S. Rept. 113-81 - 113th Congress (2013-2014)
July 25, 2013, As Reported by the Appropriations Committee

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Senate Report 113-81 - DEPARTMENT OF STATE, FOREIGN OPERATIONS, AND RELATED PROGRAMS APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2014




[Senate Report 113-81]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]


                                                       Calendar No. 150
113th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 1st Session                                                     113-81

======================================================================



 
     DEPARTMENT OF STATE, FOREIGN OPERATIONS, AND RELATED PROGRAMS 
                       APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2014
                                _______
                                

                  July 25, 2013--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

           Mr. Leahy, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                                 REPORT

                         [To accompany S. 1372]

    The Committee on Appropriations reports the bill (S. 1372) 
making appropriations for the Department of State, foreign 
operations, and related programs for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 2014, and for other purposes, reports favorably 
thereon and recommends that the bill do pass.



Amounts in new budget authority

Total of bill as reported to the Senate................. $49,491,900,000
Amount of 2013 appropriations...........................  53,501,687,000
Amount of 2014 budget estimate..........................  53,438,697,000
Bill as recommended to Senate compared to--
    2013 appropriations.................................  -4,009,787,000
    2014 budget estimate................................  -3,946,797,000


                                CONTENTS

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Glossary of Terms................................................     5
Public Law References............................................     7
Introduction.....................................................     9
Title I:
    Department of State and Related Agency:
        Department of State:
            Administration of Foreign Affairs:
                Diplomatic and Consular Programs.................    21
                Conflict Stabilization Operations................    27
                Capital Investment Fund..........................    27
                Office of Inspector General......................    27
                Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs.......    28
                Representation Expenses..........................    30
                Protection of Foreign Missions and Officials.....    30
                Embassy Security, Construction, and Maintenance..    31
                Emergencies in the Diplomatic and Consular 
                  Service........................................    32
                Repatriation Loans Program Account...............    32
                Payment to the American Institute in Taiwan......    32
                Payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and 
                  Disability 
                  Fund...........................................    32
    International Organizations:
        Contributions to International Organizations.............    33
        Contributions for International Peacekeeping Activities..    34
    International Commissions:
        International Boundary and Water Commission, United 
          States and Mexico......................................    34
        Construction.............................................    35
        American Sections, International Commissions.............    35
        International Fisheries Commissions......................    35
    Related Agency:
        Broadcasting Board of Governors:
            International Broadcasting Operations................    36
            Broadcasting Capital Improvements....................    37
    Related Programs:
        The Asia Foundation......................................    37
        United States Institute of Peace.........................    37
        Center for Middle Eastern-Western Dialogue Trust Fund....    38
        Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Program...................    38
        Israeli Arab Scholarship Program.........................    38
        International Chancery Center............................    38
        East-West Center.........................................    39
        National Endowment for Democracy.........................    39
    Other Commissions:
        Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage 
          Abroad.................................................    40
        United States Commission on International Religious 
          Freedom................................................    40
        Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe.........    40
        Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's 
          Republic of China......................................    41
        United States-China Economic and Security Review 
          Commission.............................................    41
Title II:
    United States Agency for International Development:
        Funds Appropriated to the President:
            Operating Expenses...................................    42
            Capital Investment Fund..............................    44
            Office of Inspector General..........................    44
Title III:
    Bilateral Economic Assistance:
        Funds Appropriated to the President:
            Global Health Programs...............................    45
            Development Assistance...............................    50
            International Disaster Assistance....................    58
            Transition Initiatives...............................    58
            Complex Crises Fund..................................    59
            Development Credit Authority.........................    59
            Administrative Expenses..............................    59
            Economic Support Fund................................    59
            Middle East and North Africa Incentive Fund..........    67
            Democracy Fund.......................................    68
        Department of State:
            Migration and Refugee Assistance.....................    69
            United States Emergency Refugee and Migration 
              Assistance.........................................    70
            Complex Foreign Crises Fund..........................    71
        Independent Agencies:
            Peace Corps..........................................    71
            Millennium Challenge Corporation.....................    72
            Inter-American Foundation............................    72
            United States African Development Foundation.........    73
        Department of the Treasury:
            International Affairs Technical Assistance...........    73
Title IV:
    International Security Assistance:
        Department of State:
            International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement..    74
            Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining and 
              Related Programs...................................    76
            Peacekeeping Operations..............................    77
        Funds Appropriated to the President:
            International Military Education and Training........    77
            Foreign Military Financing Program...................    78
            Global Security Contingency Fund.....................    83
Title V:
    Multilateral Assistance:
        Funds Appropriated to the President:
            International Organizations and Programs.............    84
        International Financial Institutions.....................    85
            Global Environment Facility..........................    86
            Transition Fund......................................    86
            Contribution to the International Development 
              Association........................................    86
            Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative..................    86
            Contribution to the International Bank for 
              Reconstruction and Development.....................    87
            Limitation on Callable Capital Subscriptions.........    87
            Contribution to the Clean Technology Fund............    87
            Contribution to the Strategic Climate Fund...........    87
            Global Agriculture and Food Security Program.........    87
            Contribution to the Inter-American Development Bank..    88
            Limitation on Callable Capital Subscriptions.........    88
            Contribution to the Enterprise for the Americas 
              Multilateral Investment Fund.......................    88
            Contribution to the Asian Development Bank...........    88
            Limitation on Callable Capital Subscriptions.........    88
            Contribution to the Asian Development Fund...........    88
            Contribution to the African Development Bank.........    89
            Limitation on Callable Capital Subscriptions.........    89
            Contribution to the African Development Fund.........    89
            Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative..................    89
            Contribution to the International Fund for 
              Agricultural Development...........................    89
            United States Quota, International Monetary Fund.....    89
            Loans to International Monetary Fund.................    90
Title VI:
    Export and Investment Assistance:
        Export-Import Bank of the United States..................    91
        Overseas Private Investment Corporation..................    91
        Program Account..........................................    92
        Trade and Development Agency.............................    92
Title VII: General Provisions....................................    94
Title VIII:
    Overseas Contingency Operations:
        Department of State:
            Administration of Foreign Affairs:
                Diplomatic and Consular Programs.................    97
                Conflict Stabilization Operations................    97
                Office of Inspector General......................    97
                Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs.......    97
                Embassy Security, Construction, and Maintenance..    98
                Contributions to International Organizations.....    98
            Related Agency:
                Broadcasting Board of Governors..................    98
            Related Programs:
                United States Institute of Peace.................    98
        United States Agency for International Development:
            Funds Appropriated to the President:
                Operating Expenses...............................    98
                Office of Inspector General......................    98
        Bilateral Economic Assistance:
            Funds Appropriated to the President:
                International Disaster Assistance................    99
                Transition Initiatives...........................    99
                Economic Support Fund............................    99
        Department of State:
            Migration and Refugee Assistance.....................    99
            Complex Foreign Crises Fund..........................    99
    International Security Assistance:
        Department of State:
            International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement..    99
            Peacekeeping Operations..............................    99
        Funds Appropriated to the President:
            Foreign Military Financing Program...................   100
    Multilateral Assistance:
        Funds Appropriated to the President:
            International Financial Institutions:
                Transition Fund..................................   100
        General Provisions.......................................   100
Compliance With Paragraph 7, Rule XVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the 
  Senate.........................................................   101
Compliance With Paragraph 7(c), Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules 
  of the Senate..................................................   102
Compliance With Paragraph 12, Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   102
Budgetary Impact of Bill.........................................   122
Comparative Statement of Budget Authority........................   123

                           GLOSSARY OF TERMS

    ADB--Asian Development Bank
    AfDB--African Development Bank
    AFRICOM--United States Africa Command
    APB--Atrocities Prevention Board
    ARB--Accountability Review Board
    ASHA--American Schools and Hospitals Abroad
    AU--African Union
    BBG--Broadcasting Board of Governors
    CARPE--Central Africa Regional Program for the Environment
    CARSI--Central America Regional Security Initiative
    CBJ--Congressional Budget Justification
    CBSI--Caribbean Basin Security Initiative
    CEO--Chief Executive Officer
    CFCF--Complex Foreign Crises Fund
    CICIG--International Commission Against Impunity in 
Guatemala
    CIO--Contributions to International Organizations
    DA--Development Assistance
    DCHA--Democracy, Conflict, and Humanitarian Assistance, 
U.S. Agency for International Development
    DCOF--Displaced Children and Orphans Fund
    D&CP--Diplomatic and Consular Programs
    DF--Democracy Fund
    DLI--Development Leadership Initiative, U.S. Agency for 
International Development
    DRC--Democratic Republic of the Congo
    DRL--Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, 
Department of State
    ECA--Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Department 
of State
    EITI--Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative
    EJE--Extra-judicial Execution
    ESCM--Embassy Security, Construction, and Maintenance
    ESF--Economic Support Fund
    Ex-Im Bank--Export-Import Bank of the United States
    FAA--Foreign Assistance Act of 1961
    FDA--U.S. Food and Drug Administration
    FMF--Foreign Military Financing Program
    FtF--Feed the Future
    FtF CRIL--Feed the Future Collaborative Research Innovation 
Lab
    GCI--General Capital Increase
    GHP--Global Health Programs
    GLFC--Great Lakes Fishery Commission
    GoA--Government of Afghanistan
    GoG--Government of Georgia
    GoH--Government of Haiti
    GoI--Government of Iraq
    GoP--Government of Pakistan
    GoU--Government of Uzbekistan
    GPE--Global Partnership for Education
    GPOI--Global Peacekeeping Operations Initiative
    HIV/AIDS--Human Immune Deficiency/Acquired Immune 
Deficiency Syndrome
    HRDF--Human Rights and Democracy Fund
    IACHR--Inter-American Human Rights Commission
    IAF--Inter-American Foundation
    IBO--International Broadcasting Operations
    IBRD--International Bank for Reconstruction and Development
    IBWC--International Boundary and Water Commission, United 
States and Mexico
    IDB--Inter-American Development Bank
    IDP--Internally Displaced Person
    IFI--International Financial Institution
    IIP--Bureau of International Information Programs, 
Department of State
    IJC--International Joint Commission
    ILEA--International Law Enforcement Training Academies
    IMET--International Military Education and Training
    IMF--International Monetary Fund
    INCLE--International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement
    IO&P--International Organizations and Programs
    J/TIP--Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, 
Department of State
    LES--Locally Employed Staff
    LRA--Lord's Resistance Army
    LWVF--Patrick Leahy War Victims Fund
    MCC--Millennium Challenge Corporation
    MDR-TB--Multi-drug Resistance Tuberculosis
    MEPI--Middle East Partnership Initiative, Department of 
State
    MERC--Middle East Regional Cooperative, U.S. Agency for 
International Development
    MFO--Multinational Force and Observers
    NAB--New Arrangements to Borrow
    NADR--Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining, and 
Related Programs
    NATO--North Atlantic Treaty Organization
    NCC--New Consulate Compound
    NEC--New Embassy Compound
    NED--National Endowment for Democracy
    NGO--Nongovernmental Organization
    NIH--National Institutes of Health
    NOAA--National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
    NTD--Neglected Tropical Diseases
    OAS--Organization of American States
    OCO--Overseas Contingency Operations
    OECD--Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development
    OGAC--Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator
    OIG--Office of Inspector General
    OMEP--Office of Middle East Programs, U.S. Agency for 
International Development
    OPIC--Overseas Private Investment Corporation
    OSCE--Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe
    OTI--Office of Transition Initiatives
    PEPFAR--President's Emergency Plan for AIDS
    PPA--Program, Project, and Activity
    PRC--People's Republic of China
    QDDR--Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review
    RFA--Radio Free Asia
    SDR--Special Drawing Rights, International Monetary Fund
    SFG--Somali Federal Government
    SIGAR--Special Inspector General for Afghanistan 
Reconstruction
    SIGIR--Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction
    SRAP--Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan
    TEF--United Nations Tax Equalization Fund
    TIP--Trafficking in Persons
    U.N.--United Nations
    UNESCO--United Nations Educational, Scientific, and 
Cultural Organization
    UNFPA--United Nations Population Fund
    UNHCHR--United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights
    UNHCR--United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
    UNICEF--United Nations Children's Fund
    UNRWA--United Nations Relief and Works Agency
    USADF--United States African Development Foundation
    USAID--United States Agency for International Development
    USFWS--United States Fish and Wildlife Service
    USIP--United States Institute of Peace
    USFS--United States Forest Service
    USNPS--United States National Park Service
    USTDA--United States Trade and Development Agency
    UXO--Unexploded Ordnance
    VOA--Voice of America
    WCF--Working Capital Fund
    WSP--Worldwide Security Protection

                         PUBLIC LAW REFERENCES

    Public Law 113-6--Consolidated and Further Continuing 
Appropriations Act, 2013.
    Public Law 113-4--Violence Against Women Reauthorization 
Act of 2013.
    Public Law 112-239--National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2013.
    Public Law 112-158--Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human 
Rights Act of 2012.
    Public Law 112-74--Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012.
    Public Law 112-25--Budget Control Act of 2011.
    Public Law 112-10--Department of Defense and Full-Year 
Continuing Appropriations Act, 2011.
    Public Law 111-212--Supplemental Appropriations, 2010.
    Public Law 111-172--Lord's Resistance Army Disarmament and 
Northern Uganda Recovery Act.
    Public Law 111-32--Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2009.
    Public Law 111-8--Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009.
    Public Law 110-293--Tom Lantos and Henry J. Hyde United 
States Global Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and 
Malaria Reauthorization Act of 2008.
    Public Law 110-252--Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2008.
    Public Law 110-246--Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 
2008.
    Public Law 110-161--Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008.
    Public Law 109-282--Federal Funding Accountability and 
Transparency Act.
    Public Law 109-121--Senator Paul Simon Water for the Poor 
Act of 2005.
    Public Law 107-228--Foreign Relations Authorization Act, 
Fiscal Year 2003.
    Public Law 106-113--Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2000.
    Public Law 106-87--Torture Victims Relief Reauthorization 
Act of 1999.
    Public Law 99-177--Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
Control Act of 1985.

                              INTRODUCTION

                       Summary of Appropriations

    The Committee recommends total appropriations of 
$50,752,900,000 for the Department of State, foreign 
operations, and related programs for fiscal year 2014. Of this 
amount, $50,594,000,000, including $6,515,000,000 for overseas 
contingency operations, is for discretionary programs, and 
$158,900,000 is for mandatory programs.
    The Committee's recommendations for fiscal year 2014, by 
title, compared to the budget request, are allocated in the 
following table:

                         APPROPRIATIONS BY TITLE
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                          Fiscal year       Committee
                 Title                    2014 request    recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Title I--Department of State and            15,384,074       14,721,502
 Related Agency.......................
Title II--United States Agency for           1,500,340        1,449,261
 International Development............
Title III--Bilateral Economic               21,388,226       18,190,196
 Assistance...........................
Title IV--International Security             7,669,384        7,445,900
 Assistance...........................
Title V--Multilateral Assistance......       3,196,424        3,541,479
Title VI--Export and Investment             (1,117,038)      (1,117,438)
 Assistance...........................
Title VII--General Provisions.........           7,000            7,000
Title VIII--Overseas Contingency             3,807,341        6,515,000
 Operations...........................
                                       ---------------------------------
      Total...........................      51,835,751       50,752,900
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                              INTRODUCTION

    The Committee notes that governmentwide efforts to reduce 
the Federal deficit require cuts in operations and programs 
funded by this act. The Committee has also taken further steps 
to reduce wasteful and unnecessary spending.

                             Reducing Costs

    The Federal agencies administering funds appropriated by 
this act are directed to regularly review all costs associated 
with operations and programs to determine their necessity, 
priority, and effectiveness. All programs, except for 
humanitarian relief and recovery purposes, should be designed 
to be sustained by host country governments or civil society, 
and include a cost-matching requirement, as appropriate. 
Programs that are failing to perform or meet sustainability 
guidelines, or that have required excessive overhead or 
security costs, should be modified or discontinued.
    Section 7020(a) of this act clarifies the intended uses of 
funds for representation and entertainment expenses at the 
Federal agencies and entities funded by this act. The Committee 
directs the Department and agencies to achieve further savings 
by reducing the cost of executive meetings, ceremonies, and 
conferences, and curtailing the purchase of commemorative and 
promotional items.
    Cost Savings and Efficiencies.--The Committee directs the 
Department of State's OIG to provide the Committee a 
consolidated list of OIG recommendations for potential position 
reductions and office reductions or closures since October 1, 
2012, including cost savings, and the Department's responses to 
such recommendations.
    The GAO's ``2013 Annual Report: Actions Needed to Reduce 
Fragmentation, Overlap and Duplication, and Achieve Other 
Financial Benefits'' (GAO-13-279SP) provided updates on the 
status of the implementation of recommendations in prior annual 
reports to reduce duplication, improve coordination, and 
achieve savings at the Department of State and USAID. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of State, USAID Administrator, 
and the BBG to submit a report to the Committee on the status 
of implementation of the GAO recommendations relevant to 
programs funded by this act.
    Energy Audits and Savings.--The Committee directs the 
agencies funded by this act to improve energy efficiency at 
overseas posts. If any such agency has not conducted 
environmental assessments and water and energy audits of their 
overseas post operations to assess consistency with Federal 
energy efficiency standards and environmental practices within 
5 years prior to the date of enactment of this act, such 
agencies shall conduct such assessments and audits and should 
implement the recommendations of such assessments and audits to 
reduce costs and better align overseas post operations with the 
department's or agency's targets for Federal building energy 
efficiency and environmental sustainability in accordance with 
Executive Order 13514. The Committee directs each agency funded 
by this act to submit a report not later than September 30, 
2014, detailing the findings of such assessments and audits, a 
plan, including steps taken, to implement such recommendations, 
and a comparison of such findings with the targets for Federal 
building energy efficiency and environmental sustainability.
    Financial and Contract Management.--The Committee is 
concerned with OIG and independent auditor findings on 
weaknesses and shortcomings in financial and contract 
management at the Department of State, USAID, and other 
agencies funded by this act. The Committee expects the 
Department, USAID, and other agencies to continue efforts to 
improve financial management, contracting processes, and 
internal controls. The Committee directs the Department of 
State, USAID, and other Federal agencies, as applicable, to 
report to the Committee on the process for complying with the 
subawards reporting requirements in Public Law 109-282, as 
amended by Public Law 110-252, and the fiscal year 2013 
statistics for contractor compliance with such requirements.
    Other Than Coach Class Travel.--The bill does not include 
section 7073 of Public Law 112-74. However, the Committee 
expects the Department of State, USAID, and all agencies, 
commissions, and organizations funded by this act to comply 
with the other than coach class travel restrictions in sections 
301-10.122 through 301-10.124 of title 41, Code of Federal 
Regulations.
    Transparency, Governance, and Oversight Requirements.--The 
Committee notes that oversight, transparency and accountability 
are key factors in achieving optimal efficiency and performance 
and includes section 7078 directing the organizations funded 
under the ``Related Programs'' heading in title I to report to 
the Committee on compliance with the 12 key broad-based 
governance, accountability, and transparency requirements 
identified and reviewed in GAO's ``Federally Created Entities'' 
report (GAO-10-97). The Committee directs the Department of 
State's OIG to report on the organizations for which the OIG 
currently has authority to conduct oversight, and the 
additional authorities and resources the OIG would require for 
oversight of the other organizations.

                  Congressional Budget Justifications

    While the Committee understands that performance data is 
required by the Government Performance and Results Act for 
inclusion in the CBJ, timely budget information that is 
clearly, concisely, and accurately presented must continue to 
be the priority. The Committee expects the Department of State, 
USAID, and other agencies funded by this act to submit CBJs 
within 4 weeks of the release of the President's fiscal year 
2015 budget request. The Committee also directs the Department 
of State, USAID, and other agencies to include detailed 
information on all reimbursable agreements and significant uses 
of the Economy Act.
    Department of State and USAID operating expense accounts 
are appropriated with 2-year availability to provide 
flexibility for new or complex programs and procurement 
sensitive programs. However, the Committee intends the 
Department and USAID to request funding for other costs, 
including salaries and related expenses, in the fiscal year 
that it is to be expended. The Committee also directs the 
Department and USAID to include in their spend plans a 
justification for any funding that is planned to be executed in 
the fiscal year after it is appropriated, and to include 
specific detail and justification in the CBJ for funding 
requested with 2-year availability.
    The Committee directs the Department of State, USAID, and 
any other agency that utilizes a Working Capital Fund to 
include in the CBJ the total budgetary resources for the 
offices that use funds from a WCF. The CBJ shall also include a 
table on WCF resources that will serve as the baseline for 
reprogramming and transfer purposes.
    The Committee directs that the CBJs include estimated 
savings from any proposed office or mission closing and actual 
prior year representation expenses for each department and 
agency that is authorized such expenses.

              Definition of Program, Project, and Activity

    For purposes of Public Law 99-177, as amended, with respect 
to appropriations contained in this act the term ``program, 
project, and activity'' shall mean any item for which a dollar 
amount is specified in this report or this act. In addition, 
the definition of PPA in section 7023 of this act shall apply 
to the accounts listed in that section.
    In carrying out any Presidential sequestration, the 
Department of State, USAID, and other agencies funded by this 
act shall conform to the definition of PPA described above.

                              Definitions

    The Committee includes language in this act making certain 
actions, such as obligations of funds, ``subject to the regular 
notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations.'' 
This language requires a separate notification to the Committee 
15 days prior to the proposed obligation of funds or other 
action that is the subject of this special notification 
requirement, regardless of what may be contained in an agency's 
CBJ or in the operating and spend plans required in section 
7076 of this act. Thus, such CBJs, operating and spend plans do 
not suffice as justification for purposes of satisfying the 
special notification requirement.
    Unless expressly provided to the contrary, the term 
``appropriate congressional committees'' as used in this act 
and report shall mean the Committees on Appropriations and 
Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committees on 
Appropriations and Foreign Affairs of the House of 
Representatives.

                        Reprogramming Guidelines

    The Committee directs the Department of State and other 
agencies funded by this act to notify the Committee of 
reprogrammings of funds as required by sections 7015 and 7019 
of this act at the most detailed level of either the CBJ or the 
report accompanying this act, and the Committee expects to be 
notified of any significant departure from the CBJ or of any 
commitment that will require significant funding in future 
years. The Committee directs that staffing levels and future 
year impacts of reprogrammings be included with the 
notification.
    Section 7076 of this act requires operating and spend plans 
to be submitted not later than 45 days after enactment of this 
act. The Committee expects operating plans to include, as 
applicable, a comparison between the most recent congressional 
directives or approved funding levels and the funding level 
proposed by the department or agency; WCF resources; title VIII 
funds aligned with enduring operations and assistance funds; 
applicable legislative references, including the authority to 
spend funds in a manner notwithstanding any other provision of 
law; and a clear, concise, and informative description/
justification. The Committee directs the Department of State, 
USAID, and other agencies to provide quarterly updates of 
salary and benefits costs and on-board staffing levels 
(employees and contractors).
    The Committee is disappointed by the absence of useful 
information in prior fiscal year spend plans and congressional 
notifications. Broadly stated goals and dollar amounts only at 
the account level with few details about how funds will be 
spent are not sufficient for effective oversight. The Committee 
requests departments and agencies to consult with the Committee 
on the content, format, and manner of submission for such 
documents.

                    Reporting Requirement Guidelines

    All reports required by the Committee are due 90 days after 
enactment of this act except those with a specific date 
otherwise indicated. To save paper and printing costs, the 
Committee directs that one copy of reports, congressional 
notifications, and correspondence be jointly addressed to the 
chairs of the Committee and subcommittee, and one copy jointly 
addressed to the ranking members of the Committee and 
subcommittee. Reports required by the Committee may also be 
electronically transmitted and posted on the Department of 
State and USAID Web sites, as appropriate.
    The Committee directs that the Department of State, USAID, 
BBG, MCC, USADF, and IAF no longer send to the Committee the 
quarterly, semi-annual, or annual reports from their respective 
OIG, as these documents are already received by the Committee 
directly from the OIG. Instead, the Committee directs these 
agencies to notify the Committee by email or letter that their 
OIG has sent such reports.

          Prohibition on Taxation of United States Assistance

    The Committee is concerned that despite the inclusion of 
section 7013 (Prohibition on Taxation of United States 
Assistance) in prior acts making appropriations for the 
Department of State, foreign operations, and related programs, 
foreign governments are taxing assistance provided by the 
United States. This section also limited the 200 percent 
penalty to be assessed in a subsequent year for taxes on 
commodities only. The Committee has modified section 7013(b) 
(Reimbursement of Foreign Taxes) of this act to make the 200 
percent withholding requirement consistent with subsection (a) 
(Prohibitions on Taxation), and to more clearly define the 
terms in subsection (g) (Definitions).
    The Committee intends that with the exception of income 
taxes assessed to local employees and personal service 
contractors, no tax (including value added taxes and customs 
duties on commodities, and taxes on U.S. and international 
businesses and organizations) should be assessed against 
assistance made available by titles III through VI and VIII of 
this act. If a country or entity does not provide substantial 
reimbursement of such taxes, 200 percent of total assessed 
taxes shall be withheld from subsequent fiscal year assistance 
for the central government of the taxing country and 
reprogrammed for assistance to other countries. The Committee 
directs all departments and agencies that provide assistance 
funded under titles III through VI and VIII of this act to 
report on the department's or agency's rules and procedures, 
including for assisting businesses and contractors to obtain 
the necessary tax-exemption documentation and for training 
contracting officers to properly identify taxes in contracts 
and invoices, to implement this section.

             Strategic Public Diplomacy and Communications

    Public Diplomacy Coordination.--The Committee remains 
concerned with the absence of a coherent and unified strategic 
public diplomacy and communications effort by the Department of 
State, USAID, and BBG, and notes that United States interests 
abroad are adversely impacted by the inability of agencies to 
clearly and effectively coordinate the articulation of 
policies, programs, and information to a global audience. The 
Department of State OIG's findings as reported in the February 
2012 ``Inspection of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural 
Affairs'' and the May 2013 ``Inspection of the Bureau of 
International Information Programs'' are consistent with the 
Committee's concerns.
    In previous fiscal years, the Committee has recommended the 
development of communication strategies by agencies and 
improved coordination among programs, with limited success. 
Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary of State to 
ensure that the Undersecretary of State for Public Diplomacy 
and Public Affairs coordinates the strategic public diplomacy 
and communication activities of the Department of State, USAID, 
and BBG, as appropriate. Among other activities, the 
Undersecretary shall review activities and programs and make 
recommendations to the Secretary to reduce redundancies as well 
as address gaps in programs; facilitate a meaningful dialogue 
between the Department and BBG regarding the analysis of 
language service and broadcast priorities as part of the annual 
language service review, and advise the Secretary on BBG 
priorities and broadcast strategies; and review public 
diplomacy and media programs funded by the Department of State 
and USAID and make recommendations to the Secretary and the 
USAID Administrator to ensure coordination between programs and 
reduce redundancies.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit, not 
later than 180 days after enactment of this act, the status of 
the Undersecretary's implementation of the above 
responsibilities and a Department of State, USAID, and BBG 
joint strategic plan for public diplomacy and communication, a 
description of public diplomacy priorities, and a clarification 
of the responsibilities of ECA and IIP and the Center for 
Strategic Counterterrorism Communications, to ensure adequate 
coordination and minimize unnecessary overlap, including an 
evaluation of the function of the Office of Audience Research 
and Evaluation.
    Global Internet Freedom.--Section 7072 of this act provides 
$44,600,000 for programs to promote Internet freedom globally 
for countries whose governments restrict freedom of speech and 
association on the Internet.
    The Committee recognizes the complexities of promoting 
Internet freedom, and that a multi-faceted U.S. Government-wide 
strategy is required to concurrently support the efforts of 
democracy activists abroad to counter the development and 
implementation of repressive Internet-related laws and 
regulations; to counter intimidation and violence against 
bloggers and other users; and to enhance digital security 
training and capacity for democracy activists and other users. 
Circumvention tools and technology alone are not sufficient to 
empower such activists. The Committee endorses the objectives 
of the May 2011 International Strategy for Cyberspace.
    The Committee requires that programs to promote Internet 
freedom shall be coordinated with other democracy, governance, 
and broadcasting programs funded by this act and in country 
assistance, democracy, and broadcasting strategies, as 
appropriate.
    The Committee believes that the research of key threats to 
Internet freedom and development of technologies that provide 
or enhance access to the Internet is an ongoing process 
requiring sufficient funding to maintain a technological 
advantage over the censorship techniques imposed by 
authoritarian governments. The Committee requires that all 
research and development activities be coordinated with other 
relevant Federal departments and agencies in order to share 
information, technologies, and best practices, and to assess 
the effectiveness of technological advances.
    The Committee requires spend plans for the uses of funds 
appropriated by this act to promote Internet freedom. The spend 
plans shall also include a description of safeguards 
established by relevant agencies to ensure that programs are 
not used for illicit purposes. In addition, the Committee 
directs the Secretary of State, the USAID Administrator, and 
the BBG to provide a summary of all Internet freedom spend 
plans demonstrating that there is no unnecessary overlap 
between the Department and other agencies, and that the spend 
plans support coordinated strategic priorities.
    The Committee recommends $19,600,000 for the BBG's Internet 
freedom and circumvention programs, a two-fold increase above 
current program levels. The Committee provides for longer term 
leases for BBG satellite transmissions, which significantly 
reduces annual lease costs. The Committee expects that as the 
BBG renegotiates its satellite lease costs the lease savings 
shall be used to further enhance its Internet freedom and 
circumvention programs. The Committee directs the BBG to 
regularly report to the appropriate congressional committees 
the lease savings utilized for such programs, and to consult 
with the committees prior to using such savings for 
administrative expenses.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to consult 
with the Committee on options to mitigate the proliferation of 
censorship and other technologies developed by U.S. companies 
to authoritarian governments.
    Funds are allocated according to the following table and 
are subject to the provisions of section 7019 of this act:

                            INTERNET FREEDOM
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                         Account                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
HRDF....................................................          18,000
ESF.....................................................           7,000
IBO.....................................................          19,600
                                                         ---------------
      Total.............................................          44,600
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      Countries of Special Concern

                              AFGHANISTAN

    The Committee recommends $759,692,000 for the operations of 
the Department of State, including $15,096,000 for public 
diplomacy, and $149,771,000 for the operations of USAID in 
Afghanistan. The Committee encourages Embassy Kabul to 
accelerate its downsizing and consolidation of operations and 
personnel in light of the 2014 military drawdown.
    The Committee recognizes that the diplomatic footprint in 
Afghanistan is determined by many factors, including security 
conditions, costs, and coordination with international and U.S. 
forces remaining in-country. The Committee expects the 
Secretary of State to continue to keep the appropriate 
congressional committees informed of any significant changes in 
Department of State and USAID operations, including plans to 
close facilities in insecure areas or to acquire additional 
property adjacent to the Embassy.
    The Committee recommends $958,300,000 for assistance for 
Afghanistan in this act, and updates prior year conditionality 
on aid. The Committee expects amounts of assistance to decrease 
significantly in the future due to changes in security 
conditions, challenges associated with the formation of a new 
government, reduced regional platforms, and travel limitations 
on personnel that may be imposed by Embassy Kabul. The 
Committee notes the large pipeline of assistance for 
Afghanistan which exceeds $4,500,000,000, including prior year 
funding and estimates for fiscal year 2013, and directs the 
Secretary of State to submit a multi-year assistance plan not 
later than 180 days after enactment of this act, describing 
anticipated amounts and types of U.S. assistance for 
Afghanistan following the drawdown of U.S. military forces.
    Among other assistance requirements, 25 percent of the 
funds appropriated for Afghanistan by this act are withheld 
until the Secretary of State certifies, among other actions, 
that a successful democratic election has been held and a U.S.-
Afghan Bilateral Security Agreement has been negotiated. The 
Committee requires that security-related assistance provided in 
this and other acts as on-budget support to the Government of 
Afghanistan is calculated as part of the total U.S. on-budget 
contribution per the Tokyo Conference, and endorses the 
continued provision of such assistance by USAID on a 
reimbursable basis only. The Committee recommends that the 
Department of State continue to use international donor 
conferences as a means of coordinating pledges and 
conditionality on assistance for Afghanistan. The Committee 
expects that gender related programs remain a top priority 
during the upcoming elections and transition, and that 
continued emphasis be placed on programs and activities that 
regionally integrate Afghanistan into neighboring economies and 
cooperative security arrangements.
    The Committee is concerned with the ability of donors and 
implementers to conduct effective program and project oversight 
before, during, and after the transition, and does not support 
the use of third party monitors for such purposes. The 
Committee expects that if security conditions preclude adequate 
oversight of programs or projects, such activities will not be 
initiated or continued. The Committee notes that LES conduct 
monitoring of programs in neighboring countries, often in 
conjunction with the host government, and the use of LES in 
Afghanistan should be explored more fully.
    The Committee recommends $10,000,000 for the Afghan 
Civilian Assistance Program for continued assistance for 
individuals and communities that suffer losses as a result of 
military operations. The Committee directs USAID to consult 
with the Committee on the use of funds prior to obligation.
    The Committee continues to support assistance for the 
Afghan Reconstruction Trust Fund and its National Solidarity 
Program to build the capacity of Afghan communities to 
participate in and manage their own development projects, and 
directs USAID to prioritize support for this program.
    The Committee recommends that assistance for Afghanistan 
under the ESF and INCLE headings be used to support the GoA in 
replicating the Helmand Food Zone program in Kandahar.
    The Committee supports the New Silk Road Strategy but 
remains concerned that not enough is being done to support such 
regional approaches to integrate trade and economies in South 
Asia, which is exacerbated by the division of responsibility 
between the Office of the Special Representative for 
Afghanistan and Pakistan and the Bureau of South and Central 
Asian Affairs. The Committee directs the Secretary of State to 
submit a plan for the reintegration of SRAP into the Bureau of 
South and Central Asian Affairs.
    The Committee directs that funds made available for cross 
border training and programs between Afghanistan and the 
Central Asian countries shall be the joint responsibility of 
the USAID missions in Kabul and Almaty.

