be reported. The Committee is concerned 
that, in some instances, the departments or agencies funded 
within this appropriations act are not adhering to the 
Committee's reprogramming guidelines that are clearly set forth 
in this report and in section 505 of the accompanying bill. The 
Committee expects that each department and agency funded in the 
bill will follow these notification policies precisely and will 
not reallocate resources or reorganize activities prior to 
submitting the required notifications to the Committee.
    The reprogramming process is based on comity between the 
Appropriations Committee and the administration. The Commerce, 
Justice, science, and related agencies appropriations bill 
provides specific program guidance throughout this report and 
tables accompanying the bill. The process is intended to 
provide flexibility to meet changing circumstances and 
emergency requirements of agencies, if there is agreement 
between the executive branch and the Congress that such a 
change is warranted. Reprogramming procedures provide a means 
to agree on adjustments, if necessary, during a fiscal year, 
and to ensure that the Committee is kept apprised of instances 
where nonappropriated resources are used to meet program 
requirements, such as fee collections and unobligated balances 
that were not considered in the development of the 
appropriations legislation.
    In the absence of comity and respect for the prerogatives 
of the Appropriations Committees and Congress in general, the 
Committee will have no choice but to include specific program 
limitations and details legislatively. Under these 
circumstances, programs, projects, and activities become 
absolutes and the executive branch shall lose the ability to 
propose changes in the use of appropriated funds through the 
reprogramming process between programs, projects, and 
activities without seeking some form of legislative action.
    The Committee expects each executive branch department and 
agency to manage its programs, projects and activities within 
the levels appropriated. Reprogramming or transfer requests 
shall be submitted only in the case of an unforeseen emergency 
or situation that could not have been anticipated when 
formulating the budget request for the current fiscal year.

                  Congressional Budget Justifications

    The Committee directs that all departments and agencies 
funded within this bill shall submit all of their fiscal year 
2015 budget justifications concurrently with the official 
submission of the administration's budget to Congress. Further, 
all departments and agencies with classified programs funded 
within this act are directed to submit their classified budget 
justification documents to the Committee, through appropriate 
means, at the same time the unclassified budget justifications 
are transmitted.
    These justifications shall include a sufficient level of 
detailed data, exhibits and explanatory statements to support 
the appropriations requests, including tables that outline each 
agency's programs, projects, and activities for fiscal years 
2014 and 2015. The Committee directs the chief financial 
officer of each department or agency funded in this act's 
jurisdiction to ensure that adequate justification is given to 
each increase, decrease, staffing and function change proposed 
in the fiscal year 2015 budget, particularly within the 
departmental operations and management accounts.
    The Committee is concerned that many of the budget 
submissions are inadequate and necessitate multiple requests 
for additional information. This process is inefficient and 
unnecessarily delays access to information that is fundamental 
to the work of the Committee. The Committee expects that the 
fiscal year 2015 submissions will include sufficient detail to 
justify all programs, projects, and activities contained in 
each department, agency, or commission budget request. Budget 
justifications are prepared not for the use of the agencies but 
are the primary tool of the Committee to evaluate the resource 
requirements and proposals requested by the administration.

                          Reductions-in-Force

    The Committee directs departments or agencies funded in the 
accompanying bill that are planning to conduct a reduction-in-
force [RIF] to notify the Committee in writing 30 days in 
advance of the date of the proposed personnel action.

                        Appropriations Liaisons

    The Committee prefers to channel the majority of its 
inquiries and requests for information and assistance through 
the budget offices or comptroller offices of the departments 
and agencies which it oversees, but reserves the right to call 
upon any individual or organization in any agency under its 
jurisdiction.

                                TITLE I

                         DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

    The Committee recommends a total of $8,679,014,000 for the 
Department of Commerce [DOC]. The recommendation is 
$609,187,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and 
$85,391,000 above the budget request.
    The Department of Commerce is a major innovation engine for 
the Nation. Few departments in the U.S. Government have the 
opportunity to so strongly influence and protect America's 
businesses and competitiveness in this volatile economy. DOC's 
science and innovation programs strive to find new ways to 
solve today's problems and anticipate tomorrow's challenges. 
New research inspires new technology, and DOC's development of 
new standards allows the Department to partner with industry to 
keep citizens safe and manufacturers on the right track. These 
new technologies and ideas deserve protection, and the 
Department also preserves intellectual property for our 
Nation's creative thinkers--small and big businesses alike. 
Once products and services are ready for the global market, DOC 
promotes international trade and enforces trade agreements, 
sending new ideas into the marketplace while protecting our 
workers and helping businesses create jobs at home. The 
Department monitors progress and prosperity through statistical 
analysis, economic monitoring, and periodic census.
    The Secretary of Commerce is the chief spokesperson for 
American business, but the Secretary is also the chief manager 
in charge of addressing major management challenges at the 
Department. Persistent problems need strong oversight, and 
accountability remains a top concern for the Committee.
    Controlling costs for the 2020 decennial census remains a 
top oversight concern for the Inspector General, the Government 
Accountability Office, and this Committee. Cost overruns became 
a major problem during the 2010 decennial census, and the 
Department cannot afford cost increases for the 2020 Census. 
The budget request suggests that the Census Bureau intends to 
reduce the 2020 Census costs to 2010 Census levels by finding 
ways to reduce door-to-door operations, using the Internet to 
solicit responses, and using scalable technology such as 
elastic agency-wide IT systems that can expand for the 2020 
Census and then return to normal operations tempo. While this 
indicates improved direction at the Census Bureau, the 
Committee needs assurances that the Bureau will remain on a 
reliable path for achieving real cost savings.
    When it comes to protecting American intellectual property, 
DOC needs to be cyber-obsessed and create ways to protect its 
own Dot-Gov systems while working with the private sector to 
better protect Dot-Com. The National Institute of Standards and 
Technology [NIST], DOC's outstanding science and research 
agency, helps the private sector find new ways to solve today's 
cybersecurity problems. This bill advances cybersecurity 
activities at NIST to protect online consumers and the private 
sector from cyber attacks.
    When it comes to saving lives and livelihoods, this bill 
provides balanced funding to allow all of the National Oceanic 
and Atmospheric Administration's [NOAA] services to function. 
Operational readiness is important to the scientists and 
forecasters who depend on NOAA to do their jobs. Information 
and forecasts from NOAA are vital to our communities--from the 
coastal States that depend on accurate hurricane forecasts to 
the interior States that depend on timely tornado and severe 
storm warnings. Commerce's budget request highlights new 
reforms to NOAA's satellite programs in response to direction 
made by this Committee and to critical recommendations made by 
outside experts. The Committee welcomes these changes but 
remains guarded that these important missions retain financial 
and management stability.
    The Committee looks forward to working with the Department 
of Commerce to promote innovation, stimulate economic growth, 
and protect American citizens and businesses during the 2014 
fiscal year and beyond.

                   International Trade Administration


                     OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $472,769,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     529,196,000
Committee recommendation................................     500,000,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $500,000,000 for 
the International Trade Administration [ITA]. The 
recommendation is $27,231,000 above the fiscal year 2013 
enacted level and $29,196,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee recommendations, by function, are displayed 
in the following table:

               INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION FUNDING
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Industry and Analysis.................................            56,064
Enforcement and Compliance............................            82,025
Global Markets........................................           336,000
Executive Direction/Administration....................            25,911
                                                       -----------------
      Total Direct Obligations........................           500,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Offsetting Fee Collections.--The Committee's recommendation 
adopts the proposed offsetting fee collections of $9,439,000.
    SelectUSA.--The Committee supports the SelectUSA Initiative 
and provides up to $15,000,000 to facilitate foreign direct 
investment in the United States.
    Trade Enforcement.--The Committee provides up to 
$15,000,000 for the Interagency Trade Enforcement Center [ITEC] 
in partnership with the U.S. Trade Representative. ITA is 
directed to provide a detailed funding profile for ITEC as part 
of its 2014 spending plan.
    Global Markets.--The Committee recognizes the important 
role that ITA's Global Markets division plays in promoting U.S. 
exports and attracting foreign investment, including through 
the U.S. Foreign Commercial Service [CS] and the activities 
previously housed in the Market Access and Compliance division. 
The Committee urges Global Markets to deploy resources in a 
manner so as to maximize economic potential for U.S. workers 
and businesses.
    The Committee is concerned about ITA's rebalancing strategy 
for CS officers in our embassies abroad and about resources 
being diverted away from crucial CS activities, particularly in 
developing and emerging markets, including those in Africa. 
While the Committee fully understands the budgetary constraints 
that ITA faces and also recognizes the changing nature of 
overseas markets and opportunities to promote trade, it also 
has concerns that constant ``rebalancing'' has negative impacts 
on the ability of CS to maintain crucial overseas posts and 
ultimately weakens opportunities for U.S. companies. The 
Committee directs ITA to fund CS at the highest possible level 
in fiscal year 2014 while still preserving other essential 
functions within Global Markets. ITA should place particular 
emphasis on maintaining and expanding the number of CS officers 
and support staff overseas, including proposed offices in 
Africa and in new Asia markets, and on providing them with 
adequate resources to operate fully and effectively in their 
regions.
    Within 60 days of enactment of this act, ITA shall report 
to the Committee on how CS staff and funds are allocated in 
determining where to maintain, open, or close posts, including: 
the variables considered; their relative importance; how these 
variables account for developing and emerging markets where 
U.S. exports may be low but potential for increased trade is 
high; and other factors affecting the decisionmaking process. 
ITA is directed to notify the Committee within 30 days when 
changes are made to domestic or overseas Commercial Service 
posts or State Department Partner Posts.
    U.S. Export Assistance Centers.--Within 90 days of 
enactment of this act, ITA shall report to the Committee on its 
progress and next steps to address recommendations made by the 
Office of Inspector General to improve the U.S. Export 
Assistance Centers' delivery of client services and cost 
recovery efforts.
    China Anti-dumping and Countervailing Duty Activities.--The 
Committee provides no less than $16,400,000 for China anti-
dumping and countervailing duty enforcement and compliance 
activities.
    Domestic Trade Coordination.--The Committee recognizes the 
important role that State and local governments play in 
promoting exports and urges ITA and the Trade Promotion 
Coordinating Committee [TPCC] to support the application of 
best practices between Federal, State, and local governments in 
promoting exports. Additionally, the Committee encourages the 
TPCC to collaborate with State resource partners to identify 
ways to reduce overlap and improve coordination between Federal 
and State agencies. This effort may include establishment of a 
working group including regionally equitable and diverse 
representatives of State international trade resource centers 
and Federal agencies involved in export promotion.

                    Bureau of Industry and Security


                     OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $99,686,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     112,095,000
Committee recommendation................................     112,095,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $112,095,000 for 
the Bureau of Industry and Security [BIS]. The recommendation 
is $12,409,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and the 
same as the budget request.
    BIS is the principal agency involved in the development, 
implementation, and enforcement of export controls for 
commercial technologies and for many military technologies as a 
result of the President's export control reform initiative. The 
Export Enforcement Division detects, prevents, investigates, 
and assists in the sanctioning of illegal exports of such 
items.
    Export Control Reform.--The Committee directs BIS to 
continue its exporter outreach program to educate companies of 
all sizes on the new regulatory requirements resulting from 
export control reform. The Committee encourages BIS to target 
small- and medium-sized businesses and to work with State and 
local trade and export associations, in addition to working 
with national industry groups.
    Single Window Export Licensing.--The Committee encourages 
BIS to consult with other Federal agencies to explore the 
necessary authorization, timeline, and resources required to 
achieve a single window for export licensing applications and 
increase the efficiency of the licensing process.

                  Economic Development Administration

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $220,140,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     320,913,000
Committee recommendation................................     276,245,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $276,245,000 for 
the Economic Development Administration [EDA]. The 
recommendation is $56,105,000 above the fiscal year 2013 
enacted level and $44,668,000 below the budget request.
    EDA provides grants to local governments and nonprofit 
agencies for public works, planning, and other projects 
designed to facilitate economic development. Funding amounts 
for the two appropriations accounts under this heading are 
displayed below.

                ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $183,417,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     282,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     237,332,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $237,332,000 for 
Economic Development Assistance Programs. The recommendation is 
$53,915,000 above the fiscal year 2013 level and $44,668,000 
below the budget request. The Committee expects EDA to use all 
available carryover and prior year recoveries to the maximum 
extent possible. Of the amounts provided, funds are to be 
distributed as follows. Any deviation of funds shall be subject 
to the procedures set forth in section 505 of this act:

                ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Public Works............................................         100,332
Economic Adjustment Assistance..........................          55,700
Trade Adjustment Assistance.............................          15,800
Regional Innovation Program.............................          25,000
Partnership Planning....................................          27,000
Technical Assistance....................................          12,000
Research and Evaluation.................................           1,500
                                                         ---------------
      Total.............................................         237,332
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Proposed Cuts to Economic Development Assistance 
Programs.--The Committee rejects the cuts proposed in the 
request to Public Works and Trade Adjustment Assistance. The 
Committee notes that reallocating those funds for new 
initiatives would disproportionately award funding to a limited 
number of geographic areas while decreasing support for 
communities across the country. EDA shall consider geographic 
equity in making all award decisions and shall ensure that 
rural projects are adequately represented among those selected 
for funding.
    Manufacturing and Exports.--The Committee notes that 
manufacturing and exports are crucial sources of jobs and 
innovation, and supports the administration's focus on those 
sectors of the economy that have the greatest potential to 
leverage private investment and facilitate economic growth. The 
United States is far behind its foreign competitors in 
dedicating Federal resources to these activities and must 
continue to focus on a cohesive, governmentwide strategy for 
manufacturing investment and export promotion. Any strategy to 
aid in the promotion of manufacturing and export of U.S. goods 
should be built on the needs of the private sector and 
developed in concert with private industry, taking into account 
any impediments to greater investment in the manufacturing 
sector. Additionally, the Committee notes that 
``manufacturing'' activities should be defined so as to include 
innovative technologies in diverse fields.
    The Committee encourages the administration to focus on 
generating financial investment, job creation, and sustained 
economic growth in manufacturing and exports through EDA's 
existing grant programs, including Public Works, Economic 
Adjustment Assistance, and Trade Adjustment Assistance, and 
under the Regional Innovation Program. The Committee encourages 
EDA to identify ways to make strong investments in these areas 
while preserving the success and nationwide reach of existing 
grant programs, avoiding overlap in the mission or execution of 
such programs, and continuing to meet demand for existing 
infrastructure needs across the country.
    Innovative Energy Efficiency Grants.--Within the amounts 
provided for Economic Adjustment Assistance, the Committee 
provides up to $5,000,000 to continue innovative energy 
efficiency finance programs that benefit small businesses.
    Regional Innovation Program.--The Committee maintains 
support for EDA's Regional Innovation Program, which awards 
competitive grants to regional entities to support innovation 
and entrepreneurship, including investments in science parks, 
regional innovation clusters, and the i6 Challenge program. The 
Committee provides $25,000,000 for grants and loan guarantees 
as authorized under the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 
2010 and encourages EDA to consider funding innovative 
manufacturing and export programs within this amount. EDA shall 
make Regional Innovation Program awards to multiple grantees 
and in multiple and diverse geographic areas.
    Within funds provided for the Regional Innovation Program, 
$2,000,000 shall be for cluster grants to support nonprofit, 
job-creating, revolving, equity-based seed capital funds.
    Loan Guarantees.--In fiscal years 2012 and 2013, the 
Committee provided a total of $10,000,000 for a manufacturing 
loan guarantee program and a total of $10,000,000 for a science 
parks loan guarantee and grant program. Both programs were 
authorized in the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010. 
The Committee acknowledges the challenges in establishing loan 
guarantee programs but is dissatisfied with EDA's pace, 
progress, and effort put forth to accomplish this task. EDA is 
directed to work expediently to establish both programs as soon 
as possible, including:
  --Consulting and coordinating with other agencies and their 
        loan guarantee staff, as needed;
  --Hiring necessary staff required to administer loan 
        guarantees at EDA within 180 days of enactment of this 
        act; and
  --Establishing regulations for both the manufacturing and 
        science park loan guarantees within 270 days of 
        enactment of this act.
    EDA shall provide a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations on the status of loan guarantees within 90 days 
of enactment of this act. The report shall include a plan to 
establish, implement, and oversee loan guarantee programs 
including details on any necessary staff hiring, external 
expertise sought and utilized, and steps to ensure the programs 
remain solvent in the out years. EDA is directed to move 
forward with implementation of the loan guarantee programs 
expeditiously, and preparation of this report should not delay 
progress. EDA shall report to the Committee the status of the 
loan guarantee programs every 180 days following the initial 
report until both loan guarantee programs are fully 
operational.
    Trade Adjustment Assistance for Firms.--The Committee 
rejects the administration's proposal to eliminate funds for 
Trade Adjustment Assistance Centers [TAACs]. Trade Adjustment 
Assistance is a small but effective program. EDA is correct in 
noting that there is room for improvement, but eliminating a 
significant portion of the program is not a solution to these 
institutional problems.
    The Committee directs EDA to publish a Federal Funding 
Opportunity for Trade Adjustment Assistance Centers before the 
June 2014 funding cycle, for which existing TAACs and new 
organizations shall be deemed eligible to apply. EDA shall 
report to the Committee and to the Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation within 90 days of enactment of this 
act its analysis and recommendations on the current geographic 
areas served by each TAAC, including the feasibility of 
aligning TAAC regions with existing EDA regional office service 
areas. EDA shall not consolidate the TAACs into regional EDA 
offices unless approved by the Committee, shall preserve 
geographic reach when awarding TAAC grants, and shall also 
consider: proximity and access to major manufacturing areas; 
distribution of trade-impacted firms; expertise and 
relationships with eligible client firms and consultants; and 
past performance, if applicable, including quantitative and 
qualitative assessment of inputs and outputs.
    The Committee appreciates EDA's efforts to improve its 
metrics across all programs and directs the agency to continue 
developing and implementing a success-based model of 
performance measurement for TAACs and other EDA grantees. The 
Committee is also concerned about issues raised in the GAO 
report entitled ``Trade Adjustment Assistance: Commerce Program 
has Helped Manufacturing and Services Firms, but Measures, 
Data, and Funding Formula Could Improve.'' GAO found 
inconsistencies in EDA's data collection across TAACs. The 
Committee believes that EDA should systematically maintain data 
collected by TAACs about assisted firms in an easily accessible 
format that can be used by regions and headquarters, such as a 
database. EDA shall also provide appropriate guidance regarding 
specific measures TAACs should be tracking, including metrics 
that assess program outcomes. Additionally, the Committee 
encourages implementation of the GAO recommendations regarding 
improvements to the current funding formula for TAACs. The 
Committee believes that EDA should do more to ensure that 
allocations of funding provided by this act for TAACs better 
reflect the varied need for assistance among firms and regions.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $36,723,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      38,913,000
Committee recommendation................................      38,913,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $38,913,000 for 
salaries and expenses. The recommendation is $2,190,000 above 
the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and the same as the budget 
request. The Committee directs that vacancies within the 
regional offices be prioritized over vacancies within 
headquarters.
    Staffing Decisions.--The Committee directs EDA to provide a 
report to the Committees within 30 days of enactment of this 
act detailing the geographic distribution of mission-critical 
staff vacancies in regional offices and geographic areas in 
need of additional staffing due to the size and location of 
respective jurisdictions. The report shall address the wide 
geographic coverage areas for some Economic Development 
Representatives and Economic Development Specialists and any 
increasing demands for services in areas with vast distances 
between jurisdictions. EDA shall report to the Committees on 
Appropriations every 180 days thereafter on mission critical 
vacancies in regional offices, including the specific location 
of each vacancy.

                  Minority Business Development Agency


                     MINORITY BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $28,094,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      29,286,000
Committee recommendation................................      29,286,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $29,286,000 for the 
Minority Business Development Agency [MBDA]. The recommendation 
is $1,192,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and is 
the same as the budget request. MBDA is the only Federal agency 
dedicated to promoting the growth of minority-owned firms and 
assists small, medium, and large minority business enterprises 
increase revenues and create jobs.

                   Economic and Statistical Analysis


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $98,150,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     104,048,000
Committee recommendation................................     104,048,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $104,048,000 for 
Economic and Statistical Analysis [ESA]. The recommendation is 
$5,898,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and the 
same as the budget request. ESA conducts research to provide a 
better understanding of the U.S. economy which helps Government 
make more informed policy decisions.

                          Bureau of the Census

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $905,047,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     982,484,000
Committee recommendation................................     982,484,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $982,484,000 for 
the Census Bureau. The recommendation is $77,437,000 above the 
fiscal year 2013 enacted level and equal to the budget request. 
The Committee provides $972,484,000 in direct appropriations 
and $10,000,000 in funding from the Working Capital Fund, 
resulting in a total of $982,484,000 available in fiscal year 
2014 for the Census Bureau.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $250,942,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     256,048,000
Committee recommendation................................     256,048,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $256,048,000 for 
salaries and expenses. The recommendation is $5,106,000 above 
the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and is the same as the 
budget request. This account provides for the salaries and 
expenses associated with the statistical programs of the Bureau 
of the Census, including measurement of the Nation's economy 
and the demographic characteristics of the population.

                     PERIODIC CENSUSES AND PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $654,105,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     726,436,000
Committee recommendation................................     726,436,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $726,436,000 for 
periodic censuses and programs. The recommendation is 
$72,331,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and the 
same as the budget request. In addition to the direct 
appropriated amount of $716,436,000, the Committee also 
provides $10,000,000 from the Census Working Capital Fund 
providing a total of $726,436,000 for this account, which is 
equal to the budget request.
    This account provides for the constitutionally mandated 
decennial census as well as other programs that are cyclical in 
nature. Additionally, individual surveys are conducted for 
other Federal agencies on a reimbursable basis.
    Oversight of Periodic Census Programs.--The Committee's 
recommendation provides $1,000,000 for the Office of Inspector 
General [OIG] to continue oversight and audits of periodic 
censuses and to provide the Bureau and Congress with 
independent recommendations for improving operations, which 
will be useful for the 2020 decennial census. The Committee 
directs the Bureau to continue to incorporate all OIG 
recommendations as it transitions into the 2020 decennial, 
including: a thorough review of the training process; better 
communication of Census' various enumeration practices; and 
increased budget transparency.
    Monthly Status Reports.--Census is directed to continue its 
dashboard monthly status reports to the Committee as it 
transitions into preparations for the 2020 decennial.
    Working Capital Fund [WCF].--The Committee expects the 
Bureau to execute the funding to the fullest extent possible 
without any carryover balances. The Committee directs the 
Bureau to continue to use the WCF only as a repository for 
reimbursable funds from other agencies and to obligate and 
execute that funding expeditiously. The Census Bureau shall 
provide a report to the Committee within 30 days after 
enactment of this act regarding balances in the Working Capital 
Fund including carryover funds, the intended uses of those 
funds, and a spending plan.
    American Community Survey.--The Committee provides the 
President's requested level for the American Community Survey 
[ACS]. The Committee directs the Census Bureau to continue to 
provide an updated report to the Committee no later than 120 
days after enactment of this act on efforts to evaluate 
questions included in the ACS, and the steps being taken by the 
ombudsman position established by the Census Bureau in fiscal 
year 2013 to ensure that the ACS is conducted as efficiently 
and unobtrusively as possible.
    2020 Decennial Census.--Controlling costs for the 2020 
decennial census remains a top oversight concern for the 
Committee. The Bureau shall continue to bring down the cost of 
the 2020 decennial census to a level less than the 2010 census 
and to work towards spending less than the 2000 census, not 
adjusting for inflation. Within 90 days of enactment of this 
act, the Bureau shall provide the Committee with an updated 
report that includes a strategic and budgetary plan for 
achieving these goals. The plan should include specific actions 
the Bureau can take to reduce spending compared to the 2010 
decennial census and descriptions of any challenges the Bureau 
anticipates could prevent it from achieving the budgetary goal.
    Web-based Questionnaires.--The Committee directs the Bureau 
to continue to incorporate a Web-based version of its census 
forms including the American Community Survey when planning for 
the 2020 decennial census. Such digital tools will likely 
ensure a more complete initial response and reduce the need for 
nonresponse follow-up work which is the most expensive phase of 
census operations. In planning and creating such a tool, Census 
is further directed to enlist the best cybersecurity practices 
and protocols to ensure personal information remains secure and 
confidential.
    Economic Census.--The Committee maintains strong support 
for the Economic Census and directs the Bureau to preserve 
funding when considering any administrative cost reductions. 
Any programmatic decreases should first focus on reductions to 
periodic censuses and agency-wide administrative cost savings.

       National Telecommunications and Information Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $45,040,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      52,122,000
Committee recommendation................................      52,122,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $52,122,000 for the 
National Telecommunications and Information Administration 
[NTIA] salaries and expenses. The recommendation is $7,082,000 
above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and the same as the 
budget request.
    The Committee retains language from previous years allowing 
the Secretary of Commerce to collect reimbursements from other 
Federal agencies for a portion of the cost resulting from the 
coordination of spectrum management, analysis, and operations. 
NTIA shall submit a report to the Committee no later than June 
1, 2014, detailing the collection of reimbursements from other 
agencies. The Committee directs NTIA to continue monitoring 
broadband grants to ensure that funds are used appropriately by 
recipients.
    Domestic and International Policies.--NTIA is the only 
executive agency with a core mission of ensuring that the 
Internet remains a platform for economic growth and consumer 
activity. The Committee supports the Administration's request 
to promote the development of a policy framework and 
international outreach that supports the U.S. marketplace, 
protects citizens, and maintains a free and open Internet.
    ICANN.--NTIA represents the United States on the Internet 
Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers [ICANN] Governmental 
Advisory Committee [GAC], and represents the interests of the 
Nation in protecting its companies, consumers, and intellectual 
property as the Internet becomes an increasingly important 
component of commerce. The GAC is structured to provide advice 
to the ICANN Board on the public policy aspects of the broad 
range of issues pending before ICANN, and NTIA must be an 
active supporter for the interests of the Nation. The Committee 
is concerned that the Department of Commerce, through NTIA, has 
not been a strong advocate for U.S. companies and consumers and 
urges greater participation and advocacy within the GAC and any 
other mechanisms within ICANN in which NTIA is a participant.
    NTIA has a duty to ensure that decisions related to ICANN 
are made in the Nation's interest, are accountable and 
transparent, and preserve the security, stability, and 
resiliency of the Internet for consumers, business, and the 
U.S. Government. The Committee instructs the NTIA to assess and 
report to the Committee within 30 days on the adequacy of 
NTIA's and ICANN's compliance with the Affirmation of 
Commitments, and whether NTIA's assessment of ICANN will have 
in place the necessary security elements to protect 
stakeholders as ICANN moves forward with expanding the number 
of top level Internet domain names available.

    PUBLIC TELECOMMUNICATIONS FACILITIES, PLANNING, AND CONSTRUCTION

    The Committee provides bill language allowing the NTIA to 
continue oversight and administration of previously awarded 
grants. NTIA shall not use unobligated balances to award new 
grants.

               United States Patent and Trademark Office


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $2,933,241,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   3,024,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,024,000,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $3,024,000,000 for 
the United States Patent and Trademark Office [USPTO], which is 
$90,759,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and equal 
to the budget request, to be derived from offsetting fee 
collections.
    USPTO is the central hub of an innovation-friendly 
Government. USPTO examines patent applications, grants patent 
protection for qualified inventions, and disseminates 
technological information disclosed in patents. USPTO also 
examines trademark applications and provides Federal 
registration to owners of qualified trademarks.
    Budget Execution.--The Committee continues to allow USPTO 
full access to patent and trademark fees and provides language 
allowing USPTO to retain any revenue in excess of appropriated 
levels.
    The Committee provides $2,000,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General [OIG] to continue oversight and audits of 
USPTO operations and budget transparency, and USPTO is directed 
to work with the Department of Commerce to implement all OIG 
recommendations.
    The Committee is concerned that USPTO is not taking 
appropriate steps to ensure that the Patent End-to-End system 
is developed and managed efficiently without repeating problems 
encountered by USPTO with past automation efforts. Not later 
than 90 days following enactment of this act, USPTO will submit 
a report to the Committee detailing a plan to fully implement 
and manage the Patent End-to-End system efficiently without 
duplicating setbacks experienced from previous automated 
efforts.
    Fee Collections Projections.--The Committee directs the 
USPTO to provide quarterly reports on its projected fee 
collections, and to notify the Committee during any month when 
significant changes in such projections prompt serious concern 
or require drastic budgetary responses.
    USPTO's own revenue projections--though more refined than 
previous years--have consistently overestimated real returns. 
It is imperative that USPTO balance sustainable operations with 
realistic revenue and judicious reserve spending.
    Reprogramming and Spend Plan.--USPTO is required to 
continue to follow the reprogramming procedures outlined in 
section 505 of this act before using excess fee collections to 
forward fund expenses beyond fiscal year 2014. Any deviations 
from the funding distribution provided for in this act, 
including carryover balances, are subject to the standard 
reprogramming procedures set forth in section 505 of this act. 
USPTO is directed to provide a spending plan for fiscal year 
2014, within 30 days of enactment of this act, incorporating 
all carryover balances from previous fiscal years, and 
describing any changes to the patent or trademark fee 
structure. Any changes from the spending plan shall also be 
subject to section 505 of this act. USPTO is directed to submit 
all reprogramming, spending plans and budget justifications to 
the Committee through the Department of Commerce.
    Patent Backlog.--The backlog of unprocessed patent 
applications has decreased 8 percent since 2012, but over 
566,800 patents still need approval. The average wait time has 
decreased as well, but USPTO still takes over 30 months to make 
a decision. USPTO's goal is to reduce this latency to 18 months 
by 2016.
    Patent Reviews.--The Committee urges the USPTO to increase 
the quality of patent reviews by continuing to increase the 
level of industry expertise the agency retains on staff, 
including exploring innovative solutions such as engaging and 
employing retired industry experts on a part-time basis. The 
Committee also strongly encourages USPTO to reduce ambiguity 
and vagueness in patent decisions by increasing examiner 
training regarding the appropriate use of rejections under 35 
U.S.C. 112 (a) and (b), which dictate that the patent applicant 
more thoroughly defend the invention by describing it as fully, 
clearly, and exactly as possible, and by distinctly delineating 
its bounds at the time of application submission to the USPTO.
    Satellite Offices.--The Committee maintains support for 
USPTO's nationwide workforce program and the establishment of 
satellite offices. The Committee's recommendation includes 
funding to fully fund existing satellite offices to occupy 
permanent facilities. Additionally, the Committee recognizes 
the value of creating more satellite offices in regions with a 
high volume of patents filed and issued to provide increased 
access to patent seekers. When selecting locations for 
additional satellite offices, the Committee directs USPTO to 
consider the regional volume of patent activity, geographic 
distribution of existing satellite offices, availability of 
donated space for satellite offices within a geographic area 
not currently served by USPTO, access to transportation 
options, and proximity to universities and patent experts.

             National Institute of Standards and Technology

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $807,086,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     928,292,000
Committee recommendation................................     947,547,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $947,547,000 for 
the National Institute of Standards and Technology [NIST]. The 
recommendation is $140,461,000 above the fiscal year 2013 
enacted level and $19,255,000 above the budget request. Up to 
$9,000,000 may be transferred from the Scientific and Technical 
Research and Services account to the Working Capital Fund.
    NIST's mission is to promote U.S. innovation and industrial 
competitiveness by advancing measurement science, standards, 
and technology in ways that enhance economic security and 
improve our quality of life.
    A description of each NIST account and the corresponding 
Committee recommendation follows in the subsequent three 
headings.

             SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL RESEARCH AND SERVICES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $608,295,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     693,745,000
Committee recommendation................................     703,000,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $703,000,000 for 
NIST research and services. The recommendation is $94,705,000 
above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and $9,255,000 above 
the budget request.
    Cybersecurity.--The Committee supports the administration's 
strong request for cybersecurity activities within NIST, which 
includes: $15,000,000 for the National Cybersecurity Center of 
Excellence; $15,000,000 for the Comprehensive National 
Cybersecurity Initiative; and $24,500,000 for the National 
Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace. In addition, the 
Committee directs NIST to maintain funding for the National 
Initiative for Cybersecurity Education at $4,000,000.
    The Committee has included the budget request of 
$15,000,000 for the National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence 
[NCCoE] and is encouraged by NIST's recent announcement that 
multiple companies have agreed to partner with the Center on 
various hardware, software, and best practice initiatives. The 
Committee remains supportive of NIST's proposal to transition 
management of the Center to a Federally Funded Research and 
Development Center co-located near NIST headquarters. The 
Committee expects the NCCoE to evolve into a technology 
transfer hub for cyber solutions derived from Government and 
private sector tools as they apply to specific sectors of the 
Nation's critical infrastructure, such as energy, financial 
services, telecommunications, transportation, and health, and 
as a key location for major research and development in 
cybersecurity as it applies to these and other key sectors of 
the U.S. economy.
    The Committee encourages DOC to fund multidisciplinary 
programs of study and research that focus on tackling 
cybersecurity issues on a global scale. When establishing 
criteria for external grant funding, consideration should only 
be given to institutions of higher education, including 
community colleges, designated by the National Security Agency 
as Centers of Academic Excellence for Information Assurance 
Education and Centers for Academic Excellence for Information 
Assurance Research.
    Centers of Excellence.--The Committee supports the 
administration's proposal to create Centers of Excellence that 
will produce collaborations between NIST, academic, and 
industry specialists on research focused on innovations in 
measurement science and new technology developments. Similar 
collaborations have already yielded significant benefits in 
areas of nanomaterials, healthcare, batteries and 
electrochemical energy conversion, and advanced photovoltaic 
devices.
    As NIST begins the process of establishing those Centers, 
the Committee encourages NIST to create at least one Center of 
Excellence with a focus on forensic measurement science, 
technology, and standards. Interdisciplinary research to 
enhance forensic science was one of the recommendations made by 
the 2009 National Academy of Sciences report ``Strengthening 
Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward.'' 
Enhanced science, technology, and standards in the areas of 
forensic science, especially computer forensics, are critical 
for the accurate collection, evaluation, and processing of 
evidence that is needed to strengthen our forensic science 
disciplines and to combat burgeoning Internet crime networks.
    As part of the agency's 2014 spending plan, NIST is 
directed to provide an updated framework for creating an 
appropriate number of new centers of excellence from within the 
funds provided.
    Detection Canine Teams.--Detection canine teams play a 
critical role in the Nation's law enforcement and homeland 
security efforts. The capability of a properly developed and 
trained canine-handler team far eclipses other technologies. 
The Committee is concerned however, that scientifically 
validated standards, reference materials, and protocols 
governing the breeding, training, and deployment of detection 
canine teams do not currently exist. Standards, reference 
materials, and protocols are essential to ensuring the overall 
quality of canine teams and their training and deployment which 
ultimately provide long-term value and surety to the end user 
and the public. The Committee directs NIST to collaborate with 
academic and private sector experts recognized for their 
research on canine detection and olfaction to develop rigorous, 
scientifically validated breeding, training, and deployment 
standards, reference materials, and protocols for canine 
detection teams.
    Forensic Science.--In lieu of the funding requested to be 
provided to the Department of Justice and transferred to NIST, 
the Committee has added $5,000,000 for measurement science and 
standards in support of forensic science and directs NIST to 
coordinate its activities with the Department of Justice and 
the National Science Foundation. This funding is in addition to 
$5,000,000 for forensic science included in NIST's request.
    Greenhouse Gas Measurements.--The Committee maintains 
support for NIST's greenhouse gas measurement programs and is 
aware of the need to develop prototype greenhouse gas 
observation networks for measuring carbon dioxide and methane 
in the atmosphere at local scales. In order to increase 
confidence in greenhouse gas emissions inventories and to 
improve current measurement and standards infrastructure, NIST 
should continue to leverage existing assets and services from 
the private sector that maintain high quality atmospheric 
weather monitoring systems. The Committee recommendation 
includes an additional $3,000,000 above the request to expand 
the number of locations in its public-private partnership to 
measure greenhouse gases on local and regional scales.
    Facility Security.--The Committee continues to provide 
funding for NIST to maintain security operations for its 
laboratories and facilities. The Federal Protective Services 
[FPS] has previously proposed to take over NIST's security 
operations, yet the Committee has not received a plan from the 
administration that would detail the transfer of security 
funding and responsibility from NIST to FPS. Therefore, the 
Committee does not grant such a transfer during fiscal year 
2014.
    STEM Education.--The Committee continues to support NIST's 
activities related to Science, Technology, Engineering and 
Mathematics [STEM] Education and fully funds its activities 
authorized under 15 U.S.C. 278g-2a.

                     INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY SERVICES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $140,035,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     174,507,000
Committee recommendation................................     184,507,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $184,507,000 for 
Industrial Technology Services. The recommendation is 
$44,472,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and 
$10,000,000 above the budget request. Supporting the Nation's 
manufacturers, especially small businesses, is critical to 
keeping America innovative in a global marketplace. The 
Committee's recommendation provides $153,078,000 for the 
Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership Program and 
$31,429,000 for the Advanced Manufacturing Consortia.
    Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership Program 
[MEP].--The Committee supports the full request of $153,078,000 
for MEP. The request includes $25,000,000 for a Manufacturing 
Technology Acceleration Center [M-TAC] within MEP. The 
Committee supports the MEP focus on next generation strategies 
like supply chain management that the M-TACs aim to address. 
However, the Committee believes these strategies should be 
implemented by and through the existing network of MEP centers. 
The recommendation supports the creation of three to four pilot 
M-TACs which shall be led by individual MEP centers or 
consortia of MEP centers.
    Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AmTech) Consortia.--
Initial funding for AmTech was provided in fiscal year 2013. 
The program will establish industry-led consortia, which will 
identify and prioritize research projects supporting long term 
industrial research needs. In developing AmTech, the Committee 
encourages NIST to consider partnerships and investments in 
pharmaceutical manufacturing as well as more traditional areas 
of manufacturing, including clean energy.
    Both the fiscal year 2013 and 2014 requests also included 
$1,000,000,000 in mandatory funding for the National Network of 
Manufacturing Institutes [NNMI]. This Committee cannot initiate 
a $1,000,000,000 mandatory program, and the authorizing 
committees have not acted on this proposal. The Department of 
Defense and the Department of Energy have begun investments in 
mission-related NNMI pilot institutes using discretionary 
funding, and NIST is responsible for coordinating the NNMI 
through the Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office.
    The proposed NNMI institutes would be public private 
partnerships in regional hubs that aim to accelerate 
development and adoption of cutting-edge manufacturing 
technologies for making new, globally competitive products. The 
Committee does not believe there is a significant distinction 
between the AmTech consortia and the proposed NNMI institutes. 
The Committee has provided $10,000,000 above the request for 
AmTech and directs that at least one AmTech consortium using 
the pilot NNMI model be funded using discretionary funding 
provided for AmTech. The Committee also directs NIST to report, 
within 60 days of enactment, on how NNMI-related efforts can be 
merged into AmTech.

                  CONSTRUCTION OF RESEARCH FACILITIES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $58,756,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      60,040,000
Committee recommendation................................      60,040,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $60,040,000 for 
construction of research facilities. The recommendation is 
$1,284,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and equal 
to the budget request.
    The recommendation funds the highest priority construction, 
maintenance, and repair projects at NIST. The Committee directs 
NIST to provide quarterly reports on the status of all 
construction projects.

            National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2013\1\\2\..............................  $5,320,181,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   5,439,738,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,589,738,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.
\2\Includes emergency funding of $326,000,000 in the Disaster Relief 
Appropriations Act, 2013 (division A of Public Law 113-2).

    The Committee's recommendation provides $5,589,738,000 for 
the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [NOAA]. The 
recommendation is $269,557,000 above the fiscal year 2013 
enacted level and $150,000,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee notes that the fiscal year 2014 budget 
request for NOAA is relatively more balanced than recent years 
with reasonable attention put towards all operations: ocean, 
fisheries, weather, and climate. The administration clearly 
considered the Committee's direction from last fiscal year by 
restoring funding to many important programs. While not all 
proposed terminations were agreed to by the Committee in this 
bill, such requests were at least accompanied by more salient 
justifications.
    Make no mistake--weather satellite acquisitions still 
dominate NOAA's overall budget with substantial increases 
proposed in this request. The difference now is that the 
agency's operations are not disproportionately and arbitrarily 
cut to pay for increased satellite costs. In addition, genuine 
efforts have been made to keep overall lifecycle costs capped 
for satellites, which adds to the Committee's confidence that 
these major acquisitions, though still generally unwieldy, are 
no longer completely untethered. For now, the Committee is 
prepared to maintain accountability and oversight of these 
important acquisitions within the context of the NOAA 
portfolio.
    The Committee points out that appropriations for previous 
generations of polar and geostationary weather satellite system 
acquisitions were strategically offset so that when one 
program's funding profile decreased with completed 
construction, the other program's profile could increase 
without causing dramatic increases in NOAA's overall budget 
requests. However, this fiscal year's budget request clearly 
depicts what the Committee has seen for some time in that the 
agency is suffering from having to finance two major satellite 
procurements with cost profiles in matching phases rather than 
profiles separated by several fiscal years.
    The Committee has accepted this scenario and continues to 
fund each satellite mission on its own merit and justification 
regardless of compounded budget increases. However, even though 
the department and agency are trying to tackle this budget 
profile problem over time, the Committee cannot stress enough 
that actions must be taken now, such as reducing costs for 
current satellite programs, while conducting thorough planning 
for the follow-on missions to ensure the next satellite systems 
have grounded requirements early on.

