Report text available as:

  • TXT
  • PDF   (PDF provides a complete and accurate display of this text.) Tip ?

114th Congress   }                                       {       Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session     }                                       {      114-139
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     




            DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2016

                               ----------                              

                              R E P O R T

                                 OF THE

                      COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [TO ACCOMPANY H.R. 2685]


                                     
[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]


                                     
  June 5, 2015.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed





                                      




114th Congress   }                                       {       Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session     }                                       {      114-139
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     




            DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2016

                               __________

                              R E P O R T

                                 OF THE

                      COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [TO ACCOMPANY H.R. 2685]


                                     
[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]


                                     
  June 5, 2015.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed
              
                                    ______

                         U.S. GOVERNMENT PUBLISHING OFFICE 

94-825                         WASHINGTON : 2015              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
Bill Totals......................................................     1
Committee Budget Review Process..................................     3
Introduction.....................................................     3
Definition of Program, Project, and Activity.....................     3
Funding Increases................................................     4
Committee Recommendations by Major Category......................     4
  Military Personnel.............................................     4
  Operation and Maintenance......................................     4
  Procurement....................................................     4
  Research, Development, Test and Evaluation.....................     5
  Defense Health Program.........................................     6
  Global War on Terrorism........................................     6
  Classified Programs............................................     6
  Global War on Terrorism........................................     6
  A-10 and Close Air Support.....................................     7
TITLE I. MILITARY PERSONNEL......................................     9
  Military Personnel Overview....................................    11
    Summary of End Strength......................................    11
    Overall Active End Strength..................................    11
    Overall Selected Reserve End Strength........................    11
    Full-Time Support Strengths..................................    12
    Reprogramming Guidance for Military Personnel Accounts.......    13
    Military Personnel Special Interest Items....................    13
    General and Flag Officers....................................    13
    Sexual Assault Prevention and Response.......................    14
    Cultural Sensitivity Training................................    14
    Culture and Foreign Language Training........................    14
    Minority Outreach and Officer Accessions.....................    15
    Military Compensation and Retirement Modernization Commission    15
  Military Personnel, Army.......................................    16
  Military Personnel, Navy.......................................    20
  Military Personnel, Marine Corps...............................    24
  Military Personnel, Air Force..................................    28
    Remotely Piloted Aircraft....................................    32
  Reserve Personnel, Army........................................    32
  Reserve Personnel, Navy........................................    35
  Reserve Personnel, Marine Corps................................    38
  Reserve Personnel, Air Force...................................    41
  National Guard Personnel, Army.................................    44
    Army National Guard End Strength.............................    47
    Cyber Protection Teams.......................................    47
  National Guard Personnel, Air Force............................    47
    Remotely Piloted Aircraft Missions...........................    50
TITLE II. OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE..............................    51
    Reprogramming Guidance for Operation and Maintenance Accounts    53
    Operation and Maintenance Budget Execution Data..............    54
    Operation and Maintenance Special Interest Items.............    54
    Size of the Civilian Workforce...............................    54
    Civilian Personnel and Pay Management........................    55
    Civilian Furloughs...........................................    56
    Operation and Maintenance Military Intelligence Program 
      Budget Justification Material..............................    56
    Encroachment on Military Installations.......................    57
    Maintenance of Real Property.................................    57
  Operation and Maintenance, Army................................    57
    Combat Training Center Rotations.............................    64
    Defense Generator and Rail Equipment Center at Hill Air Force 
      Base.......................................................    64
  Operation and Maintenance, Navy................................    65
    Ship Repair Industrial Base..................................    72
    Naval Postgraduate School....................................    72
  Operation and Maintenance, Marine Corps........................    72
  Operation and Maintenance, Air Force...........................    76
    Air Force Depot Maintenance and Contractor Logistics Support.    83
    Air Education and Training Command Infrastructure............    83
  Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide........................    83
    Energy Efficiency Report for Department of Defense Facilities    88
    Net-Centric Enterprise Services..............................    88
    Performance Based Logistics..................................    88
    Defense Certified Parts......................................    89
    Hubzone and Small Business Set-Aside Acquisition Programs....    89
    Defense Security Service.....................................    89
    Big Data.....................................................    90
    Bangladesh Working Conditions................................    90
    Defense Commissary Agency....................................    90
    Meals Ready-To-Eat War Reserve...............................    91
  Operation and Maintenance, Army Reserve........................    91
  Operation and Maintenance, Navy Reserve........................    94
  Operation and Maintenance, Marine Corps Reserve................    97
  Operation and Maintenance, Air Force Reserve...................   100
    Air Force Reserve Specialized Missions.......................   103
  Operation and Maintenance, Army National Guard.................   103
  Operation and Maintenance, Air National Guard..................   107
  United States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces............   110
  Environmental Restoration, Army................................   110
  Environmental Restoration, Navy................................   110
    Vieques and Culebra Environmental Restoration................   110
  Environmental Restoration, Air Force...........................   110
  Environmental Restoration, Defense-Wide........................   110
  Environmental Restoration, Formerly Used Defense Sites.........   111
  Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid.................   111
    Humanitarian Demining........................................   111
  Cooperative Threat Reduction Account...........................   111
  Department of Defense Acquisition Workforce Development Fund...   111
TITLE III. PROCUREMENT...........................................   113
    Procurement Special Interest Items...........................   115
    Reprogramming Guidance for Acquisition Accounts..............   115
    Funding Increases............................................   115
    Classified Annex.............................................   115
    Joint Strike Fighter Autonomic Logistics Information System..   115
    Precision Guidance Kit.......................................   116
  Aircraft Procurement, Army.....................................   116
  Missile Procurement, Army......................................   120
  Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles, Army.......   123
  Procurement of Ammunition, Army................................   127
  Other Procurement, Army........................................   131
    Corrosion Mitigation Covers..................................   141
  Aircraft Procurement, Navy.....................................   141
  Weapons Procurement, Navy......................................   149
  Procurement of Ammunition, Navy and Marine Corps...............   154
  Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy..............................   159
  Other Procurement, Navy........................................   162
  Procurement, Marine Corps......................................   171
    Backhoe Loader Fleet Replacement.............................   177
  Aircraft Procurement, Air Force................................   177
    E-8 JSTARS...................................................   184
  Missile Procurement, Air Force.................................   184
  Space Procurement, Air Force...................................   187
    Space Procurement............................................   190
    Defense Meteorological Satellite Program.....................   190
  Procurement of Ammunition, Air Force...........................   190
  Other Procurement, Air Force...................................   193
  Procurement, Defense-Wide......................................   198
  Defense Production Act.........................................   203
    Defense Production Act.......................................   203
TITLE IV. RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION.............   205
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Special Interest 
      Items......................................................   207
    Reprogramming Guidance for Acquisition Accounts..............   207
    Funding Increases............................................   207
    Classified Annex.............................................   207
    Small Business...............................................   207
    Aircraft Erosion Protection..................................   208
    Future Air Dominance.........................................   208
    Improved Camouflage Systems..................................   208
    Cyber Security...............................................   209
  Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Army...............   210
    Degraded Visual Environment..................................   221
    Soldier Enhancement Program..................................   221
    Body Armor...................................................   221
    Improved Turbine Engine Program..............................   221
    Helicopter Seats.............................................   221
    Subterranean Hard Target Defeat..............................   222
    Explosive Ordnance Disposal..................................   222
    Disabling and Neutralizing Weapons of Mass Destruction.......   222
    Army Research Lab Open Campus Initiative.....................   222
    Army Net Zero Industrial Base................................   223
    Transformative Technologies for Propulsion Manufacturing 
      Processes..................................................   223
    Advanced Energetic Materials.................................   223
    Enhanced Dense Urban Warfare Effectiveness...................   223
    Army Vehicle Intercommunications Systems.....................   224
    Projectile Enhancement.......................................   224
    Soldier-Borne Sensors........................................   224
  Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy...............   225
    Automated Test and Re-Test...................................   240
    Highly Integrated Photonics..................................   240
    Submarine Sonar Domes........................................   240
    Shipboard Water Purification.................................   241
    Energetics Research..........................................   241
    Air Manifold Test Facility...................................   241
    Tactical Combat Training Systems.............................   241
  Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Air Force..........   242
    Long Range Strike-Bomber.....................................   255
    Presidential Aircraft Replacement............................   255
    Engine Component Improvement Program.........................   255
    C-130 Avionics Modernization.................................   255
    Human Effectiveness Applied Research.........................   255
    Space Modernization Initiative...............................   256
  Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Defense-Wide.......   257
    Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority 
      Institutions...............................................   268
    National Security Education Program..........................   268
    High Energy and Power Density Composites.....................   268
    Systems Engineering Research Center..........................   268
    University Affiliated Research Centers.......................   269
  Operational Test and Evaluation, Defense.......................   269
TITLE V. REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS..........................   271
  Defense Working Capital Funds..................................   271
  National Defense Sealift Fund..................................   271
TITLE VI. OTHER DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PROGRAMS...................   273
  Defense Health Program.........................................   273
    Reprogramming Guidance for the Defense Health Program........   277
    Carryover....................................................   277
    Peer-Reviewed Cancer Research Programs.......................   278
    Metastatic Cancer Research...................................   278
    Joint Warfighter Medical Research Program....................   278
    Electronic Health Record System..............................   279
    Prescription Drug Abuse......................................   279
    Military Acuity Model........................................   280
    Efficiency of Patient Care Delivery..........................   280
    Functional Medicine..........................................   280
    Mental Health of Military Dependents.........................   281
    Multi-Disciplinary Brain Research............................   281
    Travel Restrictions for Medical Personnel....................   281
    Trauma Clinic Research Program...............................   281
    Cooperation Between Military Medical Facilities, Civilian 
      Healthcare Facilities, and Universities....................   282
    The Cancer Center at Walter Reed National Military Medical 
      Center.....................................................   282
    Emerging Infectious Diseases.................................   282
    Health Surveillance Technology...............................   283
    Peer-Reviewed Spinal Cord Research Program...................   283
    Reconstructive Transplants...................................   283
    Reconstructive Microsurgery..................................   283
    Military Mental Health Programs..............................   284
    Intelligent Prosthetics......................................   284
    Canine Therapy Research......................................   284
    Combating Antibiotic Resistance..............................   284
    Surgical Sterilization in Austere Military Medical 
      Environments...............................................   285
    HIV Testing..................................................   285
  Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, Defense.............   285
  Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense.........   286
    Budget Justification Material................................   286
  Joint Urgent Operational Needs Fund............................   287
  Office of the Inspector General................................   287
TITLE VII. RELATED AGENCIES......................................   289
  National and Military Intelligence Programs....................   289
    Classified Annex.............................................   289
    STEM Recruitment for Workforce Development...................   289
  Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and Disability System 
    Fund.........................................................   289
  Intelligence Community Management Account......................   290
    Wildlife Trafficking.........................................   290
TITLE VIII. GENERAL PROVISIONS...................................   291
TITLE IX. GLOBAL WAR ON TERRORISM................................   301
  Committee Recommendation.......................................   301
  Reporting Requirements.........................................   301
  Military Personnel.............................................   301
  Operation and Maintenance......................................   307
    Readiness....................................................   317
    European Reassurance Initiative..............................   317
    Operation Freedom's Sentinel.................................   318
    Assistance to Ukraine........................................   318
    Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance...............   318
  Counterterrorism Partnerships Fund.............................   319
  Afghanistan Security Forces Fund...............................   319
  Iraq Train and Equip Fund......................................   319
  Syria Train and Equip Fund.....................................   319
  Procurement....................................................   319
    Stryker......................................................   329
    National Guard and Reserve Equipment.........................   329
  Research, Development, Test and Evaluation.....................   329
  Revolving and Management Funds.................................   331
    Defense Working Capital Funds................................   331
  Other Department of Defense Programs...........................   331
    Defense Health Program.......................................   331
    Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense.......   331
    Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Fund................   331
    Office of the Inspector General..............................   332
  General Provisions.............................................   332
TITLE X..........................................................   335
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES REPORTING REQUIREMENTS..................   335
  Changes in the Application of Existing Law.....................   335
  Appropriations not Authorized by Law...........................   347
  Transfer of Funds..............................................   348
  Rescissions....................................................   350
  Directed Rule Making...........................................   350
  Program Duplication............................................   351
  Statement of General Performance Goals and Objectives..........   351
  Compliance with Rule XIII, CL. 3(e) (Ramseyer Rule)............   351
  Earmark Disclosure Statement...................................   351
  Comparison with the Budget Resolution..........................   351
  Five-Year Outlay Projections...................................   352
  Financial Assistance to State and Local Governments............   352
  Full Committee Votes...........................................   353
  Additional Views...............................................   372
  
  
  
  
  
114th Congress   }                                       {       Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session     }                                       {      114-139

======================================================================



 
            DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2016

                                _______
                                

  June 5, 2015.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Frelinghuysen of New Jersey, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 2685]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for the Department of Defense, and for other 
purposes, for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2016.

                              BILL TOTALS

    Appropriations for most military functions of the 
Department of Defense are provided for in the accompanying bill 
for fiscal year 2016. This bill does not provide appropriations 
for military construction, military family housing, civil 
defense, and military nuclear warheads, for which requirements 
are considered in connection with other appropriations Acts.
    The President's fiscal year 2016 budget request for 
activities funded in the Department of Defense Appropriations 
Act totals $577,877,613,000 in new budget obligational 
authority.

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

                    COMMITTEE BUDGET REVIEW PROCESS

    During its review of the fiscal year 2016 budget request 
and execution of appropriations for fiscal year 2015, the 
Subcommittee on Defense held a total of twelve hearings and 
three formal briefings during the period of February 2015 to 
April 2015. Testimony received by the Subcommittee totaled 
1,183 pages of transcript. Hearings were held in open session, 
except when the security classification of the material to be 
discussed presented no alternative but to conduct those 
hearings in executive or closed session.

                              INTRODUCTION

    The Committee recommendation for the fiscal year 2016 
Department of Defense base budget is $490,235,000,000, which is 
a decrease of $36,693,052,000 below the budget request. The 
Committee recommendation for the Global War on Terrorism is 
$88,421,000,000, which is an increase of $37,471,439,000 above 
the budget request.
    To reach the reduced base allocation, the Subcommittee has 
reviewed in detail the budget request, and found areas and 
programs where reductions are possible without adversely 
impacting the warfighter or modernization and readiness 
efforts. Examples of such reductions include: programs which 
have been terminated or restructured since the budget was 
submitted, savings from favorable contract pricing adjustments, 
contract or schedule delays resulting in fiscal year 2016 
savings, unjustified cost increases or funding requested ahead 
of need, anticipated or historical underexecution, rescissions 
of unneeded prior year funds, and reductions that are 
authorized in the National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal 
year 2016.

              DEFINITION OF PROGRAM, PROJECT, AND ACTIVITY

    For the purposes of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
Deficit Control Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-177), as amended by 
the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Reaffirmation 
Act of 1987 (Public Law 100-119), and by the Budget Enforcement 
Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-508), the terms ``program, project, 
and activity'' for appropriations contained in this Act shall 
be defined as the most specific level of budget items 
identified in the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 
2016, the related classified annexes and committee reports, and 
P-1 and R-1 budget justification documents as subsequently 
modified by congressional action. The following exception to 
the above definition shall apply: the military personnel and 
the operation and maintenance accounts, for which the term 
``program, project, and activity'' is defined as the 
appropriations accounts contained in the Department of Defense 
Appropriations Act.
    At the time the President submits the budget request for 
fiscal year 2017, the Secretary of Defense is directed to 
transmit to the congressional defense committees budget 
justification documents to be known as the ``M-1'' and ``O-1'' 
which shall identify, at the budget activity, activity group, 
and sub-activity group level, the amounts requested by the 
President to be appropriated to the Department of Defense for 
military personnel and operation and maintenance in any budget 
request, or amended budget request, for fiscal year 2017.

                           FUNDING INCREASES

    The Committee directs that the funding increases outlined 
in the tables for each appropriation account shall be provided 
only for the specific purposes indicated in the tables.

              COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS BY MAJOR CATEGORY

                           MILITARY PERSONNEL

    In title I of the bill, the Committee recommends a total of 
$122,727,607,000 for active, reserve, and National Guard 
military personnel, a decrease of $7,763,620,000 below the 
budget request, and a decrease of $5,277,011,000 below the 
fiscal year 2015 enacted level. The Committee recommendation 
provides funding to increase basic pay for all military 
personnel by 2.3 percent, as authorized by current law, 
effective January 1, 2016. The Committee provides funding to 
support the recommended end strength levels for active duty and 
Selected Reserve personnel.

                       OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

    In title II of the bill, the Committee recommends a total 
of $162,286,489,000 for operation and maintenance support to 
the military Services and other Department of Defense entities, 
a decrease of $14,230,739,000 below the budget request, and an 
increase of $630,810,000 above the fiscal year 2015 enacted 
level. The recommended levels will robustly fund operational 
training programs in fiscal year 2016. Requests for unit and 
depot-level maintenance, facilities sustainment, restoration 
and modernization, and base operations support program funding 
are strongly supported.

                              PROCUREMENT

    In title III of the bill, the Committee recommends a total 
of $98,559,445,000 for procurement.
    Major initiatives and modifications include:
    $1,168,461,000 for the procurement of 64 AH-64 Apache 
helicopters.
    $1,435,945,000 for the procurement of 94 UH-60 Blackhawk 
helicopters.
    $1,024,587,000 for the procurement of 39 CH-47 Chinook 
helicopters.
    $414,946,000 for the procurement of 80 MSE missiles for the 
Patriot missile system.
    $783,116,000 for the procurement of WIN-T Ground Forces 
Tactical Networks.
    $187,177,000 for the procurement of 28 UH-72A Lakota 
helicopters.
    $305,743,000 for the procurement of 62 Stryker vehicle 
upgrades.
    $660,000,000 for the procurement of seven EA-18G Growler 
electronic attack aircraft, an increase of $660,000,000 and 
seven aircraft above the President's request.
    $2,977,765,000 for the procurement of 16 P-8A Poseidon 
Multi-mission aircraft.
    $788,606,000 for the procurement of 29 UH-1Y/AH-1Z 
helicopters, an increase of one aircraft above the President's 
request.
    $8,351,227,000 for the procurement of 65 F-35 Lightning 
aircraft, an increase of $710,059,000 and eight aircraft above 
the President's request: fifteen short take-off and vertical 
landing variants for the Marine Corps, six carrier variants for 
the Navy, and 44 conventional variants for the Air Force.
    $16,852,569,000 for the procurement of nine Navy ships, 
including two DDG-51 guided missile destroyers, two fully 
funded SSN-774 attack submarines, three Littoral Combat Ships, 
one fleet oiler, one LPD-17 amphibious transport dock landing 
ship, and one afloat forward staging base; an increase of one 
ship and $255,112,000 above the President's request.
    $2,268,611,000 for the procurement of 29 C/HC/MC/KC-130J 
aircraft.
    $1,472,169,000 for the procurement of 20 MV/CV-22 aircraft, 
an increase of one aircraft and $35,814,000 above the 
President's request.
    $542,528,000 for the procurement of 29 MQ-9 Reaper unmanned 
aerial vehicles.
    $2,350,601,000 for the procurement of twelve KC-46 tanker 
aircraft.
    $199,218,000 for the procurement of one Global Positioning 
System III satellite.
    $680,201,000 for the procurement of four Evolved Expendable 
Launch Vehicles.
    $55,000,000 for the Israeli Cooperative Program Iron Dome.
    $100,000,000 for HMMWV modernization for the Army National 
Guard, an increase of $100,000,000 above the President's 
request.

               RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION

    In title IV of the bill, the Committee recommends a total 
of $66,150,652,000 for research, development, test and 
evaluation.
    Major initiatives and modifications include:
    $217,159,000 for the continued development of High 
Performance Computing, an increase of $40,000,000 above the 
President's request.
    $971,393,000 for the continued development of the 
replacement for the Ohio class ballistic missile submarine.
    $255,149,000 for the continued development of the E-2D 
Advanced Hawkeye aircraft.
    $179,682,000 for the continued development of common 
infrared countermeasures other aircraft survivability 
equipment, an increase of $84,000,000 above the President's 
request.
    $393,770,000 for the continued development of the Next 
Generation Jammer.
    $1,727,999,000 for the continued development of the F-35 
Lightning Joint Strike Fighter aircraft.
    $507,093,000 for the continued development of the 
replacement for the Presidential helicopter program.
    $250,429,000 for the continued development of the Multi-
mission Maritime Aircraft, an increase of $2,500,000 above the 
President's request.
    $786,228,000 for the continued development of a new 
penetrating bomber.
    $44,343,000 for the development of a Next Generation JSTARS 
aircraft.
    $58,720,000 for the development of a Presidential Aircraft 
Replacement.
    $156,085,000 for the continued development of a new combat 
rescue helicopter.
    $241,235,000 for the continued development of the Space 
Based Infrared Satellite and associated ground support systems.
    $350,232,000 for the continued development of the Global 
Positioning System III operational control segment.
    $180,902,000 for the continued development of the Global 
Positioning System III space segment.
    $84,438,000 for the development of an alternative rocket 
engine for space launch.
    $2,872,693,000 for the Defense Advanced Research Projects 
Agency.
    $267,595,000 for the Israeli Cooperative Program, an 
increase of $164,800,000 above the President's request.

                         DEFENSE HEALTH PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends a total of $31,440,009,000 for the 
Defense Health Program to support worldwide medical and dental 
services for active forces and other eligible beneficiaries.
    The Committee recommends funding to augment the request for 
enduring traumatic brain injury, psychological health, and 
wounded, ill and injured requirements. To address these 
challenges of the Defense Health Program, the Committee 
recommends the following:

Traumatic brain injury and psychological health research    $100,000,000
Peer-reviewed spinal cord research......................      30,000,000
Peer-reviewed orthopedic research.......................      30,000,000

                        GLOBAL WAR ON TERRORISM

    In title IX of the bill, the Committee recommends a total 
of $88,421,000,000 for Global War on Terrorism operations.
    Military Personnel: The Committee recommends a total of 
$10,467,900,000 for military personnel in title IX of the bill.
    Operation and Maintenance: The Committee recommends a total 
of $53,783,361,000 for operation and maintenance in title IX of 
the bill.
    Procurement: The Committee recommends a total of 
$18,094,699,000 for procurement in title IX of the bill.

                          CLASSIFIED PROGRAMS

    As described elsewhere in this report, the Committee's 
budget review of classified programs is published in a 
separate, detailed, and comprehensive classified annex. 
Adjustments to the classified programs are addressed in the 
classified annex accompanying this report.

                        GLOBAL WAR ON TERRORISM

    After more than a decade of war, the United States military 
and Intelligence Community remain engaged in responding to 
crises, conflicts, and instability across the globe. The rise 
of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, continued 
operations in Afghanistan, the presence of terrorist groups 
like al-Shabaab and Boko Haram in North Africa, the continued 
presence of al-Qaeda in the Middle East, ongoing efforts by 
Iran to reestablish Persian dominance in the Middle East, 
crises and instability in Yemen, Libya, and the Levant, and 
Russian aggression in Ukraine are just some of the stark 
reminders that providing the funding and resources necessary to 
ensure that the military and Intelligence Community are ready 
and able to respond to an unknown and unforeseen future event 
is more important than ever. The Committee does not assume that 
military engagements in the future will be limited to the 
Middle East or conflicts will be predicted well in advance.
    For these reasons, the Committee believes that providing 
additional resources to address both current contingencies and 
to ensure the military and Intelligence Community are ready to 
respond to future unknown crises at a moment's notice is 
critical. To further address the Global War on Terrorism, the 
bill includes funding both in base appropriations accounts and 
in title IX for the military and Intelligence Community. To 
reverse the advances of the Islamic State of Iraq and the 
Levant, maintain security along the border between Jordan and 
Syria, and to stem the aggression within the Levant, the 
Committee includes sufficient resources for the Iraq Train and 
Equip Fund and the Syria Train and Equip Fund. The Iraq Train 
and Equip Fund provides assistance to military and other 
security forces of the Government of Iraq, including Kurdish 
and tribal security forces. The Syria Train and Equip Fund 
provides support to appropriately vetted elements of the Syrian 
opposition and other appropriately vetted Syrian groups and 
individuals to enhance their combat ability and to promote 
conditions for a negotiated settlement to end the conflict in 
Syria. A general provision is included in title IX to provide 
assistance to the government of Jordan for the purpose of 
supporting and enhancing efforts of the armed forces of Jordan 
and to sustain security along the border of Jordan with Syria 
and Iraq.
    Since the war on terrorism is truly global, the Committee 
also includes funding under several authorities and efforts to 
support the U.S. Africa Command's Theater Campaign Concept to 
combat al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, Boko Haram, al-Qaeda 
East Africa, al-Shabaab, instability caused by the Lord's 
Resistance Army, and piracy and illicit trafficking. These same 
authorities are expanded using the Counterterrorism 
Partnerships Fund and are available, but not limited to, the 
countries bordering the Gulf of Aden, the Seas of Indonesia, 
the South China Sea, and other global havens for terrorism and 
extremism.
    Additional funding is also provided in title IX to restore 
readiness for the military Services and to maintain 
capabilities of the Intelligence Community to ensure that they 
are ready to address both current and emerging global 
challenges, both foreseen and unforeseen, at a moment's notice. 
These investments will start the process of restoring and 
enhancing military readiness and Intelligence Community 
capabilities.

                       A-10 AND CLOSE AIR SUPPORT

    The Committee has carefully reviewed the Air Force's 
renewed request to divest the A-10 in a phased manner by 2019. 
The Air Force's need to modernize its shrinking and aging 
inventory of aircraft, when coupled with budget constraints in 
current law, has forced difficult decisions regarding force 
structure. The Committee acknowledges the A-10's combat-proven 
advantages in the close air support (CAS) mission, but when set 
against the broad range of missions that the Air Force is 
required to carry out under the National Defense Strategy, the 
ability of other aircraft to perform CAS, and valid concerns 
regarding the A-10's susceptibility to rapidly advancing anti-
air threats in potential conflicts, divestment of the A-10 is 
the least unattractive option in the long run if the Air Force 
is to meet all of its national security responsibilities.
    At the same time, the Committee recognizes that ongoing 
conflicts and contingency operations, a security environment 
that senior military leaders have described as highly 
uncertain, and continuing overseas deployments of A-10 
squadrons raise questions of overall combat air forces capacity 
and whether it is prudent to proceed immediately with A-10 
divestment. Due to these considerations, the Committee's 
recommendation includes an additional $452,700,000 in title IX 
to preserve the present A-10 force structure. The Committee 
also includes a legislative provision that prohibits divestment 
of the A-10 or disestablishment of A-10 units in fiscal year 
2016, as well as the further movement of A-10 aircraft to 
backup inventory status.
    The Committee commends the Air Force for actions it has 
taken to preserve and enhance performance of the CAS mission. 
The Committee strongly supports these efforts and their 
continuation regardless of the disposition of the A-10 fleet in 
this and future fiscal years. In order to monitor the progress 
of Air Force efforts to sustain the CAS mission, the Committee 
directs the Secretary of the Air Force to submit a report to 
the congressional defense committees not later than 60 days 
after the submission of the fiscal year 2017 budget request 
that describes the CAS policy initiatives stemming from the 
March 2015 ``CAS Focus Week'' hosted by Air Combat Command and 
the progress made in implementing these initiatives; presents a 
set of metrics by which CAS training can be tracked year-to-
year; and describes efforts to identify new materiel solutions 
for CAS platforms and capabilities.
    Finally, the Committee recognizes that CAS is, above all 
considerations including aircraft platforms, a team effort 
requiring seamless air-ground cooperation. The Committee 
recognizes the indispensable contribution by the Air Force's 
Battlefield Airmen community, including Tactical Air Control 
Party members, to the continuing excellence of CAS performance. 
The Committee's recommendation includes an additional 
$55,900,000 in Other Procurement, Air Force for the acquisition 
of Joint Terminal Attack Controller training systems and 
Battlefield Airmen kits. The Committee directs the Secretary of 
the Air Force to submit a spending plan to the congressional 
defense committees for these additional funds not later than 90 
days after the enactment of this Act.
                                TITLE I

                           MILITARY PERSONNEL

    The fiscal year 2016 Department of Defense military 
personnel budget request totals $130,491,227,000. The Committee 
recommendation provides $122,727,607,000 for the military 
personnel accounts. The table below summarizes the Committee 
recommendations:

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

                      MILITARY PERSONNEL OVERVIEW

    The Committee recommendation provides $122,727,607,000 for 
the military personnel accounts, which funds military pay and 
allowances, recruitment and retention initiatives, and overall 
quality of life programs for active duty, National Guard, and 
reserve personnel. The Committee provides the resources 
required to maintain the recommended end strength levels for 
fiscal year 2016. The Committee recommendation provides funding 
to increase basic pay for all military personnel by 2.3 percent 
as authorized by current law, effective January 1, 2016. The 
Committee continues to encourage constructive evaluations of 
recruitment and retention programs, bonus and special pay 
incentives, and personnel benefit programs for fiscal year 
2016. The Committee remains supportive of programs intended to 
enhance the morale and quality of life of military personnel 
and their families.