                                 EGYPT

    The Committee notes that due to events on July 3, 2013, a 
democratically elected government is no longer in place in 
Egypt. As Egypt's political transition continues to evolve, the 
Committee recommends assistance for Egypt only if the Secretary 
of State certifies that conditions specified in section 7041(a) 
are met. Waiver authority is included for a portion of such 
assistance.

                                  IRAN

    The Committee condemns actions by the Government of Iran 
which contribute to instability in the Near East region, 
particularly in Lebanon and Syria. The Committee remains 
concerned with the danger Iran's pursuit of nuclear 
capabilities poses to the United States and regional allies. 
The act continues the terms and conditions of section 7041(c) 
of Public Law 112-74.
    The act requires that funds appropriated under titles I and 
III shall be made available to promote democracy and human 
rights in, and for broadcasting to, Iran, and the Committee 
expects that not less than $30,000,000 shall be made available 
for such purposes under the ESF heading. The Secretary of State 
is required to consult with the appropriate congressional 
committees on the policy and strategy of the United States to 
promote democracy and human rights in Iran prior to the initial 
obligation of funds made available for such purposes by this 
act, including implementation of the Internet freedom strategy 
required by section 414 of Public Law 112-158.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit a 
report to the appropriate congressional committees detailing 
the activities of the Department of State, USAID, and BBG to 
promote democracy and human rights in Iran over the past 2 
fiscal years, including program descriptions, financial data, 
and assessments of program effectiveness in meeting stated 
goals and objectives. The report shall be updated 180 days 
after its initial submission, and may be submitted in 
classified form if necessary.
    The Committee directs the BBG to consult with the 
appropriate congressional committees regarding the audience 
share of U.S. broadcasting to Iran as compared to other 
international broadcasters, and whether U.S. policies toward 
Iran are presented clearly and effectively in such broadcasts, 
and in a balanced manner.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit a 
report to the Committee describing steps taken by the 
Department of State to secure the release of Pastor Saeed 
Abedini, who is jailed in Tehran. The report shall include an 
assessment of Pastor Abedini's health and welfare, and 
treatment by Iranian jailers.
    The Committee notes with concern the plight of political 
prisoners in Iran, including Nasrin Sotoudeh, an Iranian lawyer 
and human rights activist imprisoned in Iran.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit a 
report to the appropriate congressional committees not later 
than 180 days after enactment of this act detailing the steps 
taken by the Secretary and the U.S. Ambassador to the United 
Nations to implement section 415 of Public Law 112-158.

                                  IRAQ

    The Committee recommends $1,124,125,000 for the operations 
of the Department of State in Iraq (including $428,700,000 in 
prior year unobligated balances), and $15,338,000 for USAID 
operations in Iraq and directs that funding for such operations 
be provided in a manner that accelerates the agency's departure 
from that country, currently scheduled for 2015. The Committee 
supports the ``glide path'' reduction in operations and 
personnel which is aimed at bringing Iraq operations in line 
with those at more traditional missions. The Committee supports 
the President's budget request for a NCC in Erbil, does not 
include funding for the Erbil Diplomatic Support Center, and 
requires a cost-benefit analysis to explore other alternatives 
for the current operation of Consulate Basrah, the cost for 
which is expected to total $295,000,000 in fiscal year 2014. 
The Committee directs that should the Department of State 
determine that the continuation of Consulate Basrah is not 
fiscally prudent and that the region can be covered from 
Baghdad, any savings should be used for the security costs of 
expeditionary, interim, or temporary facilities elsewhere in 
the world.
    The Committee recommends a total of $552,000,000 for 
assistance for Iraq in this act, including the President's 
budget request for FMF. The Committee requires a cost-matching 
requirement for INCLE and NADR assistance, and expects 
subsequent fiscal year budget requests for assistance for Iraq 
to continue to decline as the GoI assumes responsibilities for 
its needs out of its own resources, particularly oil revenues. 
The Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit a report 
to the Committee detailing a transition plan for rule of law 
activities from the Department of State to the GoI.
    The Committee recommends $25,000,000 for democracy programs 
in Iraq, which shall be the responsibility of DRL, in 
consultation with the Chief of Mission, of which $5,000,000 is 
for the Marla Ruzicka Iraqi War Victims Fund for continued 
assistance for individuals and communities that suffer losses 
as a result of armed conflict. The Committee directs USAID to 
consult with the Committee on the use of funds prior to 
obligation, and plans for the transfer of this program to Iraqi 
entities.
    The Committee continues support for programs to support 
vulnerable Iraqi ethnic and religious minorities in the Nineveh 
Plains, and for the Iraqi Christian community.
    Section 7034(g)(2) of this act extends the waiver of the 
requirement for an ARB assessment in Afghanistan and Iraq in 
the event of serious injury, loss of life, or significant 
destruction of property at, or related to, a U.S. Government 
mission abroad as proposed in the President's budget request. 
It is the Committee's intent that this is the last year for 
such waiver in Iraq. Section 7041(f)(1) of this act withholds 
from obligation 10 percent of funds for the costs of operations 
at Embassy Baghdad until the Secretary of State reports to the 
Committee on diplomatic facility construction projects in Iraq.
    The Committee recognizes the destabilizing impact the 
conflict in Syria has had on the Middle East and North Africa, 
and provides an additional source of funding for programs under 
the CFCF heading. CFCF assistance should be made available to 
help mitigate related sectarian violence in Iraq, if such 
assistance is requested by the GoI.

                                PAKISTAN

    The Committee recommends $147,923,000 for the operations of 
the Department of State, including $16,867,000 for public 
diplomacy programs and $33,826,000 for the operations of USAID 
in Pakistan. The Committee notes continued progress with the 
construction of a NEC in Islamabad, which will provide 
personnel with secure facilities that meet security and 
earthquake standards. While the Committee endorses the budget 
request for the construction of additional facilities at 
Consulate Karachi, the security and management challenges posed 
by Consulate Peshawar remain a concern. The Committee requests 
the Department of State to regularly update the Committee on 
progress in upgrading that facility and identifying and 
securing a site for the construction of a NCC.
    The Committee recommends $696,870,000 for assistance for 
Pakistan, and notes the large pipeline for assistance which 
exceeds $2,500,000,000, including prior year funding and 
estimates for fiscal year 2013.
    The Committee continues conditions on assistance for 
Pakistan with minor modifications from prior years, and notes 
that the first-ever civilian transition of power in that 
country may afford an opportunity to renew bilateral relations 
that are in the national interests of both the United States 
and Pakistan. The Committee encourages Embassy Islamabad to 
continue to prioritize U.S. assistance programs in an 
increasingly constrained domestic fiscal environment, and to 
reduce the number of pillars in which aid is provided. Priority 
should be provided to the education, energy and economic 
pillars, as well as security-related assistance and counter-
extremism programs, particularly during the transition in 
Afghanistan. USAID and the Department of State should continue 
assistance for democracy programs to build on the successful 
2012 elections, and DRL is directed to submit to the Committee 
a multi-year strategy for promoting democracy and human rights 
in Pakistan. The Committee expects the Government of Pakistan 
to make the welfare of its own people a top priority and to 
demonstrate this by increasing national budgets for health and 
education.
    The Committee remains concerned with the welfare of Dr. 
Shakil Afridi and conditions assistance on his release from 
prison.
    The Committee supports continued funding for the Pakistan 
Civilian Assistance Program for assistance for individuals and 
communities that suffer losses as a result of military 
operations. The Committee directs USAID to consult with the 
Committee on the use of funds prior to obligation.
    The Committee remains concerned with the lack of progress 
in credibly investigating and prosecuting Pakistani military 
personnel for human rights violations, including torture and 
extra-judicial executions, and expects section 620M of the FAA 
to be applied to funds made available for military assistance 
for Pakistan.

                                TITLE I

                 DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED AGENCY

                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE

                   Administration of Foreign Affairs

                    DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $9,759,500,000
    Enduring............................................   6,548,850,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................   3,210,650,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   8,481,854,000
    Enduring operations.................................   7,282,363,000
    Overseas contingency operations.....................   1,199,491,000
Committee recommendation................................   8,114,759,000
    Enduring operations.................................   7,089,851,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................   1,024,908,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
\2\Overseas contingency operations is funded under title VIII.

    The Committee recommends $7,089,851,000 for Diplomatic and 
Consular Programs, of which up to $1,867,251,000 is for 
Worldwide Security Protection, including security costs in 
Iraq. An additional $1,024,908,000 in title VIII under this 
heading is designated for OCO.
    The Committee recommendation separates the functions funded 
under this heading to provide transparency in the uses of 
funds. However, the Department of State may reprogram funds as 
necessary, subject to prior consultation with the Committee.
    Human Resources.--The Committee recommends $2,548,716,000 
for all U.S. direct hire salaries at overseas and domestic 
United States diplomatic missions, and does not include the 
requested authority and funding for phase III of Foreign 
Service overseas comparability pay, as in prior fiscal years.
    Overseas Programs.--The Committee recommends $2,033,386,000 
for the operational programs of the Department of State's 
regional bureaus, which are responsible for managing U.S. 
foreign policy through bilateral and multilateral 
relationships. Funds support U.S. embassies, consulates, and 
other diplomatic posts worldwide, and provide myriad services 
to millions of U.S. citizens living, working, studying, and 
serving abroad, including those who are arrested and imprisoned 
in foreign countries. The Committee recommends funding for 
operations, including for public diplomacy programs, to be used 
at overseas posts.
    Diplomatic Policy and Support.--The Committee recommends 
$786,180,000 for the operational programs of the Department of 
State's functional bureaus to provide overall policy direction, 
coordination, and program management among U.S. missions 
abroad. The Committee recommends not less than $7,330,000 for 
salary and program costs of the Office for Global Women's 
Issues within the Office of the Secretary; not less than 
$26,394,000 for salary and program costs for DRL; and not less 
than $37,851,000 for program costs for the Bureau of Oceans and 
International Environmental and Scientific Affairs.
    Security Programs.--The Committee recommends $1,715,600,000 
for the operation of security programs, including 
$1,611,385,000 for WSP to protect diplomatic personnel, 
overseas diplomatic missions, residences, and domestic 
facilities and information. An additional $255,866,000 is 
included within the Human Resources function for salaries for a 
total of $1,867,251,000 for WSP in this title. The Committee 
recommends an additional $900,274,000 for OCO costs for WSP. In 
recognition of normalization of Iraq operations and to more 
accurately reflect the full costs of security, the Committee 
has included in WSP the security costs for Iraq and other posts 
that were funded in D&CP in prior fiscal years.
    The Committee recommends full funding for the WSP costs 
related to the Increased Security Proposal developed by the 
Department of State to address the recommendations of the 
Benghazi ARB report and the Department's worldwide security 
assessments.
    The Committee includes language in section 7004(f)(1) of 
this act that requires funds appropriated under this heading 
and the ESCM heading (from proceeds of sales only) be made 
available to address security vulnerabilities at diplomatic 
facilities abroad, which shall be the responsibility of the 
Assistant Secretary for the Bureau of Diplomatic Security and 
Foreign Missions, in consultation with the Director of the 
Bureau of Overseas Building Operations. The Committee notes 
that expeditionary, interim, and temporary facilities lack 
consistent definitions by the Department of State and often 
lack a dedicated source of funding for security upgrades, as 
was highlighted in the Benghazi ARB report. The Committee 
expects sufficient funds to be made available for physical 
security upgrades and local guard staffing at expeditionary, 
interim, and temporary facilities, and requests the Department 
of State to submit, in writing, clear definitions and 
attributes of such facilities.
    The Committee notes that the Department of State's 
comprehensive plan dated July 16, 2013, was not responsive to 
the reporting requirement in section 1707(c) of Public Law 113-
6, and the Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit a 
detailed Increased Security Proposal including the results of 
the security assessments by post and country and the 
Department's priorities in, and estimated costs of, addressing 
such results. The Committee directs the Department to regularly 
consult on any changes to the Plan in a timely manner.
    The Committee also directs the Secretary of State to submit 
a report to the appropriate congressional committees detailing 
the status of the Department of State's implementation of the 
29 recommendations to improve security at diplomatic facilities 
overseas contained in the Benghazi ARB report and relevant 
recommendations of previous ARBs. For any recommendation not 
fully implemented, the report shall include an estimated 
completion date and cost of implementation. The report shall be 
updated not later than 180 days after the first report is 
submitted.
    The Committee recommends that the Department of State 
conduct joint training exercises with the security force of a 
foreign government that is responsible for protecting U.S. 
diplomatic facilities overseas and that receives training or 
equipment from the Department for such purposes. An exercise 
component may increase response time in the event of a crisis, 
and provide additional information on the vulnerabilities in 
response capabilities.

                             PROGRAM ISSUES

    The Arctic.--The Committee recognizes the strategic 
importance of the Arctic region to the long-term economic and 
national security interests of the United States and notes that 
the United States will assume the Chair of the Arctic Council 
in May 2015. The Committee recommends that the Department of 
State utilize available funds to increase the number of 
personnel assigned to Arctic Council issues. Section 7034(t) of 
this act provides up to $1,000,000 for grants to support the 
application of science and technology to foreign policy issues 
in the Arctic region, including facilitating the participation 
of indigenous communities in the Council. The Committee 
encourages the Department of State to establish the position of 
United States Ambassador to the Arctic in order to enhance 
engagement with other Arctic nations.
    Atrocities Prevention Board.--The Committee recommends 
funding under this title and USAID's Operating Expenses account 
to train relevant personnel at the Department of State and 
USAID in genocide and mass atrocities prevention and to support 
full participation in the interagency Atrocities Prevention 
Board, including staff to carry out the responsibilities of the 
APB, in accordance with Presidential Study Directive 10. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit a report 
describing the key objectives of the APB, its activities thus 
far, and its plans to train relevant personnel.
    Consular Lookout and Support System.--The Committee directs 
the Secretary of State, in consultation with the Secretary of 
Homeland Security, to implement the August 4, 2011 Presidential 
Proclamation relating to the suspension of entry of certain 
persons who participate in human rights violations.
    Cost Savings and Efficiencies.--The Committee recommends 
funding for the Department of State's travel budget at no 
higher than the fiscal year 2013 estimates reported in the 
President's budget request.
    The Committee directs that the Department of State reduce 
the number of information resource management staff assigned to 
the overseas regional information management centers. The 
Department of State's OIG concluded that of the 100 staff 
deployed overseas, 80 percent do not perform time sensitive 
work and do not need to be assigned overseas. The OIG estimates 
that $18,300,000 could be saved annually by moving such staff 
to the U.S.
    The Committee also directs the Department to further 
implement the centralization of voucher processing for overseas 
posts, as appropriate. The OIG found that the cost for 
centralized processing is about $12 per voucher while 
processing vouchers at post averages $34 per voucher, and can 
range as high as $97.
    Cultural Heritage.--The Committee recommends $5,750,000 for 
Cultural Heritage Programs, including $1,000,000 for the 
Cultural Antiquities Task Force, and for not less than five 
large-scale projects. The Committee recognizes the important 
public diplomacy role of this program, as well as its 
contribution in preserving some of the world's irreplaceable 
cultural antiquities. As in past years, the Department of State 
should consult with the Committee prior to the obligation of 
funds.
    Cyber Issues.--The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for the 
Office of the Coordinator for Cyber Issues. The Committee notes 
the strategic use of cyber diplomacy as a means to create a 
more open, interoperable, secure, and stable global-cyberspace, 
and defines cyber diplomacy as, among other activities, the 
development of international norms of behavior in cyberspace, 
efforts to promote international dialogue and cooperation on 
cyber issues, international cyberspace governance capacity 
building, collaboration in international cybercrime 
investigations, and the promotion of Internet freedom.
    The Coordinator, in consultation with the heads of other 
relevant Federal agencies, is encouraged to consult on a 
regular basis with other governments and organizations on 
cybersecurity issues, including research and development, 
infrastructure protection, standards, and best practices in the 
field, and to consult with the Committee prior to providing 
funds to U.N. cyber programs.
    Export Control Reform Initiative.--The Committee supports 
the President's Export Control Reform Initiative to modernize 
and reform the U.S. export control system, and encourages the 
Secretary of State, in coordination with the Secretary of 
Commerce, to directly inform businesses, particularly small 
businesses, about any new rules and regulations.
    Export Promotion Activities.--The Committee directs the 
Secretary of State to submit a report on economic and business 
diplomacy efforts supported by the Department of State, the Ex-
Im Bank, OPIC, USTDA, and other relevant components of the 
Federal Government operating under Chief of Mission authority 
at U.S. diplomatic missions. The report shall describe relevant 
programs and activities, particularly in Africa, including 
inter-agency coordination and outreach to the U.S. business 
community; address the alignment of U.S. commercial interests 
with regional development priorities; the development of 
relationships between the public and private sectors in other 
countries with U.S. businesses; and the contribution of such 
efforts to the competitiveness of U.S. businesses overseas.
    Human Rights Vetting.--The Committee supports the 
Department of State's efforts to monitor U.S. military 
assistance for foreign security forces, in accordance with 
section 620M of the FAA. The vetting process applies to 
individuals who are candidates for U.S. training, to those 
individuals' units, and to units that receive U.S. equipment or 
other assistance, as required by law. The Committee is aware of 
the technological challenges and staff time involved in the 
vetting process, and includes a provision under the FMF heading 
requiring that not less than .1 percent of funds appropriated 
for assistance for foreign security forces shall be used to 
carry out the requirements of section 620M.
    International Chancery Center.--The Committee recommends 
$5,970,150 and modified language under this heading in 
paragraph (5)(A) for the development, maintenance, and security 
of additional properties for use as an International Center, as 
authorized by section 5 of the International Center Act. The 
Committee understands that $5,400,000 is for one-time costs for 
infrastructure repairs at the International Center and planning 
and maintenance of the former Walter Reed Medical Center, and 
no further funds will be requested for these purposes.
    Office of Terrorism Finance and Economic Sanctions 
Policy.--The Committee recommends $4,000,000 for this office 
which develops strategies, in conjunction with other bureaus 
and agencies, for implementing sanctions regimes. This is an 
increase of $1,040,000 above the budget request.
    Prevention of Discrimination and Abuse of LGBT Individuals 
Abroad.--The Committee supports legal reform and legal 
assistance to protect individuals from arrest or other 
persecution because of their sexual orientation or gender 
identity, and directs the Assistant Secretary of State for DRL, 
in consultation with the Assistant Administrator for DCHA, to 
submit a report not later than 180 days after enactment of this 
act on strategies for supporting efforts that address the human 
rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities 
in countries that continue to criminalize consensual 
relationships and expressions.
    Program Changes.--The Committee recommends $83,294,000 of 
the $114,929,000 in the President's budget request to support 
the Burma program expansion; 11 new positions for increased 
diplomatic engagement in Asia and 5 new positions for the 
Office of the Coordinator for Cyber Issues; initiatives of the 
Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs, Bureau of African 
Affairs, DRL, INR, Information Resource Management, and the 
Office of Medical Director; post assignment travel; foreign 
assistance dashboard and budget system upgrades; 12 
international conferences planned for fiscal year 2014; 
$2,500,000 for the Office of Global Women's Issues Full 
Participation Fund; and $22,500,000 for the Arab Spring 
Regional Impact Initiative.
    Public Diplomacy.--The Committee recommends a total of 
$501,302,000 for public diplomacy programs to be funded through 
direct appropriations and additional revenue from applicable 
fees.
    Representation Expenses.--The Committee does not include a 
provision in the budget request authorizing the Department of 
State to transfer up to $1,000,000 from D&CP to Representation 
Expenses.
    Standards for Accessibility.--The Secretary of State, the 
Secretary of the Treasury, and the USAID Administrator shall 
seek to ensure that construction projects funded by this act 
are fully accessible to people with disabilities and in 
compliance with the USAID Policy on Standards for Accessibility 
for the Disabled, the Americans with Disabilities Act Standards 
for Accessible Design, or other similarly rigorous 
accessibility standards.
    Tibet.--The Committee recommends not less than $1,000,000 
for the Office of the Special Coordinator for Tibetan Issues to 
carry out the responsibilities detailed in section 621(d) of 
Public Law 107-228, as well as for convening and coordinating 
meetings for appropriate Federal agencies, NGOs, and 
representatives of the Tibetan leadership in exile.
    Trade and Other Sanctions.--The Committee notes that 
certain countries have offered asylum to Edward Snowden, an 
American citizen who divulged classified information to the 
press. The Committee directs the Secretary of State to consult 
with the appropriate congressional committees on sanction 
options against any country that provides asylum to Mr. 
Snowden, including revocation or suspension of trade privileges 
and preferences.
    Trafficking in Persons.--The Committee recommends a total 
of $50,200,000 in this act for TIP programs, of which 
$6,521,000 is included under the D&CP heading for the J/TIP 
($2,151,000 for programs and $4,370,000 for salaries). The 
Committee directs the Secretary of State to make publicly 
available an appropriate human trafficking hotline number and 
Web site information in Consular Affairs public waiting areas 
in all U.S. embassies and consulates in a timely manner.
    The Committee recognizes the need for transparency 
regarding the Department of State's use of waiver authority to 
prevent certain countries from being downgraded from the Tier 2 
Watch List to Tier 3 in the annual Trafficking in Persons 
Report (the Report). The Committee directs the Department of 
State to include in subsequent reports an assessment of 
progress made by each country issued such a waiver in relation 
to the country's written plan.
    The Committee directs GAO to assess the methodology used in 
the preparation of the Report, and the effectiveness of the 
Report as a tool to encourage countries to address human 
trafficking. The GAO should include specific recommendations 
for improving the methodology and effectiveness of the Report.
    Travel Cards and Purchase Cards.--The Committee directs the 
Secretary of State to report on the fiscal year 2013 use of 
Government-funded credit cards (including Department of State 
travel cards and purchase cards), including the number and 
value of purchases that did not comply with regulations, 
whether reimbursement was received for noncompliant purchases, 
and the Department's policy for disciplining employees who 
abuse the use of Government credit cards.
    Victims of Terrorism.--The Committee intends that survivors 
of Federal employees killed overseas by acts of terrorism 
receive appropriate compensation from the U.S. Government. 
Section 7084 of this act authorizes the Department of State and 
other Federal agencies to distribute just and equitable 
compensation for victims of international terrorism and their 
surviving family members, including U.S. Foreign Service 
officers, Foreign Service nationals, and civil servants. 
Survivors of victims of international terrorism shall be 
entitled to a death gratuity, an enhanced life insurance 
benefit, and an education benefit that is consistent to the 
benefits provided to survivors of members of U.S. Armed Forces 
killed in combat. The Committee notes that $4,000,000 was 
appropriated in fiscal year 2008, to be available until 
expended, for compensation to the families of members of the 
Foreign Service or other U.S. Government employees, or their 
dependents. The Committee is troubled that notwithstanding 
prior direction to the Department of State to provide a 
legislative proposal in order to expend these funds in a just 
and equitable manner, no such legislation has been brought 
forward to date.
    The Committee expects the Government of Libya to continue 
to support and assist the investigation of the bombing of Pan 
Am 103 and any other terrorist attacks attributable to the 
government of Muammar Qaddafi against U.S. citizens, including 
by providing access to documents, witnesses, and other 
information.
    The Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the 
Secretary of State, shall submit a report detailing the amount 
of assets owned by the Qaddafi family in Libya that remains 
blocked, the amount of settlement funds available to pay Libya-
related awards, and the total amount of certified awards.

                   CONFLICT STABILIZATION OPERATIONS

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................      $8,500,000
    Enduring............................................................
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................       8,500,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      45,207,000
Committee recommendation................................       8,500,000
    Enduring operations.................................................
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................       8,500,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
\2\Overseas contingency operations is funded under title VIII.

    The Committee does not recommend funding under the Conflict 
Stabilization Operations heading in this title, and instead 
includes authority under the D&CP heading to transfer up to 
$36,707,000 to this account. In addition, the Committee 
includes authority under the CFCF heading to transfer funds to 
this account. An additional $8,500,000 in title VIII under this 
heading is designated for OCO.

                        CAPITAL INVESTMENT FUND

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $59,361,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      76,900,000
Committee recommendation................................      76,900,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $76,900,000 for Capital Investment 
Fund.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $121,035,000
    Enduring operations.................................      61,884,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................      59,151,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     119,056,000
    Enduring operations.................................      69,406,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................      49,650,000
Committee recommendation................................     119,056,000
    Enduring operations.................................      69,406,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................      49,650,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
\2\Overseas contingency operations are funded under title VIII.

    The Committee recommends $69,406,000 for Office of 
Inspector General, and an additional $49,650,000 in title VIII 
under this heading is designated for OCO.
    The Committee directs the Inspectors General of the 
Department of State and USAID and SIGAR to coordinate audit 
plans and activities to minimize unnecessary duplication, 
ensure comprehensive oversight plans, and maximize the 
effective use of resources.
    The Committee directs the OIG to provide to the Committee a 
consolidated list of recommendations to the Department of State 
for position reductions, office downsizings or closures, and 
other right-sizing opportunities since October 1, 2012. The 
report should also include projected cost savings and the 
Department of State's responses to such recommendations and 
actions taken.
    The Committee notes that the administration did not request 
funding for SIGIR, which is expected to sunset by the end of 
October, 2013, and recommends $5,200,000 for the OIG's Middle 
East Regional Office to fund increased OIG oversight of 
programs and operations in Iraq.

               EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $598,613,000
    Enduring operations.................................     583,013,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................      15,600,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     562,659,000
Committee recommendation................................     603,628,000
    Enduring operations.................................     595,000,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................       8,628,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
\2\Overseas contingency operations are funded under title VIII.

    The Committee recommends $595,000,000 for Educational and 
Cultural Exchange Programs. An additional $8,628,000 in title 
VIII under this heading is designated for OCO.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of international 
exchanges and directs that programs funded under this heading 
will support U.S. foreign policy objectives.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to broaden 
participation to high priority groups that have been 
traditionally under-represented, such as youth and individuals 
from rural and impoverished areas, the Benjamin Gilman 
International Scholarship, International Visitor Leadership, 
Citizen Exchange youth programs, and educator programs. The 
Committee also urges the Secretary to continue to give priority 
to critical language programs, programs providing overseas 
training in critical languages for American students, and 
exchange programs from countries with high national security 
importance, including those with significant Muslim 
populations.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit 
within 180 days after enactment of this act a multi-year plan 
to significantly expand the number, diversity, and experience 
of participants beyond traditional study abroad programs and to 
increase the pool of potential applicants for traditional 
exchange programs through stand-alone, technology-supported, 
sustained, people-to-people educational exchange opportunities, 
including virtual exchanges. The plan should include annual 
targets for the number of exchange participants that are a 
significant increase in Department-funded participants 
(approximately 58,000 in fiscal year 2010) and expand the 
participation of traditionally under-represented groups; a 
proposal for meeting the targets in a manner that decreases the 
average cost per exchange participant; a multi-year timeline 
for increasing the number of participants and decreasing cost 
per participant; an assessment of the impact of all Department-
funded exchange programs; and estimated annual costs.
    The Committee supports a new virtual educational exchange 
initiative between the United States and Middle East, and 
intends that funds be matched by sources other than the U.S. 
Government, including from private foundations, foreign 
governments, and the private sector. Such an initiative can 
broaden understanding and engagement between U.S. and Middle 
Eastern and North African youth in a cost-effective manner.
    The Committee recognizes that the Muskie Fellowship Program 
has helped individuals from Eurasia and Central Asia to promote 
mutual understanding, build democracy, and foster the 
transition to market economies, and directs that a portion of 
the Fulbright awards from this region are designated as Edmund 
S. Muskie Fellowships.
    The Committee supports the President's budget request for 
exchange programs with Japan, including youth and student 
exchanges through the Tomodachi Initiative.
    The Committee provides authority for academic fellowships, 
scholarships, and exchanges for foreign academic professionals 
and foreign university students from countries in the Near East 
region, subject to the regular notification procedures of the 
Committee.
    The Committee supports the Secretary of State's efforts to 
reduce the administrative and overhead costs of exchange 
programs and expects that savings from such efforts will be 
used to increase the number of participants.
    Funds are allocated according to the following table and 
are subject to the provisions of section 7019 of this act:

               EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Academic Programs.......................................         329,016
    Special Academic Exchanges (non-add)................          26,050
Professional and Cultural Exchanges.....................         201,075
    Special Professional and Cultural Exchanges: (non-               575
     add)...............................................
Program Evaluation......................................           4,750
Exchanges Support.......................................          60,159
                                                         ---------------
      Total, ECE........................................         595,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Changes to Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs.--The 
Committee is concerned that ECA has modified educational and 
cultural exchange programs without adequate consultation with 
the appropriate congressional committees, and requires the 
Secretary of State to submit a report to the Committee on such 
modifications since calendar year 2011. The Committee does not 
intend ECA to subject administrative or de minimus 
modifications to the notification requirement under this 
heading. The Committee also directs the Secretary of State to 
consult with the Committee prior to implementing changes to 
exchange programs proposed for fiscal year 2014.
    Summer Work Travel and High School Exchange Programs.--The 
Committee recognizes that the Department of State has taken, 
and continues to take, steps to strengthen regulations and 
oversight of these programs to ensure they are primarily 
cultural and educational, do not divert jobs from Americans, 
and the potential for coercion or exploitation is minimized. 
The Committee expects to be informed in a timely manner of 
improvements to these programs and any recurring problems.

                        REPRESENTATION EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................      $7,298,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................       7,679,000
Committee recommendation................................       7,300,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $7,300,000 for Representation 
Expenses.
    The Committee directs the administration to submit a 
semiannual report on the allotment and expenditure of 
representation funds.

              PROTECTION OF FOREIGN MISSIONS AND OFFICIALS

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $26,991,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      28,200,000
Committee recommendation................................      28,200,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $28,200,000 for Protection of 
Foreign Missions and Officials.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to continue to 
submit a semiannual report on the number of claims for 
extraordinary protective services by eligible jurisdictions and 
certified as meeting program requirements, and the amount of 
unobligated funds available to pay such claims.
    The Committee is informed that outstanding eligible claims 
for the extraordinary protective services provided to foreign 
missions and officials from qualifying jurisdictions submitted 
to the Department of State exceed $88,000,000. Section 7080 of 
this act authorizes the Secretary to transfer up to $50,000,000 
in expired unobligated balances from D&CP to this account to be 
used for such certified eligible claims.

            EMBASSY SECURITY, CONSTRUCTION, AND MAINTENANCE

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $2,898,304,000
    Enduring operations.................................   1,626,104,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................   1,272,200,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   2,649,351,000
    Enduring operations.................................   2,399,351,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................     250,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,664,351,000
    Enduring operations.................................   2,105,803,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................     558,548,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
\2\Overseas contingency operations are funded under title VIII.

    The Committee recommends $2,105,803,00 for Embassy 
Security, Construction, and Maintenance, of which 
$1,320,452,000 is for worldwide security upgrades and 
$785,351,000 is for other construction, operations, and 
maintenance. An additional $558,548,000 in title VIII under 
this heading is designated for OCO. The total amount 
appropriated by this act is $25,000,000 above the President's 
budget request for the Increased Security Proposal, including 
at least $15,000,000 from the proceeds of sale of diplomatic 
facilities.
    Section 7076 of this act requires the Secretary of State to 
submit an operating plan for funds appropriated under this 
heading, which should include all resources available to the 
Department of State in fiscal year 2014 for operations, 
maintenance, and construction, and an accounting of the actual 
and anticipated proceeds of sales for all projects in fiscal 
year 2013.
    The Committee is concerned that the Department of State is 
not adequately balancing decisions about U.S. diplomatic 
presence abroad with increasingly costly security and 
construction requirements and shrinking budgetary resources. 
The Committee is also concerned that Embassy construction 
projects are not sufficiently prioritized and that construction 
and security costs are not always consistent with mission size, 
location, or threat environment, or reflect our national 
interest priorities. The Department of State's periodic 
rightsizing reviews are more focused on staff growth and the 
size of other agencies' presence than with more fundamental 
questions of what presence we require where, and how new 
security challenges and related costs should be reassessed. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of State to provide the 
appropriate congressional committees with a new comprehensive 
assessment of these factors, including:
  --the current relevance of the principle of universal 
        bilateral diplomatic presence if the associated costs 
        cannot be sustained;
  --alternatives, including expanded use of regional embassies 
        accredited to several foreign governments and creation 
        of Washington-based Ambassadors accredited to foreign 
        governments; and
  --the utility of constituent posts such as consulates where 
        their functions could be assumed centrally and where 
        construction, security and other associated costs make 
        them unaffordable.