                  OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2013\1\\2\..............................  $3,188,082,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   3,277,833,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,296,254,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.
\2\Includes emergency funding of $140,000,000 in the Disaster Relief 
Appropriations Act, 2013 (division A of Public Law 113-2).

    The Committee's recommendation provides $3,296,254,000 for 
NOAA's operations, research, and facilities. The recommendation 
is $108,172,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and 
$18,421,000 above the budget request.

                      NOAA NATIONAL OCEAN SERVICE

    The Committee's recommendation provides $504,809,000 for 
the National Ocean Service [NOS]. NOS programs provide 
scientific, technical, and management expertise to promote safe 
navigation; assess the health of coastal and marine resources; 
respond to natural and human-induced threats; and preserve the 
coastal ocean and global environments. The Committee supports 
the administration's proposal for a new budget structure for 
NOS.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

       NATIONAL OCEAN SERVICE OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Navigation, Observation and Positioning:
    Navigation, Observations and Positioning...........          149,852
    Hydrographic Survey Priorities/Contracts...........           26,946
    Integrated Ocean Observing System--Regional                   34,520
     Observations......................................
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Navigation, Observations and Positioning..          211,318
                                                        ================
Coastal Science and Assessment:
    Coastal Science, Assessment, Response and                     71,185
     Restoration.......................................
    Competitive External Research......................           12,000
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Coastal Science and Assessment............           83,185
                                                        ================
Ocean and Coastal Management and Services:
    Coastal Science, Assessment, Response and                     41,188
     Restoration.......................................
    Coastal Management Grants..........................           71,146
    Coral Reef Program.................................           26,775
    National Estuarine Research Reserve System.........           21,979
    National Marine Sanctuaries........................           49,218
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Ocean and Coastal Management and Services.          210,306
                                                        ================
      GRAND TOTAL NOS..................................          504,809
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Navigation, Observations and Positioning.--The Committee 
fully supports the administration's request for activities 
under Navigation, Observations and Positioning, including the 
full operational funding for NOAA's Navigation Response Teams.
    The Committee directs NOAA to provide the Committee with a 
report within 90 days of enactment of this act on designating 
two additional joint ocean and coastal mapping centers as 
authorized under the Omnibus Public Land Management Act of 2009 
(Public Law 111-11). The three total centers should be located 
in different geographic areas of the country. The report shall 
include a proposal on how fiscal year 2014 funds will be used 
toward the establishment of these centers and any estimated 
out-year costs.
    The Committee provides $4,000,000 within Navigation, 
Observations and Positioning to continue the competitive 
Geospatial Modeling Grants Program of which all funding shall 
be distributed externally.
    The Committee fully supports the administration's request 
for Physical Oceanographic Real-Time System [PORTS]. The 
Committee believes these operations, which exist as a 
partnership between NOAA and local port authorities, have been 
extremely valuable tools for providing information for safe 
vessel navigation and data for weather and coastal monitoring. 
The Committee encourages NOAA to request funding that reflects 
the totality of the program's costs, including operations and 
maintenance, in future budget requests, as authorized by 
Hydrographic Services Improvement Act (Public Law 110-386) in 
future budget submissions.
    Coastal Science, Assessment, Response and Restoration.--
Within the funds provided for Coastal Science, Assessment, 
Response and Restoration, $2,500,000 shall be for operations 
and staffing of the Gulf of Mexico Disaster Response Center 
[DRC], of which up to $500,000 may be used to support 
authorized activities for the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration 
Council, which was established by the Federal Water Pollution 
Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1321), to be carried out at the DRC. The 
DRC serves as the Gulf Coast hub for NOAA's emergency 
preparedness, response, and recovery operations which 
complements the mission of the Restoration Council. Not later 
than 90 days after enactment of this act, NOAA shall provide a 
report to the Committee detailing the facility's operational 
capacity, the current needs to reach full operational capacity, 
and expected outcomes of maintaining full operational capacity 
at the DRC.
    National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science [NCCOS].--The 
Committee maintains strong support for NCCOS and the services 
that the different centers provide. With regards to NCCOS's 
Oxford Lab, the Committee retracts its previous position of 
exploring options for moving the center to the National Marine 
Fisheries Service [NMFS], and instead directs NOS to work with 
Oxford's partners and NMFS to continue to create a more stable 
and viable center within NCCOS. Despite this change in 
direction, the Committee still feels that the Oxford lab, like 
other NCOSS centers, is underutilized and has not achieved its 
potential as a valuable laboratory, and as such, NOAA should 
provide adequate funding in future fiscal years to maintain a 
stable baseline of operational funding for inherently 
governmental duties.
    Marine Debris.--The Committee supports the requested level 
for NOAA's Marine Debris program but is concerned the current 
budget request does not adequately address the cleanup effort 
for debris impacting the West Coast of the United States as a 
result of the 2011 tsunami. Debris from the 2011 tsunami 
continues to negatively impact the West Coast and local 
communities, ecosystems, and subsistence activities. The 
Committee directs NOAA to use the one-time gift of $5,000,000 
provided by the Government of Japan to the United States to 
reimburse States, local governments, and tribes for any cleanup 
activities undertaken in response to tsunami marine debris 
resulting from the 2011 tsunami, which includes reimbursing 
States, local governments, and tribes for associated cleanup 
activities previously conducted. The Committee also recommends 
that the additional $1,000,000 provided to the Marine Debris 
Program for marine debris research and development instead be 
redirected to the community-based Removal Grants Program with 
priority given to assist communities affected by marine debris 
from the 2011 tsunami.
    Furthermore, the Committee is concerned about the lack of 
interagency coordination and planning being done by the 
administration to prepare for and respond to marine debris 
resulting from the 2011 Japanese tsunami. Specific concerns 
include how Federal agencies are coordinating and funding the 
removal of marine debris from Federal lands and the response to 
invasive species. Within 60 days of enactment of this act, the 
Secretary of Commerce is directed to submit a report to the 
Committee on how the Department is working with the Departments 
of Agriculture, Defense, Homeland Security, Interior, State, 
and Transportation to prepare for and respond to this debris 
and how it is coordinating with affected States, tribes, and 
local governments regarding that work.
    Ocean and Coastal Management Services.--For fiscal year 
2014, the Committee maintains strong support for NOAA's 
Alliance for Coastal Technologies within the Integrated Ocean 
Observing System, as in years past, given the program's 
valuable expertise in marine sensor technology development. The 
Committee directs NOAA to provide the Committee with a report 
within 90 days of enactment of this act on the prospects and 
advantages of migrating ACT to NOAA's Coastal Services Center.
    Coastal Storms.--The Committee provides the budget request 
level of $2,774,000 for NOAA's Coastal Storms program and 
encourages NOAA to continue working with existing Cooperative 
Institutes, other NOAA funded programs, and States to employ a 
multidisciplinary approach to developing innovative solutions 
addressing key issues of coastal resilience and emerging issues 
related to coastal storms.
    Regional Ocean Partnerships.--The Committee provides the 
requested level for Regional Ocean Partnership [ROP] grants. 
The Committee notes that the Governor of a given State may send 
written notification to NOAA deferring its participation in and 
opportunity to receive ROP grants. The purpose of such 
notification would be to prevent any funds from being used in 
contradiction of a State policy or to support activities 
inconsistent with a State's coastal management plan.

                 NOAA NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE

    The Committee's recommendation provides $840,332,000 for 
the National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS]. NMFS programs 
provide for the management and conservation of the Nation's 
living marine resources and their environment, including fish 
stocks, marine mammals, and endangered species. Using science-
based conservation, management, and restoration activities, 
these resources can benefit the Nation on a sustained basis. 
NMFS seeks to build sustainable fisheries, recover protected 
species, and sustain healthy coastal ecosystems and the 
communities that depend on them.
    Committee recommendations are displayed in the following 
table:

 NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Protected Species Research and Management:
    Protected Species Research and Management Programs            39,595
     Base.............................................
    Species Recovery Grants...........................             7,516
    Marine Mammal Protection..........................            49,700
    Other Protected Species...........................             7,264
    Marine Turtles....................................            12,200
    Atlantic Salmon...................................             6,083
    Pacific Salmon....................................            61,400
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Protected Species Research and Management           183,758
                                                       =================
Fisheries Research and Management:
    Fisheries Research and Management Programs........           177,923
    National Catch Share Program......................            27,246
    Expand Annual Stock Assessments...................            69,259
    Economics and Social Sciences Research............             7,390
    Salmon Management Activities......................            30,282
    Regional Councils and Fisheries Commissions.......            32,008
    Fisheries Statistics..............................            23,860
    Fish Information Networks.........................            22,114
    Survey and Monitoring Projects....................            24,754
    Fisheries Oceanography............................             2,160
    American Fisheries Act............................             3,742
    Interjurisdictional Fisheries Grants..............             2,500
    National Standard 8...............................             1,031
    Reducing Bycatch..................................             4,469
    Product Quality and Safety........................             6,763
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Fisheries Research and Management........           435,501
                                                       =================
Enforcement and Observers:
    Enforcement and Surveillance......................            67,764
    Observers and Training............................            43,571
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Enforcement and Observers................           111,335
                                                       =================
Habitat Conservation and Restoration..................            47,031
                                                       =================
Other Activities Supporting Fisheries:
    Antarctic Research................................             3,115
    Aquaculture.......................................             6,748
    Climate Regimes and Ecosystem Productivity........             2,348
    Computer Hardware and Software....................             1,812
    Cooperative Research..............................            12,037
    Information Analyses & Dissemination..............            15,021
    Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and                      842
     Prediction Program...............................
    National Environmental Policy Act.................             6,673
    NMFS Facilities Maintenance.......................             3,391
    Regional Studies..................................            10,720
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Other Activities Supporting Fisheries....            62,707
                                                       =================
      GRAND TOTAL NMFS................................           840,332
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Protected Species Research and Management.--The Committee 
rejects the administration's proposal to terminate the John H. 
Prescott Marine Mammal Rescue Assistance Grant Program and 
provides sufficient funding for Prescott grants within the 
Marine Mammal Protection account. In awarding such grants, the 
Committee directs NOAA to consider geographic equity among 
stranding regions, the size of marine mammal populations 
inhabiting a geographic area within such a region, and 
established records for rescuing or rehabilitating sick and 
stranded marine mammals in a particular stranding region.
    Steller Sea Lions.--The Committee is concerned about NOAA's 
failure to respond to external, independent critical 
evaluations of the agency's use of science in developing its 
Biological Opinion [BiOp] for Steller sea lions. Within 60 days 
of enactment of this act, NOAA shall report to the Committee on 
how the agency is incorporating the findings of the Center of 
Independent Experts panel into a revised BiOp or other relevant 
management documents.
    Promote and Develop Fisheries Products and Research Funding 
Transfer.--The bill maintains the provision restricting the use 
of the Promote and Develop Fisheries Products and Research 
funds transferred from the Department of Agriculture to NOAA in 
a way that better meets the intended purpose of the transfer 
mandated by the Saltonstall-Kennedy Act. None of the funds may 
be used for internal NOAA management, but rather funds may only 
be used for activities that directly help U.S. fisheries and 
fishery communities. Specifically, these funds may only be used 
for: cooperative research; annual stock assessments; efforts to 
improve data collection, including catch monitoring and 
reporting for commercial, charter, and recreational fisheries; 
interjurisdictional fisheries grants; and Fisheries Information 
Networks.
    The Committee further directs that no less than 10 percent 
of the total amount of the transferred funds shall be provided 
for the competitive Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant program. For 
fiscal year 2014, NOAA shall direct these funds toward 
community-based bridge plans designed to help coastal fishing 
industries adapt to reductions in allowable catches by 
retooling their fishing fleets, shore services, and port 
facilities into sustainable and innovative businesses. The 
Committee sees the value in using this transition assistance to 
stabilize our Nation's valuable fishing communities during 
times of recovery.
    As part of the 2014 spending plan, NOAA shall include a 
clear accounting of how the Promote and Develop transfer funds 
will be allocated. Furthermore, NOAA shall provide a clear 
accounting of how the agency plans to allocate these 
transferred funds based on the funding criteria described in 
this bill.
    Regional Facility and Laboratory Consolidation.--NMFS again 
proposes to consolidate the Northwest and Southwest Fisheries 
Regional Offices into a single West Coast Regional Office, 
which the Congress approved in fiscal year 2013. However, the 
Committee remains concerned that the consolidation will 
diminish services or delay the timely execution of regulatory 
reviews or scientific support, particularly NOAA's ability to 
meet the demands on its Endangered Species Act Pacific Salmon 
program. The Committee directs the administration to use 
available funds to develop and implement salmon life cycle 
modeling at NOAA Fisheries that will satisfy NOAA's obligations 
to address or revise existing salmonid biological opinions 
pursuant to Federal court orders or to provide regulatory 
reviews pertaining to Pacific Salmon habitat conservation 
planning processes.
    Northeast Regional Fisheries Office.--The Committee notes 
with grave disappointment that NOAA has determined that NMFS 
will not act on amenable direction set forth in the fiscal year 
2013 appropriations bill to enhance and repair core NMFS 
functions in the Mid-Atlantic region in the areas of fisheries 
management, endangered species, habitat protection, and 
restoration.
    Furthermore, NOAA has not delivered, and has no timeline 
for delivering, a report that was requested by the Committee to 
be delivered 30 days after enactment of the fiscal year 2013 
appropriations bill on ways NOAA would: ``(1) streamline 
procedures to allow Mid-Atlantic fisheries decisions to be made 
locally rather than remotely, as appropriate and consistent 
with procedures and practices in other NMFS regions; (2) 
increase the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council's 
accessibility to NOAA, consistent with the accessibility 
afforded to other fishery management councils; (3) reduce 
bureaucracy to allow difficult Mid-Atlantic issues to be 
brought to the attention of the NMFS Northeast Regional Office 
[NERO] and NOAA Fisheries leadership in NOAA headquarters on an 
expedited basis; and (4) improve on-the-ground coordination 
with Mid-Atlantic fisheries partners.''
    Such direction had been mutually agreed upon by the 
Committee and NOAA after the Committee has proposed moving 
operations of NERO to NMFS's headquarters to more centrally 
locate regional presence after witnessing years of 
disproportionate attention across NERO's vast jurisdiction. 
However, given NOAA's lack of cooperation and reversal of 
commitment, the Committee has no choice but to take action and 
direct NOAA to close NERO immediately and to dissolve all 
necessary operations into existing facilities located 
throughout the region.
    Specifically, NOAA is directed to improve outreach and 
services to the fishing industry by configuring fishery science 
centers and fishery statistic offices as newly configured and 
less stove-piped portals to the local fishing communities. With 
minimal overhead investment, including technology investment 
and updated staffing plans, these offices could be much better 
utilized to serve a larger NMFS purpose. Instead of relying on, 
or having to travel to, the NERO office for direct industry 
support, fishermen would have better and more immediate access 
to NMFS support services at existing NMFS offices in their home 
states, if not their homeports. The Committee directs NOAA to 
ensure that core NMFS support services be retained and 
accessible in all regions currently served by NERO, including 
New England, Mid-Atlantic, and South-Atlantic regions, at these 
local centers and offices. NOAA, in consultation with the 
Committee, shall work with the General Services Administration 
immediately to develop a plan to resolve NERO's current leased 
space, and create a plan to redirect an adequate portion of 
NERO's larger operational costs to outfit the local regional 
offices.
    Baseline Data for Gulf of Mexico.--The Committee recognizes 
that commercial and recreational fisheries in the Gulf of 
Mexico, as in other regions of the United States, contribute 
significantly to the well-being of the Gulf States' and the 
Nation's economies. The Deepwater Horizon tragedy and resulting 
gulf oil spill brought to light a serious lack of baseline data 
critical in evaluating fisheries health. The Committee directs 
NOAA to continue supporting baseline research for fisheries 
health in the Gulf of Mexico, including studies of pelagic 
species. NOAA should seek to leverage and augment fisheries 
research in the gulf that is supported by any civil or criminal 
fines resulting from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, as well 
as fisheries research conducted as part of the National 
Resources Damage Assessment process. Collaboration with ongoing 
and future fisheries research activities in the gulf has the 
potential to provide NMFS with an integrated and comprehensive 
ecosystem-level fisheries monitoring enterprise and sentinel 
species program.
    Pacific Salmon Treaty.--Within the amount provided for 
Salmon Management activities, the Committee provides a total of 
$10,900,000 to enable the States and tribal communities to move 
forward on necessary Pacific Salmon Treaty agreements. In 
addition, the Committee fully supports all other aspects of the 
budget request for Salmon Management activities that are 
essential to meeting these treaty obligations.
    Stock Assessments--Red Snapper.--The Committee is concerned 
that restrictive fishing regulations for red snapper in the 
Gulf of Mexico implemented by NOAA are not consistent with the 
rebuilding and increased health of this fish population. The 
Committee directs NOAA to continue taking into account 
artificial reefs when updating a stock assessment for red 
snapper or when conducting any new stock assessments for red 
snapper, begin taking into account offshore man-made structures 
such as oil rigs and fixed energy exploration infrastructure 
that may contribute to increases in red snapper population, and 
additionally to take into consideration any imbalance in the 
ecosystem that may be occurring between larger red snapper and 
other fish species. The Committee directs NOAA to dedicate 
necessary funding toward researching new methods and innovative 
approaches for fisheries-independent data collection, including 
activities that use resources and expertise offered by 
fishermen and research universities. This research should 
contribute to a better understanding and estimation of post 
settlement survival, critical nursery habitat, and natural 
mortality of red snapper and similar fish species. Not later 
than 90 days following enactment of this act, NOAA, in 
consultation with the appropriate Gulf State agencies, shall 
submit to the Committees on Appropriations a report summarizing 
existing efforts to collect fisheries-independent data, new 
approaches being considered to collect fisheries-independent 
data, and a plan to implement and include new approaches to 
collect fisheries-independent data in future stock assessments 
for red snapper. The report shall also include an analysis of 
the benefits provided by the Gulf of Mexico red snapper fishery 
to the local, regional, and national economy.
    Stock Assessment--Formulations.--The current NMFS stock 
assessment process forces regulators to base their fishing 
allocation decisions on prior-year data, which for some fish 
species can mean allocations based on major assessments that 
are several years old. Conversely, some State-managed fishery 
agencies have been able to provide near real-time fisheries 
data from commercial and recreational fisherman that may be 
used to validate stock assessment models, which provides a 
confirmation of the stock assessment outputs as they relate to 
current fish populations and harvest trends. The Committee 
directs NMFS to work with its State partners to evaluate their 
processes for incorporating new information into stock 
assessments whenever they are updated or re-run, and to 
incorporate all appropriate information into those new models. 
The Committee believes that making this improvement will 
increase the overall accuracy and efficiency of such 
assessments, provide regulators with access to more reliable 
information and give fishermen more confidence in NOAA's stock 
assessments.
    Big Eye Tuna Quotas in the Western and Central Pacific.--
The subcommittee notes that NMFS has been unable to amend the 
fishery management plans in its Pacific Islands region to allow 
for the assignment of unused big eye tuna quota from American 
Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Marianas Islands, and Guam to 
Hawaii's longline fleet. This amendment is crucial to support 
the well-managed domestic longline fishery for big eye tuna. To 
provide NMFS time to amend the fishery management plans, the 
subcommittee has been willing to enact interim language for the 
last 2 years to provide for such assignments in the absence of 
the amendment. The Committee will not enact a further 
extension, and instead directs NMFS to provide a timeline for 
adopting the amendment within 30 calendar days after enactment 
of this act.
    Charter Vessels.--To help improve the quality and abundance 
of fishery data used for stock assessments, NOAA is directed to 
dramatically expand the agency's activities in chartering 
commercial fishing vessels to serve as research and fishery 
survey vessels. Increasing these charter opportunities will 
enlarge the geographically diverse data collection for broad 
fish populations and enhance numerous ocean research programs. 
Other parts of NOAA, including the National Ocean Service and 
Ocean and Atmospheric Research line offices, shall charter 
commercial fishing vessels, when applicable, to augment ongoing 
survey and research activities.
    American Lobster.--The southern New England stock of 
American lobster has been in decline and is under increasing 
stress. Although the Atlantic States Marine Fishery Commission 
exercises primary regulatory responsibility for this fishery, 
portions of six out of seven management areas are in Federal 
waters. NMFS implements complementary regulations for the 
fishery in these areas, but a void of data about the condition 
of this fishery still exists. To improve coordination and 
consistency, the Committee continues to direct NMFS to engage 
the industry in conducting surveys and research that 
complements activities undertaken by the States.
    Arctic Environmental Impact Statement.--The Committee is 
concerned about the impacts the Supplemental Draft 
Environmental Impact Statement for the Effects of Oil and Gas 
Activities in the Arctic Ocean [SDEIS] issued by the National 
Marine Fisheries Service may have on the development of oil and 
natural gas resources in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas. The 
Committee acknowledges the improvements that have been made 
over the previous draft. However, there remain issues to be 
resolved before a final EIS should be released. The Committee 
expects the final EIS to be the result of a collaborative 
effort with the relevant agencies of expertise, including the 
Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the 
appropriate entities in the State of Alaska, including the 
State, the North Slope Borough, and the Northwest Arctic 
Borough. If the scope of the final EIS is to include Fish and 
Wildlife Service trust species, the Committee expects NMFS to 
coordinate with the Service. Further, the Committee expects 
NMFS to address the following categories of comments and 
concerns raised during the comment period on the SDEIS in the 
final EIS, including, but not limited to: the scope, purpose 
and time period of the EIS; range of reasonably foreseeable 
activity levels and drilling programs; mitigation measures, 
including time and area closures; acoustic criteria for impacts 
to marine mammals; and analysis of the socioeconomic impacts of 
oil and gas activity in the Arctic.
    Bycatch Reduction.--The development and implementation of 
practical bycatch solutions is a priority of U.S. and 
international fisheries management and protected species 
conservation. The Committee supports the requested amount for 
Reducing Bycatch, of which NMFS is directed to make $2,500,000 
available for competitive grants to non-Federal researchers 
working with U.S. fishermen on the development of improved 
fishing practices and innovative gear technologies.
    Enforcement and Observation.--The Committee is aware that 
implementation of the Northeast Multispecies fishery sector 
management program continues to present substantial financial 
challenges to the participants as well as to the economic 
sustainability of the fishery and fishing communities 
throughout the region. Within the funding provided for the 
National Catch Share Plan and observer coverage, the Committee 
directs NMFS to provide adequate funding for at-sea and 
dockside monitoring for fisheries with approved catch share 
management plans including catch share management plans that 
impose observer coverage as a condition for new or expanded 
fishing opportunities.
    Electronic Logbooks.--Within the funds provided for NMFS, 
the Committee directs NOAA to maintain full funding for the 
continued installation of electronic logbooks and monitoring 
systems, which is both inherent to NOAA's core mission and 
essential to the implementation of current fishery regulations. 
The electronic monitoring systems shall be part of an 
integrated at-sea monitoring program and shall serve as an 
alternative to observers for vessels carrying such electronic 
monitoring systems. Beginning in fiscal year 2014, NMFS shall, 
at a minimum, dedicate 35 percent of the fees collected from 
fixed gear vessels to the deployment of electronic monitoring 
systems on these same vessels and shall make such electronic 
monitoring systems available to these vessels in lieu of 
observers beginning in 2014. The National Marine Fisheries 
Service shall work with the fixed gear fleet to develop an 
Experimental Fisheries Permit for 2014 that contributes to the 
continued development of a viable electronic monitoring system.
    Habitat Conservation and Restoration.--The Committee 
maintains support for the consolidation of coastal habitat 
programs into the Habitat Conservation and Restoration program. 
Within funds provided, no less than $1,000,000 shall be for the 
Estuary Restoration Program, and no less than $20,000,000 shall 
be for Community-based Restoration Grants. NOAA is encouraged 
to consider habitat restoration grants for river basins that 
are critical to the restoration of priority fisheries, 
including basins with a history of drought-driven conflicts 
over natural resources including fisheries, and where such 
conflicts are being settled through collaborative efforts. 
Furthermore, NOAA is encouraged to work with tribal governments 
so they can engage in collaborative management and restoration 
of fisheries.
    NOAA shall make external competitive funding available to 
partnerships and restoration projects that support multiple 
ecosystem services, particularly coastal economic benefits and 
shoreline resiliency through the Community-based Restoration 
Program. The Committee is concerned about recent changes made 
by NOAA to their implementation and partnership selection 
process. The Committee directs NOAA to work more, not less, 
cooperatively with non-Federal partners to ensure that the 
program meets local restoration needs and interests, with 
technical and scientific expertise provided by NOAA.
    Oyster Reef Restoration.--The Committee acknowledges 
ecological and health benefits that oyster reefs offer in 
providing valuable habitat for marine life and improving water 
quality, and is concerned about the shortage of available 
natural oyster shell for coastal and bay restoration programs. 
Therefore, the Committee encourages NOAA to work with its State 
and non-Federal partners to consider supporting oyster shell 
recycling programs as part of the agency's competitive external 
funding opportunities for habitat restoration projects.
    Cooperative Research.--Depleted fish stocks result in 
significant economic losses to our Nation. At a time when 
fishing opportunities are constrained by uncertainty in stock 
assessment, and increased access to healthy stocks depends on 
better data, the Committee believes that maintenance of ongoing 
monitoring programs and surveys is critical. The Committee 
encourages NMFS to continue to prioritize long-time series 
surveys, with emphasis on surveys that are conducted 
cooperatively with industry and States.
    Regional Studies.--The Committee supports the 
administration's request for activities proposed under Regional 
Studies, but does not support the proposed reduction of funding 
for Chesapeake Bay Studies and Restoration, and therefore 
provides adequate funding for NOAA to maintain these regional 
services and activities.

                 NOAA OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH

    The Committee's recommendation provides $446,153,000 for 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Research [OAR]. OAR programs provide 
the environmental research and technology needed to improve 
NOAA weather services, air quality warnings, forecasts, climate 
predictions, and marine services. To accomplish these goals, 
OAR supports a network of scientists in its Federal research 
laboratories, universities, and joint institutes and 
partnership programs.
    Committee recommendations are displayed in the following 
table:

  OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH OPERATIONS, RESEARCH AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Climate Research:
    Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes..........            65,098
    Regional Climate Data and Information............            40,007
    Climate Competitive Research.....................            68,735
                                                      ------------------
      Total, Climate Research........................           173,840
                                                      ==================
Weather and Air Chemistry Research Programs:
    Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes..........            64,359
    U.S. Weather Research Program....................             4,241
    Tornado Severe Storm Research/Phased Array Radar.            13,024
                                                      ------------------
      Total, Weather and Air Chemistry Research......            81,624
                                                      ==================
Ocean, Coastal and Great Lakes Research:
    Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes..........            26,442
    National Sea Grant College Program...............            72,200
    Sustained Ocean Observations and Monitoring......            42,750
    Integrated Ocean Acidification...................             8,411
    Ocean Exploration................................            29,100
                                                      ------------------
      Total, Ocean, Coastal and Great Lakes Research.           178,903
                                                      ==================
High Performance Computing Initiatives...............            11,786
                                                      ==================
      GRAND TOTAL OAR................................           446,153
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes.--While some 
cooperative institutes received an increase in the budget 
request, the Committee remains concerned that NOAA continues to 
underfund other cooperative institutes, which weakens the 
agency's partnerships with the external community. The 
Committee provides an increase and expects the administration 
to fully fund these cooperative institutes at appropriate 
levels in future years, including well-established institutes 
focused on: coral reef research; wetland and barrier island 
research; watershed impacts on marine ecosystems; remote 
sensing; and long-term monitoring of oil spill impacts on 
marine ecosystem health. The Committee also encourages NOAA to 
consider how additional cooperative institutes could strengthen 
NOAA's understanding of our oceans, coasts, climate, and 
weather.
    Climate Research.--The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for 
NOAA to move forward with proposed competitive research to 
examine the impacts of climate variability on fish stocks.
    Multi-function Phased Array Radar.--The bill includes 
$13,024,000 for continued development of the multi-function 
phased array radar [MPAR], the same as the budget request. When 
completed, this system has the potential to significantly 
extend lead times for detecting severe and hazardous weather. A 
promising MPAR design that combines dual polarization with 
phased arrays is the Cylindrical Polarimetric Phased Array 
Radar [CPPAR]. The Committee directs NOAA to submit a report to 
the Committees on Appropriations within 120 days after 
enactment of this act that provides a research plan for 
developing a full-scale prototype of CPPAR including the full 
cost of the project, detailed research goals, and a plan and 
timeline for possibly transitioning the technology from 
research to operations.
    Unmanned Aerial Systems.--The Committee provides $5,023,000 
for unmanned aerial systems and encourages NOAA to continue 
research involving these systems that could support the 
agency's operations, especially weather forecasting, hurricane 
tracking, and regional river flood monitoring. The Committee 
encourages NOAA to leverage expertise of research universities 
and the private sector in developing these systems.
    National Sea Grant College Program.--The Committee provides 
$72,200,000 for NOAA's Sea Grant Office. The Committee 
continues to recognize the important role the Sea Grant program 
plays in connecting coastal and Great Lakes communities with 
practical research and results, and encourages the growth of 
this program in future budget requests. The Committee opposes 
the administration's request to eliminate fellowship programs 
within the Sea Grant program, and provides more information on 
this direction within the NOAA Education section of this 
report.
    Within the funds provided, the Sea Grant program shall 
continue its partnership with academic programs that provide 
legal expertise related to the missions of the program and 
NOAA. In addition, the Committee provides $6,000,000 for marine 
aquaculture research. The Committee encourages NOAA, in 
partnership with universities, to support marine aquaculture 
research and development. Research efforts have led to 
beneficial outcomes such as the development and 
commercialization of new technologies to meet U.S. demand for 
warm water marine seafood, including finfish, shrimp, and 
oysters. Within funding provided, NOAA shall competitively 
support external research efforts to develop new technologies 
for marine production species, improve production practices, 
and evaluate production technologies that reduce mortality risk 
for aquaculture species and improve their nutritional value 
while reducing pressure on wild stocks.
    Autonomous Ocean-Going Vehicles.--The Committee supports 
expanding the application of multi-mission, long-range 
autonomous vehicles throughout NOAA, especially where these 
technologies can augment and enhance current surface vessel 
operations. Autonomous vehicles have the ability to employ 
multiple sensors and payloads, reach over 90 percent of ocean 
depths, operate under ice, and operate continuously for months 
without being ship attended. The Committee provides up to 
$4,000,000 to initiate Sea Grant's Grand Challenge. Within 
these funds, the Committee directs OAR to conduct multi-mission 
autonomous vehicles demonstrations designed to augment and 
enhance current NOAA operations. Demonstrations should be 
multipurpose and include, but not be limited to, fisheries and 
marine mammal stock assessments, nautical charting, and general 
ocean research and exploration, including deep sea research.
    Ocean Exploration.--The Committee supports the increased 
budget request for the Office of Ocean Exploration [OE] to 
revitalize OE's annual announcement of opportunity proposal 
process, which will launch further expeditions of exploration. 
To support this proposal process, the Committee directs NOAA to 
use a portion of the increased funding to continue to 
competitively award funding to external academic institutions 
that have partnered with OE in the past, including those with 
ocean-going assets, to support new exploration missions, 
expeditions, and deep sea research. The Committee does not 
support the elimination of OE's education program which is 
consistent with larger direction on the topic of science 
education provided in this bill.

                     NOAA NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE

    The Committee's recommendation provides $961,535,000 for 
the NOAA National Weather Service [NWS]. NWS programs provide 
timely and accurate meteorologic, hydrologic, and oceanographic 
warnings and forecasts to ensure the safety of the population, 
mitigate property losses, and improve the economic productivity 
of the Nation. NWS is also responsible for issuing operational 
climate forecasts for the United States. The Committee has made 
saving lives and livelihoods though accurate weather 
forecasting a priority.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

      NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Research:
    Local Warnings and Forecasts Base.................           669,980
    Air Quality Forecasting...........................               865
    Alaska Data Buoys.................................             1,683
    Sustain Cooperative Observer Network..............               998
    NOAA Profiler Network.............................             1,811
    Pacific Island Compact............................             3,775
    Strengthen U.S. Tsunami Warning Network...........            26,880
    Advanced Hydrological Prediction Services.........            10,209
    Aviation Weather..................................            21,452
    WFO Maintenance...................................             6,588
    Central Forecast Guidance.........................            94,740
    Weather Radio Transmitters Base...................             2,297
    National Mesonet Network..........................            18,500
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Operations and Research..................           859,778
                                                       =================
Systems Operation and Maintenance:
    NEXRAD............................................            46,455
    ASOS..............................................            11,442
    AWIPS.............................................            38,578
    NWSTG Backup--CIP.................................             5,282
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Systems Operation and Maintenance........           101,757
                                                       =================
      GRAND TOTAL NWS.................................           961,535
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Local Warnings and Forecasts Base.--The budget request 
proposes once again to eliminate Information Technology Officer 
[ITO] positions at the 122 Forecast Offices around the country, 
a proposal which was previously rejected by the House of 
Representatives and the Senate Committees on Appropriations in 
the fiscal year 2013 bill. While possessing technical merits in 
updating NWS's IT infrastructure, this repeated request 
continues to fall short of acknowledging the much broader and 
unresolved issue of NWS's inability to baseline its entire 
workforce.
    Since 2010, NWS has seen a reduction of 290 positions, or 
approximately 6 percent of its workforce, with many forecaster 
and other positions left vacant across the country. The 
Committee will not presume or dictate to NOAA the right size of 
the NWS workforce. However, having worked recently with the 
administration to resolve Antideficiency Act violations and 
ungrounded operating costs, the Committee still does not 
possess evidence that the NWS has its workforce plan completely 
under control at this time--certainly not enough to propose 
further workforce reductions without NOAA addressing why some 
positions remain unfilled or articulating what the proper 
staffing level is for field offices. A discussion on a right-
sized NWS must occur, but this budget request is not the forum, 
and this Committee will not serve as the moderator. Thus, the 
Committee's recommendation for the NWS provides funding to 
retain existing ITO positions in fiscal year 2014.
    However, separate from any underlying workforce issues, the 
Committee sees merit in consolidating IT infrastructure, which 
may be analogous to similar IT consolidation efforts occurring 
throughout the Federal Government and in industry. Such a 
consolidation is also consistent with recommendations made in 
the May 2013 report by the National Academy of Public 
Administration [NAPA] titled, ``Forecast for the Future: 
Assuring the Capacity of the National Weather Service.''
    The Committee directs NOAA to submit a report to the 
Committee on Appropriations not later than 90 days after 
enactment of this act outlining a multi-phase plan for 
consolidating NWS IT operations that would streamline system 
configuration, shore up existing cybersecurity vulnerabilities, 
contribute to the expedited rollout of AWIPS II, and achieve 
cost savings. Such a report should address potential 
consolidation of NWS IT staff in the context of an overall 
workforce staffing plan, discuss a phased approach that results 
in no degradation of service, discuss how field office 
employees affected by this consolidation would be appropriately 
reassigned or repurposed throughout NWS, and take into 
consideration any impacts, risks, and benefits a consolidation 
would have on NWS's mission.
    Weather Service Modernization.--The Committee is supportive 
of NWS moving forward with broad plans to modernize its 
services, operations, and infrastructure. Using the recent NAPA 
report and the National Research Council's report ``The 
National Weather Service Modernization and Associated 
Restructuring: A Retrospective Assessment'', NWS has sufficient 
independent feedback to make a wide variety of improvements in 
a scalable and manageable manner. The Committee encourages NWS 
to work with all its external partners and internal components 
to deliver a comprehensive weather modernization plan to the 
Committee that includes short-term and long-term objectives. 
Many groups--Federal agencies, weather center managers, 
employees, industry supporters, private sector collaborators, 
and emergency managers--are awaiting positive advancements in 
NWS's forecasting capabilities and all should be part of the 
modernization conversation.
    Communications and NWS Federal Advisory Committee.--The 
public does and should look to NOAA as the authoritative voice 
for weather in the United States. An enormous part of NWS's 
mission involves public outreach and public access to 
information, sometimes delivered during emergency situations. 
Effective communications are critical.
    One of the more immediate steps NWS can take on its path to 
modernization is to form a Federal Advisory Committee [FAC], as 
recommended by NAPA. As part of this FAC, the Committee 
encourages NWS to include a component or subcommittee that 
would help to guide reforms on NWS's external communications 
while complementing the FAC's underlying focus on advancing 
science, research, and operations. NWS is encouraged to appoint 
non-Federal members with expertise in emergency communications 
who can help to improve communication protocols and streamlined 
information delivery.
    National Data Buoy Center.--Since the National Data Buoy 
Center [NDBC] serves several NOAA missions, the Committee does 
not support NWS's proposed funding reductions which would 
degrade NDBC's data availability to 73 percent. The Committee 
provides sufficient funding to maintain, at a minimum, NDBC 
operations at 80 percent data availability. The Committee 
directs NOAA to better advocate for data and information NBDC 
provides the agency and its partners since NWS obviously 
struggled to adequately fund NDBC's operations within its 
budget request.
    Central Forecast Guidance.--The Committee supports the 
proposed increase to the Central Forecast Guidance to expand 
and accelerate weather forecasting research to operations, 
which would have a positive impact on the agency's ability to 
improve hurricane track and intensity forecasts.
    Within funds provided, NOAA shall initiate the scientific 
development of the Wind and Water Event Database pursuant to 
implementation of the COASTAL Act (Public Law 112-141). The 
Committee supports NOAA's current efforts to implement the 
COASTAL Act, which will assist homeowners impacted by 
destructive winds and storm surges associated with hurricanes 
and superstorms. Greater understanding of storm surge caused by 
hurricanes and associated wind fields would benefit emergency 
managers, State and local officials, coastal communities, and 
homeowners suffering indeterminate losses following these 
events. In carrying out these activities, NOAA shall leverage 
the expertise and resources of existing Federal assets 
including, but not limited to, the National Water Center, 
research universities, and appropriate private sector entities. 
Within 90 days of enactment of this act, NOAA shall report to 
the Committees on Appropriations on the status of COASTAL Act 
implementation.
    Advanced Hydrological Prediction Services.--The Committee 
provides a total of $10,209,000 for the Advanced Hydrological 
Prediction Services and rejects the administration's proposal 
to cut $2,000,000 from flood forecasting operations. Instead, 
NOAA shall continue working with river commissions throughout 
the country for the purpose of leveraging stream and river data 
and information for coordinated flood forecasts, starting with 
rivers that have existing Federal-interstate compact 
commissions. The Committee also provides an additional 
$2,000,000 to staff and operate NOAA's National Water Center 
[NWC]. The NWC shall serve as the Nation's premier site for 
water-related severe weather research including inland 
flooding, river flooding, storm surge, and coastal inundation. 
Research activities conducted at the NWC should support the 
mission of the National Weather Service, help to better inform 
State and local emergency managers, and contribute to 
protecting lives and property of our Nation's citizens. To 
leverage funds provided for the NWC, NOAA shall build upon 
existing collaborations with Federal agencies such as the 
United States Army Corps of Engineers, the United States 
Geological Survey, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency, 
and State-based research institutions supported by the National 
Science Foundation, as well as other public or private entities 
the Secretary considers to be appropriate.
    Small Business Innovation Research.--The Committee is 
encouraged by NWS's success in carrying out Small Business 
Innovation Research [SBIR] contracts as part of the agency's 
technology transfer initiative. NWS has effectively designed 
these SBIR contracts to build community resilience in the face 
of increasing vulnerability to extreme weather impacts, which 
is part of NWS's ``Weather Ready-Nation'' concept. These 
contracts, in part, will better inform emergency managers, 
first responders, government officials, businesses and 
ultimately the public to make fast, smart decisions to save 
lives and livelihoods. The Committee directs NWS to continue to 
support, and even expand, these SBIR contracts in fiscal year 
2014.
    External Satellite Data.--The Committee notes that NOAA 
will need to develop software as a means for ingesting, 
processing, and assimilating geostationary hyperspectral and 
other weather-related data from commercial satellite companies, 
which would aid in severe storm forecasting. The Committee 
encourages NOAA to establish data agreements and develop the 
software necessary for data ingest as a precursor activity for 
incorporating such data into NOAA models and weather prediction 
forecasts.
    National Mesonet Program.--The Committee is pleased with 
the administration's support and recognition of the National 
Mesonet program through funding in NOAA's 2014 budget request 
for this important program. The Committee recommends 
$18,500,000 for continuation and expansion of the National 
Mesonet Program through a competitive single award, multiyear 
weather data procurement that maintains coverage of areas now 
included within the national mesonet, as well as expands 
coverage in high-risk areas, including the addition of critical 
new observations such as additional coastal observations, 
boundary layer data, and lightening data. Award of these funds 
should include a requirement to integrate mesonet observations 
into National Weather Service severe weather alerts at the 
local field office level, initially targeting locations with 
the greatest probability of severe weather, but expanding over 
time to include all field offices and States. The 2014 program 
should demonstrate the validity of mesonet observation data in 
increasing severe weather warning times and the benefit of 
mesonet observations for various key challenges including 
commercial aviation and electric grid management. Up to 
$500,000 may be used, subject to the standard reprogramming 
procedures set forth in section 505 of this act, for management 
of the national mesonet including all study costs on how the 
national mesonet can be integrated into the Advanced Weather 
Interactive Processing System.

     NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE, DATA AND INFORMATION SERVICE

    The Committee's recommendation provides $205,099,000 for 
the National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information 
Service [NESDIS] operations. NESDIS programs operate 
environmental polar-orbiting and geostationary satellites, and 
collect and archive global environmental data and information 
for distribution to users in commerce, industry, agriculture, 
science and engineering, the general public, and Federal, 
State, and local agencies.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

     NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE, DATA AND INFORMATION SERVICE
                  OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Environmental Satellite Observing Systems.............           121,577
                                                       =================
Data Centers & Information Services:
    Archive, Access & Assessment......................            62,782
    Coastal Data Development..........................             4,567
    Regional Climate Services.........................             6,461
    Environmental Data Systems Modernization..........             9,712
                                                       -----------------
      Total, NOAA's Data Centers & Information                    83,522
       Services.......................................
                                                       =================
      GRAND TOTAL NESDIS..............................           205,099
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       NOAA-WIDE PROGRAM SUPPORT

    The Committee's recommendation provides $459,326,000 for 
NOAA-wide program support. These programs provide for overall 
NOAA management, including staffing of the Under Secretary's 
office and services to NOAA and DOC field offices through the 
regional Administrative Support Centers. These programs also 
support NOAA's Education Office consistent with the 
recommendations of the Joint Ocean Commission. The facilities 
subactivity provides for repair and maintenance to existing 
facilities, facilities planning and design, and environmental 
compliance. The Office of Marine and Aviation Operations 
provides aircraft and marine data acquisition, repair, and 
maintenance of the existing fleet, planning of future 
modernization, and technical and management support for NOAA-
wide activities through the NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps.
    Committee recommendations are displayed in the following 
table:

          PROGRAM SUPPORT OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Corporate Services:
    Under Secretary and Associate Offices Base........            27,166
    Facilities........................................            24,847
    NOAA Wide Corporate Services and Agency Management           113,972
    DOC Accounting System.............................            10,955
    IT Security.......................................             8,321
    DOC Working Capital Fund..........................            38,074
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Corporate Services.......................           223,335
                                                       =================
NOAA Education Program................................            27,971
                                                       =================
Fleet and Aircraft Operations.........................           208,020
                                                       =================
      GRAND TOTAL, PROGRAM SUPPORT....................           459,326
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Corporate Services.--The Committee remains concerned about 
administrative costs incurred by NOAA's corporate staff and 
line offices, including regional and field offices. The 
Committee directs NOAA to include a report with the 2014 spend 
plan that identifies total NOAA administrative costs for fiscal 
years 2013 and 2014 for NOAA corporate staff and for each line 
office, including the Office of Marine and Aircraft Operations. 
The report shall also identify the administrative costs 
incurred by these organizational entities, as well as the field 
offices and financial management centers, for the standard 
administrative functions described above. Similar tables shall 
be included in all subsequent NOAA annual budget justifications 
provided to Congress. NOAA is reminded of overall direction 
included in this report to reduce overhead and achieve 
administrative savings.
    Education.--Within the funds provided for NOAA's Education 
Program, $6,500,000 is for competitive educational grants, of 
which $3,500,000 is for Environmental Literacy Grants and 
$1,500,000 is to continue to improve geographic literacy in our 
Nation's schools by utilizing NOAA's national network of 
weather and environmental activities; $14,271,000 is for the 
educational partnership program with minority serving 
institutions; and a total of $7,200,000 is provided for Bay-
Watershed Education and Training regional programs.
    A full description of the Committee's assessment and 
direction regarding the administration's Co-STEM consolidation 
proposal is found in the Office of Science Technology and 
Policy portion of this report. For NOAA's part, the Committee 
encourages efforts to streamline STEM education programs across 
NOAA line offices, and supports the internal consolidation of 
NOAA education programs as proposed by the administration at 
this time which results in a total savings of $5,100,000.
    However, the Committee does not support the elimination of 
formal and informal education activities from NOAA including, 
but not limited to, NOAA's Teacher at Sea program, that were 
proposed to migrate to the Department of Education and the 
Smithsonian Institution, and directs NOAA to work with OSTP on 
the Committee directions provided to that office for these 
programs.
    The Committee also opposes the administration's proposal to 
transfer the Sea Grant John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship 
Program, the Sea Grant/National Marine Fisheries Service 
Fellowship Program, and the Dr. Nancy Foster Scholarship 
Program to the National Science Foundation. The goal of these 
fellowship programs is to train future professionals--who have 
expertise in coastal, ocean, fisheries, or Great Lakes science 
and related policy--to become valuable members of the Federal 
workforce. Thus, all of these Fellows are required to already 
possess a background in STEM education as a prerequisite to be 
considered for any of these unique career opportunities. The 
fact that the administration's broad Co-STEM proposal confuses 
advancements in STEM education with workforce development is 
one reason why the Committee encourages the administration to 
work with Federal agencies and non-Federal partners to create a 
more refined consolidation plan. Regardless, these programs, 
which serve as a pipeline for professional development, shall 
continue to be managed by NOAA.
    Justification Improvement.--NOAA is directed to continue to 
work with the Committee to reformat the budget justification 
into a more transparent, informative, and user-friendly 
document. The Committee also expects the justification to be 
submitted on time with the rest of the Department's 
justifications.
    Research and Development [R&D] Tracking and Outcomes.--The 
Committee directs NOAA to provide a report to the Committee at 
the end of the fiscal year that: tracks the division of R&D 
funds between intramural and extramural research; assures 
consistency and clarity in the collection and reporting of 
data; clearly states expected research outcomes and available 
funding to provide transparency into the competitive grant 
process; and increases extramural research funding in future 
requests to build broad community support and leverage external 
funding for mission-oriented research.
    Marine and Aviation Operations.--Any decisions related to 
laying up any vessels, grounding any aircraft, or 
decommissioning any capital asset are subject to the standard 
reprogramming procedures set forth in section 505 of this act. 
Any changes from the spending plan shall also be subject to 
section 505 of this act. NOAA shall provide the Committees on 
Appropriations with a monthly operational status of the fleet 
and aircraft. NOAA is further directed to provide the Committee 
with updated long-term management and acquisition plans for the 
fleet and aircraft within 60 days of enactment of this act.

               PROCUREMENT, ACQUISITION, AND CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2013\1\\2\..............................  $2,072,105,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   2,117,555,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,084,134,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.
\2\Includes emergency funding of $186,000,000 in the Disaster Relief 
Appropriations Act, 2013 (division A of Public Law 113-2).

    The Committee's recommendation provides $2,084,134,000 for 
NOAA's procurement, acquisition, and construction. The 
recommendation is $12,029,000 above the fiscal year 2013 
enacted level and $33,421,000 below the budget request.
    Committee recommendations are displayed in the following 
table:

                PROCUREMENT, ACQUISITION AND CONSTRUCTION
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Ocean Service:
    Coastal and Estuarine Land Protection Program....             3,000
    National Estuarine Research Reserve Construction.             1,700
    Marine Sanctuaries Construction/Acquisition......             2,000
                                                      ------------------
      Total National Ocean Service--PAC..............             6,700
                                                      ==================
Ocean and Atmospheric Research:
    Research Super Computing.........................            10,379
                                                      ==================
National Weather Service:
    ASOS.............................................             1,635
    AWIPS............................................            21,592
    NWSTG Legacy Replacement.........................            16,215
    Radiosonde Network Replacement...................             4,014
    Weather and Climate Supercomputing...............            44,169
    Complete and Sustain NOAA Weather Radio..........             5,594
    Ground Readiness Project.........................            15,446
    WFO Construction.................................             8,650
                                                      ------------------
      Total, National Weather Service--PAC...........           117,315
                                                      ==================
National Environmental Satellite, Data and
 Information Services:
    Geostationary Systems [GOES-N]...................            26,321
    Geostationary Systems [GOES-R]...................           954,761
    Polar Orbiting Systems [POES]....................            28,788
    Joint Polar Satellite System [JPSS]..............           824,000
    Polar Free Flyer.................................            24,579
    JASON-3..........................................            37,000
    DSCOVR...........................................            23,675
    COSMIC-2.........................................             4,000
    Enterprise Ground System.........................             5,983
    CIP--single point of failure.....................             2,772
    NPP Data Exploration.............................             3,455
    EOS and Advanced Polar Data Systems..............               990
    Satellite CDA Facility...........................             2,228
    CLASS............................................             6,476
                                                      ------------------
      Total, NESDIS--PAC.............................         1,945,028
                                                      ==================
Program Support:
    Vessel Equip. and Tech Refresh...................            11,712
                                                      ------------------
      Total, Program Support--PAC....................            11,712
                                                      ==================
Unobligated balances from prior years................            [7,000]
                                                      ------------------
      GRAND TOTAL, PAC...............................         2,084,134
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    National Estuarine Research Reserve Construction.--The 
Committee is concerned about the increased costs and lack of 
transparency associated with certain third-party green building 
rating systems. The use of certain green building standards can 
arbitrarily discriminate against domestic building materials 
such as wood and increase costs to taxpayers without achieving 
significant benefits in energy and water savings. The Committee 
directs NOAA to use funding provided for National Estuarine 
Research Reserve Construction on green building rating systems 
or voluntary consensus standards that have achieved American 
National Standard Institute [ANSI] Designation or were 
developed by an ANSI Audited Designator, and take into 
consideration the environmental and economic benefits of 
building materials through lifecycle analysis.
    Weather Satellites.--The Committee is cautiously optimistic 
that the administration has started to heed the Committee's 
direction to reign in burgeoning construction costs for NOAA's 
next generation of weather satellites and to repair 
dysfunctional oversight of these large acquisitions. The 
administration refined the intergovernmental management, 
direction, and accountability of the program in February 2013 
with marked improvements. The latest budget request shows a 
concerted direction from the administration to focus on weather 
data acquisitions as the primary requirement of NOAA's weather 
satellites, while expanding the agency's collaboration with 
NASA to continue other environmental data observations on 
separate missions.
    Therefore, the Committee provides the fiscal year 2014 
requested level for the Joint Polar Satellite System [JPSS] and 
the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites [GOES-R] 
missions, but retains overall cost caps for these programs to 
keep the administration focused on controlling and, where 
applicable, reducing costs, especially interagency government 
overhead. The Committee also supports NOAA's plans to establish 
a polar free-flyer mission, which allows JPSS to better focus 
on the weather mission, and encourages NOAA to move forward 
with this concept within the funds provided in this bill.
    Enterprise Ground System.--The Committee supports NOAA's 
budget request for the Enterprise Ground System to establish an 
integrated management of the ground enterprise, which is 
consistent with recommendations made by the 2012 Satellite 
Enterprise Independent Review Team. The Committee encourages 
NOAA to continue efforts to merge or replace current disparate 
systems and procure common ground services such as command and 
control, product generation, distribution, and security through 
a common architecture and shared resources.
    Data Management.--The Committee notes the significant 
increase in volume of NOAA satellite data from the Suomi 
National Polar-Orbiting Partnership satellite and the 
anticipated increase from other planned satellite missions. The 
Committee directs NOAA to include as part of the agency's 
quarterly satellite briefing an update identifying preparations 
and enhancements that need to be made to accommodate the 
increased volume of satellite data.
    NOAA Satellite Reporting.--The Committee directs NOAA to 
provide quarterly programmatic and procurement status reports 
of all satellites actively flying and under development unless 
any reprogramming, system failure, or other extraordinary 
circumstance warrants an immediate update.

                    PACIFIC COASTAL SALMON RECOVERY

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $63,652,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      50,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      65,000,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $65,000,000 for the 
Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery. The recommendation is 
$1,348,000 above the fiscal year 2013 level and $15,000,000 
above the budget estimate. Funds are for conservation and 
restoration of Pacific salmon populations. State and local 
recipients of this funding will provide matching contributions 
of at least 33 percent of Federal funds. In addition, funds 
will be available to tribes, which do not require matching 
dollars.

                   FISHERIES DISASTER MITIGATION FUND

Appropriations, 2013....................................................
Budget estimate, 2014...................................................
Committee recommendation................................    $150,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $150,000,000 for 
the Fisheries Disaster Mitigation Fund. The recommendation is 
$150,000,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and the 
budget request.
    The Committee establishes this fund to help alleviate the 
economic impacts associated with commercial fishery failures, 
fishery resource disasters, and State and Federal regulations, 
as declared by the Secretary of Commerce. The Committee is 
aware of multiple requests for fishery assistance, and directs 
NOAA to prioritize the use of these funds for necessary 
expenses related to fishery disasters as declared by the 
Secretary of Commerce in calendar year 2012. The Secretary of 
Commerce, in consultation with affected States and tribes, 
shall provide the Committee with a spending plan for the 
allocation of these funds no later than 30 days after enactment 
of this act.
    The Committee is frustrated that when the administration 
issues fishery disaster declarations, there is no plan or 
request for financial assistance to help affected States, 
tribes, and local communities. For future fishery disaster 
declarations, the administration should request appropriate 
assistance funding in annual or supplemental budget requests.

                      FISHERMEN'S CONTINGENCY FUND

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................        $342,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................         350,000
Committee recommendation................................         350,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $350,000 for the 
Fishermen's Contingency Fund. The recommendation is $8,000 
above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and is the same as the 
President's request.

                   FISHERIES FINANCE PROGRAM ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2013....................................     -$4,000,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      -6,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      -6,000,000

    The Committee recommends that direct loans administered 
through this account for individual fishing quotas may not 
exceed $24,000,000. Traditional direct loans may not exceed 
$100,000,000, which is $41,000,000 above the fiscal year 2013 
level and budget request. The Committee directs NOAA to provide 
the Committee on Appropriations, the Senate Committee on 
Commerce, Science, and Transportation, and the House of 
Representatives Committee on Science, Space and Technology with 
a report within 60 days of enactment of this act detailing any 
changes to regulations that may need to take effect, given 
these modifications to the loan amount and associated 
provisions.

                                 OTHER


                        Departmental Management


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $54,839,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      59,595,000
Committee recommendation................................      59,595,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $59,595,000 for 
Departmental Management Salaries and Expenses. The 
recommendation is $4,756,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted 
level and the same as the budget request.
    Within Departmental Management, the Salaries and Expenses 
account provides funding for the Secretary, Deputy Secretary, 
and support staff. Responsibilities involve policy development 
and implementation affecting United States and international 
activities, as well as establishing internal goals and 
operations of the Department.
    Within 90 days of enactment of this act, the Department 
shall submit to the Committee a report detailing actions taken 
to cut costs and how much funding has been saved by such 
actions across the department's bureaus.
    Business USA.--The Committee is supportive of the 
administration's request to continue Business USA, an 
initiative designed to streamline government bureaucracy and 
create one-stop shops for business assistance. The Committee 
provides bill language allowing the Secretary more flexibility 
to enter into office space agreements with Business USA 
partners.
    Cybersecurity.--The Committee is disturbed by the June 2013 
IG Report that found that the Economic Development 
Administration [EDA] wasted $2,700,000, or nearly half its 
annual information technology [IT] budget relying on erroneous 
information from the Department's Office of the Chief 
Information Officer [OCIO] about the extent of a 2012 cyber 
attack. What was thought to be a widespread sophisticated 
attack turned out to be a limited malware attack that could 
have been handled more strategically without taking EDA's 
entire IT network of servers and personal equipment offline. 
Poor communication and training led to an overreaction that 
impacted EDA's operational effectiveness. While EDA and OCIO 
have begun corrective measures, the true nature of the attack 
only surfaced after the IG audited the response to the 
incident. Within 45 days of enactment of this act, the 
Department shall submit a report to the Committee detailing 
EDA, OCIO, and the Department's responses to the IG Report. In 
particular, the report should address: how the Department will 
ensure IT staff receive appropriate training; a description of 
who the Department turns to within the Federal Government for 
assistance in creating adequate and appropriate cybersecurity 
protocols; updated incident response procedures, including 
intra-governmental assistance when the agency becomes a victim 
of a cybersecurity intrusion or attack; review of the IT needs 
and capabilities of each Bureau, including whether shared 
services might be more secure and cost-effective; and 
implementation of appropriately skilled staffing. The Committee 
believes that cybersecurity should be a high priority for the 
Department. But vigilance should never be an excuse for waste, 
and the Department should take care to avoid wasteful, 
unnecessary spending in the name of security.
    Small Business Innovation Research [SBIR].--The Committee 
recognizes the important successes SBIR programs have in 
helping domestic small businesses to commercialize federally 
funded research and development projects. The Committee 
therefore directs the Department of Commerce to place an 
increased focus on awarding SBIR awards to firms with fewer 
than 50 employees.
    Unobligated Balances.--The amount of unobligated funding 
within the Department of Commerce is of great concern to the 
Committee, which is one reason for the Committee's requirement 
to receive quarterly updates from the Department on unobligated 
balances. Thus, the Committee is alarmed by recent findings 
made by the inspector general in a June 2013 report regarding 
the Department's relatively poor oversight and accounting of 
obligated balances. The Committee directs the Department to 
immediately correct any discrepancies in accounting records 
identified by the inspector general in the report, and to 
provide the Committees on Appropriations with a report within 
45 days of enactment of this act with a detailed status of each 
specific instance in the inspector general's report where 
obligations may have been liquidated against an incorrect 
fiscal year or erroneously charged to the wrong account. The 
report shall also include a plan for how the Department will 
incorporate the inspector general's recommendations to improve 
account record keeping and shall include a detailed explanation 
of its plans for: improving policies and procedures for 
monitoring deobligation of unliquidated obligation balances; 
improving departmental oversight of obligated balances; and 
developing guidance and training on the quarterly verification 
of open obligations and the proper methodology for funding 
invoices of multiple-year contracts.

                      RENOVATION AND MODERNIZATION

Appropriations, 2013....................................      $1,998,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      14,803,000
Committee recommendation................................      14,803,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $14,803,000, which is 
$12,805,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and the 
same as the budget request, for building renovation at the 
Department of Commerce.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $28,157,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      30,490,000
Committee recommendation................................      30,490,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $30,490,000 for the 
Office of Inspector General [OIG]. The recommendation is 
$2,333,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and the 
same as the budget request.
    In addition to funds provided under this heading, the 
Committee has recommended a transfer to the OIG: $2,000,000 
from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office; $1,000,000 from the 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; and $1,000,000 
from the Census Bureau for oversight and audits of those 
activities.
    Working Capital Fund Audits.--The Committee continues to 
direct the OIG to audit the Department's working capital funds, 
which include those available to the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology, the Office of the Secretary, and the 
Census Bureau. These funds do not receive direct appropriations 
but are funded from component budgetary resources using various 
reimbursement formulas. The objective of the audit will be to 
evaluate the budgetary controls over all of the Department's 
working capital funds. The OIG shall assess: the controls in 
place to develop reimbursement formulas; the relationship of 
reimbursements to client services; the appropriateness of the 
level of fund balances; and compliance with appropriation law 
and direction.
    International Trade Administration [ITA] Consolidation.--
The OIG is directed to report on the progress, efficacy, and 
management of the consolidation of ITA's four business units 
into three with an initial report within 180 days of enactment 
of this act. The inspector general is requested to evaluate: 
management and leadership challenges related to the 
consolidation; relevant changes in staffing and funding levels 
in headquarters, domestic, and overseas offices; and expected 
increases or decreases in administrative and overhead costs. In 
preparing this initial report and any subsequent reports, the 
inspector general is also asked to consider feedback from 
affected staff and organizations, including Commercial Service 
officers, foreign and domestic ITA employees, the American 
Foreign Service Association, and the District Export Council.
    NOAA Leased Space.--The Committee is aware that NOAA, 
particularly through the National Weather Service, is not 
addressing a large amount of real property commercial leases 
where the agency is holding over its occupancy. Some leases 
expired in 2005, nearly 8 years ago. Additionally, NOAA has 
hundreds of real property leases expiring over the next 4 
years, which are also likely to go into holdover unless action 
is taken. The Federal Government's inaction negatively affects 
property owners because NOAA does not pay holdover penalties 
for staying in space past the lease expiration, and holdover 
leases prohibit property owners from collecting additional rent 
attributed to the rising costs of operating expenses due to 
inflation. Within 90 days of enactment of this act, the 
Committee requests the OIG provide a report to the Committee 
that examines: the true scope of NOAA's leased space problem; 
why the problem is not being addressed; and a recommended 
course of action for NOAA to immediately resolve the problem.

               General Provisions--Department of Commerce

    Section 101 makes Commerce Department funds available for 
advanced payments only upon certification of officials 
designated by the Secretary that such payments are considered 
to be in the public interest.
    Section 102 makes appropriations for salaries and expenses 
available for the hire of passenger motor vehicles, and for 
services, uniforms, and allowances as authorized by law.
    Section 103 provides the authority to transfer funds 
between Department of Commerce accounts. The provision makes 
transfers subject to the Committee's standard reprogramming 
procedures.
    Section 104 provides that any cost resulting from personnel 
actions shall be absorbed by the affected department or agency.
    Section 105 extends congressional notification requirements 
for the NOAA satellite programs.
    Section 106 provides authority for the Secretary of 
Commerce to furnish certain services within the Herbert C. 
Hoover Building.
    Section 107 clarifies that grant recipients under the 
Department of Commerce may continue to deter child pornography, 
copyright infringement, or any other unlawful activity over 
their networks.
    Section 108 provides NOAA the authority to share resources 
with entities outside the agency.

                                TITLE II

                         DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

    The Committee recommends a total of $28,502,659,000 for the 
Department of Justice [DOJ]. The recommendation is 
$1,176,801,000 above the fiscal year 2013 funding level, 
including emergency appropriations, and $72,120,000 above the 
budget request. Funding recommendations for the Department's 
classified programs are detailed in the classified annex 
accompanying this report. The Committee's recommendation 
emphasizes key priorities regarding funding for the 
Department's critical ongoing missions and activities to 
protect the safety, security, and rights of our citizens.
    Justice Lifecycle.--The Committee must provide the Federal 
Bureau of Prisons and the U.S. Marshals Service's Federal 
Prisoner Detention program an increase of more than 
$191,000,000 above the fiscal year 2013 level to safely guard 
the Nation's growing Federal prison inmate and detention 
populations. While these activities are not considered 
mandatory for budget purposes, they are not truly discretionary 
in that the Committee has an obligation to adequately fund them 
regardless of budgetary constraints. Absent unforeseen 
decreases in the Federal inmate population, the day may be 
approaching when Federal prison and detention demands, which 
are not dynamic budget requests, consume the Justice 
Department's budgetary resources. The Committee knows all too 
well that neither the Justice Department nor Congress can 
afford to let this happen.
    The Committee calls upon the Justice Department and the 
administration to work together with Congress in this and 
coming fiscal years to carefully assess and, where necessary, 
reform all aspects of DOJ's enforcement and incarceration 
policies in order to address this issue, including addressing 
issues raised by the Office of Inspector General [OIG] such as: 
which criminal cases should be brought in Federal court; 
whether performance metrics are aligned with the Department's 
enforcement priorities and the need to measure the quality of 
cases brought in Federal court rather than just the number of 
cases filed; and whether existing incarceration programs are 
being used effectively.
    Combating Gun Violence and Enforcing Gun Laws.--Gun 
violence has touched States, counties, cities, and towns across 
our Nation. While the United States has seen devastating 
examples of it over the years, the horrific events in Newtown, 
Connecticut, in December 2012 have made it clear that we must 
address this problem. The Committee's recommendation fully 
funds the administration's requested programmatic increase of 
$379,078,000 and 779 additional positions, for a total of 
$1,362,978,000, in Federal, State, and local resources in order 
to reduce gun violence and prevent future tragedies. These 
funds and positions will be provided to the Bureau of Alcohol, 
Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives [ATF], the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation [FBI], and State, local, and tribal law 
enforcement partners to keep guns out of the wrong hands; help 
those on the ground prevent and mitigate violent situations 
when they occur; keep people safe; and our cities, 
neighborhoods, and schools secure.
    Hiring Freeze.--In providing, at a minimum, the requested 
level for the Department's law enforcement, litigation, and 
prisons and detention components, the Committee's 
recommendation reverses the hiring freeze under which DOJ 
currently operates, and turns back the slow decay of programs 
and readiness at the Department. Beginning in January 2011, the 
Attorney General issued a hiring freeze at DOJ in anticipation 
of budget challenges. Throughout fiscal year 2012, however, the 
Department allowed the replacement of agents, deputy U.S. 
Marshals, intelligence analysts, and correctional officers. As 
of March 5, 2013, however, the hiring freeze became a hard 
freeze that prevented backfilling except in limited 
circumstances. Since the hiring freeze went into effect on 
January 1, 2011, through April 20, 2013, the Department has 
lost more than 2,400 once-filled staff positions--over 2 
percent--and expects to lose an additional 1,000 staff through 
the end of fiscal year 2013. The once-filled staff positions 
lost include field agents, intelligence analysts, and Federal 
prosecutors, but the loss of vital support staff, including 
paralegals, chemists, accountants, budget analysts, information 
technology specialists, and contract specialists has been the 
largest thus far. These are essential personnel that analyze 
evidence and help make cases. Without the robust funding 
provided by the Committee for components to fully meet the 
Department's mission, eventually this hiring freeze will mean 
that fewer perpetrators get caught and fewer criminals get 
prosecuted, and the United States will be less safe.
    Cybersecurity.--Cyber crimes are becoming more common, more 
sophisticated, and more dangerous. Our adversaries increasingly 
use computers and the Internet to further their illicit 
activities. Terrorists seek to sabotage critical 
infrastructure; organized crime syndicates seek to defraud 
banks and corporations; and spies seek to steal defense and 
intelligence secrets and intellectual property. Each threatens 
our Nation's economy and security, and such attacks are only 
expected to grow. Given the Department's commitment to carrying 
out its role consistent with the February 2013 Executive Order 
on Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity, the 
Committee's recommendation fully funds the requested 
programmatic increase of $92,632,000 to support efforts to 
combat and keep pace with increasingly sophisticated and 
rapidly evolving cyber threats. The provided increase will fund 
the hiring of an additional 203 positions, including 60 new FBI 
special agents, 50 new computer scientists, 25 new attorneys, 2 
intelligence research specialists, and 66 professional support 
staff. Further details on the breakdown of the resources 
provided in the Committee's recommendation for cybersecurity 
are found in this report under the component sections 
pertaining to Legal Activities, the National Security Division, 
and the FBI.
    Financial and Mortgage Fraud.--The Committee strongly 
supports the Department's efforts to go after the schemers and 
scammers who prey on hardworking American families, and 
destabilize our neighborhoods and financial markets. The 
recommendation provides the requested increase of $55,000,000 
to combat economic fraud and white collar crime. The increase 
provided will fund an additional 328 positions, including 40 
new FBI agents, 184 new attorneys, 49 new in-house 
investigators, 31 new forensic accountants, 16 new paralegals 
and 8 new support staff. Further details on the breakdown of 
the resources provided in the Committee's recommendation for 
combating financial and mortgage fraud are found in this report 
under the component sections pertaining to Legal Activities, 
the United States Attorneys, and the FBI.
    The additional resources will support the Department's 
investigation and prosecution of financial fraud, including 
securities and commodities fraud, investment scams, and 
mortgage foreclosure schemes. The additional resources will 
build upon the successes of the President's Financial Fraud 
Enforcement Task Force, which has facilitated increased 
investigations and prosecutions of fraud relating to the 
financial crisis and economic recovery efforts, as well as 
support the Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities [RMBS] 
Working Group, a joint Federal and State initiative created to 
strengthen efforts to investigate and punish those responsible 
for fraud through the origination and pooling of residential 
mortgages and the securitizing and sales of RMBS.
    The U.S. Attorneys' Manual [USAM] contains general policies 
and procedures designed to guide U.S. Attorneys, Assistant U.S. 
Attorneys, and DOJ attorneys responsible for the prosecution of 
violations of Federal law. The USAM is intended to be 
comprehensive and as such includes principals that should be 
followed in the Federal prosecution of business organizations 
(section 9-28.000), which clearly states that ``Corporations 
should not be treated leniently because of their artificial 
nature nor should they be subject to harsher treatment. . . By 
bringing charges where appropriate for criminal misconduct, the 
Department promotes critical public interests. These interests 
include, to take just a few examples: (1) protecting the 
integrity of our free economic and capital markets; (2) 
protecting consumers, investors, and business entities that 
compete only through lawful means. . . ''.
    The Committee is concerned that the Department has not 
taken the steps necessary to ensure that section 9-28.000 of 
the USAM is being adhered to by attorneys throughout the 
Department, particularly as it relates to financial 
institutions. Given the sizeable increase in resources provided 
in the recommendation, the Committee believes that the 
Department should adhere to the USAM and any guidance provided 
to the Department's attorneys under all applicable 
circumstances to ensure equal administration of justice.
    Gang Violence.--The Committee recognizes the challenges 
posed by a recent uptick in violent crimes across the Nation 
over the past year and the increasing number of gang members 
who perpetuate much of this violence in urban, suburban, and 
rural areas. The Committee understands that to combat these 
gangs, continued and increased cooperation between Federal, 
State, and local law enforcement is required as well as 
support, coordination, and expertise from the Federal level. 
The Committee acknowledges the work currently being undertaken 
to fight gangs by the FBI Violent Safe Streets Task Forces, the 
Drug Enforcement Administration [DEA], the National Gang 
Targeting, Enforcement and Coordination Center [GangTECC], ATF, 
the U.S. Marshals Service [USMS], the Bureau of Prisons, the 
U.S. Attorneys' offices, and other Federal agencies. The 
Committee urges agencies to intensify current efforts, while 
enhancing coordination across Federal agencies and with State 
and local law enforcement in order to maximize the impact of 
limited personnel resources. The Committee's recommendation 
also provides programmatic increases of $7,520,000 for the 
USMS, and $12,000,000 for the Violent Gang and Gun Crime 
Reduction Program within the Office of Justice Programs aimed 
at reducing gang violence.
    Gangs threaten not only the safety of our local 
communities, but are linked nationally and internationally to 
trafficking of drugs, guns, money, and humans. The Committee 
therefore directs the Department of Justice to take a strategic 
look at fighting gangs of national significance. To this end, 
the Department shall provide a report, not more than 180 days 
from the date of enactment of this act, to the Committee on its 
strategy to combat gangs of national significance, including 
violent street gangs. The report shall discuss strategies and 
best practices for arresting and prosecuting individuals from 
large gangs, as well as the most effective prevention and 
intervention techniques. The report should identify emerging 
trends in gang activity including cyber and human trafficking 
crimes, as well as more traditional activities such as gun 
trafficking, and identify the geographic areas with the highest 
rate of such activities. Finally, the report shall include the 
number of gang cases, gun cases, and criminal Racketeer 
Influenced and Corrupt Organizations [RICO] cases tried by each 
U.S. Attorney's office over the last 5 years, as well as a 
listing of any cases in which there was coordination with 
States attorneys' offices.
    Permanent Provisions.--Four provisions carried annually in 
previous acts are not included in the fiscal year 2014 bill 
because they were made permanent law in the fiscal year 2013 
Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act (Public 
Law 113-6).
    Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crime Act.--The Committee 
fully supports the goals of the Emmett Till Unsolved Civil 
Rights Crime Act of 2007 (Public Law 110-344) to investigate 
and prosecute previously unresolved civil rights era ``cold 
case'' murders suspected of having been racially motivated, 
through a partnership among the Civil Rights Division [CRT], 
the FBI, and the Community Relations Service [CRS], as well as 
with State and local grant resources. In the Fourth Annual 
Report to Congress Pursuant to the Emmett Till Unsolved Civil 
Rights Crimes Act of 2007, DOJ reported the conclusion of 92 of 
112 cold cases involving 125 victims. Three of these closed 
cases were successfully prosecuted, while DOJ closed 89 matters 
without prosecution, after significant investigation and 
review, based on all identified subjects being deceased or 
insufficient evidence to establish that a racially motivated 
homicide prosecutable under a civil rights statute occurred.
    To continue supporting Emmett Till activities, the 
Committee urges the Department to use such sums as may be 
necessary from within the budget base for the CRT's Cold Case 
Initiative; for the FBI to pursue Emmett Till Act cold cases; 
and for the CRS to partner with law enforcement agencies and 
communities to help resolve conflicts resulting from the 
investigation of unsolved civil rights era cases. Additionally, 
the Committee directs the National Institute of Justice, the 
Bureau of Justice Assistance, and the Office for Victims of 
Crime to continue providing grants for cold case DNA 
investigations to aid State and local law enforcement agencies 
in their investigation and prosecution of unsolved civil rights 
cold cases.
    Eliminating Duplication and Improving Efficiencies in DOJ 
Grants.--The Committee believes that, as the United States 
experiences budgetary constraints, there is an ever-increasing 
need to ensure that governmental resources, including those 
awarded through grants and subgrants, are appropriately 
targeted and that unnecessary duplication is mitigated.
    The Attorney General shall act on the following:
  --Conduct an assessment to better understand the extent to 
        which DOJ grant programs overlap with one another and 
        determine if grant programs may be consolidated to 
        mitigate the risk of unnecessary duplication. To the 
        extent that DOJ identifies any statutory obstacles to 
        consolidating its grant programs, the Department should 
        work with Congress to address them, as needed; and
  --Direct grant-making agencies to coordinate with one another 
        on a consistent basis to review potential or recent 
        grant awards, including subgrant awards reported by DOJ 
        prime grant awardees, to the extent possible, before 
        awarding grants. This could help ensure an accurate 
        understanding of DOJ resources already provided to 
        applicants and the communities they serve, as well as 
        knowledge of those applicants proposing to carry out 
        the same or similar activities with funds from one or 
        more of the granting agencies' programs. The Department 
        shall also take steps to establish written policies and 
        procedures to govern this coordination and help ensure 
        that it occurs.
    Spending Plan.--In compliance with section 534 of this act, 
the Committee directs the Department of Justice to submit a 
spending plan, signed by the Attorney General, for review 
within 45 days of enactment of this act.

                         General Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $108,525,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     126,208,000
Committee recommendation................................     126,208,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $126,208,000 for 
General Administration salaries and expenses. The 
recommendation is $17,683,000 above the fiscal year 2013 
enacted level and equal to the budget request.
    The General Administration account provides funding for 
senior policy officials responsible for Departmental management 
and policy development. The specific offices funded by this 
account include the following: the immediate Office of the 
Attorney General; the immediate Office of the Deputy Attorney 
General; the immediate Office of the Associate Attorney 
General; Office of Legal Policy; Office of Public Affairs; 
Office of Legislative Affairs; Office of Professional 
Responsibility; Office of Intergovernmental and Public Liaison; 
and the Justice Management Division.

                 JUSTICE INFORMATION SHARING TECHNOLOGY

Appropriations, 2013....................................     $32,733,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      25,842,000
Committee recommendation................................      25,842,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $25,842,000 for 
Justice Information Sharing Technology [JIST]. The 
recommendation is $6,891,000 below the fiscal year 2013 enacted 
level and equal to the budget request.
    The Committee's recommendation includes the requested 
transfer of up to $35,400,000 from agency components to augment 
JIST base resources to advance initiatives to transform DOJ-
wide information technology [IT] enterprise infrastructure and 
cybersecurity, and to create a reinvestment pool to provide 
funding for smart IT investments. This will allow DOJ to pool 
purchasing power across the entire Department to drive down 
costs and improve service for DOJ-wide initiatives. The 
Department shall submit to the Committee as part of its 
spending plan for JIST an evaluation of the savings estimated 
to ensure that the reinvestment amount corresponds to any 
revised savings estimate, as well as a breakdown of the fiscal 
year 2014 investment by both component and IT commodity area.
    Cybersecurity.--The Committee's recommendation includes the 
requested program increase of $8,400,000, for a total of 
$9,215,000, so that DOJ may continue to defend proactively 
against and respond to current and emerging cybersecurity 
threats and attacks against DOJ's network infrastructure. The 
Committee supports the Department's efforts to better protect 
its networks and other IT assets, and expects that these 
resources will allow DOJ to maintain successful cybersecurity 
implementation as documented by its Federal Information 
Security Management Agency [FISMA] report card. DOJ and other 
Federal agencies should lead by example on cybersecurity and 
have an obligation to secure their dot-gov networks.

                   ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW AND APPEALS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $307,023,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     333,147,000
Committee recommendation................................     333,147,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $333,147,000 for 
Administrative Review and Appeals, of which $4,000,000 is a 
transfer from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services 
[USCIS] Immigration Examiners Fee Account. The recommendation 
is $26,124,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and 
equal to the budget request.
    This account funds the Executive Office for Immigration 
Review [EOIR], including the Board of Immigration Appeals 
[BIA], immigration judges, and administrative law judges who 
decide through administrative hearings whether to admit or 
exclude aliens seeking to enter the country, and whether to 
deport or adjust the status of aliens whose status has been 
challenged. This account also funds the Office of the Pardon 
Attorney, which receives, investigates, and considers petitions 
for all forms of executive clemency.
    EOIR represents the Department's frontline presence with 
respect to the application of immigration law. EOIR receives 
cases directly from Department of Homeland Security [DHS] 
enforcement personnel, in which the Federal Government is 
seeking the removal of immigrants who are in the United States 
without lawful status or who have committed some act, typically 
a criminal offense, that renders them removable. EOIR's 
immigration court caseload continues to increase as a result of 
heightened border enforcement efforts. The caseload increased 
by over 101,000 matters, or 44 percent, between fiscal year 
2010 and the end of the first quarter of fiscal year 2013, 
growing from 229,000 to over 330,000 new matters for 
adjudication coming to EOIR for resolution each year. On top of 
backlogged cases, the number of new cases is expected to exceed 
435,000 next year. Additionally, the BIA receives more than 
30,000 appeals per year, an extremely large volume for an 
appellate court. Court dockets have been stretched unacceptably 
far into the future, with most courts backlogged at least a 
year.
    Given these increasing caseload demands, the Committee's 
recommendation includes the requested programmatic increase of 
$17,000,000 to add 30 Immigration Judge [IJ] Teams and 15 Board 
of Immigration Appeals attorneys, for a total of 284 IJ teams. 
This will allow EOIR to better coordinate with DHS enforcement 
efforts and to help adjudicate approximately 39,000 additional 
immigration cases resulting from DHS enforcement efforts.
    Legal Orientation Program [LOP].--The Committee's 
recommendation includes $10,000,000, an increase of $4,000,000 
above fiscal year 2013, and equal to the budget request, to 
cover the expansion of LOP. The Committee strongly supports 
LOP, which informs detained non-citizens about their legal 
rights and responsibilities in immigration court. The Committee 
understands that approximately 80 percent of immigration 
detainees must act pro se in immigration court, and these 
individuals greatly benefit from accurate information about 
their legal claims and removal proceedings. The Committee 
emphasizes that LOP also benefits taxpayers by increasing the 
efficiency of immigration proceedings and reducing costs 
related to immigration detention. The Committee is aware that 
court proceedings of detainees participating in LOP were on 
average 12 days shorter and detainees spent less time in 
detention before being removed or released.
    Recognizing that LOP served detained individuals in a 
limited number of states last year, the Committee directs that 
attention be paid to geographic equity as LOP expands the reach 
of its services to additional detention centers. The Committee 
notes the particular need for legal services at more remote 
immigration detention sites that are far from legal service 
providers in urban centers.
    In 2012, EOIR reported to the Committee that LOP saved on 
average 6 days of detention for every LOP participant, 
resulting in a net cost savings to the Government of 
$17,800,000. The Committee expects EOIR to update and report to 
the Committee its estimate of the net cost savings to the 
Federal Government based upon the number of detainees served in 
the most recent fiscal year.
    The Committee's recommendation includes $2,000,000, as 
requested in the budget base for LOP, pursuant to the 
Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008 
(Public Law 110-457), for custodians of unaccompanied, 
undocumented children to address the custodian's responsibility 
for the child's appearance at all immigration proceedings, and 
to protect the child from mistreatment, exploitation, and 
trafficking.
    Pilot-Innovation Ideas.--The Committee provides the 
requested $4,000,000 for Pilot-Innovative Ideas to improve the 
level and quality of legal representation for vulnerable 
populations. The Committee commends EOIR's efforts to promote 
innovation in immigration court efficiency, improve the level 
and quality of legal representation for vulnerable populations, 
and protect children from mistreatment, exploitation, and 
trafficking.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $84,202,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      85,845,000
Committee recommendation................................      85,845,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $85,845,000 for the 
Office of Inspector General [OIG]. The recommendation is 
$1,643,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and equal 
to the budget request.
    This account finances the activities of the OIG, including 
audits, inspections, investigations, and other reviews of 
programs and operations of the Department of Justice to promote 
efficiency and effectiveness, and to prevent and detect fraud, 
waste, and abuse, as well as violations of ethical standards 
arising from the conduct of Department employees in their 
numerous and diverse activities.

                    United States Parole Commission


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $12,507,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      13,021,000
Committee recommendation................................      13,021,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $13,021,000 for the 
United States Parole Commission. The recommendation is $514,000 
above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and equal to the 
budget request.