                        SUMMARY OF END STRENGTH

    The fiscal year 2016 budget request includes a decrease of 
5,480 in total end strength for the active forces and a 
decrease of 9,800 in total end strength for the Selected 
Reserve as compared to the fiscal year 2015 authorized levels. 
The following tables summarize the Committee recommendations 
for end strength levels, both in the aggregate and for each 
active and Selected Reserve component.

                      OVERALL ACTIVE END STRENGTH

 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 authorized...........................         1,310,680
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................         1,305,200
Fiscal year 2016 recommendation.......................         1,308,915
Compared with fiscal year 2015........................            -1,765
Compared with fiscal year 2016 budget request.........            +3,715
 

                 OVERALL SELECTED RESERVE END STRENGTH

 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 authorized...........................           820,800
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................           811,000
Fiscal year 2016 recommendation.......................           819,200
Compared with fiscal year 2015........................            -1,600
Compared with fiscal year 2016 budget request.........            +8,200
 


                                   SUMMARY OF MILITARY PERSONNEL END STRENGTH
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Fiscal year 2016
                                                               -------------------------------------------------
                                                   Fiscal year                                          Change
                                                       2015       Budget      Committee     Change       from
                                                    authorized    request    recommended     from       fiscal
                                                                                            request    year 2015
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Active Forces (End Strength)
    Army.........................................      490,000     475,000       475,000       - - -     -15,000
    Navy.........................................      323,600     329,200       329,200       - - -       5,600
    Marine Corps.................................      184,100     184,000       184,000       - - -        -100
    Air Force....................................      312,980     317,000       320,715       3,715       7,735
                                                  --------------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Active Forces.....................    1,310,680   1,305,200     1,308,915       3,715      -1,765
Guard and Reserve Forces (End Strength)
    Army Reserve.................................      202,000     198,000       198,000       - - -      -4,000
    Navy Reserve.................................       57,300      57,400        57,400       - - -         100
    Marine Corps Reserve.........................       39,200      38,900        38,900       - - -        -300
    Air Force Reserve............................       67,100      69,200        69,200       - - -       2,100
    Army National Guard..........................      350,200     342,000       350,200       8,200       - - -
    Air National Guard...........................      105,000     105,500       105,500       - - -         500
                                                  --------------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Selected Reserve..................      820,800     811,000       819,200       8,200      -1,600
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total, Military Personnel........................    2,131,480   2,116,200     2,128,115      11,915      -3,365
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      FULL-TIME SUPPORT STRENGTHS

    There are four categories of full-time support in the 
National Guard and reserve components: military technicians 
(dual status), Active Guard and Reserve, non-technician 
civilians, and active component personnel.
    Full-time support personnel organize, recruit, train, 
maintain, and administer the reserve components. Military 
technicians (dual status) directly support units and are 
critical to helping units maintain readiness and meet the 
wartime missions of the Army and Air Force.
    The following table summarizes the National Guard and 
reserve components full-time support end strengths:

                                 SUMMARY OF GUARD AND RESERVE FULL TIME STRENGTH
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Fiscal year 2016
                                                               -------------------------------------------------
                                                   Fiscal year                                          Change
                                                       2015       Budget      Committee     Change       from
                                                    authorized    request    recommended     from       fiscal
                                                                                            request    year 2015
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army Reserve:
    AGR..........................................       16,261      16,261        16,261       - - -       - - -
    Technicians..................................        7,895       7,395         7,395       - - -        -500
Navy Reserve:
    AR...........................................        9,973       9,934         9,934       - - -         -39
Marine Corps Reserve:
    AR...........................................        2,261       2,260         2,260       - - -          -1
Air Force Reserve:
    AGR..........................................        2,830       3,032         3,032       - - -         202
    Technicians..................................        9,789       9,814         9,814       - - -          25
Army National Guard:
    AGR..........................................       31,385      30,770        31,385         615       - - -
    Technicians..................................       27,210      26,099        27,210       1,111       - - -
Air National Guard:
    AGR..........................................       14,704      14,748        14,748       - - -          44
    Technicians..................................       21,792      22,104        22,104       - - -       31210
Totals:
    AGR/AR.......................................       77,414      77,005        77,005       - - -        -409
    Technicians..................................       66,686      65,412        65,412       - - -      -1,274
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Total, Full-Time Support.............      144,100     142,417       144,143       1,726          43
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

         REPROGRAMMING GUIDANCE FOR MILITARY PERSONNEL ACCOUNTS

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit 
the Base for Reprogramming (DD Form 1414) for each of the 
fiscal year 2016 appropriation accounts not later than 60 days 
after the enactment of this Act. The Secretary of Defense is 
prohibited from executing any reprogramming or transfer of 
funds for any purpose other than originally appropriated until 
the aforementioned report is submitted to the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to use the 
normal prior approval reprogramming procedures to transfer 
funds in the Services' military personnel accounts between 
budget activities in excess of $10,000,000.

               MILITARY PERSONNEL SPECIAL INTEREST ITEMS

    Items for which additional funds have been provided or have 
been specifically reduced as shown in the project level tables 
or in paragraphs using the phrase ``only for'' or ``only to'' 
in this report are congressional interest items for the purpose 
of the Base for Reprogramming (DD Form 1414). Each of these 
items must be carried on the DD Form 1414 at the stated amount 
as specifically addressed in the Committee report. Below 
threshold reprogrammings may not be used to either restore or 
reduce funding from congressional special interest items as 
identified on the DD Form 1414.

                       GENERAL AND FLAG OFFICERS

    General and Flag Officers (GFOs) are the leaders of the 
military Services. While the size of the military has decreased 
in recent years, the number of GFOs has not. The Department 
ofDefense Appropriations Act, 2014 reduced funding for GFOs and 
directed the Government Accountability Office (GAO) to provide 
a report to the congressional defense committees detailing all 
associated costs.
    The GAO found that the GFO population experienced higher 
rates of growth since fiscal year 2001 than the enlisted 
population and that the full cost to the Department of Defense 
for GFOs from fiscal year 2001 through fiscal year 2013 could 
not be determined because complete cost data for GFOs and their 
aides is not available. Furthermore, the GAO noted that the 
position of officer aide is not defined in departmental 
guidance and, as a result, the Services were not able to 
consistently track the number of personnel in these positions. 
The GAO recommended that the Department update and improve 
information related to GFO aides and define the costs 
associated with GFOs.
    The Committee directs the Director of Cost Assessment and 
Program Evaluation, in coordination with the Under Secretary of 
Defense (Personnel and Readiness) and the Service Secretaries, 
to update GFO requirements and to define the costs associated 
with general and flag officers, including security details, 
government air travel, enlisted and officer aide housing costs, 
support staff, official residences, and any other costs 
incurred due to the nature of their position. Further, not 
later than 270 days after the enactment of this Act, the 
Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report 
to the congressional defense committees outlining the updated 
GFO requirements and the number of GFOs needed to fill these 
positions, and describing the costs associated with GFOs, 
including officer and enlisted aides.

                 SEXUAL ASSAULT PREVENTION AND RESPONSE

    The Committee remains concerned by the pervasive problem of 
sexual assault in the military. While the Committee is 
encouraged that the Department of Defense has worked 
aggressively to sustain and enhance its prevention and response 
systems through programmatic initiatives and policy changes, 
the Committee has previously stated that in order to fully 
address this problem there must be a culture change that occurs 
at all levels of the military.
    Federal law requires the Department of Defense to provide 
Congressan annual report on sexual assaults involving 
servicemembers. After several years of highlighting sexual 
assault as a serious issue, the Committee believes that more 
action is necessary to systematically combat this unacceptable 
epidemic. In addition to the aforementioned report, the 
Committee directs the Director of the Department of Defense 
Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program Office to brief 
the House and Senate Appropriations Committees not later than 
30 days after issuing the annual report on the initiatives it 
is implementing to reform how the military prevents, responds 
to, and adjudicates sexual assault cases, as well as the 
efforts underway to more effectively assess and address 
perceived retaliation towards victims who reported an incident 
of sexual assault that occurred during military service.
    The Committee fully funds the budget request of 
$263,325,000 for Sexual Assault Prevention and Response 
programs at the Service level and provides an additional 
$20,000,000 for the Department of Defense Sexual Assault 
Prevention and Response Program Office for transfer to the 
Services, including the National Guard and reserve components.

                     CULTURAL SENSITIVITY TRAINING

    The Committee recognizes that the Department of Defense and 
the Services have multiple cultural sensitivity training 
programs for military personnel. The Committee believes that 
protecting servicemembers' rights regarding religious exercise 
and ethnic heritage is important. The Committee supports 
efforts to identify resource and personnel gaps that may exist 
in the Department of Defense Office of Diversity Management and 
Equal Opportunity as well as efforts to identify existing gaps 
in protections for new and prospective servicemembers.

                 CULTURE AND FOREIGN LANGUAGE TRAINING

    The Committee supports efforts by the Department of Defense 
to establish foreign language, regional expertise, and cultural 
awareness as core competencies throughout the military 
Services, as well as efforts to improve foreign language 
capabilities for Army regionally aligned forces. Recently, the 
Committee received reports from the Secretary of Defense and 
the Secretary of the Army regarding the feasibility of 
requiring language and cultural education for officers in all 
Services and the feasibility of establishing an Army pilot 
program for non-commissioned officers assigned to regionally 
aligned units and other positions that require foreign area 
expertise. The Committee is supportive of the findings of both 
reports and therefore, encourages the Secretary of Defense and 
the Secretary of the Army to leverage the expertise of 
established foreign language and culture programs within the 
Department of Defense that utilize both in-residence style 
instruction and computer-based virtual classroom training. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in coordination 
with the Secretary of the Army, to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 180 days after 
the enactment of this Act on programs of record within the 
Department that leverage both in-residence instruction and 
computer based virtual classrooms for language training to 
better determine what cost savings measures can be applied to 
make foreign language training more readily available within 
the Services.
    Further, the Committee recognizes the important role of the 
Defense Language Institute in providing foreign language 
training and interpretation to the intelligence community and 
supports efforts to ensure that it can continue to effectively 
conduct its mission. The Committee also supports the Joint 
Foreign Area Officer (FAO) program, which ensures that FAOs 
have knowledge and familiarity with the politics, military, 
culture, and language of the region in which they are 
stationed. The Committee is aware that the FAO Phase II 
sustainment program, which began as a pilot program, will 
transition from a language training center grant to a non-
government educational entity beginning in fiscal year 2016. 
The Committee encourages the Director of the Defense Language 
National Security Education Office to ensure that changes made 
to the program do not inhibit FAOs from continuing to receive 
the training needed to successfully perform their duties.

                MINORITY OUTREACH AND OFFICER ACCESSIONS

    Minorities remain underrepresented in the general officer 
ranks across the Services. To build a more diverse 
organization, the Committee supports efforts to conduct 
effective outreach and recruiting programs focused on 
increasing officer accessions in minority communities and 
encourages the Secretary of Defense and the Service Secretaries 
to support efforts to improve diversity in the military.

     MILITARY COMPENSATION AND RETIREMENT MODERNIZATION COMMISSION

    The Military Compensation and Retirement Modernization 
Commission recently provided the President and Congress 
specific recommendations to modernize military pay and 
benefits. The Committee is encouraged that the Commission 
provided recommendations that endeavor to ensure the long-term 
viability of the All-Volunteer Force, to support a high quality 
of life for servicemembers and their families in a manner that 
fosters successful recruitment and retention, to support career 
opportunities for servicemembers, and to modernize the 
compensation and retirement system of servicemembers for fiscal 
sustainability.
    Among its recommendations, the Commission suggests moving 
from a purely defined benefit to a blended defined benefit and 
defined contribution retirement system. The Commission also 
outlined ways to sustain servicemember education programs, 
strengthen numerous family support programs, and promote 
servicemembers' financial literacy. While the Commission 
decided that its focus would not be budget driven, these 
recommendations offer changes that, if implemented, will impact 
government expenditures. Recognizing that there may be 
additional opportunities to identify efficiencies in personnel 
and force structure programs, the Committee looks forward to 
receiving the Secretary of Defense's response to these 
recommendations and to working with the Secretary to ensure 
pragmatic fiscal sustainability is achieved.

                        MILITARY PERSONNEL, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................   $41,116,129,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................    41,130,748,000
Committee recommendation..............................    37,295,571,000
Change from budget request............................    -3,835,177,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$37,295,571,000 for Military Personnel, Army which will provide 
the following program in fiscal year 2016:

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

                        MILITARY PERSONNEL, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................   $27,453,200,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................    28,262,396,000
Committee recommendation..............................    26,711,323,000
Change from budget request............................    -1,551,073,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$26,711,323,000 for Military Personnel, Navy which will provide 
the following program in fiscal year 2016:

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

                    MILITARY PERSONNEL, MARINE CORPS


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................   $12,828,931,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................    13,125,349,000
Committee recommendation..............................    12,586,679,000
Change from budget request............................      -538,670,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$12,586,679,000 for Military Personnel, Marine Corps which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2016:

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

                     MILITARY PERSONNEL, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................   $27,376,462,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................    27,969,322,000
Committee recommendation..............................    26,226,952,000
Change from budget request............................    -1,742,370,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$26,226,952,000 for Military Personnel, Air Force which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2016:

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

                       REMOTELY PILOTED AIRCRAFT

    The Committee understands that the Air Force has surged 
remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) operations nine times during 
the last eight years. Due to this increased operational tempo, 
the Air Force is studying the effectiveness and efficiency of 
this high-demand capability in order to alleviate any 
associated pilot training and retention issues. The Committee 
also understands that the Air Force is providing additional 
skill and incentive pays for career RPA pilots in order to 
stabilize the career path. However, the Committee notes that 
the Air Force continues to rely solely on officers to fill RPA 
pilot positions and additional incentive pays to steady the 
enterprise, while at the same time other Services have utilized 
enlisted personnel for similar operational needs. The Committee 
encourages the Secretary of the Air Force to consider utilizing 
enlisted personnel to help fill the pipeline of candidates for 
the RPA pilot mission. Additionally, the Committee directs the 
Secretary of the Air Force to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees regarding the RPA pilot 
mission not later than 60 days after the enactment of this Act. 
This report should assess the feasibility of training enlisted 
personnel as RPA pilots, provide a proposed timeline for the 
incorporation of enlisted personnel as RPA pilots, include an 
updated list of any pay and incentives that these pilots are 
eligible to receive, provide a breakdown of how the pilots have 
populated the community (i.e. how many transfers from manned 
aircraft communities, how many direct accessions, how many from 
other sources, etc.), and include a listing of their Air Force 
Specialty Codes.
    The Committee also provides an additional $40,000,000 in 
Operation and Maintenance, Air Force to accelerate RPA pilot 
training.

                        RESERVE PERSONNEL, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................    $4,317,859,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     4,550,974,000
Committee recommendation..............................     4,463,164,000
Change from budget request............................       -87,810,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $4,463,164,000 
for Reserve Personnel, Army which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2016:

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

                        RESERVE PERSONNEL, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................    $1,835,924,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     1,884,991,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,866,891,000
Change from budget request............................       -18,100,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,866,891,000 
for Reserve Personnel, Navy which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2016:

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

                    RESERVE PERSONNEL, MARINE CORPS


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................      $660,424,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................       706,481,000
Committee recommendation..............................       705,271,000
Change from budget request............................        -1,210,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $705,271,000 
for Reserve Personnel, Marine Corps which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2016:

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

                      RESERVE PERSONNEL, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................    $1,653,148,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     1,696,283,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,689,333,000
Change from budget request............................        -6,950,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,689,333,000 
for Reserve Personnel, Air Force which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2016:

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

                     NATIONAL GUARD PERSONNEL, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................    $7,643,832,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     7,942,132,000
Committee recommendation..............................     7,980,413,000
Change from budget request............................       +38,281,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $7,980,413,000 
for National Guard Personnel, Army which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2016:

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

                    ARMY NATIONAL GUARD END STRENGTH

    The fiscal year 2016 budget request proposes reducing the 
Army National Guard end strength from 350,200 in fiscal year 
2015 to 342,000 in fiscal year 2016 and reducing the levels of 
full time support personnel. The National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2015 established the National Commission on 
the Future of the Army, which will undertake a comprehensive 
study of the structure of the total Army to include a review of 
the size of the Army, force mixture, missions, force generation 
policies, and how the structure required to fulfill mission 
requirements is consistent with available resources. The 
Committee looks forward to receiving and reviewing those 
recommendations. In fiscal year 2016, the Committee recommends 
an additional $178,101,000 for the Army National Guard military 
personnel and operation and maintenance accounts to restore end 
strength to fiscal year 2015 levels. The recommendation also 
includes a provision that prohibits the reduction of the Army 
National Guard end strength levels below the authorized fiscal 
year 2015 levels.

                         CYBER PROTECTION TEAMS

    The Committee is encouraged that the Army National Guard 
plans to activate the first three of ten Army National Guard 
cyber protection teams in fiscal year 2016. The Committee 
directs the Director of the Army National Guard to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
180 days after the enactment of this Act which outlines the 
activation plan for all ten cyber protection teams.

                  NATIONAL GUARD PERSONNEL, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................    $3,118,709,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     3,222,551,000
Committee recommendation..............................     3,202,010,000
Change from budget request............................       -20,541,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $3,202,010,000 
for National Guard Personnel, Air Force which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2016:

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

                   REMOTELY PILOTED AIRCRAFT MISSIONS

    The Air National Guard is a dual-use force whose missions 
include defending the homeland and supporting federal efforts. 
The Air National Guard finds itself in the unique position to 
support border operations with the recent growth of its 
Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) enterprise. Recognizing the 
dual-use nature of the Air National Guard, the Committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 180 days after 
the enactment of this Act on the cost-effectiveness of using 
Air National Guard units to conduct RPA missions along the 
border in support of the Department of Homeland Security and 
the impact to Air National Guard training and readiness.
                                TITLE II

                       OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

    The fiscal year 2016 Department of Defense operation and 
maintenance budget request totals $176,517,228,000. The 
Committee recommendation provides $162,286,489,000 for the 
operation and maintenance accounts. The table below summarizes 
the Committee recommendations:

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

     REPROGRAMMING GUIDANCE FOR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE ACCOUNTS

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit 
the Base for Reprogramming (DD Form 1414) for each of the 
fiscal year 2016 appropriation accounts not later than 60 days 
after the enactment of this Act. The Secretary of Defense is 
prohibited from executing any reprogramming or transfer of 
funds for any purpose other than originally appropriated until 
the aforementioned report is submitted to the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to use the 
normal prior approval reprogramming procedures to transfer 
funds in the Services' operation and maintenance accounts 
between O-1 budget activities in excess of $15,000,000. In 
addition, the Secretary of Defense should follow prior approval 
reprogramming procedures for transfers in excess of $15,000,000 
out of the following budget sub-activities:

    Army:
    Maneuver units
    Modular support brigades
    Land forces operations support
    Force readiness operations support
    Land forces depot maintenance
    Base operations support
    Facilities sustainment, restoration, and modernization

    Navy:
    Aircraft depot maintenance
    Ship depot maintenance
    Facilities sustainment, restoration, and modernization

    Marine Corps:
    Depot maintenance
    Facilities sustainment, restoration, and modernization

    Air Force:
    Primary combat forces
    Combat enhancement forces
    Combat communications
    Facilities sustainment, restoration, and modernization
    Air Force Reserve:
    Depot maintenance

    Air National Guard:
    Depot maintenance

    Additionally, the Secretary of Defense shall follow prior 
approval reprogramming procedures for transfers in excess of 
$15,000,000 into the following budget sub-activity:

    Operation and Maintenance, Army National Guard:
    Other personnel support/recruiting and advertising

    With respect to Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide, 
proposed transfers of funds to or from the levels specified for 
defense agencies in excess of $15,000,000 shall be subject to 
prior approval reprogramming procedures.
    During fiscal year 2016, the Committee directs the Service 
Secretaries to submit written notification and justification to 
the congressional defense committees not later than 15 days 
prior to implementing transfers in excess of $15,000,000 out of 
the following budget sub-activities:

    Navy:
    Mission and other flight operations
    Mission and other ship operations

    Air Force:
    Operating forces depot maintenance
    Mobilization depot maintenance
    Training and recruiting depot maintenance
    Administration and service-wide depot maintenance

    These transfers may be implemented 15 days after a 
congressional notification unless an objection is received from 
one of the congressional defense committees.

            OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE BUDGET EXECUTION DATA

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to continue 
to provide the congressional defense committees with quarterly 
budget execution data. Such data should be provided not later 
than 45 days after the close of each quarter of the fiscal 
year, and should be provided for each O-1 budget activity, 
activity group, and sub-activity group for each of the active, 
defense-wide, reserve, and National Guard components. For each 
O-1 budget activity, activity group, and sub-activity group, 
these reports should include the budget request and actual 
obligation amount, the distribution of unallocated 
congressional adjustments to the budget request, all 
adjustments made by the Department in establishing the Base for 
Reprogramming (DD Form 1414) report, all adjustments resulting 
from below threshold reprogrammings, and all adjustments 
resulting from prior approval reprogramming requests.

            OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE SPECIAL INTEREST ITEMS

    Items for which additional funds have been provided or have 
been specifically reduced as shown in the project level tables 
or in paragraphs using the phrase ``only for'' or ``only to'' 
in this report are congressional special interest items for the 
purpose of the Base for Reprogramming (DD Form 1414). Each of 
these items must be carried on the DD Form 1414 at the stated 
amount as specifically addressed in the Committee report. Below 
threshold reprogrammings may not be used to either restore or 
reduce funding from congressional special interest items as 
identified on the DD Form 1414.

                     SIZE OF THE CIVILIAN WORKFORCE

    Since 2001, the demands of war have driven growth in the 
size of the military, civilian personnel workforce, and 
contract workforce. The Department of Defense is now taking 
steps to right-size this workforce in light of reduced war 
demands and efficiencies in support functions. The Committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide annual updates to 
the congressional defense committees as the size of the 
workforce changes.
    The Committee supports a strong civilian workforce and 
recognizes that much of the civilian workforce performs 
critical national security and readiness functions, including 
depot maintenance, cyber protection, medical support, and as 
reserve component military technicians. However, the Committee 
is concerned by the size and cost of headquarters and 
administrative functions, particularly at the Pentagon, 
including the size of the Services' civilian workforces. A 
January 2015 Government Accountability Office (GAO) report 
found that while the Secretary of Defense set a target to 
reduce service headquarters budgets by twenty percent through 
fiscal year 2019, including the military, civilian, and 
contracted workforce, the Department has not finalized plans to 
achieve these reductions.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to conduct a 
systematic determination of the personnel requirements for 
headquarters organizations, including the Pentagon, and the 
support organizations that perform headquarters-related 
functions, and to implement a process for conducting regular 
future determinations. Further, the Secretary of Defense is 
directed to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than 120 days after the enactment of this 
Act detailing the implementation of the twenty percent 
headquarters reduction at the Service, component, and 
headquarters level of detail. This report should provide both 
the funding baseline being used for the reduction, the baseline 
number of military, civilian, and contracted workforce at each 
headquarters and support organization, the timeline for 
implementation of the reductions, and the revised funding and 
size of the military, civilian, and contracted workforce by 
headquarters and support organization after the reduction is 
fully implemented. This report should also provide the findings 
of the systematic review of personnel requirements and a 
timeline for future periodic reassessments as recommended by 
the GAO report.

                 CIVILIAN PERSONNEL AND PAY MANAGEMENT

    The Committee believes that oversight and accurate 
budgeting is critical to making fiscally sound decisions 
regarding the civilian personnel workforce. However, the fiscal 
year 2016 budget request substantially overestimates the number 
of civilians that will be employed during fiscal year 2015, 
continuing the pattern of over-budgeting that has occurred over 
the last several fiscal years. Civilian full-time equivalent 
(FTE) data provided by the Services show that most of the 
Services and defense agencies are projected to end fiscal year 
2015 far short of what is planned for in the fiscal year 2016 
budget request. Therefore, the Committee recommends reductions 
in fiscal year 2016 due to the overestimation of civilian FTE 
targets.
    While they consistently underexecute the budgeted number of 
FTEs, some of the Services simultaneously overexecute the 
civilian pay program. The Committee is concerned that the 
Services lack oversight of their civilian personnel and pay 
programs which cause them to not fully know their FTE and 
civilian pay requirements. For example, the Committee was 
disturbed to learn that the Air Force failed to adjust their 
Average Work Year cost for three straight fiscal years, which 
led to significant civilian pay funding shortfalls despite 
large FTE underexecutions. The Air Force budget documentation 
regarding the civilian pay program is unclear, riddled with 
errors, and poorly justified. The Committee directs the 
Secretary of the Air Force to review the budget justification 
material for the civilian pay program and improve the 
documentation to properly justify requested increases and 
decreases in civilian FTEs by sub-activity group beginning in 
fiscal year 2017. The Committee also directs the Service 
Secretaries to provide the average civilian salary as part of 
the PB-31R personnel summary by account and as part of the OP-5 
personnel summary by sub-activity group beginning with the 
fiscal year 2017 budget request. Finally, the Committee directs 
the Department of Defense Inspector General to conduct a full 
audit and review of the civilian pay and personnel programs at 
the Service and component level and to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 180 days after 
the enactment of this Act on the findings of this review.

                           CIVILIAN FURLOUGHS

    In fiscal year 2013, the Secretary of Defense furloughed 
most Department of Defense civilian employees for up to six 
days due to budgetary shortfalls primarily caused by 
sequestration. The Committee believes that the negative impact 
on productivity, morale, and readiness substantially outweighed 
the savings generated from civilian furloughs. No furloughs 
were implemented in either fiscal year 2014 or fiscal year 
2015, and the Committee assumes that the enactment of this Act 
will eliminate any need to furlough civilian employees in 
fiscal year 2016.

    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE MILITARY INTELLIGENCE PROGRAM BUDGET 
                         JUSTIFICATION MATERIAL

    The Committee is unsatisfied with the current budget 
justification material submitted for the operation and 
maintenance portion of the Military Intelligence Program (MIP). 
The Committee is concerned that the current material does not 
provide full visibility into requested funding which limits 
congressional oversight. Starting with the fiscal year 2017 
budget request, the Committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide justification material for the MIP that matches the 
budget exhibit and layout formats of the non-MIP justification 
materials and corresponds to the Service provided O-1 exhibits.
    Additionally, starting with the fiscal year 2017 budget 
request, the Committee directs the Secretary of Defense and the 
Service Secretaries to include, at a minimum, a classified 
version of the OP-5 and OP-32 budget exhibits as defined in the 
Department of Defense Financial Management Regulation by sub-
activity group for each operation and maintenance account, 
budget activity, and sub-activity group in which MIP funding is 
requested. This material should be submitted for both the base 
budget request and the Global War on Terrorism request and 
should detail the MIP level of funding for the current budget 
year and the previous two fiscal years.

                 ENCROACHMENT ON MILITARY INSTALLATIONS

    The Committee recognizes the negative impact that 
encroachment and loss of habitat of threatened and endangered 
species can have on military training and readiness. The 
Committee supports efforts to prevent encroachment as well as 
efforts to protect the viability of installations and training 
ranges, to use simulation and technology to reduce training 
impacts on the environment, and to implement pre-mitigation and 
conservation efforts to preserve the critical habitats of at-
risk species.
    The Committee is also aware that the inclusion of the 
greater sage grouse under the Endangered Species Act could 
impact multiple military installations and facilities, 
including some of the military's premier training ranges. The 
Committee remains concerned by the negative impact that this 
could have on military training and readiness and believes that 
maintaining a balance between conservation efforts and meeting 
the national security and homeland defense mission is critical.

                      MAINTENANCE OF REAL PROPERTY

    The Committee is concerned with the maintenance and 
utilization of real property allocated to the Department of 
Defense. The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct no maintenance or improvements to Department of Defense 
real property with a zero percent utilization rate according to 
the Department's real property inventory database, except in 
the case of maintenance of an historic property, as required by 
the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470 et seq.) 
or maintenance to prevent a negative environmental impact as 
required by the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 
U.S.C. 4321 et seq.).

                              AUDITABILITY

    The Committee strongly supports Department of Defense 
efforts to achieve auditability by the end of fiscal year 2017. 
The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide an 
update by military department and defense agency of the 
progress to achieve financial auditability not later than 90 
days after enactment of this Act.

