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114th Congress    }                                     {        Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session       }                                     {       114-537
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     


        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2017

                               ----------                              

                              R E P O R T

                                 OF THE

                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                                   ON

                               H.R. 4909

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]


                                     


                                     


  May 4, 2016.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed








        
        
        
        
        
114th Congress    }                                     {        Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session       }                                     {       114-537
_______________________________________________________________________





        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2017

                               __________

                              R E P O R T

                                 OF THE

                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES

                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                                   ON

                               H.R. 4909

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

                                     
[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

                                     

  May 4, 2016.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed
              
              
                         U.S. GOVERNMENT PUBLISHING OFFICE 

99-910 PDF                     WASHINGTON : 2016               
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES
                    One Hundred Fourteenth Congress

             WILLIAM M. ``MAC'' THORNBERRY, Texas, Chairman

WALTER B. JONES, North Carolina      ADAM SMITH, Washington
J. RANDY FORBES, Virginia            LORETTA SANCHEZ, California
JEFF MILLER, Florida                 ROBERT A. BRADY, Pennsylvania
JOE WILSON, South Carolina           SUSAN A. DAVIS, California
FRANK A. LoBIONDO, New Jersey        JAMES R. LANGEVIN, Rhode Island
ROB BISHOP, Utah                     RICK LARSEN, Washington
MICHAEL R. TURNER, Ohio              JIM COOPER, Tennessee
JOHN KLINE, Minnesota                MADELEINE Z. BORDALLO, Guam
MIKE ROGERS, Alabama                 JOE COURTNEY, Connecticut
TRENT FRANKS, Arizona                NIKI TSONGAS, Massachusetts
BILL SHUSTER, Pennsylvania           JOHN GARAMENDI, California
K. MICHAEL CONAWAY, Texas            HENRY C. ``HANK'' JOHNSON, Jr., 
DOUG LAMBORN, Colorado                   Georgia
ROBERT J. WITTMAN, Virginia          JACKIE SPEIER, California
DUNCAN HUNTER, California            JOAQUIN CASTRO, Texas
JOHN FLEMING, Louisiana              TAMMY DUCKWORTH, Illinois
MIKE COFFMAN, Colorado               SCOTT H. PETERS, California
CHRISTOPHER P. GIBSON, New York      MARC A. VEASEY, Texas
VICKY HARTZLER, Missouri             TULSI GABBARD, Hawaii
JOSEPH J. HECK, Nevada               TIMOTHY J. WALZ, Minnesota
AUSTIN SCOTT, Georgia                BETO O'ROURKE, Texas
MO BROOKS, Alabama                   DONALD NORCROSS, New Jersey
RICHARD B. NUGENT, Florida           RUBEN GALLEGO, Arizona
PAUL COOK, California                MARK TAKAI, Hawaii
JIM BRIDENSTINE, Oklahoma            GWEN GRAHAM, Florida
BRAD R. WENSTRUP, Ohio               BRAD ASHFORD, Nebraska
JACKIE WALORSKI, Indiana             SETH MOULTON, Massachusetts
BRADLEY BYRNE, Alabama               PETE AGUILAR, California
SAM GRAVES, Missouri
RYAN K. ZINKE, Montana
ELISE M. STEFANIK, New York
MARTHA McSALLY, Arizona
STEPHEN KNIGHT, California
THOMAS MacARTHUR, New Jersey
STEVE RUSSELL, Oklahoma

                  Robert L. Simmons II, Staff Director
                  
                  
                  
                  
                  
                  
                  
                  
                  
                  
                  
                  
                  
                  
                  
                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page

Purpose of the Legislation.......................................     1
Rationale for the Committee Bill.................................     2
Hearings.........................................................     9
Committee Position...............................................     9
Explanation of the Committee Amendments..........................     9
Relationship of Authorization to Appropriations..................     9
Summary of Discretionary Authorizations in the Bill..............     9
Budget Authority Implication.....................................    10