                            Legal Activities


            SALARIES AND EXPENSES, GENERAL LEGAL ACTIVITIES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $862,735,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     902,605,000
Committee recommendation................................     905,605,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $905,605,000 for 
General Legal Activities salaries and expenses. The 
recommendation is $42,870,000 above the fiscal year 2013 
enacted level and $3,000,000 above the budget request.
    This appropriation funds the establishment of litigation 
policy, conduct of litigation, and various other legal 
responsibilities, through the Office of the Solicitor General, 
the Tax Division, the Criminal Division [CRM], the Civil 
Division [CIV], the Environmental and Natural Resources 
Division, the Civil Rights Division [CRT], the Office of Legal 
Counsel, INTERPOL Washington, and the Office of Dispute 
Resolution.
    INTERPOL Washington.--From within funds provided for 
General Legal Activities, the Committee directs the Department 
to provide an increase of $3,000,000 above the budget request 
for INTERPOL Washington, for a total of $32,844,000. The 
mission of INTERPOL Washington is to provide the United States' 
Federal, State, local, and tribal law enforcement authorities a 
central point of communication to the international law 
enforcement community, and to serve as the official U.S. 
representative to the International Criminal Police 
Organization [INTERPOL]. The Committee was disappointed to see 
that the budget request provided no increase for INTERPOL 
Washington, despite an increase in dues payments to INTERPOL, 
and the increase in transnational crime and the risks 
associated with international terrorism resulting in a greater 
need for international law enforcement cooperation and access 
to international law enforcement information. INTERPOL 
Washington's command center [IOCC] operates 24 hours a day, 7 
days a week, 365 days a year, responding to requests for 
international criminal investigative and humanitarian 
assistance from more than 18,000 U.S. law enforcement agencies 
and their counterparts in 189 other INTERPOL-member countries. 
In fiscal year 2012, the IOCC processed an average of 24,544 
individual requests for assistance each month, or 791 requests 
per day. In the first 9 months of fiscal year 2013, that number 
has risen to an all-time high of 27,003 requests per month, or 
871 per day. INTERPOL Washington's responsibility to respond to 
increasing foreign and domestic requests places additional 
operational demands on the resources of this organization.
    Cybersecurity.--The Committee's recommendation fully funds 
the requested programmatic increase of $2,580,000 and 25 
positions, for a total of $30,471,000, to enable the CRM to 
combat the growing and evolving cyber threat. As the skills and 
organization of technologically sophisticated transnational 
criminals increase, CRM requires additional resources to meet 
these new challenges. The enhancement provided will increase 
CRM's capability in four key areas: cybercrime investigations 
and prosecutions; advice and advocating legal tools and 
authorities; international cooperation and outreach; and 
forensic support. This increased capacity will allow the 
Division to successfully deter, investigate, and punish the 
theft of sensitive electronic information and other cybercrime.
    Human Trafficking and Slavery.--The Committee's 
recommendation provides $6,500,000 for the Human Trafficking 
and Slavery Prosecution Unit [HTSPU] in CRT to fight human 
trafficking and slavery. The Committee encourages the HTSPU and 
the Anti-Trafficking Coordination Teams to continue working 
with victim service providers and non-governmental 
organizations to ensure victim needs are prioritized as part of 
the overall strategy to combat human trafficking and slavery in 
the United States.
    Civil Rights.--The Committee supports the CRT's requested 
programmatic increase of $5,072,000 and 50 positions, for a 
total of $151,805,000, to strengthen its efforts to enforce 
civil rights laws; expand its capacity to prosecute and provide 
litigation support for human trafficking, hate crimes, and 
unsolved civil rights era crimes; carry out its 
responsibilities associated with the civil rights of 
institutionalized persons and the access rights of the 
disabled; and enhance the enforcement of fair housing and fair 
lending laws.
    Human Rights Crimes.--The Committee remains concerned by 
the large number of suspected human rights violators from 
foreign countries who have found safe haven in the United 
States, and directs CRM to continue increasing efforts to 
investigate and prosecute serious human rights crimes, 
including genocide, torture, use or recruitment of child 
soldiers, and war crimes. For this purpose, the Committee's 
recommendation supports continued funding of $1,800,000 within 
the base for attorneys, analysts, and support personnel in CRM 
to investigate and prosecute individuals who violate Federal 
laws regarding serious human rights abuses.
    Civil Rights Violations in State and Local Prisons and 
Jails.--The Committee is concerned by reports of civil rights 
violations in State and local prisons and jails, and directs 
CRT to increase efforts to investigate and address violations 
of the Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act in State 
and local prisons and jails. The Committee directs CRT to use 
such sums as necessary from amounts appropriated in fiscal year 
2014 for attorneys, analysts, and support personnel to address 
such issues in State and local prisons and jails.
    Intellectual Property [IP] Enforcement.--The Committee 
supports the Department's request of $8,581,000, an increase of 
$3,500,000 and 11 positions, to support CRM in combating 
international theft of IP, which causes losses of hundreds of 
billions of dollars each year and reduces the incentive for 
innovation and creativity within the U.S. economy. The request 
includes 4 International Computer Hacking and Intellectual 
Property [ICHIP] coordinators located in strategic regions 
abroad to allow the Department to quickly identify, address, 
and stop increasing transnational IP crimes and threats.
    Combating Financial and Mortgage Fraud.--The Committee 
fully funds the Department's request of $94,033,000, an 
increase of $13,500,000 and 94 positions, including 64 new 
attorneys, 20 new professional support staff, 9 new in-house 
investigators/auditors, and 1 new financial analyst, for CRM, 
CIV, and CRT to investigate and prosecute complex financial and 
mortgage fraud cases.

               THE NATIONAL CHILDHOOD VACCINE INJURY ACT

Appropriations, 2013....................................      $7,833,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................       7,833,000
Committee recommendation................................       7,833,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides a reimbursement of 
$7,833,000 for legal costs. The recommendation is equal to the 
fiscal year 2013 enacted level and the budget request.
    This account covers Justice Department expenses associated 
with litigating cases under the National Childhood Vaccine 
Injury Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-660).

               SALARIES AND EXPENSES, ANTITRUST DIVISION

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $161,192,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     160,410,000
Committee recommendation................................     160,410,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $160,410,000 for 
the Antitrust Division. The recommendation is $782,000 below 
the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and equal to the budget 
request. This appropriation is offset by $103,000,000 in pre-
merger filing fee collections, resulting in a direct 
appropriation of $57,410,000.

                        UNITED STATES ATTORNEYS

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $1,928,851,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   2,007,717,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,007,717,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $2,007,717,000 for 
the Executive Office for United States Attorneys [EOUSA] and 
the 94 U.S. Attorneys' [USAs] offices. The recommendation is 
$78,866,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and equal 
to the budget request.
    As in past years, the Committee directs the USAs to focus 
their efforts on those crimes where the unique resources, 
expertise, or jurisdiction of the Federal Government can be 
most effective.
    Adam Walsh Act Implementation.--The Committee expects the 
EOUSA to continue to focus on investigations and prosecutions 
related to the sexual exploitation of children, as authorized 
by the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 
(Public Law 109-248), and as part of Project Safe Childhood. 
The recommendation fully funds the budget request of 
$55,580,000 for this purpose in fiscal year 2014.
    Combating Financial and Mortgage Fraud.--The Committee's 
recommendation fully funds the Department's request of 
$341,493,121, an increase of $26,500,000 and 190 new positions, 
including 120 new attorneys, 20 new forensic accountants, 40 
new in-house investigators, and 10 new paralegals, to hold 
accountable criminals who perpetrate financial and mortgage 
fraud, deter future perpetrators of fraud, and recover monies 
stolen from U.S. taxpayers. The USAs will expand criminal 
investigations and prosecutions of mortgage and financial 
fraud, predatory lending, financial fraud, and market 
manipulation matters. The USAs will also increase civil 
enforcement efforts to continue to obtain recoveries from 
individuals and companies that have defrauded the Government by 
violating the terms of Federal contracts, grants, loans, and 
subsidies.
    Human Trafficking.--The Committee expects the EOUSA, in 
consultation with the USAs, to designate a point of contact in 
each U.S. Attorney's office who shall serve as the coordinator 
for all activities within that office concerning human 
trafficking and slavery matters covered by the Trafficking 
Victims Protection Act. Designating a point of contact improves 
communication and coordination within each jurisdiction, 
including with victim service organizations, in order to better 
serve the victims of human trafficking and slavery.
    Intellectual Property Rights [IPR] Enforcement.--The 
Committee expects the Department to continue to make IPR 
enforcement an investigative and prosecutorial priority for 
Federal prosecutors. The Committee notes and commends the 
Department for the high-level indictment of an international 
organized criminal enterprise charged with massive, worldwide 
online piracy of numerous types of copyright works through 
various websites, generating more than $175,000,000 in criminal 
proceeds and causing more than half a billion dollars in harm 
to copyright owners.

                   UNITED STATES TRUSTEE SYSTEM FUND

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $223,258,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     225,728,000
Committee recommendation................................     225,728,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $225,728,000 for 
the U.S. Trustee System Fund. The recommendation is $2,470,000 
above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and equal to the 
budget request. The appropriation is offset by $224,728,000 in 
fee collections and $1,000,000 derived from interest on 
investments in U.S. securities, resulting in a direct 
appropriation of $0, which is equal to the budget request.
    The U.S. Trustee Program, authorized by 28 U.S.C. 581 et 
seq., is the component of the Justice Department with 
responsibility for protecting the integrity of the bankruptcy 
system by overseeing case administration and litigation to 
enforce the bankruptcy laws. In fiscal year 2014, the U.S. 
Trustee Program will participate in an estimated 1.4 million 
business and consumer bankruptcy case filings.

      SALARIES AND EXPENSES, FOREIGN CLAIMS SETTLEMENT COMMISSION

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................      $1,997,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................       2,218,000
Committee recommendation................................       2,218,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $2,218,000 for the 
Foreign Claims Settlement Commission. The recommendation is 
$221,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and equal to 
the budget request.
    The Foreign Claims Settlement Commission settles claims of 
American citizens arising from nationalization, expropriation, 
or other takings of their properties and interests by foreign 
governments.

                     FEES AND EXPENSES OF WITNESSES

Appropriations, 2013....................................    $270,000,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     270,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     270,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $270,000,000 for 
fees and expenses of witnesses. The recommendation is equal to 
the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and the budget request.
    This appropriation, which is considered mandatory for 
scorekeeping purposes, provides for fees and expenses of 
witnesses who appear on behalf of the Government in cases in 
which the United States is a party, including fact and expert 
witnesses. These funds are also used for mental competency 
examinations, as well as witness and informant protection.
    The Committee expects that no funds will be expended for 
expert witness services, including the payment of fees and 
expenses of expert witnesses, from any DOJ accounts but Fees 
and Expenses of Witnesses.

           SALARIES AND EXPENSES, COMMUNITY RELATIONS SERVICE

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $11,786,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      12,464,000
Committee recommendation................................      12,464,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $12,464,000 for the 
Community Relations Service [CRS]. The recommendation is 
$678,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and equal to 
the budget request.
    The Community Relations Service, established by title X of 
the Civil Rights Act of 1964, provides assistance to 
communities and persons in the prevention and resolution of 
disagreements arising from discriminatory practices.
    Hate Crimes Prevention.--Within the funds provided, the 
Committee supports the budget request of $2,444,000 to handle 
an increase in workload and responsibilities stemming from 
passage of the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd, Jr., Hate Crimes 
Prevention Act [HCPA] (Public Law 111-84). The HCPA has greatly 
expanded CRS's mandate, requiring that it help communities 
prevent and respond to violent hate crimes committed on the 
basis of gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, 
and disability, in addition to race, color, and national 
origin. These enhancements will maximize CRS crisis response 
nationwide and enable it to fulfill both its original mandate 
and expanded mandate under the HCPA.

                         ASSETS FORFEITURE FUND

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $20,514,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      20,948,000
Committee recommendation................................      20,948,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $20,948,000 for the 
Assets Forfeiture Fund [AFF]. The recommendation is $434,000 
above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and equal to the 
budget request.
    The AFF provides funds for qualifying expenses of Federal 
law enforcement agencies and their State or local partners. 
Funds for these activities are provided from receipts deposited 
in the AFF resulting from the seizure and liquidation of 
assets. Expenses related to the management and disposal of 
assets are also provided from the AFF by a permanent, 
indefinite appropriation.

                     United States Marshals Service

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $2,794,226,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   2,849,571,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,857,091,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides a total of 
$2,857,091,000 for the United States Marshals Service [USMS]. 
The recommendation is $62,865,000 above the fiscal year 2013 
enacted level and $7,520,000 above the budget request.

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $1,171,204,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   1,204,033,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,211,553,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $1,211,553,000 for 
USMS salaries and expenses. The recommendation is $40,349,000 
above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and $7,520,000 above 
the budget request.
    The core mission of the USMS includes the apprehension of 
fugitives; protection of Federal court facilities, the 
judiciary, and witnesses; execution of warrants and court 
orders; and the custody and transportation of accused and 
unsentenced prisoners. In fiscal year 2012, the USMS 
apprehended roughly 123,000 fugitives, a 2 percent decline from 
the previous year.
    Gang Enforcement.--With some 20,000 violent street gangs, 
motorcycle gangs, and prison gangs with nearly one million 
members criminally active in the United States today, the 
Committee recognizes the urgent need to reduce the 
proliferation of gang members and gang crime. One of the key 
strengths of the USMS Regional Fugitive Task Forces [RFTF] 
model is the ability to conduct short-term, street level 
enforcement operations. This expertise lends extremely well to 
assisting the Marshals Service's Federal, State, and local law 
enforcement partners' ability to track down, root out, and 
prosecute the most dangerous violent gang members, thereby 
removing gangs and the tools of their trade--illicit weapons, 
drugs, and laundered money--from communities plagued by 
violence.
    Within the amount provided above the budget request, the 
USMS shall dedicate at least $7,520,000 to operate anti-gang 
investigative units, including supporting the supervisory, 
operational, equipment, and training needs of these units, in 
order to target gangs of national significance. These units 
will increase law enforcement's ability to identify, locate, 
and arrest violent gang fugitives, as well as increase USMS 
gang training and increase innovative anti-gang and violent 
crime reduction operations. If necessary, the Committee urges 
the Department of Justice to submit a reprogramming request in 
2014 that would reallocate funds from lower priority programs 
across the Department to enable the Marshals Service to expand 
its gang enforcement mission.
    Sex Offender Apprehension.--The Adam Walsh Child Protection 
and Safety Act of 2006 [AWA] (Public Law 109-248) gives the 
USMS the authority to treat convicted sex offenders who fail to 
register as fugitives. The act also directs the Marshals 
Service to assist jurisdictions in locating and apprehending 
these individuals. There are more than 100,000 non-compliant 
offenders in the United States. In 2012, the USMS tracked down 
and arrested more than 12,400 fugitive sex offenders and opened 
3,221 Adam Walsh Act investigations. Thus far in 2013, the USMS 
has arrested 5,600 fugitive sex offenders and opened more than 
1,700 investigations under the Adam Walsh Act.
    The USMS currently has on board 160 Deputy Marshals to 
assist States in locating and apprehending sex offenders who 
violate sex offender registration requirements. The Committee's 
recommendation provides not less than the budget request of 
$55,580,000 to continue AWA implementation. However, the USMS 
estimates it needs a dedicated force of at least 500 Deputy 
Marshals to expand AWA enforcement activities in districts 
across the country.
    The funds provided will also continue support for the 
National Sex Offender Targeting Center, improve the USMS 
information technology backbone, and reinforce infrastructure 
so that Deputy Marshals have timely, accurate investigative 
information to track down and arrest those who prey on our 
Nation's children.

                              CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2013....................................      $9,793,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      10,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      10,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $10,000,000 for 
construction in space controlled, occupied, or utilized by the 
USMS in Federal courthouses and buildings, including but not 
limited to the creation, renovation, and expansion of prisoner 
movement areas, elevators, and other law enforcement and court 
security support space. The recommendation is $207,000 above 
the fiscal year 2013 enacted level, and equal to the budget 
request.
    The Committee notes that the recommendation will result in 
funding for this account dropping roughly 62 percent in a span 
of 4 years, from $26,625,000 in fiscal year 2010 to $10,000,000 
in the recommendation. The USMS has approximately $41,000,000 
in shovel-ready construction and/or renovation projects pending 
at Federal courthouses and buildings. These upgrades are 
essential for maintaining the security and safety of judicial 
officials, courtroom participants, the public, USMS personnel, 
and prisoners.

                       FEDERAL PRISONER DETENTION

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $1,613,229,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   1,635,538,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,635,538,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $1,635,538,000 for 
Federal Prisoner Detention [FPD]. The recommendation is 
$22,309,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level, and equal 
to the budget request.
    The FPD appropriation funds the obligatory costs of 
housing, transportation, medical care, and medical guard 
services for Federal detainees remanded to USMS custody to 
await Federal court appearances and actions. FPD is mandated to 
accept each detainee. FPD's resources are expended from the 
time a prisoner is brought into USMS custody through the 
termination of the criminal proceeding and/or commitment to the 
Federal Bureau of Prisons [BOP]. The fiscal year 2014 request 
and the Committee's recommendation reflect increasing costs of 
detention and a growing detention population.
    Most of the growth in the detention population in recent 
years is related to immigration and drug offenses. In order to 
reduce the detention population, there would need to be a 
reduction in the number of incoming detainees; however, based 
on current projections, FPD expects bookings for immigration 
offenses alone to increase to 62,131 in 2014, a growth of 1,899 
bookings, or 3.2 percent over current levels. The Committee 
expects the Department to anticipate the true funding needs for 
this account in order to avoid funding shortfalls and the need 
for emergency reprogrammings to avert deficiencies. The 
Committee directs FPD to report to the Committee on a quarterly 
basis the number of individuals in the detention system, the 
projected number of individuals, and the annualized costs 
associated with them.

                       National Security Division


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $88,172,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      96,240,000
Committee recommendation................................      96,240,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $96,240,000 for the 
National Security Division [NSD]. The recommendation is 
$8,068,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and equal 
to the budget request.
    The NSD coordinates the Department's national security and 
counterterrorism missions through law enforcement 
investigations and prosecutions, and handles counterespionage 
cases. The NSD works in coordination with the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, the Intelligence Community, and the U.S. 
Attorneys. Its primary function is to prevent acts of terrorism 
and espionage from being perpetrated in the United States by 
foreign powers.
    Combating Cyber Threats to National Security.--The 
Committee's recommendation fully funds the requested 
programmatic increase of $3,489,000 and 26 additional 
positions, for a total of $30,468,000, to enable NSD to 
strengthen its investigative, prosecutorial, intelligence 
collection, and oversight abilities to support the Intelligence 
Community in identifying and disrupting cyber threats to 
national security.

                      Interagency Law Enforcement


                 INTERAGENCY CRIME AND DRUG ENFORCEMENT

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $510,975,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     523,037,000
Committee recommendation................................     523,037,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $523,037,000 for 
Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement. The recommendation is 
$12,062,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and equal 
to the budget request.
    The Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement account funds 
the Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Forces [OCDETF], 
which is the centerpiece of the Department's drug enforcement 
and counternarcotics efforts. The mission of OCDETF is to 
ensure a coordinated, multi-agency, intelligence-based, and 
prosecutor-led approach to identifying, disrupting, and 
dismantling those drug trafficking and money laundering 
organizations primarily responsible for the Nation's illicit 
drug supply and drug-related violence.

                    Federal Bureau of Investigation


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\\2\..............................  $8,025,332,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   8,361,687,000
Committee recommendation................................   8,361,687,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.
\2\Includes emergency funding of $10,020,000 in the Disaster Relief 
Appropriations Act, 2013 (division A of Public Law 113-2).

    The Committee's recommendation provides $8,361,687,000 for 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation [FBI] salaries and 
expenses. The recommendation is $336,355,000 above the fiscal 
year 2013 enacted level and equal to the budget request.
    Five-year Budget.--Implementation of a multi-year budget 
planning approach has been urged by the Committee in the past, 
as well as by various external review groups, such as the 
National Academy for Public Administration. This approach will 
also allow the FBI to better participate in the intelligence 
community budget process, especially as the Federal budget 
continues to be constrained. The Committee encourages the FBI 
to continue pursuing the 5-year budget within the 
administration, and directs the FBI to report to the Committee 
within 90 days of enactment of this act on the progress of this 
pursuit.
    Next Generation Cyber Initiative.--The Committee remains 
concerned that the threat to the United States from cyber-
related foreign intelligence operations is rapidly expanding. 
These cyber intrusions present evolving national security and 
economic threats, and have exploited and compromised thousands 
of computers on U.S. Government and private sector networks, 
thereby allowing cyber criminals to exfiltrate both State and 
trade secrets. Adding to foreign threats, U.S. Government and 
private sector computer networks also face persistent threats 
from hackers seeking profit, organized criminal cyber 
syndicates, and hacktivist groups. The FBI is in a unique 
position to counter cyber threats as it is the only agency with 
the statutory authority, expertise, and ability to combine 
counterterrorism, counterintelligence, and criminal resources 
to neutralize, mitigate, and disrupt illegal computer-supported 
operations domestically.
    The Committee recognizes the FBI's efforts to counter cyber 
threats and recommends the full request of $400,551,000 for 
this effort, an increase of $86,584,000 and 152 positions above 
the fiscal year 2013 enacted level, to further the FBI's 
investigatory, intelligence gathering, and technological 
capabilities. These funds will support efforts by the 
Comprehensive National Cybersecurity Initiative [CNCI] to 
increase coverage of cyber-terrorist threats, and will allow 
the FBI's National Cyber Investigative Joint Task Force 
[NCIJTF] to fully implement 24/7 operations. The NCIJTF plays 
an important role in coordinated national cybersecurity 
operations. Because threat actors operate globally, a 
significant volume of cyber threat activity occurs outside of 
normal business hours. The increasing need for real-time 
analysis to support operations and provide program management 
for multi-agency efforts requires the NCIJTF to boost its 
after-hours presence.
    Cyber Training for Field Agents.--The Committee expects the 
FBI to continue using, from within funds provided, $5,000,000 
to train FBI cyber agents involved in national security 
intrusions cases. This will allow the FBI to continue building 
its cyber threats workforce by increasing the number of cyber 
agents qualified to understand current techniques and tactics 
used by those engaged in illicit cyber activities, and stay 
abreast of emerging technologies that are used to overcome 
computer systems' defenses and to infiltrate networks, such as 
those of the U.S. Government, utility companies, defense 
contractors, and financial institutions.
    Cyber Strategy.--The FBI's approach to strengthening its 
cyber capabilities is markedly similar to the way in which the 
Bureau enhanced its intelligence and national security 
capabilities in the wake of the September 11 attacks. The FBI 
has requested--and Congress has sought to provide--a sustained 
and substantial increase in resources, culminating in the 
administration's request and the Committee's recommendation of 
$400,551,000 for the Next Generation Cyber Initiative. In order 
to maximize resources and efficiencies as the challenges posed 
by cyber crime multiply and cyber threats grow in number and 
complexity, the Committee encourages the FBI to act proactively 
and continue prioritizing its immediate and long-term areas for 
strategic development in order to best position the Bureau to 
respond more rapidly and prevent future attacks. This includes, 
but is not limited to, building the FBI's cybersecurity 
workforce; expanding and leveraging collaborative partnerships 
with other Federal agencies, State and local law enforcement, 
and the private sector; ensuring intelligence sharing on cyber 
threat investigations and disruption options with other Federal 
agencies and between FBI field offices; and avoiding techno-
boondoggles. The Committee expects such actions will be 
reflected in future budget requests, thus making a strong case 
for the urgent need for continued investment.
    Surveillance.--The recommendation provides the full request 
of a program increase of $6,000,000, for a total of 
$269,939,000, for additional surveillance specialists to 
improve the FBI's ability to provide physical surveillance for 
both national security and criminal investigations.
    National Instant Criminal Background Check System [NICS].--
The Committee's recommendation fully funds the programmatic 
increase of $100,000,000 and 524 additional positions, for a 
total of $168,400,000, to increase the capacity of the existing 
NICS system to perform background checks on prospective 
firearms buyers. Currently, the FBI is processing an average 
81,000 NICS inquiries each day. This is an increase of 81 
percent in NICS volume since December 2012, and shows no sign 
of abating. The expansions provided in the recommendation are 
vital in ensuring that the NICS system can support all 
transactions, thus allowing the NICS IT system to handle twice 
the gross transaction load it currently does. The expansion 
also doubles the population of NICS examiners and call center 
capacity to ensure the FBI has sufficient personnel to manage 
the existing capacity requirements.
    Financial and Mortgage Fraud.--The FBI continues to develop 
new approaches and techniques for detecting, investigating, and 
combating the highest impact and most complex financial 
crimes--corporate fraud, securities and commodities fraud, and 
mortgage fraud. The Committee's recommendation includes the 
requested program increases totaling $15,000,000 and 44 new 
positions, including 40 new special agents and 4 new forensic 
accountants, for a total of $162,103,000, to increase the FBI's 
ability to combat corporate fraud, securities and commodities 
fraud, and mortgage fraud at all levels of organizations, and 
will enable the FBI to adapt as new fraud schemes emerge. These 
resources will establish two hybrid squads to target the most 
complex financial crimes, provide expertise in analyzing and 
cross referencing complex financial documents, and increase 
case production by approximately 320 cases.
    The FBI identifies mortgage fraud as the top white collar 
crime problem in the United States. The Bureau is currently 
investigating nearly 2,300 mortgage fraud cases, compared to 
approximately 700 investigations in fiscal year 2005. Roughly 
72 percent of the FBI's pending investigations involve losses 
exceeding $1,000,000 per case. Suspicious Activity Reports 
[SARs] regarding mortgage fraud are at an all-time high of 
109,000. Efforts to combat mortgage fraud are paying off and in 
2012 the FBI successfully pursued cases that resulted in more 
than 1,800 indictments/informations and more than 1,600 
convictions.
    Criminal Justice Information Services [CJIS] Division.--The 
Committee's recommendation provides $778,696,700, including fee 
collections, for the CJIS Division, derived from $416,043,100 
in appropriated funds and $362,653,600 in anticipated user 
fees.
    Elimination of the National Gang Intelligence Center 
[NGIC].--The Committee's recommendation supports the 
administration's request to eliminate funding for and to close 
the NGIC, which will provide a savings of $7,826,000 annually. 
Per the request, the Committee expects that the elimination of 
the NGIC will not hinder the ability to examine the threat 
posed to the United States by criminal gangs; rather, it will 
focus the sharing of intelligence at the field level, where 
intelligence sharing and coordination between DOJ agencies and 
State and local partners already exists. The FBI will continue 
to produce intelligence products in support of Federal, State, 
and local investigations focused on gangs posing a significant 
threat to communities.
    FBI Headquarters Consolidation.--The Committee directs the 
FBI to coordinate closely with the General Services 
Administration [GSA] to move forward in a timely and 
transparent way with the consolidation of FBI Headquarters so 
that employees currently located at the J. Edgar Hoover 
building may be co-located with colleagues who are currently 
spread out across 20 leased offices in the region. The 
Committee strongly encourages the FBI and GSA to follow the 
Senate-passed resolution which directs GSA to find a 45 to 55 
acre location within a reasonable distance of the White House, 
the United States Capitol, and the FBI Complex in Quantico, 
Virginia, that is also within 2 miles of a Metrorail station 
and 2.5 miles of the Capital Beltway. This consolidation is in 
the best interests of the FBI's information sharing, 
collaboration, and integration of strategic priorities. The FBI 
must have a central headquarters that meets its needs for 
security and transportation access.
    Human Rights Violations.--The Committee remains concerned 
by the large number of suspected human rights violators from 
foreign countries who have found safe haven in the United 
States, and directs the FBI to continue its efforts to 
investigate and support DOJ's criminal prosecution of serious 
human rights crimes committed by these foreign nationals, 
including genocide, torture, use or recruitment of child 
soldiers, and war crimes. The Committee's recommendation 
supports continued funding of $1,500,000 within the FBI's 
budget base for agents and associated support personnel at FBI 
headquarters.
    Intellectual Property Rights [IPR] Enforcement.--The 
Committee expects IPR enforcement to remain an investigative 
priority at the Bureau. The Committee notes and commends the 
FBI's investigative work leading to the indictment of an 
international organized criminal enterprise charged with 
massive, worldwide online piracy of numerous types of copyright 
works through various Web sites, generating more than 
$175,000,000 in criminal proceeds and causing more than half a 
billion dollars in harm to copyright owners. A recent study 
sponsored by Wellesley College and Carnegie Mellon University 
concluded that the enforcement action against this criminal 
enterprise shifted customers from cyberlocker-based piracy to 
consumption through legal digital channels, an increase by a 
factor of 6 to 10 percent. The FBI shall submit a report, not 
later than 120 days after the enactment of this act, on the 
activities of its dedicated agents investigating IPR cases.
    Innocent Images National Initiative [IINI].--The 
Committee's recommendation provides the $59,205,000 requested 
in base funding for the Innocent Images National Initiative, 
which allows the FBI to target and investigate sexual predators 
on the Internet. This funding will address the critical 
requirements for Federal law enforcement in targeting child 
sexual exploitation and child victimization. The Committee 
trusts that the budget request is sufficient to cover the 
current Innocent Images caseload. Should the threat of child 
predators on the Internet increase, however, the Committee 
expects that future budget requests for the FBI will include 
adequate resources dedicated to investigate child predators who 
prey on children online.
    Investigations Into Severe Forms of Trafficking in 
Persons.--Within the amount provided, the Committee expects the 
FBI to increase activities related to the investigation of 
severe forms of trafficking in persons. As the lead Federal law 
enforcement agency for trafficking offenses, the FBI's ability 
to combat trafficking and slavery would be significantly 
enhanced through additional resources devoted specifically to 
the growing problem of trafficking and slavery. Funds shall be 
used for investigations into trafficking and slavery and 
providing victim witness coordinators when needed on an 
emergency basis. The FBI shall submit a report to the Committee 
no later than 120 days after the enactment of this act on agent 
utilization and overall staff resources dedicated to combat 
trafficking in fiscal years 2010 through 2014.

                              CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $79,303,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      80,982,000
Committee recommendation................................     110,982,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $110,982,000 for 
Federal Bureau of Investigation [FBI] construction. The 
recommendation is $31,679,000 above the fiscal year 2013 
funding level and $30,000,000 above the budget request.
    Terrorist Explosive Device Analytical Center [TEDAC].--The 
Committee includes language allowing the transfer of up to 
$30,000,000 from FBI construction to the FBI salaries and 
expenses account to ensure the Bureau can adhere to its 
construction, staffing, and implementation plan to make certain 
that the FBI has the necessary facilities, capabilities, and 
capacities required to safely examine and exploit improvised 
explosive devices, and conduct explosives characterization, as 
previously funded by the Congress, are in place. Recent events, 
especially the bombings of the Boston Marathon, underscore the 
continued threat that improvised explosive devices [IEDs] pose 
to the United States, its communities, and its citizens. This 
threat is not expected to diminish in the near future. The 
Committee believes that TEDAC is an essential FBI asset that 
will allow the Bureau to safely analyze IEDs for law 
enforcement and intelligence purposes and to provide the law 
enforcement, intelligence, and homeland security communities 
with up-to-date information to detect and counter the threat 
from improvised explosives. Use of this authority is subject to 
the submission of a section 505 notification to the Committee.

                    Drug Enforcement Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\\2\..............................  $2,361,321,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   2,428,869,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,428,869,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.
\2\Includes emergency funding of $1,000,000 in the Disaster Relief 
Appropriations Act, 2013 (division A of Public Law 113-2).

    The Committee's recommendation provides total resources of 
$2,428,869,000 for the Drug Enforcement Administration [DEA], 
of which $360,917,000 is derived from DEA's Drug Diversion 
Control Fee Account. The recommendation is $67,548,000 above 
the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and equal to the budget 
request.
    The DEA's mission is to enforce the controlled substances 
laws and regulations of the United States and bring to the 
criminal and civil justice system of the United States--or any 
other competent jurisdiction--those organizations and principal 
members of organizations involved in the growing, 
manufacturing, or distribution of controlled substances 
appearing in or destined for illicit traffic in the United 
States; and to support non-enforcement programs aimed at 
reducing the availability of illicit controlled substances on 
the domestic and international markets.
    Diversion Control Program.--Full funding of $360,917,000 is 
provided for the Diversion Control Program, which is an 
increase of $8,980,000 for expanded forensic support of 
diversion cases and is fully offset with fee collections.
    Prescription Drug Abuse.--The misuse and abuse of 
prescription drugs has become a national epidemic that 
jeopardizes the health of youth and adults alike. The National 
Institute on Drug Abuse [NIDA] estimates that 52 million 
people--20 percent of those aged 12 and older--have used 
prescription drugs for nonmedical reasons at least once in 
their lifetimes. In light of the urgency of this public health 
crisis, the Department shall submit a report to the Committee 
no later than 120 days after enactment of this act on how the 
DEA is approaching this growing epidemic, with a focus on four 
policy priorities identified by the Office of National Drug 
Control Policy: (1) education for prescribers and the public; 
(2) prescription monitoring; (3) safe drug disposal; and (4) 
effective enforcement.
    Afghanistan Mission.--The DEA currently assists the 
Government of Afghanistan in establishing drug enforcement 
institutions and capabilities needed to enforce the rule of 
law. DEA's enforcement operations in Afghanistan focus on high 
value targets, including Taliban members, who use the heroin 
trade to fund insurgencies combating U.S. and coalition forces. 
The Committee encourages DEA to continue its counternarcotics 
activities in Afghanistan, even as the military mission draws 
down, including, to the extent practicable, continued funding 
for Special Investigative Units, National Interdiction Units, 
and Technical Investigative Units.
    Scheduling Determinations.--Within 90 days of enactment of 
this act, the DEA shall submit to the Committee a report 
detailing the process and timeline used by the agency to 
schedule a new chemical entity contained in a product approved 
by the Food and Drug Administration [FDA]. The report shall 
contain the sequence of internal action at DEA, from receipt of 
a recommendation by FDA to DEA's Federal Register publication 
of the final rule on a scheduling determination and the typical 
time required for each of these actions. The report shall also 
explain the circumstances where a final scheduling 
recommendation was not made within 6 months and the actions 
taken by the agency to resolve unanswered questions on 
scheduling determinations for requests that did not result in a 
final rule after 6 months.
    Drug Take-Back Operations.--The Committee is concerned 
about the alarming rate of suicide among servicemembers and 
veterans. In 2012, the Department of Defense [DOD] reported 349 
military suicides, and over the first 5 months of this year DOD 
recorded 161 suicides. According to a 2012 Department of 
Veterans Affairs [VA] Suicide Data Report, based on information 
gathered from 21 States, an estimated 22 veterans lose their 
lives by suicide each day. A 2012 United States Army report 
found that 29 percent of suicides involved servicemembers with 
a known history of psychotropic medication use.
    The Committee is aware that more than 8 million veterans 
and 2 million DOD beneficiaries receive care and prescription 
drugs from the Veterans Health Administration and Military 
Treatment Facilities. The Committee encourages DEA to continue 
to consult with DOD and VA in its ongoing efforts, as 
authorized by the Secure and Responsible Drug Disposal Act of 
2010, to expand the options available for the safe disposal of 
controlled substances for our servicemembers and veterans. The 
DEA is encouraged to partner with DOD and VA to develop 
appropriate guidelines and procedures to conduct drug take-back 
operations at approved DOD and VA facilities.

          Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\\2\..............................  $1,129,663,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   1,229,518,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,229,518,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.
\2\Includes emergency funding of $230,000 in the Disaster Relief 
Appropriations Act, 2013 (division A of Public Law 113-2).

    The Committee's recommendation provides $1,229,518,000 for 
the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives [ATF]. 
The recommendation is $99,855,000 above the fiscal year 2013 
enacted level and equal to the budget request.
    The ATF's mission is to reduce violent crime, prevent 
terrorism, and protect the public. ATF reduces the criminal use 
of firearms and illegal firearms trafficking, and assists other 
Federal, State, and local law enforcement agencies in reducing 
crime and violence. ATF investigates bombing and arson 
incidents and provides for public safety by reducing the 
criminal misuse of and trafficking in explosives, combating 
acts of arson and arson-for-profit schemes, and removing safety 
hazards caused by improper and unsafe storage of explosive 
materials.
    Combating Gun Violence and Enforcing Gun Laws.--The 
Committee's recommendation provides the requested increase of 
$73,078,000, for a total of $977,578,000, to enhance ATF's 
ability to enforce existing firearms laws and perform 
regulatory oversight, as well as to update and expand the 
National Integrated Ballistics Information Network [NIBIN]. 
Within this amount, the Committee provides the requested 
increase of $51,078,000 to hire 160 additional ATF agents for 
criminal enforcement efforts and 60 additional Industry 
Operations Inspectors to further support ATF's regulatory 
oversight responsibilities. The increase also provides the 
requested programmatic increase of $22,000,000 for NIBIN to 
enhance ATF's ability to collect, report, and share ballistic 
intelligence with Federal, State, local and tribal law 
enforcement partners to identify, target, disrupt, and 
dismantle violent criminals, including serial shooters. These 
funds will support the replacement of outdated equipment and 
software upgrades that will enable firearms examiners to more 
easily discern distinct markings on the cartridge casings and 
link evidence for separate cases. Funds will also be used to 
support work with State and local law enforcement agencies and 
laboratories to collect ballistic hit information to provide 
leads to Firearms Intelligence Groups for investigations and 
document successful prosecutions as a result of NIBIN.
    National Integrated Ballistics Information Network 
Improvements.--The Committee is aware that the ATF has 
successfully operated NIBIN for over a decade, linking more 
than 180 State and local law enforcement partner agencies to a 
database with more than two million images of ballistics 
evidence retrieved from gun crime scenes. To date, more than 
100,000 shootings have been linked, providing crime solving 
leads to investigators. The Committee supports NIBIN, including 
the significant investment made by State and local law 
enforcement partners to build the current NIBIN database.
    The Committee recognizes that ATF is currently working 
toward creating a regional network for the placement of NIBIN 
equipment and resources. The Committee supports this regional 
approach and further supports all efforts to increase the 
quality and quantity of data being put into NIBIN, the 
expansion of the network for improved cross jurisdictional data 
sharing, and all efforts to sustain its operations using state 
of the art technology.
    The Committee remains concerned that not all ballistics 
information is being put into NIBIN when recovered by Federal 
law enforcement. The Committee directs DOJ to take the 
necessary steps to ensure ballistics information is entered 
into NIBIN when Federal law enforcement recovers evidence such 
as fired bullets and cartridge cases at a crime scene.
    Firearms and Explosives Industry Operations.--The Committee 
continues to support the ATF's strategic goals of reducing the 
risk to the public caused by the illegal trafficking of 
firearms, bombs, and explosives. The Committee is concerned 
that the results of recent DOJ OIG audits of ATF's Firearms and 
Explosives Industry Programs show gaps in the Bureau's ability 
to adequately monitor and investigate manufacturers and 
suppliers in a timely manner. Specifically, the inspector 
general audit found that over 58 percent of Federal firearms 
license [FFL] businesses were not inspected over a 5-year 
period due to insufficient investigator resources, large 
geographic areas covered by the field divisions, and the rising 
number of FFLs nationwide. In order to meet their goals, ATF 
estimated that an additional 504 industry staff investigators 
were needed in fiscal year 2012 to perform all inspections. The 
recommendation provides funding for the requested 60 additional 
inspectors, far short of the ATF's own estimates of need. The 
Committee recommends that ATF develop a strategic plan to 
address the OIG's findings and better balance its personnel and 
resources with the existing workload. The ATF shall report to 
the Committee within 90 days of enactment of this act.
    United States-Mexico Firearms Trafficking.--The Committee 
continues to support ATF's efforts to combat weapon trafficking 
on the border. The ATF shall continue to provide the Committee 
with annual data on the total number of firearms recovered by 
the Government of Mexico, and of those, the number for which an 
ATF trace is attempted, the number successfully traced, and the 
number determined to have originated in the United States prior 
to being recovered in Mexico.
    Violent Crime Impact Teams.--The Committee continues to 
support the ATF's Violent Crime Impact Teams [VCIT], which 
bring focused law enforcement attention to communities plagued 
by gang violence. The VCIT strategy pursues violent criminals 
and reduces the occurrence of homicides and firearms-related 
violent crime through the use of geographic targeting, 
intelligence-based assessments, proactive investigation, and 
prosecution of those responsible. The VCIT uses a multi-agency 
approach and works closely with State and local law enforcement 
to identify, target, disrupt, arrest, and prosecute violent 
criminals. Within the amount provided, ATF is expected to 
prioritize funding for VCIT to focus its extensive and distinct 
investigative resources on identifying the urban areas 
experiencing the most violent crime. The ATF is directed to 
identify its allocation for VCIT in its spending plan for 
fiscal year 2014.
    National Center for Explosives Training and Research 
[NCETR].--Preventing the criminal use of explosives is one of 
the core missions of the ATF, and NCETR serves as the Bureau's 
Center of Excellence for explosives research, training, and 
intelligence. NCETR develops, coordinates, conducts, and 
facilitates the delivery of basic and advanced training courses 
for ATF personnel, law enforcement community partners, the U.S. 
military, and other Federal agencies, both in the United States 
and abroad. The ATF's goals are to foster arson- and 
explosives-related expertise, and to promote interagency 
partnerships. The Committee is encouraged by the ATF's plans to 
consolidate remaining explosives-related work within NCETR; 
however, while NCETR's facility is a critical national asset, 
it remains understaffed and underutilized. The Committee 
encourages the ATF and the Justice Department to explore ways 
to more actively employ the unique assets possessed by NCETR 
and provide a report, not later than 120 days after the date of 
enactment of this act, detailing the current staffing levels 
and course offerings for fiscal year 2014, as well as plans for 
the future to enhance both staffing levels and course 
availability.
    ATF Director Vacancy.--The Department has been without a 
confirmed, permanent director since 2006. The ATF staff 
continues to work diligently on its ongoing and evolving 
responsibilities, including the renewed push to reduce gun 
violence and ensure that Federal law enforcement is enforcing 
gun laws already on the books; however, it is crucial that the 
Bureau have top leadership to guide its work. In order to 
ensure that the substantial resources invested by the 
Committee's recommendation are wisely spent, the Committee 
believes that the ATF should have a permanent director in place 
who can provide good leadership, oversight, and accountability.