           EMERGENCIES IN THE DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR SERVICE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................      $9,297,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................       9,652,000
Committee recommendation................................       9,652,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $9,652,000 for Emergencies in the 
Diplomatic and Consular Service. The Committee also authorizes 
the transfer of up to $10,000,000 under the D&CP heading for 
emergency evacuations and rewards.
    The Committee directs the administration to regularize 
funding for costs currently funded under this heading that are 
not related to unforeseen emergencies or the rewards program by 
requesting funding in fiscal year 2015 for these other costs 
under the appropriate accounts.
    The Committee directs that the quarterly reports required 
by section 124 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, 
fiscal years 1988 and 1989, as amended, include, by category, 
actual expenditures for the prior two fiscal years and 
cumulative totals for the current fiscal year of the funds 
available under this heading.

                   REPATRIATION LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................      $1,447,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................       1,700,000
Committee recommendation................................       1,700,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $1,700,000 for the Repatriation 
Loans Program Account to support loans totaling up to 
$2,690,000. The Committee understands that, beginning in fiscal 
year 2014, the administrative expenses previously funded under 
this account will be provided by Border Security Program Fees.

              PAYMENT TO THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE IN TAIWAN

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $21,101,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      36,221,000
Committee recommendation................................      31,221,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $31,221,000 for the American 
Institute in Taiwan. The Committee does not recommend funding 
for phase III of the Foreign Service comparability pay, as in 
prior years. The Committee directs the director of the American 
Institute in Taiwan, in coordination with the Secretary of 
State, to report in the CBJ the amount of fees estimated to be 
received from the Department of State for consular services.

     PAYMENT TO THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY FUND

Appropriations, 2013....................................    $158,900,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     158,900,000
Committee recommendation................................     158,900,000

    The Committee recommends $158,900,000 for the Foreign 
Service Retirement and Disability Fund.

                      International Organizations


              CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $1,550,536,000
    Enduring operations.................................   1,449,236,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................     101,300,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   1,573,454,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,456,808,000
    Enduring operations.................................   1,382,408,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................      74,400,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
\2\Overseas contingency operations are funded under title VIII.

    The Committee recommends $1,382,408,000 for Contributions 
to International Organizations. An additional $74,400,000 in 
title VIII under this heading is designated for OCO.
    Section 7076 of this act requires the Secretary of State to 
submit an operating plan for funds made available under this 
heading, which should include each international organization 
funded, a notation of any exchange rate fluctuations that 
occurred since such estimates were calculated for the fiscal 
year 2014 CBJ, and a description of any TEF credits applied.
    Food and Agriculture Organization.--The Committee 
encourages the U.N. Food and Agricultural Organization to work 
with land grant institutions of higher learning in the United 
States to meet global food security challenges.
    Organization of American States.--The Committee directs the 
U.S. Mission to the OAS to work with other OAS member states to 
encourage the OAS Permanent Council to conduct a transparent 
accounting of current staffing and adopt personnel practices 
that establish transparent, merit-based human resource 
standards that are applied to all aspects of the OAS personnel 
system, including the budgetary implications of appointments to 
senior level trust and contract positions and the transfer of 
individuals from these positions into senior regular positions.
    United Nations Capital Master Plan.--The Committee notes 
that the administration did not request funds for the Capital 
Master Plan construction project for the U.N. headquarters in 
New York, and no funds are provided by this act for such 
purpose.
    United States Contributions.--The Committee directs the 
Secretary of State, at the time of the submission of the 
President's budget to Congress under section 1105(a) of title 
31, United States Code, to transmit to the Committee the most 
recent biennial budget prepared by the U.N. for the operations 
of the U.N.
    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural 
Organization.--The Committee does not provide the request of 
$77,764,000 for a U.S. contribution to UNESCO and an additional 
$38,882,000 in Contingent Requirements for such a contribution, 
which is prohibited by law.
    Report.--The Committee directs the Secretary of State to 
submit a report not later than 45 days after enactment of this 
act, detailing the amount of funds available for obligation or 
expenditure in fiscal year 2014 under the CIO and IO&P headings 
that are withheld from obligation or expenditure due to any 
provision of law. The Secretary shall update such report each 
time additional funds are withheld by operation of any 
provision of law, and consult with the Committee prior to the 
reprogramming of any withheld funds identified in such report, 
including updates thereof.
    The Secretary of State shall report to the Committee not 
later than May 1, 2014, on any credits available to the United 
States from the TEF and provide updated fiscal year 2015 
assessment costs, including offsets from available TEF credits 
and updated foreign currency exchange rates.

        CONTRIBUTIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACEKEEPING ACTIVITIES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $2,005,857,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   2,094,661,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,094,661,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $2,094,661,000 for Contributions 
for International Peacekeeping Activities.
    The Committee recognizes the necessity of U.N. peacekeeping 
missions in countries where ethnic, religious, and political 
violence threatens regional stability and the safety of 
civilian populations. The Committee continues certain 
requirements for U.S. support for such missions, and section 
7076 of this act requires submission of an operating plan not 
later than 45 days after enactment of this act, which should 
include each peacekeeping mission funded and a description of 
any credits applied.
    Report.--The Secretary of State shall report to the 
Committee not later than May 1, 2014, of any credits available 
to the United States resulting from U.N. peacekeeping missions 
or the TEF.

                       International Commissions


 INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $43,412,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      45,618,000
Committee recommendation................................      45,618,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $45,618,000 for salaries and 
expenses of the International Boundary and Water Commission, 
United States and Mexico. The Committee directs the IBWC to 
ensure that representation expenses comply with section 7020 of 
this act regarding limitations on such expenses.
    The Secretary of State, in consultation with the IBWC 
Commissioner, shall report to the appropriate congressional 
committees on actions taken to ensure that the water deficits 
owed by Mexico to the United States do not increase and that 
allocations comply with the Treaty for the Utilization of 
Waters of the Colorado and Tijuana Rivers and of the Rio Grande 
of 1944.

                              CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $27,620,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      31,400,000
Committee recommendation................................      35,200,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $35,200,000 for planning, 
preparation, and construction.
    Funds in this account are allocated according to the 
following table and are subject to the provisions of section 
7019 of this act:

                           IBWC--CONSTRUCTION
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                    Program/Activity                      recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Water Quantity Program..................................          21,805
    Rio Grande Control System Rehabilitation (non-add)..           9,500
Water Quality Program...................................           9,778
Resource & Asset Management Program.....................           3,617
                                                         ---------------
      Total, IBWC--Construction.........................          35,200
------------------------------------------------------------------------

              AMERICAN SECTIONS, INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONS

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $11,899,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      12,499,000
Committee recommendation................................      12,799,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $12,799,000 for American Sections, 
International Commissions, of which $7,664,000 is for the 
International Joint Commission, $2,449,000 is for the 
International Boundary Commission, United States and Canada, 
and $2,686,000 is for the Border Environment Cooperation 
Commission. The Committee directs the IJC to ensure that 
representation expenses comply with section 7020 of this act 
regarding limitations on such expenses. The Committee supports 
the $487,000 included in the budget request for a plan of study 
on the causes and impacts of flooding in the Lake Champlain-
Richelieu River watershed.

                  INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES COMMISSIONS

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $34,548,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      31,445,000
Committee recommendation................................      39,345,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $39,345,000 for International 
Fisheries Commissions, which with the exception of GLFC funds 
all the commissions at the budget request level. The Committee 
recommends $27,074,000 for GLFC, of which $3,500,000 is for sea 
lamprey control and water quality improvements in the Lake 
Champlain Basin and $4,400,000 is for sea lamprey control and 
fishery research for the Great Lakes Basin.

                             RELATED AGENCY


                    Broadcasting Board of Governors


                 INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING OPERATIONS

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $744,263,000
    Enduring operations.................................     739,863,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................       4,400,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     722,580,000
Committee recommendation................................     721,482,000
    Enduring operations.................................     717,082,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................       4,400,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
\2\Overseas contingency operations are funded under title VIII.

    The Committee recommends $717,082,000 for International 
Broadcasting Operations, and does not include funding for phase 
III of the Foreign Service comparability pay, as in prior 
fiscal years. An additional $4,400,000 in title VIII under this 
heading is designated for OCO. The Committee directs the BBG to 
ensure that representation expenses comply with section 7020 of 
this act regarding limitations on such expenses.
    The Committee recommends $41,734,000 to be available until 
expended under IBO for satellite transmission lease costs and 
BBG's Internet freedom and circumvention programs.
    Funds in this account are allocated according to the 
following table and are subject to the provisions of section 
7019 of this act:

                  INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING OPERATIONS
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                    Program/Activity                      recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Federal Entities........................................         478,441
BBG/IBB Operations......................................          67,103
International Broadcasting Bureau [IBB]:
    Voice of America....................................         200,006
    Broadcasting to Cuba................................          23,804
    Office of Technology, Services, and Innovation......         187,528
        Internet Freedom (non-add)......................          19,600
Independent Grantee Organizations.......................         238,641
    Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty [RFE/RL]............          93,178
    Radio Free Asia [RFA]...............................          35,950
    Middle East Broadcasting Networks [MBN].............         109,513
                                                         ---------------
      Total, International Broadcasting Operations......         717,082
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Chief Executive Officer for International Broadcasting and 
Board Quorum Requirement.--The Committee is concerned with the 
dysfunction and poor management of the BBG as identified by the 
OIG, and includes section 7082 of this act providing authority 
to the Board to hire a Chief Executive Officer for 
International Broadcasting who will have management and 
oversight responsibilities for all BBG entities. The Committee 
also recommends revising the Board quorum requirement to a 
majority of Board members serving.
    New Program Initiatives.--The Committee recommends funding 
to launch new programming to counter extremism in Africa, 
engage new audiences in the Middle East and Burma, and to 
improve shortwave service to key audiences around the world.
    North Korea.--The Committee recommends the President's 
budget request for international broadcasting to North Korea.
    Proposed Reductions.--The Committee does not support the 
following reductions and terminations proposed by BBG and 
includes adequate funding to sustain current levels: reductions 
to staffing of RFA Khmer service; the consolidation and 
reorganization of VOA Central News and English Division; 
reductions to staffing and radio broadcasts of VOA Georgian; or 
closing of the BBG Poro medium wave transmitting station.
    Strategic Priorities.--The Committee directs BBG to submit 
a report on how BBG's broadcast policy reflects input from the 
Department of State and other relevant agencies, and further 
directs BBG to include in its CBJ the linkage between broadcast 
and foreign policy priorities for any proposed language service 
changes.
    VOA and RFA Tibetan Language Services.--The Committee 
supports the President's budget request for VOA and RFA Tibetan 
services and expects the BBG to continue broadcast programs at 
not less than fiscal year 2013 levels.

                   BROADCASTING CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................      $7,028,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................       8,500,000
Committee recommendation................................       8,000,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $8,000,000 for Broadcasting 
Capital Improvements.

                            RELATED PROGRAMS


                          The Asia Foundation

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $16,995,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      17,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      17,000,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $17,000,000 for The Asia 
Foundation and directs TAF to comply with sections 7051 and 
7078 of this act.

                    United States Institute of Peace

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $38,990,000
    Enduring operations.................................      30,579,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................       8,411,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      35,687,000
Committee recommendation................................      37,000,000
    Enduring operations.................................      30,984,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................       6,016,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
\2\Overseas contingency operations are funded under title VIII.

    The Committee recommends $30,984,000 for the United States 
Institute of Peace and directs that renovation, operations, and 
maintenance costs of buildings located within the Potomac Annex 
for USIP training activities shall not be paid with 
appropriated funds. An additional $6,016,000 in title VIII 
under this heading is designated for OCO. The Committee directs 
USIP to comply with sections 7051 and 7078 of this act.
    The Committee understands that a potential project to 
reconfigure the entrance ramp from Constitution Avenue to the 
Theodore Roosevelt Bridge is not a USIP project and no USIP 
funds will be used to support such project.

         Center for Middle Eastern-Western Dialogue Trust Fund

Appropriations, 2013....................................        $840,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................          90,000
Committee recommendation................................          90,000

    The Committee recommends $90,000 from interest and earnings 
from the Center for Middle Eastern-Western Dialogue Trust Fund 
and directs the Center to comply with sections 7051 and 7078 of 
this act.
    The Committee notes that the actual interest earned has 
recently been significantly lower than in the past and directs 
the Department of State and the Center for Middle Eastern-
Western Dialogue Trust Fund to leverage existing funds to 
secure contributions from private and other public sources, to 
the maximum extent practicable. The Committee supports the 
Department's oversight of the annual grant to the Center but 
directs that the Department not require prior approval of 
program participants.

                 Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Program

Appropriations, 2013....................................        $500,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................         400,000
Committee recommendation................................         400,000

    The Committee recommends $400,000 from interest and 
earnings from the Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Program Trust 
Fund.

                    Israeli Arab Scholarship Program

Appropriations, 2013....................................        $375,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................          13,000
Committee recommendation................................          13,000

    The Committee recommends $13,000 from interest and earnings 
from the Israeli Arab Scholarship Endowment Fund.

                     International Chancery Center

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................................
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      $5,970,150
Committee recommendation................................................

    The Committee does not recommend establishing this new 
account, and instead includes language under the D&CP heading 
providing $5,970,150 from the reserve available for the 
International Center. These costs were included under the D&CP 
heading in prior fiscal years, and are for the development, 
security, maintenance, and operations of U.S.-owned property at 
the International Center in Washington, DC, for lease or 
exchange to foreign governments or international organizations.

                            East-West Center

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $16,695,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      10,800,000
Committee recommendation................................      16,700,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $16,700,000 for the East-West 
Center and directs the Center to comply with sections 7051 and 
7078 of this act.

                    National Endowment for Democracy

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $117,726,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     103,450,000
Committee recommendation................................     135,000,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $135,000,000 for the National 
Endowment for Democracy, of which $100,000,000 shall be 
allocated in the traditional and customary manner, as in prior 
fiscal years, to include the core institutes. The Committee 
notes that the increase for the NED is offset by an equivalent 
decrease in the overall fiscal year 2014 budget request for 
democracy programs.
    The Committee recognizes the comparative advantages of the 
NED in the promotion of democracy and human rights abroad, 
particularly given its status as an NGO, unparalleled 
experience in promoting freedom during the Cold War, and 
continued ability to conduct programs in the most hostile 
political environments. In many circumstances, the Committee 
recognizes the NED as a more appropriate and effective 
mechanism to promote democracy and human rights abroad than 
either the Department of State or USAID. Additional funds above 
the budget request are recommended for programs in the 
following countries:

                    NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR DEMOCRACY
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                         Country                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Burma...................................................           6,000
China/Tibet.............................................           5,000
DRC.....................................................           3,000
Egypt...................................................           1,500
Iraq....................................................           3,500
North Korea.............................................           2,500
Russia..................................................           5,000
Venezuela/Bolivia/Ecuador...............................           3,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expects the NED, DRL, and USAID to regularly 
consult and coordinate democracy and human rights activities. 
However, funds appropriated under this heading shall not be 
subject to prior approval by the Department of State or USAID, 
or to administrative or managerial surcharges, and the NED 
should not be precluded from competitively bidding on other 
grant solicitations.
    The President of the NED shall submit a report on the uses 
of funds under this heading on a regional and country basis not 
later than 45 days after enactment of this act. The Committee 
directs the NED to comply with sections 7051 and 7078 of this 
act.

                           OTHER COMMISSIONS


      Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................        $605,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................         690,000
Committee recommendation................................         690,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $690,000 for the Commission for 
the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad and directs the 
Commission to comply with sections 7051 and 7078 of this act.

      United States Commission on International Religious Freedom


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................      $2,926,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................       3,500,000
Committee recommendation................................       3,500,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $3,500,000 for the United States 
Commission on International Religious Freedom, including not 
more than $4,000 for representation expenses. The Committee 
directs the Commission to ensure that such expenses comply with 
limitations in section 7020(a) of this act on representation-
type expenses, including meal costs not related to official 
travel, and entertainment expenses. The Committee also directs 
the Commission to comply with sections 7051 and 7078 of this 
act.

            Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................      $2,438,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................       2,579,000
Committee recommendation................................       2,579,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $2,579,000 for the Commission on 
Security and Cooperation in Europe, and directs the Commission 
to comply with limitations in section 7020(a) of this act on 
representation-type expenses. The Committee also directs the 
Commission to comply with sections 7051 and 7078 of this act.

  Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's Republic of China


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................      $1,902,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................       2,000,000
Committee recommendation................................       2,000,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for the Congressional-
Executive Commission on the People's Republic of China, and 
directs the Commission to comply with limitations in section 
7020(a) of this act on representation-type expenses. The 
Committee also directs the Commission to comply with sections 
7051 and 7078 of this act.

      United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................      $3,305,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................       3,500,000
Committee recommendation................................       3,500,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $3,500,000 for the United States-
China Economic and Security Review Commission, and directs the 
Commission to comply with limitations in section 7020(a) of 
this act on representation-type expenses. The Committee also 
directs the Commission to comply with sections 7051 and 7078 of 
this act.

                                TITLE II

           UNITED STATES AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

                  Funds Appropriated to the President

                           OPERATING EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $1,346,950,000
    Enduring operations.................................   1,091,950,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................     255,000,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   1,399,200,000
    Enduring operations.................................   1,328,200,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................      71,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,349,671,000
    Enduring operations.................................   1,284,321,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................      65,350,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6, but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
\2\Overseas contingency operations are funded under title VIII.

    The Committee recommends $1,284,321,000 for Operating 
Expenses. An additional $65,350,000 in title VIII under this 
heading is designated for OCO. The Committee does not recommend 
funding for phase III of the Foreign Service comparability pay, 
as in prior fiscal years.
    Funds in this account are allocated according to the 
following table and are subject to the provisions of section 
7019 of this act:

                        USAID OPERATING EXPENSES
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                        Program                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
USAID Forward Agency Reforms...........................          36,834
    Development Leadership Initiative (non-add)........          32,834
    Talent Management--Civil Service Capacity..........           4,000
Overseas Non-frontline States Operations...............         642,029
Overseas Frontline States Operations...................         133,584
Washington Operations..................................         353,906
Central Support........................................         226,149
Less other sources.....................................        (108,181)
                                                        ----------------
      Subtotal, USAID Operating Expenses...............       1,284,321
                                                        ----------------
OCO for Afghanistan operations.........................          65,350
                                                        ================
      Total, USAID Operating Expenses..................       1,349,671
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Conflict Management and Mitigation.--The Committee supports 
the work of USAID's Office of Conflict Management and 
Mitigation to resolve conflict and promote reconciliation among 
people of different ethnic, religious, and political 
backgrounds.
    Development Leadership Initiative.--The Committee continues 
to support USAID's DLI, but notes that since the beginning of 
the DLI many program managers have retired and USAID is in need 
of mid- and senior-level program managers with field 
experience. The Committee recognizes and supports the training 
role that retired USAID employees can provide, and encourages 
the USAID Administrator to utilize such training for direct-
hire staff.
    Mission Closings.--The Committee notes the decision of 
certain countries to terminate or otherwise downgrade bilateral 
development relations with the United States, including closing 
the USAID Missions in Russia and Bolivia. The Committee directs 
that the Secretary of State and USAID Administrator, as 
appropriate, regularly consult with the Committee on additional 
countries or missions that may potentially downgrade such 
relations.
    Overseas Representation and Residence Expenses.--The 
Committee expects USAID to utilize, to the maximum extent 
possible, United States-owned foreign currencies for overseas 
representation and official residence expenses.
    Procurement Reform.--The Committee supports USAID's effort 
to reform its procurement policies and practices and recommends 
not less than the President's budget request for procurement 
reform. The Committee recognizes the need to protect taxpayer 
dollars from waste, fraud, and abuse, and at the same time 
curtail practices that are inefficient, unnecessarily costly, 
and unsustainable. USAID's procurement reform initiative 
focuses on building capacity in local governments and civil 
society and streamlining the agency's procurement procedures to 
reach a wider range of partners and increase competition. The 
Committee requests the USAID Administrator to continue to 
consult on these efforts, and urges USAID to reduce reliance on 
large, inflexible contracts and work more directly with local 
governments, NGOs, universities, and other entities to develop 
sustainable programs in a transparent and accountable manner.
    The USAID Administrator is directed to submit a report to 
the Committee detailing:
  --USAID's strategy for increasing assistance through local 
        partners;
  --the eligibility and oversight requirements of such 
        assistance;
  --how such strategy will advance U.S. interests and 
        development goals; and
  --potential cost savings, including estimated reductions in 
        assistance through other partners.
    Recruitment.--The Committee directs the USAID Administrator 
to report to the Committee the number of U.S. military veterans 
currently employed by USAID to include direct hires and 
personal service contractors. The report should include hiring 
trend data, steps USAID is taking to recruit and hire veterans, 
and specific recommendations for increasing the hiring of 
veterans, as appropriate.
    The Committee directs the USAID Administrator to report not 
later than 45 days after enactment of this act on the extent to 
which USAID implemented the recruitment strategy referenced in 
section 7059(l) of division H of Public Law 111-8.

                        CAPITAL INVESTMENT FUND

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $129,658,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     117,940,000
Committee recommendation................................     117,940,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $117,940,000 for Capital 
Investment Fund, and requires that the USAID Administrator, in 
consultation with the Secretary of State, submit not later than 
180 days after enactment of this act a multiyear strategy to 
eliminate redundancy of USAID and Department of State 
administrative services and operations at diplomatic facilities 
abroad.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $50,985,000
    Enduring operations.................................      46,485,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................       4,500,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      54,200,000
Committee recommendation................................      52,000,000
    Enduring operations.................................      47,000,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................       5,000,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
\2\Overseas contingency operations are funded under title VIII.

    The Committee recommends $47,000,000 for Office of 
Inspector General. An additional $5,000,000 in title VIII under 
this heading is designated for OCO.

                               TITLE III

                     BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

                  Funds Appropriated to the President

Appropriations, 2013\1\................................. $18,932,663,000
    Enduring operations.................................  15,001,552,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................   3,931,111,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................  19,416,866,000
    Enduring operations.................................  18,034,666,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................   1,382,200,000
Committee recommendation................................  17,839,696,000
    Enduring operations.................................  15,393,196,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................   2,446,500,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
\2\Overseas contingency operations is funded under title VIII.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                           SECTOR ASSISTANCE

    This act directs funding for sectors in the amounts 
allocated in the following table which are subject to the 
requirements of section 7019 of this act:

                         PROGRAMMATIC DIRECTIVES
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                         Sectors                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Basic Education.........................................         501,500
Higher Education........................................         225,000
Development Grants Program..............................          45,000
Environment Programs....................................       1,153,500
Food Security and Agriculture Development...............       1,100,000
Microenterprise and Microfinance........................         250,000
Reconciliation Programs.................................          26,000
Trafficking in Persons..................................          43,679
Water and Sanitation....................................         405,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         GLOBAL HEALTH PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $8,473,736,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   8,315,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   8,455,000,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $8,455,000,000 for Global Health 
Programs.
    Funds in this account are allocated according to the 
following table and are subject to the provisions of section 
7019 of this act:

                         GLOBAL HEALTH PROGRAMS
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                    Program/activity                      recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Maternal and Child Health...............................         706,000
    Polio (non-add).....................................          51,000
    GAVI Alliance (non-add).............................         175,000
Nutrition (USAID).......................................          95,000
    Iodine Deficiency Disorder (non-add)................           2,500
    Micronutrients (non-add)............................          33,000
        Vitamin A (non-add).............................          22,500
Vulnerable Children (USAID).............................          22,000
    Blind Children (non-add)............................           2,500
HIV/AIDS (USAID)........................................         330,000
    Microbicides (non-add)..............................          45,000
HIV/AIDS (Department of State)..........................       5,670,000
    Global Fund (non-add)...............................       1,650,000
    UNAIDS (non-add)....................................          45,000
Family Planning/Reproductive Health (USAID).............         565,000
Other Infectious Diseases (USAID).......................       1,067,000
    Pandemics and Emerging Threats (non-add)............          75,000
    Malaria (non-add)...................................         667,000
    Tuberculosis (non-add)..............................         225,000
        Global TB Drug Facility (non-add)...............          15,000
    Neglected Tropical Diseases (non-add)...............         100,000
                                                         ---------------
      Total, GHP........................................       8,455,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH

    The Committee recommends $706,000,000 for maternal and 
child health activities under this heading.
    Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus.--The Committee recognizes 
the importance of low-cost vaccines for women of childbearing 
age in preventing tetanus in newborn children and the role of 
public-private partnerships in delivering such vaccines, and 
urges USAID to support efforts to eliminate maternal and 
neonatal tetanus.
    Pediatric Screening.--The Committee encourages USAID to 
consider support for mobile outreach programs to expand and 
improve access to pediatric eye screening for children in the 
West Bank and East Jerusalem in a manner that delivers the 
maximum amount of funds to the field.
    Polio.--The Committee recommends a total of not less than 
$61,000,000 in this act for polio eradication efforts, 
including not less than $10,000,000 under the ESF heading for 
programs in Pakistan and Afghanistan. The additional funds 
above the President's budget request are to support a multi-
donor effort to eliminate the disease.
    Uterine Prolapse.--The Committee recommends that USAID 
support efforts to prevent and treat uterine prolapse in Nepal, 
a debilitating disease that afflicts thousands of poor women.
    Vaccines and Immunizations.--The Committee recommends 
$175,000,000 for the GAVI Alliance, and directs the USAID 
Administrator to provide details on the planned uses of funds 
prior to making the contribution.
    Vulnerable Children.--The Committee recommends $22,000,000 
for the Office of Displaced Children and Orphans Fund to 
support programs and activities that address the needs of 
vulnerable children, of which not less than $9,500,000 shall be 
used to implement the U.S. Government Action Plan on Children 
in Adversity in three to five countries which embrace an 
integrated approach to fully implementing the three objectives 
of the plan, and which shall be administered under the 
direction of the USAID Senior Coordinator for Children in 
Adversity. The head of DCOF and the Senior Coordinator are 
directed to consult with the Committee prior to the obligation 
of funds.
    The Committee recommends not less than $2,500,000 for 
assistance for blind children, which USAID should administer in 
a manner that delivers the maximum amount of funds to the 
field. The Committee directs USAID to submit a report detailing 
the uses of funds for blind children in fiscal year 2013 and 
planned uses of such funds in fiscal year 2014, including 
implementing partners, services provided, objectives of the 
program, and number of beneficiaries.
    The Committee recommends support for programs that address 
autism spectrum disorders, including treatment and the training 
of healthcare workers to better diagnose such disorders.

                               NUTRITION

    The Committee recommends $95,000,000 for nutrition programs 
under this heading, to be made available through USAID.
    The Committee notes the recent announcement of the 
development of a governmentwide, cross-sectoral global 
nutrition strategy which should include a description of focus 
countries, specific nutrition intervention targets, and a plan 
for reducing malnutrition and stunting rates. The Committee 
directs the USAID Administrator to consult with the Committee 
on such strategy going forward.
    Micronutrients.--The Committee recommends not less than 
$33,000,000 for micronutrients, of which not less than 
$22,500,000 is to address vitamin A deficiencies. The Committee 
recommends that nutrition programs, including micronutrients, 
also be funded by the Department of State and USAID within 
programs to combat HIV/AIDS. The Committee recommends not less 
than $2,500,000 for the USAID/UNICEF Iodine Deficiency Disorder 
program to prevent mental retardation in children.

                  FAMILY PLANNING/REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH

    The Committee recommends a total of $669,500,000 from all 
accounts in this act for family planning and reproductive 
health programs, including $565,000,000 under this heading, 
$65,000,000 under the ESF heading, and $39,500,000 for UNFPA.
    The Committee recognizes that there is a need to accelerate 
research and development of contraceptives that are more 
effective, affordable, and easier to deliver and may also 
prevent sexually transmitted diseases. The Committee directs 
USAID to increase funding to its Office of Population and 
Reproductive Health to support the expansion of such efforts, 
and encourages partnerships and cost-sharing with USAID's 
Office of HIV/AIDS and NIH. The Committee directs USAID to 
consult with the Committee on funding for such purposes.

                                HIV/AIDS

    The Committee recommends a total of $6,000,000,000 for 
programs and activities to combat HIV/AIDS, of which 
$5,670,000,000 is for the Department of State and $330,000,000 
is for USAID.
    Global Fund.--The Committee recommends not less than 
$1,650,000,000 for a U.S. contribution to the Global Fund to 
Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria, which may not exceed 33 
percent of the total amount of funds contributed to the Global 
Fund from all sources. The Committee notes the progress made by 
the Global Fund Board of Directors and Secretariat in adopting 
and implementing reforms to further the transparency, 
accountability and effectiveness of Global Fund programs, and 
emphasizes that a strong Global Fund OIG is necessary for 
proper oversight of donor contributions.
    The Committee notes the progress made in the collection of 
information about taxation of Global Fund assistance by 
recipient countries, but remains concerned with the continued 
practice of taxation by such countries. The Committee directs 
OGAC to continue to work with the Global Fund to obtain 
information on the estimated amount of taxes collected on 
Global Fund assistance by host countries each year, by country.
    The Committee supports efforts to improve efficiencies, and 
recommends funds for a new ``challenge grants'' program to 
leverage additional funding for the Global Fund from host 
country governments, multilateral organizations, the private 
sector, and/or other donor governments. OGAC is directed to 
consult with the Committee on the parameters of the program 
prior to the initial obligation of funds. After implementation 
of the program, the Committee requires the Secretary of State 
to assess the ability of such grants to leverage increased 
support for, and funding of, Global Fund activities from donors 
other than the U.S. Government.
    Microbicides.--The Committee recommends $45,000,000 for 
research on, and development of, microbicides to prevent HIV.
    PEPFAR.--The Committee recognizes that PEPFAR plays a key 
role in HIV/AIDS prevention, care, and treatment globally.
    The Committee recognizes that continued small investments 
by PEPFAR in concentrated epidemic settings leverage a greater 
U.S. investment in the Global Fund, ensuring quality in 
programs targeting key population groups. The Committee directs 
OGAC to submit a report on how PEPFAR intends to provide 
continued support to concentrated epidemic countries to ensure 
quality of Global Fund programs, and how transition plans 
reflect the safety and rights of key populations who are 
particularly vulnerable to reduction of PEPFAR resources.
    The Committee encourages OGAC to increase efforts to expand 
pediatric treatment programs to meet the targets included in 
Public Law 108-25, and recommends that the Coordinator include 
expanded testing of high risk pediatric populations for early 
diagnosis and initiation of anti-retroviral therapy for infants 
and children as a priority in country operating plans.
    The Committee directs the USAID Administrator, in 
consultation with the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator, to submit a 
report not later than 180 days after enactment of this act 
describing efforts to increase equitable access to qualified 
health workers in developing countries, particularly in 
underserved areas, including by training more women health 
workers. The report should identify countries where 
quantifiable progress has been made over the past 5 years and 
where the most acute health worker shortages currently exist.
    The Committee requires the Secretary of State to report on 
transition plans for countries receiving PEPFAR funding, 
including South Africa.
    The Committee directs the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator to 
consult with the Committee on its response to the 
recommendations included in GAO's ``President's Emergency Plan 
for AIDS Relief: Drug Supply Chains are Stronger, but More 
Steps are Needed to Reduce Risks'' report (GAO-13-483).
    UNAIDS.--The Committee recommends $45,000,000 for a U.S. 
contribution to UNAIDS.
    Vaccines.--The Committee recommends that, among other 
methods for preventing the transmission of HIV, USAID should 
continue to support research and development of a vaccine to 
combat the AIDS virus.