DIVISION A--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AUTHORIZATIONS.................    10
TITLE I--PROCUREMENT.............................................    10
    Aircraft Procurement, Army...................................    10
      Items of Special Interest..................................    10
        Brigade combat team utilization of unmanned aircraft 
          systems in training operations.........................    10
    Missile Procurement, Army....................................    11
      Items of Special Interest..................................    11
        Joint air-to-ground missile increment 2 acquisition 
          strategy...............................................    11
    Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles, Army.....    11
      Items of Special Interest..................................    11
        Army National Guard M2 Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle 
          upgrades...............................................    11
        M240 medium machine gun modernization....................    12
        Multi-Role Anti-Armor Anti-Personnel Weapon System.......    12
    Procurement of Ammunition, Army..............................    13
      Items of Special Interest..................................    13
        Ammunition industrial base investment strategies.........    13
        Small guided munitions acquisition strategy..............    13
    Other Procurement, Army......................................    14
      Items of Special Interest..................................    14
        Accelerate fielding of personal dosimeters...............    14
        Army small-scale experimentation.........................    14
        Army tactical communications waveforms...................    14
        Bridge Erection Boat program.............................    15
        Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Response 
          Enterprise Information Management System...............    15
        Ground mobility vehicle..................................    16
        High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle ambulance 
          recapitalization.......................................    16
        Material handling equipment modernization strategy.......    17
        Mid-Tier Networking Vehicular Radio......................    17
        Tactical Communication and Protective System.............    17
    Aircraft Procurement, Navy...................................    18
      Items of Special Interest..................................    18
        MQ-8 Fire Scout aircraft.................................    18
        V-22 Osprey..............................................    18
    Weapons Procurement, Navy....................................    19
      Items of Special Interest..................................    19
        Littoral Combat Ship Over-the-Horizon Missile............    19
        Tomahawk Block IV........................................    19
    Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy............................    20
      Items of Special Interest..................................    20
        Arleigh Burke-class destroyer............................    20
        Cruiser replacement strategy.............................    20
        CVN-81 advance procurement...............................    20
        Expeditionary Mobile Base ship...........................    21
        Frigate..................................................    21
        Landing Craft Air Cushion Service Life Extension Program.    21
        Littoral Combat Ship.....................................    22
        LX(R) Dock Landing Ship Replacement Program..............    22
        Modular ship design......................................    22
        Service Craft............................................    23
        Ship to Shore Connector..................................    23
        Strike capability assessment from surface amphibious 
          forces.................................................    23
        TAO(X) oiler shipbuilding program........................    24
        Undersea Mobility for Special Operation Forces...........    24
        Virginia Class Submarine.................................    25
        Virginia class submarine industrial base capacity........    25
    Other Procurement, Navy......................................    26
      Items of Special Interest..................................    26
        Destroyer modernization..................................    26
        Joint Strike Fighter integration on amphibious ships.....    26
        Navy Communications......................................    27
        Navy expeditionary combat patrol boat requirements.......    27
        Ship's Signal Exploitation Equipment Program.............    28
    Procurement, Marine Corps....................................    29
      Items of Special Interest..................................    29
        Marine Corps fielding of Enhanced Combat Helmet..........    29
        Mobile User Objective System capability..................    29
        Non-lethal ocular interruption capabilities..............    30
    Aircraft Procurement, Air Force..............................    30
      Items of Special Interest..................................    30
        A-10 aircraft............................................    30
        Aerial refueling recapitalization........................    32
        Air Force Command, Control, Intelligence, Surveillance, 
          and Reconnaissance (C2ISR) Fleet.......................    32
        Air National Guard F-16 mission training centers.........    32
        Aircraft urethane sealant upgrades.......................    33
        B-21 bomber..............................................    33
        B-21 Development Progress Matrix.........................    34
        Basing priorities for future Air National Guard Modular 
          Airborne Firefighting Systems missions.................    34
        Battlefield Airborne Communications Node.................    35
        C-130H Modernization.....................................    35
        C-130J Hercules aircraft.................................    36
        C-40A Clipper aircraft...................................    36
        Demonstration of high performance unmanned jet aircraft..    37
        E-8C prime mission equipment diminishing manufacturing 
          sources kits...........................................    37
        EC-130H Compass Call recapitalization....................    37
        F-22 production restart assessment.......................    38
        F-35 Lightning II aircraft program.......................    39
        MQ-9 production funding in Future Years Defense Program..    40
        Reporting requirement for C-130H recapitalization and 
          modernization..........................................    40
        UH-1N replacement program................................    40
        U.S. Air Force combat search and rescue..................    41
        U.S. Marine Corps C/KC-130 digital interoperability......    42
    Procurement of Ammunition, Air Force.........................    43
      Items of Special Interest..................................    43
        25 millimeter ammunition for the F-35 program............    43
    Other Procurement, Air Force.................................    43
      Items of Special Interest..................................    43
        Civil engineers construction, surveying, and mapping 
          equipment..............................................    43
    Procurement, Defense-Wide....................................    44
      Items of Special Interest..................................    44
        Replacement of MH-60M for United States Special 
          Operations Command.....................................    44
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................    44
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................    44
      Section 101--Authorization of Appropriations...............    44
    Subtitle B--Army Programs....................................    44
      Section 111--Multiyear Procurement Authority for AH-64E 
        Apache Helicopters.......................................    44
      Section 112--Multiyear Procurement Authority for UH-60M and 
        HH-60M Black Hawk Helicopters............................    44
      Section 113--Assessment of Certain Capabilities of the 
        Department of the Army...................................    44
    Subtitle C--Navy Programs....................................    45
      Section 121--Procurement Authority for Aircraft Carrier 
        Programs.................................................    45
      Section 122--Sense of Congress on Aircraft Carrier 
        Procurement Schedules....................................    45
      Section 123--Design and Construction of LHA Replacement 
        Ship Designated LHA 8....................................    45
      Section 124--Design and Construction of Replacement Dock 
        Landing Ship Designated LX(R) or Amphibious Transport 
        Dock Designated LPD-29...................................    46
      Section 125--Ship to Shore Connector Program...............    46
      Section 126--Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
        Littoral Combat Ship or Successor Frigate................    46
    Subtitle D--Air Force Programs...............................    46
      Section 131--Elimination of Annual Report on Aircraft 
        Inventory................................................    46
      Section 132--Repeal of the Requirement to Preserve Certain 
        Retired C-5 Aircraft.....................................    46
      Section 133--Repeal of Requirement to Preserve Certain 
        Retired F-117 Aircraft...................................    46
      Section 134--Prohibition on Availability of Funds for 
        Retirement of A-10 Aircraft..............................    46
      Section 135--Prohibition on Availability of Funds for 
        Retirement of Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar 
        System Aircraft..........................................    47
    Subtitle E--Defense-wide, Joint, and Multiservice Matters....    47
      Section 141--Termination of Quarterly Reporting on Use of 
        Combat Mission Requirements Funds........................    47
      Section 142--Fire Suppressant and Fuel Containment 
        Standards for Certain Vehicles...........................    47
      Section 143--Report on Department of Defense Munitions 
        Strategy for the Combatant Commands......................    47
      Section 144--Comptroller General Review of F-35 Lightning 
        II Aircraft Sustainment Support..........................    48
TITLE II--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION............    48
    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army............    48
      Items of Special Interest..................................    48
        Armored vehicle fuel tank and bladder safety.............    48
        Army advanced body armor research and development........    49
        Army network integration evaluations and army warfighting 
          assessments............................................    49
        Blast mitigation technologies for combat and tactical 
          vehicles...............................................    50
        Helicopter seating systems...............................    51
        Improved refrigeration and cooling technology............    51
        Improved Turbine Engine Program..........................    51
        Land-Based Anti-Ship Missile program.....................    52
        Lightweight metal matrix composite technology for combat 
          and tactical vehicles..................................    52
        Lithium ion super-capacitors.............................    53
        Long Range Precision Fires...............................    53
        Long-range Army surface-to-air missile capability........    53
        Modular Handgun System...................................    54
        Next generation signature management technology..........    54
        Personal protective equipment development for female 
          soldiers...............................................    55
        Review of ballistic testing policy for body armor........    55
        Small Unit Support Vehicle...............................    56
        Telemedicine capabilities................................    56
        Vehicle active protection systems........................    56
        Warfighter Technology....................................    57
        Weight reduction for personal protective equipment.......    57
    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy............    58
      Items of Special Interest..................................    58
        Advanced Low Cost Munitions Ordnance.....................    58
        Aegis radar solid state improvements.....................    58
        Aircraft carrier design..................................    59
        Alternative energy programs..............................    59
        Amphibious Ship Replacement Program......................    59
        Automated testing........................................    59
        Autonomous Undersea Vehicles.............................    60
        Briefing on advanced flight control software for carrier 
          landings...............................................    60
        Common mount for electromagnetic railgun.................    61
        Deployable and interoperable communications..............    61
        F/A-18 fleet physiological event rate....................    61
        Five-inch precision guided projectile development for 
          naval surface fire support.............................    62
        Integrated surveillance system...........................    63
        Joint metallurgical technology for combat and tactical 
          vehicle hulls..........................................    63
        Marine Corps unmanned rotary utility aircraft............    63
        MH-60R/S multi-mission helicopter programs...............    64
        Non-imaging millimeter wave radar technology.............    64
        Ocean warfighting environment applied research...........    65
        Service life extension program for Auxiliary General 
          Purpose Oceanographic Research.........................    65
        Submarine acoustic warfare development...................    66
        UCLASS, CBARS, RAQ-25, MQ-25, MQ-XX......................    66
        Warfighter sustainment applied research..................    68
    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force.......    68
      Items of Special Interest..................................    68
        Adaptive engine transition program.......................    68
        Air Force directed energy initiatives....................    68
        Air traffic control and landing systems..................    69
        Deployable air traffic control...........................    70
        High efficiency heat exchangers..........................    70
        Human-machine teaming....................................    71
        Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System 
          recapitalization.......................................    71
        KC-46 aerial refueling tanker aircraft program...........    72
        MQ-9 automatic takeoff and landing capability............    73
        MQ-9 unmanned aircraft vehicle tactical datalink 
          integration............................................    73
        Open architecture Distributed Common Ground System.......    74
        Precision metrology tools................................    75
        Reusable hypersonic vehicle structures development.......    75
        Silicon carbide for aerospace power applications.........    75
        T-X program..............................................    76
        Technology transfer......................................    76
        Wide-area motion imagery.................................    77
    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-Wide....    77
      Items of Special Interest..................................    77
        Academia and university affiliated research center 
          support for chemical and biological defense............    77
        Additive manufacturing...................................    78
        Alternative solutions to multidrug resistant bacteria....    78
        Better Gender Reporting in Grantmaking...................    78
        Broad-spectrum antiviral drug modeling...................    79
        Cellular and broadband signals exploitation..............    79
        Comptroller General review of commercial practices for 
          trust in microelectronics..............................    80
        Counter-unmanned aerial systems roadmap..................    80
        Department of Defense medical countermeasures Advanced 
          Development and Manufacturing facility roadmap.........    81
        Desalination technology..................................    82
        Explosive Ordnance Disposal equipment technology upgrades    82
        Foundational Intelligence Modernization..................    82
        Future Vertical Lift.....................................    83
        Handheld explosive and chemical detectors................    83
        High-speed aerothermal effects...........................    83
        Human systems integration activities.....................    84
        Hydrocephalus research...................................    84
        Hyperspectral imaging technology.........................    84
        Immersive operator control stations......................    85
        Incentives for increasing private sector medical 
          countermeasures development............................    85
        Interagency unmanned aerial system research..............    85
        Intestinal mucosal barrier research to address chemical 
          and biological threats.................................    86
        Laboratory Quality Enhancement...........................    86
        Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) Briefing.............    87
        Minority-serving institutions and minority-owned 
          businesses.............................................    87
        Monoclonal antibody therapeutics.........................    88
        MQ-9 anti-icing capability...............................    88
        Nanomaterials in Combat Systems..........................    88
        Non-destructive counterfeit parts detection tools........    89
        Prioritization of joint test activities..................    89
        Program intermediary agreements..........................    89
        Ribonucleic acid technology research.....................    90
        Rotorcraft degraded visual environment...................    90
        Secure cellular communications for senior leaders........    90
        Small turbine engines for missile programs...............    91
        Social media analysis cell...............................    91
        Strategic Capabilities Office............................    92
        Technology enablers for directed energy weapon systems...    93
        Third Offset Strategy....................................    93
        Transition of biosurveillance prototype..................    94
        Treatment of traumatic brain injury......................    94
        United States-Israel Anti-tunnel cooperation.............    95
        Unmanned advanced capability combat aircraft and ground 
          combat vehicles........................................    95
        U.S. Special Operations Command rapid prototyping and 
          SOFWERX initiative.....................................    96
        Utilization of electromagnetic spectrum..................    97
        V-22 defensive weapons integration analysis..............    97
        Vector geo-location technologies for Special Operations 
          Command................................................    98
    Operational Test and Evaluation, Defense.....................    98
      Items of Special Interest..................................    98
        Range capabilities for emerging advanced technologies....    98
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................    99
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................    99
      Section 201--Authorization of Appropriations...............    99
    Subtitle B--Program Requirements, Restrictions, and 
        Limitations..............................................    99
      Section 211--Laboratory Quality Enhancement Program........    99
      Section 212--Mechanisms to Provide Funds for Defense 
        Laboratories for Research and Development of Technologies 
        for Military Missions....................................   100
      Section 213--Notification Requirement for Certain Rapid 
        Prototyping, Experimentation, and Demonstration 
        Activities...............................................   100
      Section 214--Improved Biosafety for Handling of Select 
        Agents and Toxins........................................   100
      Section 215--Modernization of Security Clearance 
        Information Technology Architecture......................   100
      Section 216--Prohibition on Availability of Funds for 
        Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction System 
        Constellation............................................   101