                         Federal Prison System

    The Committee's recommendation provides a total of 
$6,939,094,000 for the Federal Prison System, or the Bureau of 
Prisons [BOP]. The recommendation is $159,499,000 above the 
fiscal year 2013 enacted level and equal to the budget request.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $6,678,817,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   6,831,150,000
Committee recommendation................................   6,831,150,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $6,831,150,000 for 
BOP salaries and expenses. The recommendation is $152,333,000 
above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and equal to the 
budget request.
    The recommendation shall be expended, consistent with the 
budget request, in the following manner:

                          SALARIES AND EXPENSES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Inmate Care and Programs...............................        2,509,802
Institution Security and Administration................        2,995,794
Contract Confinement...................................        1,114,532
Management and Administration..........................          211,022
                                                        ----------------
      Total............................................        6,831,150
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee has made great sacrifices to fund BOP 
salaries and expenses at the request. By law, the BOP must 
accept and provide for all Federal inmates, including but not 
limited to inmate care, custodial staff, contract beds, food, 
and medical costs. The BOP cannot control the number of inmates 
sentenced to prison and, unlike other Federal agencies, cannot 
limit assigned workloads and thereby control operating costs. 
In effect, the BOP's expenses are mandatory, which leaves the 
Bureau with extremely limited flexibility.
    Correctional Officer Staffing--The Federal prison 
population has grown explosively over the last 20 years. Rising 
from roughly 25,000 prisoners in 1980, the population is 
estimated to grow to more than 224,000 by the end of fiscal 
year 2014. BOP estimates that its inmate population will 
increase by approximately 5,400 net new inmates between fiscal 
years 2013 and 2014. Correspondingly, BOP facilities are 
operating at 38 percent above capacity systemwide. What is more 
distressing is that the high-security inmate population 
overcrowding rate is at 51 percent. BOP must rely excessively 
on correctional officer overtime and the diversion of program 
staff instead of hiring additional correctional officers, 
leaving the workforce spread dangerously thin and compromising 
BOP's ability to operate in a safe and efficient manner.
    Prior to March 2013, even under tight budget constraints, 
BOP was authorized to make essential backfills in key personnel 
positions, such as correctional officers, not to exceed 
staffing levels as of January 1, 2011, or available funding, to 
maintain public safety protections. Since March 2013, however, 
under even tighter budget constraints, BOP has been unable to 
backfill empty positions. If this continues through fiscal year 
2014, the Department projects that BOP will be unable to fill 
the nearly 2,100 vacant correctional positions necessary to 
safely manage the growing inmate population. In spite of this 
need, the fiscal year 2014 request does not include funds to 
fill vacant correctional worker positions at existing BOP 
institutions, rather it only provides funding for hiring 
corrections staff under activations of new prison facilities.
    Correctional Staff Safety.--The Committee is extremely 
concerned about increasing demand for bed space in our Nation's 
prisons and notes that, despite this increased demand, budget 
requests for the operational needs of our prisons continue to 
be flat. This strain on capacity has a demonstrated impact on 
prison operations and on the safety of prison guards. Ensuring 
that correctional officers and administrators have adequate 
technology is one way to counteract the negative impacts of the 
strain on capacity. For example, providing correctional 
officers with updated, encrypted communications equipment may 
help prevent violent incidents from occurring by providing 
additional protections to officers when incidents occur. In 
addition, technology that could support all of BOP's handheld 
communications equipment from a single, centralized location 
could result in significant cost savings for the Bureau. The 
Committee encourages BOP to investigate opportunities to 
enhance its existing technology and communications 
infrastructure in ways that can provide both cost savings and 
additional safety benefits to personnel.
    Contract Confinement.--The Committee's recommendation fully 
funds the requested programmatic increase of $26,232,000 and 
procurement of 1,000 new low security contract beds, for a 
total of $1,114,532,000, for contract confinement needs. This 
activity provides for the confinement of sentenced Federal 
offenders in Government-owned, contractor-operated facilities, 
contracts with State and local facilities, the care of Federal 
prisoners in contract community residential centers, and 
assistance by the National Institute of Corrections to State 
and local corrections. This activity also covers costs 
associated with management and oversight of contract 
confinement functions.
    Prison Overcrowding.--Prison overcrowding has been 
identified as a programmatic material weakness in every 
Performance and Accountability Report prepared by the 
Department since 2006. According to the Office of the Inspector 
General [OIG], DOJ faces a significant challenge in 
``addressing the growing cost of housing a continually growing 
and aging population of Federal inmates and detainees.'' In 
order to address this challenge, BOP has contracted with 
private sector, State, and local facilities to house certain 
groups of low security inmates, purchased existing facilities, 
and even constructed new, Federal facilities. None of these 
efforts, however, have had a significant impact on prison 
overcrowding.
    The Bureau's prison population is expected to grow by 5,400 
net new inmates in fiscal year 2014 and an additional 13,000 by 
2018. Fifteen years ago, the Bureau's budget represented 14 
percent of the Department's budget. Today it represents 25 
percent, and if the projected growth continues over the next 
several years and the Department's budget remains flat, that 
number will eventually grow to 30 percent. Despite the Bureau's 
budget growth, Federal prisons are now 38 percent over rated 
capacity and BOP projects that number will increase to 44 
percent in the years ahead, despite additional funding.
    We cannot buy our way out of this problem--this path is 
unsustainable and these issues must be addressed. The OIG has 
testified that the Department ``cannot solve this challenge by 
spending more money to operate more Federal prisons . . . [and] 
must therefore articulate a clear strategy for addressing the 
underlying cost structure of the Federal Prison System and 
ensuring that the Department can continue to run our prisons 
safely and securely without compromising the scope or quality 
of its many other critical law enforcement missions.'' In order 
to address this challenge, the OIG has made a number of 
recommendations regarding the use of existing programs, 
including the treaty transfer program and the compassionate 
release program. While BOP has limited ability to address 
crowding in the Federal Prison System, these programs, as well 
as the use of contract confinement for low security inmates, 
are options currently available to the Bureau; however, the 
Committee is concerned that the Bureau is not fully utilizing 
these options. To that end, the Committee directs the Bureau to 
develop a comprehensive plan to address the anticipated growth 
in the Federal prison population utilizing the programs and 
policies already authorized. The plan shall be provided to the 
Committee not later than 180 days after the date of enactment 
of this act.
    To assist BOP in its long-term planning efforts, the 
Committee directs the Government Accountability Office to 
conduct a comprehensive assessment of the growing cost of 
housing Federal inmates and detainees, and opportunities to 
offset those costs, while ensuring the safety and security of 
the inmate population, as well as the guards and other facility 
employees. The scope of such an assessment must be Department-
wide, not just limited to BOP, in order to assess all aspects 
of DOJ's enforcement and incarceration policies, and prevention 
programs, including which criminal cases should be brought in 
Federal court, whether performance metrics are aligned with the 
Department's enforcement priorities and measure the quality of 
cases brought rather than just the number of cases filed, and 
whether existing incarceration and prevention programs are 
being used effectively. In reviewing opportunities to offset 
costs, the assessment shall consider BOP's current authorities, 
including, but not limited to, contracting with private sector, 
State, and local facilities to house certain groups of low 
security inmates; purchasing existing facilities; the 
construction of new Federal facilities; the compassionate 
release program; and the treaty transfer program.
    Activations and Expansions.--The Committee fully funds the 
request to activate prisons that currently sit empty or 
partially empty due to prior year budget constraints. These 
funds will complete the activation of a medium-security prison 
located in Berlin, New Hampshire, and a medium-security prison 
for female inmates in Aliceville, Alabama, and begin 
activations of a high-security prison in Yazoo, Mississippi, a 
medium-security prison in Hazelton, West Virginia, and a high-
security prison in Thomson, Illinois. The Committee expects BOP 
to adhere to the activation schedule included in BOP's budget 
submission regarding those prison facilities. BOP shall notify 
the Committee of any deviations to this schedule.
    Reentry and Recidivism Reducing Programs.--The Committee's 
recommendation provides the requested increase of $43,000,000 
and 120 positions, for a total $781,282,000 for the Federal 
Prison System to meet the requirements of the Second Chance Act 
(Public Law 110-199). Funding will also be used to expand 
Residential Drug Abuse Program [RDAP] capacity, which will help 
BOP reach the goal of providing 12-month sentence credits to 
all eligible inmates, and allow more inmates to complete the 
programs earlier and, if eligible, receive the full 1-year off 
their sentence. The current average sentence reduction credit 
for inmates completing RDAP is 9.4 months.

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES

Appropriations, 2013\1\\2\..............................     $98,134,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     105,244,000
Committee recommendation................................     105,244,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.
\2\Includes emergency funding of $10,000,000 in the Disaster Relief 
Appropriations Act, 2013 (division A of Public Law 113-2).

    The Committee's recommendation provides the full request of 
$105,244,000 for the construction, modernization, maintenance, 
and repair of prison and detention facilities housing Federal 
prisoners. The recommendation is $7,110,000 above the fiscal 
year 2013 enacted level and equal to the budget request. Of the 
amount provided, $67,148,000 is for modernization and repairs.
    The Committee includes bill language in Title V--General 
Provisions stipulating that no BOP resources may be used for 
facilities to house detainees from the United States Naval 
Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
    Construction.--BOP currently has no plans to activate new 
prisons, aside from those activations proposed in the fiscal 
year 2014 request, for the remainder of this decade because it 
has no plans to submit significant new construction 
appropriation requests in coming fiscal years. After receipt of 
the GAO's comprehensive assessment of ways to reduce prison 
overcrowding, BOP shall submit to the Committee a comprehensive 
plan, including funding for new prison construction if merited 
in future requests.
    The Committee directs BOP to continue providing the 
Committee the most recent monthly status of construction 
report, and to notify the Committee of any deviations from the 
construction and activation schedule identified in that report, 
including detailed explanations of the causes of delays and 
actions proposed to address them. These reports are critical to 
the Committee's ability to monitor and assess BOP's needs. BOP 
shall collaborate and coordinate with the Justice Management 
Division on methods that will efficiently deliver these 
critical reports to the Committee in a timely manner.

                FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INCORPORATED

                (LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES)

Appropriations, 2013....................................      $2,644,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................       2,700,000
Committee recommendation................................       2,700,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides a limitation on the 
administrative expenses of $2,700,000 for the Federal Prison 
Industries, Inc. The recommendation is $56,000 above the fiscal 
year 2013 enacted level and equal to the budget request.

               State and Local Law Enforcement Activities

    In total, the Committee recommends a total of 
$2,452,800,000 for State and local law enforcement and crime 
prevention grant programs, including $2,371,800,000 in 
discretionary appropriations. The discretionary total is 
$215,239,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and 
$31,600,000 above the budget estimate.
    Collaboration Between Grants Administering Components.--For 
many years, the Office on Violence Against Women [OVW], the 
Office of Justice Programs [OJP], and the Office of Community 
Oriented Policing Services [COPS] have collaborated on many 
projects and initiatives to address problems that fall within 
their respective missions. The Committee expects OVW, OJP, and 
COPS to continue and improve upon their collaborative efforts, 
where feasible, in order to avoid duplication of effort and to 
make the best possible use of their appropriations.
    Management and Administration Expenses.--The Department 
shall, in preparation of its fiscal year 2014 spending plan, 
assess management and administration [M&A] expenses against 
program funding. The Committee directs the Department to ensure 
that its assessment methodology is equitable and, for programs 
funded through the Crime Victims Fund, that the assessment 
reflects a fair representation of the share of each program 
devoted to common M&A costs. The Committee also directs grant 
offices to minimize administrative spending in order to 
maximize the amount of funding that can be used for grants or 
training and technical assistance. In addition, the Department 
shall detail, as part of its budget submission for fiscal year 
2015 and future years, the actual costs for each grant office 
with respect to training, technical assistance, research and 
statistics, and peer review for the prior fiscal year, along 
with estimates of planned expenditures by each grant office in 
each of these categories for the current year and the budget 
year.
    GAO Findings on Subgrantee Efficiencies.--The Committee 
directs OVW, OJP, and COPS to publicly disclose on each 
office's Web site the names of any subgrantees associated with 
each grant award, and to detail the purpose of each award in 
order to mitigate duplication and to ensure transparency. The 
Department shall also heed the findings of GAO's 2013 Annual 
Report: Actions Needed to Reduce Fragmentation, Overlap, and 
Duplication and Achieve Other Financial Benefits, respond 
proactively, and report to the Committee within 45 days of 
enactment of this act on a plan to implement the 
recommendations.
    Evidence-Based Programs.--Faced with an era of budget 
constraints, the Committee strongly urges OJP, COPS, and OVW to 
ensure that, to the greatest extent practicable, competitive 
grants are used for evidence-based programs and activities of 
proven effectiveness, innovation, targeted training and 
technical assistance, and multi-disciplinary collaboration, so 
as to maximize the result for each dollar spent.
    Grants Consolidation.--The Committee recognizes the efforts 
taken by the Department in the fiscal year 2014 request, as 
well as prior year requests, to consolidate and reduce the 
number of grant programs, and to ensure that Federal grant 
funding goes to evidence-based purposes and helps to advance 
knowledge about what works in State and local criminal justice. 
Many of the initiatives proposed by the Department, however, 
come at the expense of effective existing grant programs 
popular with Congress. This leaves the Committee in the 
position of filling holes, while trying to provide some funding 
for the administration's priorities. This also means that the 
number of grant programs grows, and the Committee cannot fund 
several programs at levels necessary to be most effective.
    Approximately 90 grant programs are appropriated by this 
Committee and administered by the Department. This reflects a 
reduction from the more than 120 grant programs just 3 years 
ago. While the intents of many of these grant programs are 
noble, the Committee remains concerned that the perpetual 
authorization and proposal of new grants programs, while not 
de-authorizing or omitting redundant and archaic ones, has 
become unmanageable, particularly during these tight fiscal 
times. The Committee directs the Department to work more 
closely with the appropriate congressional committees to 
seriously consider the modification of existing programs and 
omission of outdated programs before new proposals and 
initiatives are unveiled. The Committee urges the Department, 
working with Congress and stakeholder groups, to devise a 
proposal to consolidate and eliminate ineffective grant 
programs and focus on successful programs that have a proven 
track record and are cost-effective for the taxpayers' dollars, 
but reminds the Department that the appropriations process is 
not the venue for broad authorizing changes.

                    Office on Violence Against Women


       VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN PREVENTION AND PROSECUTION PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $407,865,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     412,500,000
Committee recommendation................................     417,000,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $417,000,000 for 
Office on Violence Against Women grants. The recommendation is 
$9,135,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level, and 
$4,500,000 above the budget request. Resources are provided in 
OVW above the budget request in order to reflect the passage 
into law of the Violence Against Women Act Reauthorization of 
2013 [VAWA 2013], which expands the scope of grant programs and 
services to respond to the needs of all victims of domestic 
violence, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking, 
including, but not limited to, Native women, immigrants, LGBT 
victims, college students, youths, and public housing 
residents. The administration's fiscal year 2014 request does 
not reflect VAWA 2013 becoming law; however, the Committee 
expects the Department to administer VAWA-authorized grant 
programs funded under OVW and OJP consistent with the new 
authorization.
    Timeliness of Grant Awards.--The Committee expects OVW to 
award grants within the same fiscal year that funds are 
appropriated. While the Committee recognizes there may be 
exceptions to this rule, such as the creation of or substantial 
funding for a new grant program, the Committee has made it a 
priority to provide adequate funding for OVW salaries and 
expenses in order to ensure the timeliness of grant awards. The 
Committee expects OVW to discuss, calculate, and plan in detail 
the best way to administer a grant program; however, OVW cannot 
allow the perfect to become the enemy of the good when too much 
preparation results in unnecessary delays of getting grants out 
the door and on the ground to help victims. Not later than 30 
days after the end of the current fiscal year, OVW shall submit 
to the Committee a report on grants appropriated but not 
awarded in that year, including a detailed explanation of such 
delays and the expected award dates, as well as OVW's end-of-
year unobligated balances from both fiscal year 2014 and prior 
years.
    The table below displays the Committee's recommendations 
for the programs under this office.

       VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN PREVENTION AND PROSECUTION PROGRAMS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                        Program                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
STOP Grants............................................         193,000
National Institute of Justice--Research and Evaluation.           3,000
Transitional Housing Assistance........................          25,000
Grants to Encourage Arrest.............................          50,000
    Homicide Reduction Initiative......................          (4,000)
Rural Domestic Violence Assistance Grants..............          36,000
Violence on College Campuses...........................           9,000
Civil Legal Assistance.................................          37,000
Sexual Assault Victims Services........................          27,000
Elder Abuse Grant Program..............................           4,250
Family Civil Justice Program...........................          15,000
Education and Training for Disabled Female Victims.....           5,750
Consolidated Youth-Oriented Program....................          10,000
Analysis and Research on Violence Against Indian Women.           1,000
National Resource Center on Workplace Responses........             500
American Indian/Native Alaskan Sexual Assault                       500
 Clearinghouse.........................................
                                                        ----------------
      Total............................................         417,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    STOP Grants.--Within the discretionary budget authority 
appropriated, $193,000,000 is for formula grants to the States. 
This is $4,000,000 above the budget request, and $7,918,000 
above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level. The fiscal year 2014 
recommendation will allow jurisdictions to implement mandatory 
pro-arrest and prosecution policies to prevent, identify, and 
respond to violent crimes against women, support coordination 
of State victim services, assist Native victims in Indian 
country, and provide secure settings and specialized procedures 
for visitation and exchange of children in families 
experiencing domestic violence. The recommendation supports 
increasing access to comprehensive legal services for victims, 
providing short-term housing assistance and support services 
for domestic violence victims, and education and training to 
end violence against and abuse of women with disabilities.
    Sexual Assault Services Act [SASA].--The Committee's 
recommendation provides $27,000,000, which is $2,518,000 above 
the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and $4,000,000 above the 
budget request, to fund directly the needs of sexual assault 
victims.
    As part of the Violence Against Women Act of 2005 and 
reauthorized by VAWA 2013, the Sexual Assault Services Program 
[SASP] addresses considerable gaps in services to sexual 
assault victims. The Committee supports a dedicated stream of 
funding to provide a broad range of services to male, female, 
and child sexual assault victims and their families through the 
well-established and well-regarded system of community-based 
rape crisis centers throughout the United States, and maintains 
its strong commitment to ensuring that these rape crisis 
centers have access to technical assistance, training, and 
support.

                       Office of Justice Programs

    The Office of Justice Programs [OJP] is responsible for 
providing leadership, coordination, and assistance to its 
Federal, State, local, and tribal partners to enhance the 
effectiveness and efficiency of the United States justice 
system in preventing, controlling, and responding to crime. 
Because most of the responsibility for crime control and 
prevention falls to law enforcement officers in States, cities, 
and neighborhoods, the Federal Government is effective in these 
areas only to the extent that it can enter into partnerships 
with these jurisdictions. Therefore, OJP is tasked with 
administering grants; collecting statistical data and 
conducting analyses; identifying emerging criminal justice 
issues; developing and testing promising and innovative 
approaches to address these issues; evaluating program results; 
and disseminating these findings and other information to 
State, local, and tribal governments.
    The Committee understands that issues have arisen regarding 
allowable religious activity occurring at an OJP recipient 
function and is troubled by the miscommunication that appears 
to be occurring between the Department and a grantee. The 
Committee wants to ensure that individuals can voluntarily 
exercise their right to express their religion. As such, to 
ensure equal protection of the law for organizations whose 
participants voluntarily choose to engage in religious 
activity, the Committee directs OJP to submit to the Committee 
within 45 days of enactment of this act a review of OJP's grant 
guidelines and regulations to ensure they are consistent with 
the law and protect the ability of grantees to participate in 
voluntary religious activities initiated and carried out by 
program participants. The review shall outline plans to improve 
the Department's outreach activities to potential grant 
applicants regarding the right of program participants to 
participate in voluntary religious activities.

                  RESEARCH, EVALUATION AND STATISTICS

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $124,367,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     134,400,000
Committee recommendation................................     129,000,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $129,000,000 for 
the Research, Evaluation and Statistics account. The 
recommendation is $4,633,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted 
level and $5,400,000 below the budget request.
    Funding in this account provides assistance in the areas of 
research, evaluation, statistics, hate crimes, DNA and 
forensics, criminal background checks, and gun safety 
technology, among others.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

                   RESEARCH, EVALUATION AND STATISTICS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Program                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Bureau of Justice Statistics.........................            48,000
National Institute of Justice........................            43,000
Evaluation Clearinghouse.............................             2,000
Regional Information Sharing Activities..............            30,000
Forensics Initiative.................................             6,000
    Transfer to NSF..................................            (5,000)
                                                      ------------------
      TOTAL..........................................           129,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Spending Plans.--The Department shall submit to the 
Committee as part of its spending plan for State and Local Law 
Enforcement Activities a plan for the use of all funding 
administered by NIJ and the Bureau of Justice Statistics [BJS], 
respectively, for approval by the Committee prior to the 
obligation of any such funds.
    National Institute of Justice [NIJ].--The Committee's 
recommendation provides $43,000,000 for the NIJ, in addition to 
$4,000,000 transferred from OVW for research and evaluation on 
violence against women and Indian women. NIJ's mission is to 
advance scientific research, development, and evaluation to 
advance the administration of justice and public safety.
    Human Trafficking and Slavery.--The Committee directs NIJ 
to work with the National Academy of Sciences to undertake a 
review of existing data collection methods pertaining to human 
trafficking and slavery and make recommendations to improve 
data collection in these areas.
    Forensic Sciences.--The Committee provides $6,000,000 for a 
forensics initiative, of which $1,000,000 is to support the 
Forensic Science Advisory Committee, to be chaired by the 
Attorney General and the Director of the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology [NIST], and $5,000,000 is for the 
National Science Foundation [NSF] for a forensic science grant 
program, to be developed and administered in consultation with 
NIJ, that establishes forensic science research centers. In 
lieu of the budget request that proposed to transfer funds from 
DOJ to NIST for measurement science and standards in support of 
forensic science, the Committee elects to provide that funding 
directly to NIST. The Committee directs DOJ to coordinate its 
activities with NIST and NSF.
    The Committee is concerned that the administration's 
forensic sciences proposal lacks the involvement of the State 
and local practitioner community, making the community an 
observer--not a participant--in addressing forensic reform, and 
that it will not take into consideration existing, proven 
standards and processes used within the community. The 
Committee expects the Forensic Science Advisory Committee to 
consider the need to exercise independent scientific judgment 
and, among other factors, recommendations from leading 
scientific organizations and leading professional organizations 
in the field of forensic science. The Committee expects the 
Forensic Science Advisory Committee to consult with key and 
relevant stakeholder groups prior to advancing forensic science 
solutions or reforms.
    Building Digital Forensics Capabilities.--The Committee 
continues to stress the importance of training and equipping 
State and local law enforcement with the tools and expertise 
needed to investigate and prosecute electronic crime. As 
smartphones and the Internet have become fundamental parts of 
daily life, these technologies have also become a fundamental 
part of criminal acts and enterprises, including drug deals and 
murder hits by text, to ATM heists via laptops, to child 
pornography Web sites.
    Given that more than 95 percent of all criminal cases are 
investigated and prosecuted at the State and local levels, the 
Committee remains concerned that the ability of State and local 
law enforcement to investigate and effectively prosecute cases 
involving digital evidence- and computer-based crimes will 
diminish without the Department's support of training and 
research. The Committee encourages the Department to prioritize 
State and local assistance toward computer forensics and 
digital evidence training and investigations surrounding drug, 
violent, and financial crimes, and crimes against children. If 
merited, the Department should consider establishing one or 
more centers of excellence in the field of digital forensics so 
that this valuable expertise is developed and researched in a 
sustained, coordinated, and focused manner.
    Regional Information Sharing Activities.--The Committee 
recommends $30,000,000, an increase of $5,000,000 above the 
budget request, to support activities that enable the sharing 
of nationwide criminal intelligence and other resources with 
State, local, and other law enforcement agencies and 
organizations. Such activities should address critical and 
chronic criminal threats, including gangs, terrorism, 
narcotics, weapons and officer safety or ``event 
deconfliction,'' and should reflect regional as well as 
national threat priorities. In addition, funds shall be 
available to support local-to-local law enforcement data and 
information sharing efforts focused on solving routine crimes, 
especially in rural areas, by sharing law enforcement 
information not categorized as criminal intelligence. All 
activities shall be consistent with national information-
sharing standards and requirements as determined by the Bureau 
of Justice Assistance.
    Gun Safety Technology.--From within funds made available 
under the set-aside for criminal justice research, evaluation, 
and statistics, the Committee supports the administration's 
request of $2,000,000 for a gun safety technology initiative to 
encourage the development of innovative and cost-effective gun 
safety technology.
    Safe Return.--Each year more than 600,000 ``wandering'' 
incidences occur that involve autistic children, placing these 
children at risk of death or serious injury, and resulting in 
enormous strains on families and responding law enforcement 
agencies. The Committee encourages OJP to evaluate autism 
spectrum disorders [ASD] wandering safe return strategies, 
which may serve as the basis for launching a coordinated 
nationwide response to meet the needs of the 1 in 88 Americans 
with ASD, their families, and law enforcement. To the extent 
appropriate, OJP should explore ways that allow law enforcement 
to quickly and efficiently share information that will aid in 
identifying children with ASD who have wandered.

               STATE AND LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $1,116,774,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   1,005,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,137,000,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $1,137,000,000 for 
State and local law enforcement assistance. The recommendation 
is $20,226,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level, and 
$132,000,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

               STATE AND LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Program                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grants.............           385,000
    SLATT Intelligence State and Local Training......            (2,000)
    State and Local Assistance Help Desk and                     (2,000)
     Diagnostic Center...............................
    VALOR Initiative.................................           (15,000)
    Smart Policing...................................           (10,000)
    Smart Prosecution................................            (5,000)
State Criminal Alien Assistance Program..............           190,000
Border Prosecution Initiatives.......................             5,000
Byrne Competitive Grants.............................            17,000
Victims of Trafficking Grants........................            15,000
Drug Courts..........................................            40,000
Mentally Ill Offender Courts.........................             9,000
Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State                  14,000
 Prisoners...........................................
Capital Litigation/Wrongful Prosecution Review.......             3,000
Economic, High-tech and Cybercrime Prevention........            11,000
John R. Justice Grant Program........................             4,000
Adam Walsh Act Implementation........................            20,000
Children Exposed to Violence Initiative..............            16,000
Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation Program............            21,000
Bulletproof Vests Partnerships.......................            22,500
    Transfer to NIST/OLES............................            (1,500)
National Sex Offender Website........................             1,000
Violent Gang and Gun Crime Reduction.................            17,000
National Instant Criminal Background Check System                12,000
 [NICS]..............................................
Criminal Records Upgrade [NCHIP].....................            50,000
Paul Coverdell Forensic Science......................            15,000
DNA Analysis Backlog Reduction/Crime Labs............           125,000
    Debbie Smith DNA Backlog grants..................          (117,000)
    Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing                 (4,000)
     grants..........................................
    Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners...................            (4,000)
Court-Appointed Special Advocates [CASA].............             6,000
Second Chance Act....................................            70,500
    Smart Probation..................................            (7,000)
    Children of Incarcerated Parents Demo Grants.....            (3,000)
    Pay for Success..................................           (15,000)
Veterans Treatment Courts............................             4,000
National Center for Campus Public Safety.............             1,000
Justice Reinvestment Initiative......................            30,000
Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement..             8,000
Vision 21............................................            25,000
                                                      ------------------
      Total..........................................         1,137,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Program.--
The Committee recommends $385,000,000 for Edward Byrne Memorial 
Justice Assistance Grants (Byrne-JAG). Funding is not available 
for luxury items, real estate, or construction projects. The 
Department should expect State, local, and tribal governments 
to target funding to programs and activities that are in 
conformance with evidence-based strategic plans developed 
through broad stakeholder involvement. The Committee directs 
the Department to make technical assistance available to State, 
local, and tribal governments for the development or updating 
of such plans. Furthermore, the Committee has become aware that 
some States have match requirements on their Byrne-JAG subgrant 
awards to local entities, even though the Federal JAG program 
funds awarded to States require no such match requirement. The 
Committee urges DOJ to work with States to find alternatives to 
imposing a match requirement on sub-grantees, which are often 
disadvantaged and small, local communities and law enforcement 
organizations.
    VALOR Initiative.--The Committee's recommendation fully 
funds the budget request of $15,000,000 within Byrne-JAG for 
the Preventing Violence Against Law Enforcement Officer 
Resilience and Survivability Initiative [VALOR]. This is a 
national training initiative that promotes a culture of safety 
within Federal, State, local, and tribal law enforcement 
agencies by training officers to respond to and react better in 
deadly situations, such as ambush attacks, while on duty. The 
Committee expects Federal law enforcement to continue and 
expand on efforts to provide local police with information as 
to whether or not a suspect has a violent history, to the 
extent that transfer of such information is allowable and 
available via Federal law enforcement databases, in an effort 
to prevent officer deaths.
    National Criminal History Improvement Program [NCHIP].--The 
Committee's recommendation fully funds the request of 
$50,000,000, an increase of $44,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2013 enacted level, to improve the submission of State criminal 
and mental health records to the National Instant Criminal 
Background Check System [NICS]. This increase plays a major 
role in the strategy proposed by the administration, and 
supported by the Committee, to deploy Federal resources to help 
States reduce gun violence in their communities. This 
investment will strengthen the national background check system 
by assisting States in finding ways to make more records 
available in the NICS system, especially mental health records, 
thereby addressing gaps in Federal and State records currently 
available in NICS. Those gaps significantly hinder the ability 
of NICS to quickly confirm whether a prospective purchaser is 
prohibited from acquiring a firearm.
    National Technical Assistance and Training.--The Committee 
encourages the Department to continue its efforts to assist 
States in the development and use of criminal justice 
information systems that accelerate the automation of 
identification processes for fingerprints and other criminal 
justice data, and which improve the compatibility of State and 
local law enforcement systems with the FBI's Integrated 
Automated Fingerprint Identification System [IAFIS].
    Human Trafficking.--The United States is a destination 
country for thousands of men, women, and children trafficked 
largely from Mexico and East Asia, as well as countries in 
South Asia, Central America, Africa, and Europe, for the 
purposes of sexual and labor exploitation. Trafficking victims 
are subjected to physical, mental, and sexual abuse. Victims 
need various types of assistance to begin healing and recovery, 
including counseling, housing, medical care, support groups, 
and legal assistance.
    The Committee's recommendation provides $15,000,000 for 
task force activities and services for U.S. citizens, permanent 
residents, and foreign nationals who are victims of 
trafficking, including no less than $6,700,000 for victim 
services for foreign national victims of trafficking. OJP shall 
consult with stakeholder groups in determining the overall 
allocation of Victims of Trafficking funding and shall provide 
to the Committee a plan for the use of these funds as part of 
the Department's fiscal year 2014 spending plan. The spending 
plan should be guided by the best information available on the 
regions of the United States with the highest incidence of 
trafficking.
    An effective national criminal justice response to human 
trafficking requires quick and accurate identification of 
victims along with immediate protection and support. The 
Committee supports further efforts to pursue evidence-based 
approaches that ensure trafficking victims' services are 
comprehensive, culturally competent, and use a trauma-informed 
care approach that maximizes safety, trust, and choice for 
survivors.
    Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation Program.--Persistent 
crime and public safety problems, especially gang activity, 
cannot be addressed solely by law enforcement. These issues 
require a comprehensive interagency approach that enables law 
enforcement, educators, social services agencies, and community 
organizations to address both public safety problems and their 
underlying causes.
    The Committee provides $21,000,000 to support the Byrne 
Criminal Justice Innovation Program, which provides 
demonstration grants in communities to support innovative, 
evidence-based approaches to fighting crime and improving 
public safety, as well as addressing its underlying problems. 
OJP will coordinate with the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development [HUD] and other agencies to promote interagency 
collaboration and enable a wide range of new and existing 
partners to further stabilize neighborhoods that face the most 
severe violence and crime. This program will build upon the 
approach of supporting communities with strategies that combine 
law enforcement, community policing, prevention, intervention, 
treatment, and neighborhood restoration.
    Byrne Competitive Grants.--The Committee's recommendation 
includes $17,000,000 for competitive, peer-reviewed grants to 
programs of national significance to prevent crime, improve the 
administration of justice or assist victims of crime. Within 45 
days of enactment of this act, OJP is directed to provide a 
report as part of the Department's spend plan to the Committee, 
which details the criteria and methodology that will be used to 
award these grants. The Committee expects that OJP will take 
all steps necessary to ensure fairness and objectivity in the 
award of these and future competitive grants.
    Violent Gang and Gun Crime Reduction.--Violent crime and 
homicide continue to exact a heavy toll on victims, families, 
offenders, and neighborhoods. The Committee's recommendation 
provides $17,000,000, an increase of $12,000,000 over both the 
fiscal year 2013 enacted level and the request, for competitive 
grants aimed at reducing homicides and gun-related violent 
crime in communities overwhelmed by gangs of national 
significance, and illegally purchased and trafficked guns. 
Popularly known as the Project Safe Neighborhoods model, this 
funding shall be used to hire new Federal and State 
prosecutors, support investigators, provide investigative and 
litigation training, distribute gun lock safety kits, deter 
juvenile gun crime, and develop and promote community outreach 
efforts, as well as to support other gun and gang violence 
reduction strategies.
    Drug, Mental Health, and Problem Solving Courts.--For the 
sixth straight year, the Committee's recommendation rejects the 
administration's proposal for a new Drug, Mental Health, and 
Problem Solving Courts grant program.
    The Committee notes the distinct success of the Drug Courts 
and Mentally-Ill Offender Courts grant programs. While the 
Committee recognizes the Department's attempt to consolidate 
grant programs, the Committee rejects this proposal given that 
professionals in the field have made a clear distinction 
between the two programs, and congressional support for 
maintaining separate programs remains strong.
    Veterans Treatment Courts.--The recommendation includes 
$4,000,000 to continue support for veterans treatment courts. 
The Committee expects the Department to work in conjunction 
with the Department of Veterans Affairs, as appropriate, to 
provide grant support for collaborative, rehabilitative 
approaches for continuing judicial supervision of offenders who 
are veterans.
    Bulletproof Vests.--Within the $22,500,000 provided for 
bulletproof vests, $1,500,000 is to be transferred directly to 
the NIST Office of Law Enforcement Standards [OLES] to continue 
supporting ballistic- and stab-resistant material compliance 
testing programs. The Committee expects the Bureau of Justice 
Assistance [BJA] to continue strengthening internal controls to 
manage the Bulletproof Vest Partnership program. Improving 
grantee accountability in the timely use of Federal funds to 
purchase body armor will help every police officer who needs a 
vest to get one, thus saving officers' lives.
    Second Chance Act/Offender Reentry Programs.--The 
recommendation provides $70,500,000 for Second Chance Act [SCA] 
grants. The Committee expects that SCA funding will support 
grants that foster the implementation of strategies that have 
been proven to reduce recidivism and ensure safe and successful 
reentry back to their communities of adults released from 
prisons and jails. SCA supports activities such as employment 
assistance, substance abuse treatment, housing, mentoring, 
family programming, and victims support. SCA grants will also 
support demonstration projects designed to test the impact of 
new strategies and frameworks. Within the amount provided, the 
Committee's recommendation makes targeted investments in 
initiatives requested by the administration to test and 
replicate new models of improving criminal justice efficiencies 
and recidivism outcomes.
    The Department is directed to submit as part of its 
spending plan for State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance a 
plan for the use of all funds appropriated for Second Chance 
Act programs, including new initiatives requested by the 
Department that are funded in this recommendation. It is 
expected that such plan will designate funds for proven, 
evidence-based programs that will further the goal of 
maximizing public safety, as well as for promising new 
approaches and projects.
    Criminal Justice Reform and Recidivism Reduction.--The 
Committee provides $30,000,000 for a justice reinvestment 
initiative, which would expand OJP's investment in data-driven 
approaches to improve public safety, drive down corrections and 
related criminal justice spending, and reinvest savings in 
effective strategies that can reduce crime and recidivism and 
strengthen neighborhoods. Given the potential and success of 
justice reinvestment strategies already implemented in 17 
States, saving millions of dollars, the Committee supports 
OJP's steps to make justice reinvestment a national model for 
much-needed criminal justice reform. Funds may be used to 
provide technical assistance and competitive financial support 
to States, counties, cities, and tribes that are either 
currently engaged in justice reinvestment activities or are 
preparing to undertake such work.
    HOPE Grants.--As part of the Committee's efforts to reduce 
recidivism, the Committee's recommendation includes $8,000,000 
for a new nationwide program based on the successful court-
based HOPE model. HOPE will identify probationers with a high 
risk for re-offending, focusing on reducing drug use, new 
crimes, and incarceration. Offenders are deterred from using 
drugs and committing crimes by frequent and random drug tests, 
backed by swift and certain jail stays, along with treatment, 
when necessary. This funding will be used for replicating the 
use of ``swift and certain'' sanctions in probation at 
additional sites.
    Incarcerated Women with Co-Occurring Disorders.--The 
Committee has concerns about the growing number of women who 
are incarcerated for nonviolent offenses, and who suffer from 
co-occurring mental health and substance abuse disorders that 
result in recidivism and an inability to reintegrate into the 
community after release from prison. Day treatment centers are 
a common alternative to residential treatment for persons 
struggling with mental health disorders and/or addictions; 
however, State prison systems have yet to employ this model for 
incarcerated populations. By providing a transitional step 
between full-time incarceration and probation, day treatment 
centers may be an innovative and less costly way to treat non-
violent offenders with co-occurring disorders. From within 
funds provided in the recommendation for the Second Chance Act 
or the Residential Substance Abuse Treatment program, where 
appropriate, the Committee encourages OJP to consider funds for 
States that seek to utilize day treatment centers located 
outside of the prison, within a community, to reduce recidivism 
among incarcerated women with co-occurring disorders.
    DNA Backlog/Crime Lab Improvements.--The Committee 
continues its strong support for DNA backlog and crime lab 
improvements by recommending $125,000,000 to strengthen and 
improve Federal and State DNA collection and analysis systems 
that can be used to accelerate the prosecution of the guilty 
while simultaneously protecting the innocent from wrongful 
prosecution. Within the funds provided, $117,000,000 is for 
Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Reduction grants, $4,000,000 is for 
Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing grants, and 
$4,000,000 is for Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners grants. From 
within the funding provided for Debbie Smith DNA Backlog 
Reduction grants, the Committee expects the Department to 
prioritize reducing rape kit backlogs, given that that is the 
primary reason why the Committee continues to provide robust 
funding for these grants.
    DNA evidence is playing a larger role than ever before in 
criminal cases, both to convict the guilty and to exonerate 
those wrongly accused or convicted. This increased role places 
greater importance on the ability of investigators and 
prosecutors to handle crime scene DNA evidence to avoid 
contamination or destruction. Therefore, of the amounts 
provided in the bill for Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Reduction 
grants, up to 4 percent may be used to make grants to provide 
training, technical assistance, education, and information 
regarding the identification, collection, preservation, 
analysis, and use of DNA evidence and samples for law 
enforcement and corrections personnel and court officers, and 
forensic science professionals. This is a minimal investment 
aimed at providing a maximum value return.
    The Committee expects that OJP will make funding for DNA 
analysis and capacity enhancement a priority to meet the 
purposes of the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program. The 
Committee notes that, according to DOJ, roughly 77 percent of 
DNA funding provided in fiscal year 2013 will go to crime labs 
for DNA analysis to increase capacity and reduce DNA backlogs. 
The Committee directs the Department to submit to the Committee 
as part of its spending plan for State and Local Law 
Enforcement Activities a plan with respect to funds 
appropriated for DNA-related and forensic programs, including 
the alignment of appropriated funds with the authorized 
purposes of the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program.
    Economic, High-tech, and Cybercrime Prevention.--The 
Committee recommends $11,000,000 to assist State and local law 
enforcement agencies in the prevention, investigation, and 
prosecution of economic, high-tech, and Internet crimes. Given 
the importance of protecting our Nation's new technologies, 
ideas, and products, OJP is directed to increase its investment 
in competitive grants that help State and local law enforcement 
tackle intellectual property [IP] thefts, such as 
counterfeiting and piracy, to $5,000,000.
    The Committee also supports the continued efforts of the 
Department to provide State and local law enforcement with the 
training, technical assistance, and outreach support needed to 
prevent, investigate, and prosecute economic and cyber crimes. 
The Committee directs OJP to provide $2,000,000 for operational 
support of existing or proposed computer forensics and digital 
evidence at the State and local levels.
    Flexible Tribal Assistance.--The Committee recommends 
funding tribal grant programs by permitting 5 percent of 
discretionary grant and reimbursement program funds made 
available to OJP to be used for tribal criminal justice 
assistance, and continues to strongly support efforts to help 
tribes improve the capacity of their criminal justice systems. 
OJP is expected to consult closely with tribal stakeholders in 
determining how tribal assistance funds will be awarded for 
detention facilities, courts, alcohol and substance abuse 
programs, civil and criminal legal assistance, and other 
priorities. The Committee directs OJP to submit, as part of the 
Department's spending plan for fiscal year 2014, a plan for the 
use of these funds that has been informed by such consultation. 
The Committee notes that the bill includes additional grant 
funding for tribal law enforcement programs through COPS and 
OVW.
    Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services.--The Committee's 
recommendation provides $25,000,000 for Vision 21. The 
Committee directs the Department to submit as part of its 
spending plan for State and Local Law Enforcement Activities a 
plan for the use of all funding administered by the Office for 
Victims of Crime [OVC] for Vision 21.
    Rather than follow the administration's proposal to fund 
this program out of the mandatory Crime Victims Fund, the 
Committee chooses to provide funding through discretionary 
resources. The Committee encourages the Department to work with 
Congress on legislation that will best meet the needs of crime 
victims in the 21st century.
    Vision 21 is a strategic planning initiative based on an 
18-month national assessment led by OVC that analyzed existing 
and chronic gaps, emerging challenges, and opportunities in 
crime victim assistance. The Committee supports Vision 21's 
goals of funding initiatives that will address the need for 
more data-driven research and evaluation on victimization and 
services; holistic legal assistance for crime victims; 
resources to reach tribal and rural victims in areas where 
service providers do not exist; support of national emergency 
hotlines, online, and other programs that serve American crime 
victims at the national and international level; and capacity 
building to provide technology- and evidence-based training and 
technical assistance.