                    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, ARMY

 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................   $31,961,920,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................    35,107,546,000
Committee recommendation..............................    28,349,761,000
Change from budget request............................    -6,757,785,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$28,349,761,000 for Operation and Maintenance, Army which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2016:

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

                    COMBAT TRAINING CENTER ROTATIONS

    The Army has recently increased the length of combat 
training center rotations for active duty soldiers from 14 to 
18 days. While the Army believes that the additional time will 
increase the effectiveness of the rotations, the increased 
length has reduced the throughput at the training centers from 
ten to nine rotations per year at the National Training Center 
and the Joint Readiness Training Center. Since these rotations 
are the pinnacle event to prepare soldiers for combat, the 
Committee supports efforts to make them as effective as 
possible. However, the Committee is concerned that the reduced 
number of rotations, which results in a reduced number of 
soldiers being trained, may outweigh the benefits gained by the 
additional number of training days per rotation. The Committee 
is also concerned that the Army did not conduct a full analysis 
prior to this decision and therefore was unaware that 
increasing the number of days per rotation would require a 
reduction in the total number of rotations held each year. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of the Army to submit a report 
to the congressional defense committees not later than 120 days 
after the enactment of this Act that provides a detailed 
evaluation of the decision to increase combat training center 
rotation lengths for active duty soldiers, a full cost-benefit 
analysis of the decision to increase rotation lengths, and an 
analysis of how reducing the number of rotations impacts 
readiness.

   DEFENSE GENERATOR AND RAIL EQUIPMENT CENTER AT HILL AIR FORCE BASE

    The Committee understands that the Defense Generator and 
Rail Equipment Center (DGRC), located at Hill Air Force Base 
(AFB), requires significant renovations to address 
deficiencies, including some necessary for improved health and 
safety. Further, while the DGRC is currently located within the 
boundaries of Hill AFB, the Committee is aware that after 
completion of the enhanced use lease project, the DGRC could be 
located outside of the boundaries and if so, would be required 
to provide its own force protection which would increase 
operational costs. There are also concerns that should the DGRC 
remain in its current location, it could negatively impact the 
value of future phases of the Hill AFB enhanced use lease 
project.
    The explanatory statement accompanying the Department of 
Defense Appropriations Act, 2015 included language that urged 
the Secretary of the Army to work with the Secretary of the Air 
Force and relevant state and local stakeholders to address 
concerns raised by the current DGRC location and to reach an 
agreement acceptable to all parties on the future status and 
location of the DGRC. The Committee understands that the 
aforementioned stakeholders remain concerned that the Secretary 
of the Army has not addressed their concerns and is moving 
ahead unilaterally without engaging all impacted parties. 
Further, there is concern that the Secretary of the Army has 
not conducted a comprehensive cost benefit analysis of the 
facility's current location versus a possible relocation of the 
facility.
    The Committee again directs the Secretary of the Army to 
work with the Secretary of the Air Force and relevant state and 
local stakeholders to address concerns raised by the current 
DGRC location and to reach an agreement acceptable to all 
parties on the future status and location of the DGRC. The 
Committee also directs the Secretary of the Army to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
60 days after the enactment of this Act which includes the 
following: a list of the proposed use of funds to renovate the 
DGRC and the health and safety requirement these renovations 
would address; an analysis of the current location of the DGRC 
and the feasibility of moving it to another location; Army 
proposals to address concerns raised by discussions with the 
Air Force, federal, state, and local stakeholders; proposals 
for how to reach a mutually acceptable outcome for all 
interested parties; and a timeline for the implementation of 
these proposals.

                    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................   $37,590,854,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................    42,200,756,000
Committee recommendation..............................    40,548,338,000
Change from budget request............................    -1,652,418,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$40,548,338,000 for Operation and Maintenance, Navy which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2016:
[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

                      SHIP REPAIR INDUSTRIAL BASE

    The Committee believes that a robust private sector ship 
repair industrial base, which complements a strong government 
capability, is critical to maintaining the Navy's fleet through 
the full life of a ship, including the decommissioning of 
nuclear powered vessels. The Committee encourages the Secretary 
of the Navy to work with the ship repair industrial base to 
identify periods of reduced workload in order to mitigate the 
risk of lost skills and capabilities.

                       NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL

    The Committee recognizes the important role that the Naval 
Postgraduate School (NPS) plays in providing quality foreign 
language training, professional development, and education to 
Naval and other military officers. The Navy is currently 
validating NPS requirements to ensure that staffing and funding 
levels meet workload requirements. The Committee includes a 
provision in this bill that prohibits the management of 
civilian personnel on the basis of end strength, and the 
Committee expects that any decisions regarding the NPS 
personnel and funding levels shall comply with this directive. 
The Committee fully funds the budget request for NPS and 
remains supportive of the school and its mission.

                OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, MARINE CORPS


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................    $5,610,063,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     6,228,782,000
Committee recommendation..............................     5,338,793,000
Change from budget request............................      -889,989,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $5,338,793,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Marine Corps which will provide 
the following program in fiscal year 2016:

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

                  OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................   $34,539,965,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................    38,191,929,000
Committee recommendation..............................    36,094,484,000
Change from budget request............................    -2,097,445,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$36,094,484,000 for Operation and Maintenance, Air Force which 
will provide the following program in fiscal year 2016:


      AIR FORCE DEPOT MAINTENANCE AND CONTRACTOR LOGISTICS SUPPORT

    The Committee recognizes that while the Air Force has 
improved its effort to capture all funding requested for depot 
maintenance, including contractor logistics support (CLS) for 
depot maintenance, in the depot maintenance sub-activity group 
(SAG), the Air Force is not yet able to fully differentiate 
between flight-line activities, for which funding should be 
requested in the aircraft operations and mission support SAGs, 
and depot maintenance activities, for which funding should be 
requested in the depot maintenance SAGs.
    The Air Force maintains that requesting funding for CLS in 
the appropriate sub-activity groups as they are currently 
defined would hinder its use of performance based logistics 
(PBL) contracts, and therefore it could negatively impact 
readiness. At the same time, the Committee is concerned that 
requesting funding for CLS in the depot maintenance line limits 
visibility into the execution of this funding and prevents the 
Committee from conducting proper oversight into the cost of 
contracts, the cost growth of weapons systems maintained by 
such contracts, and the primary drivers of such growth.
    The budget request includes funding in Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy for CLS and PBL in the aviation logistics 
SAG, which is separate from both the flying hours SAG and the 
depot maintenance SAG. Separating CLS and PBL funding from 
depot maintenance funding allows the Committee better oversight 
and visibility into the costs of such contracts, contract 
growth, and the total amount of funding requested for depot 
maintenance. The Committee believes the creation of a similar 
budget line item in the Operation and Maintenance, Air Force 
account would provide similar benefits. Therefore, the 
Committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to create a 
new SAG specifically for funding requested for CLS and PBL.

           AIR EDUCATION AND TRAINING COMMAND INFRASTRUCTURE

    The report accompanying the House version of the Department 
of Defense Appropriations Act, 2015 recognized the adverse 
impact that flooding and other infrastructure challenges has 
had on the Air Education and Training Command facilities, 
equipment, operations, and training. The Committee understands 
that the Secretary of the Air Force is taking steps to address 
these deficiencies and supports these efforts.

                OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, DEFENSE-WIDE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................   $30,824,752,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................    32,440,843,000
Committee recommendation..............................    30,182,187,000
Change from budget request............................    -2,258,656,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$30,182,187,000, for Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide 
which will provide the following program in fiscal year 2016:


     ENERGY EFFICIENCY REPORT FOR DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE FACILITIES

    The Committee remains concerned about the lack of progress 
on energy efficiency initiatives within the Department of 
Defense. Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than 180 days after the enactment of this 
Act on the energy use and energy efficiency projects at the 
Pentagon and the ten largest Department of Defense facilities. 
The report shall include, but is not limited to, an analysis of 
energy use at the Pentagon Reservation and the ten largest 
Department of Defense facilities; an accounting, including 
dates, of when energy audits and energy efficiency projects 
have been conducted at such facilities; and any potential 
savings associated with efficient lighting systems.
    Further, the Committee is aware of the Navy's decision to 
pursue installation of Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs), including 
tubular-LED (T-LED) lighting, on ships under construction after 
the Naval Sea Systems Command identified that LEDs use 
approximately fifty percent less energy and last longer than 
conventional lights. The Committee supports these efforts and 
encourages the Secretary of Defense to include T-LED as an 
option within the specifications for the Department's Unified 
Facilities Criteria.

                    NET-CENTRIC ENTERPRISE SERVICES

    Collaboration services provided by the Defense Information 
Systems Agency (DISA) are used by the Department of Defense for 
secure web-conferencing, virtual meetings, and distributed 
training. These services are available to all users on the 
classified and unclassified networks used by the Department of 
Defense. The Committee understands that DISA intends to replace 
the current system with an internally designed system that has 
recently deployed and will only be in service until the Unified 
Capabilities collaboration services program commences in fiscal 
year 2017. The Committee is concerned that replacing the 
current system of collaboration services with an interim 
solution is costly and shortsighted. Prior to proceeding with 
replacing the current system, the Committee directs the 
Director of DISA to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees not later than 120 days after the enactment 
of this Act describing and justifying the total costs 
associated with implementing an interim collaboration service.

                      PERFORMANCE BASED LOGISTICS

    The Committee is aware that the Department of Defense 
values the use of performance based logistics (PBL) contracts 
for maintenance and repair. The Services use PBL to improve 
support for components such as aircraft engines and tires. 
Similarly, the Defense Logistics Agency is combining multiple 
contracts for similar items into a single PBL arrangement that 
supports all the Services. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary of Defense and Service Secretaries tocontinue using 
PBL contracts.

                        DEFENSE CERTIFIED PARTS

    The Committee recognizes that cloned or counterfeit parts 
are difficult to identify or detect using current techniques, 
making supply chain vulnerability a threat to national 
security. The Committee encourages the Director of the Defense 
Logistics Agency to seek formal partnerships with industries 
and academic institutions with expertise in counterfeiting 
trends, hardware testing, counterfeit detection techniques, and 
countering hardware-based cyber-attacks.

       HUBZONE AND SMALL BUSINESS SET-ASIDE ACQUISITION PROGRAMS

    While the Committee supports the Federal Prison Industry 
(FPI) mission to reduce crime by preparing inmates for 
sucessful reentry to society through job training, the 
Committee is concerned that the Defense Logistics Agency's 
interpretation of 10 U.S.C. Section 2140(n) is inconsistent 
with legal and congressional intent. This interpretation of the 
law permits FPI to participate in HUBZone set-aside 
acquisitions and small business set-aside acquisitions, 
including Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Businesses, even 
though FPI does not meet statutory requirements as a small 
business or the established HUBZone program goals. The 
Committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, 
Technology, and Logistics), in coordination with the Director 
of the Defense Logistics Agency, to submit a report not later 
than 90 days after the enactment of this Act describing how the 
Department of Defense intends to achieve the goals of these 
set-aside programs under this legal interpretation. The report 
shall include the legal justification for permitting FPI to 
participate in small business and HUBZone set-aside 
acquisitions, the list of contracts awarded to FPI under a 
small business or HUBZone set-aside acquisition from fiscal 
year 2010 to fiscal year 2014, and an explanation of how this 
legal interpretation is in compliance with the statutory 
requirements of the HUBZone and small business set-aside 
acquisition programs.

                        DEFENSE SECURITY SERVICE

    The Defense Security Service facilitates security clearance 
requirements for personnel security investigations in support 
of the Department of Defense and 27 other federal agencies. The 
fiscal year 2016 budget request for the Defense Security 
Service reduces funding for personnel security investigations 
which would reduce the number of initial background 
investigations and periodic reinvestigations of contractors.
    Additionally, the Committee recognizes that the Department 
of Defense Insider Threat Program provides an integrated 
capability to monitor and audit information for insider threat 
detection and mitigation. The fiscal year 2016 budget request 
reduces the funding for the program, which would reduce the 
ability to combat insider threat activity and effectively 
address current and emerging threats to Department of Defense 
personnel, assets, and information. The Committee recommends 
restoring $10,498,000 for both personnel security 
investigations and the Department's Insider Threat Program.
    Further, the Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense 
to consider measures to optimize and streamline data sharing 
for continuous evaluation and threat analysis, while leveraging 
funding and infrastructure of organizations within the 
Department.

                                BIG DATA

    The Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to 
enhance the Department's big data supercomputing capability in 
order to manage and leverage the growing amount of military and 
intelligence data from an increasing number of collection 
sources. Additionally, the Committee urges the Secretary of 
Defense to provide servicemembers the education and training 
required to maximize the results provided by big data systems. 
The Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to study the 
feasibility and costs associated with co-locating and 
integrating big data technologies at Department of Defense 
education and research facilities, including the high-
performance computing cluster located at the Naval Postgraduate 
School.

                     BANGLADESH WORKING CONDITIONS

    The explanatory statement accompanying the Department of 
Defense Appropriations Act, 2015 directed the Secretary of 
Defense to provide annual reports to the congressional defense 
committees which disclose all factories in Bangladesh that 
produce items sold in the commissary and exchange systems, and 
to indicate whether these factories comply with the Alliance 
for Bangladesh Worker Safety and/or the Accord for Fire and 
Building Safety in Bangladesh.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to follow 
these additional reporting requirements in all future annual 
reports: whether the factory has been inspected for fire and 
structural safety in accordance with the Bangladesh Harmonized 
Fire Safety and Structural Integrity Standard, whether the 
factory participates in worker safety training programs, and 
whether the factory has established a plan to remediate 
building safety problems identified through inspections 
conducted under the Bangladesh Harmonized Fire Safety and 
Structural Integrity Standard. The annual reports should 
include the factory name, address, brand(s), private label(s), 
licensee(s), or retail supplier(s) sourcing from that factory 
from the previous year.

                       DEFENSE COMMISSARY AGENCY

    The Committee is aware of ongoing efforts by the Department 
of Defense to reduce the costs incurred by the Defense 
Commissary Agency. The Committee supports efforts to reduce 
costs and encourages the Secretary of Defense to evaluate 
alternative methods of controlling commissary costs. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report 
regarding commissary costs to the congressional defense 
committees not later than December 1, 2015. This report should 
include the potential efficiencies that can be realized in air 
transportation contracts and the effect that these efficiencies 
may have on second destination transportation funding needs. 
Further, the Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
defer any changes to the Defense Commissary Agency's second 
destination transportation funding policy that would increase 
commissary retail prices until 30 days after the report is 
submitted to the congressional defense committees.

                     MEALS READY-TO-EAT WAR RESERVE

    The Committee commends the Defense Logistics Agency for 
requesting full funding for the meals ready-to-eat program in 
an effort to maintain the war reserve at an objective level of 
five million cases. The Committee recommends full funding and 
maintains its support for the program.

                OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, ARMY RESERVE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................    $2,513,393,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     2,665,792,000
Committee recommendation..............................     2,644,274,000
Change from budget request............................       -21,518,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,644,274,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Army Reserve which will provide 
the following program in fiscal year 2016:


                OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, NAVY RESERVE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................    $1,021,200,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     1,001,758,000
Committee recommendation..............................       999,621,000
Change from budget request............................        -2,137,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $999,621,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Navy Reserve which will provide 
the following program in fiscal year 2016:


            OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, MARINE CORPS RESERVE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................      $270,846,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................       277,036,000
Committee recommendation..............................       276,761,000
Change from budget request............................          -275,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $276,761,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Marine Corps Reserve which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2016:


              OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, AIR FORCE RESERVE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................    $3,026,342,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     3,064,257,000
Committee recommendation..............................     2,815,862,000
Change from budget request............................      -248,395,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,815,862,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Air Force Reserve which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2016:


                 AIR FORCE RESERVE SPECIALIZED MISSIONS

    The Air Force Reserve includes units that have a designated 
specialized mission as well as a traditional tactical mission. 
The Committee is aware of concerns that these specialized units 
may lack sufficient training hours to fulfill both their 
tactical and specialized missions. The Committee encourages the 
Chief of the Air Force Reserve to review the requirements to 
ensure that specialized units are allocated sufficient training 
hours to successfully perform both their specialized and 
tactical missions and are allocated equipment upgrades 
necessary to address safety concerns associated with these 
missions. The Committee also supports efforts to build 
partnerships between units performing specialized missions and 
other government agencies when practical.

             OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, ARMY NATIONAL GUARD


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................    $6,175,951,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     6,717,977,000
Committee recommendation..............................     6,731,119,000
Change from budget request............................       +13,142,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $6,731,119,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Army National Guard which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2016:


             OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, AIR NATIONAL GUARD


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................    $6,408,558,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     6,956,210,000
Committee recommendation..............................     6,605,400,000
Change from budget request............................      -350,810,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $6,605,400,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Air National Guard which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2016:


          UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE ARMED FORCES


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................       $13,723,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................        14,078,000
Committee recommendation..............................        14,078,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $14,078,000 
for the United States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces.

                    ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................      $201,560,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................       234,829,000
Committee recommendation..............................       234,829,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $234,829,000 
for Environmental Restoration, Army.

                    ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................      $277,294,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................       292,453,000
Committee recommendation..............................       300,000,000
Change from budget request............................        +7,547,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $300,000,000 
for Environmental Restoration, Navy.

             VIEQUES AND CULEBRA ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION

    The Committee recently received a report from the Secretary 
of the Navy that detailed a plan for completing clean-up of 
contaminated areas of Vieques and Culebra. The report included 
the types of weapons that were deployed on these islands and 
the estimated amount of ordnance used at both sites. After 
reviewing the report, the Committee remains skeptical about the 
pace of environmental remediation on the islands. The Committee 
directs the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Installations 
and Environment) to brief the Committee not later than 90 days 
after the enactment of this Act on the timeline associated with 
the completion of surface clearance removal actions, site 
investigations, and subsequent remedial actions to address 
hazards not previously addressed by the initial removal 
actions.

                  ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................      $408,716,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................       368,131,000
Committee recommendation..............................       368,131,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $368,131,000 
for Environmental Restoration, Air Force.

                ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, DEFENSE-WIDE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................        $8,547,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................         8,232,000
Committee recommendation..............................         8,232,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $8,232,000 for 
Environmental Restoration, Defense-Wide.

         ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, FORMERLY USED DEFENSE SITES


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2014 appropriation........................      $250,853,000
Fiscal year 2015 budget request.......................       203,717,000
Committee recommendation..............................       228,717,000
Change from budget request............................       +25,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $228,717,000 
for Environmental Restoration, Formerly Used Defense Sites.

             OVERSEAS HUMANITARIAN, DISASTER, AND CIVIC AID


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................      $103,000,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................       100,266,000
Committee recommendation..............................       103,266,000
Change from budget request............................        +3,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $103,266,000 
for Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid.

                         HUMANITARIAN DEMINING

    The Department of Defense Humanitarian Demining Training 
Center (HDTC) is the government's focal point for mine action 
training, providing the training and subject-matter expertise 
for the Humanitarian Mine Action Program, a Department of State 
funded program. The HDTC aids in the development skills for 
host country personnel to sustain their mine action programs 
after military trainers have redeployed. The Committee is 
concerned that explosive remnants of war deny civilian 
populations their livelihoods, uproot them from their lands, 
and promote political instability. Therefore, the Committee 
recommends an additional $3,000,000 for humanitarian demining.

                  COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION ACCOUNT


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................      $365,108,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................       358,496,000
Committee recommendation..............................       358,496,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $358,496,000 
for the Cooperative Threat Reduction Account.

      DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT FUND


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................       $83,034,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................        84,140,000
Committee recommendation..............................        84,140,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $84,140,000 
for the Department of Defense Acquisition Workforce Development 
Fund.
                               TITLE III

                              PROCUREMENT

    The fiscal year 2016 Department of Defense procurement 
budget request totals $106,914,372,000. The Committee 
recommendation provides $98,559,445,000 for the procurement 
accounts. The table below summarizes the Committee 
recommendations:


                   PROCUREMENT SPECIAL INTEREST ITEMS

    Items for which additional funds have been provided as 
shown in the project level tables or in paragraphs using the 
phrase ``only for'' or ``only to'' in this report are 
congressional special interest items for the purpose of the 
Base for Reprogramming (DD Form 1414). Each of these items must 
be carried on the DD Form 1414 at the stated amount 
specifically addressed in the Committee report. These items 
remain special interest items whether or not they are repeated 
in a subsequent conference report.

            REPROGRAMMING GUIDANCE FOR ACQUISITION ACCOUNTS

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to continue 
to follow the reprogramming guidance as specified in the report 
accompanying the House version of the Department of Defense 
Appropriations bill, 2008 (House Report 110-279). Specifically, 
the dollar threshold for reprogramming funds will remain at 
$20,000,000 for procurement and $10,000,000 for research, 
development, test and evaluation.
    Also, the Committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense 
(Comptroller) to continue to provide the congressional defense 
committees quarterly, spreadsheet-based DD Form 1416 reports 
for Service and defense-wide accounts in titles III and IV of 
this Act. Reports for titles III and IV shall comply with the 
guidance specified in the explanatory statement accompanying 
the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2006. The 
Department shall continue to follow the limitation that prior 
approval reprogrammings are set at either the specified dollar 
threshold or 20 percent of the procurement or research, 
development, test and evaluation line, whichever is less. These 
thresholds are cumulative from the Base for Reprogramming value 
as modified by any adjustments. Therefore, if the combined 
value of transfers into or out of a procurement (P-1) or 
research, development, test and evaluation (R-1) line exceeds 
the identified threshold, the Secretary of Defense must submit 
a prior approval reprogramming to the congressional defense 
committees. In addition, guidelines on the application of prior 
approval reprogramming procedures for congressional special 
interest items are established elsewhere in this report.

                           FUNDING INCREASES

    The Committee directs that the funding increases outlined 
in these tables shall be provided only for the specific 
purposes indicated in the tables.

                            CLASSIFIED ANNEX

    Adjustments to the classified programs are addressed in a 
classified annex accompanying this report.

      JOINT STRIKE FIGHTER AUTONOMIC LOGISTICS INFORMATION SYSTEM

    The Autonomic Logistics Information System (ALIS) is a 
critical component of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter weapon 
system. ALIS is intended to provide the F-35 aircraft the 
capability to predict and diagnose the overall health of all 
variants of F-35 aircraft, including managing maintenance and 
supply requirements, automating logistics support, providing 
decision aids critical to reducing life-cycle sustainment 
costs, and improving aircraft readiness. ALIS also manages a 
central aircraft information database used for mission 
planning, post-sortie mission analysis, and global support to 
the entire F-35 fleet including international partners. The 
Committee is concerned that despite actions taken by the 
Department of Defense to improve the management of ALIS 
development, the system is not proceeding at a pace that will 
ensure capability to support demands for data and information 
required for rapid aircraft turn-around and efficient 
maintenance operations. This concern becomes more acute as the 
Services begin to declare initial operating capability (IOC), 
beginning with the Marine Corps in 2015.
    Therefore, the Committee recommendation includes a 
legislative provision that limits the obligation of funds to 
the full funding of no more than 36 F-35A airframes and 
associated equipment until the Secretary of Defense certifies 
to the congressional defense committees that the Department of 
Defense has accepted delivery of ALIS equipment that meets the 
requirements necessary to support Air Force declaration of IOC 
for the F-35A not later than the end of calendar year 2016. The 
Committee understands that the equipment necessary to meet Air 
Force IOC will be in the ALIS 2.0.2 version and will be capable 
of establishing direct communication between standard operating 
units; providing air vehicle status reporting to parent 
organizations; providing deployment allocation decision support 
for selecting air vehicles, spares, tools, and other equipment; 
providing the capability to select and reassign air vehicles 
between standard operating units to support partial squadron 
deployments; and providing the capability to select and 
transfer supporting assets as needed to support partial 
squadron deployments.
    In addition, the Committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to display funding for ALIS separately in budget request 
exhibits for both procurement and research, development, test 
and evaluation accounts, beginning with the submission of the 
fiscal year 2017 budget request.

                         PRECISION GUIDANCE KIT

    The Committee understands that the Army's Precision 
Guidance Kit program is progressing through the test phase and 
is in low rate initial production. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary of the Navy to leverage the Army investment in this 
munition and to consider using it for the Marine Corps.

                       AIRCRAFT PROCUREMENT, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................    $5,216,225,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     5,689,357,000
Committee recommendation..............................     5,336,971,000
Change from budget request............................      -352,386,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $5,336,971,000 
for Aircraft Procurement, Army which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2016:


                       MISSILE PROCUREMENT, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................    $1,208,692,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     1,419,957,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,160,482,000
Change from budget request............................      -259,475,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,160,482,000 
for Missile Procurement, Army which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2016:


        PROCUREMENT OF WEAPONS AND TRACKED COMBAT VEHICLES, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................    $1,722,136,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     1,887,073,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,805,773,000
Change from budget request............................       -81,300,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,805,773,000 
for Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles, Army 
which will provide the following program in fiscal year 2016:


                    PROCUREMENT OF AMMUNITION, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................    $1,015,477,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     1,233,378,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,007,778,000
Change from budget request............................      -225,600,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,007,778,000 
for Procurement of Ammunition, Army which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2016:


                        OTHER PROCUREMENT, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................    $4,747,523,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     5,899,028,000
Committee recommendation..............................     5,230,677,000
Change from budget request............................      -668,351,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $5,230,677,000 
for Other Procurement, Army which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2016:


                      CORROSION MITIGATION COVERS

    The Committee recognizes the importance of protecting 
critical aviation assets from corrosion and environmental 
degradation and supports the Army's efforts to address this 
concern through the use of corrosion mitigation covers. The 
Committee encourages the Secretary of the Army to acquire 
additional corrosion mitigation covers to provide protection 
for key equipment and assets.

                       AIRCRAFT PROCUREMENT, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................   $14,758,035,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................    16,126,405,000
Committee recommendation..............................    16,871,819,000
Change from budget request............................      +745,414,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$16,871,819,000 for Aircraft Procurement, Navy which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2016:


                       WEAPONS PROCUREMENT, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................    $3,137,257,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     3,154,154,000
Committee recommendation..............................     2,998,541,000
Change from budget request............................      -155,613,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$$2,998,541,000 for Weapons Procurement, Navy which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2016:


            PROCUREMENT OF AMMUNITION, NAVY AND MARINE CORPS


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................      $674,100,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................       723,741,000
Committee recommendation..............................       559,141,000
Change from budget request............................      -164,600,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $559,141,000 
for Procurement of Ammunition, Navy and Marine Corps which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2016:


                   SHIPBUILDING AND CONVERSION, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................   $15,954,379,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................    16,597,457,000
Committee recommendation..............................    16,852,569,000
Change from budget request............................      +255,112,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$16,852,569,000 for Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy which 
will provide the following program in fiscal year 2016:


                        OTHER PROCUREMENT, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................    $5,846,558,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     6,614,715,000
Committee recommendation..............................     6,696,715,000
Change from budget request............................       +82,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $6,696,715,000 
for Other Procurement, Navy which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2016:


                       PROCUREMENT, MARINE CORPS


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................      $935,209,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     1,131,418,000
Committee recommendation..............................       973,084,000
Change from budget request............................      -158,334,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $973,084,000 
for Procurement, Marine Corps which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2016:


                    BACKHOE LOADER FLEET REPLACEMENT

    The Committee recognizes that the aging, unarmored backhoe 
loader fleet currently operated by the Marine Corps does not 
offer the mobility, force protection, or self-deployable 
capability required. A mission critical need exists for a 
Marine Expeditionary Unit compatible, highly mobile loader/
excavator. The Committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than 90 days after the enactment of this Act detailing 
the age and condition of the Marine Corps' backhoe loader 
fleet, the plan to modernize or replace the fleet, and the 
required resources, both programmed and unfunded, for 
modernizing or replacing the fleet.

                    AIRCRAFT PROCUREMENT, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................   $12,067,703,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................    15,657,769,000
Committee recommendation..............................    14,224,475,000
Change from budget request............................    -1,433,294,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$14,224,475,000 for Aircraft Procurement, Air Force which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2016:


                               E-8 JSTARS

    The fiscal year 2016 budget request reverses the Air 
Force's prior decision to retire five operational E-8 JSTARS 
aircraft. The Committee notes that the Air Force has restored 
funding to address diminishing manufacturing source (DMS) 
issues for the primary mission equipment on these five 
aircraft. Since the Air Force's Next Generation JSTARS aircraft 
is not expected to achieve initial operating capability until 
2023, one year later than previously projected, the Air Force 
will be operating the existing JSTARS fleet until well into the 
2020s. The Committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than 60 days after the submission of the fiscal year 2017 
budget request that details how the Air Force will address 
global air traffic management mandates, as well as the 
potential degradation of mission performance due to projected 
DMS requirements, until the E-8 is replaced by the Next 
Generation system.

                     MISSILE PROCUREMENT, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................    $4,629,662,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     2,987,045,000
Committee recommendation..............................     2,334,165,000
Change from budget request............................      -652,880,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,334,165,000 
for Missile Procurement, Air Force which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2016:


                      SPACE PROCUREMENT, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................             - - -
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................    $2,584,061,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,935,034,000
Change from budget request............................      -649,027,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,935,034,000 
for Space Procurement, Air Force which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2016:


                           SPACE PROCUREMENT

    The fiscal year 2016 budget request includes a new five-
year appropriation account to fund space procurement programs 
that are not included as part of the National Intelligence 
Program. While the Committee supports the creation of the new 
appropriation account, it maintains that funding should only 
remain available for the standard three year time period for 
traditional procurement accounts.