      Section 217--Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
        Defense Innovation Unit Experimental.....................   101
      Section 218--Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
        Tactical Combat Training System Increment II.............   102
      Section 219--Restructuring of the Distributed Common Ground 
        System of the Army.......................................   102
      Section 220--Designation of Department of Defense Senior 
        Official with Principal Responsibility for Directed 
        Energy Weapons...........................................   102
    Subtitle C--Reports and Other Matters........................   102
      Section 231--Strategy for Assured Access to Trusted 
        Microelectronics.........................................   102
      Section 232--Pilot Program on Evaluation of Commercial 
        Information Technology...................................   103
      Section 233--Pilot Program for the Enhancement of the 
        Laboratories and Test and Evaluation Centers of the 
        Department of Defense....................................   103
      Section 234--Pilot Program on Modernization of 
        Electromagnetic Spectrum Warfare Systems and Electronic 
        Warfare Systems..........................................   103
      Section 235--Independent Review of F/A-18 Physiological 
        Episodes and Corrective Actions..........................   103
      Section 236--Study on Helicopter Crash Prevention and 
        Mitigation Technology....................................   103
      Section 237--Report on Electronic Warfare Capabilities.....   103
TITLE III--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE.............................   104
  OVERVIEW.......................................................   104
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   104
    Budget Request Adjustments...................................   104
      Base Realignment and Closure Request for Fiscal Year 2019..   104
      Ship Repair Capability in the Western Pacific..............   105
    Energy Issues................................................   105
      Alternatively Financed Energy Projects.....................   105
      Energy Assurance for Department of Defense.................   106
      Expeditionary Power Management Systems.....................   107
      Integration of Installation Energy Authorities.............   107
      Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology.........................   107
      Procurement of Alternative Fuels...........................   108
      Small Modular Reactors.....................................   108
    Logistics and Sustainment Issues.............................   109
      Defective Spare Parts......................................   109
      Discrepancies in the Transportation of Hazardous Material..   109
      Enhanced Decision Analysis for Weapons System Sustainment..   110
      F-35 Sustainment...........................................   110
      Funding for Corrosion Control and Prevention...............   111
      Implementation of Product Support Managers.................   112
      Integration of Operational Contract Support Matters in 
        Joint Training Programs..................................   112
      Item Unique Identification Policy Implementation...........   113
      Sustainment of Major Weapon Systems........................   114
    Readiness Issues.............................................   114
      Air Refueling Requirements.................................   114
      Armed Forces Sports Program and Service Academy Athletic 
        Interns..................................................   115
      Army Aviation Multi-Component Pilot Program................   116
      Assessment of Navy and Marine Corps Training Requirements..   116
      C-130 Aircraft Maintenance and Modernization...............   117
      Condition-Based Maintenance on Navy Surface Ships..........   117
      Corrective Actions in Response to the Temporary Detention 
        of United States Sailors by Iran.........................   117
      Defense Language Institute Support to the Intelligence 
        Community................................................   118
      Defense Travel System......................................   118
      Force of the Future........................................   118
      Global Response Force Readiness............................   119
      Green Flag East............................................   120
      Impact of Mandatory Training Requirements on Achieving 
        Increased Readiness......................................   120
      Language Training..........................................   121
      Management Software for Navy Training......................   122
      Military Bands.............................................   123
      Mobility Support for Operations on the Korean Peninsula....   123
      Output-Based Readiness Metrics.............................   124
      Refinement of Joint Staff Input into the Quarterly 
        Readiness Report to Congress.............................   124
      Regional Air Ranges and Exercise...........................   124
      Regional Biosecurity Plan Implementation...................   125
      Report on Small Boat Maintenance...........................   126
      Review of the Readiness of Military Sealift Command Ships 
        and Employment Plans.....................................   126
      Rotary-Wing Aviation Readiness and Safety..................   127
      Soldiers Medically Unavailable for Training................   128
      Support Capabilities for Operations in Europe..............   128
      Synthetic Training System and Small Arms Qualification.....   129
    Other Matters................................................   130
      Acquisition of Highly Technical Contract Services..........   130
      Adoption of Tactical Explosive Detection Military Working 
        Dogs.....................................................   130
      Army Explosive Ordnance Disposal...........................   131
      Associated Unit Concept for Terminal High Altitude Area 
        Defense Security Force Manning...........................   132
      Collaboration with U.S. Universities.......................   132
      Combat Footwear Survey.....................................   133
      Disabled Veterans Non-Profit Groups........................   133
      Disposal of Excess Agriculture-Related Equipment...........   133
      End-of-Service Veterinary Care for Military Working Dogs...   134
      Flame-Resistant Military Uniform Postures..................   134
      Military Free Fall Course as a Requirement of the U.S. Army 
        Special Forces Qualification Course......................   135
      Military Glove System......................................   135
      National Guard Cyber Protection Teams......................   135
      National Guard Unit for the Commonwealth of the Northern 
        Mariana Islands..........................................   136
      Procurement and Inspection of Armored Commercial Passenger-
        Carrying Vehicles........................................   136
      Public-Private Partnerships for Cyber Education and 
        Training.................................................   137
      Retaining Critical Skills and STEM Capabilities During 
        Headquarters Downsizing..................................   138
      The Role of the National Security Contractor...............   139
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   139
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................   139
      Section 301--Authorization of Appropriations...............   139
    Subtitle B--Energy and Environment...........................   139
      Section 311--Rule of Construction Regarding Alternative 
        Fuel Procurement Requirement.............................   139
    Subtitle C--Logistics and Sustainment........................   139
      Section 321--Pilot Program for Inclusion of Certain 
        Industrial Plants in the Armament Retooling and 
        Manufacturing Support Initiative.........................   139
      Section 322--Private Sector Port Loading Assessment........   140
      Section 323--Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
        Defense Contract Management Agency.......................   140
    Subtitle D--Reports..........................................   140
      Section 331--Modification of Annual Department of Defense 
        Energy Management Reports................................   140
      Section 332--Report on Equipment Purchased from Foreign 
        Entities and Authority to Adjust Army Arsenal Labor Rates   141
    Subtitle E--Other Matters....................................   141
      Section 341--Explosive Ordnance Disposal Corps.............   141
      Section 342--Explosive Ordnance Disposal Program...........   141
      Section 343--Expansion of Definition of Structures 
        Interfering with Air Commerce and National Defense.......   141
      Section 344--Development of Personal Protective Equipment 
        for Female Marines and Soldiers..........................   141
      Section 345--Study on Space-Available Travel System of the 
        Department of Defense....................................   142
      Section 346--Supply of Specialty Motors from Certain 
        Manufacturers............................................   142
      Section 347--Limitation on Use of Certain Funds Until 
        Establishment and Implementation of Required Process by 
        which Members of the Armed Forces May Carry Appropriate 
        Firearms on Military Installations.......................   142
TITLE IV--MILITARY PERSONNEL AUTHORIZATIONS......................   142
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   142
    Subtitle A--Active Forces....................................   142
      Section 401--End Strengths for Active Forces...............   142
      Section 402--Revisions in Permanent Active Duty End 
        Strength Minimum Levels..................................   143
    Subtitle B--Reserve Forces...................................   143
      Section 411--End Strengths for Selected Reserve............   143
      Section 412--End Strengths for Reserves on Active Duty in 
        Support of the Reserves..................................   143
      Section 413--End Strengths for Military Technicians (Dual 
        Status)..................................................   144
      Section 414--Fiscal Year 2017 Limitation on Number of Non-
        Dual Status Technicians..................................   144
      Section 415--Maximum Number of Reserve Personnel Authorized 
        To Be on Active Duty for Operational Support.............   144
      Section 416--Sense of Congress on Full-Time Support for the 
        Army National Guard......................................   145
    Subtitle C--Authorization of Appropriations..................   145
      Section 421--Military Personnel............................   145
TITLE V--MILITARY PERSONNEL POLICY...............................   145
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   145
      Army National Guard Preventive Intervention for Suicide and 
        Substance Abuse..........................................   145
      Briefing on Credentialing Programs for Service Members in 
        Combat Arms Specialties..................................   146
      Briefing on Stars and Stripes Funding......................   146
      Community and Military Education Partnerships..............   146
      Comptroller General Review of the Military Entrance 
        Processing Stations Medical Examinations.................   147
      Cyber Science Education at the Service Academies...........   147
      Database Tracking System for Valor Awards..................   147
      Dual Military Shared Parental Leave Feasibility Study......   148
      Enhanced Access and Consideration before Discharge Review 
        Boards and Correction of Military Records Boards.........   148
      Implementation by the Services of the recommendations 
        listed in the ``Program to Assist Veterans to Acquire 
        Commercial Driver's Licenses Report to Congress''........   149
      Improved Oversight of Hazing Prevention Programs and 
        Reporting in the Military Services.......................   149
      Information Regarding On-the-Job Training and 
        Apprenticeship Programs..................................   150
      Informing Service Members About the United Services 
        Military Apprenticeship Program..........................   150
      Integration of Women into Previously Closed Military 
        Occupations..............................................   150
      Military Reemployment Initiatives..........................   151
      National Guard Bureau Briefing Requirement.................   151
      Non-Appropriated Fund Instrumentality Compliance with 
        Department of Defense Policy.............................   151
      Report on Department of Defense Efforts to Provide Timely 
        Review of Separation Characterization of Former Members 
        of the Armed Forces who were Separated by Reason of 
        Sexual Orientation.......................................   152
      Report on the Purpose and Utility of a Registration System 
        for Military Selective Service...........................   152
      Review and Report on Port Chicago..........................   153
      Review of Qualified Joint Tours............................   153
      Suicide Prevention.........................................   154
      Troops to Teachers Partnership.............................   154
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   154
    Subtitle A--Officer Personnel Policy.........................   154
      Section 501--Number of Marine Corps General Officers.......   154
      Section 502--Equal Consideration of Officers for Early 
        Retirement or Discharge..................................   154
      Section 503--Modification of Authority to Drop from Rolls a 
        Commissioned Officer.....................................   155
    Subtitle B--Reserve Component Management.....................   155
      Section 511--Extension of Removal of Restrictions on the 
        Transfer of Officers Between the Active and Inactive 
        National Guard...........................................   155
      Section 512--Extension of Temporary Authority to Use Air 
        Force Reserve Component Personnel to Provide Training and 
        Instruction Regarding Pilot Training.....................   155
      Section 513--Limitations on Ordering Selected Reserve to 
        Active Duty for Preplanned Missions in Support of the 
        Combatant Commands.......................................   155
      Section 514--Exemption of Military Technicians (Dual 
        Status) from Civilian Employee Furloughs.................   155
    Subtitle C--General Service Authorities......................   156
      Section 521--Technical Correction to Annual Authorization 
        for Personnel Strengths..................................   156
      Section 522--Entitlement to Leave for Adoption or Birth of 
        Child by Dual Military Couples...........................   156
      Section 523--Revision of Deployability Rating System and 
        Planning Reform..........................................   156
      Section 524--Expansion of Authority to Execute Certain 
        Military Instruments.....................................   156
      Section 525--Technical Correction to Voluntary Separation 
        Pay and Benefits.........................................   156
      Section 526--Annual Notice to Members of the Armed Forces 
        Regarding Child Custody Protections Guaranteed by the 
        Servicemembers Civil Relief Act..........................   157
      Section 527--Pilot Program on Consolidated Army Recruiting.   157
      Section 528--Application of Military Selective Service 
        Registration and Conscription Requirements to Female 
        Citizens and Residents of the United States Between the 
        Ages of 18 and 26........................................   157
      Section 529--Parental Leave for Members of the Armed Forces   157
    Subtitle D--Military Justice, Including Sexual Assault and 
        Domestic Violence Prevention and Response................   157
      Section 541--Expedited Reporting of Child Abuse and Neglect 
        to State Child Protective Services.......................   157
      Section 542--Extension of the Requirement for Annual Report 
        Regarding Sexual Assaults and Coordination with Release 
        of Family Advocacy Report................................   158
      Section 543--Requirement for Annual Family Advocacy Program 
        Report Regarding Child Abuse and Domestic Violence.......   158
      Section 544--Improved Department of Defense Prevention of 
        and Response to Hazing in the Armed Forces...............   158
      Section 545--Burdens of Proof Applicable to Investigations 
        and Reviews Related to Protected Communications of 
        Members of the Armed Forces and Prohibited Retaliatory 
        Actions..................................................   158
      Section 546--Improved Investigation of Allegations of 
        Professional Retaliation.................................   158
    Subtitle E--Member Education, Training, and Transition.......   159
      Section 561--Revision to Quality Assurance of Certification 
        Programs and Standards...................................   159
      Section 562--Establishment Of ROTC Cyber Institutes At 
        Senior Military Colleges.................................   159
      Section 563--Military-to-Mariner Transition................   159
      Section 564--Employment Authority for Civilian Faculty at 
        Certain Military Department Schools......................   159
      Section 565--Revision of Name on Military Service Record to 
        Reflect Change in Name of a Member of the Army, Navy, Air 
        Force, or Marine Corps, after Separation from the Armed 
        Forces...................................................   159
      Section 566--Direct Employment Pilot Program for Members of 
        the National Guard and Reserve...........................   160
      Section 567--Prohibition on Establishment, Maintenance, or 
        Support of Senior Reserve Officers' Training Corps Units 
        at Educational Institutions That Display Confederate 
        Battle Flag..............................................   160
    Subtitle F--Defense Dependents' Education and Military Family 
        Readiness Matters........................................   160
      Section 571--Continuation of Authority to Assist Local 
        Educational Agencies That Benefit Dependents of Members 
        of the Armed Forces and Department of Defense Civilian 
        Employees................................................   160
      Section 572--Support for Programs Providing Camp Experience 
        for Children of Military Families........................   160
    Subtitle G--Decorations and Awards...........................   160
      Section 581--Review Regarding Award of Medal of Honor to 
        Certain Asian American and Native American Pacific 
        Islander War Veterans....................................   160
      Section 582--Authorization for Award of Medals for Acts of 
        Valor....................................................   161
      Section 583--Authorization for Award of the Medal of Honor 
        to Gary M. Rose for Acts of Valor During the Vietnam War.   161
      Section 584--Authorization for Award of the Medal of Honor 
        to Charles S. Kettles for Acts of Valor During the 
        Vietnam War..............................................   161
    Subtitle H--Miscellaneous Reports and Other Matters..........   161
      Section 591--Burial of Cremated Remains in Arlington 
        National Cemetery of Certain Persons Whose Service Is 
        Deemed To Be Active Service..............................   161
      Section 592--Representation from Members of the Armed 
        Forces on Boards, Councils, and Committees Making 
        Recommendations Relating to Military Personnel Issues....   162
      Section 593--Body Mass Index Test..........................   162
      Section 594--Preseparation Counseling Regarding Options for 
        Donating Brain Tissue at Time of Death for Research......   162
      Section 595--Recognition of the Expanded Service 
        Opportunities Available to Female Members of the Armed 
        Forces and the Long Service of Women in the Armed Forces.   162
      Section 596--Sense of Congress Regarding Plight of Male 
        Victims of Military Sexual Trauma........................   162
      Section 597--Sense of Congress Regarding Section 504 of 
        Title 10, United States Code, on Existing Authority of 
        the Department of Defense to Enlist Individuals, Not 
        Otherwise Eligible for Enlistment, Whose Enlistment Is 
        Vital to the National Interest...........................   162
      Section 598--Protection of Second Amendment Rights of 
        Military Families........................................   162
      Section 599--Pilot Program on Advanced Technology for 
        Alcohol Abuse Prevention.................................   163
TITLE VI--COMPENSATION AND OTHER PERSONNEL BENEFITS..............   163
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   163
      Feasibility study to expanding Veterans Access to 
        Commissary...............................................   163