                       OTHER GLOBAL HEALTH ISSUES

    Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia.--The Committee is 
concerned with the mounting global human health and economic 
costs associated with Alzheimer's disease and dementia, which 
are estimated to afflict more than 35 million people worldwide, 
and urges the Department of State, in coordination with USAID, 
to work with HHS and other relevant Federal agencies, the 
United Nations, and foreign governments, to begin the process 
of establishing a Global Alzheimer's and Dementia Action Plan. 
The Committee directs the Department of State to report to the 
Committee on these efforts not later than 180 days after 
enactment of this act.
    Malaria.--The Committee recommends $667,000,000 for 
programs to combat malaria and encourages USAID to continue to 
support public-private partnerships, research and development, 
access, and delivery of anti-malarial medicines, including new, 
effective pediatric formulations and alternatives to 
artemisinin combination therapies in response to the threat of 
resistance, and to continue efforts to develop new insecticides 
and a malaria vaccine.
    The Committee supports the work of the Federal inter-agency 
and institutions of higher learning in addressing the health, 
economic, and security impacts of malaria and other parasitic 
diseases, and in seeking improvements in FDA-approved drugs for 
malaria prevention.
    The Committee reaffirms its support for the Coordinator of 
U.S. Government Activities to Combat Malaria Globally as 
established in Public Law 110-293, and expects that section 304 
of such law shall be implemented across all relevant executive 
branch agencies.
    Neglected Tropical Diseases.--The Committee recommends 
$100,000,000 for continued support for USAID's integrated NTD 
program to eliminate soil-transmitted helminthiasis, 
schistosomiasis, lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis, 
trachoma, and leprosy which afflict hundreds of millions of 
people in tropical countries. The Committee also notes the 
contributions of the private sector in research and development 
and product innovation to improve diagnostic and therapeutic 
tools to treat patients with NTDs.
    Pandemic Influenza and Other Emerging Threats.--The 
Committee recommends $75,000,000 to combat pandemic influenza 
and other highly virulent viruses and emerging diseases, and is 
concerned with the continuing health risks to humans from the 
H5N1 and H7N9 viruses, as well as the Middle East respiratory 
syndrome coronavirus. The Committee directs the administration 
to request sufficient funds for this purpose in subsequent 
fiscal years.
    Tuberculosis.--The Committee recommends $225,000,000 for 
programs to combat tuberculosis.

                         DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $2,519,144,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   2,837,812,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,507,001,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $2,507,001,000 for Development 
Assistance.
    The Committee directs that relevant USAID bureaus and 
offices that support cross-cutting development programs shall 
coordinate such programs on a regular basis.

                     AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SECURITY

    The Committee recommends $1,100,000,000 for the Feed the 
Future program from all accounts in this act. The Committee 
supports FtF's country-driven approach to address causes of 
hunger and poverty, and to create long term solutions to food 
insecurity and malnutrition. The Committee recognizes the 
importance of integrating women as key recipients of 
agricultural and technical assistance, and intends that 
programs are prioritized for women farmers, small-holder 
farmers, and other vulnerable populations.
    Cotton Contracts.--The Committee notes that the drop in the 
world cotton price resulted in default, or risk of default, for 
some U.S. cotton contracts, and that in some countries legal 
redress may be lacking. Therefore, the Committee requests the 
Secretary of State to report on the extent of such risks on a 
regional basis, and including actions taken by the Governments 
of Vietnam, Bangladesh, and Thailand to address such defaults, 
and an assessment of respective judicial systems to resolve 
cases in a fair and impartial manner.
    Feed the Future Collaborative Research Innovation Lab.--The 
Committee recommends not less than $32,000,000 for the FtF 
CRIL, formerly known as the Collaborative Research Support 
Program, and supports efforts to improve agricultural 
productivity, nutritional quality and security, and innovative 
research to prevent malnutrition.
    Global Crop Diversity Trust.--The Committee recommends a 
U.S. contribution to the Global Crop Diversity Trust's 
endowment, which seeks to ensure the viability of agriculture 
worldwide by conserving and making available collections of 
crop diversity.
    Land Grant Institutions.--The Committee supports the work 
of land grant institutions of higher learning, and encourages 
USAID to continue partnering with such institutions with 
specialized capability in agriculture research to assist 
developing countries to improve food production.
    Sustainable Agriculture.--The Committee encourages USAID to 
support programs that train farmers in sustainable agricultural 
techniques and methods that increase productivity, particularly 
in sub-Saharan Africa.

                          ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    Cooperative Development.--The Committee has long recognized 
the important role that U.S. cooperatives and credit unions 
play in overseas programs as a means to lift people out of 
poverty by mobilizing equity and savings for community-based 
economic growth. The Committee recommends $10,000,000 for the 
Cooperative Development Program managed by USAID's Office of 
Innovation and Development Alliances.
    Measuring Economic Growth.--The Committee directs the USAID 
Assistant Administrator for Economic Growth, Education and 
Environment to continue to consult with the Committee on how to 
set meaningful goals and objectives, and effectively measure 
results, from technical assistance and capacity building 
activities to promote economic growth, as the impact of such 
assistance may not be apparent until years later.
    Microenterprise and Microfinance Development Programs.--The 
Committee recommends $250,000,000 in this act for microfinance 
and microenterprise development programs. USAID is directed to 
consult with the Committee and other interested stakeholders on 
ways to maximize the use of microenterprise and microfinance 
assistance to benefit the poorest people. The purpose of 
section 7034(p) of this act is to reduce the cost of USAID's 
annual Microenterprise Results Report. The Committee directs 
the USAID Administrator to consult with the Committee on 
adjustments that can further reduce the cost of the report.
    Trade Capacity Building.--The Committee recommends not less 
than $10,000,000 under this heading and an additional 
$10,000,000 under the ESF heading for labor and environmental 
capacity building activities relating to free trade agreements 
with countries of Central America, Peru, the Dominican 
Republic, and Colombia.

                               EDUCATION

    Basic Education.--The Committee recommends $501,500,000 in 
this act for basic education programs, including programs aimed 
at improving early childhood development, primary and secondary 
education, teacher training, and basic skills training for 
adults and out-of-school youth. The Committee notes that the 
total unobligated balance of prior year appropriations for 
basic education, excluding fiscal year 2013, exceeds 
$1,388,000,000.
    Global Partnership for Education.--The Committee recommends 
$25,000,000 for the GPE, and directs the USAID Administrator to 
consult with the Committee on GPE's efforts to improve 
monitoring and evaluation, and on the effectiveness and 
sustainability of programs.
    Higher Education.--The Committee recommends not less than 
$225,000,000 in this act for higher education programs, 
including $25,000,000 for such programs in Africa of which 
$15,000,000 is for partnerships between higher education 
institutions in Africa and the United States.
    The Committee supports the work of land grant institutions 
of higher learning with specialized capabilities and encourages 
USAID to partner with such organizations.
    The Committee supports cost-effective programs that offer 
educational opportunities at U.S. post-secondary institutions 
to students from underserved populations including from 
indigenous populations and persons with disabilities, and 
women.
    The Committee directs USAID to post all funding 
opportunities for higher education institutions on its Web 
site. Partners should be selected through a competitive 
process.
    American Schools and Hospitals Abroad Program.--The 
Committee recommends $23,000,000 for the ASHA program. Grants 
should be awarded through a competitive process and in 
accordance with all applicable rules and regulations.

                          ENVIRONMENT PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends not less than $1,153,500,000 in 
this act for bilateral and multilateral environment programs.
    Funds for environment programs are allocated according to 
the following table and are subject to the provisions of 
section 7019 of this act:

                          ENVIRONMENT PROGRAMS
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                    Program/activity                      recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Adaptation..............................................         186,900
Clean energy............................................         171,500
Sustainable landscapes..................................         123,500
Biodiversity............................................         225,000
    Andean Amazon.......................................          20,000
    Brazilian Amazon....................................          11,000
    USFS................................................           3,500
    Mayan Biosphere--DoI................................           1,000
    CARPE...............................................          25,000
        [of which, USAID]...............................           7,500
        [of which, USFWS]...............................          17,500
    Wildlife poaching and trafficking...................          45,000
Contributions to Multilateral Environment Funds.........         446,600
    Climate Investment Funds............................         283,700
    Global Environment Facility.........................         143,800
    Other Multilateral Environment Funds................          19,100
                                                         ---------------
      Total, Environment Programs.......................       1,153,500
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Adaptation and Mitigation.--The Committee recommends 
assistance through the Department of State, USAID, and 
multilateral environment funds to enable developing countries 
to adapt to decreases in agricultural productivity, water 
scarcity, and rising temperatures and sea levels, and to 
mitigate contributors to climate change.
    Sustainable Landscapes and Biodiversity.--The Committee 
recommends $123,500,000 in this act for programs to protect 
sustainable landscapes, and an additional $225,000,000 for 
biodiversity conservation programs, including $2,000,000 to 
implement and enforce section 8204 of Public Law 110-246, 
$20,000,000 for the Initiative for Conservation in the Andean 
Amazon, and $11,000,000 for the Brazilian Amazon.
    The Committee recommends assistance to support efforts by 
Brazilian and Andean indigenous groups to protect their 
territories from illegal loggers, miners, ranchers, and other 
encroachment, and to promote public support for Brazil's 
national parks.
    The Committee supports the Amazon Region Protected Areas 
program.
    The Committee recommends that of the funds made available 
for the Central Africa Regional Program for the Environment, 
not less than $17,500,000 be apportioned directly to the USFWS 
which should also utilize the technical expertise of the USFS, 
the USNPS, NOAA, and other appropriate Federal entities. The 
Committee emphasizes that CARPE's success depends on building 
the capacity of governments in Central Africa to professionally 
manage and protect their countries' resources. Memoranda of 
understanding and cooperative agreements should be used to 
provide a roadmap, with benchmarks for measuring progress, to 
carry out environmental impact assessments, social and 
environmental management plans, fisheries management, and 
training of effective law enforcement for wildlife protection 
and park management. Buy-in by governments, in coordination 
with implementing partners, is essential to make CARPE a more 
effective and sustainable program. The Committee notes the 
efforts of the Government of Gabon as illustrative of what can 
be achieved with leadership and modest resources to 
significantly reduce illegal logging and poaching, and conserve 
tropical forest and marine environments.
    The Committee recommends $1,000,000 be apportioned directly 
to the Department of the Interior for biodiversity and 
archaeological conservation activities in Guatemala's Mayan 
Biosphere Reserve, to include governance and law enforcement.
    The Committee recommends not less than $3,500,000 for USFS 
forest and wildlife conservation programs.
    The Committee recommends continued funding to protect great 
apes in Central Africa and Indonesia, and wildlife in South 
Sudan and Niger.
    The Committee supports funding, including under the INCLE 
heading, for programs to combat trafficking in wildlife and 
wildlife products, including between Africa and Asia. The 
poaching crisis is decimating elephant and rhinoceros 
populations and providing illicit revenue to traffickers, 
terrorists, and other criminal entities. The Committee supports 
the development of a Central African wildlife law enforcement 
network that includes the professionalization of park guards 
and other law enforcement officials, site-based conservation 
activities, and tools and technologies for measuring the 
success of these efforts. The Committee recognizes the 
expertise and assets, including the provision of used 
equipment, of AFRICOM in addressing the poaching crisis.
    The Committee is aware of the rapid deforestation and loss 
of biodiversity in the Atlantic Forest region of Paraguay, and 
supports funding at not less than the fiscal year 2013 level to 
help address this problem.
    The Committee is increasingly concerned with the loss of 
tropical forests that are habitat for many endangered species, 
particularly in the Amazon Basin, Central America, Central 
Africa, and Indonesia, due to agricultural conversion, 
industrial scale logging, mining, other extractive industries 
and large hydroelectric dams that result in the displacement of 
local people, are unsustainable, and expose these areas to 
further development and environmental degradation. The 
Committee does not support the use of funds appropriated by 
this act for such activities or the construction of roads or 
other infrastructure to facilitate such activities, or for the 
cultivation or processing of African oil palm, if doing so 
would contribute to significant loss of native species, disrupt 
or contaminate natural water sources, reduce local food 
security, or cause the forced displacement of local people.
    Clean Energy.--The Committee intends that funds for clean 
energy programs under title III of this act shall be used only 
to promote the sustainable use of renewable energy and energy 
efficiency technologies, and to support other efforts to 
reduce, mitigate, and/or sequester emissions of greenhouse 
gases.
    International Financial Institutions.--Section 
7060(c)(9)(E) of this act requires the Secretary of the 
Treasury to instruct the executive directors of each 
international financial institution that it is the policy of 
the United States to oppose any loan, grant, strategy or policy 
of such institution that would result in the construction of 
any coal-fired power plant or large hydroelectric dam.
    Marine Protection.--The Committee is aware that emissions 
from fossil fuels and deforestation are changing the acidity of 
the ocean in ways that threaten fish and other ocean species on 
which many humans depend for survival, and encourages the 
Department of State and the Department of the Treasury to 
coordinate with NOAA in efforts to reduce such emissions.
    The Committee recognizes that scientific exchanges between 
U.S. and Cuban scientists could help protect the Gulf of Mexico 
and U.S. shorelines from environmental disasters from oil and 
gas exploration, as well as promote scientific advances 
beneficial to both countries and the region, and directs the 
Secretary of State to work with the Secretary of the Treasury 
and the Secretary of Commerce to foster increased engagement 
with Cuban scientists.
    Mekong River Basin.--The Committee is aware that the PRC 
intends to build additional dams along the Upper Mekong River 
that may have serious, adverse impacts on the people, economy, 
and environment in countries along the Lower Mekong River. 
Other countries plan to build dams on the Lower Mekong and on 
the river's tributaries. The Committee recommends support for 
the Mekong River Commission to prevent or mitigate the adverse 
impacts of large hydroelectric projects.
    Toxic Pollution.--The Committee recommends not less than 
$5,000,000 for small grants to support initiatives to eliminate 
threats to human health and the environment from toxic 
chemicals such as lead, chromium, arsenic, cadmium, and 
mercury, and from mining, surface water contamination, 
smelting, oil refining, coal power plants, chemical plants, 
untreated sewage, garbage dumps, and other causes. Funds are to 
be awarded on a competitive basis.
    Waste Recycling.--The Committee recommends not less than 
$5,000,000 for small grants to support initiatives to recycle 
waste which threatens human health and the environment and 
which, if recycled, could generate income, improve agriculture, 
and produce energy. Funds are to be awarded on a competitive 
basis.
    Report.--The Committee is concerned with the conversion of 
tropical forest to agricultural use and supports the Tropical 
Forest Alliance which aims to eliminate deforestation from 
beef, soy, palm oil, and paper supply chains by 2020. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of State, in consultation with 
the Secretary of Agriculture, the U.S. Trade Representative, 
and the heads of other relevant Federal agencies, to submit a 
report on the administration's plan and a timetable for meeting 
expected outcomes, including to: (1) redirect production onto 
already deforested lands; (2) increase supply-chain tracking 
and transparency; (3) negotiate forest protections in trade 
agreements; (4) advance deforestation-free procurement; (5) 
increase private-sector investments in deforestation-free 
agriculture; and (6) prevent importation of products produced 
on illegally deforested lands.

                            GENDER EQUALITY

    The Committee supports the budget request of $1,909,920,000 
in this act for gender programs, to promote women's political 
leadership, implement a multiyear strategy to respond to 
gender-based violence, and support implementation of the U.S. 
National Action Plan on Women, Peace, and Security.
    The Committee intends the Department of State, guided by 
the Office of Global Women's Issues, and USAID, guided by the 
Office of Gender Equality and Women's Empowerment, to 
mainstream a focus throughout U.S. diplomatic and development 
efforts on raising the status, increasing participation, and 
protecting the rights of women and girls worldwide, and to post 
on respective Web sites specific steps taken to accomplish 
these objectives. The Committee recommends funding for the Full 
Participation Fund to support the integration of gender in 
operations, diplomacy and programming.
    The Committee directs that U.S. diplomatic and development 
efforts promote gender equality worldwide consistent with the 
activities enumerated in the Gender Equality and Female 
Empowerment Policy and U.S. Strategy to Prevent and Respond to 
Gender-Based Violence Globally.
    Child Marriage.--The Committee directs the Secretary of 
State, in consultation with the Coordinator for Global Women's 
issues and USAID's Senior Coordinator for Gender Equality and 
Women's Empowerment, to submit a strategy to accomplish the 
goals of Public Law 113-4. The Committee recommends not less 
than $5,000,000 for programs that reduce the incidence of child 
marriage consistent with section 1207 of Public Law 113-4, and 
directs the Secretary to consult with the Committee prior to 
the obligation of funds.
    Political Participation.--The Committee directs that funds 
appropriated under this and the ESF, DF, CFCF, and INCLE 
headings be made available for programs to increase women's 
participation in the political process, including political 
parties, elections, and leadership positions in local and 
national governments. Funds should be awarded on a competitive 
basis and in accordance with section 7059(b) of this act.

                            GLOBAL PROGRAMS

    Clean Cookstoves.--The Committee is aware that exposure to 
smoke from traditional cookstoves by an estimated 3 billion 
people in developing countries causes nearly 2 million 
premature deaths, primarily of women and young children, 
annually, and contributes to deforestation, erosion, and 
drought, and the women and children who collect firewood face 
daily hardship and security risks. This global health, 
environmental, and personal safety issue should be a priority 
for USAID, and the Committee urges investments in cookstoves 
that sustainably reduce fuel consumption and exposure to 
harmful smoke.
    Disability Programs.--The Committee recommends $5,000,000 
for disability programs, of which $3,000,000 should be made 
available for programs and activities administered by USAID 
through foreign missions to address the needs and protect and 
promote the rights of people with disabilities in developing 
countries.
    The Committee recommends $1,000,000 to support capacity 
building of disabled persons organizations in Latin America and 
the Caribbean in order to increase accessibility of people with 
disabilities to infrastructure, programs, and systems in 
individual countries; and $1,000,000 to develop, support, and 
strengthen sports programs for people with disabilities in 
developing countries. Funds are to be awarded on a competitive 
basis.
    The Committee directs that at least 25 percent of USAID 
mission funds for disability programs be dispersed in small 
grants.
    Indigenous Peoples.--The Committee recognizes that 
indigenous peoples face increasing threats to their territory 
and cultures due to growing population pressures, the expansion 
of mechanized agriculture, mining, logging and other extractive 
industries. The Committee directs the Advisor for Indigenous 
Peoples Issues to submit a report not later than 180 days after 
enactment of this act, on a strategy for carrying out the 
responsibilities described in section 699B of Public Law 110-
161.
    Partner Vetting.--The Committee supports a partner vetting 
system that safeguards against the inadvertent disbursement of 
funds by the Department of State or USAID to a terrorist or 
terrorist organization, while preserving important and, in some 
regions, sensitive relationships with grantees and contractors. 
All individuals and organizations being vetted should be 
provided with full disclosure of how information will be stored 
and used by the U.S. Government, including how information 
regarding a ``positive match'' will be handled and how to 
appeal such a match. There should also be provision for waiving 
the vetting requirements to prevent delay in responding to 
humanitarian crises. The Committee expects that other Federal 
agencies conducting foreign assistance programs, including for 
security sector reform, will utilize vetting procedures similar 
to those devised by USAID and the Department of State, 
including in Afghanistan.
    Patrick Leahy War Victims Fund.--The Committee recommends 
$12,000,000 for the LWVF, administered by USAID, which assists 
persons who are severely disabled as a result of armed 
conflict.
    USAID Forward.--The Committee supports funding to implement 
USAID Forward initiatives and recommends the President's budget 
request for Development Innovation Ventures and USAID's Office 
of Science and Technology.
    Victims of Torture.--The Committee recommends not less than 
$11,700,000 under this heading for programs and activities that 
address the needs of victims of torture and trauma resulting 
from violent conflict, and support for centers for victims of 
torture that provide services consistent with the goals of 
Public Law 106-87. An additional $6,500,000 is recommended for 
the U.N. Voluntary Fund for Victims of Torture under the IO&P 
account.
    Water and Sanitation.--The Committee recommends not less 
than $405,000,000 in this act for water and sanitation projects 
pursuant to Public Law 109-121. The Committee intends these 
funds to be used for programs to provide safe drinking water 
and sanitation for urban and rural communities where water 
scarcity or contamination poses serious risks to human health, 
with an emphasis on drought prone regions of Africa. These 
funds are in addition to other funds in this act to protect and 
sustainably manage water resources.
    Wheelchairs.--The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for 
wheelchair programs in developing countries, allocated through 
an open and competitive process. The Committee supports funding 
that provides quality, low-cost wheelchairs that can be 
produced and maintained locally using appropriate technologies.
    Youth in Development.--The Committee recognizes USAID's 
Youth in Development Policy, encourages USAID to name a Youth 
Coordinator who can represent youth issues at a high level 
within the agency and internationally, and directs the USAID 
Administrator to consult with the Committee on how it will 
measure effectiveness of the policy.

                               COUNTRIES

    Bangladesh.--The Committee directs the Secretary of State 
to prioritize assistance to labor programs in Bangladesh and 
recommends $5,000,000 to improve labor conditions in 
Bangladesh's readymade garment, shrimp and fish export sectors. 
The Committee expects the Department of State and USAID to 
provide training for workers on understanding and asserting 
their rights, including by improving the capacity of 
independent worker organizations. The Department of State, 
USAID, and the Department of Labor should coordinate efforts to 
avoid unnecessary overlap and work in consultation with the 
Government of Bangladesh and the International Labor 
Organization on an integrated approach.
    Indonesia.--The Committee recommends not less than $350,000 
for grants for capacity building of Indonesian human rights 
organizations, including in Papua.
    Nepal.--The Committee recommends not less than $37,000,000 
under this heading for assistance for Nepal, including for 
training and other assistance to enhance the participation and 
leadership of Dalits and other minority groups in political and 
economic decisionmaking.
    Rwanda and Uganda.--The Committee recommends support for 
local and international NGOs to conduct oversight of the trade 
in conflict minerals out of Eastern DRC and to strengthen 
border controls with the DRC.
    The Committee is concerned with the deterioration of 
respect for democratic principles in Uganda, including freedom 
of expression and assembly. The Committee remains concerned 
with the lack of transparency and potential for corruption in 
the petroleum sector in Uganda, and directs the Department of 
State and USAID to urge the Government of Uganda to promote 
transparency in the management of oil revenues and bidding 
process, including public disclosure of receipts and 
expenditures, consistent with section 7031(b) of this act.
    Vietnam.--The Committee recommends $7,000,000 for 
assistance for Vietnam under this heading for health/disability 
programs in areas sprayed with Agent Orange or otherwise 
contaminated by dioxin.

                   INTERNATIONAL DISASTER ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $1,599,397,000
    Enduring operations.................................     824,736,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................     774,661,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   2,045,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,615,000,000
    Enduring operations.................................     610,000,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................   1,005,000,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
\2\Overseas contingency operations is funded under title VIII.

    The Committee recommends $610,000,000 for International 
Disaster Assistance. An additional $1,005,000,000 in title VIII 
under this heading is designated for OCO.

                         TRANSITION INITIATIVES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $56,679,000
    Enduring operations.................................      50,125,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................       6,554,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      57,600,000
Committee recommendation................................      57,600,000
    Enduring operations.................................      52,600,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................       5,000,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
\2\Overseas contingency operations is funded under title VIII.

    The Committee recommends $52,600,000 for Transition 
Initiatives. An additional $5,000,000 in title VIII under this 
heading is designated for OCO.
    The Committee directs USAID's Office of Transition 
Initiatives to submit a report at the end of the fiscal year 
summarizing new, ongoing, and completed country programs 
implemented by OTI in fiscal year 2014.

                          COMPLEX CRISES FUND

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $39,997,000
    Enduring operations.................................       9,997,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................      30,000,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      40,000,000
Committee recommendation................................................

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
\2\Overseas contingency operations is funded under title VIII.

    The Committee does not recommend funding for Complex Crises 
Fund. Instead, the Committee recommends funding under titles 
III and VIII for a new account, Complex Foreign Crises Fund.

                      DEVELOPMENT CREDIT AUTHORITY

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

                            PROGRAM ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $40,000,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      40,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      40,000,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                        ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................      $8,297,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................       8,200,000
Committee recommendation................................       8,200,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends a ceiling of $40,000,000 for funds 
that may be transferred from other programs in this title to 
the Development Credit Program and recommends $8,200,000 for 
administrative expenses.

                         ECONOMIC SUPPORT FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $6,120,680,000
    Enduring operations.................................   3,000,784,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................   3,119,896,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   5,548,254,000
    Enduring operations.................................   4,076,054,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................   1,382,200,000
Committee recommendation................................   4,491,395,000
    Enduring operations.................................   3,589,895,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................     901,500,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
\2\Overseas contingency operations is funded under title VIII.

    The Committee recommends $3,589,895,000 for Economic 
Support Fund. An additional $901,500,000 in title VIII under 
this heading is designated for OCO.

                                 AFRICA

    Africa Pilot Programs.--The Committee recognizes that while 
nominally Chief Executive Officers, as outlined in the QDDR, 
U.S. Ambassadors often exert little influence over how 
interagency funds are apportioned or reprogrammed. In order to 
empower U.S. Ambassadors in Africa with the ability to directly 
address regional health, development, economic, and security 
challenges--as well as create increased trade and investment 
opportunities for the United States--in a timely and 
governmentwide manner, section 7042(f) of this act establishes 
pilot programs under Chief of Mission authority totaling 
$15,000,000. A cost matching requirement is included to 
leverage support from host governments, multilateral 
organizations, and the private sector to the maximum extent 
practicable, and funds are made available for oversight 
purposes. The Secretary of State is directed to consult with 
the Committee on additional parameters of such programs prior 
to the obligation of funds.
    Counterterrorism in Africa.--The Committee recommends 
$53,000,000 in this act for the Trans-Sahara Counterterrorism 
Partnership program, and $24,000,000 for the Partnership for 
Regional East Africa Counterterrorism program. The Committee 
directs that an additional $10,000,000 be made available for 
programs among vulnerable populations that are susceptible to 
terrorist influence, to be managed by USAID and coordinated 
with other Federal agencies.
    Democratic Republic of the Congo.--The Committee recommends 
not less than $25,000,000 to support a strategy to demilitarize 
the mining sector in eastern Congo, enhance independent 
monitoring of the development of responsible mining and related 
supply chains, protect the rights of mine laborers, build local 
oversight and regulatory capacity to combat the illicit trade 
in minerals, wildlife and other contraband, and assist victims 
of sexual violence.
    The Committee notes the Peace, Security and Cooperation 
Framework signed by the DRC, Rwanda, Uganda, and other 
countries, and supports efforts by the U.S. Special Envoy for 
the Great Lakes Region to promote implementation of the 
framework.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit a 
report, in classified form if necessary, listing persons 
impacted by the visa ban in section 1284 of Public Law 112-239.
    Djibouti.--The Committee is concerned with the high 
incidence of extreme poverty in Djibouti, a country of 
strategic importance to the United States, and directs USAID to 
develop and implement a multi-year social, economic, and 
democratic development strategy to address the needs of the 
people of Djibouti. The Committee directs that not less than 
$5,000,000 under this heading be made available for this 
purpose and requests to be consulted not later than 90 days 
after enactment of this act on the strategy, which should 
include methods for measuring and sustaining the effectiveness 
of such assistance.
    Power Africa.--The Committee supports the President's 
budget request for this initiative, which seeks to double 
access to power in sub-Saharan Africa.
    Somalia.--The Committee notes that despite recent political 
and security advances in certain areas of Somalia, the Somali 
Federal Government has not implemented provisions in the 
Provisional Constitution to promote dialogue and 
reconciliation, including establishing a Truth and 
Reconciliation Commission and a Human Rights Commission. The 
Committee recognizes that peace, stability and prosperity in 
Somalia depend on reconciliation and effective governance and 
encourages the Department of State to support the SFG in 
establishing these two commissions as independent entities. The 
Committee is also concerned that key constitutional provisions 
for establishing states and resolving disputes between the 
central government and the regions have not been implemented.
    Special Court for Sierra Leone.--The Committee recognizes 
the mandate of the Special Court of Sierra Leone is nearing 
completion and the transition to a Residual Special Court is 
underway, and recommends not less than $1,700,000 for this 
purpose.
    Sudan.--The Committee supports funding for Sudanese civil 
society groups and political parties working for peaceful 
democratic change in that country, including through technical 
assistance and capacity building programs.
    War Crimes in Central Africa.--The Committee continues to 
support efforts by the U.S., U.N., A.U., and governments in 
Central Africa to capture Joseph Kony and other top commanders 
of the LRA, and to assist victims of the LRA's crimes. The 
Committee recommends not less than $10,000,000 to implement 
Public Law 111-172, including for programs to improve physical 
access, for telecommunications infrastructure and early-warning 
mechanisms, and to support the disarmament, demobilization, and 
reintegration of former LRA combatants, especially child 
soldiers. The Committee recognizes that continued funding for 
USAID's ``Secure, Empowered, and Connected Communities'' 
program may reduce civilian vulnerability to LRA attacks and 
increase LRA defections. The Committee directs the Department 
of State to weigh the degree of cooperation by the Government 
of the DRC with the AU and other regional partners in efforts 
to counter the LRA when considering training additional DRC 
military battalions.
    Zimbabwe.--The Committee remains concerned with corruption 
and repression in Zimbabwe. In accordance with section 7043(m) 
of this act, funds may be obligated for assistance for the 
central Government of Zimbabwe only if the Secretary of State 
certifies that such government has made significant and 
sustained progress toward restoration of the rule of law, 
respect for property ownership and title, security sector 
reform (including accountability for members of security forces 
responsible for abuses), and freedom of expression, 
association, and assembly.

                       EAST ASIA AND THE PACIFIC

    Burma.--The Committee is encouraged by political and 
economic reforms underway in Burma but recognizes that they are 
reversible. In order to promote Burma's sustained transition to 
a democratic, peaceful, and prosperous country, the Committee 
supports increased assistance for Burma, subject to certain 
conditions. The Committee expects USAID, following coordination 
with other donors, to support microfinance programs that will 
promote small and medium agricultural businesses.
    The Committee recognizes the important role of civil 
society in this transition and directs the Department of State 
and USAID to make core support for local NGOs a top priority, 
including those formed by democracy activists and former 
political prisoners. The Committee directs that DRL shall be 
consulted on all democracy programs conducted in Burma prior to 
the obligation of funds.
    The Committee underscores the need for meaningful 
reconciliation between the Government of Burma and ethnic 
minorities, and Buddhist and Muslim populations, as a means of 
sustaining the transition in Burma. The Committee expects the 
Department of State to play a role in reconciliation efforts.
    The Committee is concerned with the absence of transparency 
and accountability within the Government of Burma and its 
state-owned enterprises, particularly Myanmar Oil and Gas 
Enterprise. Corruption and the continued absence of the rule of 
law in Burma hinder prospects for legitimate international 
investment and economic progress in that country.
    Cambodia.--The Committee is concerned with the political 
situation in Cambodia and the lack of political will by the 
Government of Cambodia to further democracy, human rights, and 
the rule of law. Therefore, assistance for Cambodia is 
restricted in this act.
    The report required under section 7043(c)(1) of this act 
shall include a comprehensive assessment of U.S. assistance for 
Cambodia for the past two fiscal years, including a comparative 
analysis of the contributions of the Government of Cambodia's 
budgetary investment in specific sectors to that of 
international donors, and the effectiveness of such assistance 
in achieving stated goals and objectives.
    For purposes of subsection 7043(c)(4), ``appropriate 
redress'' shall include the provision of legal security of 
tenure to the 61 families remaining in the Boeung Kak area who 
have been excluded from receiving land titles; clear 
demarcation of the developer's concession and the area reserved 
for the community; and the establishment of livelihood programs 
for those forcibly evicted from the Boeung Kak area, in 
accordance with the World Bank Policy on Involuntary 
Resettlement.
    People's Republic of China.--The Committee recommends not 
less than $15,000,000 under this heading for U.S. institutions 
of higher education and NGOs for democracy, governance, rule of 
law, and environment programs in the PRC, to be awarded on a 
competitive basis. No funds under the GHP, DA, and ESF headings 
may be made available for assistance for the central government 
of the PRC, with the exception of funds for programs to detect, 
prevent, and treat infectious diseases, pandemics and other 
emerging health threats.
    Section 7043(e)(3) of this act requires the Secretary of 
State, in consultation with the Committee and relevant Federal 
agencies, to develop and fund a coordinated diplomacy and 
assistance strategy to counter the strategic influence of the 
PRC globally, including through the use of international 
broadcasting.
    Tibet.--The Committee recommends not less than $7,900,000 
for activities implemented by NGOs to preserve cultural 
traditions and promote sustainable development and 
environmental conservation in Tibetan communities in the 
Tibetan Autonomous Region, and in other Tibetan communities in 
China. Funds should be awarded on a competitive basis.
    Vietnam.--The Committee recommends not less than 
$22,000,000 for analysis and environmental remediation of 
dioxin contamination at the Da Nang and Bien Hoa sites, and not 
less than $7,000,000 under the DA heading for direct assistance 
for disabled persons, disability surveys, and capacity building 
in areas that were heavily sprayed with Agent Orange or are 
otherwise contaminated with dioxin, for a total of $29,000,000 
in this act for these activities. In order to minimize 
administrative costs and maximize impact in the field, the 
Committee intends that, to the maximum extent practicable, 
health/disability funds shall be implemented by Vietnamese 
organizations and entities. The Committee expects that in 
future years the administration will request funds for such 
environmental remediation activities under function 050, and 
directs the Department of State, in consultation with the 
Department of Defense and USAID, to submit, not later than 180 
days after enactment of this act, a multi-year strategy to 
complete such activities in Vietnam.