                DEFENSE METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE PROGRAM

    The fiscal year 2016 budget request includes $89,351,000 to 
complete integration and testing of the final Defense 
Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite. The request 
also includes $120,000,000 to purchase a launch vehicle for the 
satellite. Since the existing DMSP constellation is healthy, 
the Air Force stated last year that it prefers not to launch 
the last satellite before 2019, despite the fact that projected 
storage costs until 2019 are excessive. The explanatory 
statement accompanying the Department of Defense Appropriations 
Act, 2015 prohibited the Air Force from obligating more than 
$28,000,000 of fiscal year 2015 funds until the Secretary of 
the Air Force certified that the satellite would be launched by 
the end of calendar year 2016 in order to reduce the excessive 
storage costs. The explanatory statement further stated that if 
the final DMSP satellite would not launch prior to the end of 
calendar year 2016, the program is expected to be brought to an 
orderly close during calendar year 2015.
    The Secretary of the Air Force has made no such 
certification, but on March 25, 2015, requested relief from the 
direction in the explanatory statement. The Air Force has not 
presented a compelling requirement to change the direction 
clearly outlined last year. The DMSP constellation remains in 
good health and the final satellite is ill suited to meet other 
emerging weather requirements.
    The Committee believes that the Air Force should build 
systems to meet legitimate requirements and manage programs 
accordingly. Therefore, the Committee denies the Secretary's 
request for relief from the direction in the explanatory 
statement accompanying the Department of Defense Appropriations 
Act, 2015. Further, the Committee reduces the fiscal year 2016 
budget request by $89,351,000 for integration and testing and 
$120,000,000 for launch and rescinds $50,000,000 from fiscal 
year 2015 funds to bring the DMSP acquisition program to an 
orderly close.

                  PROCUREMENT OF AMMUNITION, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................      $659,909,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     1,758,843,000
Committee recommendation..............................       253,496,000
Change from budget request............................    -1,505,347,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $253,496,000 
for Procurement of Ammunition, Air Force which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2016:


                      OTHER PROCUREMENT, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................   $16,781,266,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................    18,272,438,000
Committee recommendation..............................    15,098,950,000
Change from budget request............................    -3,173,488,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$15,098,950,000 for Other Procurement, Air Force which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2016:


                       PROCUREMENT, DEFENSE-WIDE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................    $4,429,303,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     5,130,853,000
Committee recommendation..............................     5,143,095,000
Change from budget request............................       +12,242,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $5,143,095,000 
for Procurement, Defense-Wide which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2016:


                         DEFENSE PRODUCTION ACT


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................       $51,638,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................        46,680,000
Committee recommendation..............................        76,680,000
Change from budget request............................       +30,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $76,680,000 
for the Defense Production Act which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2016:

                EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Change from
                                     Budget      Committee     request
                                    request     recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
NEXT GENERATION STAR TRACKER           12,050        12,050        - - -
 SYSTEM.........................
CADMIUM ZINC TELLURIDE                    452           452        - - -
 SUBSTRATES.....................
SPACE ELECTRONICS AND MATERIAL         21,000        21,000        - - -
 INVESTMENTS....................
SUBMARINE VALVE-REGULATED LEAD          3,000         3,000        - - -
 ACID BATTERIES.................
3D MICROELECTRONICS FOR ANTI-           2,911         2,911        - - -
 TAMPER.........................
SECURE COMPOSITE SHIPPING               7,267         7,267        - - -
 CONTAINERS.....................
PROGRAM INCREASE................        - - -        30,000
------------------------------------------------------------------30,000
        TOTAL, DEFENSE                 46,680        76,680       30,000
         PRODUCTION ACT.........
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         DEFENSE PRODUCTION ACT

    The Committee is pleased that the Defense Production Act 
program has been successful in restoring the production 
capacity for several critical defense requirements. However, 
the Committee remains concerned about reduced production 
capacity within the domestic weapons and munitions industrial 
base. The Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to use 
the Defense Production Act program to address these shortfalls 
in the weapons and munitions domestic industrial base.
                                TITLE IV

               RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION

    The fiscal year 2016 Department of Defense research, 
development, test and evaluation budget request totals 
$69,784,963,000. The Committee recommendation provides 
$66,150,652,000 for the research, development, test and 
evaluation accounts. The table below summarizes the Committee 
recommendations:


   RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION SPECIAL INTEREST ITEMS

    Items for which additional funds have been provided as 
shown in the project level tables or in paragraphs using the 
phrase ``only for'' or ``only to'' in this report are 
congressional special interest items for the purpose of the 
Base for Reprogramming (DD Form 1414). Each of these items must 
be carried on the DD Form 1414 at the stated amount 
specifically addressed in the Committee report. These items 
remain special interest items whether or not they are repeated 
in a subsequent conference report.

            REPROGRAMMING GUIDANCE FOR ACQUISITION ACCOUNTS

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to continue 
to follow the reprogramming guidance as specified in the report 
accompanying the House version of the Department of Defense 
Appropriations bill, 2008 (House Report 110-279). Specifically, 
the dollar threshold for reprogramming funds will remain at 
$20,000,000 for procurement and $10,000,000 for research, 
development, test and evaluation.
    Also, the Committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense 
(Comptroller) to continue to provide the congressional defense 
committees quarterly, spreadsheet-based DD Form 1416 reports 
for Service and defense-wide accounts in titles III and IV of 
this Act. Reports for titles III and IV shall comply with the 
guidance specified in the explanatory statement accompanying 
the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2006. The 
Department shall continue to follow the limitation that prior 
approval reprogrammings are set at either the specified dollar 
threshold or 20 percent of the procurement or research, 
development, test and evaluation line, whichever is less. These 
thresholds are cumulative from the Base for Reprogramming value 
as modified by any adjustments. Therefore, if the combined 
value of transfers into or out of a procurement (P-1) or 
research, development, test and evaluation (R-1) line exceeds 
the identified threshold, the Secretary of Defense must submit 
a prior approval reprogramming to the congressional defense 
committees. In addition, guidelines on the application of prior 
approval reprogramming procedures for congressional special 
interest items are established elsewhere in this report.

                           FUNDING INCREASES

    The Committee directs that the funding increases outlined 
in these tables shall be provided only for the specific 
purposes indicated in the tables.

                            CLASSIFIED ANNEX

    Adjustments to the classified programs are addressed in a 
classified annex accompanying this report.

                             SMALL BUSINESS

    The Committee is extremely supportive of the contributions 
made by the nation's small businesses to the defense industrial 
base and research and development communities. Small businesses 
are frequently on the cutting edge of new technologies that are 
vital for the nation to maintain a technological advantage over 
adversaries. In particular, the Department of the Navy has 
benefited from using small business innovations to improve the 
reliability of various components and weapon systems, reduce 
acquisition costs, and provide new capabilities to the 
warfighter. The Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense 
to consider small business suppliers for the manufacture of 
equipment and the development of new technologies.

                      AIRCRAFT EROSION PROTECTION

    Aircraft corrosion and erosion present serious safety-of-
flight concerns for military aircraft. The Committee encourages 
the Secretary of Defense to continue development and use of 
technologies, including protective tapes for composite and 
aluminum exterior surfaces where appropriate, to protect 
aircraft surfaces and mission equipment that are susceptible to 
erosion from the impact of rain, sand, and airborne particles.

                          FUTURE AIR DOMINANCE

    The fiscal year 2016 budget request includes $5,000,000 in 
the Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy account 
for the Next Generation Fighterand $8,830,000 in the Research, 
Development, Test and Evaluation, Air Force account for the 
Next Generation Air Dominance program. With the submission of 
the budget request, the Department of Defense also announced 
the Aerospace Innovation Initiative (AII), described by the 
Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology, and 
Logistics) as a new Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency-
led program, in partnership with the Navy and Air Force, 
intended to develop technologies and address the risks 
associated with the air dominance platforms that will follow 
the F-35. While these efforts have been described publicly as 
``F-X'', ``F/A-XX'', ``sixth generation fighter'', or ``X-
plane'', the Committee understands these efforts not as a 
single-minded focus on acquisition of the next fighter 
aircraft, but as a consideration of the broader range of 
capabilities necessary to ensure air dominance in future 
conflicts, and supports these efforts as such.
    The Committee understands that the Department will complete 
an AII technology transition plan by July 2015. The Committee 
directs the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, 
Technology, and Logistics) to submit the transition plan to the 
congressional defense committees not later than September 30, 
2015.

                      IMPROVED CAMOUFLAGE SYSTEMS

    The Committee is concerned that currently fielded 
camouflage netting systems do not afford adequate concealment 
against current battlefield threats, particularly by short-wave 
infrared sensors. The Committee understands that the Department 
of Defense is currently reviewing the requirements for improved 
camouflage net systems. The Committee supports this effort and 
encourages the Secretary of Defense to expedite the fielding of 
an advanced camouflage net system to defeat a broad spectrum of 
threats.

                             CYBER SECURITY

    Cyber security across the total military enterprise remains 
a significant concern of the Committee. The Committee is 
encouraged by the efforts of Cyber Command (CYBERCOM) and the 
Chief Information Officers (CIO) of the Services and the 
Department of Defense to identify cyber threats and 
mitigations. However, the Committee is concerned about the 
scope of the cyber threats and the efforts to address them. For 
example, the Services currently use legacy weapon systems that 
were developed before cyber activities were identified. While 
these systems are mission capable, they may have cyber 
vulnerabilities that were not anticipated during development. 
The Committee believes that these vulnerabilities have not been 
identified and directs the CIO of the Department of Defense, in 
coordination with the CIOs of the Services, to include an 
assessment of the potential cyber vulnerabilities and 
mitigation plans of legacy weapon system capabilities with the 
fiscal year 2017 budget submission. If necessary, this 
assessment can include a separate classified portion.
    The Committee is also concerned with cyber vulnerabilities 
associated with systems currently under development. The 
dynamic nature of the cyber threat environment presents a 
significant challenge during the development process. The 
Committee believes that without greater insight, it will be 
impossible to have confidence in the Department's commitment to 
addressing cyber vulnerabilities. Therefore, the Committee 
directs the CIO of the Department of Defense, in coordination 
with the CIOs of the Services and the Director of Operational 
Test and Evaluation, to develop a standardized cyber 
vulnerability/mitigation report that will be included with the 
acquisition program baseline of all current and future Major 
Defense Acquisition Programs and Major Automated Information 
System as defined by Department of Defense Instruction 5000.02.
    The Committee is also concerned about the concept of 
operations and the coordination of capabilities employed by the 
Department against a cyber-event. The Committee directs the CIO 
of the Department of Defense, in coordination with the CIOs of 
the Services and the Commander of CYBERCOM, to submit a report 
to the congressional defense committees not later than 45 days 
after the enactment of this Act, that details the concept of 
operations for responses to cyber-events.
    Finally, the Committee is interested in the resourcing that 
the Department and the Services are allocating to cyber 
activities. The Committee commends the CIO of the Department of 
Defense for delivering the information technology justification 
book with the annual budget request. Further, the Committee is 
pleased with the adoption of the cyber taxonomy utilized by the 
Office of Management and Budget. However, the Committee finds 
it difficult to track cyber related efforts as they pertain to 
programmatic capabilities. Therefore, the Committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to include with the annual budget 
submission, starting with fiscal year 2017, the funding levels 
for cyber investment at the sub-activity group, program 
element, and line item levels, respectively, in the standard O-
1, R-1, and P-1 documents. The funding data provided shall 
conform to the cyber taxonomy as it is presented in the 
information technology justification book and identified under 
those categories.

              JOINT STRIKE FIGHTER DECONTAMINATION SYSTEM

    The Committee is aware that the Department of Defense 
continues to plan for a full system-level chemical-biological 
decontamination test for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) in 
fiscal year 2016 and that the Director of Operational Test and 
Evaluation has recommended that the program demonstrate 
decontamination system effectiveness in a range of 
operationally realistic environments. The Committee is 
concerned whether the existing test plan sufficiently includes 
decontamination of pilot equipment such as protective 
ensembles, masks, helmets, and helmet-mounted devices. The 
Committee encourages the Director of the Joint Program Office 
for the JSF to test technologies that would allow for such 
equipment to be rapidly decontaminated within several hours of 
exposure to chemical-biological materials while protecting 
sensitive components from degradation. The Committee directs 
the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology and 
Logistics) to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than 30 days after the enactment of this 
Act that describes how F-35 testing will incorporate pilot 
equipment decontamination, the technologies being considered 
for decontamination, and the funds allocated for this purpose. 
The Committee further directs the Director of Operational Test 
and Evaluation to include in its annual report an evaluation of 
the adequacy of the decontamination test plan.

                    GROUND BASED STRATEGIC DETERRENT

    The Committee directs that not later than 120 days after 
the enactment of this Act the Secretary of Defense shall submit 
to the congressional defense committees a report on the ground 
based strategic deterrent. The report shall include the planned 
number of missiles; an estimate of the annual and total cost 
for research, development, test, and evaluation and procurement 
for the total number of planned missiles; and an estimate of 
the proportional annual cost of the missiles as compared to the 
annual cost of the nuclear triad and annual defense spending.

            RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................    $6,675,565,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     6,924,959,000
Committee recommendation..............................     7,372,047,000
Change from budget request............................      +447,088,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $7,372,047,000 
for Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Army which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2016:


                      DEGRADED VISUAL ENVIRONMENT

    The Committee is aware of the emphasis that Army leadership 
is placing on the development of technical enhancements, which 
when combined with evolving tactics, techniques, and procedures 
will assist helicopter flight crews to operate safely in 
conditions of reduced visibility due to darkness, dust, snow, 
smoke, and other impediments. Therefore, the Committee 
recommends an additional $15,000,000 for the development of 
enhancements to improve capabilities in a degraded visual 
environment. The Committee directs the Secretary of the Army to 
provide the congressional defense committees a plan for the use 
of these funds not later than 60 days after the enactment of 
this Act.

                      SOLDIER ENHANCEMENT PROGRAM

    The Committee understands that the soldier enhancement 
program helps the Army evaluate, test, and type-classify 
prototype or commercially available items that will enhance 
soldiers' ability to execute combat missions. A robust soldier 
enhancement program facilitates small scale procurement, in-
depth field evaluation opportunities, and the means to rapidly 
field validated technologies. Therefore, the Committee 
recommends an additional $5,000,000 to accelerate the efforts 
of this program.

                               BODY ARMOR

    The Committee recognizes the importance of body armor in 
protecting soldiers in combat. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary of the Army to ensure that the body armor industrial 
base is able to continue the development and manufacture of 
more advanced body armor by implementing the body armor 
modernization through replenishment program.

                    IMPROVED TURBINE ENGINE PROGRAM

    The Committee continues to support the Army's Improved 
Turbine Engine Program (ITEP), which is a competitive 
acquisition program that is designed to develop a more fuel 
efficient and powerful engine for the current Black Hawk and 
Apache helicopter fleets. The Committee understands that this 
new engine is intended to increase operational capabilities in 
high altitude and high temperature environments while reducing 
operation and support costs. The Committee acknowledges the 
benefits of improved fuel efficiencies that the ITEP will bring 
to the battlefield and encourages the Secretary of the Army to 
prioritize maintenance and sustainment cost savings for ITEP to 
ensure the continued affordability of the program.

                            HELICOPTER SEATS

    The Committee acknowledges the need to improve seating in 
the Army's rotary wing aircraft. The current seats lack modern 
ergonomics and are not sized to fit all aviators, including 
female pilots. Additionally, the stroking mechanism does not 
adequately protect pilots at the extreme ends of the size and 
weight spectrum. The Committee encourages the Secretary of the 
Army to continue research and development and rapid deployment 
of improved seating for rotary wing aircraft.

                    SUBTERRANEAN HARD TARGET DEFEAT

    The Committee is aware that the complex issue of 
subterranean hard target defeat goes well beyond wall breaching 
and bunker busters. New tactics, techniques, and doctrine are 
expected from Army leadership to deal with tunnels, sewers, 
caves, and bunkers as the environments in which soldiers 
operate become increasingly urban. The Army lead for the 
development of material solutions and systems integration is 
the Armaments Research Development Engineering Development 
Center (ARDEC). ARDEC provides subject matter expertise and 
technological solutions in support of emerging subterranean 
hard target defeat requirements and coordinates the 
technological responses across the Research Engineering Command 
(RDECOM). Additionally, ARDEC builds relationships across 
RDECOM to better serve the needs of the Training and Doctrine 
Command, the U.S. Special Forces Command, the Defense Threat 
Reduction Agency, and other government agencies. Therefore, the 
Committee encourages the Secretary of the Army to work with 
other government agencies to adapt solutions applicable to the 
Army's subterranean hard target defeat needs, and to support 
experimentation of technologies to disable and neutralize 
underground facilities and their associated components, 
including weapons of mass destruction.

                      EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE DISPOSAL

    The Committee understands that a need exists to develop 
environmentally sustainable, near 100 percent efficient, 
explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) technologies and techniques 
for unexploded ordnance containing highly insensitive energetic 
materials while minimizing the amount of energetic material 
required for successful EOD operations. The Committee 
encourages the Secretary of the Army to develop alternate EOD 
technologies and techniques to reduce the risk to personnel on 
the battlefield, to reduce the risk of increased range 
contamination with energetic materials, and to reduce the cost 
of range remediation.

         DISABLING AND NEUTRALIZING WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION

    The Committee recognizes the need to support the 
development and demonstration of weapons of mass destruction 
defeat technology solutions to mitigate current and anticipated 
threat capabilities in subterranean facilities. Therefore, the 
Committee recommends an additional $15,000,000 for the Army to 
increase efforts to mature system technologies and develop 
defeat capability prototypes.

                ARMY RESEARCH LAB OPEN CAMPUS INITIATIVE

    The Army Research Laboratory's open campus concept program 
is an endeavor to encourage advances in basic and applied 
research. The Committee encourages the Secretary of the Army to 
establish a pilot program within the open campus concept 
program with the goal of creating a network of public-private 
ventures for technology transfer, business incubation, and 
technology commercialization. Partners should be selected based 
on criteria including expertise in technology transfer, 
strength of business plans, and demonstrated capacity to 
identify, recruit, and mentor public-private venture 
participants.

                     ARMY NET ZERO INDUSTRIAL BASE

    The Army's net zero installations policy establishes the 
management of resources to achieve a balance of resources 
consumed versus resources produced at installations. The net 
zero concept builds on longstanding practices and requires 
installations to reduce overall energy use, maximize 
efficiency, implement energy recovery and cogeneration 
opportunities, and offset the remaining demand with the 
production of renewable energy from onsite sources. In addition 
to energy, the concept also requires installations to reduce 
overall water use, use water more efficiently, and reduce, 
recycle, compost, or recover solid waste streams and convert 
them to resource values, resulting in zero landfill disposal. 
The Committee supports the Army's net zero policy, including 
efforts to enhance the sustainable operation of its industrial 
munitions base.

   TRANSFORMATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR PROPULSION MANUFACTURING PROCESSES

    The Committee is aware that the Army, in its role as the 
single manager for conventional ammunition for the Department 
of Defense, ensures effective life cycle management of 
conventional ammunition products. The Committee believes that 
the manufacture of conventional ammunition could be assisted by 
automating and optimizing ammunition propellant production 
processes such as solvent-less and spherical propellants, and 
integrating new materials such as energetic thermoplastic 
elastomers. Further, the Committee believes that these 
processes and materials play a crucial role in reducing cost, 
increasing ammunition performance, and enhancing soldier 
safety. The Committee encourages the Secretary of the Army to 
study the use of these new and emerging manufacturing processes 
and materials.

                      ADVANCED ENERGETIC MATERIALS

    The Committee recognizes the need to rapidly advance the 
use of advanced energetic material technology for lightweight 
combustible ammunitions and high-energy binder systems to meet 
current and future combat readiness and effectiveness 
objectives. The Committee encourages the Secretary of the Army 
to explore the use of advanced energetic materials for 
lightweight combustible ammunitions and future high explosives 
to continue the progress being made to increase lethality and 
better protect the warfighter.

               ENHANCED DENSE URBAN WARFARE EFFECTIVENESS

    The Committee is aware that dense urban warfare presents a 
new set of challenges for the military. In dense urban terrain, 
command and control is difficult, engagements occur at short-
range, and battles often rage without meaningful coordination 
or fire support. Urban terrain and obstacles create significant 
communication and navigation difficulties that result in 
confusion identifying enemy forces and their capabilities. The 
Committee encourages the Secretary of the Army to support 
efforts to enhance dense urban warfare awareness, adeptness, 
and performance.

                ARMY VEHICLE INTERCOMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS

    The Committee understands that the Army will soon review 
vehicle intercommunication system requirements for maneuver 
combat vehicles and the family of tactical wheeled vehicles. 
The Committee looks forward to receiving the Army's evaluation 
of these requirements and how they support future capability 
needs. The Committee directs the Secretary of the Army to 
submit a report detailing any changes to existing requirements 
to the congressional defense committees not later than 60 days 
after the completion of the review.

                         PROJECTILE ENHANCEMENT

    The Committee is aware of the Army's effort to develop 
enhanced lethality and accuracy for dismounted soldiers. The 
Committee believes that emerging manufacturing technologies 
play a critical role in these efforts by enabling rapid 
flexible munitions production and cost savings for advanced 
projectile systems. The Committee encourages the Secretary of 
the Army to continue development of extended range hybrid and 
affordable precision gun launched projectiles to mitigate 
soldier risk.

                         SOLDIER-BORNE SENSORS

    The Committee understands that the Army is developing a 
pocket-sized soldier-borne sensor that will provide soldiers 
with improved intelligence, situational awareness, and enhanced 
targeting capability. The Committee understands that the 
technology has been successfully demonstrated by allies during 
operations and believes that soldier-borne sensors have 
promising potential for Army operations. The Committee urges 
the Secretary of the Army to advance development of pocket 
intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance technologies to 
assist soldiers in maintaining a tactical advantage during 
conflict. The Committee directs the Secretary of the Army to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than 90 days after the enactment of this Act on the 
progress of soldier-borne sensors development.

                     CANNON LIFE EXTENSION PROGRAM

    The Committee commends the Department of Defense for its 
efforts to minimize the use of Hexavalent Chromium from weapons 
systems to reduce harm to humans and the environment. The 
Committee commends the Department of the Army in particular for 
its work on the Cannon Life Extension Program researching and 
developing Hexavalent Chromium substitutes and approving the 
use of safe alternatives. The Committee is also encouraged by 
the potential decrease in lifecycle costs and other benefits to 
members of the military that this program may produce. 
Therefore, the Committee encourages the Department of the Army 
to continue supporting the Cannon Life Extension Program and 
explore the benefits of incorporating this technology into 
other firearms.

            RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................   $15,958,460,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................    17,885,916,000
Committee recommendation..............................    17,237,724,000
Change from budget request............................      -648,192,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$17,237,724,000 for Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, 
Navy which will provide the following program in fiscal year 
2016:


                       AUTOMATED TEST AND RE-TEST

    Although in an early stage, the Navy's Automated Test and 
Re-test (ATRT) program has performed extremely well. The 
Committee recommends an additional $15,000,000 for this program 
and directs the Secretary of the Navy to expand its use to as 
many programs as possible to maximize the return on investment. 
Additionally, the Committee notes with concern the lower than 
normal funding execution of this program. The ATRT program has 
vast potential for saving time and funding across the spectrum 
of Navy acquisition programs. Due to this potential, the 
Committee is dismayed as to why the Navy is not taking maximum 
advantage of the program and allowing it to execute at a more 
rapid pace. The Committee strongly encourages the Secretary of 
the Navy to allow this program to execute at the fastest rate 
possible.

                      HIGHLY INTEGRATED PHOTONICS

    The Committee is pleased with the Navy's development of 
highly integrated photonics technology to transmit and process 
information in wired and chip-level electronic components. This 
technology can dramatically reduce platform size, weight, and 
power requirements, all very attractive features for aircraft 
acquisition programs. Additionally, overall platform 
sustainment cost will likely be reduced as a result of using 
this technology. Although primarily employed on aircraft 
programs, this technology can be deployed across a wider range 
of platforms. The Committee encourages the Secretary of the 
Navy to continue the development of this technology and 
incorporate it into operational platforms and provides an 
additional $15,000,000 to accelerate this effort.

                         SUBMARINE SONAR DOMES

    The Committee understands the important role that a 
submarine bow dome plays in the success of the mission of 
nuclear powered submarines. The Committee is extremely 
supportive of the Navy's original plan to acquire the bow domes 
for the Ohio Class replacement program. This plan called for 
the development of domes fabricated from two different 
composite material systems. The Committee believed that this 
plan would reduce program risk while at the same time ensure 
competition to reduce the program's acquisition cost, an 
extremely important factor for a program whose potential cost 
was described by a former Secretary of Defense as ``being 
capable to suck the life from the Navy's shipbuilding budget''. 
Considering the many benefits of this plan, the Committee is 
confused as to why the Navy prematurely down-selected to a 
single material system last year. The selection was made before 
either system was fully qualified by the design yard for the 
Ohio replacement program. The Committee assumes that a cost 
benefit analysis was conducted and provided a convincing case 
for the early selection. Therefore, the Committee directs the 
Secretary of the Navy to provide the congressional defense 
committees the cost benefit analysis that led to the early 
selection of a single material system for the bow dome not 
later than 30 days after the enactment of this Act. If a cost 
benefit analysis was not conducted, the Committee directs the 
Secretary of the Navy to conduct a cost benefit analysis and 
provide the results to the congressional defense committees not 
later than January 31, 2016.

                      SHIPBOARD WATER PURIFICATION

    The Navy's legacy shipboard water purification systems use 
bromine as an anti-microbial agent, and while it is effective 
as an anti-microbial agent, it is toxic and requires hazardous 
material handling which can be time consuming and expensive. 
While the Navy has placed bromine-free water purification 
systems on most of the large deck surface ship classes, it has 
not yet removed bromine systems from the cruiser, destroyer, 
and frigate fleets. The Committee supports the Navy's efforts 
to remove bromine systems from the fleet and encourages the 
Secretary of the Navy to continue to explore alternate water 
purification systems technologies.

                          ENERGETICS RESEARCH

    The Committee recognizes the potential value of advanced 
energetics capabilities and encourages the Secretary of the 
Navy to develop these capabilities for undersea weapons. The 
Committee also encourages the Secretary of the Navy to develop 
a database of global energetics materials activities as they 
apply to undersea warfare.

                       AIR MANIFOLD TEST FACILITY

    The Committee understands that the Navy lacks an east coast 
test, production, and qualification facility for the highly 
specialized air manifolds used in the systems on nuclear 
powered submarines. These air manifolds and valves are critical 
in maintaining the acoustic advantage over adversaries. The 
submarine construction yards are located on the east coast, 
while the majority of air manifold testing is accomplished on 
the west coast. When items require testing they must be shipped 
to the west coast for testing and then returned to the east 
coast for installation in a ship system. This practice is 
cumbersome, expensive, and time consuming. The Committee 
believes that there is a better way to complete testing and 
certification. Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary 
of the Navy to conduct a study to determine if the creation of 
an east coast test facility would be beneficial to the Navy's 
shipbuilding programs. The study should include, at a minimum, 
a cost benefit analysis of establishing an east coast facility 
and possible locations for the facility that are central to the 
submarine construction yards. The Secretary is directed to 
submit a report detailing the results of this study to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 90 days after 
the enactment of this Act.

                    TACTICAL COMBAT TRAINING SYSTEMS

    The Committee supports the continuation of joint Air Force 
and Navy development of near-term encrypted air combat 
maneuvering instrumentation for tactical combat training 
systems. The Committee believes that a joint effort would 
reduce cost, address encryption vulnerabilities, add 
capability, and ensure all combat aircraft are interoperable 
with the existing architecture. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary of the Navy to ensure future instrumentation 
development is based on a comprehensive analysis of 
alternatives that considers both cost and interoperability with 
legacy and future combat aircraft.

                           TORPEDO TEST CRAFT

    The development of effective and reliable torpedo systems 
is important to the Navy's undersea warfare mission. Yard Test 
Torpedo (YTT) craft play an important role in torpedo 
development and underwater range maintenance. The Committee is 
aware that the Navy's YTT craft have exceeded their expected 
service lives and encourages the Secretary of the Navy to 
conduct a service life extension program for these craft to 
minimize the impact on torpedo development and underwater range 
operations. Additionally, the Committee encourages the 
Secretary of the Navy to develop a plan for the eventual 
replacement of these craft.

         RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................   $23,643,983,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................    26,473,669,000
Committee recommendation..............................    23,163,152,000
Change from budget request............................    -3,310,517,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$23,163,152,000 for Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, 
Air Force which will provide the following program in fiscal 
year 2016:


                        LONG RANGE STRIKE-BOMBER

    The Committee recommends $786,228,000 for the Long Range 
Strike-Bomber program, a reduction of $460,000,000 from the 
request. The reduction from the request aligns funds with the 
program's current schedule.