      Inspector General Review of the Fresh Fruits and Vegetable 
        Contract for the Pacific.................................   163
      Service Members Group Life Insurance Report................   164
      Student Loan Interest for Eligible Military Borrowers......   165
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   165
    Subtitle A--Pay and Allowances...............................   165
      Section 601--Annual Adjustment of Monthly Basic Pay........   165
      Section 602--Extension of Authority to Provide Temporary 
        Increase in Rates of Basic Allowance for Housing Under 
        Certain Circumstances....................................   165
      Section 603--Prohibition on Per Diem Allowance Reductions 
        Based on the Duration of Temporary Duty Assignment or 
        Civilian Travel..........................................   166
    Subtitle B--Bonuses and Special and Incentive Pays...........   166
      Section 611--One-Year Extension of Certain Bonus and 
        Special Pay Authorities for Reserve Forces...............   166
      Section 612--One-Year Extension of Certain Bonus and 
        Special Pay Authorities for Health Care Professionals....   166
      Section 613--One-Year Extension of Special Pay and Bonus 
        Authorities for Nuclear Officers.........................   166
      Section 614--One-Year Extension of Authorities Relating to 
        Title 37 Consolidated Special Pay, Incentive Pay, and 
        Bonus Authorities........................................   166
      Section 615--One-Year Extension of Authorities Relating to 
        Payment of Other Title 37 Bonuses and Special Pays.......   167
      Section 616--Increase in Maximum Amount of Aviation Special 
        Pays for Flying Duty.....................................   167
      Section 617--Conforming Amendment to Consolidation of 
        Special Pay, Incentive Pay, and Bonus Authorities........   167
      Section 618--Technical and Clerical Amendments Relating to 
        2008 Consolidation of Certain Special Pay Authorities....   167
      Section 619--Combat-Related Special Compensation 
        Coordinating Amendment...................................   168
    Subtitle C--Disability, Retired Pay, and Survivor Benefits...   168
      Section 621--Separation Determinations for Members 
        Participating in Thrift Savings Plan.....................   168
      Section 622--Continuation Pay for Full Thrift Savings Plan 
        Members Who Have Completed 8 to 12 Years of Service......   168
      Section 623--Special Survivor Indemnity Allowance..........   168
      Section 624--Equal Benefits Under Survivor Benefit Plan for 
        Survivors of Reserve Component Members who Die in the 
        Line of Duty during Inactive-Duty Training...............   168
      Section 625--Use of Member's Current Pay Grade and Years of 
        Service, Rather Than Final Retirement Pay Grade and Years 
        of Service, in a Division of Property Involving 
        Disposable Retired Pay...................................   169
    Subtitle D--Commissary and Nonappropriated Fund 
        Instrumentality Benefits and Operations..................   169
      Section 631--Protection and Enhancement of Access to and 
        Savings at Commissaries and Exchanges....................   169
    Subtitle E--Travel and Transportation Allowances and Other 
        Matters..................................................   169
      Section 641--Maximum Reimbursement Amount for Travel 
        Expenses of Members of the Reserves Attending Inactive 
        Duty Training Outside of Normal Commuting Distances......   169
      Section 642--Statute of Limitations on Department of 
        Defense Recovery of Amounts Owed to the United States by 
        Members of the Uniformed Services, Including Retired and 
        Former Members...........................................   169
TITLE VII--HEALTH CARE PROVISIONS................................   169
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   169
      Briefing on TRICARE Coverage for Emerging Health Care 
        Services.................................................   169
      Department of Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs Health 
        Care Partnerships........................................   170
      Designation of TRICARE Providers with Military Awareness 
        and Cultural Training....................................   170
      Diabetes Prevention Programs...............................   171
      Expedited Treatment for Fetal Repair.......................   171
      Full Spectrum Ultraviolet Technologies for Routine 
        Disinfection and Outbreak Mitigation.....................   171
      Gluten-Free Meals Ready to Eat.............................   172
      Improving Beneficiary Experience and Outcomes..............   172
      Improving Pediatric Health Care Under TRICARE..............   172
      Infertility Treatment and Services for Wounded Ill or 
        Injured Members of the Armed Forces......................   172
      Joint Medical Research Test Centers........................   173
      Military Medical Photonics.................................   173
      Network of Support.........................................   173
      Osteoarthritis.............................................   174
      Prescription Opioid Abuse and Effects on Readiness.........   174
      Private-Public Partnership in Military Treatment Facilities   175
      Storage of DNA Samples of Members of the Armed Forces......   175
      TRICARE Coverage of Medically Necessary Foods..............   175
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   176
    Subtitle A--Reform of TRICARE and Military Health System.....   176
      Section 701--TRICARE Preferred and Other TRICARE Reform....   176
      Section 702--Reform of Administration of the Defense Health 
        Agency and Military Medical Treatment Facilities.........   176
      Section 703--Military Medical Treatment Facilities.........   177
      Section 704--Access to Urgent Care Under TRICARE Program...   177
      Section 705--Access to Primary Care Clinics at Military 
        Medical Treatment Facilities.............................   177
      Section 706--Incentives for Value-Based Health Under 
        TRICARE Program..........................................   177
      Section 707--Improvements to Military-Civilian Partnerships 
        to Increase Access to Health Care and Readiness..........   178
      Section 708--Joint Trauma System...........................   178
      Section 709--Joint Trauma Education and Training 
        Directorate..............................................   178
      Section 710--Improvements to Access to Health Care in 
        Military Medical Treatment Facilities....................   178
      Section 711--Adoption of Core Quality Performance Metrics..   179
      Section 712--Study on Improving Continuity of Health Care 
        Coverage for Reserve Components..........................   179
    Subtitle B--Other Health Care Benefits.......................   179
      Section 721--Provision of Hearing Aids to Dependents of 
        Retired Members..........................................   179
      Section 722--Extended TRICARE Program Coverage for Certain 
        Members of the National Guard and Dependents During 
        Certain Disaster Response Duty...........................   179
    Subtitle C--Health Care Administration.......................   179
      Section 731--Prospective Payment of Funds Necessary to 
        Provide Medical Care for the Coast Guard.................   179
    Subtitle D--Reports and Other Matters........................   180
      Section 741--Mental Health Resources for Members of the 
        Military Services at High Risk of Suicide................   180
      Section 742--Research of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy..   180
      Section 743--Active Oscillating Negative Pressure Treatment   180
      Section 744--Long-Term Study on Health of Helicopter and 
        Tiltrotor Pilots.........................................   180
      Section 745--Pilot Program for Prescription Drug 
        Acquisition Cost Parity in the TRICARE Pharmacy Benefits 
        Program..................................................   180
      Section 746--Study on Display of Wait Times at Urgent Care 
        Clinics, Pharmacies, and Emergency Rooms of Military 
        Medical Treatment Facilities.............................   180
      Section 747--Report on Feasibility of Including Acupuncture 
        and Chiropractic Services for Retirees Under TRICARE 
        Program..................................................   180
      Section 748--Clarification on Submission of Reports on 
        Longitudinal Study on Traumatic Brain Injury.............   181
TITLE VIII--ACQUISITION POLICY, ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT, AND 
    RELATED MATTERS..............................................   181
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   181
      Acquisition Auditing and Agility...........................   181
      Acquisition Manager Career Paths...........................   182
      Advanced Small Business....................................   182
      Appropriate Use of Lowest Price, Technically Acceptable 
        Source Selection Processes and Contracts.................   183
      Contracting Delays for the Small Business Innovative 
        Research Program.........................................   184
      Defense Acquisition University Course Curriculum...........   184
      Development Planning.......................................   184
      Developmental and Operational Testing Agility..............   185
      Discussions Between Government and Industry After Receipt 
        of Proposals.............................................   185
      Domestic Source of Traveling Wave Tubes....................   186
      Innovation Clusters........................................   186
      Large Lot Procurement......................................   186
      Operation and Support Cost Data............................   187
      Public-Private Competitions Conducted under Office of 
        Management and Budget Circular A-76......................   188
      Rare Earths................................................   188
      Requirement for Non-U.S. Contracts in Afghanistan..........   189
      Service Contracts Inventory and Accountability.............   189
      Small Business Participation Across Industry Categories....   190
      Veterans in Piping program.................................   190
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   190
    Subtitle A--Amendments to General Contracting Authorities, 
        Procedures, and Limitations..............................   190
      Section 801--Revision to Authorities Relating to Department 
        of Defense Test Resource Management Center...............   190
      Section 802--Amendments to Restrictions on Undefinitized 
        Contractual Actions......................................   191
      Section 803--Revision to Requirements Relating to Inventory 
        Method for Department of Defense Contracts for Services..   191
      Section 804--Procurement of Personal Protective Equipment..   191
      Section 805--Revision to Effective Date of Senior Executive 
        Benchmark Compensation for Allowable Cost Limitations....   191
      Section 806--Amendments Related to Detection and Avoidance 
        of Counterfeit Electronic Parts..........................   191
      Section 807--Amendments to Special Emergency Procurement 
        Authority................................................   192
      Section 808--Compliance with Domestic Source Requirements 
        for Footwear Furnished to Enlisted Members of the Armed 
        Forces Upon Their Entry into the Armed Forces............   192
      Section 809--Requirement for Policies and Standard 
        Checklist in Procurement of Services.....................   192
      Section 810--Extension of Limitation on Aggregate Annual 
        Amount Available for Contract Services...................   192
    Subtitle B--Provisions Relating to Major Defense Acquisition 
        Programs.................................................   192
      Section 811--Change in Date of Submission to Congress of 
        Selected Acquisition Reports.............................   192
      Section 812--Amendments Relating to Independent Cost 
        Estimation and Cost Analysis.............................   192
      Section 813--Revisions to Milestone B Determinations.......   193
      Section 814--Review and Report on Sustainment Planning in 
        the Acquisition Process..................................   193
      Section 815--Revision to Distribution of Annual Report on 
        Operational Test and Evaluation..........................   194
    Subtitle C--Provisions Relating to Commercial Items..........   194
      Section 821--Revision to Definition of Commercial Item.....   194
      Section 822--Market Research for Determination of Price 
        Reasonableness in Acquisition of Commercial Items........   194
      Section 823--Value Analysis for the Determination of Price 
        Reasonableness...........................................   194
      Section 824--Clarification of Requirements Relating to 
        Commercial Item Determinations...........................   195
      Section 825--Pilot Program for Authority to Acquire 
        Innovative Commercial Items Using General Solicitation 
        Competitive Procedures...................................   195
    Subtitle D--Other Matters....................................   195
      Section 831--Review and Report on the Bid Protest Process..   195
      Section 832--Review and Report on Indefinite Delivery 
        Contracts................................................   195
      Section 833--Review and Report on Contractual Flow-Down 
        Provisions...............................................   196
      Section 834--Review of Anti-Competitive Specifications in 
        Information Technology Acquisitions......................   196
      Section 835--Coast Guard Major Acquisition Programs........   196
      Section 836--Waiver of Congressional Notification for 
        Acquisition of Tactical Missiles and Munitions Greater 
        than Quantity Specified in Law...........................   197
      Section 837--Closeout of Old Department of the Navy 
        Contracts................................................   198
      Section 838--Requirement that Certain Ship Components be 
        Manufactured in the National Technology and Industrial 
        Base.....................................................   198
      Section 839--Department of Defense Acquisition Workforce 
        Development Fund Determination Adjustment................   198
      Section 840--Amendment to Prohibition on Performance of 
        Non-Defense Audits by Defense Contract Audit Agency to 
        Exempt Audits for National Nuclear Security 
        Administration...........................................   198
      Section 841--Selection of Service Providers for Auditing 
        Services and Audit Readiness Services....................   198
      Section 842--Modifications to the Justification and 
        Approval Process for Certain Sole-Source Contracts for 
        Small Business Concerns..................................   198
TITLE IX--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT......   199
  OVERVIEW.......................................................   199
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   200
      Conference Travel Policy...................................   200
      Defense Logistics Agency Overhead Costs....................   201
      Human Capital Plan for Business Transformation.............   202
      Oversight and Management of Defense-Wide Training..........   202
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   203
    Subtitle A--Goldwater-Nichols Reform.........................   203
      Section 901--Sense of Congress on Goldwater-Nichols Reform.   203
      Section 902--Repeal of Defense Strategy Review.............   203
      Section 903--Commission on National Defense Strategy for 
        the United States........................................   204
      Section 904--Reform of Defense Strategic and Policy 
        Guidance.................................................   204
      Section 905--Reform of the National Military Strategy......   205
      Section 906--Modification to Independent Study of National 
        Security Strategy Formulation Process....................   206
      Section 907--Term of Office for the Chairman of the Joint 
        Chiefs of Staff..........................................   206
      Section 908--Responsibilities of the Chairman of the Joint 
        Chiefs of Staff relating to Operations...................   206
      Section 909--Assigned Forces within the Continental United 
        States...................................................   207
      Section 910--Reduction in General Officer and Flag Officer 
        Grades and Positions.....................................   207
      Section 911--Establishment of Unified Combatant Command for 
        Cyber Operations.........................................   208
      Section 912--Revision of Requirements Relating to Length of 
        Joint Duty Assignments...................................   208
      Section 913--Revision of Definitions Used for Joint Officer 
        Management...............................................   208
      Section 914--Independent Assessment of Combatant Command 
        Structure................................................   208
    Subtitle B--Other Matters....................................   208
      Section 921--Modifications to Corrosion Report.............   208
      Section 922--Authority to Employ Civilian Faculty Members 
        at Joint Special Operations University...................   208
      Section 923--Guidelines for Conversion of Functions 
        Performed by Civilian or Contractor Personnel to 
        Performance by Military Personnel........................   209
      Section 924--Public Release by Inspectors General of 
        Reports of Misconduct....................................   209
      Section 925--Modifications to Requirements for Accounting 
        for Members of the Armed Forces and Department of Defense 
        Civilian Employees Listed as Missing.....................   209
    Subtitle C--Department of the Navy and Marine Corps..........   209
      Section 931--Redesignation of the Department of the Navy as 
        the Department of the Navy and Marine Corps..............   209
      Section 932--Conforming Amendments to Title 10, United 
        States Code..............................................   209
      Section 933--Other Provisions of Law and Other References..   209
      Section 934--Effective Date................................   209
TITLE X--GENERAL PROVISIONS......................................   210
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   210
    Counter-Drug Activities......................................   210
      Colombia Peace Process.....................................   210
      United States Southern Command Operational Support.........   210
    Other Matters................................................   211
      Accessibility of Translated Foreign Military and Technical 
        Writings.................................................   211
      Air Force Combat Search and Rescue Associate Units.........   211
      Airlift Safety and Readiness for Certain Aircraft..........   212
      Army and Joint Force Integration of Former Unmanned 
        Aircraft System Center of Excellence Responsibilities....   212
      Carrier Air Wing Force Structure...........................   213
      Comprehensive Detention Strategy...........................   214
      Comptroller General Assessment of Deployable Identity 
        Management Forensics Capability..........................   214
      Countering Violent Extremism...............................   215
      Department of Defense Briefing on United States 
        Ratification of the United Nations Convention on the Law 
        of the Sea...............................................   215
      Department of Defense Strategy for Countering 
        Unconventional Warfare...................................   215
      Enterprise Resource Planning Financial Management 
        Implementation...........................................   216
      Financial Management Systems for Army Non-Appropriated Fund 
        Activities...............................................   217
      Foreign Currency Fluctuation Account.......................   217
      Maintaining Compliance with the Financial Improvement and 
        Audit Readiness Plan.....................................   218
      Minerva Research Initiative................................   218
      Preventing Unfair Trade Practices in Military Equipment 
        Sales....................................................   219
      Recommendations of the National Commission on the Future of 
        the Army.................................................   219
      Repeal of Report on Unmanned Aircraft Systems..............   220
      Special Operations Forces Education Briefing...............   220
      Wassenaar Arrangement Impacts to the Department of Defense.   221
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   221
    Subtitle A--Financial Matters................................   221
      Section 1001--General Transfer Authority...................   221
      Section 1002--Requirement to transfer Funds from Department 