                    EUROPE, EURASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

    Belarus.--The Committee recommends not less than $1,700,000 
for additional assistance for Belarus above the President's 
budget request, for democracy and human rights programs in 
coordination with the European Union, and for youth and higher 
education programs that support critical thinking and academic 
freedom.
    Democracy Programs.--The Committee recommends $35,000,000 
for programs to support democracy and human rights in these 
regions under this heading.
    Georgia.--The Committee notes that since 2008 the U.S. has 
provided over $1,500,000,000 for assistance for Georgia, which 
was accompanied by a strengthened commitment by the GoG to 
democracy and the rule of law. The Committee is concerned with 
the arrests and detentions of political figures in Georgia, and 
directs the Department of State to consult with the Committee, 
prior to the obligation of funds for assistance for Georgia, on 
the GoG's efforts to ensure that the pursuit of justice is 
conducted in a fair, transparent, and impartial manner.
     Ireland.--The Committee supports the President's budget 
request for assistance for Ireland.
    Nagorno-Karabakh.--The Committee recommends assistance for 
victims of the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict in amounts consistent 
with prior years, and for ongoing needs related to the 
conflict. The Committee urges a peaceful resolution of the 
conflict.
    North Caucasus.--The Committee recommends funding for 
programs to address immediate and long-term needs of conflict-
affected populations in the North Caucasus.
    Serbia and Kosovo.--The Committee supports the President's 
budget request for assistance for Serbia and Kosovo in this act 
and encourages continued progress in the implementation of the 
April 19, 2013, agreement to resolve disputes in the region.
    Turkmenistan.--The Committee remains concerned with the 
detention of human rights activists and political leaders in 
Turkmenistan, and will weigh such issues when considering 
assistance for Turkmenistan.
    Ukraine.--The Committee supports funding above the 
President's budget request for programs to ensure competitive 
and transparent elections in Ukraine, including through poll 
watching activities, and directs the Secretary of State to 
submit a democracy promotion strategy for Ukraine not later 
than 180 days after enactment of this act.

                               NEAR EAST

    Bahrain.--The Committee recommends not less than $3,000,000 
to support democracy and governance activities in Bahrain.
    Lebanon.--The Committee recommends that of the assistance 
appropriated under this heading for Lebanon, $12,000,000 be 
made available for scholarships for students in Lebanon with 
high financial need to attend not-for-profit educational 
institutions in Lebanon that meet standards comparable to those 
required for American accreditation. The institutions, students 
and their families are encouraged to pay as much of the cost of 
the education as possible in order to share the commitment to 
the future of Lebanon and to maximize the number of students 
who are assisted. All students should be eligible for 
scholarships based on need, academic record, and potential to 
contribute to the long-term political, economic, and social 
development of Lebanon.
    Libya.--The Committee directs the Secretary of State to 
report to the Committee that the central Government of Libya is 
cooperating with U.S. efforts to investigate and bring to 
justice those responsible for the attack on U.S. facilities and 
personnel in Benghazi on September 11, 2012, prior to the 
obligations of funds for assistance for such government.
    MEPI, OMEP and MERC.--The Committee recommends the 
President's budget request for MEPI and for OMEP under this 
heading, and the fiscal year 2012 level for MERC.
    Tunisia.--The Committee recommends the President's budget 
request for assistance for Tunisia in this act.
    West Bank.--The Committee recommends the President's budget 
request for assistance for the West Bank in this act. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit a report to 
the Committee prior to the initial obligation of funds 
detailing and assessing the capabilities of key Palestinian 
Authority and security services officials to manage and conduct 
effective oversight of U.S. assistance.
    Yemen.--The Committee recommends the President's budget 
request for assistance for Yemen in this act.

                           WESTERN HEMISPHERE

    Colombia.--The Committee recommends not less than 
$141,500,000 apportioned directly to USAID for alternative 
development/institution building and local governance programs 
in Colombia, including $6,500,000 for human rights activities.
    The Committee directs that if a peace agreement is signed 
ending the armed conflict in Colombia, the Department of State, 
USAID and other relevant Federal agencies shall review U.S. 
assistance programs for Colombia and redirect funds 
appropriated under this heading and the INCLE and FMF headings 
to support the implementation of such agreement, particularly 
relating to demobilization and reintegration of former 
combatants, demining, transitional justice, victims 
reparations, the recuperation of communities most affected by 
violence, and the recovery and productive use of land in former 
conflict zones.
    The Committee recommends not less than $15,000,000 for 
Afro-Colombian and indigenous communities for projects 
developed in consultation with such communities, many of which 
have experienced increases in violence, including 
assassinations of social activists, poverty and displacement. 
The Committee is concerned with the rapid expansion of 
government sanctioned, as well as illegal, mining operations in 
or adjacent to these communities. The Committee directs the 
Department of State and USAID to work with the Government of 
Colombia to address these issues as a priority, and requests to 
be informed of any multilateral development bank financing 
proposed for mining operations in Colombia.
    The Committee recommends not less than $3,000,000 for 
biodiversity conservation programs, including for the Colombian 
National Park Service.
    The Committee recommends $500,000 for community-based 
programs to address the needs of civilians disabled by 
landmines and other causes related to the violence.
    Haiti.--The Committee directs that assistance be made 
available, to the maximum extent practicable, in a manner that 
emphasizes the participation of Haitian NGOs and directly 
improves the security, economic and social well-being, and 
political status of Haitian women and girls. The Committee 
expects the Government of Haiti, USAID, and other donors to 
communicate directly and regularly with Haitian community 
leaders and civil society organizations about U.S. programs and 
plans.
    The Committee urges the Secretary of State to regularize 
the management and oversight of U.S. policy toward Haiti within 
the Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs.
    The Committee requests the Secretary of State to continue 
to submit the report on supplemental assistance for Haiti 
required by Chapter 10, section 1003(b) of Public Law 111-212 
every 180 days until such funds are expended, as recommended in 
GAO's ``Haiti Reconstruction'' report (GAO-13-558), and to post 
the report on the Department of State's Web site. The Committee 
further requests the Secretary, in consultation with the USAID 
Administrator, to include in the report a description of:
  --the amounts disbursed and any significant changes to the 
        Haiti Rebuilding and Development Strategy since January 
        2010, with an explanation of such changes;
  --the amounts obligated and expended on U.S. Government 
        programs and activities since January 2010 to implement 
        the Strategy, including grants, contracts, and 
        disbursement data;
  --the goals and quantitative and qualitative indicators to 
        evaluate progress within specific timeframes, and an 
        assessment of the extent to which such goals have been 
        achieved;
  --a description of the manner in which Haitian civil society 
        organizations are consulted on the establishment of 
        goals and timeframes and on the design and 
        implementation of programs under the Strategy;
  --a description of efforts to increase involvement of the 
        private sector in Haiti in recovery and development 
        activities;
  --a description of how the needs of vulnerable populations, 
        including internally displaced persons, women, 
        children, orphans, and persons with disabilities, have 
        been addressed in the design and implementation of new 
        programs and infrastructure;
  --an assessment of the impact of agriculture and 
        infrastructure programs on food security and the 
        livelihoods of smallholder farmers in Haiti; and
  --a description of methods for communicating the progress of 
        recovery and development efforts to people in Haiti.
    Report.--The Committee directs the Secretary of State, in 
consultation with the heads of other relevant Federal agencies, 
to submit to the appropriate congressional committees not later 
than 180 days after enactment of this act a report on the 
importance of the 1977 bilateral agreement with Canada for the 
reconstruction of Canadian portions of the Alaska Highway to 
U.S. economic and energy interests.

                            GLOBAL PROGRAMS

    Arms Trade Treaty.--The Committee does not support the use 
of funds in this act to implement the Arms Trade Treaty, for 
which no funds were included in the President's budget request.
    Conflict Diamonds.--The Committee supports funding to 
implement programs to prevent diamonds from fueling conflict in 
Central Africa. The Committee is concerned that the Kimberley 
Process is failing to adequately prevent conflict diamonds from 
entering the international market. The Committee directs the 
Department of State to engage with members of the OECD to 
assess whether complementary mechanisms, such as those 
coordinated by the OECD for other minerals from high risk and 
conflict affected areas, are needed to prevent conflict 
diamonds from entering legitimate supply chains.
    Direct Government-to-Government Assistance.--The Committee 
clarifies, in section 7031(a) of this act, the application of 
the notification requirement for direct government-to-
government assistance. The threshold for notification (the 
purpose of which is to explain how the proposed activity 
complies with pre-obligation assessment requirements), is to be 
calculated based on the anticipated cumulative value of the 
program. Once notified before the initial obligation is made, 
the Committee does not expect to be notified again unless 
future year obligations result in a cumulative value in excess 
of $10,000,000 and the program was not notified prior to the 
initial obligation of funds.
    Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative.--The 
Committee recommends $5,000,000 for the EITI including to 
strengthen the capacity of civil society organizations to 
participate in the EITI process.
    Institutions of Higher Education.--The Committee supports 
continued funding of institutions of higher education in the 
Middle East and South Asia, including through the funds made 
available by title VIII of this act.
    International Child Abductions.--The Committee remains 
concerned with the failure of certain governments to comply 
with Federal and State court orders concerning child custody 
and visitation or with the Convention on the Civil Aspects of 
International Child Abduction (done at The Hague on October 25, 
1980).
    Media Programs.--The Committee recommends funding under 
this and the DF heading for Department of State and USAID 
programs which support the development of independent media, 
including in Burma, Afghanistan, and Pakistan and through radio 
broadcasting.
    Reconciliation Programs.--The Committee recommends a total 
of $26,000,000 under this heading and the DA heading for 
reconciliation programs and activities which bring together and 
facilitate direct communication between individuals of 
different ethnic, religious and political backgrounds in 
countries affected by civil strife and war, of which 
$10,000,000 is for such programs and activities in the Middle 
East and North Africa. Funds should be leveraged to secure 
contributions from other donors to the maximum extent 
practicable.
    The Committee recommends funding for the ``New Generation 
in the Middle East'' initiative to build understanding, 
tolerance, and mutual respect among the next generation of 
Israeli and Palestinian leaders.
    Rule of Law.--The Committee recognizes that the rule of law 
is fundamental to promoting democracy and sustaining 
development, including by strengthening independent 
judiciaries, protecting human rights, combating human 
trafficking and corruption, and increasing public 
accountability and access to justice. The Committee directs 
continued support for such programs that advance the rule of 
law worldwide.
    Scholar Rescue.--The Committee includes in section 7032(c) 
authority to use funds appropriated by this act for programs to 
rescue scholars from countries denying freedom of expression, 
and the Committee's expectation is that such scholars would 
leave their country only temporarily and return home when 
conditions permit.
    Report.--The Committee directs the Secretary of State to 
submit a report, not later than 180 days after enactment of 
this act, detailing how U.S. foreign assistance made available 
by this act incorporates the furtherance of religious freedom 
for countries identified in the Annual Report of the U.S. 
Commission on International Religious Freedom (April 2013) as 
tiers 1 and 2. The report should assess the effectiveness of 
programs supported by the Department of State and USAID that 
directly and indirectly further religious freedom abroad, 
including through the development of institutions and 
implementation of legal reforms.

              MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA INCENTIVE FUND

Appropriations, 2013....................................................
Budget estimate, 2014...................................    $580,000,000
Committee recommendation\1\.............................................

\1\The Committee does not recommend an appropriation for the Middle East 
and North Africa Incentive Fund.

    The Committee does not recommend funding for Middle East 
and North Africa Incentive Fund. Instead, the Committee 
recommends funding under the Complex Foreign Crises Fund to 
respond to political transitions in the Middle East and North 
Africa, among other purposes.

                             DEMOCRACY FUND

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $114,733,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................................
Committee recommendation................................     130,500,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $130,500,000 for Democracy Fund, 
of which $70,500,000 is for DRL's Human Rights and Democracy 
Fund and $60,000,000 is for USAID's Center of Excellence for 
Democracy, Human Rights, and Governance. The Committee notes 
that the increase for the HRDF above the President's budget 
request is offset by an equivalent decrease in the request for 
democracy programs.
    The Committee directs the Assistant Secretary for DRL to 
consult with the Committee on the proposed allocation of funds 
within the HRDF prior to the initial obligation of funds.
    Coordination.--The Committee recognizes challenges in 
implementing democracy and human rights programs overseas, and 
that improved coordination and communication between DRL, 
USAID's Center, and the NED would enhance the effectiveness of 
such programs. To avoid duplication, the Committee recommends 
that DRL implement democracy and human rights programs that 
directly support diplomatic goals and objectives and the key 
priorities of the Secretary of State, especially in restrictive 
environments; the Center support programs that are an integral 
part of country development strategies and that span the 
technical areas of elections, governance, human rights, civil 
society and media, and rule of law; and NED continue to target 
programs in countries and regions in which the advancement of 
democracy and human rights are particularly challenging.
    Democracy Promotion and Security Requirements.--The 
Committee notes the often unanticipated high costs associated 
with security of property and personnel in countries in 
conflict and transition, and that with respect to Iraq and 
Afghanistan both the Department of State and USAID have not 
provided clear and consistent guidance to democracy grantees 
regarding such costs and methods of allocation and accounting 
regarding such costs. The Committee directs the Secretary of 
State and USAID Administrator to improve such guidance to 
grantees in conflict and transitional countries, and to develop 
prompt and transparent dispute resolution mechanisms for 
democracy grantees. The Committee notes that democracy grantees 
must continue to have flexibility in determining their security 
needs. The Committee is concerned that the failure to 
adequately address these issues may hinder the interest and 
ability of democracy grantees to respond to political openings 
elsewhere with support from the Department of State or USAID.
    Forensic Assistance.--The Committee recommends not less 
than $2,500,000 for forensic anthropology programs in Central 
and South America, including Guatemala and Peru, where armed 
conflicts resulted in large numbers of human remains that have 
yet to be exhumed and/or identified, delaying justice and 
fostering impunity. These funds are to be administered by DRL.
    Journalists.--The Committee notes that journalists and 
social and labor rights activists in Ecuador, Mexico, Honduras, 
and other Central and South American countries have been 
threatened and assassinated, and recommends increased support 
for programs to protect them.
    Labor Rights.--The Committee encourages DRL to continue to 
promote labor rights as a means of advancing American interests 
and values. DRL and USAID's Center should continue to support 
economic reforms that promote safe working conditions and 
include working people in decisions that affect their jobs. 
USAID should continue to fund its global labor strengthening 
programs.
    Prison Conditions.--The Committee recommends not less than 
$15,000,000 under this heading to eliminate inhumane prison 
conditions. The Committee is aware that millions of people 
suffer inhumane conditions in prisons and other detention 
facilities in developing countries that are overcrowded, 
unsanitary, and unsafe. Eliminating such conditions would 
strengthen the rule of law, protect human rights, and save 
lives.
    Repressive Environments.--The Committee requests the 
Secretary of State, in consultation with the USAID 
Administrator, as appropriate, to consult with the Committee on 
governance programs conducted in countries in which the central 
government acts in a manner contrary democratic principles. The 
Committee encourages the Department of State and USAID to have 
contingency plans for such events that include rapid assessment 
and response mechanisms, and targeted support for only those 
institutions or individuals within the government and civil 
society that demonstrate a commitment to democracy, after such 
an event occurs.
    Sudan.--The Committee encourages DRL to support democracy 
and human rights programs in Sudan.

                          Department of State


                    MIGRATION AND REFUGEE ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $2,791,425,000
    Enduring operations.................................   1,638,575,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................   1,152,850,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   1,790,960,000
    Committee recommendation............................   2,900,000,000
    Enduring operations.................................   1,387,000,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................   1,513,000,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
\2\Overseas contingency operations is funded under title VIII.

    The Committee recommends $1,387,000,000 for Migration and 
Refugee Assistance. An additional $1,513,000,000 in title VIII 
under this heading is designated for OCO.
    Colombia.--The Committee recommends funding under this 
heading at not less than the fiscal year 2013 level for 
Colombian IDPs and refugees.
    Iraq.--The Committee expects the administration to make 
every effort to expedite refugee resettlement of the most 
vulnerable Iraqis and maximize the use of Special Immigrant 
Visa processing while maintaining an effective screening 
process. The Committee is also concerned that many Iraqis 
remain displaced and in need of assistance.
    Israel.--The Committee recommends $15,000,000 from this act 
and prior acts for refugee resettlement in Israel, to be 
awarded through a competitive process.
    North Korea.--The Committee supports assistance for North 
Korean refugees, including in the PRC. The Committee condemns 
the forced repatriation of North Korean refugees, and supports 
the involvement of UNHCR and other international humanitarian 
agencies in protecting the rights of such refugees.
    Protracted Refugee Situations and Report.--The Committee 
recognizes that growing refugee populations, including Burmese, 
Somalis, Sudanese, Afghans, Bhutanese, Palestinians, and others 
have been unable to return home for generations, and continue 
to require international assistance. The Committee directs the 
Secretary of State to fulfill the reporting requirement 
relating to UNRWA under the ``Protracted Refugee Situations'' 
subheading in Senate Report 112-172.
    Syria.--The Committee urges the Department of State and 
USAID to continue working with humanitarian organizations, 
other donor nations, the United Nations, and Syria's neighbors 
to keep borders open to Syrians fleeing violence, provide 
access to basic services, and ensure their freedom of movement. 
The Committee supports sufficient funding to address the 
humanitarian needs of Syrian refugees in Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq, 
and Turkey, particularly of the most vulnerable people, 
including persons with disabilities. Assistance should be 
identified as originating from the American people whenever 
possible, unless such identification jeopardizes the safety of 
implementers or recipients of such assistance.
    Tibetan Refugees.--The Committee recommends additional 
assistance for Tibetan refugees in Nepal and India, and 
deplores the PRC's increasing repression of the Tibetan people. 
The Committee is concerned that Nepalese officials have handed 
over Tibetan refugees to Chinese border authorities, in 
contravention of Nepal's international obligations to protect 
refugees fleeing persecution. The Committee supports efforts by 
the Secretary of State to work with the Government of Nepal to 
provide safe transit for Tibetan refugees and legal protections 
to Tibetans residing in Nepal.

     UNITED STATES EMERGENCY REFUGEE AND MIGRATION ASSISTANCE FUND

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $27,191,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     250,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      50,000,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $50,000,000 for United States 
Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund.

                      COMPLEX FOREIGN CRISES FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2013....................................................
Budget estimate, 2014...................................................
Committee recommendation................................    $575,000,000
    Enduring operations.................................      40,000,000
    Overseas contingency operations\1\..................     535,000,000

\1\Overseas contingency operations is funded under title VIII.

    The Committee recommends $40,000,000 for Complex Foreign 
Crises Fund. An additional $535,000,000 in title VIII under 
this heading is designated for OCO.
    This account is a modification of the previously existing 
Complex Crises Fund, and incorporates certain authorities 
contained in the President's budget request under the Middle 
East and North Africa Incentive Fund proposal, including for 
loan guarantees and enterprise funds for Jordan, Tunisia, and 
Egypt. The CFCF provides the Secretary of State with the 
necessary flexibility to respond to complex foreign crises and 
political transitions in the Middle East and North Africa.

                          Independent Agencies


                              PEACE CORPS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $374,880,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     378,800,000
Committee recommendation................................     385,000,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $385,000,000 for Peace Corps.
    The Committee includes a cap on Peace Corps representation 
expenses of $104,000, and within this amount limits domestic 
representation expenses to $4,000.
    The Committee is informed that Executive Order 11103, which 
provides returned volunteers with 1 year of noncompetitive 
eligibility for Federal hiring, with possible extensions to 3 
years, in practice often results in volunteers only receiving 
this benefit for 1 year. The Committee directs the Peace Corps 
Director to consult with the Committee on whether the 
noncompetitive eligibility for Federal employment of returned 
Peace Corps volunteers (including Peace Corps Response 
volunteers) who serve in good standing should in all cases be 
extended for 3 years, or at least match the volunteers' length 
of service, without eliminating other grounds for extensions of 
noncompetitive eligibility for Federal employment. The 
Committee further directs the Peace Corps Director to recommend 
ways that human resource departments of all Federal agencies 
can be informed of the current noncompetitive eligibility of 
these individuals.
    While this act continues language prohibiting the use of 
funds to pay for abortions, an exception is included consistent 
with section 614 of division C of Public Law 112-74, as 
proposed in the President's budget request.
    The Peace Corps Director is directed to submit a spend plan 
not later than 45 days after enactment of this act on the 
proposed uses of funds under this heading.
    Funds appropriated under this heading are subject to the 
terms of section 7076 of this act.

                    MILLENNIUM CHALLENGE CORPORATION

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $897,913,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     898,200,000
Committee recommendation................................     899,000,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $899,000,000 for Millennium 
Challenge Corporation.
    The Committee is concerned that the MCC's methodology for 
evaluating eligibility of prospective compact countries under 
the Control of Corruption indicator may not be sufficiently 
timely or effective. The Committee directs the MCC to more 
closely coordinate evaluation of corruption in candidate 
countries with relevant offices at the Departments of State 
(including DRL), Treasury, and Commerce. The Committee is 
concerned that the MCC has proposed second compacts and 
threshold programs in countries where corruption permeates 
public institutions, such as Honduras and El Salvador, and that 
second compacts have been approved in countries that have 
received large amounts of other U.S. bilateral and multilateral 
assistance, such as Georgia. The Committee requires that 609(g) 
funding is subject to the regular notification procedures of 
the Committees on Appropriations, threshold programs for 
countries that have received a compact are prohibited, and that 
to be eligible for a second compact a country must have 
significantly improved its score under the Control of 
Corruption indicator.
    The Committee notes that legal difficulties in contract 
enforcement faced by private investors in certain compact 
countries indicates weak rule of law and pervasive corruption 
in those countries.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State, the USAID 
Administrator, and the MCC CEO to jointly assess and report on 
the extent to which compacts are aligned with U.S. strategic 
interests on a regional basis and with other U.S. assistance 
programs; the sustainability of the MCC's investments by host 
country governments; and whether lessons learned since the 
MCC's inception indicate a need for adjustments in the MCC's 
model of development.
    Funds in this account are subject to the requirements of 
section 7076 of this act.

                       INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $22,493,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      18,100,000
Committee recommendation................................      22,500,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $22,500,000 for Inter-American 
Foundation.
    The Committee directs the president of the Inter-American 
Foundation to submit, not later than 45 days after enactment of 
this act, a revised policy on representation expenses 
consistent with section 7020(a) of this act.

              UNITED STATES AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $29,990,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      24,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      30,000,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $30,000,000 for United States 
African Development Foundation, and directs the USADF's 
president to ensure that the USADF's policy on representation 
expenses is consistent with section 7020(a) of this act.

                       Department of the Treasury


               INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $26,992,000
    Enduring operations.................................      25,440,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................       1,552,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      23,500,000
Committee recommendation................................      23,500,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
\2\Overseas contingency operations is funded under title VIII.

    The Committee recommends $23,500,000 for International 
Affairs Technical Assistance.

                                TITLE IV

                   INTERNATIONAL SECURITY ASSISTANCE

                          Department of State

          International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $2,044,365,000
    Enduring operations.................................   1,060,760,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................     983,605,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   1,473,727,000
    Enduring operations.................................   1,129,727,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................     344,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,131,500,000
    Enduring operations.................................   1,025,000,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................     106,500,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
\2\Overseas contingency operations is funded under title VIII.

    The Committee recommends $1,025,000,000 for International 
Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement. An additional 
$106,500,000 in title VIII under this heading is designated for 
OCO.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to notify the 
Committee in writing within 5 days of exercising authority 
allowing funds made available under this heading to be spent 
``notwithstanding any other provision of law'', and such 
notification shall include a justification of such activities.
    CARSI/CBSI.--The Committee supports the goals of CARSI and 
CBSI to address narcotics-related violence and corruption in 
Central America, through law enforcement reform and economic 
and social programs that provide alternatives to gangs. The 
Committee is concerned that corrupt and abusive police and 
military forces, impunity, and a lack of political will to 
address these problems have limited the effectiveness of these 
efforts. CARSI and CBSI funds should be made available for 
assistance only for governments that demonstrate a commitment 
to punishing corruption and reforming their security forces.
    Colombia.--The Committee recommends $149,000,000 for 
assistance for Colombia, including not less than $10,000,000 
for the human rights unit of the Office of the Attorney 
General, to be administered by the Department of State.
    The Committee is aware of concerns with the effects of 
glyphosate-based herbicides on the environment and human 
health. The Committee requires the Secretary of State to 
certify, prior to the obligation of funds, that the toxic 
chemicals sprayed do not pose unreasonable risks or adverse 
effects to humans, especially pregnant women and children, or 
the environment, including endemic species. In assessing the 
risks of aerial spraying of chemical herbicides to humans and 
the environment, the Secretary of State shall consult with the 
Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency and the 
Secretary of Health and Human Services. As in past years, funds 
may not be used for aerial spraying in Colombia's national 
parks or reserves unless the Secretary of State reports in 
writing, prior to the use of funds for such purpose, that there 
are no effective alternatives and the spraying is in accordance 
with Colombian laws and regulations.
    Consular Notification Compliance.--The purpose of section 
7083 of this act is to facilitate compliance with Article 36 of 
the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations (``Vienna 
Convention''), done at Vienna April 24, 1963, and any 
comparable provision of a bilateral international agreement 
addressing consular notification and access, and to provide a 
limited but important remedy for certain previous violations. 
The Committee notes that Article 36 of the Vienna Convention, 
and similar provisions in other comparable bilateral 
international agreements addressing consular notification and 
access, are self-executing and have automatic domestic effect 
as Federal law. The Committee encourages the work already being 
done by the Judicial Conference's Committee on Rules of 
Practice and Procedure and the Uniform Law Commission to 
facilitate compliance with the Vienna Convention by Federal, 
State, and local officials. The Committee did not include 
express authority for a Federal court to provide a stay of 
execution to consider a petition for review under this section 
because Federal courts already have such statutory authority.
    The Committee took steps to ensure the expeditious review 
of petitions and to conserve judicial resources. The initial 
showing provision limits review to those petitions where actual 
consular notification violations can be established or have 
been previously established, for example, in previous domestic 
or international court proceedings. Judicial resources are 
further conserved by allowing initial review and proposed 
recommendations and findings on a petition for review to be 
done by a magistrate judge and barring review of a petition if 
the claimed violation has previously been fully adjudicated by 
a Federal or State court. In order to ensure the prompt 
resolution of these cases, the Committee included a 1-year time 
limitation on Federal court review from the date a petition is 
filed.
    Demand Reduction.--The Committee supports the budget 
request for the Demand Reduction Program.
    Guatemala.--The Committee recommends up to $5,000,000 for 
the International Commission Against Impunity in Guatemala, but 
requests to be consulted before funds are obligated.
    The Committee encourages USAID and the Department of State 
to give priority to strengthening the capacity of tribunals of 
high risk in Guatemala which handle cases involving organized 
crime, narco-trafficking, violations of human rights, money 
laundering, and other such crimes that threaten peace and 
security.
    International Law Enforcement Academies.--The Committee 
recommends $31,300,000 for the ILEAs.
    Mexico.--The Committee supports the prioritization of 
reform of national, state, and local judicial institutions and 
police forces, and cooperation between the United States and 
Mexico to combat organized crime and drug trafficking along the 
border.
    Rule of Law Programs.--The Committee directs that 
$3,000,000 be made available for coordination of rule of law 
programs, and that such programs shall be awarded on a 
competitive basis. The Committee expects overhead costs for 
such programs to be reasonable, and that funds will be matched, 
to the maximum extent practicable, by sources other than the 
U.S. Government.
    The Committee notes that fair and transparent justice 
systems are critical components to improve the rule of law and 
the administration of justice, particularly in countries 
confronting organized crime and drug trafficking. The Committee 
directs that funds be made available to continue programs that 
strengthen and promote independent judiciaries to advance the 
rule of law worldwide.
    Trafficking in Persons.--The Committee supports DRL's 
efforts to combat human trafficking and exploitative labor 
practices overseas.

    NONPROLIFERATION, ANTI-TERRORISM, DEMINING AND RELATED PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $710,581,000
    Enduring operations.................................     589,924,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................     120,657,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     616,125,000
Committee recommendation................................     700,000,000

\1\ The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $700,000,000 for Nonproliferation, 
Anti-terrorism, Demining and Related Programs.
    Funds in this account are allocated, unless otherwise 
noted, according to the following table, and are subject to the 
provisions of section 7019 of this act:

     NONPROLIFERATION, ANTI-TERRORISM, DEMINING AND RELATED PROGRAMS
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                        Programs                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Nonproliferation Programs...............................         311,000
    Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund...............          30,000
    Export Control and Related Border Security                    70,000
     Assistance.........................................
    Global Threat Reduction.............................          80,000
    Weapons of Mass Destruction Terrorism...............           6,042
    IAEA Voluntary Contribution.........................          89,958
    CTBT International Monitoring System................          34,000
    CTBTO Preparatory Commission-Special Contributions..           1,000
Anti-terrorism Programs.................................         220,000
Conventional Weapons Destruction........................         169,000
    Humanitarian Demining...............................         149,000
        of which, Laos..................................          12,000
                                                         ---------------
          Total, Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism,               700,000
           Demining and Related Programs................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Syria.--The Committee directs the Secretary of State to 
consult with the Committee prior to obligating funds for 
programs in Syria.
    UXO Clearance.--The Committee is aware that the Department 
of State is developing a multi-year strategy for UXO clearance 
in Southeast Asia and the Pacific islands. The Committee 
supports funds to implement the strategy, prioritizes the 
clearance of landmines and other unexploded ordnance in areas 
where such ordnance was caused by the United States, and 
directs that not less than $12,000,000 be made available for 
UXO clearance in Laos.

                        PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $383,721,000
    Enduring operations.................................     302,721,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................      81,000,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     347,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     389,500,000
    Enduring operations.................................     250,900,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................     138,600,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
\2\Overseas contingency operations is funded under title VIII.

    The Committee recommends $250,900,000 for Peacekeeping 
Operations. An additional $138,600,000 in title VIII under this 
heading is designated for OCO.
    MFO.--The Committee recommends $36,000,000 for the 
Multinational Force and Observers mission in the Sinai, 
including $8,000,000 to address force protection enhancements.
    Global Peacekeeping Operations Initiative.--The Committee 
notes that the budget request for GPOI represents the final 
year of the second phase of that initiative, which seeks to 
train and equip international peacekeepers to participate in 
missions abroad. The Committee encourages the Department of 
State to continue to work with other donors to share the costs 
of such activities, and to coordinate with relevant 
multilateral organizations, and on a bilateral basis, to 
establish financial models that use the proceeds from 
participation in peacekeeping missions to sustain training 
efforts. The Committee does not endorse the use of GPOI funds 
for construction of infrastructure, the costs of which should 
be the responsibility of respective foreign governments. The 
Committee expects to be consulted prior to any initiation of a 
third phase of this initiative.

                  Funds Appropriated to the President


             INTERNATIONAL MILITARY EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $105,754,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     105,573,000
Committee recommendation................................     105,000,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6, but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $105,000,000 for International 
Military Education and Training.
    The Committee is concerned that IMET representation 
expenses have been used for such items as ball caps, coins, and 
tote bags, and directs the Secretary of State to eliminate 
expenditures for these types of items.
    Analysis and Report.--The Committee directs the Secretary 
of State, following consultation with the Committee, to conduct 
an analysis of IMET's effectiveness in promoting respect for 
human rights among military officers from countries with a 
history of human rights violations and in establishing enduring 
relationships with U.S. military and civilian personnel. The 
analysis should include a review of relevant GAO and human 
rights reports, and consultation with the Department of 
Defense.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to provide, 
not later than 45 days after enactment of this act, a report on 
the proposed uses of funds under this heading on a country 
basis, including a detailed description of proposed activities.
    Saudi Arabia.--The Committee is concerned with the 
continued detention of blogger and journalist Hamza Kashgari, 
who was arrested in February 2012 and remains in detention.
    Training Report.--The Committee notes that the report on 
foreign military training required by section 656 of the FAA is 
to include the units of operation of military personnel who 
receive training. The Committee intends that such units should 
be specified at the battalion or equivalent level.

                   FOREIGN MILITARY FINANCING PROGRAM

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $6,310,333,000
    Enduring operations.................................   5,208,333,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................   1,102,000,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   5,956,959,000
    Enduring operations.................................   5,554,959,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................     511,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,865,000,000
    Enduring operations.................................   5,365,000,000
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................     500,000,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
\2\Overseas contingency operations is funded under title VIII.