                   PRESIDENTIAL AIRCRAFT REPLACEMENT

    The Committee recommends $58,720,000 for the Presidential 
Aircraft Replacement program, a reduction of $43,900,000 from 
the request. The Committee defers funding for initiating 
procurement of a commercial aircraft until the design for the 
aircraft's mission systems, which constitute a majority of the 
program's projected cost, benefits from further risk reduction 
activities, and the Air Force finalizes an acquisition 
strategy.

                  ENGINE COMPONENT IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM

    The fiscal year 2016 budget request includes $177,048,000 
for F135 engine system development and demonstration (SDD) 
under the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program and $14,800,000 for 
the F135 element of the Engine Component Improvement Program 
(CIP). The Committee recommends full funding for both requests, 
but the concurrency of the two programs makes it necessary to 
clearly delineate the tasks to be properly accomplished under 
both SDD and CIP. The Committee understands that the Air Force 
has established a process to ensure that future engine tasks 
are prioritized and assigned to meet the respective 
requirements of the Air Force and the F-35 program. The 
Committee directs that none of the funds provided in this Act 
for F135 engine CIP be obligated until 15 days after the 
Secretary of the Air Force submits a report to the 
congressional defense committees describing the outcome of this 
process and the tasks to be accomplished on the F135 engine 
using CIP funds.

                      C-130 AVIONICS MODERNIZATION

    The Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2015 provided 
the Air Force with the flexibility to use funds previously 
appropriated for the C-130 Avionics Modernization Program to 
pursue a more limited scope program intended to satisfy safety 
and airspace access requirements for legacy C-130H aircraft. 
The Committee continues to support a phased approach that 
prioritizes these more immediate operability concerns while 
retaining options for further avionics modernization and 
intends that the $33,962,000 provided in the Committee's 
recommendation be used in accordance with this approach.

                  HUMAN EFFECTIVENESS APPLIED RESEARCH

    The Committee notes that unmanned aerial systems continue 
to rely heavily on human operators and supports ongoing 
research to develop a more seamless human-machine environment. 
The Committee understands that the Air Force is researching how 
to measure, accelerate, and expand the cognitive skills 
necessary to improve airmen training and mission performance, 
as well as how to evaluate human dynamics to advance machine 
intelligence and operator-aiding technologies for advanced 
intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance capabilities. 
The Committee encourages the Secretary of the Air Force to 
continue these research efforts.

                     SPACE MODERNIZATION INITIATIVE

    The Committee is concerned that the Air Force is using 
Space Modernization Initiative (SMI) funding to begin and 
sustain new development programs. The Committee believes that 
SMI funding should be used to make evolutionary upgrades to 
existing programs to enhance mission effectiveness and avoid 
parts obsolescence. Over the last few years, the Air Force has 
attempted to begin next generation technologies using SMI funds 
within the Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) and the 
Space Based Infrared (SBIRS) satellite programs.
    The Committee can find no analyses of alternatives or fully 
vetted operational requirements documents that support the 
initiation of these efforts. The Government Accountability 
Office has found that these efforts are limited by lack of 
direction, are focused on isolated technologies, and are not 
set up to identify insertion points for a desired future 
system.
    The Committee is skeptical of the operational impacts, 
potential program risks, and cost of these new efforts. Before 
investing in this architectural approach, the Committee 
recommends that the Joint Requirements Oversight Council 
assesses the operational impacts and approves the requirements; 
the Secretary of the Air Force completes an analysis of 
alternatives, and the Director of Cost Assessment and Program 
Evaluationcertifies that the new program is cost effective. 
Until these actions have been completed, funding for these 
efforts is premature. Therefore, the Committee reduces the 
fiscal year 2016 request for AEHF SMI by $140,000,000 and SBIRS 
SMI by $51,000,000.

                         NEXT GENERATION JSTARS

    The House report accompanying the Department of Defense 
Appropriations Act, 2015 encouraged the Secretary of the Air 
Force to adopt an acquisition strategy for the next generation 
JSTARS system that would minimize development cost and schedule 
and field new aircraft ahead of the first planned delivery date 
of 2019. The Committee believes development and procurement of 
a single integrated system would significantly reduce 
development costs and provide a solution consistent with the 
conclusions of the Air Force's mission area analysis of 
alternatives. The Committee notes that the fiscal year 2016 
budget request delays the initial operating capability for the 
next generation system by 21 months as a consequence of the Air 
Force's decision to extend the technology maturation and risk 
reduction phase. The Committee recognizes the need to reduce 
technological risk, but is also concerned by the growth in the 
program's schedule in light of the increasing costs and 
capability risks associated with the legacy JSTARS system. The 
Committee believes that finalizing and adhering to a stable set 
of requirements will support an accelerated and more cost 
effective acquisition strategy for the next generation system 
and is critical to ensuring competition and accountability in 
the program. Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary of 
the Air Force to brief the congressional defense committees on 
the updated status of the next generation JSTARS program not 
later than 90 days following formal milestone A approval for 
the program. The briefing shall include an update on 
requirements definition, a technological risk analysis and the 
strategy to reduce such risk, an update on the acquisition 
strategy for all phases of the program, and any options for 
accelerating the program's schedule relative to the plan 
included with the fiscal year 2016 budget request.

        RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION, DEFENSE-WIDE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................   $17,225,889,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................    18,329,861,000
Committee recommendation..............................    18,207,171,000
Change from budget request............................      -122,690,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$18,207,171,000 for Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, 
Defense-Wide which will provide the following program in fiscal 
year 2016:


 HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES AND MINORITY INSTITUTIONS

    The Committee recommendation includes $10,000,000 above the 
request for the Historically Black Colleges and Universities 
and Minority Institutions Program (HBCU/MI). The HBCU/MI 
program provides access to scientific and technical information 
products and services to faculty, staff, and students of 
Historically Black Colleges and Universities, American Indian 
Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities, Native American-
Serving Nontribal Institutions, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, 
and other minority serving institutions.
    The Committee remains concerned about the long-term 
development of the Science, Technology, Engineering and 
Mathematics (STEM) workforce pipeline for underrepresented 
minorities. The Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense 
to emphasize STEM education improvement within the HBCU/MI 
program and to focus on increasing the participation of 
minority students through engaged mentoring, enriched research 
experiences, and opportunities to publish, present, and 
network. The Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to 
consider these factors when awarding competitive funding under 
this program, and directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
90 days after the enactment of this Act that details plans to 
expand STEM opportunities for underrepresented minorities.

                  NATIONAL SECURITY EDUCATION PROGRAM

    The Committee supports the Department of Defense and the 
intelligence community in their partnerships with higher 
education institutions to ensure an adequate supply of 
professionals with proficiency in critical languages. The 
Committee believes that these efforts should include minority 
serving institutions, such as Historically Black Colleges and 
Universities, to ensure diversity within the intelligence 
community and to increase the number of analysts with 
proficiency in critical languages and cultural studies, 
including Russian, Chinese, Farsi, and Arabic.

                HIGH ENERGY AND POWER DENSITY COMPOSITES

    The Committee recommends $7,500,000 above the request for 
emerging capabilities technology development to allow for the 
development of scalable composite systems which are capable of 
high energy and power densities. The Committee also encourages 
the Secretary of Defense to support the low-weight munitions 
for unmanned aerial system platforms that could increase range 
and mission duration for such aircraft.

                  SYSTEMS ENGINEERING RESEARCH CENTER

    In the report accompanying the House version of the 
Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2015, the Committee 
provided $500,000 to conduct a study to assess the state of the 
Army's lethality capability and to provide recommendations to 
achieve the lethality capability of the future. The Committee 
understands the study is nearing completion and directs the 
Secretary of the Army to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees detailing the results and recommendations of 
the study not later than 60 days after the completion of the 
study.

                 UNIVERSITY AFFILIATED RESEARCH CENTERS

    The National Strategic Research Institute is the only 
University Affiliated Research Center capable of developing 
solutions for combating weapons of mass destruction for the 
nation. The Department considers these centers strategic assets 
that are formally established by the Department of Defense's 
Director of Defense Research and Engineering. The centers were 
developed to ensure that essential engineering and technology 
capabilities are maintained. The Committee encourages the 
Director of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and the 
Secretary of the Air Force to utilize the capabilities these 
organizations can provide and to fund their operation beginning 
in fiscal year 2017.

                OPERATIONAL TEST AND EVALUATION, DEFENSE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................      $209,378,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................       170,558,000
Committee recommendation..............................       170,558,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $170,558,000 
for Operational Test and Evaluation, Defense which will provide 
the following program in fiscal year 2016:


                                TITLE V

                     REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS

                     DEFENSE WORKING CAPITAL FUNDS

 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................    $1,649,468,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................     1,312,568,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,634,568,000
Change from budget request............................      +322,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,634,568,000 
for the Defense Working Capital Funds accounts which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2016:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee         Change from
                                                           Budget request      recommended          request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
WORKING CAPITAL FUND, ARMY.............................             50,432             50,432              - - -
WORKING CAPITAL FUND, AIR FORCE........................             62,898             62,898              - - -
WORKING CAPITAL FUND, DEFENSE WIDE.....................             45,084             45,084              - - -
DEFENSE WORKING CAPITAL FUND, DECA.....................          1,154,154          1,476,154            322,000
    Program increase...................................              - - -            322,000              - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, DEFENSE WORKING CAPITAL FUNDS.............          1,312,568          1,634,568            322,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                     NATIONAL DEFENSE SEALIFT FUND

 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................      $485,012,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................       474,164,000
Committee recommendation..............................       474,164,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $474,164,000 
for the National Defense Sealift Fund which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2016:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee         Change from
                                                           Budget request      recommended          request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
STRATEGIC SEALIFT ACQUISITION..........................             15,456             15,456              - - -
DoD MOBILIZATION ASSETS................................            160,520            160,520              - - -
SEALIFT RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT.......................             25,197             25,197              - - -
READY RESERVE FORCE OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE.........            272,991            272,991              - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        TOTAL, NATIONAL DEFENSE SEALIFT FUND...........            474,164            474,164              - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                TITLE VI

                  OTHER DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PROGRAMS

                         DEFENSE HEALTH PROGRAM

 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................   $32,069,772,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................    32,243,328,000
Committee recommendation..............................    31,440,009,000
Change from budget request............................      -803,319,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$31,440,009,000 for the Defense Health Program which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2016:


         REPROGRAMMING GUIDANCE FOR THE DEFENSE HEALTH PROGRAM

    The Committee remains concerned regarding the transfer of 
funds from the In-House Care budget sub-activity to pay for 
contractor-provided medical care. To limit such transfers and 
improve oversight within the Defense Health Program operation 
and maintenance account, the Committee includes a provision 
which caps the funds available for Private Sector Care under 
the TRICARE program subject to prior approval reprogramming 
procedures. The provision and accompanying report language 
should not be interpreted as limiting the amount of funds that 
may be transferred to the In-House Care budget sub-activity 
from other budget sub-activities within the Defense Health 
Program. In addition, funding for the In-House Care budget sub-
activity continues to be designated as a congressional special 
interest item. Any transfer of funds from the In-House Care 
budget sub-activity into the Private Sector Care budget sub-
activity or any other budget sub-activity requires the 
Secretary of Defense to follow prior approval reprogramming 
procedures for operation and maintenance funds.
    The Committee commends the Secretary of Defense for 
submitting a report to the congressional defense committees 
delineating transfers of funds from the Private Sector budget 
sub-activity group for fiscal years 2012, 2013, and 2014. 
However, the Committee remains concerned that these substantial 
transfers of funds from the Private Sector Care budget sub-
activity occurred without the submission of written 
notification as required by prior year Department of Defense 
Appropriations Acts. The Committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide written notification to the congressional 
defense committees of cumulative transfers in excess of 
$10,000,000 out of the Private Sector Care budget sub-activity 
not later than fifteen days after such a transfer. Furthermore, 
the Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
30 days after the enactment of this Act that delineates 
transfers of funds, and the dates any transfers occurred, from 
the Private Sector Care budget sub-activity to any other budget 
sub-activity for fiscal year 2015.
    The Committee further directs the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense (Health Affairs) to provide quarterly reports to the 
congressional defense committees on budget execution data for 
all of the Defense Health Program budget activities and to 
adequately reflect changes to the budget activities requested 
by the Services in future budget submissions.

                               CARRYOVER

    For fiscal year 2016, the Committee recommends one percent 
carryover authority for the operation and maintenance account 
of the Defense Health Program. The Committee directs the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to submit a 
detailed spending plan for any fiscal year 2015 designated 
carryover funds to the congressional defense committees not 
less than 30 days prior to executing the carryover funds.

                 PEER-REVIEWED CANCER RESEARCH PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $120,000,000 for the peer-reviewed 
breast cancer research program, $80,000,000 for the peer-
reviewed prostate cancer research program, $20,000,000 for the 
peer-reviewed ovarian cancer research program, $12,000,000 for 
the peer-reviewed lung cancer research program, and $30,000,000 
for the peer-reviewed cancer research program that would 
research cancers not addressed in the aforementioned programs 
currently executed by the Department of Defense.
    The funds provided in the peer-reviewed cancer research 
program are directed to be used to conduct research in the 
following areas: bladder cancer, colorectal cancer, kidney 
cancer, listeria vaccine for cancer, liver cancer, lymphoma, 
melanoma and other skin cancers, mesothelioma, pancreatic 
cancer, pediatric brain tumors, stomach cancer, and the link 
between scleroderma and cancer.
    The funds provided under the peer-reviewed cancer research 
program shall be used only for the purposes listed above. The 
Committee directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health 
Affairs) to provide a report not later than 180 days after the 
enactment of this Act to the congressional defense committees 
on the status of the peer-reviewed cancer research program. For 
each research area, the report should include the funding 
amount awarded, the progress of the research, and the relevance 
of the research to servicemembers and their families.

                       METASTATIC CANCER RESEARCH

    The Committee continues to support the establishment of a 
task force to focus on research for metastasized cancer with a 
focus on clinical and translational research aimed at extending 
the lives of advanced state and recurrent patients. The 
Committee directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health 
Affairs) to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than 60 days after the enactment of this 
Act on the status of establishing such a task force.

               JOINT WARFIGHTER MEDICAL RESEARCH PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends $45,000,000 for the continuation 
of the joint warfighter medical research program. The funding 
shall be used to augment and accelerate high priority 
Department of Defense and Service medical requirements and to 
continue prior year initiatives that are close to achieving 
their objectives and yielding a benefit to military medicine. 
The funding shall not be used for new projects nor for basic 
research, and it shall be awarded at the discretion of the 
Secretary of Defense following a review of medical research and 
development gaps as well as unfinanced medical requirements of 
the Services. Further, the Committee directs the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to submit a report not 
later than 180 days after the enactment of this Act to the 
congressional defense committees which lists the projects that 
receive funding. The report should include the funding amount 
awarded to each project, a thorough description of each 
project's research, and the benefit the research will provide 
to the Department of Defense.

                    ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD SYSTEM

    For the last few fiscal years, the Committee has expressed 
its concern with the inability of the Departments of Defense 
and Veterans Affairs to develop and procure interoperable 
electronic health records and has fenced the funding for the 
two Departments until certain reporting requirements have been 
met. The Committee recognizes that the Department of Defense 
has continually provided the required information regarding 
strategy and resource requirements in a timely, concise, and 
complete manner. Additionally, since restructuring the 
administration of the acquisition program and creating the 
Program Executive Office for Defense Healthcare Management 
Systems (DHMS), the Committee believes that the program is 
slowly progressing. The Committee also recognizes that the 
contract award for the new electronic health record system is 
currently scheduled for the third quarter of fiscal year 2015.
    However, although the request for proposals for the new 
electronic health record system for the Department of Defense 
included interoperability requirements, the Committee remains 
concerned that the future electronic health record system may 
not be able to seamlessly exchange meaningful patient data with 
the electronic health record system of the Department of 
Veterans Affairs. The Committee reiterates its concern that the 
two systems be completely and meaningfully interoperable and 
encourages the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, 
Technology, and Logistics) to not lose sight of the overall 
goal of seamless compatibility between the two Departments' 
electronic health record systems.
    Furthermore, the Committee directs the Director of the 
Interagency Program Office to continue to provide quarterly 
reports on the progress of interoperability between the two 
Departments to the House and Senate Subcommittees on 
Appropriations for Defense and the House and Senate 
Subcommittees on Appropriations for Military Construction, 
Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies. Additionally, the 
Program Executive Officer DHMS, in conjunction with the 
Director of the IPO, is directed to provide quarterly reports 
to the congressional defense committees on the cost and 
schedule of the program, to include milestones, knowledge 
points, and acquisition timelines, as well as quarterly 
obligation reports. The Committee directs the PEO DHMS to 
continue briefing the House and Senate Defense Appropriations 
Subcommittees on a quarterly basis, coinciding with the report 
submission.

                        PRESCRIPTION DRUG ABUSE

    The Committee is encouraged at the progress that the 
Department of Defense and the Services have made in reducing 
the prevalence of prescription medication dependency among 
servicemembers. However, it remains imperative that the 
Services and military medical community continue to evolve 
their approach to prescribing and monitoring prescription drug 
usage to prevent overmedication, as well as to provide 
education and treatment options for servicemembers suffering 
from addiction. The Committee directs the Assistant Secretary 
of Defense (Health Affairs) to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 90 days after 
the enactment of this Act that details the current programs 
offered to educate servicemembers about the risks of 
prescription medication; the current treatment options for 
servicemembers suffering from addiction; the estimated number 
of servicemembers that participated in education and/or 
treatment programs in fiscal years 2012, 2013, and 2014; and 
specific recommendations for improving education and treatment 
programs.
    Further, the Committee commends the Navy on recent efforts 
to develop new pharmacological and pain management processes 
with minimal side effects or addictive qualities and encourages 
the Surgeon General of the Navy to continue these efforts.

                         MILITARY ACUITY MODEL

    The Committee is pleased by the continued progress of the 
Military Acuity Model as demonstrated in military research 
organizations and academic medical centers and believes that 
utilizing the model can provide more efficient care and 
improved access to care for patients. For the last few years, 
the Committee has encouraged the Assistant Secretary of Defense 
(Health Affairs) to consider expanding the use of the model 
throughout the military health system. As such, the Committee 
directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than 90 days after the enactment of this Act on the 
feasibility and costs associated with implementing the Military 
Acuity Model throughout the military health system, and the 
potential benefits that employing this model would achieve.

                  EFFICIENCY OF PATIENT CARE DELIVERY

    The Committee understands the necessity of developing 
technologies to improve the efficiency of patient care in 
military treatment facilities. The Committee recognizes that, 
in the event of a mass casualty, military treatment facilities 
would experience a significant increase in patient volume. The 
ability to maximize efficiency and effectiveness of care would 
be critical to the management of an overwhelming surge in 
patient volume and intensity. The Committee encourages the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to research the 
development of an automated resource management system to 
improve patient care, both in normal and emergency situations.

                          FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE

    The Committee is encouraged by the use of a patient-
centered care model throughout the military health system. The 
patient-centered medical home is a team-based model that 
provides a strong primary care foundation, enhanced access to 
care, and a focus on the individual instead of symptoms that 
may be causing an illness. Exploring genetic, environmental, 
and other patient-centered factors are central components in 
the growing field of functional medicine. The Committee 
encourages the Service Surgeons General to continue promoting 
the patient-centered model of care and to consider the efficacy 
of functional medicine compared to traditional medicine when 
treating chronic diseases.

                  MENTAL HEALTH OF MILITARY DEPENDENTS

    The Secretary of Defense has indicated that military 
dependents are at a higher risk of depression and pediatric 
behavioral issues compared to the general population, and that 
further research to improve military dependent psychological 
health issues is needed to continue the adaptation and 
development of appropriate evidence-based interventions and 
targeted therapies. The Committee has expressed concern for the 
rising number of outpatient mental health cases among children 
of servicemembers for the last few years and has encouraged the 
Secretary of Defense to make the prevention of trauma in 
dependent children a priority. It is imperative to develop 
efficient means to identify children at risk of deployment-
related mental health issues and to provide tools, education, 
and guidance to the professionals and families caring for these 
children. The Committee remains concerned and directs the 
Secretary of Defense to fully fund a program to address this 
issue starting in fiscal year 2017.

                   MULTI-DISCIPLINARY BRAIN RESEARCH

    The Committee recognizes recent efforts by the Department 
of Defense to leverage partnerships with academia and the 
private sector to understand and improve prevention and 
treatment of traumatic brain injuries to servicemembers. The 
Committee encourages the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health 
Affairs) to continue to leverage partnerships with academia and 
the private sector and to support further studies of traumatic 
brain injuries to gain a deeper understanding of concussive 
injuries including how they impact the brain, how and to what 
extent the brain recovers, and how prevention and treatment 
methods may be improved.

               TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS FOR MEDICAL PERSONNEL

    The Committee recognizes the necessity of restricting 
unnecessary and expensive travel for government employees. 
However, severe travel restrictions for military health system 
medical personnel have adverse consequences on the readiness 
and skillsets of these professionals. Medical personnel often 
need to travel to learn new techniques and best practices that 
will ultimately improve patient care. The Committee encourages 
the Secretary of Defense to re-evaluate and consider easing 
travel limitations on military health system medical personnel.

                     TRAUMA CLINIC RESEARCH PROGRAM

    The Committee recognizes that a significant number of 
servicemember casualties are caused by traumatic injury and 
supports the efforts that the military medical community is 
taking to further advances in trauma care. As recent military 
operations decline, military trauma research will likely also 
decline. To advance this research even as combat deployments 
decrease, the Committee understands that the Department of 
Defense is creating a coordinated, multi-institution, clinical 
research network of civilian and military trauma centers to 
address the military relevant priorities and gaps in trauma 
care. The Committee supports this trauma consortium and 
recommends an additional $10,000,000 to advance the continued 
research of traumatic injuries. However, the Committee 
recognizes that the Department of Defense is initiating this 
program and expects it to be fully funded in the fiscal year 
2017 and subsequent budget submissions.

 COOPERATION BETWEEN MILITARY MEDICAL FACILITIES, CIVILIAN HEALTHCARE 
                      FACILITIES, AND UNIVERSITIES

    The Committee recognizes the importance of cooperation 
between military medical facilities, universities, and other 
civilian partners to provide valuable medical trauma training 
to sustain the education of military medical providers. This 
training and real-life experience contributes to maintain the 
capabilities of the National Guard Chemical, Biological, 
Radiological, and Nuclear Explosives Enhanced Response Force 
Packages, the National Guard Homeland Response Forces, and the 
Army Reserve Consequence Management Response Forces.
    The Committee encourages the Service Surgeons General and 
the Chief of the National Guard Bureau to continue to pursue 
trauma training with civilian partners in order to maintain 
unit medical readiness at optimum levels as military healthcare 
providers maintain their individual skills to respond 
effectively to emergency incidents. Additionally, the Committee 
supports the development of enhanced emergency preparedness 
medical training programs.

   THE CANCER CENTER AT WALTER REED NATIONAL MILITARY MEDICAL CENTER

    The John P. Murtha Cancer Center at Walter Reed National 
Military Medical Center is the only center of excellence for 
cancer care in the military health system. It provides world 
class care, patient-family support services, and translational 
research. The Committee understands that the Murtha Cancer 
Center is in the nascent stages of joining the Oncology 
Research Information Network which will allow it access to 
cancer tissue repositories and shareable data. This 
collaboration may advance research through the enhanced use of 
patient data derived from large patient studies that include 
long-term health records, biospecimen repositories, and pre-
existing research. The Committee encourages the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to assist the Murtha 
Cancer Center to collaborate with the Oncology Research 
Information Network.

                      EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES

    The Committee recognizes that infectious diseases have the 
potential to significantly impact the operational readiness of 
deployed servicemembers and combat units. Although many 
diseases common in areas where troops are frequently deployed, 
such as malaria, are well known to researchers and clinicians, 
emerging infectious diseases that are not well known pose an 
increasing threat. For instance, in the Pacific region the 
Chikungunya virus, the Zika virus, and rickettsial infections 
potentially pose a major health threat to servicemembers. 
Disease surveillance, rapid detection, and outbreak response 
are essential to providing an early warning of emerging risks. 
The Committee urges the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health 
Affairs) to pursue partnerships with colleges and universities 
that have strong research programs in emerging infectious 
diseases and to support research efforts that incorporate 
genomic technologies, bioinformatics, and computational 
biology.

                     HEALTH SURVEILLANCE TECHNOLOGY

    The Committee recognizes that the Department of Defense 
currently uses surveillance technology to improve hospital-
based patient safety and to monitor any acute or chronic public 
health disease threats. Health surveillance technology can 
detect rare biological threat agents and instances of naturally 
occurring infectious diseases, and may also be modified to 
detect non-infectious diseases and chronic illnesses. The 
Committee encourages the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health 
Affairs) to continue deploying this technology.

               PEER-REVIEWED SPINAL CORD RESEARCH PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends $30,000,000 to continue funding 
the peer-reviewed spinal cord research program. However, the 
Committee is concerned that not enough funding is being 
dedicated to projects that are at the advanced research or 
translational research stages. As with all of the 
congressionally directed medical research programs, the 
Committee believes that there should be a focus on advanced 
projects which will potentially yield medical breakthroughs 
more quickly. The Committee encourages the Assistant Secretary 
of Defense (Health Affairs) to fund projects at more advanced 
stages of research and development that focus on finding a cure 
for paralysis.

                       RECONSTRUCTIVE TRANSPLANTS

    The Committee recommends $12,000,000 for the peer-reviewed 
reconstructive transplant research program. Reconstructive 
transplantation is a growing discipline that benefits from 
collaboration among institutions and surgeons working to 
improve the lives of servicemembers who suffer significant 
combat injuries. Continued research in reconstructive 
transplantation will allow for the refinement of approaches for 
hand, face, and other vascularized composite tissue allografts, 
as well as the transplants of skin, muscle, tendon, nerves, 
bone, and blood vessels. The Committee encourages the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to promote multi-
institutional collaboration among clinicians and research 
scientists that accelerates the advancement of innovative ideas 
in reconstructive transplantation into clinical applications.

                      RECONSTRUCTIVE MICROSURGERY

    Reconstructive microsurgery is a growing surgical field 
that uses precision instruments to perform complicated 
operations. The Committee encourages the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense (Health Affairs) to research the benefits that 
reconstructive microsurgeries could yield in operations for 
severely injured servicemembers.

                    MILITARY MENTAL HEALTH PROGRAMS

    The Committee has expressed its concern for the high number 
of suicides in the military for the last several years and has 
recognized the potential difficulties for members of the 
National Guard and reserve components to receive required 
treatment because they often do not live near military 
treatment facilities. It is encouraging that the Secretary of 
Defense created a pilot program to use community partnerships 
to improve treatment of servicemembers suffering from mental 
health disorders in the National Guard and reserve components. 
The Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to expand 
this program and to consider partnerships with entities that 
engage in research, treatment, education, and outreach 
activities for servicemembers suffering from traumatic brain 
injuries and mental health disorders. Any additional community 
partners should be chosen through a competitive and merit-based 
award process.

                        INTELLIGENT PROSTHETICS

    The Committee recommends $30,000,000 for the peer-reviewed 
orthopedic research program. The Committee is aware that many 
of the injuries sustained by servicemembers in combat include 
multiple limb trauma and are often distinct from trauma 
typically seen in the civilian environment, thus requiring a 
unique solution set. The Committee encourages the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to support research at 
the intersection of bioengineering, neuroscience, and 
rehabilitation to support neural interfaces to peripheral 
nerves and advanced prosthetics that deliver more functionality 
to amputees.

                        CANINE THERAPY RESEARCH

    The Committee is aware of the potential benefits of canine 
therapy for treatment of servicemembers suffering from 
traumatic brain injuries or post-traumatic stress disorder and 
believes that it may be a promising alternative to 
pharmaceutical treatment. To that extent, the Committee has 
appropriated $8,000,000 over the last two fiscal years to 
support the research and application of canine therapy and 
recommends an additional $5,000,000 for fiscal year 2016 to 
continue providing therapeutic service dog training programs. 
The Committee encourages the Service Surgeons General to 
initiate or expand the use of canine therapy in military 
treatment facilities.

                    COMBATING ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE

    The Committee recognizes the importance of combating 
antibiotic resistance as a public health priority and commends 
the Secretary of Defense for implementing antimicrobial 
stewardship programs aimed at preventing, detecting, and 
controlling illnesses caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria. 
The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
180 days after the enactment of this Act on the progress of the 
Department's stewardship programs, including funds obligated to 
date, coordination with other federal agencies, and plans for 
subsequent programs.

    SURGICAL STERILIZATION IN AUSTERE MILITARY MEDICAL ENVIRONMENTS

    The Committee recognizes that emergency surgical procedures 
often take place in less than ideal locations and that there is 
a need to modernize medical sterilization technology for 
instruments, devices, and materials used in military combat 
support hospitals, emergency humanitarian relief settings, and 
other austere military medical environments. The Committee 
directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than 180 days after the enactment of this Act on the 
costs and benefits of alternative sterilization techniques and 
a plan for modernizing medical sterilization, including the 
potential use of portable hydrogen peroxide vapor sterilization 
technology. The report should compare logistics, energy 
consumption, effectiveness, and the ability to enhance surgical 
capabilities of combat support hospitals.