        of Defense Acquisition Workforce Development Fund to the 
        Treasury.................................................   221
    Subtitle B--Counter-Drug Activities..........................   222
      Section 1011--Extension of Authority to Provide Additional 
        Support for Counter-Drug Activities of Foreign 
        Governments..............................................   222
      Section 1012--Secretary of Defense Review of Curricula and 
        Program Structures of National Guard Counterdrug Schools.   222
      Section 1013--Extension of Authority to Support Unified 
        Counterdrug and Counterterrorism Campaign in Colombia....   222
    Subtitle C--Naval Vessels and Shipyards......................   222
      Section 1021--Definition of Short-Term Work with Respect to 
        Overhaul, Repair, or Maintenance of Naval Vessels........   222
      Section 1022--Warranty Requirements for Shipbuilding 
        Contracts................................................   222
      Section 1023--National Sea-Based Deterrence Fund...........   223
      Section 1024--Availability of Funds for Retirement or 
        Inactivation of Ticonderoga-Class Cruisers or Dock 
        Landing Ships............................................   223
      Section 1025--Restrictions on the Overhaul and Repair of 
        Vessels in Foreign Shipyards.............................   223
    Subtitle D--Counterterrorism.................................   223
      Section 1031--Frequency of Counterterrorism Operations 
        Briefings................................................   223
      Section 1032--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Transfer or 
        Release of Individuals Detained at United States Naval 
        Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba to the United States.......   223
      Section 1033--Prohibition on Use of Funds to Construct or 
        Modify Facilities in the United States to House Detainees 
        Transferred from United States Naval Station, Guantanamo 
        Bay, Cuba................................................   224
      Section 1034--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Transfer or 
        Release to Certain Countries of Individuals Detained at 
        United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba........   224
      Section 1035--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Realignment 
        of Forces at or Closure of United States Naval Station, 
        Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.....................................   224
      Section 1036--Modification of Congressional Notification of 
        Sensitive Military Operations............................   224
      Section 1037--Comprehensive Strategy for Detention of 
        Certain Individuals......................................   224
    Subtitle E--Miscellaneous Authorities and Limitations........   225
      Section 1041--Expanded Authority for Transportation by the 
        Department of Defense of Non-Department of Defense 
        Personnel and Cargo......................................   225
      Section 1042--Limitation on Retirement, Deactivation, or 
        Decommissioning of Mine Countermeasures Ships............   225
      Section 1043--Extension of Authority of Secretary of 
        Transportation to Issue Non-Premium Aviation Insurance...   225
      Section 1044--Evaluation of Navy Alternate Combination 
        Cover and Unisex Combination Cover.......................   225
      Section 1045--Department of Defense Protection of National 
        Security Spectrum........................................   226
      Section 1046--Transportation on Military Aircraft on a 
        Space-Available Basis for Members and Former Members of 
        the Armed Forces with Disabilities Rated as Total........   226
      Section 1047--National Guard Flyovers of Public Events.....   226
    Subtitle F--Studies and Reports..............................   226
      Section 1061--Temporary Continuation of Certain Department 
        of Defense Reporting Requirements........................   226
      Section 1062--Matters for Inclusion in Report on 
        Designation of Countries for which Rewards May Be Paid 
        under Department of Defense Rewards Program..............   227
      Section 1063--Congressional Notification of Biological 
        Select Agent and Toxin Theft, Loss, or Release Involving 
        the Department of Defense................................   227
      Section 1064--Report on Service-Provided Support to United 
        States Special Operations Forces.........................   227
      Section 1065--Report on Citizen Security Responsibilities 
        in the Northern Triangle of Central America..............   227
      Section 1066--Report on Counterproliferation Activities and 
        Programs.................................................   227
      Section 1067--Inclusion of Ballistic Missile Defense 
        Information in Annual Report on Requirements of Combatant 
        Commands.................................................   228
      Section 1068--Reviews by Department of Defense Concerning 
        National Security Use of Spectrum........................   228
      Section 1069--Annual Report on Personnel, Training, and 
        Equipment Requirements for the Non-Federalized National 
        Guard to Support Civilian Authorities in Prevention and 
        Response to Domestic Disasters...........................   229
    Subtitle G--Other Matters....................................   229
      Section 1081--Technical and Clerical Amendments............   229
      Section 1082--Modification to Support for Non-Federal 
        Development and Testing of Material for Chemical Agent 
        Defense..................................................   229
      Section 1083--Increase in Maximum Amount Available for 
        Equipment, Services, and Supplies Provided for 
        Humanitarian Demining Assistance.........................   229
      Section 1084--Liquidation of Unpaid Credits Accrued as a 
        Result of Transactions Under a Cross-Servicing Agreement.   230
      Section 1085--Clarification of Contracts Covered by Airlift 
        Service Provision........................................   230
      Section 1086--National Biodefense Strategy.................   230
      Section 1087--Global Cultural Knowledge Network............   231
      Section 1088--Modification of Requirements Relating to 
        Management of Military Technicians.......................   231
      Section 1089--Sense of Congress Regarding Connecticut's 
        Submarine Century........................................   232
      Section 1090--LNG Permitting Certainty and Transparency....   232
      Section 1091--Sense of Congress Regarding the Reporting of 
        the MV-22 Mishap in Marana, Arizona, on April 8, 2000....   232
      Section 1092--Transfer of Surplus Firearms to Corporation 
        for the Promotion of Rifle Practice and Firearms Safety..   232
      Section 1093--Sense of Congress Regarding the Importance of 
        Panama City, Florida, to the History and Future of the 
        Armed Forces.............................................   232
      Section 1094--Protections Relating to Civil Rights and 
        Disabilities.............................................   232
      Section 1095--Nonapplicability of Certain Executive Order 
        to Department of Defense and National Nuclear Security 
        Administration...........................................   232
      Section 1096--Determination and Disclosure of 
        Transportation Costs Incurred by Secretary of Defense for 
        Congressional Trips Outside the United States............   233
      Section 1097--Waiver of Certain Polygraph Examination 
        Requirements.............................................   233
TITLE XI--CIVILIAN PERSONNEL MATTERS.............................   233
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   233
      Defense Intelligence Agency Housing Allowances.............   233
      Five-Year Limitation on Civilian Personnel Working Overseas   233
      Joint Base Wage Grade Parity...............................   234
      Security Clearances........................................   234
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   235
      Section 1101--Temporary Direct Hire Authority for Domestic 
        Defense Industrial Base Facilities and the Major Range 
        and Test Facilities Base.................................   235
      Section 1102--Temporary Personnel Flexibilities for 
        Domestic Defense Industrial Base Facilities and Major 
        Range and Test Facilities Base Civilian Personnel........   235
      Section 1103--One-Year Extension of Temporary Authority to 
        Grant Allowances, Benefits, and Gratuities to Civilian 
        Personnel on Official Duty in a Combat Zone..............   235
      Section 1104--Advance Payments for Employees Relocating 
        within the United States and Its Territories.............   235
      Section 1105--Permanent Authority for Alternative Personnel 
        Program for Scientific and Technical Personnel...........   235
      Section 1106--Modification to Information Technology 
        Personnel Exchange Program...............................   236
      Section 1107--Treatment of Certain Localities for 
        Calculation of Per Diem Allowances.......................   236
      Section 1108--Eligibility of Employees in a Time-Limited 
        Appointment to Compete for a Permanent Appointment at Any 
        Federal Agency...........................................   236
      Section 1109--Limitation on Administrative Leave...........   236
      Section 1110--Record of Investigation of Personnel Action 
        in Separated Employee's Official Personnel File..........   236
      Section 1111--Review of Official Personnel File of Former 
        Federal Employees before Rehiring........................   236
TITLE XII--MATTERS RELATING TO FOREIGN NATIONS...................   237
  OVERVIEW.......................................................   237
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   238
      Assistance to Iraqi Forces for Mosul Operations............   238
      Assistance to the Afghan National Defense and Security 
        Forces...................................................   239
      Chinese Participation in Rim of the Pacific Exercise.......   239
      Comptroller General of the United States Assessment of 
        Foreign Military Sales...................................   240
      Countering Adversarial Messaging...........................   241
      Counterterrorism and Security Cooperation Efforts in 
        Somalia and the Horn of Africa...........................   241
      Department of Defense Briefing on Foreign Military Sales...   242
      Enduring Basing Requirements in the U.S. Central Command 
        Area of Responsibility...................................   242
      Enduring High-Resolution Geospatial Data...................   243
      Instability in Libya.......................................   243
      Interpretation of gross violation of human rights..........   244
      Military Assistance to the Government of Ukraine...........   244
      North Atlantic Treaty Organization Defense Spending 
        Commitments..............................................   244
      Report on U.S. Military Enabler Support within Operation 
        Inherent Resolve.........................................   245
      Reporting Requirements of Authority for Support of Special 
        Operations to Combat Terrorism...........................   245
      Review of Taiwan Midshipman Cruise Training Port Call......   246
      Social Media Analytics and Publically Available Information 
        Supporting Battlespace Awareness.........................   246
      State Partnership Program Activities in Ukraine............   247
      Strategy for Regional Counter-Narrative Capabilities.......   247
      Syria No Fly Zone..........................................   248
      The Military Campaign to Counter the Islamic State of Iraq 
        and the Levant...........................................   248
      Transparency in Security Cooperation Activities............   249
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   250
    Subtitle A--Assistance and Training..........................   250
      Section 1201--One-Year Extension of Logistical Support for 
        Coalition Forces Supporting Certain United States 
        Military Operations......................................   250
      Section 1202--Extension of Authority for Training of 
        General Purpose Forces of the United States Armed Forces 
        with Military and Other Security Forces of Friendly 
        Foreign Countries........................................   250
      Section 1203--Modification and Extension of Authority to 
        Conduct Activities to Enhance the Capability of Foreign 
        Countries to Respond to Incidents Involving Weapons of 
        Mass Destruction.........................................   250
      Section 1204--Extension of Authority for Support of Special 
        Operations to Combat Terrorism...........................   250
      Section 1205--Modification and Codification of Reporting 
        Requirements Relating to Security Cooperation Authorities   250
      Section 1206--Independent Assessment of Department of 
        Defense Security Cooperation Programs....................   251
    Subtitle B--Matters Relating to Afghanistan and Pakistan.....   252
      Section 1211--Extension and Modification of Commanders' 
        Emergency Response Program...............................   252
      Section 1212--Extension and Modification of Authority for 
        Reimbursement of Certain Coalition Nations for Support 
        Provided to United States Military Operations............   252
      Section 1213--Extension of Authority to Acquire Products 
        and Services Produced in Countries Along a Major Route of 
        Supply to Afghanistan....................................   253
      Section 1214--Extension of Authority to Transfer Defense 
        Articles and Provide Defense Services to the Military and 
        Security Forces of Afghanistan...........................   253
      Section 1215--Sense of Congress on United States Policy and 
        Strategy in Afghanistan..................................   253
      Section 1216--Special Immigrant Status for Certain Afghans.   253
    Subtitle C--Matters Relating to Syria and Iraq...............   254
      Section 1221--Modification and Extension of Authority to 
        Provide Assistance to the Vetted Syrian Opposition.......   254
      Section 1222--Modification and Extension of Authority to 
        Provide Assistance to Counter the Islamic State of Iraq 
        and the Levant...........................................   254
      Section 1223--Extension and Modification of Authority to 
        Support Operations and Activities of the Office of 
        Security Cooperation in Iraq.............................   255
      Section 1224--Report on Prevention of Future Terrorist 
        Organizations in Iraq and Syria..........................   255
      Section 1225--Semiannual Report on Integration of Political 
        and Military Strategies Against ISIL.....................   256
    Subtitle D--Matters Relating to the Russian Federation.......   256
      Section 1231--Limitation on Use of Funds to Approve or 
        Otherwise Permit Approval of Certain Requests by Russian 
        Federation Under Open Skies Treaty.......................   256
      Section 1232--Military Response Options to Russian 
        Federation Violation of INF Treaty.......................   257
      Section 1233--Limitation on Military Cooperation between 
        the United States and the Russian Federation.............   257
      Section 1234--Statement of Policy on United States Efforts 
        in Europe to Reassure United States Partners and Allies 
        and Deter Aggression by the Government of the Russian 
        Federation...............................................   258
      Section 1235--Modification of Ukraine Security Assistance 
        Initiative...............................................   258
      Section 1236--Prohibition on Availability of Funds Relating 
        to Sovereignty of the Russian Federation over Crimea.....   258
      Section 1237--Modification and Extension of Report on 
        Military Assistance to Ukraine...........................   259
      Section 1238--Additional Matters in Annual Report on 
        Military and Security Developments Involving the Russian 
        Federation...............................................   259
    Subtitle E--Other Matters....................................   259
      Section 1241--Sense of Congress on Malign Activities of the 
        Government of Iran.......................................   259
      Section 1242--Modification of Annual Report on Military and 
        Security Developments Involving the People's Republic of 
        China....................................................   259
      Section 1243--Sense of Congress on Trilateral Cooperation 
        Between Japan, South Korea, and the United States........   260
      Section 1244--Sense of Congress on Cooperation Between 
        Singapore and the United States..........................   260
      Section 1245--Monitoring and Evaluation of Overseas 
        Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid Programs of the 
        Department of Defense....................................   260
      Section 1246--Enhancement of Interagency Support During 
        Contingency Operations and Transition Periods............   260
      Section 1247--Two-Year Extension and Modification of 
        Authorization of Non-Conventional Assisted Recovery 
        Capabilities.............................................   261
      Section 1248--Authority to Destroy Certain Specified World 
        War II-Era United States-Origin Chemical Munitions 
        Located on San Jose Island, Republic of Panama...........   261
      Section 1249--Strategy for United States Defense Interests 
        in Africa................................................   262
      Section 1250--United States-Israel Directed Energy 
        Cooperation..............................................   262
      Section 1251--Sense of Congress on Support for Estonia, 
        Latvia, and Lithuania....................................   262
      Section 1252--Sense of Congress on Support for Georgia.....   262
      Section 1253--Modification of Annual Report on Military 
        Power of Iran............................................   263
      Section 1254--Sense of Congress on Senior Military 
        Exchanges Between the United States and Taiwan...........   263
      Section 1255--Quarterly Report on Freedom of Navigation 
        Operations...............................................   263
    Subtitle F--Codification and Consolidation of Department of 
        Defense Security Cooperation Authorities.................   263
      Section 1261--Enactment of New Chapter for Department of 
        Defense Security Cooperation Authorities and Transfer of 
        Certain Authorities to New Chapter.......................   263
TITLE XIII--COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION.........................   264
  OVERVIEW.......................................................   264
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   264
      Section 1301--Specification of Cooperative Threat Reduction 
        Funds....................................................   264
      Section 1302--Funding Allocations..........................   264
      Section 1303--Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
        Cooperative Threat Reduction in People's Republic of 
        China....................................................   265
TITLE XIV--OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS..................................   265
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   265
      Beryllium Metal Supply.....................................   265
      Clarification of Product Improvement Pilot Program 
        Authority................................................   265
      Defense Production Act Implications for Propeller Shafts...   266
      Destruction of Chemical Weapons Stockpile..................   266
      Locality Pay at Department of Defense Working Capital Fund 
        Facilities...............................................   267
      Rare Earth Stockpile Acquisitions by the Defense Logistics 
        Agency...................................................   267
      Successful Changes to Working Capital Fund Cash Management 
        Policy...................................................   268
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   269
    Subtitle A--Military Programs................................   269
      Section 1401--Working Capital Funds........................   269
      Section 1402--National Defense Sealift Fund................   269
      Section 1403--Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, 
        Defense..................................................   269
      Section 1404--Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug 
        Activities, Defense-Wide.................................   269
      Section 1405--Defense Inspector General....................   269
      Section 1406--Defense Health Program.......................   269
      Section 1407--National Sea-Based Deterrence Fund...........   269
    Subtitle B--National Defense Stockpile.......................   269