                       JUVENILE JUSTICE PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $273,705,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     332,500,000
Committee recommendation................................     279,000,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $279,000,000 for 
juvenile justice programs. The recommendation is $5,295,000 
above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and $53,500,000 below 
the budget request.
    The mission of the Office of Juvenile Justice and 
Delinquency Prevention [OJJDP] is to provide national 
leadership, coordination and resources to prevent and respond 
to juvenile delinquency and victimization. OJJDP supports 
States, tribes and local communities in efforts to develop, 
implement and improve the juvenile justice system in order to 
protect the public safety, hold offenders accountable, and 
provide treatment and rehabilitative services tailored to the 
needs of juveniles and their families.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

                        JUVENILE JUSTICE PROGRAMS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Part B--State Formula..................................          50,000
    Emergency Planning--Juvenile Detention Facilities..            (500)
Youth Mentoring Grants.................................          61,000
Title V--Delinquency Prevention Incentive Grants.......          35,000
    Tribal Youth.......................................         (10,000)
    Gang and Youth Violence Education and Prevention...          (5,000)
    Alcohol Prevention.................................          (5,000)
    Juvenile Justice & Education Collaboration                  (10,000)
     Assistance........................................
    Juvenile Justice Realignment Incentive Grants......          (5,000)
Victims of Child Abuse Programs........................          19,000
Juvenile Accountability Block Grants...................          30,000
Community-Based Violence Prevention Initiatives........          11,000
Missing and Exploited Children Programs................          67,000
Training for Judicial Personnel........................           1,500
National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention............           2,000
Girls in the Justice System............................           2,000
Children of Incarcerated Parents Web Portal............             500
                                                        ----------------
      Total............................................         279,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Any deviation from the above plan is subject to the 
reprogramming requirements of section 505 of this act.
    Part B: State Formula Grants.--The Committee provides 
$50,000,000 for grants to implement comprehensive State 
juvenile justice plans, including community-based prevention 
and intervention programs and activities for juvenile 
offenders. This amount is $6,912,000 above the fiscal year 2013 
level and $20,000,000 below the budget request.
    Within the amount provided, the Committee recommends 
$500,000 for competitive demonstration grants for State, local, 
and tribal juvenile justice detention facilities and systems to 
meet the needs of children and adolescents housed in detention 
facilities in preparation for, during, and after a disaster, as 
detailed in the 2011 emergency planning guidance issued by 
OJJDP.
    The Committee directs OJP to submit as part of its spending 
plan for State and Local Law Enforcement Activities a plan for 
the administration of Part B State Formula Grants. The 
Committee expects this plan to include details pertaining to 
the formulas utilized in awarding grants under this heading and 
a plan for State-based competitions promoting community-based 
integrated continuums of service for at-risk juveniles and 
their families.
    Youth Mentoring Grants.--To support the critical work of 
national, regional, and local organizations in nurturing and 
mentoring at-risk children and youths, the Committee recommends 
$61,000,000 for competitive, peer-reviewed youth mentoring 
grants. Within 45 days of enactment of this act, OJP is 
directed to provide a report and spend plan to the Committee 
detailing the criteria and methodology that will be used to 
award these grants. The Committee expects that OJJDP will take 
all steps necessary to ensure fairness and objectivity in the 
award of these and future competitive grants.
    Controlling Costs.--At a time when the Committee is faced 
with budgetary challenges and is working to ensure that all 
grant programs receive sufficient funding, it is particularly 
troubling to learn that some grantees continue to operate with 
questionable management structures and pay scales. The 
Committee agrees that good, professional staff should be well 
compensated; however, there is a tipping point with respect to 
not-for-profits receiving 90 percent or more of their funding 
from Federal grant programs. The Committee directs the 
Government Accountability Office to conduct a review of OJJDP 
grant recipients to determine whether the budgeting and 
administrative practices of grantees are truly cost-efficient 
and not wasteful of tax dollars. Such prudent budgeting 
practices include, but are not limited to, diversification of 
not-for-profit organization funding, organizational policies to 
ensure the highest percentage possible of Federal funding is 
used for actual services, and accepted best practices for 
executive and director-level compensation as a percentage of an 
organization's revenue.
    Victims of Child Abuse Act.--The Committee's recommendation 
provides $19,000,000 for the various programs authorized under 
the Victims of Child Abuse Act [VOCA] (Public Law 101-647). The 
Committee rejects the administration's request to eliminate 
this program. Within the funds provided, $5,000,000 shall be 
for Regional Children's Advocacy Centers [RCACs] Programs. The 
RCACs were established to provide information, consultation, 
training, and technical assistance to communities, and to help 
establish child-focused programs that facilitate and support 
coordination among agencies responding to child abuse.
    Missing and Exploited Children Programs.--OJP works with 
law enforcement agencies find missing children and to target, 
dismantle, and prosecute predatory child molesters and those 
who traffic in child pornography. The Committee recommends 
$67,000,000 for Missing and Exploited Children Programs and 
expects the Department to allocate no less than the current 
funding level for task force grants, training and technical 
assistance, research and statistics, and administrative costs 
for the Internet Crimes Against Children [ICAC] program. The 
Committee directs OJP to provide a spending plan for the use of 
these funds as part of the Department's spending plan for 
fiscal year 2014.
    The Committee supports efforts across the country to train 
child protection professionals beginning with undergraduate and 
graduate curricula and following up with ongoing training for 
professionals in the field, including the development of State 
forensic interviewing courses. The Committee directs OJJDP to 
provide training and technical assistance to improve forensic 
interview training for investigation and prosecution 
professionals, evidence-based community prevention programs for 
child protection professionals, and undergraduate and graduate 
curricula on the maltreatment and exploitation of children.
    Crimes Against Children Monitoring System.--OJJDP conducts 
a number of studies to inform the Federal Government's 
understanding of child victimization; however, the ad-hoc 
nature of these efforts has created gaps in understanding of 
the scope and contributing factors to child mistreatment. One 
of the more successful initiatives is the National Survey of 
Children Exposed to Violence series. This series, conducted in 
2009 and 2011, monitored children exposed to a range of perils, 
including sexual abuse, physical abuse, bullying, hate crimes, 
and domestic violence, and provided valuable information for 
law enforcement and public officials. The Committee encourages 
OJJDP to conduct its studies on child victimization, both in 
person and on the Internet, once every 3 years, at minimum.

                    PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICERS BENEFITS

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $77,962,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      97,300,000
Committee recommendation................................      97,300,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $97,300,000 for 
public safety officers benefits. The recommendation is 
$19,338,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and equal 
to the budget estimate. This mandatory program provides a one-
time death benefit payment to eligible survivors of Federal, 
State, and local public safety officers whose death was the 
direct and proximate result of a traumatic injury sustained in 
the line of duty or certain eligible heart attacks or strokes.
    Within funds provided, $81,000,000 is for death benefits 
for survivors, an amount estimated by the Congressional Budget 
Office and considered mandatory for scorekeeping purposes. The 
Committee also recommends $16,300,000, as requested, for 
disability benefits for injured officers and education benefits 
for the families of officers who have been permanently disabled 
or killed in the line of duty.

                  Community Oriented Policing Services


             COMMUNITY ORIENTED POLICING SERVICES PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $217,887,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     439,500,000
Committee recommendation................................     393,500,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $393,500,000 for 
community oriented policing services. The recommendation is 
$175,613,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and 
$46,000,000 below the budget request.
    Local law enforcement is not only essential to ensuring the 
safety of the public but also plays a critical role in 
preventing and responding to terrorist threats. Since its 
creation, the Community Oriented Policing Services [COPS] 
office has assisted State and local law enforcement agencies by 
providing grants, training, and technical assistance that not 
only ensure public safety from traditional crime, but also 
better enable law enforcement officers to address the growing 
threat from terrorist organizations.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

                  COMMUNITY ORIENTED POLICING SERVICES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                        Program                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tribal Resources Grant Program.........................          20,000
COPS Hiring Grants.....................................         201,000
    Transfer to Tribal Resources Grant Program.........         (15,000)
    Community Policing Development/Training and                 (10,000)
     Technical Assistance..............................
    Collaborative Reform Model.........................          (5,000)
Reimbursement for DEA for Methamphetamine Lab Cleanups.          12,500
Comprehensive School Safety Program....................         150,000
Anti-Methamphetamine Task Forces.......................          10,000
                                                        ----------------
      Total............................................         393,500
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Any deviations from the above plan are subject to the 
reprogramming requirements of section 505.
    COPS Hiring Program.--The Committee recommends $201,000,000 
for COPS Hiring grants to help State, local, or tribal law 
enforcement agencies to create and preserve police officer 
positions and to increase community policing capacity and crime 
prevention efforts. Like the request, the grants will have an 
award cap of $125,000 and require grantees to provide a 25 
percent local match.
    The Committee rejects the proposal by the COPS Office to 
eliminate the requirement that 50 percent of COPS Hiring 
Program funds be awarded to law enforcement agencies that serve 
populations of 150,000 or greater, and that 50 percent of the 
funds be awarded to agencies serving populations of 150,000 or 
fewer. Such a change in program structure falls within the 
jurisdiction of the authorizing committees. Should the COPS 
Office wish to pursue such a change, which would pit urban 
areas against rural areas for highly competitive funding, the 
Committee recommends it work with the authorizers, rather than 
insert such an extensive programmatic change in a budget 
request.
    Comprehensive School Safety Initiative.--Americans 
everywhere grieved after the tragic shootings in Newtown, 
Connecticut. To help prevent future, school-based tragedies and 
ensure that students and parents feel safe in their schools, 
the Committee's recommendation establishes a new, Comprehensive 
School Safety Program and provides $150,000,000 to the COPS 
Office for holistic, integrated, and individually tailored 
school safety and security resources for elementary and 
secondary schools. This funding will also support programs to 
properly train educators and other school professionals to 
ensure that students feel comfortable sharing critical 
information about potential threats in their schools.
    The Committee directs the COPS Office, in collaboration 
with the U.S. Department of Education, to bring together key 
stakeholders from law enforcement, mental health, and education 
disciplines to develop a model for comprehensive school safety. 
The Committee directs the COPS Office to provide a report 
detailing the results of this effort and a copy of the model 
not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this act. 
Immediately following the development of this model the COPS 
Office is directed to make it publicly available via the 
Department of Justice Web site.
    The Committee expects law enforcement and schools, in 
consultation with school mental health professionals, to 
coordinate when applying for funding that fills the gaps in 
their own comprehensive school safety assessments and plans. 
The Committee directs the COPS Office to require a memorandum 
of understanding between the law enforcement agency of 
jurisdiction and the primary or secondary school or, as an 
alternative option in certain situations, the school district.
    Under this program, funds are available for the hiring of 
school safety personnel, as well as the development and 
updating of comprehensive school safety assessments and plans, 
technical assistance, and/or training, as well as other 
programs or technology that may enhance overall school safety 
efforts. School safety personnel includes sworn school resource 
officers [SROs] and non-sworn school safety personnel, such as 
civilian public safety personnel; school counselors; school 
psychologists; other qualified psychologists; school social 
workers; and child and adolescent psychiatrists. Funding may 
also be used to purchase school safety equipment; conduct 
threat assessments; and train ``crisis intervention teams'' 
that span the law enforcement, education, and mental health 
communities to respond to and assist students in crisis.
    The Committee directs the COPS Office to develop a program 
that is ``needs based,'' meaning eligible expenses shall be 
limited to those necessary to fill existing safety gaps that 
have been identified in a comprehensive school safety plan. The 
Committee requires that to be eligible, applicants must provide 
the COPS Office with a comprehensive school safety plan, which 
should include a description of the schools' comprehensive 
school safety assessment and identify the safety needs of the 
school, the role that any requested staff, equipment, or 
training will fill in meeting those needs, and how those staff, 
equipment, or training will be integrated into the overall 
budget after 3 years. For those agencies that have not 
conducted a comprehensive school safety assessment or do not 
yet have a school safety plan and are seeking funding to 
develop one, up to 50 percent of the funds provided shall be 
available for that specific purpose.
    The COPS Office shall evaluate applicants on the quality of 
their proposed programs; how closely they address all aspects 
of existing evidenced-based comprehensive school safety models 
(including, if available, the model developed by the COPS 
Office); adherence to their comprehensive school safety plan; 
how grant funding would further enhance and complement existing 
school safety efforts; and any efforts to fully implement with 
their comprehensive school safety plan.
    The Committee notes its concern for the national rise in 
school-based arrests for more minor forms of student misconduct 
and the harm that unnecessary involvement with the criminal 
justice system has on students' futures, popularly known as the 
``School-to-Prison Pipeline.'' As part of the grant 
requirements for SRO hiring, the Committee directs the COPS 
Office, in its development of a model for comprehensive school 
safety, to specify the scope and role of SROs. The COPS Office 
shall also provide training and technical assistance to ensure 
that localities requesting such funds are able to train and 
deploy SROs in a manner that ensures safety for all students 
and does not expand the School-to-Prison Pipeline.
    The Committee directs the Department's Office of Inspector 
General [OIG] to conduct audits and oversight of funds provided 
under the Comprehensive School Safety Program. The Committee 
further directs the OIG to review concerns raised by the public 
about specific investments using funds made available in this 
program, and to relay findings of their reviews to the Director 
of the COPS Office and the Committee.
    School Resource Officers.--Research shows that most school-
based, violent attacks are thought out beforehand and involve 
some degree of advanced planning. Additionally, the observable 
behavior of most attackers suggested they may be planning an 
attack, including sharing that information with another 
individual. This research, the Committee believes, indicates 
that school safety greatly depends on the communication and 
trust between students and adults, whether they be parents, 
teachers, faculty, or SROs. Properly trained SROs can serve to 
protect school communities from serious, immediate threats from 
school violence without compromising a healthy and positive 
school climate; however, the Committee realizes that SROs can 
in no way replace teachers, mental health professionals, 
counselors, and social workers in properly identifying and 
addressing students' needs.
    The Committee firmly believes that the role of SROs should 
be to take action against unauthorized persons on school 
property and prevent serious matters that pose an imminent 
threat to school safety, not usurp the role of educators by 
engaging in routine school discipline. Moreover, SROs cannot be 
the sole school personnel responsible for school safety. The 
Committee's recommendation allows the COPS Office to examine 
the role of SROs in positively contributing to the safety and 
security at primary and secondary schools, including the need 
for clearly articulated roles and responsibilities for SROs. 
The COPS Office shall assess the effectiveness of SRO training 
programs and the effectiveness of SROs in preserving order and 
safety in school settings as informal counselors/mentors. This 
assessment shall be provided to the Committee not later than 
180 days after the date of enactment of this act.
    Training and Technical Assistance.--The Committee's 
recommendation provides $10,000,000 within the COPS Hiring 
Program to provide Training and Technical Assistance to assist 
agencies with developing innovative community policing 
strategies through applied research and evaluation initiatives.
    Due to limited tax bases and growing poverty levels, public 
safety professionals in rural areas face unique challenges when 
attempting to secure crime-fighting tools and personnel. The 
Committee encourages the COPS Office to focus on efforts to 
provide training and technical assistance to increase the 
capacity of law enforcement agencies, executives, and managers 
serving rural communities. This will allow these communities to 
enhance the use of community policing practices and innovations 
in policing to increase the effectiveness of limited resources.
    Methamphetamine Hot Spots.--The Committee's recommendation 
includes a $12,500,000 transfer to reimburse the Drug 
Enforcement Administration [DEA] for assistance to State and 
local law enforcement for proper removal and disposal of 
hazardous materials at clandestine methamphetamine labs and to 
initiate container programs. This is the level DEA estimates 
will be sufficient in fiscal year 2014 to operate the full 
cleanup program for States to transition to container program 
cleanups, and to cover the costs of smaller methamphetamine 
cleanups in States where the problem is intermittent.
    Anti-Methamphetamine Task Forces.--The Committee's 
recommendation provides $10,000,000 for the COPS Office to make 
competitive grants to law enforcement agencies in States with 
high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, 
laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures. These funds shall 
be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate 
illicit activities such as precursor diversion, laboratories, 
or methamphetamine traffickers.
    Tribal Resources.--The Committee has provided a total of 
$35,000,000 in programs targeted entirely to tribal communities 
through the Tribal Resources Grant Program [TRGP]. Within the 
TRGP, $20,000,000 is provided through direct appropriations and 
$15,000,000 is provided by transfer from the COPS Hiring 
program. All funds available to the TRGP can be used for 
equipment and hiring or training of tribal law enforcement. 
This will allow tribes maximum flexibility to respond the 
priorities they deem most urgent.

               General Provisions--Department of Justice

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions, 
all of which were included in the enacted fiscal year 2012 act:
    Section 201 limits the amount of funding the Attorney 
General can use for official reception and representation.
    Section 202 prohibits the use of funds in this title to pay 
for an abortion except where the life of the mother would be in 
danger.
    Section 203 prohibits the use of funds in this title to 
require a person to perform or facilitate an abortion.
    Section 204 requires female prisoners to be escorted when 
off prison grounds.
    Section 205 allows the Department of Justice, subject to 
the Committee's reprogramming procedures, to transfer up to 5 
percent between appropriations, but limits to 10 percent the 
amount that can be transferred into any one appropriation.
    Section 206 authorizes the Attorney General to extend a 
personnel management demonstration project.
    Section 207 limits the placement of maximum or high 
security prisoners to appropriately secure facilities.
    Section 208 restricts Federal prisoner access to certain 
amenities.
    Section 209 requires review by the Deputy Attorney General 
and the Department's Investigative Review Board prior to the 
obligation or expenditure of funds for major technology 
projects.
    Section 210 requires the Department to follow reprogramming 
procedures prior to any deviation from the program amounts 
specified in this title or the reuse of specified deobligated 
funds provided in previous years.
    Section 211 prohibits the use of funds to plan for, begin, 
continue, finish, process, or approve a public-private 
competition under OMB Circular A-76 for work performed by 
employees of the Bureau of Prisons or of the Federal Prison 
Industries, Incorporated.
    Section 212 prohibits U.S. Attorneys from simultaneously 
holding multiple jobs outside of the scope of a U.S. Attorney's 
professional duties.
    Section 213 permits up to 4 percent of grant and 
reimbursement program funds made available to the Office of 
Justice Programs to be used for training and technical 
assistance, permits up to 2 percent of grant and reimbursement 
program funds made available to that office to be transferred 
to the National Institute of Justice or the Bureau of Justice 
Statistics for criminal justice research and statistics, and 
permits up to 5 percent of discretionary grant and 
reimbursement program funds made available to OJP to be used 
for tribal criminal justice assistance. The Committee continues 
to support strongly efforts to help tribes improve the capacity 
of their criminal justice systems.
    Section 214 gives the Attorney General the authority to 
waive matching requirements for Second Chance Act adult and 
juvenile reentry demonstration projects; State, tribal and 
local reentry courts; and drug treatment programs.
    Section 215 waives the requirement that the Attorney 
General reserve certain funds from amounts provided for 
offender incarceration.
    Section 216 prohibits funds, other than funds for the 
national instant criminal background check system established 
under the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, from being 
used to facilitate the transfer of an operable firearm to a 
known or suspected agent of a drug cartel where law enforcement 
personnel do not continuously monitor or control such firearm.

                               TITLE III

                                SCIENCE

                Office of Science and Technology Policy

Appropriations, 2013....................................      $5,729,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................       5,658,000
Committee recommendation................................       5,658,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $5,658,000. The 
recommendation is $71,000 below the fiscal year 2013 enacted 
level and equal to the budget request.
    The Office of Science and Technology Policy [OSTP] was 
created by the National Science and Technology Policy, 
Organization, and Priorities Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-282) 
and coordinates science and technology policy for the White 
House. OSTP provides scientific and technological information, 
analysis, and advice for the President and the executive 
branch; participates in formulation, coordination, and 
implementation of national and international policies and 
programs that involve science and technology; maintains and 
promotes the health and vitality of the U.S. science and 
technology infrastructure; reviews and analyzes, with the 
Office of Management and Budget, the research and development 
budgets for all Federal agencies; and coordinates research and 
development efforts of the Federal Government to maximize the 
return on the public's investment in science and technology and 
to ensure Federal resources are used efficiently and 
appropriately.
    Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics 
Education.--The Committee has encouraged OTSP in prior fiscal 
year appropriation acts to report on the duplication of 
science, technology, engineering, and mathematics [STEM] 
education programs with an emphasis on coordinating with 
agencies to evaluate the effectiveness of STEM education 
programs. Within the fiscal year 2014 budget request, the 
administration, led by OSTP, has proposed a government-wide 
consolidation of STEM education programs and a transfer of 
responsibilities across several agencies.
    While the Committee maintains its support of greater 
efficiencies and consolidation--as evident by adopting some of 
the STEM consolidation recommendations made by the 
administration's budget request--the Committee has concerns 
that the proposal as a whole has not been thoroughly vetted 
with the education community or congressional authorizing 
committees, and lacks thorough guidance and input from Federal 
agencies affected by this proposal, from both those that stand 
to lose education and outreach programs and from those that 
stand to gain them. The administration has yet to provide a 
viable plan ensuring that the new lead STEM institutions--the 
National Science Foundation, the Department of Education, and 
the Smithsonian Institution--can support the unique fellowship, 
training, and outreach programs now managed by other agencies. 
Conversely, what is proposed as a consolidation of existing 
STEM programs from NOAA, NASA, and NIST into the new lead STEM 
agencies is really the elimination of many proven and 
successful programs with no evaluation on why they were deemed 
duplicative or ineffective.
    The proposal also lacks clarity on how it will meet the 
goals of the Federal STEM Education Five Year Strategic Plan 
mandated by the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 
(Public Law 111-358) which was only recently delivered to 
Congress on May 31, 2013, a month after the budget request 
submission. The budget request appears to prevent the new plan 
from assessing and evaluating Federal investments and 
developing STEM program guidance with significant agency input.
    Therefore, the Committee continues to support effective 
mission-oriented STEM education programs at NASA, NOAA, and 
NIST within this bill, and defers action on the consolidation 
proposal until such time that OSTP, in working with these and 
other Federal science agencies, finalizes the STEM program 
assessments as required by America COMPETES. OSTP is also 
required to work with the non-Federal education and outreach 
communities to present a proposal that garners wider support 
since these external partners often serve as the real bridge 
between Federal science content and our communities and 
schools. In seeking efficiencies for STEM programs, OSTP and 
its partners should be mindful of ensuring that scientists 
supported by the Federal Government are not absolved of 
responsibility to educate and train the next generation. OSTP 
should also take care to preserve effective training and 
education programs designed to directly fulfill the unique STEM 
needs of the agencies administering them.
    Open Access to Federal Research.--The America COMPETES 
Reauthorization Act established a working group under the 
National Science and Technology Council [NSTC] charged with 
coordinating ``Federal science agency research and policies 
related to the dissemination and long-term stewardship of the 
results of unclassified'' federally funded research. The 
working group was charged with establishing ``priorities for 
coordinating the development of any Federal science agency 
policies related to public access to the results of federally 
funded research'' and to report to Congress within one year 
after passage of the act on the status of any Federal science 
agency policies related to public access. That report was 
issued in March of 2012 and stated that NSTC groups continued 
to review public comments on the matter to make a final 
decision. Once reached, the final decision will be presented to 
the NSTC Committee on Science which will in turn, consider 
implementation options.
    The Committee is disappointed that more than one year after 
NSTC issued its report no measurable action has been taken with 
respect to open access policies for federally funded research. 
It is the Committee's understanding that the Office of Science 
and Technology Policy [OSTP] has undertaken an effort--working 
with the Department of Commerce, the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, and 
other Federal science agencies who have more than $100,000,000 
in annual research and development expenditures--to develop a 
Federal research public access policy. However, absent a formal 
plan, the Committee and the science community remain concerned 
that a practicable, reasonable, and agreeable policy can be 
developed. Furthermore, there is additional congressional 
interest in enacting open access policies by statute. Thus, the 
Committee directs OSTP to report to the Committee on 
Appropriations and the appropriate authorizing committees 
within 45 days of enactment of this act regarding the 
administration's coordinated plan to support increased public 
access to federally funded research based on the feedback OSTP 
received from the science agencies as well as implementation 
guidelines across the myriad of agencies and scientific 
disciplines effected by the plan.

             National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Appropriations, 2013\1\\2\.............................. $17,506,676,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................  17,715,395,000
Committee recommendation................................  18,010,300,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.
\2\Includes emergency funding of $15,000,000 in the Disaster Relief 
Appropriations Act, 2013 (division A of Public Law 113-2).

    The Committee's recommendation provides $18,010,300,000 for 
the National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA]. The 
recommendation is $503,624,000 above the fiscal year 2013 
enacted level and $294,905,000 above the budget request.
    NASA was established by the National Aeronautics and Space 
Act of 1958 (Public Law 85-568) to conduct space and 
aeronautical research and development and to conduct flight 
activities for peaceful purposes. NASA's unique mission of 
exploration, discovery, and innovation is intended to preserve 
the United States' role as both a leader in world aviation and 
as the pre-eminent space-faring nation. It is NASA's mission 
to: advance human exploration, use and development of space; 
advance and communicate scientific knowledge and understanding 
of the Earth, the solar system, and the universe; and research, 
develop, verify, and transfer advanced aeronautics and space 
technologies.
    The Committee's recommendation seeks to implement a 
balanced space program that adequately funds science, space 
exploration, and aeronautics, all made possible by reliable and 
safe space transportation. For Science, the Committee's 
recommendation strives to keep NASA's near-term launches on 
track to continue progress in exploring our solar system and 
the universe, understanding the sun, and observing and 
protecting our planet. The Committee is concerned that the 
budget request does not invest adequately in future missions, 
as evident by proposed cuts and cancellations for top priority 
science missions. The Committee expects NASA to maintain making 
progress on the recommendations of National Academies' decadal 
surveys, now and in the future.
    The Committee believes this bill represents a solid path 
forward for human spaceflight that can reach beyond low-Earth 
orbit with affordable crew and launch vehicles, consistent with 
Public Law 111-267; invests in the burgeoning commercial launch 
industry that is bringing cargo, and eventually crew, to the 
International Space Station [ISS]; and revitalizes NASA science 
and technology programs. These elements should be viewed as 
complementary pieces of a balanced whole.
    The Committee is counting on NASA to maintain focus on 
improving oversight and accountability throughout the agency. 
NASA's acquisition management remains on the Government 
Accountability Office's [GAO] ``high risk'' list, though the 
Committee notes that NASA is making progress in strengthening 
financial management, including better cost estimates and 
higher standards of accountability for contractors. GAO's most 
recent assessment of NASA's large projects found the agency's 
cost and schedule performance on major projects has improved 
since GAO's first assessment in 2009, with average cost growth 
and schedule having decreased to about a third of their 2009 
levels. However, NASA must remain vigilant since more than 80 
percent of NASA's funding is awarded by contract, which equates 
to roughly $14,408,000,000 of NASA's funding in this bill. NASA 
is directed to cooperate fully and to provide timely program 
analysis, evaluation data, and relevant information to the GAO 
so that GAO can report to Congress shortly after the annual 
budget submission of the President and semiannually thereafter 
on the status of large-scale NASA programs, projects, and 
activities based on its review of this information.
    In addition, NASA is directed to include in its budget 
justification the reserve assumed by NASA to be necessary 
within the amount proposed for each directorate, theme, 
program, project, and activity, or, if the proposed funding 
level for a directorate, theme, program, project, or activity 
is based on confidence level budgeting, the confidence level 
assumed in the proposed funding level.
    The Committee has chosen to articulate the funding levels 
of programs within the account structure for NASA in the form 
of tables. Major mission and program funding is listed within 
the tables and, if necessary, supplemented with explanatory 
report language.
    This bill attempts to make tough choices in order to afford 
a balanced space program. To do that, the Committee was 
informed by the priorities of the Senate as well as the 
administration. However, the Committee does not always agree 
with the administration. The Committee grants NASA flexibility 
to craft spending plans that manage funds appropriately and, 
where necessary, address funding shortfalls that were not 
foreseen by the Congress or the agency prior to passage of 
annual appropriations. However, that latitude should not be 
viewed as a license to disregard the Congress' choices about 
where limited resources should be spent. The Federal funding 
priorities for NASA set forth in this bill should not be 
interpreted as a suggestion from the Committee; rather they 
should be interpreted like any other statutory requirement 
levied upon NASA. The Committee objects to NASA's efforts in 
recent fiscal years to redirect funding away from priorities 
clearly set by the Congress in law. Continued use of section 
505 of this bill in this manner will result in limited funding 
flexibility in the future.

                                SCIENCE

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $5,037,352,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   5,017,800,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,154,200,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee provides $5,154,200,000 for Science, which is 
$116,848,000 above the fiscal year 2013 level and $136,400,000 
above the budget request. The Science account encompasses five 
lines of study: Earth Science, Planetary Science, Astrophysics, 
the James Webb Space Telescope, and Heliophysics. This funding 
seeks to answer fundamental questions concerning the ways in 
which Earth's climate is changing; the comparison of Earth with 
other planets in the solar system and around other stars; the 
connections between the Sun and Earth; and the origin and 
evolution of planetary systems, the galaxy, and the universe, 
including the origin and distribution of life in the universe. 
These objectives are achieved through robotic flight missions, 
ground-based scientific research and data analysis, and the 
development of new technologies for future missions.

                                 SCIENCE
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Earth Science:
    Earth Science Research.............................          443,300
    Earth Systematic Missions..........................          787,600
    Earth System Science Pathfinder....................          353,500
    Earth Science Multi-Mission Operations.............          171,700
    Earth Science Technology...........................           55,100
    Applied Sciences...................................           35,000
                                                        ----------------
      Subtotal, Earth Science..........................        1,846,200
                                                        ================
Planetary Science:
    Planetary Science Research.........................          220,600
    Lunar Quest Program................................           17,700
    Discovery..........................................          257,900
    New Frontiers......................................          257,500
    Mars Exploration...................................          334,000
    Outer Planets......................................           79,000
    Technology.........................................          150,900
                                                        ----------------
      Subtotal, Planetary Science......................        1,317,600
                                                        ================
Astrophysics:
    Astrophysics Research..............................          147,700
    Cosmic Origins.....................................          268,000
    Physics of the Cosmos..............................          110,400
    Exoplanet Exploration..............................           55,400
    Astrophysics Explorer..............................           96,900
                                                        ----------------
      Subtotal, Astrophysics...........................          678,400
                                                        ================
James Webb Space Telescope.............................          658,200
                                                        ================
Heliophysics:
    Heliophysics Research..............................          195,700
    Living with a Star.................................          216,200
    Solar Terrestrial Probes...........................          146,700
    Heliophysics Explorer..............................           95,200
                                                        ----------------
      Subtotal, Heliophysics...........................          653,800
                                                        ================
      Total, Science...................................        5,154,200
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Earth Science Missions.--The Committee maintains the 
ongoing development of the Tier I Earth Science missions, and 
provides the full budget requests for the Soil Moisture Active 
and Passive [SMAP] and the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation 
Satellite [IceSat-2] missions.
    The Committee maintains support for the pre-Aerosol, 
Clouds, Ecosystem [PACE] mission, originally introduced as a 
climate continuity mission in the fiscal year 2011 request. 
PACE will address ocean ecology, ocean color, and climate data 
record continuity as the primary objectives and aerosol 
interaction and measurement as a secondary objective. The 
Committee expects NASA to use adequate funding as proposed in 
the Earth Systematic Missions' budget request to begin 
technology risk reduction and formulation studies for PACE with 
the goal of enabling a launch by 2018.
    Land Imaging.--The Committee commends NASA and its team for 
the recent successful launch of Landsat 8, and provides 
$30,000,000 for Land Imaging activities, which is the same as 
the budget request. However, the Committee is concerned about 
the administration's approach towards the follow-on Landsat 9 
mission, for which funds requested in fiscal year 2014 are 
extremely low. The Committee is highly skeptical of either a 
hosted payload or international partner concept for Landsat 9. 
The Committee discourages NASA from spending an inordinate 
amount of time or funds on these alternate approaches, which 
already have been considered on multiple occasions over the 
past four decades and have only distracted and delayed the 
inherently governmental role in preserving the continuity of 
Landsat data. At the same time, expectations that a Landsat 9 
mission will cost a billion dollars due to enhanced new 
instrumentation or other efforts at program resiliency are 
equally unrealistic. For this reason, the Committee expects a 
plan not later than 120 days after enactment of this act 
detailing how Landsat 9 will ensure data continuity in an era 
of increasingly scarce resources with an overall mission cap of 
approximately $650,000,000, a level substantially below that 
required for Landsat 8.
    Carbon Monitoring.--Of the funds provided within the Earth 
Science research and analysis activity, the Committee 
recommends $10,000,000 to continue efforts for the development 
of a carbon monitoring system. The majority of the funds should 
be directed toward acquisition, field sampling, quantification, 
and development of a prototype Monitoring Reporting and 
Verification [MRV] system which can provide transparent data 
products achieving levels of precision and accuracy required by 
current carbon trading protocols. The Committee is concerned 
that NASA has not established a program of record around the 
development of MRV system, and therefore expects a plan from 
NASA not later than 90 days after enactment of this act 
incorporating such a system into its operating plan and long-
term budget projection. The Committee recognizes that the 
current orbital and suborbital platforms are insufficient to 
meet these objectives. Therefore, the use of commercial off-
the-shelf technologies is recommended as these products could 
provide robust calibration validation datasets for future NASA 
missions.
    Cooperation Between NASA and NOAA.--The Committee remains 
discouraged by NASA's lack of cooperation with NOAA's Ocean and 
Atmospheric Research office in the area of non-space based 
Earth science. NASA shall better coordinate with NOAA on all 
aspects of relevant NASA-funded projects, including project 
planning, project execution, and post-project data sharing.
    SERVIR.--The Committee maintains funding for the SERVIR 
initiative within the Applied Sciences Program and is 
encouraged by NASA's continued support of the program. SERVIR 
integrates satellite observations, ground-based data, and 
forecast models to monitor and forecast environmental changes 
and to improve response to natural disasters. The program 
allows people in developing regions to use Earth observations 
to address challenges in agriculture, biodiversity 
conservation, climate change, disaster response, weather 
forecasting, and energy and health issues.
    Planetary Science.--With the exception of increased funding 
for Mars Exploration, the Committee supports Planetary Science 
at the budget request levels, including $150,900,000 for 
Technology and $40,500,000 for Near Earth Object Observations 
within Planetary Science Research.
    The Committee also provides $257,900,000 for Discovery and 
$257,500,000 for New Frontiers, which includes $218,700,000 for 
the OSIRIS-REx mission. The Committee directs NASA to provide 
the full operational and data analysis funding for the 
Messenger mission to account for extended operations and 
attendant scientific activity. The Committee fully expects NASA 
to continue Discovery and New Frontiers competitive planetary 
programs as distinct opportunities awarded on a merit-based, 
competitive basis, in order maximize the delivery of more high-
quality science within a constrained fiscal environment. These 
programs allow NASA an opportunity to make progress on the 
goals of the decadal survey, such as outer planet exploration, 
in a cost-effective manner.
    The Committee is deeply disappointed at NASA's failure to 
utilize both programs for broader participation by the 
scientific community by limiting selection to just one mission 
per announcement of opportunity [AO] resulting in a selection 
rate that is below 10 percent for nearly a decade. In fact, the 
last 8 years has seen a selection process with a high 
concentration of activity in this program and with each AO just 
a single mission selected. Given the severe fiscal constraints 
which NASA faces going forward, the Committee believes more 
robust utilization of the Discovery and New Frontiers program 
will result in a more robust planetary science program because 
of its lower cost alternative to expensive, over-budget 
observatory class missions. Hence, NASA should elect to adjust 
its expectations and programmatic efforts accordingly. The 
Committee directs NASA to provide additional funding in 
Discovery to initiate Phase B study activities on an additional 
Discovery mission from the most recent 2012 announcement of 
opportunity with the highest scientific value that meets the 
program's cost cap.
    Mars Exploration.--The budget request proposes to cut and 
restructure the program of robotic rovers and in-space 
observatories expected to culminate in a Mars sample return, 
which was identified as the top priority for planetary science 
by the National Research Council's Decadal Survey. The 
Committee provides $334,000,000, which is $100,000,000 above 
the request level, for Mars Exploration. This amount supports 
any re-planned Mars program that can take advantage of upcoming 
opportunities to launch robotic science platforms to Mars as 
early as 2016. NASA is expected to use these funds to retain 
core U.S. competencies in areas such as entry, descent, and 
landing.
    Astrophysics.--Within funds provided to advance scientific 
knowledge of the origins of the universe, the Committee 
provides the budget request levels of $98,300,000 for the 
Hubble Space Telescope and $32,900,000 for the Balloon Project.
    WFIRST Science Mission.--Within the funds provided, the 
Committee provides $56,000,000 for NASA to proceed with design 
studies, further technical risk reduction, and detailed 
formulation on a science mission that meets the exoplanet and 
dark energy science objectives of WFIRST. This recommendation 
corresponds with findings from NASA's May 23, 2013, report on 
Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets, and should build upon 
the Agency's work with both the Hubble Space Telescope and the 
James Webb Space Telescope to ensure that the synergies and 
discoveries from those missions enhance WFIRST's scientific 
objectives so that they can be achieved in a way this is both 
cost effective and advances the field of study in astrophysics 
to guarantee world class results.
    James Webb Space Telescope.--The Committee maintains strong 
support for the completion of the James Webb Space Telescope 
[JWST], and provides $658,200,000, the same as the budget 
request. In 2011, the Committee asked for an independent 
assessment of JWST. That assessment, led by Dr. John Casani, 
found that while JWST is technically sound, NASA had never 
requested adequate resources to fund its development.
    In response to the Casani report, NASA submitted a new 
baseline for JWST with an overall life-cycle cost in 2012 of 
$8,700,000,000. NASA and its contractors continue to assure the 
Committee that this new baseline includes adequate reserves to 
achieve a 2018 launch without further cost overruns. The 
Committee intends to hold NASA and its contractors to that 
commitment, and the bill maintains an overall development cost 
ceiling for JWST at $8,000,000,000. The Committee expects to be 
kept fully informed on issues relating to program and risk 
management, achievement of cost and schedule goals, and program 
technical status. The Committee appreciates GAO's continuing 
work to monitor JWST progress, costs, and schedule.
    Heliophysics.--Within funds provided to advance scientific 
knowledge of the Sun's impact on the Earth, the Committee 
provides the full budget request of $120,900,000 for the 
Magnetospheric Multiscale [MMS] mission. The Committee expects 
NASA will seek additional programmatic flexibility and 
financial resources, as needed, to maintain the current MMS 
launch profile, and expects NASA to keep the Committee apprised 
on this matter prior to the start of fiscal year 2014.
    The Committee also provides $104,800,000 for the Solar 
Probe Plus mission, the same as the budget request. The 
Committee strongly affirms its multiyear commitment to a 2018 
launch for the solar probe plus mission as advanced technology 
development funds provided to NASA in prior years have retired 
substantial technical risk and made the funding profile for the 
mission manageable, points independently verified by outside 
reviews. The Committee fully expects that all future NASA 
budget submissions will adhere to a funding profile that 
guarantees a 2018 launch.
    The Committee provides the budget request of $95,200,000 
for the Heliophysics Explorer Program. The Committee believes 
that this program and other programs of opportunity are crucial 
to a robust space science program, and that each Explorer 
selection round should be adequately funded to guarantee one 
full mission for astrophysics and a corresponding one for 
heliophysics. The Committee expects to monitor this activity 
carefully since this program is one of NASA's longest running 
most successful programs, and has launched more than 90 
missions, including Explorer 1, which discovered the Earth's 
radiation belts and the Nobel Prize-enabling Cosmic Background 
Explorer mission.

                              AERONAUTICS

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $558,182,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     565,690,000
Committee recommendation................................     558,700,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee provides $558,700,000 for Aeronautics, which 
is $518,000 above the fiscal year 2013 level and $6,990,000 
below the budget request. The Aeronautics account funds 
research in key areas related to the development of advanced 
aircraft technologies and systems, including those related to 
aircraft safety, environmental compatibility and fuel 
efficiency; and research that supports the Next Generation Air 
Transportation System in partnership with the Joint Planning 
and Development Office.
    Within the funds provided, the Committee supports the 
budget request level of $25,000,000 for the Advanced Composites 
Initiative within the Integrated Systems Research division.

                            SPACE TECHNOLOGY

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $628,690,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     742,600,000
Committee recommendation................................     670,100,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee provides $670,100,000 for Space Technology, 
which is $41,410,000 above the fiscal year 2013 level and 
$72,500,000 below the budget request. The Space Technology 
Program funds basic research that can advance multi-purpose 
technologies to enable new approaches to NASA's current 
missions. It includes NASA's Small Business Innovative Research 
[SBIR] and Small Business Technology Transfer [STTR] programs.