                              HIV TESTING

    The Committee believes that all health delivery services 
within the military health system, including HIV testing, 
should be of the highest quality and should be administered in 
the most cost effective and efficient manner possible. The 
Committee understands that both the Department of the Navy and 
the Department of the Army have recently made the decision to 
transition HIV testing from a contracted service to an in-house 
capability. The Committee directs the Surgeons General of the 
Navy and the Army to submit individual reports to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 90 days after 
the enactment of this Act that detail the analysis undertaken 
before recommending these decisions and that include a copy of 
any business case analysis performed.

           CHEMICAL AGENTS AND MUNITIONS DESTRUCTION, DEFENSE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................      $802,268,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................       720,721,000
Committee recommendation..............................       720,721,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $720,721,000 
for Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, Defense which 
will provide the following program in fiscal year 2016:

                EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Change from
                                     Budget      Committee     request
                                    request     recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE.......      139,098       139,098        - - -
PROCUREMENT.....................        2,281         2,281        - - -
RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND       579,342       579,342        - - -
 EVALUATION.....................
------------------------------------------------------------------------
    TOTAL, CHEMICAL AGENTS AND        720,721       720,721        - - -
     MUNITIONS DESTRUCTION,
     DEFENSE....................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

         DRUG INTERDICTION AND COUNTER-DRUG ACTIVITIES, DEFENSE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................      $950,687,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................       850,598,000
Committee recommendation..............................       878,298,000
Change from budget request............................       +27,700,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $878,298,000 
for Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense 
which will provide the following program in fiscal year 2016:

                EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Change from
                                     Budget      Committee     request
                                    request     recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
COUNTER-NARCOTICS SUPPORT.......      739,009       616,811     -122,198
    Transfer to National Guard          - - -       -87,898        - - -
 counter-drug program...........
CENTCOM requirements--transfer          - - -       -34,300        - - -
 to title IX....................
DRUG DEMAND REDUCTION PROGRAM...      111,589       113,589        2,000
    Young Marines--drug demand          - - -         2,000        - - -
 reduction......................
NATIONAL GUARD COUNTER-DRUG             - - -       147,898      147,898
 PROGRAM........................
    Transfer from counter-              - - -        87,898        - - -
 narcotics support..............
    Program increase............        - - -        60,000        - - -
------------------------------------------------------------------------
    TOTAL, DRUG INTERDICTION AND      850,598       878,298       27,700
 COUNTER-DRUG ACTIVITIES,
 DEFENSE........................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                     BUDGET JUSTIFICATION MATERIAL

    In the report accompanying the House version of the 
Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2015, the Committee 
directed that the Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug 
Activities, Defense Account be divided into three separate sub-
activity groups: counter-narcotics support, the drug demand 
reduction program, and the National Guard counter-drug program. 
The Committee was disappointed when the fiscal year 2016 budget 
request only separated the funding request into sub-activity 
groups for counter-narcotics support and the drug demand 
reduction program. The Committee again separates the funding 
into three distinct lines to provide greater transparency and 
oversight of the program and its budget execution. 
Additionally, in lieu of formal reprogramming guidance and 
restrictions, the Committee directs the Deputy Assistant 
Secretary of Defense (Counter-narcotics and Global Threats) to 
provide written notification to the congressional defense 
committees not less than 15 days before transferring funding in 
excess of $5,000,000 between any of the three lines. The 
Committee again directs the Secretary of Defense to request 
funding for each separate sub-activity group under the Drug 
Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense account in 
the fiscal year 2017 and subsequent budget submissions.

                            DRUG TRAFFICKING

    The Committee recognizes that drug trafficking is a major 
source of funding for terrorist organizations, contributes to 
violence in parts of the United States, and creates instability 
in many other countries. The Committee understands the 
important role that the Department of Defense plays in the 
counter-drug mission and the benefits that the Department 
provides to the security of the United States and the entire 
region, including Mexico and Central America.

                  JOINT URGENT OPERATIONAL NEEDS FUND


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................             - - -
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................        99,701,000
Committee recommendation..............................             - - -
Change from budget request............................       -99,701,000
 

    The Committee recommends no funding for the Joint Urgent 
Operational Needs Fund.

                    OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................      $311,830,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................       316,159,000
Committee recommendation..............................       316,159,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $316,159,000 
for the Office of the Inspector General which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2016:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee         Change from
                                                           Budget Request      Recommended          request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE..............................            310,459            314,059              3,600
    IG requested transfer from Procurement.............              - - -              1,000              - - -
    IG requested transfer from Research, Development,                - - -              2,600              - - -
     Test and Evaluation...............................
PROCUREMENT............................................              1,000              - - -             -1,000
    IG requested transfer to Operation and Maintenance.             -1,000             -1,000              - - -
RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION.............              4,700              2,100             -2,600
    IG requested transfer to Operation and Maintenance.              - - -             -2,600              - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        TOTAL, OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL.........            316,159            316,159              - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                               TITLE VII

                            RELATED AGENCIES

              NATIONAL AND MILITARY INTELLIGENCE PROGRAMS

    The National Intelligence Program and the Military 
Intelligence Program budgets funded in the Department of 
Defense Appropriations Act consist primarily of resources for 
the Director of National Intelligence including the 
Intelligence Community Management staff, the Central 
Intelligence Agency (CIA), the Defense Intelligence Agency, the 
National Reconnaissance Office, the National Security Agency, 
the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, the intelligence 
services of the Departments of the Army, Navy, Air Force, and 
the CIA Retirement and Disability fund.

                            CLASSIFIED ANNEX

    The Committee's budget review of classified programs is 
published in a separate, detailed, and comprehensive classified 
annex. The intelligence community, Department of Defense, and 
other organizations are expected to fully comply with the 
recommendations and directions in the classified annex 
accompanying the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 
2016.

               STEM RECRUITMENT FOR WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee supports research engagement and workforce 
recruitment efforts of students from leading universities 
trained in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics 
(STEM). Therefore, the Committee encourages the federal 
intelligence community's human capital and science and 
technology officers to develop and invest in a focused program 
designed to attract a large pool of STEM students from the 
nation's university community. Such efforts may include 
cooperative agreements, fellowships, summer internships, and 
sponsored research between the university community and the 
intelligence community. The Committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than 180 days after the enactment of this 
Act on the progress to develop and implement such initiatives.

   CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM FUND

 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................      $514,000,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................       514,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................       514,000,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    This appropriation provides payments of benefits to 
qualified beneficiaries in accordance with the Central 
Intelligence Agency Retirement Act of 1964 for Certain 
Employees (P.L. 88-643), as amended by Public Law 94-522. This 
statute authorized the establishment of the CIA Retirement and 
Disability System for certain employees and authorized the 
establishment and maintenance of a fund from which benefits 
would be paid to those beneficiaries.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $514,000,000 
for the Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and Disability 
System Fund. This is a mandatory account.

               INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT ACCOUNT


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2015 appropriation........................      $507,600,000
Fiscal year 2016 budget request.......................       530,023,000
Committee recommendation..............................       507,923,000
Change from budget request............................       -22,100,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $507,923,000 
for the Intelligence Community Management Account.

                          WILDLIFE TRAFFICKING

    The Committee is concerned that wildlife poaching and 
trafficking, particularly of African elephant ivory, can be 
used as a source of funding by terrorist organizations, 
extremist militias, and transnational organized crime 
syndicates in Central and Eastern Africa. The Committee 
encourages the Director of National Intelligence to work with 
American and international law enforcement and partner 
countries to share information and analysis on transnational 
criminal organizations, terrorist entities, corrupt officials, 
and others that facilitate illegal wildlife trafficking.
                               TITLE VIII

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    The accompanying bill includes 128 general provisions. Most 
of these provisions were included in the Department of Defense 
Appropriations Act, 2015 and many have been included in the 
Defense Appropriations Acts for a number of years. A 
description of each provision follows.
    Section 8001 provides that no funds made available in this 
Act may be used for publicity or propaganda purposes not 
authorized by Congress.
    Section 8002 provides for conditions and limitations on the 
payment of compensation to, or employment of, foreign 
nationals.
    Section 8003 provides that no funds made available in this 
Act may be obligated beyond the end of the fiscal year unless 
expressly provided for a greater period of availability 
elsewhere in the Act.
    Section 8004 provides a 20 percent limitation on the 
obligation of certain funds provided in this Act during the 
last two months of the fiscal year.
    Section 8005 has been amended and provides for the general 
transfer authority of working capital funds to other military 
functions.
    Section 8006 provides that the tables titled ``Explanation 
of Project Level Adjustments'' in the committee report and 
classified annex shall be carried out in the manner provided by 
the tables to the same extent as if the tables were included in 
the text of this Act.
    Section 8007 provides for the establishment of a baseline 
for application of reprogramming and transfer authorities for 
the current fiscal year.
    Section 8008 provides for limitations on the use of 
transfer authority of working capital fund cash balances.
    Section 8009 provides that none of the funds appropriated 
in this Act may be used to initiate a special access program 
without prior notification to the congressional defense 
committees.
    Section 8010 provides limitations and conditions on the use 
of funds made available in this Act to initiate multi-year 
contracts.
    Section 8011 provides for the use and obligation of funds 
for humanitarian and civic assistance costs under chapter 20 of 
title 10, United States Code.
    Section 8012 has been amended and provides that civilian 
personnel of the Department of Defense may not be managed on 
the basis of end strength or be subject to end strength 
limitations.
    Section 8013 prohibits funding from being used to influence 
congressional action on any matters pending before the 
Congress.
    Section 8014 prohibits compensation from being paid to any 
member of the Army who is participating as a full-time student 
and who receives benefits from the Education Benefits Fund when 
time spent as a full-time student is counted toward that 
member's service commitment.
    Section 8015 provides for the transfer of funds 
appropriated in title III of this Act for the Department of 
Defense Pilot Mentor-Protege Program.
    Section 8016 provides for the Department of Defense to 
purchase anchor and mooring chains manufactured only in the 
United States.
    Section 8017 has been amended and makes permanent the 
prohibition of funds made available to the Department of 
Defense from being used to demilitarize or dispose of certain 
surplus firearms and small arms ammunition or ammunition 
components.
    Section 8018 provides a limitation on funds being used for 
the relocation of any Department of Defense entity into or 
within the National Capital Region.
    Section 8019 provides for incentive payments authorized by 
section 504 of the Indian Financing Act of 1974 (25 U.S.C. 
1544).
    Section 8020 provides that no funding for the Defense Media 
Activity may be used for national or international political or 
psychological activities.
    Section 8021 provides for the obligation of funds for 
purposes specified in section 2350j(c) of title 10, United 
States Code, in anticipation of receipt of contributions from 
the Government of Kuwait.
    Section 8022 provides funding for the Civil Air Patrol 
Corporation.
    Section 8023 has been amended and prohibits funding from 
being used to establish new Department of Defense Federally 
Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDC), with certain 
limitations, and reduces funding provided for FFRDCs.
    Section 8024 provides for the Department of Defense to 
procure carbon, alloy, or armor steel plate melted and rolled 
only in the United States and Canada.
    Section 8025 defines the congressional defense committees 
as being the Armed Services Committees of the House and Senate 
and the Subcommittees on Defense of the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House and Senate.
    Section 8026 provides for competitions between private 
firms and Department of Defense depot maintenance activities 
for modification, depot maintenance, and repair of aircraft, 
vehicles, and vessels as well as the production of components 
and other defense-related articles.
    Section 8027 has been amended and provides for the 
revocation of blanket waivers of the Buy American Act upon a 
finding that a country has violated a reciprocal defense 
procurement memorandum of understanding by discriminating 
against products produced in the United States that are covered 
by the agreement.
    Section 8028 provides for the availability of funds 
contained in the Department of Defense Overseas Military 
Facility Investment Recovery Account for purposes specified in 
section 2921(c)(2) of the 1991 National Defense Authorization 
Act.
    Section 8029 provides for the conveyance, without 
consideration, of relocatable housing units that are excess to 
the needs of the Air Force located at Grand Forks Air Force 
Base, Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mountain Home Air Force Base, 
Ellsworth Air Force Base, and Minot Air Force Base to Indian 
Tribes located in the states of Nevada, Idaho, North Dakota, 
South Dakota, Montana, Oregon, Minnesota, and Washington.
    Section 8030 provides authority to use operation and 
maintenance appropriations to purchase items having an 
investment item unit cost of not more than $250,000.
    Section 8031 prohibits the use of funds to disestablish, 
close, downgrade from host to extension center, or place on 
probation a Senior Reserve Officers' Training Corps.
    Section 8032 has been amended and prohibits the use of 
Working Capital Funds to purchase specified investment items.
    Section 8033 has been amended and provides that none of the 
funds appropriated for the Central Intelligence Agency shall 
remain available for obligation beyond the current fiscal year 
except for funds appropriated for the Reserve for 
Contingencies, the Working Capital Fund, or other programs as 
specified.
    Section 8034 provides that funds available for the Defense 
Intelligence Agency may be used for the design, development, 
and deployment of General Defense Intelligence Program 
intelligence communications and intelligence information 
systems.
    Section 8035 provides for the availability of funds for the 
mitigation of environmental impacts on Indian lands resulting 
from Department of Defense activities.
    Section 8036 requires the Department of Defense to comply 
with the Buy American Act, chapter 83 of title 41, United 
States Code.
    Section 8037 provides conditions under which contracts for 
studies, analyses, or consulting services may be entered into 
without competition on the basis of an unsolicited proposal.
    Section 8038 places certain limitations on the use of funds 
made available in this Act to establish Field Operating 
Agencies.
    Section 8039 places restrictions on converting to 
contractor performance an activity or function of the 
Department of Defense unless it meets certain guidelines 
provided.

                             (RESCISSIONS)

    Section 8040 has been amended and provides for the 
rescission of $869,429,000 from the following programs:

 
 
 
2014 Appropriations:
    Other Procurement, Army:
        WIN-T.........................................       $40,000,000
    Aircraft Procurement, Navy:
        E-2D economic change orders...................        48,156,000
        KC-130J.......................................         3,415,000
        MH-60R........................................        40,000,000
    Weapons Procurement, Navy:
        Sidewinder....................................           888,000
    Aircraft Procurement, Air Force:
        HH-60G........................................         2,300,000
    Missile Procurement, Air Force:
        Spaceborne equipment..........................         1,000,000
    Procurement of Ammunition, Air Force:
        Fuzes-HTVSF...................................        12,600,000
    Other Procurement, Air Force:
        Night vision goggles..........................        12,000,000
        Space launch range services...................         2,000,000
2015 Appropriations:
    Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat
     Vehicles, Army:
        Paladin PIM...................................        30,000,000
    Other Procurement, Army:
        JTRS..........................................        20,000,000
        Night vision devices..........................        10,000,000
    Aircraft Procurement, Navy:
        E-2D airframe.................................        10,675,000
        E-2D economic change orders...................        27,000,000
        KC-130J.......................................         3,418,000
        SH-60 series..................................         8,284,000
    Weapons Procurement, Navy:
        MH-54 mods growth.............................         6,400,000
        MH-54 mods other cost.........................         4,717,000
        Sidewinder....................................         4,305,000
    Procurement of Ammunition, Navy and Marine Corps:
        120mm all types contract delay................         5,011,000
        120mm all types support.......................         3,895,000
    Procurement, Marine Corps:
        Amphibious support equipment..................         1,722,000
        Common computer resources.....................        22,519,000
        Distributed common ground system..............         2,500,000
        Family of tactical trailers...................         5,000,000
        5/4 truck HMMWV...............................        57,255,000
    Aircraft Procurement, Air Force:
        B-1B..........................................        12,300,000
        C-17..........................................        15,500,000
        F-15..........................................        15,770,000
        F-22 depot activation.........................        15,000,000
        HH-60G........................................         2,300,000
        KC-46.........................................        48,000,000
    Missile Procurement, Air Force:
        Defense meteorological satellite program......        45,000,000
        GPS III advance procurement...................        30,000,000
    Other Procurement, Air Force:
        Classified programs...........................         8,000,000
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy:
        COD follow-on.................................         8,873,000
        Marine Corps combat services support..........         5,355,000
        UCLASS........................................       218,000,000
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Air
     Force:
        3DELRR........................................        47,000,000
        F-15 IRST.....................................         5,271,000
        Operationally responsive space................           500,000
        Service support to SPACECOM...................         1,000,000
        Space control.................................           500,000
        Space launch range services...................           500,000
        Space situational awareness...................           500,000
        Space situational awareness operations........         1,000,000
        Weather system follow-on......................         4,000,000
 

    Section 8041 prohibits funds made available in this Act 
from being used to reduce authorized positions for military 
technicians (dual status) of the Army National Guard, Air 
National Guard, Army Reserve, and Air Force Reserve unless such 
reductions are a direct result of a reduction in military force 
structure.
    Section 8042 prohibits funding from being obligated or 
expended for assistance to the Democratic People's Republic of 
Korea unless specifically appropriated for that purpose.
    Section 8043 provides for reimbursement to the National 
Guard and Reserve when members of the National Guard and 
Reserve provide intelligence or counterintelligence support to 
the combatant commands, defense agencies, and joint 
intelligence activities.
    Section 8044 prohibits the transfer of Department of 
Defense and Central Intelligence Agencies drug interdiction and 
counter-drug activity funds to other agencies except as 
specifically provided in an appropriations law.
    Section 8045 prohibits funding from being used for the 
procurement of ball and roller bearings other than those 
produced by a domestic source and of domestic origin.
    Section 8046 provides funding for Red Cross and United 
Service Organization grants.
    Section 8047 prohibits funding from being used to purchase 
supercomputers which are not manufactured in the United States.
    Section 8048 has been amended and provides set asides for 
the Small Business Innovation Research program and the Small 
Business Technology Transfer program.
    Section 8049 prohibits funding from being used for 
contractor bonuses being paid due to business restructuring.
    Section 8050 provides for prior congressional notification 
of article or service transfers to international peacekeeping 
organizations.
    Section 8051 provides for the Department of Defense to 
dispose of negative unliquidated or unexpended balances for 
expired or closed accounts.
    Section 8052 provides conditions for the use of equipment 
of the National Guard Distance Learning Project on a space-
available, reimbursable basis.
    Section 8053 provides for the availability of funds to 
implement cost-effective agreements for required heating 
facility modernization in the Kaiserslautern Military 
Community, Landstuhl Army Regional Medical Center, and Ramstein 
Air Base, Germany.
    Section 8054 has been amended and provides funding for 
Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Programs.
    Section 8055 provides for the limitation on the use of 
funds appropriated in title IV to procure end-items for 
delivery to military forces for operational training, 
operational use or inventory requirements.
    Section 8056 provides for a waiver of ``Buy America'' 
provisions for certain cooperative programs.
    Section 8057 prohibits funding from being used to support 
the training of members of foreign security forces who have 
engaged in gross violations of human rights.
    Section 8058 prohibits funding in this Act from being used 
for repairs or maintenance to military family housing units.
    Section 8059 provides obligation authority for new starts 
for advanced concept technology demonstration projects only 
after notification to the congressional defense committees.
    Section 8060 provides that the Secretary of Defense shall 
provide a classified quarterly report on certain matters as 
directed in the classified annex accompanying this Act.
    Section 8061 has been amended and provides for the use of 
National Guard personnel to support ground-based elements of 
the National Ballistic Missile Defense System.
    Section 8062 prohibits the use of funds made available in 
this Act to transfer to any nongovernmental entity ammunition 
held by the Department of Defense that has a center-fire 
cartridge and is designated as ``armor piercing'' except for 
demilitarization purposes.
    Section 8063 provides for a waiver by the Chief of the 
National Guard Bureau or his designee for all or part of 
consideration in cases of personal property leases of less than 
one year.
    Section 8064 provides for a limitation on funding from 
being used to support non-appropriated funds that purchase 
alcoholic beverages.
    Section 8065 has been amended and provides for the transfer 
of funds made available in this Act under Operation and 
Maintenance, Army to other activities of the Federal Government 
for classified purposes.
    Section 8066 has been amended and prohibits funding to 
separate, or to consolidate from within, the National 
Intelligence Program budget from the Department of Defense 
budget.
    Section 8067 has been amended and provides grant authority 
for the construction and furnishing of additional Fisher Houses 
to meet the needs of military family members when confronted 
with the illness or hospitalization of an eligible military 
beneficiary.
    Section 8068 has been amended and provides funding and 
transfer authority for the Israeli Cooperative Programs.
    Section 8069 has been amended and provides for the funding 
of prior year shipbuilding cost increases.
    Section 8070 has been amended and provides that funds made 
available in this Act for intelligence activities are deemed to 
be specifically authorized by Congress for purposes of section 
504 of the National Security Act of 1947 until the enactment of 
the Intelligence Authorization Act for the current fiscal year.
    Section 8071 prohibits funding from being used to initiate 
a new start program without prior written notification.
    Section 8072 has been amended and provides that the budget 
of the President for the subsequent fiscal year shall include 
separate budget justification documents for costs of the United 
States Armed Forces' participation in contingency operations 
for the military personnel, operation and maintenance, and 
procurement accounts.
    Section 8073 prohibits funding from being used for the 
research, development, test, evaluation, procurement, or 
deployment of nuclear armed interceptors of a missile defense 
system.
    Section 8074 has been amended and reduces appropriations to 
reflect savings due to favorable exchange rates.
    Section 8075 prohibits funding from being used to reduce or 
disestablish the operation of the 53rd Weather Reconnaissance 
Squadron of the Air Force Reserve.
    Section 8076 prohibits funding from being used for the 
integration of foreign intelligence information unless the 
information has been lawfully collected and processed during 
conduct of authorized foreign intelligence activities.
    Section 8077 provides that at the time members of reserve 
components of the Armed Forces are called or ordered to active 
duty, each member shall be notified in writing of the expected 
period during which the member will be mobilized.
    Section 8078 prohibits funding from being used to transfer 
program authority relating to current tactical unmanned aerial 
vehicles from the Army and requires the Army to retain 
responsibility for and operational control of the MQ-1C 
Unmanned Aerial Vehicle.
    Section 8079 provides funding under certain conditions for 
the Asia Pacific Regional Initiative Program for the purpose of 
enabling the Pacific Command to execute certain theater 
security cooperation activities.
    Section 8080 has been amended and limits the availability 
of funding provided for the Office of the Director of National 
Intelligence beyond the current fiscal year, except for funds 
appropriated for research and technology, which shall remain 
available for the current and the following fiscal years.
    Section 8081 provides for the adjustment of obligations 
within the Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy appropriation.
    Section 8082 has been amended and provides for the 
establishment of a baseline for application of reprogramming 
and transfer authorities for the Office of the Director of 
National Intelligence for the current fiscal year.
    Section 8083 prohibits the use of funds to modify Army 
Contracting Command--New Jersey without prior congressional 
notification.
    Section 8084 prohibits funding from being used to violate 
the Child Soldiers Prevention Act of 2008.
    Section 8085 provides for the transfer of funds by the 
Director of National Intelligence to other departments and 
agencies for the purposes of Government-wide information 
sharing activities.
    Section 8086 provides for limitations on funding provided 
for the National Intelligence Program to be available for 
obligation or expenditure through a reprogramming or transfer 
of funds in accordance with section 102A(d) of the National 
Security Act of 1947 (50 U.S.C. 403-1(d)).
    Section 8087 directs the Director of National Intelligence 
to submit a future-years intelligence program reflecting 
estimated expenditures and proposed appropriations.
    Section 8088 defines the congressional intelligence 
committees as being the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence of the House, the Select Committee on Intelligence 
of the Senate, and the Subcommittees on Defense of the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate.
    Section 8089 has been amended and directs the Department of 
Defense to continue to report incremental contingency 
operations costs for Operation Inherent Resolve, Operation 
Freedom's Sentinel, or any other named successor operations on 
a monthly basis in the Cost of War Execution Report as required 
by Department of Defense Financial Management Regulation.
    Section 8090 provides the authority to transfer funding 
from operation and maintenance accounts for the Army, Navy, and 
Air Force to the central fund for Fisher Houses and Suites.
    Section 8091 has been modified and provides that funds 
appropriated in this Act may be available for the purpose of 
making remittances and transfers to the Defense Acquisition 
Workforce Development Fund.
    Section 8092 provides that any agency receiving funds made 
available in this Act shall post on a public website any report 
required to be submitted by Congress with certain exceptions.
    Section 8093 prohibits the use of funds for federal 
contracts in excess of $1,000,000 unless the contractor agrees 
not to require, as a condition of employment, that employees or 
independent contractors agree to resolve through arbitration 
any claim or tort related to, or arising out of, sexual assault 
or harassment, including assault and battery, intentional 
infliction of emotional distress, false imprisonment, or 
negligent hiring, supervision, or retention, and to certify 
that each covered subcontractor agrees to do the same.
    Section 8094 has been amended and provides funds for 
transfer to the Joint Department of Defense--Department of 
Veterans Affairs Medical Facility Demonstration Fund.
    Section 8095 prohibits the Office of the Director of 
National Intelligence from employing more Senior Executive 
employees than are specified in the classified annex.
    Section 8096 has been amended and provides for the purchase 
of heavy and light armed vehicles for the physical security of 
personnel or for force protection purposes up to a limit of 
$450,000 per vehicle.
    Section 8097 has been amended and prohibits the use of 
funds providing certain missile defense information to certain 
entities.
    Section 8098 requires monthly reporting of the civilian 
personnel end strength by appropriation account to the 
congressional defense committees.
    Section 8099 has been amended and provides the Director of 
National Intelligence with general transfer authority with 
certain limitations.
    Section 8100 prohibits funding to transfer or release any 
individual detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba into the United 
States, its territories, or possessions. This language is 
identical to language enacted in Public Law 112-74.
    Section 8101 prohibits funding to modify any United States 
facility (other than the facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba) to 
house any individual detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. This 
language is identical to language enacted in Public Law 112-74.
    Section 8102 prohibits funding to transfer any individual 
detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba to a country of origin or 
other foreign country or entity unless the Secretary of Defense 
makes certain certifications. This language is similar to 
language enacted in Public Law 112-239.
    Section 8103 prohibits funding from being used to violate 
the War Powers Resolution Act.
    Section 8104 prohibits funds from being used to purchase or 
lease new light duty vehicles except in accordance with the 
Presidential Memorandum-Federal Fleet Performance.
    Section 8105 prohibits funds from being used to enter into 
a contract, memorandum of understanding, or cooperative 
agreement with, make a grant to, or provide a loan or loan 
guarantee to Rosoboronexport, except under certain conditions.
    Section 8106 prohibits the use of funds for the purchase of 
manufacture of a United States flag unless such flags are 
treated as covered items under section 2533a(b) of title 10, 
United States Code.
    Section 8107 prohibits the use of funds for certain 
activities in Afghanistan.
    Section 8108 provides that funds may be used to provide ex 
gratia payments to local military commanders for damage, 
personal injury, or death that is incident to combat operations 
in a foreign country.
    Section 8109 prohibits the use of funds to reduce or 
prepare to reduce the number of deployed and non-deployed 
strategic delivery vehicles and launchers.
    Section 8110 directs the Secretary of Defense to post grant 
awards on a public website in a searchable format.
    Section 8111 prohibits the use of funding to reduce the 
force structure at Lajes Field, Azores, Portugal.
    Section 8112 prohibits the use of funds for flight 
demonstration teams outside of the United States.
    Section 8113 prohibits the use of funds by the National 
Security Agency targeting U.S. persons under authorities 
granted in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.
    Section 8114 has been amended and provides funding for 
basic allowance for housing for military personnel.
    Section 8115 prohibits the use of funds to implement the 
Arms Trade Treaty until ratified by the Senate.
    Section 8116 has been amended and prohibits the use of 
funding to transfer or divest AH-64 Apache helicopters from the 
Army National Guard to the active Army.
    Section 8117 prohibits the use of funds to provide 
counterterrorism support to foreign partners unless the 
congressional defense committees are notified accordingly.
    Section 8118 requires a report on the justification and 
approval requirements under section 811 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010.
    Section 8119 prohibits the use of funds to contravene the 
War Powers Resolution with respect to Iraq.
    Section 8120 has been amended and prohibits the use of 
funds to retire the A-10 aircraft.
    Section 8121 is new and provides funds to support 
Department of Defense activities related to the Digital 
Accountability and Transparency Act.
    Section 8122 is new and prohibits the transfer of funds to 
the National Sea Based Deterrent Fund.
    Section 8123 is new and prohibits the use of funds to award 
a new T-AO(X) program contract for the acquisition of certain 
components unless those components are manufactured in the 
United States.
    Section 8124 is new and provides for the transfer of 
additional funds to military personnel accounts for the 
purposes of military pay.
    Section 8125 is new and reduces Working Capital Funds to 
reflect excess cash balances.
    Section 8126 is new and reduces the total amount 
appropriated to reflect lower than anticipated fuel prices.
    Section 8127 is new and prohibits the use of funds to 
reduce end strength levels for the Army National Guard below 
the level specified in subtitle B of title IV of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015.
    Section 8128 is new and prohibits the use of funds to 
enforce section 526 of the Energy Independence and Security Act 
of 2007.
                                TITLE IX

                        GLOBAL WAR ON TERRORISM

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    In title IX, the Committee recommends total new 
appropriations of $88,421,000,000. A detailed review of the 
Committee recommendation for programs funded in this title is 
provided in the following pages.