      Section 1411--Authority to Dispose of Certain Materials 
        from and to Acquire Additional Materials for the National 
        Defense Stockpile........................................   269
      Section 1412--Revisions to the Strategic and Critical 
        Materials Stock Piling Act...............................   270
    Subtitle C--Other Matters....................................   270
      Section 1421--Authority for Transfer of Funds to Joint 
        Department of Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs 
        Medical Facility Demonstration Fund for Captain James A. 
        Lovell Health Care Center, Illinois......................   270
      Section 1422--Authorization of Appropriations for Armed 
        Forces Retirement Home...................................   270
TITLE XV--AUTHORIZATION OF ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR OVERSEAS 
    CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS.......................................   270
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   270
      Execution of Counterterrorism Partnerships Fund............   270
      National Guard and Reserve Component Equipment Account.....   271
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   272
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................   272
      Section 1501--Purpose and Treatment of Certain 
        Authorizations of Appropriations.........................   272
      Section 1502--Procurement..................................   272
      Section 1503--Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation..   272
      Section 1504--Operation and Maintenance....................   272
      Section 1505--Military Personnel...........................   273
      Section 1506--Working Capital Funds........................   273
      Section 1507--Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug 
        Activities, Defense-Wide.................................   273
      Section 1508--Defense Inspector General....................   273
      Section 1509--Defense Health Program.......................   273
      Section 1510--Counterterrorism Partnerships Fund...........   273
    Subtitle B--Financial Matters................................   274
      Section 1521--Treatment as Additional Authorizations.......   274
      Section 1522--Special Transfer Authority...................   274
    Subtitle C--Limitations, Reports, and Other Matters..........   274
      Section 1531--Afghanistan Security Forces Fund.............   274
      Section 1532--Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Fund   274
      Section 1533--Extension of Authority to Use Joint 
        Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Fund for Training of 
        Foreign Security Forces to Defeat Improvised Explosive 
        Devices..................................................   275
TITLE XVI--STRATEGIC PROGRAMS, CYBER, AND INTELLIGENCE MATTERS...   275
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   275
      Accrediting Models for Missile Defense Testing.............   275
      Air Force Global Strike Command............................   275
      Analytic Line Review of U.S. Central Command Intelligence 
        Assessments..............................................   276
      Army Small Satellite Technology Development................   276
      Assessment of Department of Defense Efforts to Secure 
        Internet of Things.......................................   277
      Assessment of Hardening Technologies for Microgrids........   277
      Asset Tracking for Information Technology Security.........   278
      Biennial Cyber Exercises...................................   279
      Briefing on B61-12 Deployment Plans and Costs for Modifying 
        Dual-Capable Aircraft....................................   279
      Briefing on Security Standards Related to Forward-Deployed 
        U.S. Nuclear Weapons.....................................   279
      Cloud Access Points........................................   280
      Command and Control of National Security Space Assets......   281
      Commercial Geospatial Intelligence.........................   281
      Commercial Satellite Communications........................   281
      Commercial Space-Based Capabilities........................   282
      Comptroller General Assessment of the Management and 
        Measurement of Cyber Activities..........................   283
      Comptroller General Review of Software-Intensive Space 
        Acquisition Programs.....................................   284
      Comptroller General Review of the Space Acquisition 
        Workforce................................................   284
      Confidence-Building Measures Related to Conventional Prompt 
        Global Strike Capabilities...............................   285
      Contribution of AN/TPY-2 Radars............................   286
      Cyber Hardening Through Program Sustainment................   286
      Cyber Training Equivalency.................................   287
      Department of Defense Equities on Approval of the Galileo 
        Positioning, Navigation, and Timing System...............   288
      Department of Defense Requirements for National 
        Reconnaissance Office Programs...........................   288
      Ensuring Robust Missile Defense for Hawaii.................   288
      Ensuring Technical Expertise for Sustainment of the Nuclear 
        Command and Control System...............................   289
      Evaluation of Department of Defense Use of Non-Allied 
        Global Navigation Satellite Systems......................   289
      Excess Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Motor 
        Certification............................................   290
      Expeditionary Large Data Object Repository for Analytics in 
        Deployed Operations......................................   290
      Ground Based Strategic Deterrent...........................   290
      Host Based Security System Best Practices..................   291
      Hosted Payloads............................................   291
      Improving Intelligence Support to Acquisition..............   292
      Improving Sea-Based X Band radar...........................   292
      Information Assurance of Joint Test and Evaluation 
        Activities...............................................   294
      Insider Threat Capabilities for the Joint Information 
        Environment..............................................   294
      Integrated Department of Defense Intelligence Priorities...   295
      Intelligence Analysis Processes of the Combatant Commands..   295
      Interagency Collaboration on Physical Security for Nuclear 
        Weapons..................................................   296
      Intermediate-Range Ground-Launched Missiles................   297
      JLENS Redeployment.........................................   298
      Joint Interagency Combined Space Operations Center.........   299
      Military Space Acquisition Improvements....................   300
      Minimum Essential Emergency Communications Network.........   301
      Modernizing the Ballistic Missile Defense System...........   301
        Accelerating development of missile defense radars for 
          homeland defense.......................................   302
        Booster upgrades for improved homeland defense 
          interceptor............................................   302
        Cyber protection improvements to the Ballistic Missile 
          Defense System.........................................   302
        Ground system communications and fire control software 
          upgrades to enable full Redesigned Kill Vehicle 
          capabilities...........................................   303
        Missile defense test ranges..............................   303
        Multi-Object Kill Vehicle technology maturation..........   303
        Post-Intercept Assessment acceleration...................   304
        Redesigned Kill Vehicle risk reduction...................   304
      Next Generation Operational Control Segment................   304
      Nuclear Weapons Security Forces Standards..................   305
      Operationally Responsive Space.............................   305
      Plan for Strengthening Outer Space Cooperation with Japan..   306
      Propulsion Test Facilities.................................   306
      Quarterly Briefings on Strategic Forces....................   306
      Report on Long-Range Standoff Weapon.......................   307
      Report on Strategic Missile Commonality....................   308
      Report on Theater Missile Defense Training and Deployment 
        Requirements.............................................   308
      Review of Dual-Hatting Relationship........................   309
      Satellite Ground Control Systems...........................   310
      Space Defense and Protection...............................   310
      Space Situational Awareness................................   311
      Spaceports.................................................   311
      Strategic Plan for the Defense Insider Threat Management 
        and Analysis Center......................................   311
      Streamlining Missile Defense Oversight.....................   312
      Supply Chain Security of Strategic Capabilities............   313
      Sustainment and Modernization of the Cobra Dane Radar......   314
      Trusted foundries for strategic-hardened microelectronics..   315
      Unified Platform...........................................   315
      Use of Surplus ICBM Motors for Commercial Space Launches...   316
      Weather Forecasting Model..................................   316
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   317
    Subtitle A--Space Activities.................................   317
      Section 1601--Rocket Propulsion System to Replace RD-180...   317
      Section 1602--Exception to the Prohibition on Contracting 
        with Russian Suppliers of Rocket Engines for the Evolved 
        Expendable Launch Vehicle Program........................   318
      Section 1603--Analysis of Alternatives for Wide-Band 
        Communications...........................................   318
      Section 1604--Modification to Pilot Program for Acquisition 
        of Commercial Satellite Communication Services...........   319
      Section 1605--Space-Based Environmental Monitoring.........   319
      Section 1606--Prohibition on Use of Certain Non-Allied 
        Positioning, Navigation, and Timing Systems..............   319
      Section 1607--Limitation of Availability of Funds for the 
        Joint Space Operations Center Mission System.............   320
      Section 1608--Space-Based Infrared System and Advanced 
        Extremely High Frequency Program.........................   320
      Section 1609--Plans on Transfer of Acquisition and Funding 
        Authority of Certain Weather Missions to National 
        Reconnaissance Office....................................   321
      Section 1610--Pilot Program on Commercial Weather Data.....   322
      Section 1611--Organization and Management of National 
        Security Space Activities of the Department of Defense...   322
      Section 1612--Review of Charter of Operationally Responsive 
        Space Program Office.....................................   322
      Section 1613--Backup and Complementary Positioning, 
        Navigation, and Timing Capabilities of Global Positioning 
        System...................................................   323
    Subtitle B--Defense Intelligence and Intelligence-Related 
        Activities...............................................   323
      Section 1621--Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
        Intelligence Management..................................   323
      Section 1622--Limitations on Availability of Funds for 
        United States Central Command Intelligence Fusion Center.   323
      Section 1623--Limitation on Availability of Funds for Joint 
        Intelligence Analysis Complex............................   324
    Subtitle C--Cyberspace-related Matters.......................   324
      Section 1631--Special Emergency Procurement Authority to 
        Facilitate the Defense Against or Recovery from a Cyber 
        Attack...................................................   324
      Section 1632--Change in Name of National Defense 
        University's Information Resources Management College to 
        College of Information and Cyberspace....................   324
      Section 1633--Requirement to Enter into Agreements Relating 
        to Use of Cyber Opposition Forces........................   324
      Section 1634--Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
        Cryptographic Systems and Key Management Infrastructure..   325
    Subtitle D--Nuclear Forces...................................   325
      Section 1641--Improvements to Council on Oversight of 
        National Leadership Command, Control, and Communications 
        System...................................................   325
      Section 1642--Treatment of Certain Sensitive Information by 
        State and Local Governments..............................   326
      Section 1643--Procurement Authority for Certain Parts of 
        Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Fuzes.................   326
      Section 1644--Prohibition on the Availability of Funds for 
        Mobile Variant of Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent 
        Missile..................................................   327
      Section 1645--Limitation On Availability of Funds for 
        Extension of New START Treaty............................   327
      Section 1646--Consolidation of Nuclear Command, Control, 
        and Communications Functions of the Air Force............   327
      Section 1647--Report on Russian and Chinese Political and 
        Military Leadership Survivability, Command and Control, 
        and Continuity of Government Programs and Activities.....   328
      Section 1648--Sense of Congress on Importance of 
        Independent Nuclear Deterrent of United Kingdom..........   328
    Subtitle E--Missile Defense Programs.........................   328
      Section 1651--Extensions of Prohibitions Relating to 
        Missile Defense Information and Systems..................   328
      Section 1652--Review of the Missile Defeat Policy and 
        Strategy of the United States............................   328
      Section 1653--Iron Dome Short-Range Rocket Defense System 
        and Israeli Cooperative Missile Defense Program 
        Codevelopment and Coproduction...........................   329
      Section 1654--Maximizing Aegis Ashore Capability...........   330
      Section 1655--Technical Authority for Integrated Air and 
        Missile Defense Activities and Programs..................   331
      Section 1656--Development and Research of Non-Terrestrial 
        Missile Defense Layer....................................   331
      Section 1657--Hypersonic Boost Glide Vehicle Defense.......   332
      Section 1658--Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
        Patriot Lower Tier Air and Missile Defense Capability of 
        the Army.................................................   332
      Section 1659--Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
        Conventional Prompt Global Strike Weapons System.........   333
      Section 1660--Pilot Program on Loss of Unclassified, 
        Controlled Technical Information.........................   333
      Section 1661--Review of Missile Defense Agency Budget 
        Submissions for Ground-based Midcourse Defense and 
        Evaluation of Alternative Ground-based Interceptor 
        Deployments..............................................   333
      Section 1662--Declaratory Policy, Concept of Operations, 
        and Employment Guidelines for Left-of-Launch Capability..   334
      Section 1663--Procurement of Medium-Range Discrimination 
        Radar to Improve Homeland Missile Defense................   334
      Section 1664--Semiannual Notifications on Missile Defense 
        Tests and Costs..........................................   335
      Section 1665--National Missile Defense Policy..............   335
      Section 1666--Sense of the Congress on Initial Operating 
        Capability of Phase 2 of European Phased Adaptive 
        Approach to Missile Defense..............................   335
    Subtitle F--Other Matters....................................   335
      Section 1671--Protection of Certain Facilities and Assets 
        from Unmanned Aircraft...................................   335
      Section 1672--Improvement of Coordination by Department of 
        Defense of Electromagnetic Spectrum Usage................   335
TITLE XVII--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION AGILITY............   336
  OVERVIEW.......................................................   336
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   337
      Implementation of the Acquisition Agility Authorities......   337
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   338
      Section 1701--Modular Open System Approach in Development 
        of Major Weapon Systems..................................   338
      Section 1702--Development, Prototyping, and Deployment of 
        Weapon System Components or Technology...................   339
      Section 1703--Cost, Schedule, and Performance of Major 
        Defense Acquisition Programs.............................   340
      Section 1704--Transparency in Major Defense Acquisition 
        Programs.................................................   341
      Section 1705--Amendments Relating to Technical Data Rights.   341
TITLE XVIII--MATTERS RELATING TO SMALL BUSINESS PROCUREMENT......   342
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   342
      Nonapplicability to Defense Production Act.................   342
      Review of Surety Bonds Required by Federal Contractors.....   343
      Review of the Office of Government Contracting and Business 
        Development of the Small Business Administration.........   343
      Small Business Subcontractor Transparency..................   344
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   344
    Subtitle A--Improving Transparency and Clarity for Small 
        Businesses...............................................   344
      Section 1801--Plain Language Rewrite of Requirements for 
        Small Business Procurements..............................   344
      Section 1802--Improving Reporting on Small Business Goals..   344
      Section 1803--Transparency in Small Business Goals.........   345
      Section 1804--Uniformity in Procurement Terminology........   345
    Subtitle B--Clarifying the Roles of Small Business Advocates.   345
      Section 1811--Scope of Review by Procurement Center 
        Representatives..........................................   345
      Section 1812--Responsibilities of Commercial Market 
        Representatives..........................................   345
      Section 1813--Duties of the Office of Small and 
        Disadvantaged Business Utilization.......................   346
      Section 1814--Improving Contractor Compliance..............   346
      Section 1815--Responsibilities of Business Opportunity 
        Specialists..............................................   346
    Subtitle C--Strengthening Opportunities for Competition in 
        Subcontracting...........................................   346
      Section 1821--Good Faith in Subcontracting.................   346
      Section 1822--Pilot Program to Provide Opportunities for 
        Qualified Subcontractors to Obtain Past Performance 
        Ratings..................................................   347
    Subtitle D--Mentor-Protege Programs..........................   347
      Section 1831--Amendments to the Mentor-Protege Program of 
        the Department of Defense................................   347
      Section 1832--Improving Cooperation between the Mentor-
        Protege Programs of the Small Business Administration and 
        the Department of Defense................................   347
    Subtitle E--Women's Business Programs........................   347
      Section 1841--Office of Women's Business Ownership.........   347
      Section 1842--Women's Business Center Program..............   347
      Section 1843--Matching Requirements Under Women's Business 
        Center Program...........................................   348
    Subtitle F--SCORE Program....................................   348
      Section 1851--SCORE Reauthorization........................   348
      Section 1852--SCORE Program................................   348
    Subtitle G--Miscellaneous Provisions.........................   348
      Section 1861--Improving Education on Small Business 
        Regulations..............................................   348
      Section 1862--Protecting Task Order Competition............   348
      Section 1863--Improvements to Size Standards for Small 
        Agricultural Producers...................................   349
      Section 1864--Uniformity in Service-Disabled Veteran 
        Definitions..............................................   349
      Section 1865--Required Reports Pertaining to Capital 
        Planning and Investment Control..........................   349
      Section 1866--Office of Hearings and Appeals...............   349
      Section 1867--Issuance of Guidance on Small Business 
        Matters..................................................   349