    The Committee recommends $5,365,000,000 for Foreign 
Military Financing Program. An additional $500,000,000 in title 
VIII under this heading is designated for OCO.
    Bahrain.--The Committee notes the importance of Bahrain to 
the security interests of the United States and allies in the 
region. However, the Committee is concerned that actions by the 
Government of Bahrain to limit freedom of expression, 
association and assembly, and reports of excessive force, 
unfair trials, and mistreatment of prisoners could have 
negative consequences for U.S. interests in Bahrain. The 
Committee is also concerned with acts of violence against the 
government by some protestors. The Committee notes that some of 
the most important reforms recommended by the Bahrain 
Independent Commission of Inquiry have not been implemented. 
The Committee intends that no crowd control items shall be 
provided to Bahrain during fiscal year 2014, and notes that 
none are included in the President's budget request. The 
Committee directs that the report required by section 7010 of 
this act shall include a description of any such items provided 
to foreign security forces.
    Colombia.--The Committee is concerned with constitutional 
reforms which may result in impunity for crimes against 
humanity and the transfer of crimes such as ``false positives'' 
from civilian prosecutors to military jurisdiction, which lacks 
independence.
    The Committee recommends assistance under this heading for 
Colombia in accordance with the requirements of section 
7044(a)(2) of this act. Of this amount, 25 percent may be 
obligated only if the Secretary of State consults with, and 
subsequently certifies and submits a report to, the Committee 
that:
  --cases involving members of the Colombian military who have 
        been credibly alleged to have violated human rights, or 
        to have aided, abetted or benefitted from criminal or 
        illegal armed groups are subject only to civilian 
        jurisdiction during investigation and prosecution, and 
        the Colombian military is not opposing civilian 
        jurisdiction in such cases and is cooperating with 
        civilian prosecutors and judicial authorities;
  --the Government of Colombia is not providing immunity from 
        prosecution or the suspension of sentences for persons 
        responsible for crimes against humanity, war crimes, or 
        other gross violations of human rights; and
  --the Colombian military is respecting the rights and 
        territory of indigenous and Afro-Colombian communities.
    Crowd Control Items.--The Committee is concerned with 
reports that foreign security forces have used U.S.-
manufactured crowd control items, such as tear gas, small arms, 
light weapons, and ammunition to repress peaceful expression in 
countries undergoing democratic transition. Section 7034(i) of 
this act addresses this matter. The Committee notes that 
section 620M of the FAA prohibits such assistance to any unit 
of a foreign security force that has committed a gross 
violation of human rights.
    Ethiopia.--The Committee notes the Government of Ethiopia's 
efforts to address security and stability in the region, but is 
concerned with the use of anti-terrorism laws to imprison 
journalists, political opponents, and others calling for free 
and fair elections and political and human rights. The 
Committee urges the Departments of State and Defense to apply a 
consistent policy to engagement with the Ethiopian military and 
police, to help ensure the protection of these rights.
    Guatemala.--The Committee is concerned with the failure of 
the Government of Guatemala to implement the Reparations Plan 
for Damages Suffered by the Communities Affected by the 
Construction of the Chixoy Hydroelectric Dam (April 2010). 
Section 7044(c) of this act restricts assistance for the 
Guatemalan army and requires a certification by the Secretary 
of State. Funds appropriated under this heading may be 
obligated for assistance for the Guatemalan army only if the 
Secretary of State also certifies that the army:
  --has a narrowly defined mission focused on border security 
        and external threats, and a credible plan to end the 
        army's involvement in internal law enforcement;
  --is cooperating with civilian investigations and 
        prosecutions of human rights cases involving current 
        and retired military officers, with the Inter-American 
        Court on Human Rights, and with CICIG, including 
        providing timely access for investigators to witnesses, 
        documents, forensic evidence, and other relevant 
        information; and
  --is publicly disclosing all military archival documents 
        relating to the internal armed conflict in a timely 
        manner in response to requests by civilian judicial 
        authorities.
    The Committee notes that Department of State and U.S. 
Citizenship and Immigration Services have worked with the 
Government of Guatemala [GOG] to develop a complete list of 
transition adoption cases involving Guatemalan children and 
American adoptive parents pending since December 31, 2007, as 
well as a legal and transparent progress for bringing these 
cases to a close. The Committee is concerned that approximately 
90 transition adoption cases on this list remain unresolved and 
that meanwhile these children have been stranded in orphanages. 
Section 7044(c)(2) of this act restricts assistance for the 
Guatemalan armed forces until the Secretary of State certifies 
to the Committees on Appropriations that these adoption cases 
have been resolved or that the GoG is making significant 
progress toward meeting a specific timetable for resolving such 
cases. In determining that these cases have been resolved, the 
Secretary shall consult with the Director of USCIS.
    Honduras.--The Committee is concerned with violence and 
corruption in Honduras involving drug-traffickers, other 
criminal organizations, large landowners, peasant groups, 
militias, and Honduran police and military forces. 
Assassinations of human rights defenders, journalists, and 
social activists are common and rarely result in prosecutions. 
In accordance with section 7044(e) of this act, funds may be 
obligated for assistance for the Honduran army and police only 
if the Secretary of State certifies that:
  --the Government of Honduras is reducing corruption including 
        by prosecuting corrupt officials and removing them from 
        office;
  --agreements between the United States and Honduras 
        concerning counter-narcotics operations, including 
        assistance for innocent victims of such operations, are 
        being implemented;
  --the Government of Honduras is protecting freedom of 
        expression, association, and assembly, and due process 
        of law, including in the Bajo Aguan Valley;
  --the Government of Honduras is investigating and prosecuting 
        in the civilian justice system army and police 
        personnel who are credibly alleged to have violated 
        human rights, including forced evictions, or to have 
        aided or abetted other armed groups involved in such 
        acts; and
  --the Honduran military and police are cooperating with 
        civilian judicial authorities in such cases.
    Indonesia.--The Committee notes the progress the Government 
of Indonesia is making in strengthening democracy, but military 
reform, particularly accountability for past crimes, lags 
behind.
    The Secretary of State shall submit a report on steps taken 
by the Government of Indonesia, including the military, during 
the previous 12 months to:
  --deny promotion, suspend from active service, and/or 
        prosecute and punish military officers who have 
        violated human rights, and to refine further the 
        military's mission and develop an appropriate defense 
        budget to carry out that mission;
  --cooperate with civilian judicial authorities to resolve 
        cases of violations of human rights;
  --implement reforms that increase the transparency and 
        accountability of the military's budget and operations, 
        and achieve divestment of military businesses; and
  --allow unimpeded access to Papua, respect due process and 
        freedom of expression, association, and assembly in 
        Papua, and release Papuans and Moluccans imprisoned for 
        peaceful political activity.
    Mexico.--The Committee supports joint U.S.-Mexican efforts 
to address drug trafficking and other organized crime and 
corruption in Mexico, and remains concerned with impunity among 
Mexican military and police forces for violations of human 
rights. In accordance with section 7044(f) of this act, 15 
percent of the funds under the INCLE and FMF headings that are 
available for assistance for the Mexican army and police may be 
obligated only if the Secretary of State reports in writing 
that:
  --the Government of Mexico has reformed the military justice 
        system to require that military personnel who are 
        credibly alleged to have violated human rights are 
        investigated and prosecuted in the civilian justice 
        system;
  --the Government of Mexico is enforcing prohibitions against 
        torture and the use of testimony obtained through 
        torture;
  --the Mexican military and police are immediately 
        transferring detainees to the custody of civilian 
        judicial authorities, in accordance with Mexican law, 
        and are cooperating with such authorities in such 
        cases; and
  --the Government of Mexico is searching for the victims of 
        enforced and involuntary disappearances and prosecuting 
        those responsible for such crimes.
    Middle East.--The Committee recommends the President's 
budget requests under this heading for Israel and Jordan.
    Morocco.--The Committee notes that Morocco is a strategic 
ally in North Africa where the United States has an interest in 
preventing terrorism and promoting democracy. The Committee 
directs the Secretary of State to update the report required by 
section 7041(g) of division I of Public Law 112-74, including 
on steps taken during the previous 12 months by the Government 
of Morocco to release political prisoners and support a human 
rights monitoring and reporting role for the U.N. Mission in 
Western Sahara in cooperation with the Office of the U.N. High 
Commissioner for Human Rights.
    Nepal.--The Committee notes that the Government of Nepal is 
making progress in integrating former rebel combatants into the 
Nepal army, and that further progress in military reform is 
needed. The Committee is concerned that, despite numerous 
violations of human rights and the laws of war during the 
period 1995 to 2005, the Nepal army continues to shield itself 
from punishment and has promoted officers implicated in such 
crimes.
    Nigeria.--The Committee notes the contributions of the 
Nigerian military to international peacekeeping and in 
countering Boko Haram extremists, but is concerned with reports 
of abuses by army personnel in Baga, Northern Nigeria. The 
Secretary of State shall submit a report detailing the steps 
taken by the Government of Nigeria to:
  --support an impartial investigation into the violence in 
        Baga by providing the National Human Rights Commission 
        unimpeded access to Baga, members of the local 
        community, and relevant military officials; and
  --prosecute those implicated in extra-judicial killings and 
        destruction of property in Baga.
    Philippines.--The Committee recommends assistance under 
this heading for the Philippines which the Committee 
understands is primarily to enhance maritime security. The 
Committee notes that the Government of the Philippines has 
stated that it is taking steps to reduce extra-judicial 
executions by military officers and militias, but new cases 
have been reported and impunity for these crimes continues. In 
accordance with section 7043(f) of this act, funds may be 
obligated for assistance for the Philippine army only if the 
Secretary of State reports in writing that:
  --the GoP is prosecuting those responsible for EJEs and 
        forced disappearances and strengthening government 
        institutions working to eliminate such crimes;
  --the GoP is implementing a policy of promoting army 
        personnel who demonstrate professionalism and respect 
        for human rights, and is investigating, prosecuting, 
        and punishing army personnel and others who have been 
        credibly alleged to have violated such rights; and
  --the Philippine army and paramilitary groups under its 
        control are not engaging in acts of violence or 
        intimidation against journalists or members of legal 
        organizations and indigenous communities who advocate 
        for human rights.
    Security Sector Reform.--The Committee directs that funds 
appropriated by this act for security sector reform shall be 
implemented in a manner consistent with the roles, 
responsibilities and guiding principles of the February 2009 
``Security Sector Reform'' paper prepared jointly by USAID, the 
Department of Defense, and the Department of State.
    Somalia.--The Committee does not recommend lethal 
assistance for the Somali security forces and notes that none 
was included in the President's budget request. The Committee 
supports reform of Somali security forces to ensure they are 
clan and regionally representative; demonstrate a commitment to 
respect human rights and the rule of law; have a clear command 
and control structure; and do not permit child soldiers.
    Sri Lanka.--The Committee continues restrictions on 
assistance, export licenses, sales and transfers of equipment 
for the Sri Lankan military unless, in accordance with section 
7045(e) of this act, the Secretary of State certifies that the 
Government of Sri Lanka is:
  --conducting credible, thorough investigations of war crimes 
        and violations of international humanitarian law by 
        government forces and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil 
        Eelam;
  --bringing to justice individuals who have been credibly 
        alleged to have committed such violations;
  --supporting and cooperating with any U.N. investigation of 
        war crimes and violations of international humanitarian 
        law;
  --implementing policies to protect judicial independence; 
        freedom of expression, association, assembly, and 
        religion; the right of political parties, civil society 
        organizations, and journalists to operate without 
        harassment or interference; and due process of law, 
        including ending arrest and detention under emergency-
        type regulations;
  --providing access to detainees by humanitarian 
        organizations; and
  --implementing policies to promote reconciliation and justice 
        including the demilitarization of public administration 
        and development activities in the north, and devolution 
        of power.
    Uzbekistan.--The Committee notes the cooperation of the 
Government of Uzbekistan in the transport of supplies and 
equipment in and out of Afghanistan. The Committee is aware, 
however, that the GoU continues to repress its own citizens, 
and urges the Department of State to use its influence with the 
GoU to release imprisoned human rights defenders and political 
prisoners, allow NGOs to operate without interference, 
cooperate with U.N. human rights monitors, guarantee freedom of 
expression and of the media, implement conventions against 
child labor, and fully align its election processes with OSCE 
guidelines.

                    GLOBAL SECURITY CONTINGENCY FUND

Appropriations, 2013....................................................
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     $25,000,000
Committee recommendation................................................

    The Committee does not recommend an appropriation for the 
Global Security Contingency Fund but provides transfer 
authority in title VIII (section 8003).

                                TITLE V

                        MULTILATERAL ASSISTANCE

                  Funds Appropriated to the President

                INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $348,593,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     320,645,000
Committee recommendation................................     355,700,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $355,700,000 for International 
Organizations and Programs.
    Organization of American States.--The Committee recognizes 
the essential role of the IACHR in providing justice for 
victims of human rights violations and protecting basic 
freedoms in many Latin American countries whose justice systems 
are weak and influenced by corruption. The Committee recommends 
$2,000,000 for a U.S. voluntary contribution to the IACHR, of 
which not less than $500,000 is for the Office of the Special 
Rapporteur for Freedom of Expression. The Committee is 
concerned with actions by some governments in the region to 
curtail freedom of the press, and supports efforts of the 
Special Rapporteur to defend the rights of journalists.
    United Nations.--The Committee directs the Secretary of 
State to post U.S. voluntary contributions under this heading 
which are provided to the U.N. and its affiliated agencies on 
the Department of State's Web site in a timely manner, and the 
first such posting should include funding detail for fiscal 
year 2013.
    The Committee recommends $5,500,000 for a U.S. voluntary 
contribution to the UNHCHR, of which $1,000,000 is to support a 
UNHCHR office in Honduras, $500,000 is to support the UNHCHR 
office in Colombia, and $500,000 is to support the UNHCHR 
office in Mexico.
    The Committee notes that no funds are provided under this 
heading for a U.S. contribution to UNESCO, which is prohibited 
by law.
    Funds in this account are allocated according to the 
following table and are subject to the provisions of section 
7019 of this act:

                INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND PROGRAMS
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                      Organization                        recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
International Civil Aviation Organization...............             850
International Conservation Programs.....................           7,900
International Contributions for Scientific, Educational,             700
 and Cultural Activities................................
International Development Law Organization..............             600
IMO Maritime Security Programs..........................             375
International Panel on Climate Change/UN Framework on             13,000
 Climate Change.........................................
International Chemicals and Toxics Programs.............           3,650
Montreal Protocol Multilateral Fund.....................          25,500
Multilateral Action Initiatives.........................           1,000
OAS Development Assistance Programs.....................           3,500
OAS Fund for Strengthening Democracy....................           4,500
    Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (non-add).           2,000
Regional Cooperation Agreement on Combating Piracy and                50
 Armed Robbery Against Ships in Asia....................
UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs..           2,900
UN Voluntary Fund for Technical Cooperation in the Field           1,400
 of Human Rights........................................
UN Women................................................           7,500
Center for Human Settlements............................           1,500
UN Capital Development Fund.............................             850
UN Democracy Fund.......................................           4,225
UN Development Program..................................          81,500
UN Environment Program..................................           7,700
UN Children's Fund......................................         132,000
UN High Commissioner for Human Rights...................           5,500
UN Population Fund......................................          39,500
UN Voluntary Fund for Victims of Torture................           6,500
World Meteorological Organization.......................           2,000
World Trade Organization Technical Assistance...........           1,000
                                                         ---------------
      Total, IO&P.......................................         355,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                  INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $2,611,208,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   2,875,779,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,190,778,882
    Enduring operations.................................   3,185,778,882
    Overseas contingency operations\2\..................       5,000,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
\2\Overseas contingency operations is funded under title VIII.

    The Committee recommends $3,185,778,882 for contributions 
to the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, 
the International Development Association, the Multilateral 
Debt Relief Initiative, the Global Environment Facility, the 
Clean Technology Fund, the Strategic Climate Fund, the Inter-
American Development Bank, the Multilateral Investment Fund, 
the Asian Development Bank, the Asian Development Fund, the 
African Development Bank, the African Development Fund, the 
Global Agriculture and Food Security Program, the International 
Fund for Agricultural Development, and the International 
Monetary Fund. An additional $5,000,000 in title VIII under 
this heading is designated for OCO.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of the Treasury to 
inform the Committee in a timely manner of any proposal for 
financing by any such IFI for infrastructure projects or other 
activities that would cause significant harm to the 
environment, forced displacement of local people, or other 
violations of human rights.
    The Committee recommends transfer authority for the 
Secretary of State, after consultation with the Secretary of 
the Treasury, of funds appropriated under the ESF heading to 
funds appropriated under this heading for additional payments 
to multilateral environmental funds and facilities.

                      GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT FACILITY

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $129,359,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     143,750,000
Committee recommendation................................     143,750,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $143,750,000 for Global 
Environment Facility.

                            TRANSITION FUND

Appropriations, 2013....................................................
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      $5,000,000
Committee recommendation................................       5,000,000
    Enduring operations.................................................
    Overseas contingency operations\1\..................       5,000,000

\1\Overseas contingency operations is funded under title VIII.

    The Committee does not recommend $5,000,000 for Transition 
Fund, a new multi-donor trust fund established to assist Arab 
countries in transition, including Egypt, Tunisia, Jordan, 
Morocco, Libya, and Yemen, in this title as requested. The 
Committee recommends $5,000,000 in title VIII under Transition 
Fund for these purposes.

       CONTRIBUTION TO THE INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................  $1,358,065,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................   1,358,500,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,358,500,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                  MULTILATERAL DEBT RELIEF INITIATIVE

Appropriations, 2013....................................................
Budget estimate, 2014...................................    $145,300,000
Committee recommendation................................     145,300,000

    The Committee recommends $1,358,500,000 for Contribution to 
the International Development Association. In addition, the 
Committee recommends $145,300,000 for payment to the 
Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative.
    The Committee notes that the World Bank is reviewing its 
environmental and social safeguard policies. The Committee 
supports mandatory, enforceable requirements to maximize 
development results, and as the Committee considers a U.S. 
contribution to IDA 17 it will assess the Bank's progress in 
adopting effective safeguard policies. Such policies should 
require for all Bank actions (including policy and program 
based lending, borrower systems, country assistance strategies, 
and public private partnerships) public availability of an 
assessment of environmental, social and human rights impacts at 
least 120 days prior to Board consideration of any proposed 
action which could have a significant environmental, social or 
human rights impact.
    The Committee is concerned with the impact of Bank actions 
on indigenous peoples. The Committee also notes that the World 
Bank's current safeguard policies do not expressly address the 
special needs of persons with disabilities and children at risk 
of exploitative labor. The Committee directs the Secretary of 
the Treasury to seek protections to prevent children from being 
exploited economically and to promote access for people with 
disabilities during the Bank's safeguard policy review.

     CONTRIBUTION TO THE INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND 
                              DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $186,897,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     186,956,866
Committee recommendation................................     186,956,866

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $186,956,866 for Contribution to 
the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, for 
the third of five installments of the U.S. paid-in capital 
subscription to the World Bank's GCI, which funds the IBRD, and 
for the second of four payments to the World Bank's selective 
capital increase.

              LIMITATION ON CALLABLE CAPITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS

    The Committee recommends a limitation on the amount that 
the U.S. Governor of the IBRD may subscribe to the callable 
portion of the U.S. share of the GCI in an amount not to exceed 
$2,928,990,899 in fiscal year 2014.

               CONTRIBUTION TO THE CLEAN TECHNOLOGY FUND

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $184,571,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     215,700,000
Committee recommendation................................     215,700,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $215,700,000 for Contribution to 
the Clean Technology Fund.

               CONTRIBUTION TO THE STRATEGIC CLIMATE FUND

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $49,884,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      68,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      68,000,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $68,000,000 for Contribution to 
the Strategic Climate Fund.

              GLOBAL AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SECURITY PROGRAM

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $134,957,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     135,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     135,000,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $135,000,000 for Global 
Agriculture and Food Security Program, a trust fund 
administered by the IBRD.

          CONTRIBUTION TO THE INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $111,117,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     102,020,448
Committee recommendation................................     102,020,448

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $102,020,448 for Contribution to 
the Inter-American Development Bank, which is for the third of 
five U.S. paid-in capital contributions to the IDB's Ninth GCI.

              LIMITATION ON CALLABLE CAPITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS

    The Committee recommends a limitation on the amount that 
the U.S. Governor of the IDB may subscribe to the callable 
portion of the U.S. share of the Ninth GCI in an amount not to 
exceed $4,098,794,833 in fiscal year 2014.

CONTRIBUTION TO THE ENTERPRISE FOR THE AMERICAS MULTILATERAL INVESTMENT 
                                  FUND

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $14,995,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................       6,298,000
Committee recommendation................................       6,298,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $6,298,000 for Contribution to the 
Enterprise for the Americas Multilateral Investment Fund for 
payment of arrears owed by the United States from prior years 
to the fund.

               CONTRIBUTION TO THE ASIAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $106,552,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     106,585,848
Committee recommendation................................     106,585,848

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $106,585,848 for Contribution to 
the Asian Development Bank for the fourth of five scheduled 
U.S. paid-in capital contributions to the ADB's Fifth GCI.

              LIMITATION ON CALLABLE CAPITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS

    The Committee recommends a limitation on the amount that 
the U.S. Governor of the ADB may subscribe to the callable 
portion of the U.S. share of the GCI-V in an amount not to 
exceed $2,558,048,769 in fiscal year 2014.

               CONTRIBUTION TO THE ASIAN DEVELOPMENT FUND

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $99,968,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     115,250,000
Committee recommendation................................     115,250,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $115,250,000 for Contribution to 
the Asian Development Fund.

              CONTRIBUTION TO THE AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $32,408,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      32,417,720
Committee recommendation................................      32,417,720

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $32,417,720 for Contribution to 
the African Development Bank for the third of eight 
installments of the U.S. paid-in capital subscription to the 
AfDB's Sixth GCI.

              LIMITATION ON CALLABLE CAPITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS

    The Committee recommends a limitation on the amount that 
the U.S. Governor of the AfDB may subscribe to the callable 
portion of the U.S. share of the Sixth GCI in an amount not to 
exceed $507,860,808 in fiscal year 2014.

              CONTRIBUTION TO THE AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FUND

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................    $172,445,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     195,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     195,000,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                  MULTILATERAL DEBT RELIEF INITIATIVE

Appropriations, 2013....................................................
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     $30,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      30,000,000

    The Committee recommends $195,000,000 for Contribution to 
the African Development Fund. In addition, the Committee 
recommends $30,000,000 for payment to the Multilateral Debt 
Relief Initiative.

  CONTRIBUTION TO THE INTERNATIONAL FUND FOR AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $29,990,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      30,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      30,000,000

\1\ The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $30,000,000 for Contribution to 
the International Fund for Agricultural Development.

                    INTERNATIONAL MONETARY PROGRAMS

            UNITED STATES QUOTA, INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND

Appropriations, 2013....................................................
Budget estimate, 2014\1\................................................
Committee recommendation................................    $315,000,000

\1\The President's budget request includes a proposal for the 
authorization of and mandatory funding for an increase in the U.S. quota 
at the IMF and the simultaneous reduction in the U.S. participation in 
the New Arrangements to Borrow.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                  LOANS TO INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND

                    (INCLUDING RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2013

                                             ...........................

Budget estimate, 2014\1\

                                             ...........................

Committee recommendation\2\

                                                         -$1,200,000,000

\1\The President's budget request includes a proposal for the 
authorization of and mandatory funding for an increase in the U.S. quota 
at the IMF and the simultaneous reduction in the U.S. participation in 
the New Arrangements to Borrow.
\2\Rescinds funding appropriated in the Supplemental Appropriations Act 
of 2009 (Public Law 111-32).

    The Committee recommends $315,000,000 to increase the U.S. 
quota by 40,871,800,000 Special Drawing Rights, and rescinds 
$1,200,000,000 from funds appropriated in Public Law 111-32 to 
reduce the U.S. participation in the New Arrangements to Borrow 
by an equal amount of SDRs. The Committee understands that the 
increase in SDRs in the U.S. quota to the IMF and the 
simultaneous decrease in SDRs in the U.S. contribution to the 
NAB will not change the overall U.S. commitment to the IMF.
    Section 7069(d) of this act authorizes the decrease in SDRs 
in the U.S. participation in the NAB, the United States to 
accept an amendment to the IMF Articles of Agreement that will 
change the composition of the IMF Executive Board while 
preserving the U.S. seat on the Board, and the increase in SDRs 
to the U.S. quota.

                                TITLE VI

                    EXPORT AND INVESTMENT ASSISTANCE

                Export-Import Bank of the United States

                           INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................      $3,999,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................       5,100,000
Committee recommendation................................       5,100,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                        ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $89,871,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................     125,400,000
Committee recommendation................................     125,000,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $5,100,000 for the Inspector 
General and $125,000,000 for Administrative Expenses for the 
Export-Import Bank of the United States, including $7,000,000 
to increase small business financing, $1,000,000 to support 
U.S. export expansion to sub-Saharan Africa, $5,600,000 to fund 
technology upgrades to streamline the loan process, and 
$10,500,000 to complete the renovation of the Ex-Im Bank's 
headquarters.
    The Committee directs the President of the Ex-Im Bank to 
provide, not later than 45 days after enactment of this act, a 
revised policy on the use of representation funds that is 
consistent with section 7020(a) of this act. The Committee 
includes a provision under the Program Account heading 
directing that not less than 20 percent of the aggregate loan, 
guarantee, and insurance authority available to Ex-Im Bank in 
fiscal year 2014 is used to support financing directly for 
small businesses.

                Overseas Private Investment Corporation


                           NONCREDIT ACCOUNT

                        ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $54,972,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      71,800,000
Committee recommendation................................      71,800,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                            PROGRAM ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $24,992,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      31,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      31,000,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $71,800,000 for Administrative 
Expenses and $31,000,000 for Program Account for the costs of 
direct and guaranteed loans for the Overseas Private Investment 
Corporation.
    The Committee directs the President of OPIC to provide, not 
later than 45 days after enactment of this act, a revised 
policy on the use of representation funds that is consistent 
with section 7020(a) of this act.
    The Committee supports the implementation of a memorandum 
of understanding between OPIC and the USAID OIG, notes that an 
agreement for fiscal year 2013 was implemented, and directs the 
President of OPIC to implement a fiscal year 2014 agreement, 
including an inspection/audit plan, as authorized, and allocate 
adequate funding to support the mutually agreed upon plan in 
fiscal year 2014 to reimburse the USAID OIG for costs related 
to oversight and audit functions.
    The Committee supports the continued presence of an Office 
of Accountability within OPIC to evaluate compliance with 
environmental, social, labor, human rights, and transparency 
standards, and directs the President of OPIC to work with the 
USAID OIG to determine the appropriate role of this office in 
light of the OIG's oversight role.
    The Committee encourages OPIC to consult with relevant 
Federal agencies and civil society organizations on the 
advisability of adopting an investment policy that supports the 
export of nuclear energy products and services to countries 
that are developing or expanding their nuclear energy program. 
U.S. participation in global nuclear development could enhance 
nuclear power plant safety and reliability, increase influence 
over nuclear nonproliferation policy, and create American jobs. 
The Committee recognizes, however, that such an investment 
policy would raise serious nonproliferation issues needing 
thorough consideration, as many countries lack the ability to 
safeguard nuclear material.
    The Committee encourages OPIC to use its existing budget 
and statutory authorities to support small businesses and 
cooperatives in connection with OPIC's overseas cooperative 
development programs. Such programs shall include food 
security, credit, housing, agribusiness, technology transfer, 
rural telecommunications and electrification, private 
enterprise development, and healthcare.

                      TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT AGENCY

Appropriations, 2013\1\.................................     $49,984,000
Budget estimate, 2014...................................      62,662,000
Committee recommendation................................      62,662,000

\1\The enacted level reflects the across the board rescission in Public 
Law 113-6 but does not reflect the March 1, 2013, sequester of funds in 
Public Law 112-25.

    The Committee recommends $62,662,000 for Trade and 
Development Agency.
    The Committee directs the President of the Trade and 
Development Agency to provide, not later than 45 days after 
enactment of this act, a revised policy on the use of 
representation funds that is consistent with section 7020(a) of 
this act.

                               TITLE VII

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 7001. Allowances and Differentials
    Sec. 7002. Unobligated Balances Report
    Sec. 7003. Consulting Services
    Sec. 7004. Diplomatic Facilities
    Sec. 7005. Personnel Actions
    Sec. 7006. Local Guard Contracts
    Sec. 7007. Prohibition Against Direct Funding for Certain 
Countries
    Sec. 7008. Coups d'etat
    Sec. 7009. Transfer Authority
    Sec. 7010. Reporting Requirement
    Sec. 7011. Availability of Funds
    Sec. 7012. Limitation on Assistance to Countries in Default
    Sec. 7013. Prohibition on Taxation of United States 
Assistance
    Sec. 7014. Reservations of Funds
    Sec. 7015. Notification Requirements
    Sec. 7016. Notification on Excess Defense Equipment
    Sec. 7017. Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
International Organizations and Programs
    Sec. 7018. Prohibition on Funding for Abortions and 
Involuntary Sterilization
    Sec. 7019. Allocations
    Sec. 7020. Representation and Entertainment Expenses
    Sec. 7021. Prohibition on Assistance to Governments 
Supporting International Terrorism
    Sec. 7022. Authorization Requirements
    Sec. 7023. Definition of Program, Project, and Activity
    Sec. 7024. Authorities for the Peace Corps, Inter-American 
Foundation and United States African Development Foundation
    Sec. 7025. Commerce, Trade and Surplus Commodities
    Sec. 7026. Separate Accounts
    Sec. 7027. Eligibility for Assistance
    Sec. 7028. Impact on Jobs in the United States
    Sec. 7029. International Financial Institutions
    Sec. 7030. Debt-for-Development
    Sec. 7031. Financial Management and Budget Transparency
    Sec. 7032. Democracy Programs
    Sec. 7033. Multi-Year Pledges
    Sec. 7034. Special Provisions
    Sec. 7035. Arab League Boycott of Israel
    Sec. 7036. Palestinian Statehood
    Sec. 7037. Restrictions Concerning the Palestinian 
Authority
    Sec. 7038. Prohibition on Assistance to the Palestinian 
Broadcasting Corporation
    Sec. 7039. Assistance for the West Bank and Gaza
    Sec. 7040. Limitation on Assistance for the Palestinian 
Authority
    Sec. 7041. Middle East and North Africa
    Sec. 7042. Africa
    Sec. 7043. East Asia and the Pacific
    Sec. 7044. Western Hemisphere
    Sec. 7045. South and Central Asia
    Sec. 7046. Prohibition of Payments to United Nations 
Members
    Sec. 7047. War Crimes Tribunals
    Sec. 7048. United Nations
    Sec. 7049. Community-Based Police Assistance
    Sec. 7050. Enterprise Funds
    Sec. 7051. Conferences
    Sec. 7052. Aircraft Transfer and Coordination
    Sec. 7053. Parking Fines and Real Property Taxes Owed by 
Foreign Governments
    Sec. 7054. Landmines and Cluster Munitions
    Sec. 7055. Prohibition on Publicity or Propaganda
    Sec. 7056. Limitation on Residence Expenses
    Sec. 7057. United States Agency for International 
Development
Management
    Sec. 7058. Global Health Activities
    Sec. 7059. Gender Equality
    Sec. 7060. Sector Allocations
    Sec. 7061. Uzbekistan
    Sec. 7062. Requests for Documents
    Sec. 7063. Overseas Private Investment Corporation
    Sec. 7064. International Prison Conditions
    Sec. 7065. Prohibition on Use of Torture
    Sec. 7066. Extradition
    Sec. 7067. Commercial Leasing of Defense Articles
    Sec. 7068. Independent States of the Former Soviet Union
    Sec. 7069. International Monetary Fund
    Sec. 7070. Disability Programs
    Sec. 7071. Procurement Reform
    Sec. 7072. Global Internet Freedom
    Sec. 7073. Border Crossing Card Fee for Minors
    Sec. 7074. Special Defense Acquisition Fund
    Sec. 7075. United Nations Population Fund
    Sec. 7076. Operating and Spend Plans
    Sec. 7077. Department of State Organization
    Sec. 7078. Transparency, Governance, and Oversight 
Requirements
    Sec. 7079. Buying Power Maintenance, International 
Organizations
    Sec. 7080. Transfer of Expired Balances to the Protection 
of Foreign Missions and Officials Account
    Sec. 7081. Community Development Funds
    Sec. 7082. Establishment of Broadcasting Board of Governors 
Chief Executive Officer Position
    Sec. 7083. Consular Notification Compliance
    Sec. 7084. Death Gratuity and Other Benefits
    Sec. 7085. United States Citizenship for Internationally 
Adopted Individuals
    Sec. 7086. Assistance for Foreign Nongovernmental 
Organizations
    Sec. 7087. Use of Funds in Contravention of this Act

                               TITLE VIII

                    OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS

    The Committee recommends a total of $6,515,000,000 for 
overseas contingency operations for the Department of State, 
USAID, and related agency and programs.