                         REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to continue 
to report incremental contingency operations costs for all 
named operations in the Central Command Area of Responsibility 
on a monthly basis in the Cost of War Execution report as 
required by Department of Defense Financial Management 
Regulation, Chapter 23, Volume 12. The Committee further 
directs the Secretary of Defense to continue providing Cost of 
War reports to the congressional defense committees that 
include the following information by appropriation account: 
funding appropriated, funding allocated, monthly obligations, 
monthly disbursements, cumulative fiscal year obligations, and 
cumulative fiscal year disbursements.
    The Committee expects that in order to meet unanticipated 
requirements, the Secretary of Defense may need to transfer 
within these appropriations accounts for purposes other than 
those specified in this report. The Committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to follow normal prior approval 
reprogramming procedures should it be necessary to transfer 
funding between different appropriations accounts in this title 
using authority provided in Section 9003 of this Act.

                           MILITARY PERSONNEL

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$10,467,900,000 for Military Personnel. The Committee 
recommendation for each military personnel account is as 
follows:


                       OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$53,783,361,000 for Operation and Maintenance. The Committee 
recommendation for each operation and maintenance account is as 
follows:


                               READINESS

    The agreement includes $2,500,000,000 in title IX to be 
transferred to the operation and maintenance accounts and be 
divided among the Services and the National Guard and reserve 
components. Funding is to be distributed as follows: thirty-
five percent to the Army, including seven percent to the Army 
Reserve and ten percent to the Army National Guard; thirty-
three percent to the Navy, including the Navy Reserve; seven 
percent to the Marine Corps, including the Marine Corps 
Reserve; and twenty-five percent to the Air Force, including 
the Air Force Reserve and the Air National Guard.
    This funding shall be used only to improve military 
readiness, specifically increased training, depot maintenance, 
and base operations support. Funding should be obligated only 
in readiness sub-activity groups that fund training, depot 
maintenance, and base operations support within budget activity 
1 ``Operating Forces'' or, for the Air Force only, budget 
activity 2 ``Mobilization Forces''. The Committee is concerned 
that in fiscal year 2015, some Services proposed to use 
readiness funds on named operations or to accelerate 
information technology requirements from future years rather 
than to build readiness. As such, none of the funds provided 
may be used to participate in named operations, and none of the 
funds provided may be used for recruiting, marketing, or 
advertising programs.
    The funding provided is a congressional special interest 
item. The Secretary of Defense and the Service Secretaries are 
directed to submit a detailed spending plan by sub-activity 
group to the House and Senate Appropriations Committees not 
less than 30 days prior to the obligation of these funds. These 
transfers may be implemented 30 days after congressional 
notification unless an objection is received from either the 
House or Senate Appropriations Committees.
    Additional funds are also provided to the Army, Army 
Reserve, and the Army National Guard in their respective 
operation and maintenance accounts only for the purpose of 
restoring readiness.

                    EUROPEAN REASSURANCE INITIATIVE

    The Committee supports efforts started in fiscal year 2015 
to reassure NATO allies and partners of the continued 
commitment of the United States to their security and 
territorial integrity. The Committee recommends $789,300,000 
for the European Reassurance Initiative (ERI) to support 
increased capability, presence, readiness, and responsiveness 
to deter further destabilization in central and eastern Europe. 
Efforts include an increased U.S. military presence in Europe, 
additional bilateral and multilateral exercises and training 
opportunities with allies and partners, improved infrastructure 
to allow for greater responsiveness, enhanced prepositioning of 
equipment in Europe, and intensified efforts to build partner 
capacity for new NATO members and other partners.
    This funding is provided as requested in the fiscal year 
2016 budget request in the military personnel and operation and 
maintenance accounts at the budget activity and sub-activity 
group level of detail. The Committee again directs the 
Secretary of Defense to request any required fiscal year 2017 
funding within the existing military personnel and operation 
and maintenance accounts as part of the fiscal year 2017 budget 
request.

                      OPERATION FREEDOM'S SENTINEL

    The mission of Operation Freedom's Sentinel is to work with 
allies and partners on Resolute Support and continue 
counterterrorism operations against the remnants of Al-Qaeda in 
Afghanistan. The President recently announced a change to the 
drawdown in Afghanistan that will affect this operation. The 
Army reports that it will have a $593,000,000 shortfall in 
operation and maintenance requirements as a result of this 
change to the drawdown timeline. The Committee recommendation 
provides an additional $593,000,000 in the Operation and 
Maintenance, Army account to be used only for Operation 
Freedom's Sentinel. This funding is a congressional special 
interest item. The Committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a spend plan by sub-activity group to the House and 
Senate Appropriations Committees not less than 15 days prior to 
any obligation of funds. This funding may be implemented 15 
days after congressional notification unless an objection is 
received from either the House or Senate Appropriations 
Committee.

                         ASSISTANCE TO UKRAINE

    The Committee recommends an additional $200,000,000 to 
provide assistance to the national security forces of Ukraine. 
Section 9014 of this Act provides guidance for the use of this 
funding and directs the purchase of items such as training, 
equipment, lethal weapons of a defensive nature, and logistics 
support. This assistance is provided for the purpose of helping 
Ukraine secure its sovereign territory and protect its citizens 
against foreign aggressors.

             INTELLIGENCE, SURVEILLANCE, AND RECONNAISSANCE

    The Committee believes that a strong Intelligence, 
Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) capability is a critical 
component of the Global War on Terrorism. Accordingly, the 
Committee recommends additional funding for the procurement of 
several ISR aircraft and also provides $500,000,000 above the 
request to improve the Department's ISR capabilities. This 
funding shall be used to address the ISR gap faced by the 
combatant commanders and is available for the pay, allowances, 
and training of ISR personnel, operation and maintenance of ISR 
assets, procurement of ISR assets, and processing of ISR-
derived data. None of the funds provided may be used for 
bonuses, to include critical skills retention bonuses and 
enlistment and re-enlistment bonuses. The Committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense and the Service Secretaries to submit a 
detailed spending plan by account, activity group, and sub-
activity group or line item to the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees not less than 30 days prior to the 
obligation of these funds. This report shall include at a 
minimum the intended use of funds, including specific 
information on how this funding will improve the ISR 
capabilities of the Department. These transfers may be 
implemented 30 days after congressional notification unless an 
objection is received from either the House or Senate 
Appropriations Committee.

                   COUNTERTERRORISM PARTNERSHIPS FUND

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$2,060,000,000 for the Counterterrorism Partnerships Fund.

                    AFGHANISTAN SECURITY FORCES FUND

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$3,762,257,000 for the Afghanistan Security Forces Fund.

                       IRAQ TRAIN AND EQUIP FUND

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$715,000,000 for the Iraq Train and Equip Fund.

                       SYRIA TRAIN AND EQUIP FUND

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$600,000,000 for the Syria Train and Equip Fund.

                              PROCUREMENT

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$18,094,699,000 for Procurement. The Committee recommendation 
for each procurement account is as follows:


                                STRYKER

    The Stryker series of vehicles has provided improved force 
protection, agility, and mobility for the Army's medium weight 
vehicle class. The Committee is aware of efforts to improve 
Stryker survivability, power, and lethality while limiting 
growth in size and weight. The Committee recommendation 
provides an increase of $106,300,000 to upgrade 36 Strykers to 
Double V Hull vehicles. Additionally, the Committee provides an 
increase of $314,300,000 to purchase Stryker lethality 
upgrades.

                  NATIONAL GUARD AND RESERVE EQUIPMENT

    The Committee recommends $1,500,000,000 for National Guard 
and Reserve Equipment. Of that amount, $500,000,000 is for the 
Army National Guard; $500,000,000 is for the Air National 
Guard; $315,000,000 is for the Army Reserve; $70,000,000 is for 
the Navy Reserve; $40,000,000 is for the Marine Corps Reserve; 
and $75,000,000 is for the Air Force Reserve to meet urgent 
equipment needs that may arise this fiscal year.
    This funding will allow the National Guard and reserve 
components to procure high priority equipment that may be used 
by these units for both their combat missions and their 
missions in support of state governors. The funding within this 
account is not to be used to procure equipment that has been 
designated as high density critical equipment item, major 
weapon systems, aircraft, and other items of equipment central 
to a unit's ability to perform its doctrinal mission. The 
funding within this account is not to be used to procure 
equipment that should be purchased by the senior Service, to 
expand or accelerate current Service procurement plans 
increasing program risk borne by the reserve components, to 
purchase expendable items, or to purchase facilities or 
equipment for any requirement that can be satisfied elsewhere.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to ensure 
that the National Guard and Reserve Equipment account shall be 
executed by the Chiefs of the National Guard and reserve 
components with priority consideration given to the following 
items: acoustic hailing devices, large aircraft infrared 
countermeasures, advanced targeting pods, security and support 
mission equipment communications packages for UH-60 civil 
support communications, electromagnetic in-flight propeller 
balance system, joint threat emitter systems, data links in 
ground vehicles, upgrades for first responder radios, network 
wideband radios (including airborne terminals), training 
systems and simulators, wireless mobile mesh network 
technologies, integrated facial protection components for 
standard issue helmets, and laser protective eyewear.

               RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$1,784,653,000 for Research, Development, Test and Evaluation. 
The Committee recommendation for each research, development, 
test and evaluation account is as follows:


                     REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS


                     DEFENSE WORKING CAPITAL FUNDS

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$88,850,000 for the Defense Working Capital Funds accounts.

                  OTHER DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PROGRAMS


                         DEFENSE HEALTH PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$272,704,000 for the Defense Health Program. The Committee 
recommendation is as follows:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee         Change from
                                                           Budget request      recommended          request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
IN-HOUSE CARE..........................................             65,149             65,149              - - -
PRIVATE SECTOR CARE....................................            192,210            192,210              - - -
CONSOLIDATED HEALTH SUPPORT............................              9,460              9,460              - - -
EDUCATION AND TRAINING.................................              5,885              5,885              - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    TOTAL, OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE...................            272,704            272,704              - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

         DRUG INTERDICTION AND COUNTER-DRUG ACTIVITIES, DEFENSE

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$275,300,000 for Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities 
Defense. The Committee recommendation is as follows:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee         Change from
                                                           Budget request      recommended          request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
DRUG INTERDICTION AND COUNTER-DRUG ACTIVITIES..........            186,000            260,300             89,300
    CENTCOM requirements--transfer from title VI.......              - - -             34,300              - - -
    Program increase...................................              - - -             40,000              - - -
    Program increase--SOUTHCOM ISR.....................              - - -             15,000              - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, DRUG INTERDICTION AND COUNTER-DRUG                    186,000            275,300             89,300
     ACTIVITIES........................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

             JOINT IMPROVISED EXPLOSIVE DEVICE DEFEAT FUND

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$443,271,000 for the Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat 
Fund. The Committee recommendation is as follows:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee         Change from
                                                           Budget request      recommended          request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ATTACK THE NETWORK.....................................            219,550            219,550              - - -
DEFEAT THE DEVICE......................................             77,600             77,600              - - -
TRAIN THE FORCE........................................              7,850              7,850              - - -
STAFF AND INFRASTRUCTURE...............................            188,271            138,271            -50,000
    Program reduction..................................              - - -            -50,000              - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, JOINT IED DEFEAT FUND.....................            493,271            443,271            -50,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$10,262,000 for the Office of the Inspector General.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Title IX contains several general provisions, many of which 
extend or modify war-related authorities included in previous 
Acts. A brief description of the recommended provisions 
follows:
    Section 9001 is new and requires the President to designate 
Overseas Contingency Operation/Global War on Terrorism funds.
    Section 9002 has been amended and provides that funds made 
available in this title are in addition to funds appropriated 
or otherwise made available for the Department of Defense for 
the current fiscal year.
    Section 9003 has been amended and provides for general 
transfer authority within title IX.
    Section 9004 provides that supervision and administration 
costs associated with a construction project funded with 
appropriations available for operation and maintenance, 
Afghanistan Infrastructure Fund, or the Afghanistan Security 
Forces Fund may be obligated at the time a construction 
contract is awarded.
    Section 9005 provides for the procurement of passenger 
motor vehicles and heavy and light armored vehicles for use by 
military and civilian employees of the Department of Defense in 
the U.S. Central Command area.
    Section 9006 has been amended and provides funding for the 
Commander's Emergency Response Program, within certain 
limitations.
    Section 9007 provides lift and sustainment to coalition 
forces supporting military and stability operations in Iraq and 
Afghanistan.
    Section 9008 prohibits the establishment of permanent bases 
in Iraq or Afghanistan or United States control over Iraq oil 
resources.
    Section 9009 prohibits the use of funding in contravention 
of the United Nations Convention Against Torture and Other 
Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment.
    Section 9010 limits the obligation of funding for the 
Afghanistan Security Forces Fund until certain conditions have 
been met.
    Section 9011 provides for the purchase of items of a 
particular investment unit cost from funding made available for 
operation and maintenance.
    Section 9012 has been amended and provides funding for the 
operations and activities of the Office of Security Cooperation 
in Iraq and security assistance teams.
    Section 9013 is new and provides security assistance to the 
Government of Jordan.
    Section 9014 is new and provides assistance and sustainment 
to the military and national security forces of Ukraine.
    Section 9015 restricts funds provided under the heading 
Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide for payments under 
Coalition Support Funds for reimbursement to the Government of 
Pakistan until certain conditions are met.
    Section 9016 is new and provides funds to the Department of 
Defense to improve intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance capabilities.
    Section 9017 has been amended and provides funds for the 
operation and maintenance accounts of the Army, Navy, Marine 
Corps and Air Force (including the National Guard and reserve 
components) to improve military readiness.
    Section 9018 prohibits the use of funds with respect to 
Syria in contravention of the War Powers Resolution.
                                TITLE X

    Title X contains two new general provisions.
    Section 10001 states that the Congress has a constitutional 
duty to debate the use of authorized military force against the 
Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant.
    Section 10002 states that the applicable allocation of 
budget authority made by the Committee on Appropriations does 
not exceed the amount of proposed new budget authority.

            HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

    The following items are included in accordance with various 
requirements of the Rules of the House of Representatives:

               CHANGES IN THE APPLICATION OF EXISTING LAW

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following statements are 
submitted describing the effect of provisions in the 
accompanying bill which directly or indirectly change the 
application of existing law.
    Language is included in various parts of the bill to 
continue ongoing activities which require annual authorization 
or additional legislation, which to date has not been enacted.
    The bill includes a number of provisions which place 
limitations on the use of funds in the bill or change existing 
limitations and which might, under some circumstances, be 
construed as changing the application of law.
    The bill includes a number of provisions, which have been 
virtually unchanged for many years that are technically 
considered legislation.
    The bill provides that appropriations shall remain 
available for more than one year for some programs for which 
the basic authorizing legislation does not presently authorize 
each extended availability.
    In various places in the bill, the Committee has allocated 
funds within appropriation accounts in order to fund specific 
programs.
    Changes in the application of existing law found within 
appropriations headings:
    Language is included in various accounts placing a 
limitation on funds for emergencies and extraordinary expenses.
    Language is included that provides not more than 
$15,000,000 for the Combatant Commander Initiative Fund.
    Language is included that provides not more than 
$36,000,000 for emergencies and extraordinary expenses.
    Language is included that provides not less than 
$35,045,000 for the Procurement Technical Assistance 
Cooperative Agreement Program, of which not less than 
$3,600,000 shall be available for centers.
    Language is included that prohibits the consolidation of 
certain legislative affairs or liaison offices.
    Language is included that makes available $9,031,000 for 
certain classified activities, allows such funds to be 
transferred between certain accounts, and exempts such funds 
from the investment item unit cost of items ceiling.
    Language is included that provides that any transfer 
authority provided under the heading ``Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-Wide'' shall be in addition to any other 
transfer authority provided in this Act.
    Language is included under the various Environmental 
Restoration accounts that provides that the Service Secretaries 
may transfer such funds for the purposes of the funds provided 
under such appropriations headings, and provides that such 
transfer authority shall be in addition to any other transfer 
authority provided in the Act.
    Language is included that provides for specific 
construction, acquisition, or conversion of vessels under the 
heading ``Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy''.
    Language is included under the heading ``Aircraft 
Procurement, Air Force'' that limits the purchase of certain 
aircrafts until a certification is made.
    Language is included under the heading ``Research, 
Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy'' that provides funds 
for certain activities.
    Language is included under the heading ``Research, 
Development, Test and Evaluation, Defense-Wide'' that provides 
$250,000,000 for the Defense Rapid Innovation Program and 
provides for the transfer of funds subject to certain 
requirements.
    Language is included under the heading ``National Defense 
Sealift Fund'' providing authority for certain awards.
    Language is included that provides that not less than 
$8,000,000 of funds provided under ``Defense Health Program'' 
shall be available for HIV/AIDS prevention education 
activities.
    Language is included that provides for the carry-over of 
one percent of the Operation and Maintenance account under the 
``Defense Health Program''.
    Language is included under the ``Defense Health Program'' 
that provides for not less than $587,100,000 to be made 
available to the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel 
Command to carry out congressionally directed medical research 
programs.
    Language is included that specifies the use of certain 
funds provided under ``Chemical Agents and Munitions 
Destruction''.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
funds under ``Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities'''. 
Such transfer authority shall be in addition to other transfer 
authority provided elsewhere in the Act.
    Language is included that provides that no funds made 
available in this Act may be used for publicity or propaganda 
purposes not authorized by Congress.
    Language is included that provides for conditions and 
limitations on the payment of compensation to, or employment 
of, foreign nationals.
    Language is included that provides that no funds made 
available in this Act may be obligated beyond the end of the 
fiscal year unless express provision for a greater period of 
availability is provided elsewhere in this Act.
    Language is included that provides a 20 percent limitation 
on the obligation of funds provided in this Act during the last 
two months of the fiscal year with certain exceptions.
    Language is included that provides for general transfer 
authority.
    Language is included that provides for incorporation of 
project level tables.
    Language is included that provides for the establishment of 
a baseline for application of reprogramming and transfer 
authorities for fiscal year 2016 and prohibits certain 
reprogrammings until after submission of a report.
    Language is included that provides for limitations on the 
use and transfer authority of working capital fund cash 
balances.
    Language is included that provides that prohibits funds 
appropriated in this Act to initiate a special access program 
without prior notification to the congressional defense 
committees.
    Language is included that provides limitations and 
conditions on the use of funds made available in this Act to 
initiate multi-year contracts.
    Language is included that provides for the use and 
obligation of funds for humanitarian and civic assistance costs 
under Chapter 20 of title 10, United States Code.
    Language is included that provides that civilian personnel 
of the Department may not be managed on the basis of end 
strength or be subject to end strength limitations, sets forth 
certain requirements related to end strength for the budget 
submission, and requires that Department of Army Science and 
Technology Reinvention Laboratories be managed based on budget 
availability.
    Language is included that prohibits funds made available in 
this Act from being used to influence congressional action on 
any matters pending before the Congress.
    Language is included that prohibits compensation from being 
paid to any member of the Army who is participating as a full-
time student and who receives benefits from the Education 
Benefits Fund when time spent as a full-time student is counted 
toward that member's service commitment.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
funds appropriated in title III of this Act for the Department 
of Defense Pilot Mentor-Protege Program.
    Language is included that provides for the Department of 
Defense to purchase anchor and mooring chains manufactured only 
in the United States.
    Language is included that prohibits funds made available to 
the Department of Defense from being used to demilitarize or 
dispose of surplus firearms.
    Language is included that provides a limitation on funds 
being used for the relocation of any Department of Defense 
entity into or within the National Capital Region.
    Language is included that provides for incentive payments 
authorized by section 504 of the Indian Financing Act of 1974 
(25 U.S.C. 1544).
    Language is included that provides that no funds made 
available in this Act for the Defense Media Activity may be 
used for national or international political or psychological 
activities.
    Language is included that provides for the obligation of 
funds for purposes specified in section 2350j(c) of title 10, 
United States Code.
    Language is included that provides funding for the Civil 
Air Patrol Corporation.
    Language is included that provides for the number of staff 
years of technical effort that may be funded for defense 
Federally Funded Research and Development Centers.
    Language is included that provides for the Department of 
Defense to procure carbon, alloy, or armor steel plate melted 
and rolled only in the United States and Canada.
    Language is included that defines congressional defense 
committees as being the Armed Services Committees and the 
Subcommittees on Defense of the Committees on Appropriations of 
the House and Senate.
    Language is included that provides for competitions between 
private firms and Department of Defense Depot Maintenance 
Activities for modification, depot maintenance, and repair of 
aircraft, vehicles, and vessels, as well as the production of 
components and other Defense-related articles.
    Language is included that provides for revocation of 
blanket waivers of the Buy America Act upon a finding that a 
country has violated a reciprocal trade agreement by 
discriminating against products produced in the United States 
that are covered by the agreement.
    Language is included that provides for the availability of 
funds for the Department of Defense Overseas Military Facility 
Investment Recovery Account established by section 2921(c)(2) 
of the 1991 National Defense Authorization Act.
    Language is included that provides for the conveyance, 
without consideration, of relocatable housing units located at 
Grand Forks, Malmstrom, Mountain Home, Ellsworth, and Minot Air 
Force Bases to Indian Tribes that are excess to Air Force 
needs.
    Language is included that provides authority to use 
operation and maintenance appropriations to purchase items 
having an investment item unit cost of not more than $250,000.
    Language is included that prohibits funds from being used 
to disestablish, close downgrade or place of probation a Senior 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps program.
    Language is included that prohibits the purchase of 
specified investment items within Working Capital Fund.
    Language is included that provides that none of the funds 
appropriated for the Central Intelligence Agency shall remain 
available for obligation beyond the current fiscal year except 
for finds appropriated for the Reserve for Contingencies, the 
Working Capital Fund, or other certain programs authorized 
under section 503 of the National Security Act.
    Language is included that provides that funds available for 
the Defense Intelligence Agency may be used for intelligence 
communications and intelligence information systems for the 
Services, the Unified and Specified Commands, and the component 
commends.
    Language is included that provides that not less than 
$12,000,000 within ``Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide'' 
shall be for mitigation of environmental impacts on Indian 
lands.
    Language is included that provides for the Department of 
Defense to comply with the Buy American Act (chapter 83 of 
title 41, United States Code).
    Language is included that provides conditions under which 
contracts for studies, analyses, or consulting services may be 
entered into without competition on the basis of an unsolicited 
proposal.
    Language is included that provides for the limitations of 
funds made available in this Act to establish Field Operating 
Agencies.
    Language is included that provides for the limitations on 
the conversion of an activity or function of the Department of 
Defense to contractor performance.
    Language is included that provides for the rescission of 
previously appropriated funds.
    Language is included that prohibits funds made available in 
this Act from being used to reduce authorized positions for 
military technicians (dual status) of the Army National Guard, 
Air National Guard, Army Reserve, and Air Force Reserve unless 
such reductions are a direct result of a reduction in military 
force structure.
    Language is included that provides that none of the funds 
made available in this Act may be obligated or expended for 
assistance to the Democratic People's Republic of Korea unless 
appropriated for that purpose.
    Language is included that provides for reimbursement to the 
National Guard and reserve when members of the National Guard 
and reserve provide intelligence or counterintelligence support 
to the Combatant Commands, Defense Agencies, and Joint 
Intelligence Activities.
    Language is included that provides that Defense and Central 
Intelligence Agencies' drug interdiction and counter-drug 
activity funds may not be transferred to other agencies unless 
specifically provided in an appropriations law.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds 
appropriated by this Act for the procurement of ball and roller 
bearings other than those produced by a domestic source and of 
domestic origin.
    Language is included to provide funding to make grants if 
it serves the national interest to do so.
    Language is included that provides for the Department of 
Defense to purchase supercomputers manufactured only in the 
United States unless the Secretary certifies such acquisition 
must be made for national security purposes.
    Language is included to allow for Small Business Innovation 
Research program and Small Business Technology Transfer program 
set-asides to the extent they contribute to the extramural 
budget.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act for contractor bonuses from being paid 
due to business restructuring.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
funds to be used to support personnel supporting approved non-
traditional defense activities.
    Language is included that provides for the Department of 
Defense to dispose of negative unliquidated or unexpended 
balances for expired or closed accounts.
    Language is included that provides conditions for the use 
of equipment of the National Guard Distance Learning Project on 
a space-available, reimbursable basis.
    Language is included that provides for the availability of 
funds provided by this Act to implement cost-effective 
agreements for required heating facility modernization in the 
Kaiserslautern Military Community, Germany and for other 
purposes.
    Language is included to provide for funding under 
``Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide'' to support high 
priority Sexual Assault Prevention and Response program 
requirements, including the transfer of funds.
    Language is included that provides for the limitation on 
the use of funds appropriated in title IV to procure end-items 
for delivery to military forces for operational training, 
operational use, or inventory requirements.
    Language is included that provides for a waiver of the 
``Buy America'' provisions for certain cooperative programs.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act to support the training of members of 
foreign security forces who have engaged in gross violations of 
human rights.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act for repairs or maintenance to military 
family housing units.
    Language is included that provides obligation authority for 
new starts for advanced concept technology demonstration 
projects only after notification to the congressional defense 
committees.
    Language is included that provides that the Secretary of 
Defense shall provide a classified quarterly report on certain 
matters as directed in the classified annex accompanying this 
Act.
    Language is included that provides for the use of National 
Guard personnel to support ground-based elements of the 
National Ballistic Missile Defense System.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act to transfer to any nongovernmental entity 
ammunition held by the Department of Defense that has a 
center--fire cartridge and designated as ``armor piercing'' 
except for demilitarization purposes.
    Language is included that provides for a waiver by the 
Chief, National Guard Bureau or his designee for all or part of 
consideration in cases of personal property leases of less than 
one year.
    Language is included that prohibits funds made available in 
this Act from being used to purchase malt beverages and wine 
with nonappropriated funds for resale.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
funds made available in this Act under ``Operation and 
Maintenance, Army'' to other activities of the Federal 
Government.
    Language is included that prohibits the modification of the 
appropriations budget request for the National Intelligence 
Program budget structure and presentation.
    Language is included that provides grant authority for the 
construction and furnishing of additional Fisher Houses to meet 
the needs of military family members when confronted with the 
illness or hospitalization of an eligible military beneficiary.
    Language is included that provides funding and transfer 
authority for the Israeli Cooperative missile defense programs.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
funds to properly complete prior year shipbuilding programs.
    Language is included that provides that funds made 
available in this Act are deemed to be specifically authorized 
by Congress for purposes of section 504 of the National 
Security Act of 1947 until enactment of the authorization Act.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act to initiate a new start program without 
prior written notification.
    Language is included that provides that the budget of the 
President for fiscal year 2017 shall include separate budget 
justification documents for costs of the United States Armed 
Forces' participation in contingency operations that contain 
certain budget exhibits as defined in the Department of Defense 
Financial Management Regulation.
    Language is included that prohibits funds made available in 
this Act from being used for the research, development, test, 
evaluation, procurement, or deployment of nuclear armed 
interceptors of a missile defense system.
    Language is included that reduces funding due to favorable 
foreign exchange rates.
    Language is included that prohibits funds made available in 
this Act from being used to reduce or disestablish the 
operation of the 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron of the 
Air Force Reserve.
    Language is included that prohibits funds made available in 
this Act from being used for the integration of foreign 
intelligence information unless the information has been 
lawfully collected and processed during conduct of authorized 
foreign intelligence activities.
    Language is included that provides that at the time members 
of reserve components of the Armed Forces are called or ordered 
to active duty, each member shall be notified in writing of the 
expected period during which the member will be mobilized.
    Language is included that prohibits the transfer of program 
authorities related to tactical unmanned aerial vehicles from 
the Army.
    Language is included that provides funding and authority 
for the Asia Pacific Regional Initiative program.
    Language is included that limits the obligation authority 
of funds provided for the Director of National Intelligence to 
the current fiscal year except for research and technology 
which shall remain available for the current and the following 
fiscal years.
    Language is included that provides for the adjustment of 
obligations within the ``Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy'' 
appropriation.
    Language is included that prohibits transfers of funds 
until the Director of National Intelligence submits a baseline 
for application of reprogramming and transfer authorities.
    Language is included that prohibits the realignment or 
personnel reductions for certain Army command sites within 
prior notification to the congressional defense committees.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds in 
violation of the standards of the Child Soldiers Prevention Act 
of 2008.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of up 
to $20,000,000 of funds available for the Program Manager for 
Information Sharing Environment to be transferred to other 
departments and agencies for certain purposes.
    Language is included that sets forth reprogramming and 
transfer procedures for the National Intelligence Program.
    Language is included that provides that the Director of 
National Intelligence shall provide budget exhibits identifying 
the five year future-years intelligence program.
    Language is included that defines the congressional 
intelligence committees.
    Language is included that directs the Department of Defense 
to report on the Cost of War Execution Report on a monthly 
basis.
    Language is included that provides that funds from certain 
operation and maintenance accounts may be transferred to a 
central fund established for Fisher Houses and Suites pursuant 
to section 2493(d) of title 10, United States Code.
    Language is included that provides that funds may be used 
for the Defense Acquisition Workforce Development Fund.
    Language is included that provides that agencies post 
congressionally directed reports on a public website.
    Language is included that provides limitations on the award 
of contracts to contractors that require mandatory arbitration 
for certain claims as a condition of employment or a 
contractual relationship. The Secretary is authorized to waive 
the applicability of these limitations for national security 
interests.
    Language is included that provides funds and transfer 
authority for the Joint Department of Defense-Department of 
Veterans Affairs Medical Facility Demonstration Fund.
    Language is included that provides a limitation on the 
number of senior executives employed by the Office of the 
Director of National Intelligence.
    Language is included that provides authority to purchase 
heavy and light armored vehicles notwithstanding price or other 
limitations on the purchase of passenger carrying vehicles.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds in 
contravention of sections 1661, 1662, or 1663 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016.
    Language is included that requires the Secretary of Defense 
to provide quarterly reports on civilian personnel end 
strength.
    Language is included that provides transfer authority for 
the Director of National Intelligence for the National 
Intelligence Program.
    Language is included that prohibits funds to transfer or 
release certain individuals detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba 
into the United States, its territories, or possessions.
    Language is included that prohibits funds to construct, 
acquire, or modify any facility in the United States, its 
territories, or possessions to house individuals detained at 
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
transfer any individual detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba to the 
custody or control of the individual's country of origin, any 
other foreign country, or any other foreign entity except in 
accordance with section 1035 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds in 
contravention of the War Powers Resolution (50 USC 1541).
    Language is included that prohibits the lease or purchase 
of new light duty vehicles except in accordance with 
Presidential Memorandum-Federal Fleet Performance.
    Language is included that prohibits the Department of 
Defense from entering into certain agreements with 
Rosoboronexport with certain waiver authorities.
    Language is included that prohibits the purchase or 
manufacture of a United States flag unless such flag is treated 
as a covered item under section 2533a(b) of the United States 
Code.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds for 
the direct personal benefit of the President of Afghanistan.
    Language is included that provides for the payment of ex 
gratia payments in certain circumstances subject to certain 
conditions.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
reduce or prepare to reduce the number of deployed and non-
deployed strategic delivery vehicles and launchers below 
certain authorized levels.
    Language is included that directs grants awards to be 
posted on a public website.
    Language is included that limits force structure changes at 
Lajes Field, Azores, Portugal except under certain conditions.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds for 
the performance of a flight demonstration team at a location 
outside the United States only if a performance at a location 
within the United States was canceled during the current fiscal 
year due to insufficient funding.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds by the 
National Security Agency for certain activities.
    Language is included that provides for an additional 
appropriation and transfer authority for basic allowance for 
housing for military personnel.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
implement the Arms Trade Treaty until the Senate approves a 
resolution of ratification.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
transfer or divest AH-64 Apache helicopters from the Army 
National Guard to the active Army with certain conditions.
    Language is included that requires certain notification on 
funds provided under section 1208 authorities, with a waiver 
for exigent circumstances.
    Language is included that requires a report to assess 
requirements under section 811 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds with 
respect to Iraq in contravention of the War Powers Resolution.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
divest, retire, transfer or place in storage or backup status 
any A-10 aircraft.
    Language is included that provides for the use of funds 
from ``Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Defense-
Wide'' to support the Department's activities related to the 
implementation of the Digital Accountability and Transparency 
Act.
    Language is included that prohibits funds from being 
transferred to the National Sea Based Deterrent Fund.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
aware a new contract for the T-AO(X) program except under 
certain circumstances.
    Language is included that provides an additional 
appropriation and transfer authority for pay for military 
personnel.
    Language is included that reduces the amount of funds due 
to excess cash balances in the Department of Defense Working 
Capital Funds.
    Language is included that reduces the amount of funds due 
to lower than anticipated fuel prices.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
reduced end strength levels for the Army National Guard below 
levels specified in the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2015, except in certain circumstances.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
enforce section 526 of the Energy Independence and Security Act 
of 2007.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
funds to the ``Coast Guard Operating Expenses'' account from 
the ``Operation and Maintenance, Navy'' account.
    Language is included under ``Operation and Maintenance, 
Defense-Wide'' that provides for the use of funds under certain 
circumstances.
    Language is included under ``Counterterrorism Partnerships 
Fund'' that provides for the use of funds for certain purposes, 
compliance with vetting standards, and transfer of such funds 
to other accounts.
    Language is included under ``Afghanistan Security Forces 
Fund'' that provides for the use of funds for certain purposes 
and the management of contributions and returned items.
    Language is included under ``Iraq Train and Equip Fund'' 
that provides for the use of funds for certain purposes, 
compliance with vetting standards, management of contributions, 
and the submission of certain onetime reporting.
    Language is included under ``Syria Train and Equip Fund'' 
that provides for the use of funds for certain purposes, 
compliance with vetting standards, and the management of 
contributions.
    Language is included under ``National Guard and Reserve 
Equipment Account'' providing for the procurement of certain 
items and the submission of modernization priority assessments. 
Language is included under ``Joint Improvised Explosive Device 
Defeat Fund'' that makes funds available for certain purposes 
notwithstanding any other provision of law and provides for 
transfers to other accounts.
    Language is included that provides that amounts designed in 
this Act as Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on 
Terrorism shall be available only if the President subsequently 
so designates all such amounts and transmits such designations 
to the Congress.
    Language is included that provides that funds made 
available in title IX are in addition to amounts appropriated 
or otherwise made available for the Department of Defense for 
the current fiscal year.
    Language is included that provides for transfer authority 
between appropriations made available in title IX.
    Language is included that provides for supervision and 
administration costs associated with overseas contingency 
operations.
    Language is included that provides authority to purchase 
passenger, heavy, and light armored vehicles notwithstanding 
price or other limitations on the purchase of passenger 
carrying vehicles for use in the U.S. Central Command area of 
responsibility.
    Language is included that provides funds and authority for 
the Commander's Emergency Response Program and establishes 
certain reporting requirements.
    Language is included that authorizes the use of funds to 
provide certain assistance to coalition forces supporting 
military and stability operations in Afghanistan and to counter 
the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, and establishes 
certain reporting requirements.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
establish permanent bases in Iraq or Afghanistan.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds in 
contravention of certain laws or regulations promulgated to 
implement the United Nations Convention Against Torture and 
Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment.
    Language is included that places limitations on the use of 
Afghanistan Security Forces Funds and requires certain 
certifications.
    Language is included that authorizes funds in title IX for 
the purchase of items having an investment unit cost of up to 
$250,000, subject to certain conditions.
    Language is included that authorizes up to $140,000,000 
under the heading ``Operation and Maintenance'' for the Office 
of Security Cooperation in Iraq and security assistance teams, 
and operations and activities authorized in the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016, subject to 
written notice requirements.
    Language is included that provides for up to $600,000,000 
of funds appropriated for the Counterterrorism Partnerships 
Fund to be used for assistance to the Government of Jordan for 
certain purposes and under certain circumstances.
    Language is included that provides for $200,000,000 for 
assistance to the military and national security forces of 
Ukraine for certain purposes and under certain circumstances.
    Language is included that places limitations on the use of 
Coalition Support Funds for the Government of Pakistan.
    Language is included that provides for additional funds and 
transfer authority to improve the intelligence, surveillance, 
and reconnaissance capabilities of the Department of Defense.
    Language is included that provides for additional funds and 
transfer authority to the Department of Defense for purposes of 
improving military readiness.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds with 
respect to Syria in contravention of the War Powers Resolution 
(50 U.S.C. 1541).
    Language is included that sets the amount by which 
subcommittee allocation exceeds the amount of proposed new 
budget authority at $0.