DIVISION B--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AUTHORIZATIONS.................   350
  PURPOSE........................................................   350
  MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AND FAMILY HOUSING OVERVIEW..............   350
      Section 2001--Short Title..................................   350
      Section 2002--Expiration of Authorizations and Amounts 
        Required To Be Specified by Law..........................   350
      Section 2003--Effective Date...............................   350
TITLE XXI--ARMY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION............................   350
  SUMMARY........................................................   350
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   351
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   351
      Combat Aviation Hangar Sustainment.........................   352
      Former Fitzsimons Army Medical Center......................   352
      Relocation of the Defense Non-Tactical Generator and Rail 
        Equipment Center.........................................   352
      Statue of Ulysses S. Grant at United States Military 
        Academy..................................................   353
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   353
      Section 2101--Authorized Army Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   353
      Section 2102--Family Housing...............................   353
      Section 2103--Authorization of Appropriations, Army........   354
      Section 2104--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2014 Project.........................   354
      Section 2105--Extension of Authorizations of Certain Fiscal 
        Year 2013 Projects.......................................   354
      Section 2106--Extension of Authorizations of Certain Fiscal 
        Year 2014 Projects.......................................   354
TITLE XXII--NAVY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION...........................   354
  SUMMARY........................................................   354
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   354
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   354
      Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle..................................   356
      Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands Joint Military 
        Training.................................................   356
      Implementation of Guam Munitions and Explosives of Concern 
        Clearance Policy.........................................   357
      Infrastructure Requirements to Support Marine Rotational 
        Force-Darwin.............................................   357
      Port of Virginia Channel...................................   358
      Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility........................   359
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   360
      Section 2201--Authorized Navy Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   360
      Section 2202--Family Housing...............................   360
      Section 2203--Improvements to Military Family Housing Units   360
      Section 2204--Authorization of Appropriations, Navy........   360
      Section 2205--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2014 Project.........................   360
      Section 2206--Extension of Authorizations of Certain Fiscal 
        Year 2013 Projects.......................................   360
      Section 2207--Extension of Authorizations of Certain Fiscal 
        Year 2014 Projects.......................................   360
      Section 2208--Status of ``Net Negative'' Policy Regarding 
        Navy Acreage on Guam.....................................   361
TITLE XXIII--AIR FORCE MILITARY CONSTRUCTION.....................   361
  SUMMARY........................................................   361
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   361
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   361
      Air Force Remotely Piloted Aircraft Stationing, Basing, and 
        Laydown Selection Process................................   362
      Lincoln Laboratory Recapitalization........................   362
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   363
      Section 2301--Authorized Air Force Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   363
      Section 2302--Family Housing...............................   363
      Section 2303--Improvements to Military Family Housing Units   363
      Section 2304--Authorization of Appropriations, Air Force...   363
      Section 2305--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2016 Project.........................   363
      Section 2306--Extension of Authorization of Certain Fiscal 
        Year 2013 Project........................................   364
      Section 2307--Extension of Authorization of Certain Fiscal 
        Year 2014 Project........................................   364
      Section 2308--Restriction on Acquisition of Property in 
        Northern Mariana Islands.................................   364
TITLE XXIV--DEFENSE AGENCIES MILITARY CONSTRUCTION...............   364
  SUMMARY........................................................   364
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   364
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   364
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   366
      Section 2401--Authorized Defense Agencies Construction and 
        Land Acquisition Projects................................   366
      Section 2402--Authorized Energy Conservation Projects......   366
      Section 2403--Authorization of Appropriations, Defense 
        Agencies.................................................   366
      Section 2404--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2014 Project.........................   366
      Section 2405--Extension of Authorizations of Certain Fiscal 
        Year 2013 Projects.......................................   366
      Section 2406--Extension of Authorizations of Certain Fiscal 
        Year 2014 Projects.......................................   366
TITLE XXV--NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY ORGANIZATION SECURITY INVESTMENT 
    PROGRAM......................................................   367
  SUMMARY........................................................   367
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   367
      Section 2501--Authorized NATO Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   367
      Section 2502--Authorization of Appropriations, NATO........   367
TITLE XXVI--GUARD AND RESERVE FORCES FACILITIES..................   367
  SUMMARY........................................................   367
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   367
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   367
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   369
    Subtitle A--Project Authorizations and Authorization of 
        Appropriations...........................................   369
      Section 2601--Authorized Army National Guard Construction 
        and Land Acquisition Projects............................   369
      Section 2602--Authorized Army Reserve Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   369
      Section 2603--Authorized Navy Reserve and Marine Corps 
        Reserve Construction and Land Acquisition Projects.......   369
      Section 2604--Authorized Air National Guard Construction 
        and Land Acquisition Projects............................   369
      Section 2605--Authorized Air Force Reserve Construction and 
        Land Acquisition Projects................................   370
      Section 2606--Authorization of Appropriations, National 
        Guard and Reserve........................................   370
    Subtitle B--Other Matters....................................   370
      Section 2611--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2014 Project.........................   370
      Section 2612--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2015 Project.........................   370
      Section 2613--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2016 Project.........................   370
      Section 2614--Extension of Authorization of Certain Fiscal 
        Year 2013 Project........................................   370
      Section 2615--Extension of Authorizations of Certain Fiscal 
        Year 2014 Projects.......................................   371
TITLE XXVII--BASE REALIGNMENT AND CLOSURE ACTIVITIES.............   371
  SUMMARY........................................................   371
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   371
      Section 2701--Authorization of Appropriations for Base 
        Realignment and Closure Activities Funded Through 
        Department of Defense Base Closure Account...............   371
      Section 2702--Prohibition on Conducting Additional Base 
        Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Round.....................   371
TITLE XXVIII--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION GENERAL PROVISIONS...........   371
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   371
      Aqueous Film-Forming Foam..................................   371
      Concept of Operations for Military Environmental Control 
        Units....................................................   372
      Condition of Military Airfield Infrastructure..............   372
      Consultation with Federally-Recognized Indian Tribes.......   373
      Contract Management of Problem Construction Projects.......   373
      Facility Industrial Control Systems........................   374
      Improvement of Design-Build Selection Process..............   374
      Innovative Construction Materials and Design Process for 
        Military Engineering in Cold Regions.....................   375
      Installation Access for Ride Sharing Services..............   375
      Live-Fire Small Arms Training Ranges.......................   376
      Military Construction for Military Intelligence Facilities.   376
      Military Housing Privatization Initiative..................   377
      Modification of Guidance on Use of Airfield Pavement 
        Markings.................................................   377
      Okinawa Consolidation Plan.................................   378
      Overseas Infrastructure Long-Range Planning................   379
      Report on Military Construction Project Cost Estimating and 
        Execution................................................   379
      Workforce Issues for Relocation of Marines to Guam.........   380
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   380
    Subtitle A--Military Construction Program and Military Family 
        Housing..................................................   380
      Section 2801--Modification of Criteria for Treatment of 
        Laboratory Revitalization Projects as Minor Military 
        Construction Projects....................................   380
      Section 2802--Classification of Facility Conversion 
        Projects as Repair Projects..............................   381
      Section 2803--Extension of Temporary, Limited Authority to 
        Use Operation and Maintenance Funds for Construction 
        Projects Outside the United States.......................   381
      Section 2804--Extension of Temporary Authority for 
        Acceptance and Use of Contributions for Certain 
        Construction, Maintenance, and Repair Projects Mutually 
        Beneficial to the Department of Defense and Kuwait 
        Military Forces..........................................   381
      Section 2805--Notice and Reporting Requirements for Energy 
        Conservation Construction Projects.......................   381
      Section 2806--Additional Entities Eligible for 
        Participation in Defense Laboratory Modernization Pilot 
        Program..................................................   381
    Subtitle B--Real Property and Facilities Administration......   381
      Section 2811--Congressional Notification of In-Kind 
        Contributions for Overseas Military Construction Projects   381
      Section 2812--Prohibition on Use of Military Installations 
        to House Unaccompanied Alien Children....................   382
      Section 2813--Allotment of Space and Provision of Services 
        to WIC Offices Operating on Military Installations.......   382
      Section 2814--Sense of Congress Regarding Need to Consult 
        with State and Local Officials Prior to Acquisitions of 
        Real Property............................................   382
      Section 2815--Sense of Congress Regarding Inclusion of 
        Stormwater Systems and Components within the Meaning of 
        ``Wastewater System'' Under the Department of Defense 
        Authority for Conveyance of Utility Systems..............   382
      Section 2816--Assessment of Public Schools on Department of 
        Defense Installations....................................   382
    Subtitle C--Provision Related to Asia-Pacific Military 
        Realignment..............................................   382
      Section 2821--Limited Exceptions to Restriction on 
        Development of Public Infrastructure in Connection with 
        Realignment of Marine Corps Forces in Asia-Pacific Region   382
    Subtitle D--Land Conveyances.................................   383
      Section 2831--Land Conveyances, High Frequency Active 
        Auroral Research Program Facility and Adjacent Property, 
        Gakona, Alaska...........................................   383
      Section 2832--Land Conveyance, Campion Air Force Radar 
        Station, Galena, Alaska..................................   383
      Section 2833--Exchange of Property Interests, San Diego 
        Unified Port District, California........................   383
      Section 2834--Release of Property Interests Retained in 
        Connection with Land Conveyance, Eglin Air Force Base, 
        Florida..................................................   383
      Section 2835--Land Exchange, Fort Hood, Texas..............   383
      Section 2836--Land Conveyance, P-36 Warehouse, Colbern 
        United States Army Reserve Center, Laredo, Texas.........   384
      Section 2837--Land Conveyance, St. George National Guard 
        Armory, St. George, Utah.................................   384
      Section 2838--Release of Restrictions, Richland Innovation 
        Center, Richland, Washington.............................   384
    Subtitle E--Military Land Withdrawals........................   384
      Section 2841--Bureau of Land Management Withdrawn Military 
        Lands Under Military Land Withdrawal Act of 1999.........   384
      Section 2842--Permanent Withdrawal or Transfer of 
        Administrative Jurisdiction of Public Land, Naval Air 
        Weapons Station China Lake, California...................   384
    Subtitle F--Military Memorials, Monuments, and Museums.......   385
      Section 2851--Cyber Center for Education and Innovation-
        Home of the National Cryptologic Museum..................   385
      Section 2852--Renaming Site of the Dayton Aviation Heritage 
        National Historical Park, Ohio...........................   385
      Section 2853--Support for Military Service Memorials and 
        Museums Highlighting Role of Women in the Military.......   385
      Section 2854--Petersburg National Battlefield Boundary 
        Modification.............................................   385
      Section 2855--Amendments to the National Historic 
        Preservation Act.........................................   385
      Section 2856--Recognition of the National Museum of World 
        War II Aviation..........................................   386
    Subtitle G--Designations and Other Matters...................   386
      Section 2861--Designation of Portion of Moffett Federal 
        Airfield, California, as Moffett Air National Guard Base.   386
      Section 2862--Redesignation of Mike O'Callaghan Federal 
        Medical Center...........................................   386
      Section 2863--Transfer of Certain Items of the Omar Bradley 
        Foundation to the Descendants of General Omar Bradley....   386
      Section 2864--Protection and Recovery of Greater Sage 
        Grouse...................................................   386
      Section 2865--Implementation of Lesser Prairie-Chicken 
        Range-Wide Conservation Plan and Other Conservation 
        Measures.................................................   387
      Section 2866--Removal of Endangered Species Status for 
        American Burying Beetle..................................   387
TITLE XXIX--OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS MILITARY CONSTRUCTION   387
  SUMMARY........................................................   387
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   387
      Section 2901--Authorized Navy Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   387
      Section 2902--Authorized Air Force Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   387
      Section 2903--Authorization of Appropriations..............   387
TITLE XXX--UTAH TEST AND TRAINING RANGE ENCROACHMENT PREVENTION 
    AND TEMPORARY CLOSURE AUTHORITIES............................   388
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   388
      Section 3001--Findings and Definitions.....................   388
    Subtitle A--Utah Test and Training Range.....................   388
      Section 3011--Management of BLM Land.......................   388
      Section 3012--Temporary Closures...........................   388
      Section 3013--Community Resource Group.....................   388
      Section 3014--Liability....................................   388
      Section 3015--Effects of Subtitle..........................   388
    Subtitle B--Land Exchange....................................   388
      Section 3021--Findings and Purpose.........................   388
      Section 3022--Definitions..................................   389
      Section 3023--Exchange of Federal Land and Non-Federal Land   389
      Section 3024--Status and Management of Non-Federal Land 
        after Exchange...........................................   389
      Section 3025--Hazardous Materials..........................   389
    Subtitle C--Highway Rights-of-way............................   389
      Section 3031--Recognition and Transfer of Certain Highway 
        Rights-of-Way............................................   389