                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE

                   Administration of Foreign Affairs

                    DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends $1,024,908,000 for Diplomatic and 
Consular Programs, of which $900,274,000 is for Worldwide 
Security Protection, including for security costs in Iraq. The 
amount provided is for the extraordinary costs of operations in 
Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iraq, and is designated for OCO.
    The Committee directs that the spend plan required by 
section 7076 of this act include a detailed description of 
designated amounts by category, breakout costs of operations by 
location, and staffing levels for each location and provincial 
area, where applicable. In addition, with respect to funds 
transferred to other agencies in support of Afghanistan 
operations, the spend plan should include projected transfer 
amounts and the number of staff supported by each agency.

                   CONFLICT STABILIZATION OPERATIONS

    The Committee recommends $8,500,000 for Conflict 
Stabilization Operations for deployment costs, including to 
Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Syria, and is designated for OCO.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends $49,650,000 for Office of 
Inspector General, which is for SIGAR. The amount provided is 
for the extraordinary costs of program oversight in 
Afghanistan, and is designated for OCO.
    Section 7076 of this act requires the relevant department, 
agency, or organization to submit to the Committee a spend plan 
for funds appropriated in titles I and II of this act. The 
Committee expects SIGAR to submit such plan not later than 30 
days after enactment of this act.

               EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $8,628,000 for Educational and 
Cultural Exchange Programs. The amount is provided for the 
extraordinary costs of exchange and public diplomacy programs 
in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iraq, and is designated for OCO.

            EMBASSY SECURITY, CONSTRUCTION, AND MAINTENANCE

    The Committee recommends $558,548,000 for Embassy Security, 
Construction, and Maintenance for the construction of a NCC in 
Erbil, Iraq, and for worldwide security upgrades, including for 
physical security at expeditionary, interim, and temporary 
facilities, and is designated for OCO.

                      International Organizations

              CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

    The Committee recommends $74,400,000 for Contributions to 
International Organizations for the extraordinary costs of 
operations in Afghanistan and Iraq, and is designated for OCO.

                             RELATED AGENCY

                    Broadcasting Board of Governors

                 INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING OPERATIONS

    The Committee recommends $4,400,000 for International 
Broadcasting Operations for the extraordinary costs of United 
States international broadcasting to Iraq, Afghanistan, 
Pakistan, and the Middle East, and is designated for OCO.

                            RELATED PROGRAMS

                    UNITED STATES INSTITUTE OF PEACE

    The Committee recommends $6,016,000 for United States 
Institute of Peace. The amount provided is for the 
extraordinary costs of USIP programs in Afghanistan, Pakistan, 
Iraq, and the Middle East, and is designated for OCO.

           UNITED STATES AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

                  Funds Appropriated to the President

                           OPERATING EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $65,350,000 for Operating Expenses 
for the extraordinary costs of operations in Afghanistan, and 
is designated for OCO.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for Office of Inspector 
General for the extraordinary costs of oversight activities of 
programs and operations in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iraq, and 
is designated for OCO.

                     BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

                  Funds Appropriated to the President

                   INTERNATIONAL DISASTER ASSISTANCE

    The Committee recommends $1,005,000,000 for International 
Disaster Assistance for the extraordinary costs of the U.S. 
response to crises resulting from conflict, including in 
Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Yemen, and 
Africa, and is designated for OCO.

                         TRANSITION INITIATIVES

    The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for Transition 
Initiatives for the extraordinary costs of contingency 
operations in countries in conflict, such as Afghanistan, 
Pakistan, Libya, Yemen, and Syria, and is designated for OCO.

                         ECONOMIC SUPPORT FUND

    The Committee recommends $901,500,000 for Economic Support 
Fund for the extraordinary costs of operations in Afghanistan, 
Pakistan, and Iraq, and is designated for OCO.

                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE

                    Migration and Refugee Assistance

    The Committee recommends $1,513,000,000 for Migration and 
Refugee Assistance for the extraordinary costs of the U.S. 
response to humanitarian crises, including in South Asia, the 
Middle East, and Africa, and is designated for OCO.

                      COMPLEX FOREIGN CRISES FUND

    The Committee recommends $535,000,000 for Complex Foreign 
Crises Fund for the extraordinary costs of responding to 
humanitarian and security crises and political transitions 
globally, including in the Middle East and North Africa 
(including not less than $200,000,000 for assistance for 
Jordan), and peacekeeping operations in Mali, and is designated 
for OCO.

                   INTERNATIONAL SECURITY ASSISTANCE

                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE

          International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

    The Committee recommends $106,500,000 for International 
Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement for the extraordinary 
costs of contingency operations, including in Afghanistan, 
Pakistan, and Iraq, and is designated for OCO.

                        Peacekeeping Operations

    The Committee recommends $138,600,000 for Peacekeeping 
Operations for the extraordinary costs of contingency 
operations in Somalia and peacekeeping operations in Mali, and 
is designated for OCO. The Committee directs the Department of 
State to consult with the appropriate congressional committees 
on the use of TEF and other credits to offset the assessed cost 
of peacekeeping activities in Mali.

                  Funds Appropriated to the President

                   FOREIGN MILITARY FINANCING PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends $500,000,000 for the Foreign 
Military Financing Program for the extraordinary costs of 
contingency operations in Iraq, and is designated for OCO.

                        MULTILATERAL ASSISTANCE

                  Funds Appropriated to the President

                  International Financial Institutions

                            TRANSITION FUND

    The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for Transition Fund, a 
new multi-donor trust fund for extraordinary costs to assist 
Arab countries in transition, including Egypt, Tunisia, Jordan, 
Morocco, Libya, and Yemen.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 8001. Additional Appropriations.
    Sec. 8002. Extension of Authorities and Conditions.
    Sec. 8003 Transfer Authority. Subsection (b)(2) authorizes 
transfer of not to exceed $25,000,000 from INCLE and FMF to the 
Global Security Contingency Fund.

  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Rule XVI, paragraph 7 requires that every report on a 
general appropriation bill filed by the Committee must identify 
each recommended amendment, with particularity, which proposes 
an item of appropriation which is not made to carry out the 
provisions of an existing law, a treaty stipulation, or an act 
or resolution previously passed by the Senate during that 
session.
    The Committee is filing an original bill, which is not 
covered under this rule, but reports this information in the 
spirit of full disclosure.
    Items providing funding for fiscal year 2014 which lack 
authorization are as follows:
    Administration of Foreign Affairs;
    International Organizations;
    International Commissions;
    Department of State and Related Programs;
    Broadcasting Board of Governors;
    USAID Operating Expenses;
    USAID Operating Expenses, Office of Inspector General;
    USAID Capital Investment Fund;
    Global Health Programs;
    Development Assistance;
    International Disaster Assistance;
    Transition Initiatives;
    Development Credit Authority;
    Economic Support Fund;
    Assistance for Europe, Eurasia, and Central Asia;
    Inter-American Foundation;
    African Development Foundation;
    Peace Corps;
    Millennium Challenge Corporation;
    Democracy Fund;
    International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement;
    Migration and Refugee Assistance;
    Complex Foreign Crises Fund;
    Nonproliferation, Anti-Terrorism, Demining and Related 
Assistance;
    International Affairs Technical Assistance;
    Debt Restructuring;
    International Military Education and Training;
    Foreign Military Financing Program;
    Peacekeeping Operations;
    International Organizations and Programs;
    Clean Technology Fund;
    Strategic Climate Fund; and
    Global Security Contingency Fund.

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(c), RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, on July 25, 2013, 
the Committee ordered favorably reported an original bill (S. 
1372) making appropriations for the Department of State, 
foreign operations, and related programs for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2014, and for other purposes, provided 
that the bill be subject to amendment and that the bill be 
consistent with the subcommittee funding guidance, by a 
recorded vote of 23-7, a quorum being present. The vote was as 
follows:
        Yeas                          Nays
Chairwoman Mikulski                 Mr. Shelby
Mr. Leahy                           Mr. McConnell
Mr. Harkin                          Mr. Alexander
Mrs. Murray                         Mr. Coats
Mrs. Feinstein                      Mr. Hoeven
Mr. Durbin                          Mr. Johanns
Mr. Johnson                         Mr. Boozman
Ms. Landrieu
Mr. Reed
Mr. Pryor
Mr. Tester
Mr. Udall
Mrs. Shaheen
Mr. Merkley
Mr. Begich
Mr. Coons
Mr. Cochran
Ms. Collins
Ms. Murkowski
Mr. Graham
Mr. Kirk
Mr. Blunt
Mr. Moran

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of rule XXVI requires that the Committee 
report on a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any 
statute or part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the 
statute or part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and 
(b) a comparative print of that part of the bill or joint 
resolution making the amendment and of the statute or part 
thereof proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through 
type and italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate 
typographical devices the omissions and insertions which would 
be made by the bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form 
recommended by the Committee.''
    In compliance with this rule, the following changes in 
existing law proposed to be made by the bill are shown as 
follows: existing law to be omitted is enclosed in black 
brackets, new matter is printed in italic, and existing law in 
which no change is proposed is shown in roman.

                    TITLE 8--ALIENS AND NATIONALITY


                CHAPTER 12--IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY


                    Subchapter I--General Provisions


Sec. 1101. Definitions

    (a) As used in this chapter--

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (b) As used in subchapters I and II--
            (1) The term ``child'' means an unmarried person 
        under twenty-one years of age who is--

            (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (F)(i) a child, under the age of sixteen at the 
        time a petition is filed in his behalf to accord a 
        classification as an immediate relative under section 
        1151(b) of this title, who is an orphan because of the 
        death or disappearance of, abandonment or desertion by, 
        or separation or loss from, both parents, or for whom 
        the sole or surviving parent is incapable of providing 
        the proper care and has in writing irrevocably released 
        the child for emigration and adoption; who has been 
        adopted abroad by a United States citizen and spouse 
        jointly, or by an unmarried United States citizen [at 
        least twenty-five years of age, who personally saw and 
        observed the child prior to or during the adoption 
        proceedings;] who is at least 25 years of age, at least 
        1 of whom personally saw and observed the child before 
        or during the adoption proceedings; or who is coming to 
        the United States for adoption by a United States 
        citizen and spouse jointly, or by an unmarried United 
        States citizen at least twenty-five years of age, who 
        have or has complied with the preadoption requirements, 
        if any, of the child's proposed residence; Provided, 
        That the Attorney General is satisfied that proper care 
        will be furnished the child if admitted to the United 
        States: Provided further, That no natural parent or 
        prior adoptive parent of any such child shall 
        thereafter, by virtue of such parentage, be accorded 
        any right, privilege, or status under this chapter; or

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


             Subchapter III--Nationality and Naturalization


              PART II--NATIONALITY THROUGH NATURALIZATION

Sec. 1431. Children born outside the United States and residing 
                    permanently in the United States; conditions under 
                    which citizenship automatically acquired

    (a) A child born outside of the United States automatically 
becomes a citizen of the United States when all of the 
following conditions have been fulfilled:
            (1) * * *
            (2) * * *
            (3) [The child is residing in the United States in 
        the legal and physical custody of the citizen parent 
        pursuant to a lawful admission for permanent 
        residence.] The child is physically present in the 
        United States in the legal custody of the citizen 
        parent pursuant to a lawful admission.
    (b) Subsection (a) of this section shall apply to a child 
adopted by a United States citizen parent if the child 
satisfies the requirements applicable to adopted children under 
section 1101(b)(1) of this title, regardless of the date on 
which the adoption was finalized.
                                ------                                


              TITLE 22--FOREIGN RELATIONS AND INTERCOURSE


                          CHAPTER 4--PASSPORTS


Sec. 214. Fees for execution and issuance of passports; persons excused 
                    from payment

    (a) * * *
    (b)(1) * * *
    (2) The authority to collect the surcharge provided under 
paragraph (1) may not be exercised after [September 30, 2010] 
September 30, 2014.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


           CHAPTER 7--INTERNATIONAL BUREAUS, CONGRESSES, ETC.


Subchapter XV--International Monetary Fund and Bank for Reconstruction 
                            and Development

Sec. 286e-2. Loans to Fund

(a) Limitations

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

(b) Authorization of appropriations; repayments available for 
            loans to Fund

    (1) For the purpose of making loans to the International 
Monetary Fund pursuant to subsection (a)(1) of this section, 
there is authorized to be appropriated 6,712,000,000 Special 
Drawing Rights, except that prior to activation, the Secretary 
of the Treasury shall certify whether supplementary resources 
are needed to forestall or cope with an impairment of the 
international monetary system and that the Fund has fully 
explored other means of funding, to remain available until 
expended to meet calls by the International Monetary Fund. Any 
payments made to the United States by the International 
Monetary Fund as a repayment on account of the principal of a 
loan made under this section shall continue to be available for 
loans to the International Monetary Fund only to the extent 
that such amounts are not subject to rescission.
    (2) For the purpose of making loans to the International 
Monetary Fund pursuant to subsection (a)(2) of this section, 
there is hereby authorized to be appropriated not to exceed the 
dollar equivalent of 75,000,000,000 Special Drawing Rights, in 
addition to any amounts previously authorized under this 
section, except that prior to activation, the Secretary of the 
Treasury shall report to Congress on whether supplementary 
resources are needed to forestall or cope with an impairment of 
the international monetary system and whether the Fund has 
fully explored other means of funding, to remain available 
until expended to meet calls by the Fund. Any payments made to 
the United States by the Fund as a repayment on account of the 
principal of a loan made under this section shall continue to 
be available for loans to the Fundonly to the extent that such 
amounts are not subject to rescission.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Sec. 286vv. Capital stock increases

(a) Increases authorized

    The United States Governor of the Bank is authorized--

            (1)(A) to vote in favor of a resolution to increase 
        the capital stock of the Bank on a selective basis by 
        230,374 shares; and
            (B) to subscribe on behalf of the United States to 
        38,459 additional shares of the capital stock of the 
        Bank, as part of the selective increase in the capital 
        stock of the Bank, except that any subscription to such 
        additional shares shall be effective only to such 
        extent or in such amounts as are provided in advance in 
        appropriations Acts;
            (2)(A) to vote in favor of a resolution to increase 
        the capital stock of the Bank on a general basis by 
        484,102 shares; and
            (B) to subscribe on behalf of the United States to 
        81,074 additional shares of the capital stock of the 
        Bank, as part of the general increase in the capital 
        stock of the Bank, except that any subscription to such 
        additional shares shall be effective only to such 
        extent or in such amounts as are provided in advance in 
        appropriations Acts.

(b) Limitations on authorization of appropriations

            (1) In order to pay for the increase in the United 
        States subscription to the Bank under subsection 
        (a)(2)(B), there are authorized to be appropriated, 
        without fiscal year limitation, $9,780,361,991 for 
        payment by the Secretary of the Treasury.

            (2) Of the amount authorized to be appropriated 
        under paragraph (2)(A)--\1\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\So in original. Probably should be ``paragraph (1)--''.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
            (A) $586,821,720 shall be for paid in shares of the 
        Bank; and
            (B) $9,193,540,271 shall be for callable shares of 
        the Bank.

SEC. 71. ACCEPTANCE OF AMENDMENTS TO THE ARTICLES OF AGREEMENT OF THE 
                    FUND.

    The United States Governor of the Fund may accept the 
amendments to the Articles of Agreement of the Fund as proposed 
in resolution 66-2 of the Board of Governors of the Fund.

SEC. 72. QUOTA INCREASE.

    (a) In General.--The United States Governor of the Fund may 
consent to an increase in the quota of the United States in the 
Fund equivalent to 40,871,800,000 Special Drawing Rights.
    (b) Subject to Appropriations.--The authority provided by 
subsection (a) shall be effective only to such extent or in 
such amounts as are provided in advance in appropriations Acts.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


            Subchapter XXIII--African Development Foundation


Sec. 290h-1. African Development Foundation

(a) Establishment of Foundation

    There is established a body corporate to be known as the 
``United States African Development Foundation'' (hereafter in 
this subchapter referred to as the ``Foundation'').

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                    CHAPTER 38--DEPARTMENT OF STATE


         Subchapter III--General and Administrative Provisions


                   PART II--ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

Sec. 2385. Employment of personnel

(a) Authorization

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

(j) Reemployment of annuitants under the Civil Service 
            Retirement System and the Federal Employees' 
            Retirement System

    (1)(A) * * *
    (B) The authority of the Administrator under subparagraph 
(A) shall terminate on [October 1, 2010] September 30, 2014. An 
annuitant reemployed pursuant to such authority prior to such 
termination date may be employed for a period ending not later 
than one year after such date.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Sec. 2708. Department of State rewards program

(a) Establishment

        (1) In general

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

        (2) Purpose

            The rewards program shall be designed to assist in 
        the prevention of acts of international terrorism, 
        international narcotics trafficking serious violations 
        of international humanitarian law, transnational 
        organized crime, and other related criminal acts.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (7) the disruption of financial mechanisms of a 
        foreign terrorist organization, including the use by 
        the organization of illicit narcotics production or 
        international narcotics trafficking--
                    (A) to finance acts of international 
                terrorism; or
                    (B) to sustain or support any terrorist 
                organization.
            (8) the arrest or conviction in any country, or the 
        transfer to or conviction by an international criminal 
        tribunal (including a hybrid or mixed tribunal), of any 
        foreign national accused of war crimes, crimes against 
        humanity, or genocide, as defined under the statute of 
        such tribunal.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Sec. 2733. Reemployment of annuitants under the Civil Service 
                    Retirement System and Federal Employees' Retirement 
                    System

(a) Authority

        (1) In general

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

        (2) Termination of authority

            The authority of the Secretary under paragraph (1) 
        shall terminate on [October 1, 2010] September 30, 
        2014. An annuitant reemployed pursuant to such 
        authority prior to such termination date may be 
        employed for a period ending not later than one year 
        after such date.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                      CHAPTER 52--FOREIGN SERVICE


                      Subchapter IV--Compensation


Sec. 3973. Death gratuities

(a) Criteria; amount; payment deemed gift

    The Secretary may provide for payment of a gratuity to the 
surviving dependents of any Foreign Service employee, who dies 
as a result of injuries sustained in the performance of duty 
abroad, in an amount equal to one year's salary [at the time of 
death] at level II of the Executive Schedule under section 5313 
of title 5, United States Code, at the time of death, except 
that for employees compensated under local compensation plans 
established under section 408 the amount shall be equal to the 
greater of either one year's salary at the time of death, or 
one year's basic salary at the highest step of the highest 
grade on the local compensation plan from which the employee 
was being paid at the time of death. Any death gratuity payment 
made under this section shall be held to have been a gift and 
shall be in addition to any other benefit payable from any 
source.
    (b) Other Executive Agencies.--The head of an executive 
agency shall make a death gratuity payment authorized by this 
section to the survivors, as defined in subsection (e), of any 
employee of that agency who dies as a result of injuries 
sustained in the performance of duty abroad while subject to 
the authority of the chief of mission pursuant to section 207.
    (c) Interns Without Regular Salary.--The Secretary shall 
make a special death gratuity payment of up to $500,000 to the 
survivors of an intern serving at a United States diplomatic or 
consular mission abroad without a regular salary who dies as a 
result of an act of terrorism while on duty abroad, and who is 
not otherwise compensated under this section.

[(b)] (d) Eligibility to elect monthly compensation as 
            condition to payment

    A death gratuity payment shall be made under this section 
only if the survivor entitled to payment under subsection (c) 
of this section is entitled to elect monthly compensation under 
section 8133 of title 5, because the death resulted from an 
injury (excluding a disease proximately caused by the 
employment) sustained in the performance of duty, without 
regard to whether such survivor elects to waive compensation 
under such section 8133.

[(c) Order of payment

    [A death gratuity payment under this section shall be made 
as follows:
            [(1) First, to the widow or widower.
            [(2) Second, to the child, or children in equal 
        shares, if there is no widow or widower.
            [(3) Third, to the dependent parent, or dependent 
        parents in equal shares, if there is no widow, widower, 
        or child.
    [If there is no survivor entitled to payment under this 
subsection, no payment shall be made.]
    (e) Order of Payment.--A death gratuity payment under this 
section shall be made as follows:
            (1) First, to the widow, widower, or surviving 
        domestic partner (as defined by Department of State 
        regulation).
            (2) Second, to the child, or children in equal 
        shares, if there is no widow, widower, or domestic 
        partner.
            (3) Third, to the parent, or parents in equal 
        shares, if there is no widow, widower, domestic 
        partner, or child.
    If there is no survivor entitled to payment under this 
subsection, no payment shall be made.

[(d)] (f) Definitions

    As used in this section--
            (1) the term ``Foreign Service employee'' means any 
        member of the Service or United States representative 
        to an international organization or commission; and
            (2) each of the terms ``widow'', ``widower'', 
        ``child'', and ``parent'' shall have the same meaning 
        given each such term by section 8101 of title 5. The 
        Secretary may waive the requirement that the survivor 
        be entitled to elect monthly compensation under section 
        8133 of title 5, United States Code, if the survivor 
        would otherwise be entitled to payment under this 
        section and the Secretary determines such waiver is 
        appropriate under the circumstances.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


       Subchapter VIII--Foreign Service Retirement and Disability


        PART I--FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM

Sec. 4064. Reemployment

(a) Termination of annuity; coverage under same retirement 
            system or another contributory retirement system; 
            rights and benefits

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

(g) Waiver of annuity limitations

    (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

        (2)(A) * * *
        (B) The authority of the Secretary to waive the 
        application of subsections (a) through (d) for an 
        annuitant pursuant to subparagraph (C)(i) of paragraph 
        (1) shall terminate on [October 1, 2010] September 30, 
        2014.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


          CHAPTER 71--UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING


Sec. 6203. Establishment of Broadcasting Board of Governors

(a) Continued existence within Executive branch

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

(f) Decisions

    Decisions of the Board shall be made by majority vote, a 
quorum being present. A quorum shall consist of [5 members] a 
majority of Governors then serving (as determined under 
subsection (c) of such section) at the time a decision of the 
Board is made.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Sec. 6204. Authorities of Board

(a) Authorities

    The Board shall have the following authorities:

            (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            [(11)] (11)(A) To appoint such staff personnel for 
        the Board as the Board may determine to be necessary, 
        subject to the provisions of title 5 governing 
        appointments in the competitive service, and to fix 
        their compensation in accordance with the provisions of 
        chapter 51 and subchapter III of chapter 53 of such 
        title relating to classification and General Schedule 
        pay rates.
            (B) To appoint a Chief Executive Officer for a 5-
        year term, renewable at the Board's discretion, subject 
        to the provisions of title 5, United States Code, 
        governing appointments, classification, and 
        compensation; and to remove the Chief Executive Officer 
        upon a two-thirds majority vote of the members of the 
        Board then serving.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

[(b) Delegation of authority

    [The Board may delegate to the Director of the 
International Broadcasting Bureau, or any other officer or 
employee of the United States, to the extent the Board 
determines to be appropriate, the authorities provided in this 
section, except those authorities provided in paragraph (1), 
(2), (3), (4), (5), (6), (9), or (11) of subsection (a) of this 
section.]
    (b) Authorities; Delegation.--The Chief Executive Officer 
shall have sole responsibility to carry out the authorities 
enumerated in paragraphs (1), (5), (6), (7), (8), (10), 
(11)(A), (12), (13), (14), (15), (16), (17), (18), and (19) of 
subsection (a) subject to the supervision of the Board. The 
Board may delegate the responsibilities enumerated in 
paragraphs (2), (3), (4), and (9) of such subsection. The 
authority under paragraph 11(B) shall be exercised solely by 
the Board.

(c) Broadcasting budgets

    [The Director of the Bureau and the grantees identified in 
sections 6207 and 6208 of this title] The Chief Executive 
Officer shall submit proposed budgets to the Board. The Board 
shall forward its recommendations concerning the proposed 
budget for the Board and broadcasting activities under this 
chapter, the Radio Broadcasting to Cuba Act [22 U.S.C. 1465 et 
seq.], and the Television Broadcasting to Cuba Act [22 U.S.C. 
1465aa et seq.] to the Office of Management and Budget.

(d) Professional independence of broadcasters

    The Secretary of State [and the Board], the Board, and the 
Chief Executive Officer, in carrying out their functions, shall 
respect the professional independence and integrity of the 
International Broadcasting Bureau, its broadcasting services, 
and the grantees of the Board.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Sec. 6206. International Broadcasting Bureau

(a) Establishment

    There is hereby established an International Broadcasting 
Bureau under the Board (hereafter in this chapter referred to 
as the ``Bureau''), to carry out all nonmilitary international 
broadcasting activities supported by the United States 
Government other than those described in sections 6207 and 6208 
of this title. The Bureau shall operate under the direction of 
the Chief Executive Officer.

[(b) Selection of Director of Bureau

    [The Director of the Bureau shall be appointed by the 
President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate. 
The Director of the Bureau shall be entitled to receive 
compensation at the rate prescribed by law for level IV of the 
Executive Schedule.]

(c) Responsibilities of [Director] Chief Executive Officer

    [The Director] The Chief Executive Officer shall organize 
and chair a coordinating committee to examine and make 
recommendations to the Board on long-term strategies for the 
future of international broadcasting, including the use of new 
technologies, further consolidation of broadcast services, and 
consolidation of currently existing public affairs and 
legislative relations functions in the various international 
broadcasting entities. The coordinating committee shall include 
representatives of Radio Free Asia, RFE/RL, Incorporated, the 
Broadcasting Board of Governors, and, as appropriate, the 
Office of Cuba Broadcasting, the Voice of America, and 
Worldnet.
                                ------                                


           FOREIGN ASSISTANCE ACT OF 1961, PUBLIC LAW 87-195


SEC. [620J.] 620M LIMITATION ON ASSISTANCE TO SECURITY FORCES.

    (a) In General.--* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (d) Credible Information.--* * *
            (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (5) ensure that when vetting an individual for 
        eligibility to receive United States training, 
        equipment, or other types of assistance the 
        individual's unit is also vetted;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                                 PART I


        Chapter 1--Policy; Development Assistance Authorizations


SEC. 101. GENERAL POLICY

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 104C. ASSISTANCE TO COMBAT MALARIA.

    (a) Finding.--Congress finds that malaria kills more people 
annually than any other communicable disease except 
tuberculosis, that more than 90 percent of all malaria cases 
are in sub-Saharan Africa, and that children and women are 
particularly at risk. Congress recognizes that there are cost-
effective tools to decrease the spread of malaria and that 
malaria is a curable disease if promptly diagnosed and 
adequately treated.
    (b) Policy.--It is a major objective of the foreign 
assistance program of the United States to provide assistance 
for the prevention, control, treatment, and cure of malaria.
    (c) Authorization.--To carry out this section and 
consistent with section 104(c), the President is authorized to 
furnish assistance, on such terms and conditions as the 
President may determine, for the prevention, treatment, 
control, and elimination of malaria.
    (d) Coordination.--In carrying out this section, the 
President shall coordinate with the World Health Organization, 
the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria, the 
Department of Health and Human Services (the Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of 
Health), and other organizations with respect to the 
development and implementation of a comprehensive malaria 
control program.

SEC. 104D. ELIGIBILITY FOR ASSISTANCE.

    Notwithstanding any other provision of law, regulation, or 
policy, in determining eligibility for assistance authorized 
under sections 104, 104A, 104B, and 104C--
            (1) a foreign nongovernmental organization shall 
        not be ineligible for such assistance solely on the 
        basis of health or medical services, including 
        counseling and referral services, provided by such 
        organization with non-United States Government funds if 
        such services are permitted in the country in which 
        they are being provided and would not violate United 
        States law if provided in the United States; and
            (2) a foreign nongovernmental organization shall 
        not be subject to requirements relating to the use of 
        non-United States Government funds for advocacy and 
        lobbying activities other than those that apply to 
        United States nongovernmental organizations receiving 
        assistance under this part.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


            TITLE VI--MICROENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE


                  Subtitle D--Miscellaneous Provisions


SEC. 258. REPORT.

    (a) In General.--Not later than June 30, 2006, and each 
June 30 thereafter, the Administrator of the Agency, acting 
through the Director of the office, shall submit to the 
appropriate congressional committees a report that contains a 
detailed description of the implementation of this title for 
the previous fiscal year.
    (b) Contents.--The report shall contain the following:
            [(1) The number of grants, cooperative agreements, 
        contracts, contributions, or other form of assistance 
        provided under section 252, with a listing of--
                    [(A) the amount of each grant, cooperative 
                agreement, contract, contribution, or other 
                form of assistance;
                    [(B) the name of each recipient and each 
                developing country with respect to which 
                projects or activities under the grant, 
                cooperative agreement, contract, contribution, 
                or other form of assistance were carried out; 
                and
                    [(C) a listing of the number of countries 
                receiving assistance authorized by section 
                252.]
            [(2)] (1) The results of the monitoring system 
        required under section 253.
            [(3)] (2) The process of developing and applying 
        poverty assessment procedures required under section 
        254.
            [(4)] (3) The percentage of assistance furnished 
        under section 252 that was allocated to the very poor 
        based on the data collected using the certified methods 
        required by section 254.
            [(5)] (4) The estimated number of the very poor 
        reached with assistance provided under section 252.
            [(6) The amount of assistance provided under 
        section 252 through central mechanisms.
            [(7) The name of each country that receives 
        assistance under section 256 and the amount of such 
        assistance.
            [(8) Information on the efforts of the Agency to 
        ensure that recipients of United States microenterprise 
        and microfinance development assistance work closely 
        with nongovernmental organizations and foreign 
        governments to identify and assist victims or potential 
        victims of severe forms of trafficking in persons and 
        women who are victims of or susceptible to other forms 
        of exploitation and violence.
            [(9) Any additional information relating to the 
        provision of assistance authorized by this title, 
        including the use of the poverty measurement tools 
        required by section 254, or additional information on 
        assistance provided by the United States to support 
        microenterprise development under this title or any 
        other provision of law.
            [(10) An estimate of the percentage of 
        beneficiaries of assistance under this title in 
        countries where a strong relationship between poverty 
        and race or ethnicity has been demonstrated.
            [(11) The level of funding provided through 
        contracts, the level of funding provided through 
        grants, contracts, and cooperative agreements that is 
        estimated to be subgranted or subcontracted, as the 
        case may be, to direct service providers, and an 
        analysis of the comparative cost-effectiveness and 
        sustainability of projects carried out under these 
        mechanisms.]

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


          TITLE XII--FAMINE PREVENTION AND FREEDOM FROM HUNGER


          Chapter 3--International Organizations and Programs

    Sec. 307. Withholding of United States Proportionate Share 
for Certain Programs of International Organizations.--(a) 
Notwithstanding any other provision of law, none of the funds 
authorized to be appropriated by this chapter shall be 
available for the United States proportionate share for 
programs for [Burma,] North Korea, Syria, Iran, Cuba, or the 
Palestine Liberation Organization or for projects whose purpose 
is to provide benefits to the Palestine Liberation Organization 
or entities associated with it or at the discretion of the 
President, Communist countries listed in section 620(f) of this 
Act.
                                ------                                


      FOREIGN OPERATIONS, EXPORT FINANCING, AND RELATED PROGRAMS 
              APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 1990, PUBLIC LAW 101-167


       ESTABLISHING CATEGORIES OF ALIENS FOR PURPOSES OF REFUGEE 
                             DETERMINATIONS

    Sec. 599D. (a) In General.-- * * *
    (b) Establishment of Categories.--
            (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (3) Within the number of admissions of refugees 
        allocated for each of fiscal years 1990, 1991, and 1992 
        for refugees who are nationals of the Soviet Union 
        under section 207(a)(3) of the Immigration and 
        Nationality Act and within the number of such 
        admissions allocated for each of fiscal years 1993, 
        1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 
        2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 [and 
        2013] 2013, and 2014 for refugees who are nationals of 
        the independent states of the former Soviet Union, 
        Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania under such section, 
        notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
        President shall allocate one thousand of such 
        admissions for such fiscal year to refugees who are 
        within the category of aliens described in paragraph 
        (2)(B).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (e) Period of Application.--
            (1) Subsections (a) and (b) shall take effect on 
        the date of the enactment of this Act [Nov. 21, 1989] 
        and shall only apply to applications for refugee status 
        submitted before June 1, [2013] 2014.
            (2) Subsection (c) shall apply to decisions made 
        after the date of the enactment of this Act and before 
        June 1, [2013] 2014.
            (3) Subsection (d) shall take effect on the date of 
        the enactment of this Act and shall only apply to 
        reapplications for refugee status submitted before June 
        1, [2013] 2014.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


    ADJUSTMENT OF STATUS FOR CERTAIN SOVIET AND INDOCHINESE PAROLEES

    Sec. 599E. (a) In General.-- * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (b) Aliens Eligible for Adjustment of Status.--The benefits 
provided in subsection (a) shall only apply to an alien who--
            (1) * * *
            (2) was inspected and granted parole into the 
        United States during the period beginning, on August 
        15, 1988, and ending or September 30, [2013] 2014, 
        after being denied refugee status.
                                ------                                


      FOREIGN OPERATIONS, EXPORT FINANCING, AND RELATED PROGRAMS 
              APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 1991, PUBLIC LAW 101-513


                      TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS


                        PROPERTY MANAGEMENT FUND

    Sec. 585. (a) The proceeds of overseas property acquired by 
the Agency for International Development under the authority of 
section 636(c) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 may be 
deposited in a separate fund, which shall be known as the 
Property Management Fund. Such proceeds shall be available for 
use only for the purposes of section 636(c) of that Act and for 
maintenance, and shall remain available until expended. The 
Administrator of the Agency for International Development shall 
report all uses of funds deposited into the Property Management 
Fund as part of the annual Congressional Presentation materials 
submitted by the Agency for International Development.
                                ------                                


FOREIGN RELATIONS AUTHORIZATION ACT, FISCAL YEARS 1994 AND 1995, PUBLIC 
                              LAW 103-236


        TITLE III--UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING ACT

SEC. 301. * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 309. RADIO FREE ASIA.