                            SPACE TECHNOLOGY
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
SBIR and STTR.........................................          186,400
Partnership Development and Strategic Integration.....           34,100
Crosscutting Space Technology.........................          252,600
Exploration Technology................................          197,000
                                                       -----------------
      TOTAL...........................................          670,100
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Within Space Technology, the Committee prioritizes funding 
for ongoing activities including Crosscutting Space Technology, 
and encourages NASA to prioritize ongoing efforts funded in 
fiscal year 2013. The Committee recommends Space Technology 
continue to fund satellite servicing in concert with the Space 
Operations directorate. This funding will contribute to a 
competitive demonstration mission and shall be managed by the 
Space Operations mission directorate.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of the SBIR program 
and its previous success in commercialization of results from 
federally funded research and development projects. The 
Committee therefore directs NASA to place an increased focus on 
awarding SBIR awards to firms with fewer than 50 employees.
    The Committee encourages NASA to focus on developing 
advanced technology solutions that have strong dual use 
potential for both NASA and terrestrial applications with 
commercial potential. Such an approach will help ensure that 
NASA's work has a greater positive impact on the U.S. economy.
    Within the funds provided for Crosscutting Space Technology 
Development, the Committee provides the budget request level of 
$17,000,000 for Flight Opportunities.

                              EXPLORATION

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $3,806,413,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   3,915,505,000
Committee recommendation................................   4,209,300,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee provides $4,209,300,000 for Exploration, 
which is $402,887,000 above the fiscal year 2013 level and 
$293,795,000 above the budget request. The Exploration account 
funds the capabilities required to develop, demonstrate, and 
deploy the transportation, life support and surface systems 
that will enable sustained human presence throughout the solar 
system, including at the International Space Station [ISS], in 
low-Earth orbit and beyond low-Earth orbit.
    The Committee believes the Nation deserves a safe, robust 
human spaceflight program. This program aims to regularly and 
reliably provide access to the ISS and enable exploration 
beyond low-Earth orbit. Capabilities to reach the ISS with U.S. 
vehicles and explore beyond low-Earth orbit must work hand in 
hand. The United States must continue building a heavy lift 
rocket to complement emerging domestic capabilities for a 
sustainable human spaceflight program that can accomplish both 
of these goals.
    Furthermore, the United States must engage its 
international partners to have a truly robust and successful 
program. With the funds provided here, the United States will 
be able to contribute heavy lift launch technology, including 
the capability to launch humans beyond low-Earth orbit, to that 
effort.

                               EXPLORATION
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Exploration Research and Development..................          316,100
Commercial Space Flight...............................          775,000
Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle.......................        1,200,000
Space Launch System...................................        1,600,000
Exploration Ground Systems............................          318,200
                                                       -----------------
      TOTAL...........................................        4,209,300
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Human Exploration Capabilities.--The Committee is committed 
to the development of a U.S. capability to launch NASA 
astronauts beyond low-Earth orbit. The development of the Space 
Launch System [SLS] and Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle will 
provide the United States the capability to take humans to 
destinations well beyond current international capabilities. 
SLS and Orion will also provide a capability that will not be 
attainable by the vehicles envisioned in the commercial crew 
program currently underway. The goal of our human space program 
has always been to explore areas beyond our own planet. To 
attain this goal, NASA's stated priorities include the 
development of SLS and Orion; however, the funding levels 
requested fall far short of what is necessary.
    The Committee believes that the amounts specified in the 
independent cost assessment [ICA] for the SLS are necessary and 
appropriate in order to maintain the programs estimated cost 
and schedule. Despite numerous directives to provide an updated 
cost assessment for the SLS, which supports the lower funding 
levels proposed, NASA has never provided the Committee any 
verifiable documentation supporting the amount reflected in the 
agency's budget request. Such blatant disregard for the 
direction provided by the Committee and for NASA's own 
independent cost assessment for the SLS is inappropriate and 
calls into question NASA's ability to appropriately manage and 
oversee its ongoing projects. The Committee cannot support 
NASA's position to undermine its own, independently verified, 
funding plans and has instead provided the full amount assumed 
in the independent cost assessment for fiscal year 2014 for SLS 
in order to maintain a launch date of 2017. In furtherance of 
that goal, NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission 
Directorate shall not tax SLS for engineering or other 
activities not directly related to SLS vehicle development. The 
Committee cautions NASA against relying on anything other than 
an actual independent cost assessment in its recommendation for 
fiscal year 2015.
    In fiscal years 2012 and 2013, the Committee asked NASA to 
provide a report to the Committee either validating the funding 
levels included in the ICA for human exploration, or justifying 
alternative funding levels that maintain the same schedule that 
was assessed in the ICA. To date, NASA has not provided any 
such justification, and instead has claimed that proposed 
funding levels are sufficient for the program, but with no 
comparative validation or justification for the significant 
deviation from ICA. NASA shall appropriately respond to 
previous direction regarding funding profiles provided in 
Public Law 112-55 and Public Law 113-6, or follow NASA's own 
independently validated funding plan in current and future 
fiscal year budget submissions.
    Commercial Crew.--The Committee recommends $775,000,000 for 
commercial crew activities and offers NASA several 
opportunities to strengthen the program to launch astronauts to 
ISS on U.S. vehicles. The Committee remains concerned but is 
encouraged by NASA's commitment to hold commercially developed 
launch vehicles which may be used to carry out NASA missions to 
the same safety standards as Government-developed launch 
vehicles but is encouraged by recent efforts. If NASA is to 
fund vehicle development under this program, the agency must 
have appropriately tested and verified safety protocols to 
ensure safe and reliable U.S. transportation to the ISS.
    The Committee believes that for NASA to truly embark on a 
public-private partnership for a commercial crew vehicle, 
private companies should accept an appropriate amount of 
funding risk. Currently, NASA has funded a majority of the 
development costs associated with the commercial spaceflight 
program and at the end of the development phase, the companies, 
not NASA, will own the vehicles that Federal tax dollars have 
funded which is, by design, a significant departure from 
traditional NASA programs. The Committee believes that NASA 
must balance its mission needs with its support for the 
development of emerging capabilities with true commercial 
applicability. The Committee has directed that any subsequent 
phase of the commercial crew program be awarded as a contract 
or contracts under the Federal Acquisition Regulations [FAR], 
and NASA has testified before the Committee that it will use 
FAR-based contracts in the next phase of commercial crew. The 
Committee directs NASA when evaluating commercial crew 
proposals to evaluate and weigh the amount of funding the 
company will contribute to vehicle development and which 
investment will result in the best value for the Government.
    If the ISS only operates until 2020, NASA would not have 
time to reap the benefits from such a substantial investment in 
the commercial crew program. NASA has already committed a 
significant investment of more than $1,000,000,000 in multiple 
vehicles to service a station that is only authorized to 
operate until 2020. The first launch of one of these new 
vehicles, provided there are no problems or delays, is not 
scheduled to occur until 2017, meaning NASA could ultimately 
invest billions of dollars to develop launch vehicles that will 
only be used for two flights a year over 3 years, or a total of 
six launches. Such a schedule does not justify the current 
spending levels.
    Thus, the Committee directs NASA to clearly define and plan 
for the operational longevity of the ISS, if it is advisable 
based upon NASA's comprehensive assessment of the ISS, in order 
to justify its investment in commercial crew, and provides 
language within the act limiting NASA's access to funds for 
additional commercial crew activities until the NASA 
Administrator certifies that the program is cost beneficial 
based upon the expected life of ISS.
    The Administrator's certification that the program is cost 
beneficial, meaning it will produce a net positive return on 
investment, must be accompanied by a plan that is: (1) based on 
a comprehensive assessment of the essential modules, 
operational systems and components, structural elements, and 
permanent scientific equipment on board the U.S. segment of the 
ISS; (2) identifies the systems and components, elements, and 
equipment that are required to ensure safe and effective 
functioning and full scientific utilization of ISS; and (3) 
contains a long-term financial and operational plan, including 
a plan for engaging international partners, to extend the life 
of the ISS for as long is as safe and scientifically 
beneficial.
    The Committee believes that the funding available to NASA 
before the certification is provided is adequate to fund NASA's 
current commitments under the commercial crew program, and that 
the requirement for certification before releasing certain 
funds should not prevent NASA from issuing a RFP for commercial 
crew. The Committee's goal is to preserve value for the 
taxpayers and delaying the program will not serve that cause.
    Furthermore, the commercial crew program is set up such 
that any chosen vehicle will not be owned by NASA but rather, 
be available to be used by NASA. Given the significant amount 
of Federal tax dollars that are being invested in the program, 
and the fact that NASA has the ability to enter into long-term 
contracts with other countries for rides to the ISS, the 
Committee has included language ensuring that the cost per seat 
on these newly developed vehicles does not exceed the amount 
for which NASA can currently contract seats. NASA's price per 
seat will be lower if the commercial crew providers have a 
variety of low-Earth orbit uses.
    Within the funds available, the Committee directs NASA to 
ensure that multiple competitors remain, but remain mindful 
that, faced with a stagnant future budget, NASA should not take 
on obligations to more companies than can be practically 
supported. It is vital that NASA wisely invest available funds 
in companies that agree to adhere to NASA's safety guidelines.
    The Committee maintains concern expressed by the Aerospace 
Safety Advisory Panel, the OIG, and others that Space Act 
agreements may not give NASA sufficient oversight to correct 
safety defects. The Committee directs NASA to only place 
astronauts on a commercial crew vehicle that NASA acquired 
under a FAR contract that allows NASA to require the company to 
meet all safety requirements. The Committee encourages NASA to 
continue working closely with commercial companies, even under 
Space Act agreements, so that those companies know what will be 
acceptable should NASA eventually contract for crew 
transportation services aboard those companies' vehicles. The 
Committee encourages NASA to develop plans to fully utilize 
NASA-owned rocket testing infrastructure for commercially 
developed launch vehicles to ensure that these vehicles not 
only are tested in the same manner as Government-developed 
launch vehicles but at the same facilities to ensure 
consistency in testing across all potential vehicles.
    Advanced Exploration Systems.--Within Exploration Research 
and Development, the Committee provides no less than 
$162,000,000 for Advanced Exploration Systems. The Committee 
encourages NASA to continue to develop and test technology for 
supporting human spaceflight, including the use of expandable 
habitats, per the budget request.

                            SPACE OPERATIONS

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $3,871,045,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   3,882,900,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,882,900,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee provides $3,882,900,000 for Space Operations, 
which is $11,855,000 above the fiscal year 2013 level and the 
same as the budget request. The Space Operations account funds 
the ISS, and the supporting functions required to conduct 
operations in space. The ISS is a complex of research 
laboratories in low-Earth orbit in which American, Russian, 
Canadian, European, and Japanese astronauts are conducting 
unique scientific and technological investigations in a 
microgravity environment.
    International Space Station.--The Committee provides the 
budget request level of $3,049,100,000 for the ISS Program, 
which includes ISS Operations, ISS Research, and ISS Crew and 
Cargo Services. This Committee has consistently supported the 
construction and operation of the ISS on the promise that it 
would support world class, international science that could 
improve life on Earth. However, NASA cannot abdicate its 
responsibility for safety and oversight of entities receiving 
Federal dollars to develop launch and crew capabilities to the 
ISS, regardless of the acquisition model used. The Committee 
considers astronaut safety its highest priority and maintains 
support for the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel's 
recommendation that NASA reconsider its criteria for future 
human spaceflight to the ISS. NASA must ensure that safety 
standards for transportation to, and ongoing operations at, the 
ISS improve should NASA begin to purchase crew transportation 
services from commercial providers.
    The Committee is concerned that there is limited value in 
NASA's commercial crew program given the lack of firm 
commitment by the Administration to support the ISS beyond 
fiscal year 2020. Per direction set forth under the Exploration 
heading of this title, NASA shall provide a report to the 
Committees on Appropriations not later than 60 days after 
enactment of this act detailing a comprehensive long-term 
financial and operational plan, if certified by the 
Administrator as safe that will support the International Space 
Station and all of its modules, components, and equipment.
    Space and Flight Support.--The Committee provides the 
budget request level of $833,800,000 for Space and Flight 
support, which includes: $39,600,000 for the 21st Century Space 
Launch Complex; $554,500,000 for Space Communication and 
Navigation; and $47,800,000 for Rocket Propulsion Testing.
    Satellite Servicing.--Within Space Operations and Space 
Technology, the Committee provides $125,000,000 for satellite 
servicing, including carryover funding from fiscal year 2013. 
Funds shall be used to establish Restore, which shall be 
conducted as a public-private partnership where a competitively 
selected commercial entity will provide the mission's 
spacecraft and launch vehicle to complement NASA's supply of 
the key instruments necessary to operationalize a robotic 
servicing system for refueling satellites on orbit. This is an 
extension of satellite servicing work this Committee has funded 
since fiscal year 2010. In addition, funds may be used to 
continue advanced technology development to refuel, repair, and 
reposition satellites on orbit and to test satellite servicing 
technologies aboard the ISS.
    Technologies developed from this effort should be focused 
primarily on the servicing of satellites in geosynchronous 
Earth orbits but may also benefit those assets in low-Earth 
orbits. Any effort shall include capability to service other 
Government satellites operated by NOAA, the Department of 
Defense, and other Government agencies. The program shall focus 
follow-on commercial satellite servicing capability to meet the 
needs of both the commercial and government sectors.
    Space Operations shall be responsible for overall direction 
and management of all agency servicing activities and funds, 
including advanced servicing technology demonstrations on the 
ISS. Unlike previous years, NASA's Human Exploration and 
Operations Mission Directorate shall not tax the program for 
engineering or other activities that are not directly related 
to satellite servicing. Space Operations shall provide a plan 
and schedule to the Committee on the mission not later than 90 
days from enactment of this act.

                               EDUCATION

Appropriations, 2013....................................    $122,408,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      94,200,000
Committee recommendation................................     116,600,000

    The Committee provides $116,600,000 for Education, which is 
$5,808,000 below the fiscal year 2013 level and $22,400,000 
above the budget request. The Education account funds science, 
technology, engineering, and mathematics [STEM] education 
activities to educate and inspire our next generation of 
explorers and innovators.

                                EDUCATION
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
NASA Space Grant........................................          40,000
Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research..          18,000
Minority University Research and Education Program......          30,000
STEM Education and Accountability Projects..............          28,600
                                                         ---------------
    TOTAL...............................................         116,600
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    A full description of the Committee's assessment and 
direction regarding the administration's Co-STEM consolidation 
proposal is found in the Office of Science Technology and 
Policy portion of this report. For NASA's part, the Committee 
does not support the elimination of formal and informal 
education activities from NASA at this time that were planned 
to migrate to the Department of Education and the Smithsonian 
Institution, and directs NASA to work with OSTP on the 
Committee's directions provided to that office for these 
programs.
    However, the Committee does encourage efforts to streamline 
STEM education programs across NASA line offices and supports 
the internal consolidation of NASA education programs. Prior to 
the administration's proposed STEM education consolidation, 
NASA intended to combine multiple Education programs into the 
STEM Education and Accountability Project, which include: the 
Undergraduate Student Research Project; the Learning 
Environment and Research Network; Education Flight Projects; 
NASA Education Technology Services; Aerospace Education 
Services Project; the Graduate Student Researchers Program; 
Innovation in Higher Education; the Learning Technologies 
Project; NASA Explorer Schools; and the Summer of Innovation.
    The Committee believes that there is value in consolidating 
these programs within NASA and encourages NASA to move forward 
with their consolidation. NASA should maintain education and 
outreach within science missions. As part of this 
consolidation, NASA shall provide the Committee with a report, 
within 60 days of enactment, that will describe the goals and 
activities of the STEM Education and Accountability Project and 
how the needs of the consolidated activities will be addressed 
within the consolidated program.
    Workforce Development.--Over the years, NASA has developed 
a myriad of programs intended both to identify college and 
university students that will eventually become part of NASA's 
workforce and provide long-term educational support for the 
efforts of these students. Some of NASA's programs are 
educational and aid in the development of a robust engineering 
and technical workforce for the Nation. Other programs allow 
these same students to gain additional, specialized hands-on 
experiences in areas directly related to NASA's mission. While 
these are important national goals and essential to ensuring a 
future workforce in NASA's core disciplines, the Committee is 
concerned that NASA may be supporting some programs that, while 
useful to the development of students interested in STEM 
fields, may not be directly useful to NASA. The Committee 
directs NASA to review all existing programs that offer 
internships, fellowships, and other related undergraduate and 
graduate programs and identify those programs that are directly 
associated with NASA's mission, and those that are of general 
value which may be more effectively coordinated through the 
National Science Foundation. NASA should also consider whether 
fellowships funded is Space Technology are more appropriately 
the Education mission directorate. The findings shall be 
included in a report and presented to the Committee not later 
than 90 days after the date of enactment of this act.
    Space Grant.--The Committee provides $40,000,000 for Space 
Grant, and directs NASA to prioritize funding for State 
consortia that did not receive forward funding in fiscal year 
2012 and the remaining funds will be directly allocated to the 
State consortia through an augmentation award.

                          CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $2,764,472,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   2,850,300,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,793,600,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee provides $2,793,600,000 for Cross-Agency 
Support, which is $29,128,000 above the fiscal year 2013 level 
and $56,700,000 below the budget request. The Cross-Agency 
Support account funds agency management, including headquarters 
and each of the nine NASA field centers, as well as the design 
and execution of non-programmatic Construction of Facilities 
and Environmental Compliance and Restoration activities.
    Independent Verification and Validation [IV&V] Program.--
Within the amounts provided for cross-agency support, the 
Committee recommends $39,100,000 for NASA's IV&V Program.
    Cybersecurity.--Cybersecurity has been identified as one of 
NASA's top management challenges by the OIG. NASA spends in 
excess of $1,500,000,000 annually on its IT-related activities. 
Yet, in a June 2013 report, the OIG found that control and 
governance of NASA IT assets remain diffuse, leaving NASA's 
chief information officer [CIO] without adequate authority to 
manage IT security practices throughout the agency. 
Specifically, the OIG recommended NASA consolidate governance 
and budgeting for IT resources within the office of the CIO. 
These practices have the potential not only to make NASA's IT 
systems more secure but also to save money through purchasing 
and support efficiencies. Within 90 days of enactment of this 
act, NASA shall provide a plan to implement the OIG's 
recommendations on IT governance, including an assessment of 
the personnel, training, management structure, and resources 
necessary.
    Public Outreach.--NASA is an agency with very high public 
visibility, and as such, must take responsibility that its 
center directors appropriately represent NASA and the work that 
it does. Even the best work of scientists and engineers can 
become trivialized and misrepresented if proper judgment is not 
exercised when interacting with, educating, and inspiring the 
public. The Committee is concerned that, based on certain 
activities at some centers, NASA may not have the proper 
standards and training in place to ensure the actions of its 
center directors, acting in an official capacity, reflect the 
professional work being done at NASA. Accordingly, NASA shall 
report within 60 days after enactment of this act to the 
Committee guidelines and processes by which center directors 
personally, or via electronic media, are trained in public 
outreach. The report should also describe how headquarters 
public affairs and the office of general counsel review and 
approve material on official center-managed Web sites, 
publications, and other outreach material in order to maintain 
a public image in line with the agency's goals.
    Employee Performance Communications System [EPCS].--The 
Committee is awaiting the results of GAO's assessment of NASA's 
EPCS. GAO's pending assessment should not be used as an 
impediment to performance system reforms that result in 
increased accountability and fairness for NASA employees.

       CONSTRUCTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE AND RESTORATION

Appropriations, 2013\1\\2\..............................    $680,902,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     609,400,000
Committee recommendation................................     586,900,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.
\2\Includes emergency funding of $15,000,000 in the Disaster Relief 
Appropriations Act, 2013 (division A of Public Law 113-2).

    The Committee provides $586,900,000 for Construction and 
Environmental Compliance and Restoration, which is $94,002,000 
below the fiscal year 2013 level and $22,500,000 below the 
budget request. The Construction and Environmental Compliance 
and Remediation account provides for design and execution of 
programmatic, discrete and minor revitalization, construction 
of facilities projects, facility demolition projects, and 
environmental compliance and remediation activities.

        CONSTRUCTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE AND RESTORATION
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Construction of Facilities (CoF)......................          516,400
    Institutional CoF.................................         (347,900)
    Exploration CoF...................................         (142,300)
    Space Operations CoF..............................          (26,200)
Environmental Compliance and Restoration..............           70,500
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Construction and Environmental Compliance          586,900
       and Restoration................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $37,212,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      37,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      38,000,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $38,000,000 for the 
Office of Inspector General [IG], which is $788,000 above the 
fiscal year 2013 level and $1,000,000 above the budget request. 
The Office is responsible for promoting efficiency and 
preventing and detecting crime, fraud, waste, and 
mismanagement.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    The Committee includes bill language regarding the 
availability of funds for certain prizes. The Committee also 
includes bill language regarding: transfers of funds between 
accounts, the NASA spending plan for fiscal year 2014.

                      National Science Foundation

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $7,239,824,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   7,625,780,000
Committee recommendation................................   7,425,890,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $7,425,890,000 for 
the National Science Foundation [NSF]. The recommendation is 
$186,066,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and 
$199,890,000 below the budget request.
    The National Science Foundation was established as an 
independent agency by the National Science Foundation Act of 
1950 (Public Law 81-507) and is authorized to support research 
and education programs that promote the progress of science and 
engineering in the United States. The Foundation supports 
research and education in all major scientific and engineering 
disciplines through grants, cooperative agreements, contracts, 
and other forms of assistance in all parts of the United 
States. The Foundation also supports unique, large-scale 
research facilities and international facilities.
    In his July 1945 letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt 
transmitting the report that recommended the creation of the 
NSF, Vannevar Bush stated: ``The pioneer spirit is still 
vigorous within this Nation. Science offers a largely 
unexplored hinterland for the pioneer who has the tools for his 
task. The rewards of such exploration both for the Nation and 
the individual are great. Scientific progress is one essential 
key to our security as a nation, to our better health, to more 
jobs, to a higher standard of living, and to our cultural 
progress.'' More recently, the National Academies and the 
Council on Competitiveness have reminded us that basic research 
forms the engine of American economic growth.
    The Committee again supports a generous increase for the 
NSF because unfettered basic research selected in a merit-
reviewed, competitive process generates new ideas that become 
new products and new companies. The unexpected consequences of 
a good idea can be transformational. For example, two graduate 
students' NSF grant to optimize search engines has become a 
powerhouse of search, email, cloud computing, and online 
connectivity--Google. Not every grant becomes a company with a 
market capitalization of more than $300,000,000, but basic 
research is a key element of high growth, high value companies 
in the 21st century.

                    RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $5,859,232,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   6,212,290,000
Committee recommendation................................   6,018,290,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $6,018,290,000. The 
recommendation is $159,058,000 above the fiscal year 2013 
enacted level and $194,000,000 below the budget request.
    The Research and Related Activities [R&RA] appropriation 
funds scientific discovery, trains a dynamic workforce, and 
supports broadly accessible state-of-the-art tools and 
facilities. Research activities will contribute to the 
achievement of these outcomes through expansion of the 
knowledge base; integration of research and education; 
stimulation of knowledge transfer among academia and public and 
private sectors; and international activities, and will bring 
the perspectives of many disciplines to bear on complex 
problems important to the Nation. The Foundation's discipline-
oriented R&RA account includes: Biological Sciences; Computer 
and Information Science and Engineering; Engineering; 
Geosciences; Mathematical and Physical Sciences; Social, 
Behavioral and Economic Sciences; Office of 
Cyberinfrastructure; Office of International Science and 
Engineering; Office of Polar Programs; Integrative Activities; 
and U.S. Arctic Research Commission.
    The Committee's fiscal year 2014 recommendation renews its 
support for Federal long-term basic research that has the 
potential to be transformative to our economy and our way of 
life in the context of a stagnant Federal budget. However, the 
Foundation continues to prioritize new initiatives while 
cutting support for core, merit-based science grants and for 
scientific infrastructure like ships and facilities. The seven 
``OneNSF'' framework priority activities continue to grow by 
cutting NSF's core programs. The Committee once again directs 
that the $194,000,000 reduction below the fiscal year 2014 
budget request level for R&RA be taken from the proposed 
increases in OneNSF initiatives and not from core NSF program 
or infrastructure funding. The Committee urges NSF to 
reconsider cuts to key scientific infrastructure when 
delivering its spending plan by further reducing proposed 
increases for OneNSF initiatives.
    Scientific Facilities and Instrumentation.--A critical 
component of the Nation's scientific enterprise is the 
infrastructure that supports researchers in discovery science. 
Investments to advance the frontiers of research and education 
in science and engineering are critical to the Nation's 
innovation enterprise. The Committee expects the NSF to fully 
fund world-class U.S. scientific research facilities and 
instruments to adequately support scientists and students 
engaged in ground-breaking research to maximize sustained 
investments in research.
    CHESS.--The Committee support's the budget request for 
NSF's Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source [CHESS], which is 
a unique multi-disciplinary user facility that supports 
research in medicine, physics, materials science, chemistry, 
biology, and engineering.
    Astronomy.--The Committee remains concerned about the 
continued erosion of support for NSF's domestic national 
astronomy facilities, including facilities such as the National 
Radio Astronomy Observatory [NRAO], that have been at the 
forefront of science for more than 50 years. The Committee 
expects NSF to fully support the scientific and educational 
activities at the Division of Astronomical Sciences in the 
context of a strong NSF astronomy program with NRAO funding at 
fiscal 2012 levels, and fully supporting the domestic 
instruments and facilities that produce U.S. leadership in 
these fields.
    Furthermore, the Committee is aware that NSF is preparing 
to make a final decision on the Astronomy Portfolio Review 
Commission's recommendation. At least 60 days before issuing a 
final decision, the Committee directs NSF to submit a report to 
the Committees on Appropriations and the authorizing committees 
of jurisdiction outlining the legal authorities the agency has 
to dispose of real property and providing a full accounting of 
the multi-year costs that will be required to close these 
operations if efforts to identify new tenants are unsuccessful.
    The Committee welcomes the line item identification of pre-
construction funds for future major MREFC projects, including 
the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, the astrophysics decadal 
survey's top ranked ground-based priority in the coming decade. 
This joint NSF-Department of Energy project will provide 
unprecedented views of the changing sky and will drive key 
advances in cyber-infrastructure and large-volume data 
management. The Committee provides funding at the request level 
in order to make progress toward a potential new start in a 
subsequent year, subject to the project meeting the necessary 
conditions for such action.
    Cybersecurity.--The Committee's recommendation includes the 
full request of $159,250,000 for cybersecurity research, 
including $57,000,000 for NSF's contribution to the 
Comprehensive National Cybersecurity Initiative. NSF provides 
support for core computer science research at academic 
institutions. The discovery and innovation in cybersecurity 
supported by NSF will form the intellectual foundations for 
practical applications that make our information networks 
safer, more secure, and better able to predict, resist, repel, 
and recover from cyber attacks.
    Experimental Program To Stimulate Competitive Research 
[EPSCoR].--Within the amount provided, the Committee provides 
$163,580,000 for EPSCoR, an amount equal to the fiscal year 
2014 request.
    Ocean Science Infrastructure--The Committee is supportive 
of improved funding for Ocean Science infrastructure items 
including the International Ocean Discovery Program and the 
Ocean Observing Initiative, and directs NSF to fund these items 
at the budget request level. However, the Committee is 
disappointed with the proposed funding cuts to the Academic 
Research Fleet and planning for the regional-class research 
vessels. The Committee is concerned that this budget request 
will mean that current research ships will either not be 
properly maintained or will not be adequately utilized. Both 
scenarios are unacceptable. The Committee directs NSF to fund 
the Academic Research Fleet at no less than the fiscal year 
2012 level from proposed budget request increases to OneNSF 
initiatives. Furthermore, as these current vessels continue to 
age, planning for their replacements--which includes regional-
class vessels--must not be derailed. The Committee directs NSF 
to ensure that the design and planning for these vessels will 
soon make them viable candidates for approval for inclusion in 
the Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction 
account.
    Science, Engineering, and Education for Sustainability 
[SEES].--In order to develop the scientific knowledge vital to 
improving our ability to respond rapidly to extreme events, 
such as power grid disruption, floods, and dangerous weather, 
the Committee includes the full budget request for SEES.

          MAJOR RESEARCH EQUIPMENT AND FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $192,103,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     210,120,000
Committee recommendation................................     210,120,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $210,120,000. The 
recommendation is $18,017,000 above the fiscal year 2013 
enacted level and the same as the budget request.
    The major research equipment and facilities construction 
appropriation supports the acquisition, procurement, 
construction, and commissioning of unique national research 
platforms and facilities as well as major research equipment. 
Projects supported by this appropriation will push the 
boundaries of technology and offer significant expansion of 
opportunities, often in new directions, for the science and 
engineering community. Preliminary design and development 
activities, on-going operations, and maintenance costs of the 
facilities are provided through the Research and Related 
Activities appropriation account.
    The Committee's recommendation includes funding at the 
requested level for the following ongoing projects: the 
Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory 
[AdvLIGO]; the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope [ATST]; the 
Ocean Observatories Initiative [OOI]; and the National 
Ecological Observatory Network [NEON]. The Committee welcomes 
the start of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope [LSST] at the 
budget request level.

                     EDUCATION AND HUMAN RESOURCES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $877,042,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     880,290,000
Committee recommendation................................     880,290,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $880,290,000. The 
recommendation is $3,248,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted 
level and the same as the budget request.
    The education and human resources appropriation supports a 
comprehensive set of programs across all levels of education in 
science, technology, engineering, and mathematics [STEM]. The 
appropriation supports activities that unite school districts 
with institutions of higher learning to improve precollege 
education. Other precollege activities include the development 
of the next generation of precollege STEM education leaders, 
instructional materials and the STEM instructional workforce. 
Undergraduate activities support curriculum, laboratory, and 
instructional improvement; expand the STEM talent pool; attract 
STEM participants to teaching; augment advanced technological 
education at 2-year colleges; and develop dissemination tools. 
Graduate support is directed to research and teaching 
fellowships and traineeships and instructional workforce 
improvement by linking precollege systems with higher 
education. Programs also seek to broaden the participation of 
groups underrepresented in the STEM enterprise and promote 
informal science education. Ongoing evaluation efforts and 
research on learning strengthen the base for these programs.
    STEM Consolidation.--The Committee provides overall 
direction under the Office of Science and Technology Policy 
[OSTP] section of this report with regards to the 
administration's Government-wide proposal to consolidate STEM 
education programs and a transfer of responsibilities across 
several agencies. Under this STEM proposal, NSF would be tasked 
with evaluating STEM related fellowships and other 
undergraduate and graduate activities across the Government. 
While the structures are in place for NSF to evaluate potential 
students for fellowships, and other related activities and 
programs across Government, it is unclear whether the resulting 
pool of successful candidates selected through these programs 
will accommodate the specific and varied needs of mission 
agencies for highly trained scientists. In order to ensure a 
proper distribution of candidates to fit the different 
requirements across Government, NSF would need to subdivide the 
process, and in the end, result in NSF doing the job agencies 
currently do for themselves.
    The Committee believes that NSF is well suited to handle 
undergraduate and graduate fellowships, internships, and 
specific grants similar to its current mission and, if there 
are general needs across Government, that NSF could similarly 
serve as a clearing house for such students. However, moving 
all graduate related fellowships and scholarships to NSF is not 
optimal to meet the long-term, specific, STEM workforce needs 
of the entire Government. The Committee requests that NSF work 
with OSTP on how NSF could implement a broader program for 
graduate and undergraduate programs across the entire Federal 
Government, and to identify which programs across Government 
could benefit from such a program.
    Advanced Technological Education.--The Committee supports 
the full request level of $64,000,000 for Advanced 
Technological Education.
    STEM-C Partnerships.--The Committee supports the full 
request level of $57,080,000 for STEM-C Partnerships, formally 
known as the Math and Science Partnership Program.
    Robert Noyce Scholarship Program.--The Committee has 
provided the budget request level of $60,890,000 for the Robert 
Noyce Scholarship program. This program helps fill the critical 
need for STEM teachers in elementary and secondary schools by 
funding institutions of higher education to provide 
scholarships, stipends, and programmatic support to recruit and 
prepare STEM majors and professionals to become K-12 teachers. 
Scholarship and stipend recipients are required to complete 2 
years of teaching in a high-need school district for each year 
of support.
    CyberCorps: Scholarships for Service.--The CyberCorps: 
Scholarships for Service program helps the Federal Government 
respond to threats to our information technology infrastructure 
by providing scholarships to train cybersecurity professionals. 
In return, scholarship recipients agree to serve in a Federal 
Government agency position, building the Government's capacity 
to understand, respond to, and prevent cyber threats. More than 
900 students have completed the program, which was initiated in 
fiscal year 2001; 92.6 percent of students have placed with 
more than 120 Federal agencies. The Committee provides 
$45,000,000, which is $20,000,000 above the requested level, to 
expand the Federal Cyber Service: Scholarships for Service 
program.
    Not less than $5,000,000 of the additional amount should be 
used to continue work with community colleges that have been 
designated a Center of Academic Excellence in Information 
Assurance 2-Year Education [CAE2Y] by the National Security 
Agency and the Department of Homeland Security.
    Informal Science Education.--The Committee maintains its 
strong support for NSF's informal science education program and 
rejects the proposed cut to Advancing Informal STEM Learning 
[AISL]. The Committee directs NSF to fund this program at the 
fiscal year 2012 level of $61,430,000.
    Broadening Participation.--The Committee continues its 
longstanding support for existing initiatives to broaden 
participation in STEM fields and recognizes these programs have 
different purposes and engage students in a different manner. 
The Committee notes support for these programs has stagnated in 
spite of increases to the overall NSF budget. The Committee 
recommends $31,940,000 for the Historically Black Colleges and 
Universities Undergraduate Program, $7,840,000 for the Alliance 
for Graduate Education and the Professoriate, $45,620,000 for 
the Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation, 
$13,500,000 for the Tribal Colleges and Universities Program, 
and $20,240,000 for Centers for Research Excellence in Science 
and Technology. In proposal selection, the Committee encourages 
NSF to give priority to grant proposals that have demonstrated 
maturity, including previous partnerships with other Federal 
agencies.
    In broadening participation, NSF shall expand efforts to 
increase the recruitment, retention, and graduation rates of 
Hispanic students pursuing associate or baccalaureate degrees 
in STEM fields and consider a program for Hispanic Serving 
Institutions similar to other broadening participation 
programs.
    The Committee is also committed to growing the STEM 
workforce by attracting broader participation from all 
underrepresented groups in STEM fields. The Committee directs 
NSF to maintain Research in Disabilities Education and Research 
on Gender in Science and Engineering as separate programs at 
the fiscal year 2012 enacted level.

                 AGENCY OPERATIONS AND AWARD MANAGEMENT

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $293,193,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     304,290,000
Committee recommendation................................     298,400,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $298,400,000. The 
recommendation is $5,207,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted 
level and $5,890,000 below the budget request.
    The appropriation provides salaries and expenses funds for 
staff salaries, benefits, travel, training, rent, advisory and 
assistance services, communications and utilities expenses, 
supplies, equipment and other operating expenses necessary for 
management of the National Science Foundation's research and 
education activities.
    The Committee directs NSF to find savings from operating 
expenses and future headquarters planning.
    The Committee reiterates its long-standing requirement that 
NSF submit reprogrammings when initiating new programs or 
activities of more than $500,000 or reorganizing components. 
The Committee expects to be notified of reprogramming actions 
which involve less than the above-mentioned amount if such 
actions would have the effect of changing the agency's funding 
requirements in future years, or if programs or projects 
specifically cited in the Committee's reports are affected.

                  OFFICE OF THE NATIONAL SCIENCE BOARD

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................      $4,348,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................       4,470,000
Committee recommendation................................       4,470,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $4,470,000. The 
recommendation is $122,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted 
level and equal to the budget request.
    The National Science Board is the governing body of the 
National Science Foundation and is charged with serving as an 
independent adviser to the President and Congress on policy 
matters related to science and engineering research and 
education.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $13,906,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      14,320,000
Committee recommendation................................      14,320,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $14,320,000. The 
recommendation is $414,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted 
level and equal to the budget request.
    The Office of Inspector General appropriation provides 
audit and investigation functions to identify and correct 
deficiencies that could create potential instances of fraud, 
waste, or mismanagement.

                        ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISION

    The bill includes one administrative provision to allow 
limited transfers of funds among accounts.

                                TITLE IV

                            RELATED AGENCIES

                       Commission on Civil Rights

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................      $9,205,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................       9,400,000
Committee recommendation................................       9,400,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $9,400,000 for the 
salaries and expenses of the Commission on Civil Rights. The 
recommendation is $195,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted 
level and equal to the budget request.
    Improving Oversight.--The Committee supports the goals and 
mission of the Commission. However, chronic financial and 
managerial problems at the Commission have been allowed to 
continue for too long without sufficient attention. Because the 
Commission has no enforcement power, the key means for 
achieving its mission lies in its credibility as an 
independent, impartial fact-finding and reporting organization. 
In recent years, however, many key staff positions at the 
Commission have remained vacant, making it difficult for the 
agency to conduct normal business operations. In addition, many 
questions have been raised about the quality of the 
Commission's reports, which are researched and written by 
Commission staff and approved by the Commissioners, and the 
quality of the State advisory committee reports, which are 
researched and drafted by the Commission's regional staff under 
the direction of the State advisory committees.
    To rectify this situation, the Congress established an 
inspector general [IG] for the Commission in fiscal year 2012 
and directed that the post be filled by the individual holding 
the position of IG at the Government Accountability Office 
[GAO]. However, despite an increase in resources and bill 
language providing the IG flexibility in submitting statutorily 
required reports in order to focus on more substantive 
oversight issues, the GAO IG was unable to fulfill the 
statutory requirements as IG for the Commission. In fiscal year 
2014, the Committee no longer wishes to pursue a course that 
has failed to result in reform at the Commission, and turns 
from the GAO IG to GAO itself for assistance. GAO's previous 
reviews of the Commission led to several recommendations for 
improvement in the agency's management and financial operations 
and its internal controls, and called for additional 
independent oversight of the agency. The Committee requests 
that GAO update its prior work by conducting a new management 
review of the Commission, including assessing the role of the 
State advisory committees in accomplishing the mission of the 
agency and identifying the Commission's progress in 
implementing GAO's prior recommendations.
    Vacancies.--The Committee is troubled by the Commission's 
lack of action with respect to direction provided in the fiscal 
year 2013 explanatory statement, which called for an 
examination of the number of longstanding vacancies highlighted 
by the inspector general, and, if necessary, a realignment of 
positions according to staffing needs and funding resources. 
Such an examination should have been undertaken immediately 
upon passage of the act, given the directive for the Commission 
to submit the report to Congress within 90 days of enactment of 
that act. The Commission, however, ignored the direction and 
took no meaningful action, choosing instead to wait for the 
installation of a staff director. Given that the Commission has 
operated without a staff director for more than 2 years, the 
Committee is left to question the intent of the Commissioners 
to comply with the law.
    Upon further examination, it has come to light that the 
Commission chose to wait until a staff director was in place 
because leadership lacked familiarity with the roles and 
responsibilities of their own staff. The Committee directs the 
GAO, as part of conducting the new management review, to study 
the organizational structure of the Commission, the roles and 
responsibilities of the Commissioners within that structure, 
and what measurable effect the Commission has had over the past 
5 years and how that is materially different from the work that 
is done by other, similarly tasked agencies within the Federal 
Government.

                Equal Employment Opportunity Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $362,329,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     372,923,000
Committee recommendation................................     372,923,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission [EEOC] is the 
leading Federal agency dedicated to eradicating employment 
discrimination in both the public and private sectors on the 
basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, 
pregnancy, age, disability and family medical history or 
genetic information. The EEOC serves both U.S. public and 
private workplaces by helping provide a fair and inclusive 
workplace, which engenders employee satisfaction and 
commitment, and enhances employee retention, productivity, and 
profitability.
    The Committee's recommendation provides $372,923,000 for 
EEOC salaries and expenses. This recommendation is $10,594,000 
above the fiscal year 2013 enacted level, and equal to the 
request. This funding will support the EEOC's obligations to 
investigate and prosecute charges of employment discrimination 
in the private and State and local government sectors, and to 
provide remedial relief to Federal applicants and employees who 
have experienced employment discrimination in the Federal 
sector. The Committee notes that the EEOC has recently 
undertaken fundamental reforms that should enable it to reduce 
its pending inventory of private sector charges, enhance 
efficiency in the Federal sector, and help prevent employment 
discrimination.
    Strategic Plan and Strategic Enforcement Plan.--The 
Committee expects EEOC to continue to implement the strategic 
objectives identified in its Strategic Plan for 2012-2016. The 
Committee recognizes that many of the strategies and measures 
outlined in the Strategic Plan are multi-year efforts. The 
Committee is pleased that the EEOC satisfied its first 
performance measure by developing a Strategic Enforcement Plan 
in fiscal year 2013, which establishes national enforcement 
priorities, and integrates all components of the EEOC's 
private, public, and Federal sector work. The Committee expects 
that implementation of the Strategic Enforcement Plan will 
result in the EEOC being able to use its limited resources to 
have a broader and more lasting impact.
    Inventory Management.--The Committee commends the EEOC for 
its renewed focus on its Priority Charge Handling Procedures 
[PCHP]. The Committee applauds the EEOC's goal of reducing its 
inventory of pending charges through a combination of rigorous 
implementation of its PCHP, as well as the additional resources 
provided in this recommendation. In addition, the Committee 
anticipates that a combination of additional resources and 
implementation of the EEOC's new case management system and a 
review of the organizational structure of its Federal sector 
work will ultimately help the EEOC reduce its pending inventory 
of Federal sector hearings and appeals. Finally, the Committee 
encourages the EEOC to use the additional resources provided in 
this recommendation to hire the investigators, attorneys, and 
other frontline staff needed to meet its obligations.
    Implementing Efficiencies and Cost Savings.--The EEOC 
should continue its efforts to leverage technology to increase 
productivity and streamline customer service. These efforts 
include the establishment of an electronic portal for private 
sector charges for intake inquiries, scheduling, uploading 
charge documents, and checking the status of a charge online, 
as well as an electronic portal for Federal sector cases. The 
Committee encourages the EEOC, during implementation of its 
Strategic Plan and Strategic Enforcement Plan, to seriously 
review other proposals that also may increase efficiencies and 
generate cost savings, which in turn may improve services 
provided to the public.
    Transparency of EEOC Processes and Commitment to Bipartisan 
Efforts.--The Committee commends the EEOC for its transparency 
during the development of its Strategic Plan, Strategic 
Enforcement Plan, and Quality Control Plan, as well as for the 
bipartisan manner in which the Commission operates. The 
Committee expects the Commission will continue its efforts at 
transparency and bipartisanship.
    State and Local Enforcement Assistance.--The Committee 
recommends up to $30,000,000 to assist State and local 
enforcement agencies. This will ensure that EEOC provides 
adequate resources to its State partners.