                           TRANSFER OF FUNDS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is submitted describing 
the transfer of funds provided in the accompanying bill.
    Language has been included under ``Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-Wide'' which provides for the transfer of 
funds for certain classified activities.
    Language has been included under ``Environmental 
Restoration, Army'' which provides for the transfer of funds 
for environmental restoration, reduction and recycling of 
hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings and debris, or for 
similar purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Environmental 
Restoration, Navy'' which provides for the transfer of funds 
for environmental restoration, reduction and recycling of 
hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings and debris, or for 
similar purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Environmental 
Restoration, Air Force'' which provides for the transfer of 
funds for environmental restoration, reduction and recycling of 
hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings and debris, or for 
similar purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Environmental 
Restoration, Defense-Wide'' which provides for the transfer of 
funds for environmental restoration, reduction and recycling of 
hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings and debris, or for 
similar purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Environmental 
Restoration, Formerly Used Defense Sites''' which provides for 
the transfer of funds for environmental restoration, reduction 
and recycling of hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings 
and debris, or for similar purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Shipbuilding and 
Conversion, Navy'' which provides for the transfer of funds for 
expenses necessary for the construction, acquisition, or 
conversion of vessels as authorized by law.
    Language has been included under ``Research, Development, 
Test and Evaluation, Defense Wide'' which provides for the 
transfer of funds for the Defense Rapid Innovation Program to 
appropriations for research, development, test and evaluation 
for specific purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Drug Interdiction and 
Counter-Drug Activities, Defense'' which provides for the 
transfer of funds to appropriations available to the Department 
of Defense for military personnel of the reserve components; 
for operation and maintenance; for procurement; and for 
research, development, test and evaluation for drug 
interdiction and counter-drug activities of the Department of 
Defense. Language has been included under ``General Provisions, 
Sec. 8005'' which provides for the transfer of working capital 
funds to other appropriations accounts of the Department of 
Defense for military functions.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8008'' which provides for the transfer of funds between working 
capital funds and the ``Foreign Currency Fluctuations, 
Defense'' appropriation and the ``Operation and Maintenance'' 
appropriation accounts.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8015'' which provides for the transfer of funds from the 
Department of Defense Pilot Mentor-Protege Program to any other 
appropriation for the purposes of implementing a Mentor-Protege 
Program development assistance agreement.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8050'' which provides for the transfer of funds from 
``Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide'' to appropriations 
available for the pay of military personnel in connection with 
support and services of eligible organizations and activities 
outside the Department of Defense.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8054'' which provides for the transfer of funds from the 
Department of Defense to the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air 
Force, including Reserve and National Guard, to support high 
priority Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program 
requirements and activities.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8065'' which provides for the transfer of funds from 
``Operation and Maintenance, Army'' to other activities of the 
federal government.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8068'' which provides for the transfer of funds from 
``Procurement, Defense-Wide'' and ``Research, Development, Test 
and Evaluation, Defense-Wide'' for the Israeli Cooperative 
Programs.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8069'' which provides for the transfer of funds under the 
heading ``Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy'' to fund prior 
year shipbuilding cost increases.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8085'' which provides for the transfer of funds appropriated in 
the Intelligence Community Management Account for the Program 
Manager for the Information Sharing Environment to other 
departments and agencies for the purposes of Government-wide 
information sharing activities.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8090'' which provides for the transfer of funds from 
``Operation and Maintenance, Army'', ``Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy'', and ``Operation and Maintenance, Air 
Force'' to the central fund established for Fisher Houses and 
Suites.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8091'' which provides that funds appropriated by this Act may 
be made available for the purpose of making remittances to the 
Defense Acquisition Workforce Development Fund.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8094'' which provides for the transfer of funds appropriated 
for operation and maintenance for the Defense Health Program to 
the Joint Department of Defense--Department of Veterans Affairs 
Medical Facility Demonstration Fund.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8099'' which provides for the transfer of funds for the 
National Intelligence Program. Language has been included under 
``General Provisions, Sec. 8114'' which provides for the 
transfer of funds for basic allowance for housing for military 
personnel.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8124'' which provides for the transfer of funds for pay for 
military personnel for purposes of fully funding the authorized 
military pay raise.
    Language has been included under title IX ``Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy'' for the transfer of funds to the ``Coast 
Guard Operating Expenses''' account.
    Language has been included under title IX 
``Counterterrorism Partnerships Fund'' for the transfer of 
funds to other appropriations provided for in this Act.
    Language has been included under title IX ``Joint 
Improvised Explosive Devise Defeat Fund'' which provides for 
the transfer of funds to appropriations available to the 
Department of Defense for military personnel; for operation and 
maintenance; for procurement; for research, development, test 
and evaluation; and for defense working capital funds for 
purposes related to assisting United States forces in the 
defeat of improvised explosive devices.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
9003'' which provides for the authority to transfer funds 
between the appropriations or funds made available to the 
Department of Defense in title IX, subject to certain 
conditions.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
9016'' which provides for the transfer of funds to the 
operations and maintenance, military personnel, and procurement 
accounts, to improve the intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance capabilities of the Department of Defense.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
9017'' which provides for the transfer of funds to the 
operation and maintenance accounts of the Army, Navy, Marine 
Corps, and Air Force, including National Guard and reserve, for 
purposes of improving military readiness.

                              RESCISSIONS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House or Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the rescissions recommended in the accompanying 
bill:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Other Procurement, Army, 2014/2016.............              $40,000,000
Aircraft Procurement, Navy, 2014/2016..........               91,571,000
Weapons Procurement, Navy, 2014/2016...........                  888,000
Aircraft Procurement, Air Force, 2014/2016.....                2,300,000
Missile Procurement, Air Force, 2014/2016......                1,000,000
Procurement of Ammunition, Air Force, 2014/2016               12,600,000
Other Procurement, Air Force, 2014/2016........               14,000,000
Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat                     30,000,000
 Vehicles, Army, 2015/2017.....................
Other Procurement, Army, 2015/2017.............               30,000,000
Aircraft Procurement, Navy, 2015/2017..........               49,377,000
Weapons Procurement, Navy, 2015/2017...........               15,422,000
Procurement of Ammunition, Navy and Marine                     8,906,000
 Corps, 2015/2017..............................
Procurement, Marine Corps, 2015/2017...........               88,996,000
Aircraft Procurement, Air Force, 2015/2017.....              108,870,000
Missile Procurement, Air Force, 2015/2017......               75,000,000
Other Procurement, Air Force, 2015/2017........                8,000,000
Research, Development, Test and Evaluation,                  232,228,000
 Navy, 2015/2016...............................
Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Air                60,271,00
 Force, 2015/2016..............................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          DIRECTED RULE MAKING

    This bill does not contain any provision that specifically 
directs the promulgation or completion of a rule.

                          PROGRAM DUPLICATION

    No provision of this bill establishes or reauthorizes a 
program of the Federal Government known to be duplicative of 
another Federal program, a program that was included in any 
report from the Government Accountability Office to Congress 
pursuant to section 21 of Public Law 111-139, or a program 
related to a program identified in the most recent Catalog of 
Federal Domestic Assistance.

         STATEMENT OF GENERAL PERFORMANCE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is a statement of 
general performance goals and objectives for which this measure 
authorizes funding:
    The Committee on Appropriations considers program 
performance, including a program's success in developing and 
attaining outcome-related goals and objectives, in developing 
funding recommendations.

          COMPLIANCE WITH RULE XIII, CL. 3(E) (RAMSEYER RULE)

    In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the Committee notes that the 
accompanying bill does not propose to repeal or amend a statute 
or part thereof.

                      EARMARK DISCLOSURE STATEMENT

    Neither the bill nor the report contains any congressional 
earmarks, limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as 
defined in Clause 9 of rule XXI.

                 COMPARISON WITH THE BUDGET RESOLUTION

    Clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires an explanation of compliance with 
section 308(a)(1)(A) of the Congressional Budget and 
Impoundment Control Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, which requires that the report accompanying a bill 
providing new budget authority contain a statement detailing 
how that authority compares with the reports submitted under 
section 302 of the Act for the most recently agreed to 
concurrent resolution on the budget for the fiscal year from 
the Committee's section 302(a) allocation. This information 
follows:

 
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             302(b) Allocation                This Bill
                                                       ---------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Budget                       Budget
                                                           Authority      Outlays       Authority      Outlays
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discretionary:
    General Purpose...................................         490,235      519,579         490,235   \1\515,802
    Global War on Terrorism\2\........................          88,421       46,849          88,421       45,029
Mandatory.............................................             514          514             514          514
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\2\Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism

                      FIVE-YEAR OUTLAY PROJECTIONS

    In compliance with section 308(a)(1)(B) of the 
Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 
(Public Law 93-344), as amended, the following table contains 
five-year projections associated with the budget authority 
provided in the accompanying bill.

 
                        [In millions of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                             Non-GWOT          GWOT
------------------------------------------------------------------------
2016....................................      \1\312,144          45,029
2017....................................         103,401          24,328
2018....................................          39,709          10,317
2019....................................          18,817           4,790
2020 and future years...................          14,608        \2\2,518
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\2\Note: GWOT is Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism

          FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS

    In accordance with section 308(a)(1)(C) of the 
Congressional Budget and Impoundment Act of 1974 (Public Law 
93-344), as amended, no new budget or outlays are provided by 
the accompanying bill for financial assistance to State and 
local governments.



ADDITIONAL VIEWS--FISCAL YEAR 2016 DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS 
                                  BILL

    With this bill, the Committee has carried out its 
Constitutional responsibility to recommend the appropriations 
necessary to provide for the common defense of our Nation. The 
Committee did this in a collegial and bipartisan fashion 
consistent with its long-standing traditions.
    The base portion of this bill provides $490,235,000,000 in 
new budget authority covering all Department of Defense (DoD) 
and Intelligence Community functions except for Military 
Construction and Family Housing. This is $36,693,052,000 below 
the President's budget request, and $2,617,782,000 below last 
year's enacted level. The Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) 
portion provides $88,421,000,000. This is an increase of 
$37,471,439,000 above the President's budget request, and 
$24,485,705,000 above the FY 2015 level.
    As with all the Fiscal Year (FY) 2016 Appropriations 
measures, this bill was developed under the constraints of the 
Budget Control Act (BCA) of 2011, and therefore continues the 
mindless austerity it has wrought upon our great nation.
    Despite near universal disdain, and plenty of buyer's 
remorse, the BCA has proven to be an extremely resilient yet 
utterly ineffective piece of law. We have seen short 
postponements of sequestration in the American Taxpayers Relief 
Act of 2012 and two-year alleviations of the caps provided by 
the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013. Yet, the Committee finds 
itself, nearly five years since the BCA's enactment, far away 
from the consensus needed to repeal the law. Further, the 
continued half-hearted attempts to fix the BCA are almost as 
detrimental as the law itself, as they add to the uncertainty 
and waste everyone's time
    It is becoming increasingly difficult to point to any 
positive changes in our fiscal situation as a result of the 
BCA. While intended to reduce the budget deficit through 
spending limits and reductions, our nation's debt has increased 
by 24.5 percent since the BCA was signed into law, mainly 
because committees that are not truly constrained by the BCA's 
discretionary spending caps continue to push politically 
popular legislation with little regard for its impact on the 
federal budget. For example, in April of this year, Congress 
passed legislation that permanently fixed the long-standing 
issues with Medicare's payment rates for physicians' services. 
According to the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), this 
``fix'' will result in a $141 billion increase in federal 
budget deficits over the next ten years and yet the measure 
sailed through both Houses with very little opposition and was 
greeted by a cheerful signing statement at the White House. 
After 17 temporary overrides since 2003, we cannot argue that 
the permanent ``Doc fix'' was not long overdue. However, we 
believe it illustrates our larger point that the legislative 
and executive branches are nowhere close to having a sincere 
conversation about our deficits while non-discretionary 
spending and lack of revenue continue to largely get a free 
pass.
    Until the President and Congress confront the continued 
growth in mandatory spending while simultaneously increasing 
revenues, this Committee has no choice but to carry out the 
implausible mandate contained in the BCA and attempt to control 
deficits with jurisdiction over only 34 percent of one-half of 
the federal ledger.
    Unfortunately, we fear a majority of our colleagues have no 
idea when the fiscal year starts, except that is when it is 
time to shut down the government. We despair that most think 
Continuing Resolutions are the norm, and sequestration is not 
that bad; that some delight every time a civilian federal 
employee is furloughed. All are symptoms of failure to us.
    The time we have caused people to waste by not finishing 
our work on time, enacting innumerable Continuing Resolutions, 
and vacillating from one topline to another is deplorable. 
Whether it is a federal agency, a state, other political 
subdivisions, non-profit organizations, contractors, or an 
allied nation, all have been less efficient in recent years 
because of the constant uncertainty surrounding the federal 
government's finances.
    To illustrate, in nearly every fiscal year since the BCA's 
enactment there have been attempts to alter the caps on defense 
and non-defense spending. For example, just two years ago, the 
House and Senate had top-line allocations that were $91 billion 
apart, yet the sub-allocations for Defense were less than $4 
billion apart. Needless to say, we ended up at a point 
somewhere between the two, but only after a lot of wasted time 
and a federal government shutdown.
    While not a mirror image of two years ago, the FY 2016 
process is careening towards a similar fate. This fiscal year, 
the President started the process by submitting a budget 
request that did not comply with the limitations mandated by 
the BCA across all budgeted fiscal years. Further, paired with 
the President's budget request was a threat to veto any 
appropriations bills that adhered to the BCA caps.
    The Majority party's response to the President was to pass 
a Budget Resolution that purports to abide by the BCA caps in 
FY 2016 for defense and non-defense discretionary spending, yet 
evades the defense cap by proposing $38 billion above the 
President's budget request for Overseas Contingency Operations 
(OCO) or as renamed in this bill, the Global War on Terrorism 
(GWOT). Despite objections from the Secretary of Defense, this 
additional GWOT funding was further entrenched by the recently 
passed FY 2016 National Defense Authorization Act.
    Needless to say, this solution is very troubling and not 
because of our objection to providing additional funding for 
the Department of Defense. We are in agreement with the 
Commander in Chief that complying with the BCA caps on defense 
spending would necessitate our forces to assume unacceptable 
risk in carrying out our National Defense Strategy. At this 
moment, the United States military and Intelligence Community 
are actively engaged in responding to current and emerging 
crises and conflicts around the globe. The Nation needs them 
ready to respond at a moment's notice to future challenges, 
both foreseen and unforeseen.
    However, just as we need a strong defense, we need a strong 
Nation. We cannot continue to let our country deteriorate with 
interstate bridges that collapse and kill our citizens, 
meaningful scientific research that atrophies, and a population 
whose educational attainment falls further and further behind. 
Increasing GWOT funding is merely a fleeting salve to the 
sequester caps for one agency and does not allow the Department 
of Defense to properly plan and budget for the future. Further, 
if the President is true to his veto threat, then we are 
playing a serious game of brinksmanship with DoD and the rest 
of the federal government.
    The Committee realizes we will be in the throes of another 
crisis in December--our time should no longer be wasted and the 
President and the leaders of both Houses and both parties 
should start meaningful negotiations now, so that they can be 
concluded before October 1st, to allow this preeminent 
committee to again do the business of the country in an 
orderly, thoughtful, and timely fashion.
    Additionally, the Administration, DoD, and Congress have 
been complicit since 2001 in using emergency war funding to 
fund enduring requirements for the military. Over the past few 
years, despite the constraints of the BCA, the Subcommittee, 
led by Chairman Frelinghuysen, had begun to make strides in 
limiting what is an eligible expense in OCO and shift 
activities to the base budget. After fourteen years into the 
fight it is increasingly difficult to argue that this 
operational tempo for our military is a contingency and not the 
new normal in defending our nation and our interests. If the 
higher GWOT funding is enacted, much of the progress made in 
reining in Title IX will be undone.
    Unfortunately, as in past years, this bill is largely 
silent on several of the Defense Department's long-term fiscal 
challenges and in some cases severely restricts DoD's ability 
to even consider initiatives that recognize the reality of 
finite resources. Congress needs to consider the retirement of 
aging and underperforming weapons systems, policy changes that 
curb the expected increase in health care costs, and 
modifications to military compensation that are prospective and 
keep the promises we have made to those who have served. The 
sooner Congress reaches the consensus required to make the 
difficult decisions needed in this constrained fiscal 
environment, the better we can provide for our national 
defense.
    Ignoring the numerous concerns just expressed, Chairman 
Frelinghuysen and the Subcommittee did an exceptional job 
assembling this bill. In particular, the Chairman was very 
meticulous with the $37.5 billion added to Title IX of the bill 
by the FY 2016 Budget Resolution. He avoided the easy path and 
did not dump large portions of the Operations and Maintenance 
accounts into GWOT. Rather, he has painstakingly worked to 
provide the needed resources for the preparation of our forces 
in the field. Further, the Chairman was very thoughtful in his 
construction of the base portion of the bill to provide the 
resources needed for our military personnel, readiness 
activities, and preserving the industrial base.
    The Subcommittee has again included additional resources 
for sexual assault prevention and response. This year, there is 
a new and welcome focus on retaliation. Specifically, the bill 
fully funds the budget request for the activities and offices 
tackling this act of mistrust with an additional $20 million to 
be divided among all services and components.
    The bill continues to robustly fund research for traumatic 
brain injury and psychological health, suicide prevention 
outreach programs, and medical research. The report, again this 
year, carries language expressing our concerns about 
interoperable electronic health records becoming a reality for 
veterans and service members.
    Small businesses will be able to compete for funding with 
the Rapid Innovation Fund once again funded in this bill at 
$250 million. This find allows small businesses with big ideas 
for national security problems to participate, providing a path 
into the defense acquisition community.
    We commend the Chairman for including the funding increase 
for the Humanitarian Mine Action program. While it may be a 
small program, this mission is of immense value. It may take 
years to reclaim lands around the world from the explosive 
remnants of war, but we can share our military's expertise with 
host nations on detection, clearance, disposal, and 
demilitarization of explosive ordnance to protect innocent 
civilians.
    The Chairman's focus on resourcing the Combatant Commands 
beyond Central Command is appreciated. Let us be clear, while 
the support for our almost ten thousand U.S. service members 
still serving in Afghanistan and the threat of ISIL is 
paramount, there are other Areas of Responsibility that need 
attention. The $200 million in the bill to provide assistance 
to the Ukrainian national security forces to help Ukraine 
secure its sovereign territory and protect its citizens against 
foreign aggressors is an example of how the Committee can, and 
will, help those who ask for help. The additional money added 
to support Drug Interdiction and Counter-drug Activities, 
especially the additional $15 million for Intelligence, 
Surveillance and Reconnaissance activities in Southern Command 
is another example of support included in this bill. The 
additional funding to allow Africa Command to maintain a 
persistent presence on a continent that rules with ``the 
tyranny of distance'' ensures U.S. efforts in that part of the 
world are successful.
    Also, this bill addresses the Service Chiefs' concerns 
about readiness. The billions allocated to readiness activities 
will allow the services to mitigate the effects of constant 
deployments and financial unpredictability. The concern for 
readiness is also addressed in the $1.4 billion added across 
the services for Facility Sustainment, Restoration and 
Modernization although, this figure could be much lower if 
Congress allowed the Department of Defense to divest itself of 
unusable infrastructure through a Base Realignment and Closure 
round.
    Traditionally, the Committee emphasizes the positive side 
of the ledger; however, we believe the Committee should also 
highlight the other side of the ledger, as reductions in 
funding are also a result of good oversight. In this bill, 
there is a reduction of $100 million to the Defense Advanced 
Research Projects Agency's total request. This bill also made a 
reduction of $82 million, denying the purchase of radars 
because the programs were delayed. The elimination of funding 
for the Joint Urgent Operational Needs Fund drives requests 
from the Combatant Commanders back into the normal acquisitions 
process for more oversight and scrutiny. The restriction on 
funding 8 Joint Strike Fighters until the Autonomic Logistics 
Information System is delivered is another example of 
oversight.
    Throughout this year's process, the Defense Subcommittee 
continued its tradition of bipartisanship. The Subcommittee has 
operated collaboratively and effectively for many years and, 
within the constraints placed upon the bill, our interests have 
been addressed. The adoption of Representative Barbara Lee's 
amendment, stating that Congress has a constitutional duty to 
debate and decide when to authorize the use of military force 
in the fight against the Islamic State in the Levant, is an 
example of this culture and demonstrates the important role the 
Committee has in protecting the prerogatives of the Legislative 
Branch.
    The process for preparing this bill, and the 
recommendations it contains, were done in a deliberate and 
thoughtful manner. However, we need to find a way to provide 
for our national security needs without relying on contingency 
war funds to pay for regular base budget activities. Our 
military leaders contend that unless we wean ourselves from 
this dependency on war funding, we will completely undermine 
the Defense Department's ability to plan over the long term.
                                   Nita M. Lowey.
                                   Peter J. Visclosky.

                                  [all]