    (a) Authority.--

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (i) Not a Federal Agency or Instrumentality.--Nothing in 
this title may be construed to make Radio Free Asia a Federal 
agency or instrumentality.

SEC. 310. BROADCAST ENTITIES REPORTING TO CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER.

    (a) Voice of America and Office of Cuba Broadcasting.--The 
Directors of Voice of America and the Office of Cuba 
Broadcasting are subordinate to, and shall report to, the Chief 
Executive Officer of the Broadcasting Board of Governors.
    (b) RFE/RL, Incorporated, Radio Free Asia, and the Middle 
East Broadcast Networks.--The Directors of RFE/RL, 
Incorporated, Radio Free Asia, and the Middle East Broadcast 
Networks shall communicate with, and submit reports to, the 
Board through the Chief Executive Officer.
                                ------                                


  OMNIBUS CONSOLIDATED AND EMERGENCY SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 
                       1999 (PUBLIC LAW 105-277)


            DIVISION A--OMNIBUS CONSOLIDATED APPROPRIATIONS


           TITLE IV--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED AGENCIES


                            RELATED AGENCIES


      General Provisions--Department of State and Related Agencies

    Sec. 410. (a)(1)(A) Notwithstanding any other provision of 
law and subject to subparagraph (B), the Secretary of State and 
the Attorney General shall impose, for the processing of any 
application for the issuance of a machine readable combined 
border crossing card and nonimmigrant visa under section 
101(a)(15)(B) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, [a fee of 
$13] a fee equal to one-half the fee that would otherwise apply 
for processing a machine readable combined border crossing 
identification card and nonimmigrant visa (for recovery of the 
costs of manufacturing the combined card and visa) in the case 
of any alien under 15 years of age where the application for 
the machine readable combined border crossing card and 
nonimmigrant visa is made in Mexico by a citizen of Mexico who 
has at least one parent or guardian who has a visa under such 
section or is applying for a machine readable combined border 
crossing card and nonimmigrant visa under such section as well.
                                ------                                


   DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 1999, PUBLIC LAW 106-113


                         APPENDIX G--H.R. 3427


SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the ``Admiral James W. Nance and 
Meg Donovan Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 
2000 and 2001''.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


    TITLE III--ORGANIZATION AND PERSONNEL OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE

            Subtitle B--Personnel of the Department of State


SEC. 321. * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 333. BORDER EQUALIZATION PAY ADJUSTMENT.

    (a) In General.--Chapter 4 of title I of the Foreign 
Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3961 et seq.) is amended by 
adding at the end the following new section:

``SEC. 414. BORDER EQUALIZATION PAY ADJUSTMENT.

    ``(a) In General.--An employee who regularly commutes from 
the employee's place of residence in the continental United 
States to an official duty station in Canada or Mexico shall 
receive a border equalization pay adjustment equal to the 
amount of comparability payments under section 5304 of title 5, 
United States Code, that the employee would receive if the 
employee were assigned to an official duty station within the 
United States locality pay area closest to the employee's 
official duty station.
    ``(b) Employee Defined.--For purposes of this section, the 
term `employee' means a person who--
            ``(1) is an `employee' as defined under section 
        2105 of title 5, United States Code; and
            ``(2) is employed by the Department of State, the 
        United States Agency for International Development, or 
        the International Joint Commission of the United States 
        and Canada (established under Article VII of the treaty 
        signed January 11, 1909) (36 Stat. 2448), except that 
        the term shall not include members of the Service (as 
        specified in section 103).
    ``(c) Treatment as Basic Pay.--An equalization pay 
adjustment paid under this section shall be considered to be 
part of basic pay for the same purposes for which comparability 
payments are considered to be part of basic pay under section 
5304 of title 5, United States Code.
    ``(d) Regulations.--The heads of the agencies referred to 
in subsection (b)(2) may prescribe regulations to carry out 
this section.''.

``SEC. 415. GROUP LIFE INSURANCE SUPPLEMENT APPLICABLE TO THOSE KILLED 
                    IN TERRORIST ATTACKS.

    ``(a) Foreign Service Employees.--
            ``(1) In general.--Notwithstanding the amounts 
        specified in chapter 87 of title 5, United States Code, 
        a Foreign Service employee who dies as a result of 
        injuries sustained while on duty abroad because of an 
        act of terrorism, as defined in section 140(d) of the 
        Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1998 
        and 1999 (22 U.S.C. 2656f(d)), shall be eligible for a 
        payment from the United States in an amount that, when 
        added to the amount of the employee's employer-provided 
        group life insurance policy coverage (if any), equals 
        $400,000. In the case of an employee compensated under 
        a local compensation plan established under section 
        408, the amount of such payment shall be determined by 
        regulations implemented by the Secretary of State and 
        shall be no greater than $400,000.
            ``(2) Designation of beneficiary.--A payment made 
        under paragraph (1) shall be made in accordance with 
        the order of payment set forth in section 414(e).
    ``(b) Other Executive Agencies.--The head of an executive 
agency shall provide the additional payment authorized by this 
section, consistent with the provisions set forth in subsection 
(a), with respect to any employee of that agency who dies as a 
result of injuries sustained while on duty abroad because of an 
act of terrorism, as defined in section 140(d) of the Foreign 
Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1998 and 1999 (22 
U.S.C. 2656f(d)), while subject to the authority of the chief 
of mission pursuant to section 207.

``SEC. 416. SURVIVORS' AND DEPENDENTS' EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE.

    ``(a) Foreign Service Employees.--The Secretary shall 
provide educational assistance to a widow, widower, familial 
designee, or child(ren) of any United States national Foreign 
Service employee who dies while on duty abroad as a result of 
an act of terrorism, as defined in section 140(d) of the 
Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1998 and 1999 
(22 U.S.C. 2656f(d)), to meet, in whole or in part, the 
expenses incurred by a widow, widower, familial designee, or 
child(ren) in pursuing a program of education at an educational 
institution, including subsistence, tuition, fees, supplies, 
books, equipment, and other educational costs.
    ``(b) Other Executive Agencies.--The head of an executive 
agency shall provide educational assistance authorized by this 
section to a widow, widower, familial designee, or child(ren) 
of any employee of that agency who dies as a result of an act 
of terrorism or terrorism, as defined in section 140(d) of the 
Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1998 and 1999 
(22 U.S.C. 2656f(d)), while on duty abroad and subject to the 
authority of the chief of mission pursuant to section 207.
    ``(c) Amount of Assistance.--Educational assistance under 
this section may be made available up to the amounts provided 
for in section 3532 of title 38, United States Code, as 
adjusted by section 3564 of such title, and for an aggregate 
period not in excess of 48 months.
    ``(d) Program of Education and Educational Institution 
Defined.--For purposes of this section, the terms `program of 
education' and `educational institution' have the meanings 
given the terms in section 3501 of title 38.''
    (b) Conforming Amendment.--The table of contents for the 
Foreign Service Act of 1980 is amended by inserting after the 
item relating to section 413 the following new item:

``Sec. 414. Border equalization pay adjustment.''.
``Sec. 415. Group life insurance supplement applicable to those killed 
          in terrorist attacks.
``Sec. 416. Survivors' and dependents' educational assistance.''
                                ------                                


           CHILD CITIZENSHIP ACT OF 2000, PUBLIC LAW 106-395


   TITLE I--CITIZENSHIP FOR CERTAIN CHILDREN BORN OUTSIDE THE UNITED 
                                 STATES

SEC. 101 * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


[SEC. 104. EFFECTIVE DATE.

    The amendments made by this title shall take effect 120 
days after the date of the enactment of this Act and shall 
apply to individuals who satisfy the requirements of section 
320 or 322 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, as in effect 
on such effective date.]

SEC. 104. APPLICABILITY.

    The amendments made by this title shall apply to any 
individual who satisfies the requirements under section 320 or 
322 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, regardless of the 
date on which such requirements were satisfied.
                                ------                                


  NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2008, PUBLIC LAW 
                                110-181


             TITLE XII--MATTERS RELATING TO FOREIGN NATIONS

                    Subtitle C--Iraq Refugee Crisis

SEC. 1244. SPECIAL IMMIGRANT STATUS FOR CERTAIN IRAQIS.

    (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (c) Numerical Limitations.--
            (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (3) Carry forward.--
                    (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                    (B) Fiscal years five and six.--If the 
                numerical limitation specified in paragraph (1) 
                is not reached in the fifth fiscal year 
                beginning after the date of the enactment of 
                this Act, the total number of principal aliens 
                who may be provided special immigrant status 
                under this section for the sixth fiscal year 
                beginning after such date shall be equal to the 
                difference between--
                            (i) the numerical limitation 
                        specified in paragraph (1) for the 
                        fifth fiscal year; and
                            (ii) the number of principal aliens 
                        provided such status under this section 
                        during the fifth fiscal year.
                    (C) Fiscal year 2014.--Any unused balance 
                of the total number of principal aliens who may 
                be provided special immigrant status under this 
                subsection in fiscal years 2008 through 2013 
                may be carried forward and provided through the 
                end of fiscal year 2014, notwithstanding the 
                provisions of subparagraphs (A) and (B), and 
                consistent with relevant terms of subsection 
                (b), except that the one year period during 
                which an alien must have been employed in 
                accordance with subsection (b)(1) shall be the 
                period from March 20, 2003 through September 
                30, 2013, and except that the principal alien 
                seeking special immigrant status under this 
                subparagraph shall apply to the Chief of 
                Mission in accordance with subsection (b)(4) no 
                later than September 30, 2014.
                                ------                                


  NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2008, PUBLIC LAW 
                                110-181


             TITLE XII--MATTERS RELATING TO FOREIGN NATIONS

                    Subtitle C--Iraq Refugee Crisis

SEC. 1244. SPECIAL IMMIGRANT STATUS FOR CERTAIN IRAQIS.

    (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (c) Numerical Limitations.--
            (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (3) Carry forward.--
                    (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                    (B) Fiscal years five and six.--If the 
                numerical limitation specified in paragraph (1) 
                is not reached in the fifth fiscal year 
                beginning after the date of the enactment of 
                this Act, the total number of principal aliens 
                who may be provided special immigrant status 
                under this section for the sixth fiscal year 
                beginning after such date shall be equal to the 
                difference between--
                            (i) the numerical limitation 
                        specified in paragraph (1) for the 
                        fifth fiscal year; and
                            (ii) the number of principal aliens 
                        provided such status under this section 
                        during the fifth fiscal year.
                    (C) Fiscal year 2014.--Any unused balance 
                of the total number of principal aliens who may 
                be provided special immigrant status under this 
                subsection in fiscal years 2008 through 2013 
                may be carried forward and provided through the 
                end of fiscal year 2014, notwithstanding the 
                provisions of subparagraphs (A) and (B), and 
                consistent with relevant terms of subsection 
                (b), except that the one year period during 
                which an alien must have been employed in 
                accordance with subsection (b)(1) shall be the 
                period from March 20, 2003 through September 
                30, 2013, and except that the principal alien 
                seeking special immigrant status under this 
                subparagraph shall apply to the Chief of 
                Mission in accordance with subsection (b)(4) no 
                later than September 30, 2014.
                                ------                                


           OMNIBUS APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2009, PUBLIC LAW 111-8


   DIVISION F--DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, AND 
        EDUCATION, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2009


                                TITLE VI


                  AFGHAN ALLIES PROTECTION ACT OF 2009


SEC. 601. SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the ``Afghan Allies Protection Act 
of 2009''.

SEC. 602. PROTECTION FOR AFGHAN ALLIES.

    (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (b) Special Immigrant Status for Certain Afghans.--
            (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (3) * * *
                    (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                    (C) Carry forward.--
                            (i) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                            (ii) The number of applications 
                        referred to in clause (i) that--
                                    (I) were approved; or
                                    (II) were denied, including 
                                a description of the basis for 
                                each denial.
                    (D) Fiscal year 2015.--For fiscal year 
                2015, the total number of principal aliens who 
                may be provided special immigrant status under 
                this section may not exceed 3,000 per year, 
                except that any unused balance of the total 
                number of principal aliens who may be provided 
                special immigrant status in fiscal year 2015, 
                in addition to any unused balance of the total 
                number of principal aliens who may be provided 
                special immigrant status under paragraph (A) of 
                this subsection in fiscal years 2009 through 
                2013, may be carried forward and provided 
                through the end of fiscal year 2015, 
                notwithstanding the provisions of paragraph 
                (C), except that the alien must have been 
                employed in accordance with subsection 
                (b)(2)(A)(ii) on or after October 7, 2001 for 
                not less than 1 year, and except that the 
                principal alien seeking special immigrant 
                status under this subparagraph shall apply to 
                the Chief of Mission in accordance with 
                subsection (b)(2)(D) no later than September 
                30, 2014.

                        BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL


  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS
                                                     AMENDED
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  Budget authority               Outlays
                                                            ----------------------------------------------------
                                                               Committee    Amount  in   Committee    Amount  in
                                                              guidance\1\      bill       guidance       bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with Committee
 allocations to its subcommittees of amounts in the Budget
 Resolution for 2014: Subcommittee on State, Foreign
 Operations, and Related Programs
    Mandatory..............................................            NA          159           NA       \2\159
    Discretionary..........................................        44,079       50,594           NA    \2\48,452
        Security...........................................  ............  ...........           NA           NA
        Nonsecurity........................................        44,079       50,594           NA           NA
Projections of outlays associated with the recommendation:
    2014...................................................  ............  ...........  ...........    \3\21,588
    2015...................................................  ............  ...........  ...........       12,223
    2016...................................................  ............  ...........  ...........        7,523
    2017...................................................  ............  ...........  ...........        4,367
    2018 and future years..................................  ............  ...........  ...........        4,133
Financial assistance to State and local governments for                NA  ...........           NA  ...........
 2014......................................................

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\There is no section 302(a) allocation to the Committee on Appropriations for fiscal year 2014.
\2\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\3\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

NA: Not applicable.

NOTE.--Consistent with the funding recommended in the bill for overseas contingency operations and in accordance
  with section 251(b)(2)(A)(II) of the BBEDCA of 1985, the Committee anticipates that the Budget Committee will
  provide, at the appropriate time, 302(a) allocation for the Committee on Appropriations reflecting an upward
  adjustment of $6,515,000,000 in budget authority plus associated outlays.


  COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2013 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL
                                                                        YEAR 2014
                                                                [In thousands of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                        Senate Committee recommendation
                                                                                                                            compared with (+ or -)
                             Item                                     2013         Budget estimate      Committee    -----------------------------------
                                                                  appropriation                      recommendation         2013
                                                                                                                        appropriation    Budget estimate
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED AGENCY

                      Department of State

               Administration of Foreign Affairs

Diplomatic and consular programs..............................        5,194,284         5,491,189         5,216,630           +22,346          -274,559
    Worldwide security protection.............................        1,354,566         1,791,174         1,867,251          +512,685           +76,077
    International Center......................................  ................  ................            5,970            +5,970            +5,970
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Diplomatic and consular programs.................        6,548,850         7,282,363         7,089,851          +541,001          -192,512
                                                               =========================================================================================
Conflict stabilization operations.............................  ................           45,207   ................  ................          -45,207
Capital investment fund.......................................           59,361            76,900            76,900           +17,539   ................
Office of Inspector General...................................           61,884            69,406            69,406            +7,522   ................
Educational and cultural exchange programs....................          583,013           562,659           595,000           +11,987           +32,341
Representation allowances.....................................            7,298             7,679             7,300                +2              -379
Protection of foreign missions and officials..................           26,991            28,200            28,200            +1,209   ................
Embassy security, construction, and maintenance...............          937,825           785,351           785,351          -152,474   ................
    Worldwide security upgrades...............................          688,279         1,614,000         1,320,452          +632,173          -293,548
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Embassy security.................................        1,626,104         2,399,351         2,105,803          +479,699          -293,548
                                                               =========================================================================================
Emergencies in the diplomatic and consular service............            9,297             9,652             9,652              +355   ................

Repatriation Loans Program Account:
    Direct loans subsidy......................................              737               963             1,700              +963              +737
    Administrative expenses...................................              710               737   ................             -710              -737
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Repatriation loans program account...............            1,447             1,700             1,700              +253   ................

Payment to the American Institute in Taiwan...................           21,101            36,221            31,221           +10,120            -5,000
Payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and Disability Fund.          158,900           158,900           158,900   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Administration of Foreign Affairs................        9,104,246        10,678,238        10,173,933        +1,069,687          -504,305
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  International Organizations

Contributions to international organizations, current year            1,449,236         1,573,454         1,382,408           -66,828          -191,046
 assessment...................................................
Contributions for international peacekeeping activities,              2,005,857         2,094,661         2,094,661           +88,804   ................
 current year assessment......................................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, International Organizations......................        3,455,093         3,668,115         3,477,069           +21,976          -191,046
                                                               =========================================================================================
                   International Commissions

International Boundary and Water Commission, United States and
 Mexico:
    Salaries and expenses.....................................           43,412            45,618            45,618            +2,206   ................
    Construction..............................................           27,620            31,400            35,200            +7,580            +3,800
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Boundary and Water Commission....................           71,032            77,018            80,818            +9,786            +3,800

American sections, international commissions..................           11,899            12,499            12,799              +900              +300
International fisheries commissions...........................           34,548            31,445            39,345            +4,797            +7,900
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, International commissions........................          117,479           120,962           132,962           +15,483           +12,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
                        Related Agency

                Broadcasting Board of Governors

International broadcasting operations.........................          739,863           722,580           717,082           -22,781            -5,498
Broadcasting capital improvements.............................            7,028             8,500             8,000              +972              -500
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Broadcasting Board of Governors..................          746,891           731,080           725,082           -21,809            -5,998
                                                               =========================================================================================
                       Related Programs

The Asia Foundation...........................................           16,995            17,000            17,000                +5   ................
United States Institute of Peace, Operating expenses..........           30,579            35,687            30,984              +405            -4,703
Center for Middle Eastern-Western dialogue....................              840                90                90              -750   ................
Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship program........................              500               400               400              -100   ................
Israeli Arab scholarship program..............................              375                13                13              -362   ................
International Chancery Center.................................  ................            5,970   ................  ................           -5,970
East-West Center..............................................           16,695            10,800            16,700                +5            +5,900
National Endowment for Democracy..............................          117,726           103,450           135,000           +17,274           +31,550
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Related programs.................................          183,710           173,410           200,187           +16,477           +26,777
                                                               =========================================================================================
                       Other Commissions

 Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad

Salaries and expenses.........................................              605               690               690               +85   ................

         Commission on International Religious Freedom

Salaries and expenses.........................................            2,926             3,500             3,500              +574   ................

       Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe

Salaries and expenses.........................................            2,438             2,579             2,579              +141   ................

Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's Republic of
                             China

Salaries and expenses.........................................            1,902             2,000             2,000               +98   ................

 United States--China Economic and Security Review Commission

Salaries and expenses.........................................            3,305             3,500             3,500              +195   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, title I, Department of State and Related Agency..       13,618,595        15,384,074        14,721,502        +1,102,907          -662,572
                                                               =========================================================================================
        TITLE II--ADMINISTRATION OF FOREIGN ASSISTANCE

              Funds Appropriated to the President

       U.S. Agency for International Development [USAID]

Operating expenses, USAID.....................................        1,091,950         1,328,200         1,284,321          +192,371           -43,879
Capital investment fund.......................................          129,658           117,940           117,940           -11,718   ................
Office of Inspector General, USAID............................           46,485            54,200            47,000              +515            -7,200
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, title II, Administration of Foreign Assistance...        1,268,093         1,500,340         1,449,261          +181,168           -51,079
                                                               =========================================================================================
           TITLE III--BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

              Funds Appropriated to the President

Global Health Programs:
    U.S. Agency for International Development.................        2,755,068         2,645,000         2,785,000           +29,932          +140,000
    Department of State.......................................        5,718,668         5,670,000         5,670,000           -48,668   ................
        (Global fund contribution)............................       (1,649,472)       (1,650,000)       (1,650,000)            (+528)  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Total, Global Health Programs.......................        8,473,736         8,315,000         8,455,000           -18,736          +140,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
Development assistance........................................        2,519,144         2,837,812         2,507,001           -12,143          -330,811
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Development Assistance...........................        2,519,144         2,837,812         2,507,001           -12,143          -330,811
                                                               =========================================================================================
International disaster assistance.............................          824,736         2,045,000           610,000          -214,736        -1,435,000
Emergency Food Assistance Contingency Fund....................  ................           75,000   ................  ................          -75,000
Transition initiatives........................................           50,125            57,600            52,600            +2,475            -5,000
Complex Crises fund...........................................            9,997            40,000   ................           -9,997           -40,000

Development Credit Authority:
    (By transfer).............................................          (40,000)          (40,000)          (40,000)  ................  ................
    Administrative expenses...................................            8,297             8,200             8,200               -97   ................

Economic Support Fund.........................................        3,000,784         4,076,054         3,589,895          +589,111          -486,159
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Development Assistance...........................        3,000,784         4,076,054         3,589,895          +589,111          -486,159
                                                               =========================================================================================
Democracy Fund................................................          114,733   ................          130,500           +15,767          +130,500
Middle East and North Africa incentive fund...................  ................          580,000   ................  ................         -580,000

                      Department of State

Migration and refugee assistance..............................        1,638,575         1,760,960         1,387,000          -251,575          -373,960
United States Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund.           27,191           250,000            50,000           +22,809          -200,000
Complex Foreign crises fund...................................  ................  ................           40,000           +40,000           +40,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Department of State..............................        1,665,766         2,010,960         1,477,000          -188,766          -533,960
                                                               =========================================================================================
                     Independent Agencies

Peace Corps...................................................          374,880           378,800           385,000           +10,120            +6,200
Millenium Challenge Corporation...............................          897,913           898,200           899,000            +1,087              +800
Inter-American Foundation.....................................           22,493            18,100            22,500                +7            +4,400
African Development Foundation................................           29,990            24,000            30,000               +10            +6,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Independent Agencies.............................        1,325,276         1,319,100         1,336,500           +11,224           +17,400
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  Department of the Treasury

International Affairs Technical Assistance....................           25,440            23,500            23,500            -1,940   ................
Debt restructuring............................................           11,996   ................  ................          -11,996   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Department of the Treasury.......................           37,436            23,500            23,500           -13,936   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, title III, Bilateral economic assistance.........       18,030,030        21,388,226        18,190,196          +160,166        -3,198,030
          (By transfer).......................................          (40,000)          (40,000)          (40,000)  ................  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
          TITLE IV--INTERNATIONAL SECURITY ASSISTANCE

                      Department of State

International narcotics control and law enforcement...........        1,060,760         1,129,727         1,025,000           -35,760          -104,727
Nonproliferation, anti-terrorism, demining and related                  589,924           616,125           700,000          +110,076           +83,875
 programs.....................................................
Peacekeeping operations.......................................          302,721           347,000           250,900           -51,821           -96,100

              Funds Appropriated to the President

International Military Education and Training.................          105,754           105,573           105,000              -754              -573

Foreign Military Financing Program:
    Grants:
        Israel................................................        3,099,008         3,100,000         3,100,000              +992   ................
        Egypt.................................................        1,299,584         1,300,000         1,300,000              +416   ................
        Other.................................................          809,741         1,045,959           965,000          +155,259           -80,959
            Limitation on Administrative Expenses.............          (62,780)  ................          (60,000)          (-2,780)         (+60,000)
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Total, Foreign Military Financing Program.......        5,208,333         5,445,959         5,365,000          +156,667           -80,959
                                                               =========================================================================================
Global security contingency fund..............................  ................           25,000   ................  ................          -25,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, title IV, Security assistance....................        7,267,492         7,669,384         7,445,900          +178,408          -223,484
                                                               =========================================================================================
               TITLE V--MULTILATERAL ASSISTANCE

              Funds Appropriated to the President

International Organizations and Programs......................          348,593           320,645           355,700            +7,107           +35,055

             International Financial Institutions

                       World Bank Group

Clean tchnology fund..........................................          184,571           215,700           215,700           +31,129   ................
Strategic climate fund........................................           49,884            68,000            68,000           +18,116   ................

The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development
 (IBRD):
    Contribution to the IBRD paid in capital..................          186,897           186,957           186,957               +60   ................
    (Limitation on callable capital)..........................       (2,928,991)       (2,928,991)       (2,928,991)  ................  ................
    Global Environment Facility...............................          129,359           143,750           143,750           +14,391   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, IBRD..........................................          316,256           330,707           330,707           +14,451   ................

Contribution to the International Development Association.....        1,358,065         1,358,500         1,358,500              +435   ................
Multilateral debt relief initiative...........................  ................          145,300           145,300          +145,300   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, World Bank Group.................................        1,908,776         2,118,207         2,118,207          +209,431   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
Contribution to the Enterprise for the Americas Multilateral             14,995             6,298             6,298            -8,697   ................
 Investment Fund..............................................
Contribution to the Inter-American Development Bank paid in             111,117           102,020           102,020            -9,097   ................
 capital......................................................
    (Limitation on callable capital)..........................       (4,098,795)       (4,098,795)       (4,098,795)  ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Inter-American Development Bank..................          111,117           102,020           102,020            -9,097   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
Contribution to the Asian Development Fund....................           99,968           115,250           115,250           +15,282   ................
Asian development bank paid in capital........................          106,552           106,586           106,586               +34   ................
    (Limitation on callable capital)..........................       (2,558,049)       (2,558,049)       (2,558,049)  ................  ................

Contribution to the African Development Bank:
    Paid in capital...........................................           32,408            32,418            32,418               +10   ................
    (Limitation on callable capital)..........................         (507,861)         (507,861)         (507,861)  ................  ................
    Contribution to the African Development Fund..............          172,445           195,000           195,000           +22,555   ................
    Multilateral debt relief initiative.......................  ................           30,000            30,000           +30,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, African Development Bank.........................          204,853           257,418           257,418           +52,565   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
Contribution to the International Fund for Agricultural                  29,990            30,000            30,000               +10   ................
 Development..................................................
Global agriculture and food security program..................          134,957           135,000           135,000               +43   ................
Middle East and North Africa Transition Fund..................  ................            5,000   ................  ................           -5,000
International Monetary fund quota increase....................  ................  ................          315,000          +315,000          +315,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, International Financial Institutions.............        2,611,208         2,875,779         3,185,779          +574,571          +310,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, title V, Multilateral assistance.................        2,959,801         3,196,424         3,541,479          +581,678          +345,055
          (Limitation on callable capital)....................      (10,093,696)      (10,093,696)      (10,093,696)  ................  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
          TITLE VI--EXPORT AND INVESTMENT ASSISTANCE

            Export-Import Bank of the United States

Subsidy appropriation.........................................           57,981   ................  ................          -57,981   ................
Administrative expenses.......................................           89,871           114,900           125,000           +35,129           +10,100
Administrative expenses--Headquarters renovation..............  ................           10,500   ................  ................          -10,500
Inspector General.............................................            3,999             5,100             5,100            +1,101   ................
Offsetting collections........................................         -506,000        -1,090,000        -1,090,000          -584,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Export-Import Bank of the United States..........         -354,149          -959,500          -959,900          -605,751              -400
                                                               =========================================================================================
            Overseas Private Investment Corporation

Noncredit account:
    Administrative expenses...................................           54,972            71,800            71,800           +16,828   ................
    Insurance fees and other offsetting collections...........         -283,900          -323,000          -323,000           -39,100   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................         -228,928          -251,200          -251,200           -22,272   ................

Program account...............................................           24,992            31,000            31,000            +6,008   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Overseas Private Investment Corporation..........         -203,936          -220,200          -220,200           -16,264   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
              Funds Appropriated to the President

Trade and Development Agency..................................           49,984            62,662            62,662           +12,678   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, title VI, Export and investment assistance.......         -508,101        -1,117,038        -1,117,438          -609,337              -400
                                                               =========================================================================================
                 TITLE VII--GENERAL PROVISIONS

Export Import Bank--Balances (Rescission) (Sec. 2005).........         -400,000   ................  ................         +400,000   ................
Special Immigrant VISA proposal (Sec. 7024(q))................  ................            5,000             5,000            +5,000   ................
Reappropriation of funds in Titles III-VI (Sec. 7013).........  ................            2,000   ................  ................           -2,000
IMF Quota rescission from Public Law 111-32 (emergency).......  ................  ................       -1,261,000        -1,261,000        -1,261,000
Death gratuity and other benefits (Sec. 7084).................  ................  ................           23,000           +23,000           +23,000
Export-Import Bank (Sec. 7084 (e)) (rescission)...............  ................  ................          -21,000           -21,000           -21,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, title VII, General Provisions....................         -400,000             7,000        -1,254,000          -854,000        -1,261,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
         TITLE VIII--OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS /

                 GLOBAL WAR ON TERRORISM (OCO)

Diplomatic and consular programs (OCO)........................        3,210,650         1,199,491         1,024,908        -2,185,742          -174,583
    (Worldwide security protection) (OCO).....................         (918,435)         (390,961)         (900,274)         (-18,161)        (+509,313)
    Rescission (OCO)..........................................       -1,109,700   ................  ................       +1,109,700   ................
Conflict stabilization operations (OCO).......................            8,500   ................            8,500   ................           +8,500
Office of Inspector General (OCO).............................           59,151            49,650            49,650            -9,501   ................
Education and cultural exchange programs (OCO)................           15,600   ................            8,628            -6,972            +8,628
Embassy security, construction, and maintenance (OCO).........        1,272,200           250,000           558,548          -713,652          +308,548
Contributions to int'l organizations (OCO)....................          101,300   ................           74,400           -26,900           +74,400
Broadcasters board of governors (OCO).........................            4,400   ................            4,400   ................           +4,400
United States Institute of Peace (USIP) (OCO).................            8,411   ................            6,016            -2,395            +6,016
Operating expenses of USAID (OCO).............................          255,000            71,000            65,350          -189,650            -5,650
Operating expenses of USAID International Development: OIG                4,500   ................            5,000              +500            +5,000
 (OCO)........................................................
International Disaster Assistance (OCO).......................          774,661   ................        1,005,000          +230,339        +1,005,000
Transition Initiatives (OCO)..................................            6,554   ................            5,000            -1,554            +5,000
Complex Crises fund (OCO).....................................           30,000   ................  ................          -30,000   ................
Economic Support Fund (OCO)...................................        3,119,896         1,382,200           901,500        -2,218,396          -480,700
Migration and Refugee assistance (MRA) (OCO)..................        1,152,850   ................        1,513,000          +360,150        +1,513,000
Complex Foreign Crises fund (OCO).............................  ................  ................          535,000          +535,000          +535,000
International Affairs Technical Assistance (OCO)..............            1,552   ................  ................           -1,552   ................
International narcotics control and law enforcement (OCO).....          983,605           344,000           106,500          -877,105          -237,500
Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining and Related                  120,657   ................  ................         -120,657   ................
 programs (NADR) (OCO)........................................
Peacekeeping Operations (PKO) (OCO)...........................           81,000   ................          138,600           +57,600          +138,600
Foreign Military Financing program (OCO)......................        1,102,000           511,000           500,000          -602,000           -11,000
Transition fund (OCO).........................................  ................  ................            5,000            +5,000            +5,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, Title VIII--OCO..................................       11,202,787         3,807,341         6,515,000        -4,687,787        +2,707,659
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Grand total.............................................       53,438,697        51,835,751        49,491,900        -3,946,797        -2,343,851
          Appropriations......................................      (42,635,910)      (48,026,410)      (44,258,900)      (+1,622,990)      (-3,767,510)
          Reappropriations....................................  ................           (2,000)  ................  ................          (-2,000)
          Overseas contingency operations / Global War on           (11,202,787)       (3,807,341)       (6,515,000)      (-4,687,787)      (+2,707,659)
           Terrorism..........................................
          Rescissions.........................................        (-400,000)  ................         (-21,000)        (+379,000)         (-21,000)
    (Rescission of emergency funding).........................  ................  ................      (-1,261,000)      (-1,261,000)      (-1,261,000)
    (By transfer).............................................          (40,000)          (40,000)          (40,000)  ................  ................
    (Limitation on callable capital)..........................      (10,093,696)      (10,093,696)      (10,093,696)  ................  ................
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