                     International Trade Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $82,847,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      85,102,000
Committee recommendation................................      85,102,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $85,102,000. The 
recommendation is $2,255,000 above the fiscal year 2013 level 
and is the same as the budget request.
    The International Trade Commission is an independent, 
quasi-judicial agency responsible for conducting trade-related 
investigations and providing Congress and the President with 
independent technical advice related to United States 
international trade policy.

                       Legal Services Corporation


               PAYMENT TO THE LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION

Appropriations, 2013\1\\2\..............................    $358,433,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     430,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     430,000,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.
\2\Includes emergency funding of $1,000,000 in the Disaster Relief 
Appropriations Act, 2013 (division A of Public Law 113-2).

    The Committee's recommendation provides $430,000,000 for 
payment to the Legal Services Corporation [LSC]. The 
recommendation is $71,567,000 above the fiscal year 2013 
enacted level, and equal to the budget request.
    The Committee's recommendation provides $400,000,000 for 
basic field programs, to be used for competitively awarded 
grants and contracts; $19,500,000 for management and 
administration; $3,500,000 for client self-help and information 
technology; $4,500,000 for the Office of the Inspector General 
[OIG]; $1,000,000 for loan repayment assistance, and $1,500,000 
for LSC's new Pro Bono Innovation Fund.
    Governance and Management.--The LSC must continue its 
governance and management improvement efforts in order to 
further restore the credibility of the organization and direct 
additional funds into legal aid, where they are desperately 
needed. The Committee expects the Inspector General of the LSC 
to continue conducting annual audits of LSC grantees to ensure 
that funds are not being used in contravention of the 
restrictions by which LSC grantees are required to abide.
    Pro Bono Task Force.--The Committee applauds the LSC for 
launching a pro bono task force, which released its report in 
the fall of 2012. The Committee urges LSC to implement the 
recommendations as it continues to work with grantees to adopt 
measures aimed at increasing the involvement of private 
attorneys in the delivery of legal services to their clients.
    Pro Bono Innovation Fund.--The Committee's recommendation 
provides full funding of $1,500,000 to establish a new Pro Bono 
Innovation Fund. This fund will support innovative projects 
that promote and enhance pro bono initiatives throughout the 
Nation, as well as leverage Federal dollars to increase free 
legal aid for low-income Americans by engaging private 
attorneys.

          ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISION--LEGAL SERVICE CORPORATION

    The Committee's recommendation continues the administrative 
provisions contained in the fiscal year 1998 appropriations act 
(Public Law 105-119) regarding operation of this program to 
provide basic legal services to disadvantaged individuals and 
the restrictions on the use of LSC funds.
    LSC funds cannot be used to engage in litigation and 
related activities with respect to a variety of matters 
including: (1) redistricting; (2) class action suits; (3) 
representation of illegal aliens; (4) political activities; (5) 
abortion; (6) prisoner litigation; (7) welfare reform; (8) 
representation of charged drug dealers during eviction 
proceedings; and (9) solicitation of clients. The exception to 
the restrictions occurs in a case where there is imminent 
threat of physical harm to the client or prospective client.
    The bill makes no changes to the permanent restrictions 
established under the Legal Services Corporation Act (42 U.S.C. 
Sec. 2996 et seq.). The Committee provides language that 
affects only the 1996 appropriations rider in the following 
manner: (1) keeps the restriction on use of funds from all 
private and public sources for abortion-related litigation, 
representation of prisoners, and class action suits; and (2) 
lifts the restriction on use of funds from all private 
sources--but keeps the restriction on use of all public 
sources--for all other activities currently restricted by the 
rider. This provision was included to level the playing field 
between legal aid attorneys and their counterparts in the 
private sector and open potentially crucial sources of 
additional revenue to legal aid providers given that State and 
private funding sources have declined in recent years.

                        Marine Mammal Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013....................................      $3,017,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................       3,431,000
Committee recommendation................................       3,431,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $3,431,000. The 
recommendation is $414,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted 
level and is the same as the budget request.
    The Marine Mammal Commission and its Committee of 
Scientific Advisors on Marine Mammals provide oversight and 
recommend actions on domestic and international topics to 
advance policies and provisions of the Marine Mammal Protection 
Act. The Commission provides precise, up-to-date scientific 
information to Congress on issues related to the safety of 
marine mammals.

            Office of the United States Trade Representative


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $50,188,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      56,170,000
Committee recommendation................................      56,170,000

\1\Does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds under Public 
Law 112-25.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $56,170,000 for the 
Office of the United States Trade Representative [USTR]. The 
recommendation is $5,982,000 above the fiscal year 2013 level 
and is the same as the budget request.
    USTR is responsible for developing and leading 
international negotiations for the United States on policies 
regarding international trade, direct investment, and 
commodities. Its areas of responsibility include all matters 
relating to the World Trade Organization; trade, commodity, and 
direct investment matters dealt with by certain international 
institutions; industrial, agricultural and services trade 
policy; and trade-related protection of intellectual property 
and the environment. The Committee's recommendation supports 
the Interagency Trade Enforcement Center.
    The Committee supports the President's request for USTR to 
ensure that the United States maintains the strongest position 
in all trade negotiations. Additionally, the Committee urges 
USTR to leverage the resources and expertise of other Federal 
agencies to strengthen its negotiating position.

                        State Justice Institute


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013....................................      $5,015,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................       5,121,000
Committee recommendation................................       5,121,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $5,121,000 for the 
State Justice Institute. The recommendation is $106,000 above 
the fiscal year 2013 enacted level and equal to the budget 
request.
    The Institute was created in 1984 to further the 
development and adoption of improved judicial administration in 
State courts.

                                TITLE V

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

                        (INCLUDING RESCISSIONS)

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions 
for the departments, agencies and commissions funded in the 
accompanying bill. Similar provisions were included in the 
fiscal year 2013 act.
    Section 501 prohibits the use of appropriations for certain 
publicity and propaganda purposes.
    Section 502 prohibits any appropriations contained in this 
act from remaining available for obligation beyond the current 
fiscal year unless expressly provided.
    Section 503 limits funds for certain consulting purposes.
    Section 504 provides that should any provision of the act 
be held to be invalid, the remainder of the act would not be 
affected.
    Section 505 stipulates the policy and procedures by which 
funding available to the agencies funded under this act may be 
reprogrammed for other purposes.
    Section 506 provides for a penalty for persons found to 
have falsely mislabeled products.
    Section 507 requires agencies to provide quarterly reports 
to the Appropriations Committees regarding unobligated 
balances.
    Section 508 requires agencies and departments funded in 
this act to absorb any necessary costs related to downsizing or 
consolidation within the amounts provided to the agency or 
department.
    Section 509 limits funds for the sale or export of tobacco 
or tobacco products.
    Section 510 stipulates obligation of receipts available 
under the Crime Victims Fund.
    Section 511 prohibits the use of Department of Justice 
funds for programs that discriminate against, denigrate, or 
otherwise undermine the religious beliefs of students 
participating in such programs.
    Section 512 limits transfers of funds between agencies.
    Section 513 provides that funding for E-government 
initiatives are subject to reprogramming guidelines established 
by this act.
    Section 514 requires the Inspectors General of the 
Departments of Commerce and Justice, the National Aeronautics 
and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, and 
the Legal Services Corporation to conduct reviews of activities 
funded in this act; prohibits the use of funds for certain 
banquets and conferences; and requires certifications regarding 
conflicts of interest.
    Section 515 prohibits funds for information technology 
acquisitions unless the acquiring department or agency has 
assessed the supply chain risk of the technology.
    Section 516 prohibits the use of funds to support or 
justify the use of torture.
    Section 517 limits funds pertaining to certain activities 
related to the export of firearms.
    Section 518 limits funds to process permits to import 
certain products.
    Section 519 prohibits funds for activities that seek to 
include certain language in new trade agreements.
    Section 520 prohibits funds to authorize a national 
security letter in contravention of the statutes authorizing 
the FBI to issue national security letters.
    Section 521 requires notification to the Committees in the 
event of cost overruns.
    Section 522 authorizes funds appropriated for intelligence 
activities for the Department of Justice during fiscal year 
2014 until the enactment of the Intelligence Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2014.
    Section 523 directs the departments, agencies, and 
commissions funded under this act to establish and maintain on 
the homepages of their Internet Web sites a link to their 
Offices of Inspectors General and a method by which individuals 
may anonymously report cases of waste, fraud, or abuse.
    Section 524 prohibits contracts or grant awards in excess 
of $5,000,000 unless the prospective contractor or grantee has 
certified in writing that he or she has filed all Federal tax 
returns, has not been convicted of a criminal offense under the 
IRS Code of 1986, and has no unpaid Federal tax assessment.
    Section 525 specifies rescissions of prior appropriations.
    Section 526 prohibits the use of funds in a manner that is 
inconsistent with the principal negotiating objective of the 
United States with respect to trade remedy laws.
    Section 527 prohibits the use of funds to purchase first 
class or premium airline travel in contravention of current 
regulations.
    Section 528 prohibits the use of funds to pay for the 
attendance of more than 50 employees at any single conference 
outside the United States.
    Section 529 prohibits the use of funds in this act for the 
transfer or release of certain individuals detained at Naval 
Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to or within the United States, 
its territories or possessions.
    Section 530 prohibits the use of funds in this act to 
construct, acquire, or modify any facility in the United 
States, its territories, or possessions to house certain 
individuals who, as of June 24, 2009, were located at Naval 
Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba for the purposes of detention or 
imprisonment in the custody or control of the Department of 
Defense.
    Section 531 prohibits funds to the Association of Community 
Organizations for Reform Now [ACORN] and its subsidiaries.
    Section 532 requires, when practicable, the use of ``Energy 
Star'' or ``Federal Energy Management Program'' designated 
light bulbs.
    Section 533 requires agencies funded in this act to report 
on undisbursed balances.
    Section 534 requires the Department of Commerce, the 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National 
Science Foundation to submit spending plans to the House and 
Senate Appropriations Committees within 30 days of enactment of 
this act and the Department of Justice to submit its spending 
plan within 45 days of enactment of this act.
    Section 535 prohibits funds made available by this act from 
being used to deny the importation of certain shotgun models.
    Section 536 prohibits the use of funds to establish or 
maintain a computer network that does not block pornography, 
except for law enforcement purposes.
    Section 537 prohibits funds made available by this act from 
being used for contract, memorandum of understanding, 
cooperative agreement, grant, or loan activities if the 
proposed recipient has been convicted of a felony criminal 
violation.
    Section 538 prohibits funds made available by this act from 
being used for contract, memorandum of understanding, 
cooperative agreement, grant, or loan activities if the 
proposed recipient has unpaid Federal tax liabilities.
    Section 539 specifies reporting requirements regarding 
vehicle fleets for all agencies and departments funded by this 
act.
    Section 540 requires agencies to report conference spending 
to the Inspectors General.

  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Rule XVI, paragraph 7 requires that every report on a 
general appropriation bill filed by the Committee must identify 
items of appropriation not made to carry out the provisions of 
an existing law, a treaty stipulation, or an act or resolution 
previously passed by the Senate during that session.
    The Committee is filing an original bill, which is not 
covered under this rule, but reports this information in the 
spirit of full disclosure. 
    The Committee recommends funding for the following programs 
or activities that currently lack an authorization for fiscal 
year 2014, either in whole or in part, and therefore fall under 
this rule:

         APPROPRIATIONS NOT AUTHORIZED BY LAW--FISCAL YEAR 2014
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Last year of
                     Agency/program                        authorization
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Commerce:
    International Trade Administration:
        Export Promotion................................            1996
    Bureau of Industry and Security:
        Export Administration...........................            2001
    Economic Development Administration:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2008
        Economic Development Assistance Programs:
            Public Works and Economic Development.......            2008
            Trade Adjustment Assistance.................            2013
            Investing in Manufacturing Communities Fund.            2013
            Regional Export Challenge Programs..........            2013
            Regional Innovation Research and Information            2013
    Bureau of the Census:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2013
    National Telecommunications and Information
     Administration:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            1993
    National Institute of Standards and Technology:
        Scientific and Technical Research and Services..            2013
        Industrial Technology Services..................            2013
        Construction of Research Facilities.............            2013
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration:
        Operations, Research, and Facilities:
            National Ocean Service:
                Coral Reef Conservation.................            2004
                Hydrographic Services...................            2012
                Coastal Zone Management.................            1999
                Marine Protection, Research,                        2005
                 Preservation & Sanctuaries.............
                Estuary Restoration.....................            2012
            National Marine Fisheries Service:
                Endangered Species Act Amendment........            1992
                Marine Mammal Protection................            1999
                NOAA Marine Fisheries Program...........            2000
                Interjurisdictional Fisheries...........            2000
                Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation               2013
                 and Management.........................
            Oceanic and Atmospheric Research:
                National Sea College Program............            2008
        Procurement, Acquisition and Construction:
            National Ocean Service:
                Marine Protection, Research,                        2005
                 Preservation & Sanctuaries.............
Department of Justice:
    General Administration:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2009
        Justice Information Sharing Technology..........            2009
    Administrative Review & Appeals:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2009
    Office of Inspector General:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2009
    U.S. Parole Commission:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2009
    Legal Activities:
        General Legal Activities:
            Salaries and Expenses.......................            2009
        Antitrust Division:
            Salaries and Expenses.......................            2009
        U.S. Attorneys:
            Salaries and Expenses.......................            2009
        Foreign Claims Settlement Commission:
            Salaries and Expenses.......................            2009
        Fees and Expenses of Witnesses..................            2009
        Community Relations Service:
            Salaries and Expenses.......................            2009
        Assets Forfeiture Fund Current Budget Authority.            2009
    U.S. Marshals Service...............................            2009
        Salaries and Expenses...........................             N/A
        Federal Prison Detention........................             N/A
        Construction....................................             N/A
    National Security Division:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................             N/A
    Interagency Law Enforcement:
        Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement..........            2009
    Federal Bureau of Investigation.....................            2009
        Salaries and Expenses...........................             N/A
        Construction....................................             N/A
    Drug Enforcement Administration:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2009
    Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2009
    Federal Prison System...............................            2009
        Salaries and Expenses...........................             N/A
        Buildings and Facilities........................             N/A
Office of Justice Programs:
    Research, Evaluation, and Statistics:
        National Institute of Justice...................            1995
        Bureau of Justice Statistics....................            1995
        Regional Information Sharing Activities.........            2003
        Evaluation Clearinghouse........................            2013
        Forensic Sciences...............................             N/A
            Forensic Science Advisory Committee.........             N/A
            Transfer--NSF...............................             N/A
State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance:
    Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grants............            2012
        SLATT Intelligence State and Local Training.....            2013
        State and Local Help-Desk & Diagnostic Center...            2013
        VALOR Initiative................................            2013
        Smart Policing..................................             N/A
        Smart Prosecution...............................             N/A
    John R. Justice Grant Program.......................            2014
    Byrne Competitive Grants............................            2013
    Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation Program...........            2013
    Adam Walsh Act......................................            2009
    Children Exposed to Violence Initiative.............            2013
    State Criminal Alien Assistance Program.............            2011
    Border Prosecutor Initiative........................            2013
    Victims of Trafficking Grants.......................            2011
    Residential Substance Abuse Treatment...............            2000
    Mentally Ill Offender Act...........................            2014
    Drug Courts.........................................            2008
    Capital Litigation (and Wrongful Prosecution review)            2009
    Economic, High Tech and Cybercrime Prevention.......            2013
    Second Chance Act/Offender Reentry..................            2010
        Smart Probation.................................            2013
        Children of Incarcerated Parents Demo Grants....             N/A
        Pay for Success (Discretionary).................             N/A
        Pay for Success (Permanent Supportive Housing                N/A
         Model).........................................
    Coverdell Forensic Science Grants...................            2009
    Violent Gang and Gun Crime Reduction................            2013
    Bulletproof Vests...................................            2012
        NIST/OLES Transfer..............................             N/A
    National Sex Offender Website.......................            2013
    Court-Appointed Special Advocates...................            2013
    National Instant Criminal Background Check System               2013
     (NICS).............................................
    Criminal Records Upgrade (NCHIP)....................            2007
    DNA Initiative:
        Debbie Smith DNA Backlog........................       N/A; 2014
        Post-Conviction DNA Testing.....................            2009
        Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners..................       N/A; 2009
    Veterans Treatment Courts Program...................            2013
    National Center for Campus Public Safety............            2013
    Justice Reinvestment Initiative.....................             N/A
    Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with Enforcement.             N/A
    Vision 21...........................................             N/A
Juvenile Justice Programs:
    Part B--State Formula...............................            2007
        Emergency Planning in Juvenile Justice Research             2013
         Facilities.....................................
    Part G--Youth Mentoring.............................       N/A; 2007
    Title V--Local Delinquency Prevention Incentive                 2008
     Grants.............................................
        Tribal Youth....................................             N/A
        Gang/Youth Violence Education and Prevention....             N/A
        Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws................       N/A; 2007
        Juvenile Justice & Education Collaboration                   N/A
         Assistance (JJECA).............................
        Juvenile Justice Realignment Incentive Grants...             N/A
    Victims of Child Abuse Act..........................            2005
    Juvenile Accountability Block Grant.................            2009
    Community-Based Violence Prevention Initiatives.....            2013
    Training for Judicial Personnel.....................            2005
    Missing and Exploited Children Programs.............      2004; 2013
    National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention.........            2013
    Competitive Grants for Girls in the Justice System..             N/A
    Children of Incarcerated Parents Web Portal.........             N/A
COPS Programs:
    COPS Hiring Program.................................            2009
        Tribal Resources Grant Program..................            2013
        Community Policing Development..................            2009
        Collaborative Reform Model......................             N/A
    Transfer to DEA for Methamphetamine Clean-Up........            2013
    Comprehensive School Safety Program.................             N/A
    Anti-Methamphetamine Task Forces....................             N/A
National Aeronautics and Space Administration:
    Science.............................................            2013
    Aeronautics.........................................            2013
    Exploration.........................................            2013
    Space Operations....................................            2013
    Education...........................................            2013
    Cross-Agency Support Programs.......................            2013
    Construction and Environmental Compliance and                   2013
     Restoration........................................
    Office of the Inspector General.....................            2013
National Science Foundation.............................            2013
Related Agencies:
    Commission on Civil Rights:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            1995
    International Trade Commission:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2004
    Payment to the Legal Services Corporation:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            1980
    Marine Mammal Commission:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            1999
    Office of the U.S. Trade Representative:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2004
    State Justice Institute:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2008
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\NOAA authorizations are spread across over 60 separate statutory
  authorities. In many cases, the authorizations do not match exactly to
  specific programs.


COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(c), RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, on July 18, 2013, 
the Committee ordered favorably reported, en bloc, an original 
bill (S. 1329) making appropriations for the Departments of 
Commerce and Justice, and Science, and Related Agencies for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 2014, and for other purposes, 
and a bill (H.R. 2217) making appropriations for the Department 
of Homeland Security for the year ending September 30, 2014, 
and for other purposes, with an amendment in the nature of a 
substitute, provided, that each bill be subject to amendment, 
or further amendment, and that each bill be consistent with the 
subcommittee funding guidance, by a recorded vote of 21-9, a 
quorum being present. The vote was as follows:
        Yeas                          Nays
Chairwoman Mikulski                 Mr. Shelby
Mr. Leahy                           Mr. McConnell
Mr. Harkin                          Mr. Alexander
Mrs. Murray                         Mr. Graham
Mrs. Feinstein                      Mr. Coats
Mr. Durbin                          Mr. Blunt
Mr. Johnson                         Mr. Hoeven
Ms. Landrieu                        Mr. Johanns
Mr. Reed                            Mr. Boozman
Mr. Pryor
Mr. Tester
Mr. Udall
Mrs. Shaheen
Mr. Merkley
Mr. Begich
Mr. Coons
Mr. Cochran
Ms. Collins
Ms. Murkowski
Mr. Kirk
Mr. Moran

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of the rule XXVI requires that Committee 
reports on a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any 
statute or part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the 
statute or part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and 
(b) a comparative print of that part of the bill or joint 
resolution making the amendment and of the statute or part 
thereof proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through 
type and italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate 
typographical devices the omissions and insertions which would 
be made by the bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form 
recommended by the Committee.''
    In compliance with this rule, the following changes in 
existing law proposed to be made by this bill are shown as 
follows: existing law to be omitted is enclosed in black 
brackets; new matter is printed in italic; and existing law in 
which no change is proposed is shown in roman.

OMNIBUS CONSOLIDATED RESCISSIONS AND APPROPRIATIONS ACT OF 1996, PUBLIC 
                              LAW 104-134


DEPARTMENTS OF COMMERCE, JUSTICE, AND STATE, THE JUDICIARY, AND RELATED 
                       AGENCIES APPROPRIATION ACT


                       TITLE V--RELATED AGENCIES


                       Legal Services Corporation


         ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION

    Sec. 504. (a) None of the funds appropriated in this Act to 
the Legal Services Corporation may be used to provide financial 
assistance to any person or entity (which may be referred to in 
this section as a ``recipient'') that uses Federal funds (or 
funds from any source with regard to paragraphs (7), (14) and 
(15)) in a manner--
            (1) that makes available any funds, personnel, or 
        equipment for use in advocating or opposing any plan or 
        proposal, or represents any party or participates in 
        any other way in litigation, that is intended to or has 
        the effect of altering, revising, or reapportioning a 
        legislative, judicial, or elective district at any 
        level of government, including influencing the timing 
        or manner of the taking of a census;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    [(d)(1) The Legal Services Corporation shall not accept any 
non-Federal funds, and no recipient shall accept funds from any 
source other than the Corporation, unless the Corporation or 
the recipient, as the case may be, notifies in writing the 
source of the funds that the funds may not be expended for any 
purpose prohibited by the Legal Services Corporation Act or 
this title.
    [(2) Paragraph (1) shall not prevent a recipient from--
            [(A) receiving Indian tribal funds (including funds 
        from private nonprofit organizations for the benefit of 
        Indians or Indian tribes) and expending the tribal 
        funds in accordance with the specific purposes for 
        which the tribal funds are provided; or
            [(B) using funds received from a source other than 
        the Legal Services Corporation to provide legal 
        assistance to a covered individual if such funds are 
        used for the specific purposes for which such funds 
        were received, except that such funds may not be 
        expended by recipients for any purpose prohibited by 
        this Act or by the Legal Services Corporation Act.]

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    [(e)] (d) Nothing in this section shall be construed to 
prohibit a recipient from using funds derived from a source 
other than the Legal Services Corporation to comment on public 
rulemaking or to respond to a written request for information 
or testimony from a Federal, State or local agency, legislative 
body or committee, or a member of such an agency, body, or 
committee, so long as the response is made only to the parties 
that make the request and the recipient does not arrange for 
the request to be made.
    [(f)] (e) As used in this section:
            (1) The term ``controlled substance'' has the 
        meaning given the term in section 102 of the Controlled 
        Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 802).
            (2) The term ``covered individual'' means any 
        person who--
                    (A) except as provided in subparagraph (B), 
                meets the requirements of this Act and the 
                Legal Services Corporation Act relating to 
                eligibility for legal assistance; and
                    (B) may or may not be financially unable to 
                afford legal assistance.
            (3) The term ``public housing project'' has the 
        meaning as used within, and the term ``public housing 
        agency'' has the meaning given the term, in section 3 
        of the United States Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 
        1437a).
                        BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL


  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS
                                                     AMENDED
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  Budget authority               Outlays
                                                            ----------------------------------------------------
                                                               Committee    Amount  in   Committee    Amount  in
                                                              guidance\1\      bill       guidance       bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with Committee guidance
 to its subcommittees of amounts in the Budget Resolution
 for 2014: Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science, and
 Related Agencies:
    Mandatory..............................................            NA          347           NA       \2\337
    Discretionary..........................................        52,272       52,272           NA    \2\61,680
        Security...........................................         5,045        5,045           NA           NA
        Nonsecurity........................................        47,227       47,227           NA           NA
Projections of outlays associated with the recommendation:
    2014...................................................  ............  ...........  ...........    \3\39,675
    2015...................................................  ............  ...........  ...........       14,554
    2016...................................................  ............  ...........  ...........        3,885
    2017...................................................  ............  ...........  ...........       -1,005
    2018 and future years..................................  ............  ...........  ...........        5,809
Financial assistance to State and local governments for                NA       -7,001           NA       \3\160
 2014......................................................

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\There is no section 302(a) allocation to the Committee on Appropriations for fiscal year 2014.
\2\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\3\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

NA: Not applicable.


  COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2013 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL
                                                                        YEAR 2014
                                                                [In thousands of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                         Senate Committee recommendation
                                                                                                                             compared with (+ or -)
                                Item                                       2013       Budget estimate     Committee    ---------------------------------
                                                                      appropriation                     recommendation        2013
                                                                                                                         appropriation   Budget estimate
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

                 International Trade Administration

Operations and administration......................................         472,769          529,196          500,000          +27,231          -29,196
Offsetting fee collections.........................................         -11,360           -9,439           -9,439           +1,921   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Direct appropriation...........................................         461,409          519,757          490,561          +29,152          -29,196
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                  Bureau of Industry and Security

Operations and administration......................................          66,717           80,095           80,095          +13,378   ...............
    Defense function...............................................          32,969           32,000           32,000             -969   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Bureau of Industry and Security.......................          99,686          112,095          112,095          +12,409   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                Economic Development Administration

Economic development assistance programs...........................         183,417          282,000          237,332          +53,915          -44,668
Salaries and expenses..............................................          36,723           38,913           38,913           +2,190   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Economic Development Administration...................         220,140          320,913          276,245          +56,105          -44,668
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                Minority Business Development Agency

Minority business development......................................          28,094           29,286           29,286           +1,192   ...............

                 Economic and Statistical Analysis

Salaries and expenses..............................................          98,150          104,048          104,048           +5,898   ...............

                        Bureau of the Census

Salaries and expenses..............................................         250,942          256,048          256,048           +5,106   ...............
Periodic censuses and programs.....................................         654,105          726,436          716,436          +62,331          -10,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Bureau of the Census..................................         905,047          982,484          972,484          +67,437          -10,000
                                                                    ====================================================================================
     National Telecommunications and Information Administration

Salaries and expenses..............................................          45,040           52,122           52,122           +7,082   ...............

             United States Patent and Trademark Office

Salaries and expenses, current year fee funding....................       2,933,241        3,024,000        3,024,000          +90,759   ...............
Offsetting fee collections.........................................      -2,933,241       -3,024,000       -3,024,000          -90,759   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, United States Patent and Trademark Office.............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
           National Institute of Standards and Technology

Scientific and technical research and services.....................         608,295          693,745          703,000          +94,705           +9,255

Industrial technology services.....................................         140,035          174,507          184,507          +44,472          +10,000
    Manufacturing extension partnerships...........................        (125,836)        (153,078)        (153,078)        (+27,242)  ...............
    Advanced manufacturing technology consortia....................         (14,199)         (21,429)         (31,429)        (+17,230)        (+10,000)

Construction of research facilities................................          58,756           60,040           60,040           +1,284   ...............
Working capital fund (by transfer).................................          (9,000)          (9,000)          (9,000)  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Institute of Standards and Technology........         807,086          928,292          947,547         +140,461          +19,255
                                                                    ====================================================================================
          National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Operations, research, and facilities...............................       3,048,082        3,277,833        3,296,254         +248,172          +18,421
    Supplemental appropriations (Public Law 113-2) (emergency).....         140,000   ...............  ...............        -140,000   ...............
        (By transfer)..............................................        (119,064)        (115,000)        (115,000)         (-4,064)  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................       3,188,082        3,277,833        3,296,254         +108,172          +18,421

Procurement, Acquisition and Construction..........................       1,886,105        2,117,555        2,084,134         +198,029          -33,421
    Supplemental appropriations (Public Law 113-2) (emergency).....         186,000   ...............  ...............        -186,000   ...............

Pacific coastal salmon recovery....................................          63,652           50,000           65,000           +1,348          +15,000
Fisheries disaster mitigation fund.................................  ...............  ...............         150,000         +150,000         +150,000
Fishermen's contingency fund.......................................             342              350              350               +8   ...............
Fisheries finance program account..................................          -4,000           -6,000           -6,000           -2,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.......       5,320,181        5,439,738        5,589,738         +269,557         +150,000
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                      Departmental Management

Salaries and expenses..............................................          54,839           59,595           59,595           +4,756   ...............
Renovation and modernization.......................................           1,998           14,803           14,803          +12,805   ...............
Office of Inspector General........................................          28,157           30,490           30,490           +2,333   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Departmental Management...............................          84,994          104,888          104,888          +19,894   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title I, Department of Commerce.......................       8,069,827        8,593,623        8,679,014         +609,187          +85,391
          Appropriations...........................................      (7,743,827)      (8,593,623)      (8,679,014)       (+935,187)        (+85,391)
          Emergency appropriations.................................        (326,000)  ...............  ...............       (-326,000)  ...............
      (By transfer)................................................         128,064          124,000          124,000           -4,064   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                  TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

                       General Administration

Salaries and expenses..............................................         108,525          126,208          126,208          +17,683   ...............
Justice Information Sharing Technology.............................          32,733           25,842           25,842           -6,891   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, General Administration................................         141,258          152,050          152,050          +10,792   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Administrative review and appeals..................................         307,023          333,147          333,147          +26,124   ...............
    Transfer from immigration examinations fee account.............          -4,000           -4,000           -4,000   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Direct appropriation.......................................         303,023          329,147          329,147          +26,124   ...............

Office of Inspector General........................................          84,202           85,845           85,845           +1,643   ...............

                  United States Parole Commission

Salaries and expenses..............................................          12,507           13,021           13,021             +514   ...............

                          Legal Activities

Salaries and expenses, general legal activities....................         862,735          902,605          905,605          +42,870           +3,000
Vaccine injury compensation trust fund.............................           7,833            7,833            7,833   ...............  ...............

Salaries and expenses, Antitrust Division..........................         161,192          160,410          160,410             -782   ...............
    Offsetting fee collections--current year.......................        -115,000         -103,000         -103,000          +12,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Direct appropriation.......................................          46,192           57,410           57,410          +11,218   ...............

Salaries and expenses, United States Attorneys.....................       1,928,851        2,007,717        2,007,717          +78,866   ...............

United States Trustee System Fund..................................         223,258          225,728          225,728           +2,470   ...............
    Offsetting fee collections.....................................        -223,258         -225,728         -225,728           -2,470   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Direct appropriation.......................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............

Salaries and expenses, Foreign Claims Settlement Commission........           1,997            2,218            2,218             +221   ...............
Fees and expenses of witnesses.....................................         270,000          270,000          270,000   ...............  ...............
Salaries and expenses, Community Relations Service.................          11,786           12,464           12,464             +678   ...............
Assets forfeiture fund.............................................          20,514           20,948           20,948             +434   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Legal Activities......................................       3,149,908        3,281,195        3,284,195         +134,287           +3,000
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                   United States Marshals Service

Salaries and expenses..............................................       1,171,204        1,204,033        1,211,553          +40,349           +7,520
Construction.......................................................           9,793           10,000           10,000             +207   ...............
Federal prisoner detention.........................................       1,613,229        1,635,538        1,635,538          +22,309   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, United States Marshals Service........................       2,794,226        2,849,571        2,857,091          +62,865           +7,520
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                     National Security Division

Salaries and expenses..............................................          88,172           96,240           96,240           +8,068   ...............

                    Interagency Law Enforcement

Interagency crime and drug enforcement.............................         510,975          523,037          523,037          +12,062   ...............

                  Federal Bureau of Investigation

Salaries and expenses..............................................       3,251,812        3,392,336        3,392,336         +140,524   ...............
    (By transfer)..................................................  ...............  ...............         (12,171)        (+12,171)        (+12,171)
    Counterintelligence and national security......................       4,763,500        4,969,351        4,969,351         +205,851   ...............
        (By transfer)..............................................  ...............  ...............         (17,829)        (+17,829)        (+17,829)
    Supplemental appropriations (Public Law 113-2) (emergency).....          10,020   ...............  ...............         -10,020   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................       8,025,332        8,361,687        8,361,687         +336,355   ...............

Construction.......................................................          79,303           80,982          110,982          +31,679          +30,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Bureau of Investigation.......................       8,104,635        8,442,669        8,472,669         +368,034          +30,000
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                  Drug Enforcement Administration

Salaries and expenses..............................................       2,360,321        2,428,869        2,428,869          +68,548   ...............
    Diversion control fund.........................................        -351,937         -360,917         -360,917           -8,980   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................       2,008,384        2,067,952        2,067,952          +59,568   ...............

    Supplemental appropriations (Public Law 113-2) (emergency).....           1,000   ...............  ...............          -1,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Drug Enforcement Administration.......................       2,009,384        2,067,952        2,067,952          +58,568   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
        Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives

Salaries and expenses..............................................       1,129,433        1,229,518        1,229,518         +100,085   ...............
    Supplemental appropriations (Public Law 113-2) (emergency).....             230   ...............  ...............            -230   ...............

                       Federal Prison System

Salaries and expenses..............................................       6,678,817        6,831,150        6,831,150         +152,333   ...............

Buildings and facilities...........................................          88,134          105,244          105,244          +17,110   ...............
    Supplemental appropriations (Public Law 113-2) (emergency).....          10,000   ...............  ...............         -10,000   ...............

Limitation on administrative expenses, Federal Prison Industries,             2,644            2,700            2,700              +56   ...............
 Incorporated......................................................
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Prison System.................................       6,779,595        6,939,094        6,939,094         +159,499   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
             State and Local Law Enforcement Activities

Office on Violence Against Women:
    Prevention and prosecution programs............................         407,865          412,500          417,000           +9,135           +4,500

Office of Justice Programs:
    Research, evaluation and statistics............................         124,367          134,400          129,000           +4,633           -5,400

    State and local law enforcement assistance.....................       1,116,774        1,005,000        1,137,000          +20,226         +132,000
    Juvenile justice programs......................................         273,705          332,500          279,000           +5,295          -53,500

    Public safety officer benefits:
        Death benefits.............................................          62,000           81,000           81,000          +19,000   ...............
        Disability and education benefits..........................          15,962           16,300           16,300             +338   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................          77,962           97,300           97,300          +19,338   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Total, Office of Justice Programs........................       1,592,808        1,569,200        1,642,300          +49,492          +73,100
                                                                    ====================================================================================

Community Oriented Policing Services:
    COPS programs..................................................         217,887          439,500          393,500         +175,613          -46,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, State and Local Law Enforcement Activities............       2,218,560        2,421,200        2,452,800         +234,240          +31,600
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title II, Department of Justice.......................      27,326,108       28,430,539       28,502,659       +1,176,551          +72,120
          Appropriations...........................................     (27,304,858)     (28,430,539)     (28,502,659)     (+1,197,801)        (+72,120)
          Emergency appropriations.................................         (21,250)  ...............  ...............        (-21,250)  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                         TITLE III--SCIENCE

Office of Science and Technology Policy............................           5,729            5,658            5,658              -71   ...............

           National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Science............................................................       5,037,352        5,017,800        5,154,200         +116,848         +136,400
Aeronautics........................................................         558,182          565,690          558,700             +518           -6,990
Space technology...................................................         628,690          742,600          670,100          +41,410          -72,500
Exploration........................................................       3,806,413        3,915,505        4,209,300         +402,887         +293,795
Space operations...................................................       3,871,045        3,882,900        3,882,900          +11,855   ...............
Education..........................................................         122,408           94,200          116,600           -5,808          +22,400
Cross-agency support...............................................       2,764,472        2,850,300        2,793,600          +29,128          -56,700

Construction and environmental compliance and restoration..........         665,902          609,400          586,900          -79,002          -22,500
    Supplemental appropriations (Public Law 113-2) (emergency).....          15,000   ...............  ...............         -15,000   ...............

Office of Inspector General........................................          37,212           37,000           38,000             +788           +1,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.........      17,506,676       17,715,395       18,010,300         +503,624         +294,905
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                    National Science Foundation

Research and related activities....................................       5,792,642        6,144,770        5,950,770         +158,128         -194,000
    Defense function...............................................          66,590           67,520           67,520             +930   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................       5,859,232        6,212,290        6,018,290         +159,058         -194,000

Major research equipment and facilities construction...............         192,103          210,120          210,120          +18,017   ...............
Education and human resources......................................         877,042          880,290          880,290           +3,248   ...............
Agency operations and award management.............................         293,193          304,290          298,400           +5,207           -5,890
Office of the National Science Board...............................           4,348            4,470            4,470             +122   ...............
Office of Inspector General........................................          13,906           14,320           14,320             +414   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Science Foundation...........................       7,239,824        7,625,780        7,425,890         +186,066         -199,890
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title III, Science....................................      24,752,229       25,346,833       25,441,848         +689,619          +95,015
          Appropriations...........................................     (24,737,229)     (25,346,833)     (25,441,848)       (+704,619)        (+95,015)
          Emergency appropriations.................................         (15,000)  ...............  ...............        (-15,000)  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                     TITLE IV--RELATED AGENCIES

                     Commission on Civil Rights

Salaries and expenses..............................................           9,205            9,400            9,400             +195   ...............

              Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

Salaries and expenses..............................................         362,329          372,923          372,923          +10,594   ...............

                   International Trade Commission

Salaries and expenses..............................................          82,847           85,102           85,102           +2,255   ...............

                     Legal Services Corporation

Payment to the Legal Services Corporation..........................         357,433          430,000          430,000          +72,567   ...............
    Supplemental appropriations (Public Law 113-2) (emergency).....           1,000   ...............  ...............          -1,000   ...............

                      Marine Mammal Commission

Salaries and expenses..............................................           3,017            3,431            3,431             +414   ...............

              Office of the U.S. Trade Representative

Salaries and expenses..............................................          50,188           56,170           56,170           +5,982   ...............

                      State Justice Institute

Salaries and expenses..............................................           5,015            5,121            5,121             +106   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title IV, Related Agencies............................         871,034          962,147          962,147          +91,113   ...............
          Appropriations...........................................        (870,034)        (962,147)        (962,147)        (+92,113)  ...............
          Emergency appropriations.................................          (1,000)  ...............  ...............         (-1,000)  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                    TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS

Federal Prisoner Detention (rescission)............................  ...............         -80,000          -80,000          -80,000   ...............
DOJ, Working Capital Fund (rescission).............................         -26,000          -30,000          -30,000           -4,000   ...............
DOJ, Assets Forfeiture Fund (rescission)...........................        -722,697         -675,000         -692,520          +30,177          -17,520
FBI, Salaries and expenses, nondefense (rescission)................  ...............         -61,000          -29,000          -29,000          +32,000
FBI, Salaries and expenses, defense (rescission)...................  ...............         -89,000          -42,000          -42,000          +47,000
US Marshals Salaries and expenses (rescission).....................  ...............         -12,200          -12,200          -12,200   ...............
ATF (rescission)...................................................  ...............         -12,400          -12,400          -12,400   ...............
ATF Violent Crime Reduction (rescission)...........................          -1,028   ...............  ...............          +1,028   ...............
DEA, Salaries and expenses (rescission)............................  ...............         -10,000          -10,000          -10,000   ...............
FPS, Buildings and facilities (rescission).........................         -64,700          -30,000          -10,276          +54,424          +19,724
Violence against women prevention and prosecution programs                  -12,000           -6,200          -18,300           -6,300          -12,100
 (rescission)......................................................
Office of Justice programs (rescission)............................         -43,000          -47,000          -59,000          -16,000          -12,000
COPS (rescission)..................................................         -12,200          -14,000          -26,000          -13,800          -12,000
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title V, Rescissions..................................        -881,625       -1,066,800       -1,021,696         -140,071          +45,104
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Grand total..................................................      60,137,573       62,266,342       62,563,972       +2,426,399         +297,630
          Appropriations...........................................     (60,655,948)     (63,333,142)     (63,585,668)     (+2,929,720)       (+252,526)
          Rescissions..............................................       (-881,625)     (-1,066,800)     (-1,021,696)       (-140,071)        (+45,104)
          Emergency appropriations.................................        (363,250)  ...............  ...............       (-363,250)  ...............
      (By transfer)................................................         128,064          124,000          154,000          +25,936          +30,000
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