DIVISION C--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY AUTHORIZATIONS 
  AND OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS.......................................   389
TITLE XXXI--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY PROGRAMS......   389
  OVERVIEW.......................................................   389
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   390
    National Nuclear Security Administration.....................   390
      Overview...................................................   390
      Weapons Activities.........................................   390
        Attraction and retention of personnel within the nuclear 
          security enterprise....................................   390
        Defense nuclear security and physical security 
          infrastructure recapitalization........................   391
        Deferred maintenance.....................................   392
        Domestic uranium enrichment program......................   393
        Funding prioritization within Weapons Activities.........   393
        Future Years Nuclear Security Program funding............   394
        Life extension programs..................................   395
        Plutonium strategy.......................................   396
        Stockpile systems, surveillance and assessments, and 
          Integrated Surety Architecture.........................   396
        Strategic commodities....................................   397
        Technology maturation programs, prototypes program, and 
          stockpile responsiveness program.......................   398
      Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation...........................   399
        Comptroller General assessment of project management 
          processes and systems for defense nuclear 
          nonproliferation programs..............................   399
        Nuclear Counterterrorism and Incident Response Program 
          and emergency preparedness.............................   400
      Naval Reactors.............................................   401
        Naval Reactors program...................................   401
      Federal Salaries and Expenses..............................   401
        Briefing on contracting strategy and plan................   401
        Briefing on damage assessment of improper disposal of 
          sensitive information..................................   402
        Governance and management reform.........................   402
    Environmental and Other Defense Activities...................   403
      Overview...................................................   403
      Defense Environmental Cleanup..............................   403
        Hanford Site.............................................   403
        Technology development...................................   403
        Waste Isolation Pilot Plant..............................   404
      Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal.............................   404
        Defense nuclear waste repository.........................   404
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   405
    Subtitle A--National Security Programs Authorizations........   405
      Section 3101--National Nuclear Security Administration.....   405
      Section 3102--Defense Environmental Cleanup................   405
      Section 3103--Other Defense Activities.....................   405
      Section 3104--Nuclear Energy...............................   405
    Subtitle B--Program Authorizations, Restrictions, and 
        Limitations..............................................   405
      Section 3111--Independent Acquisition Project Reviews of 
        Capital Assets Acquisition Projects......................   405
      Section 3112--Research and Development of Advanced Naval 
        Nuclear Fuel System Based on Low-Enriched Uranium........   406
      Section 3113--Disposition of Weapons-Usable Plutonium......   406
      Section 3114--Design Basis Threat..........................   407
      Section 3115--Prohibition on Availability of Funds for 
        Provision of Certain Assistance to Russian Federation....   407
      Section 3116--Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
        Federal Salaries and Expenses............................   408
      Section 3117--Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
        Defense Environmental Cleanup Program Direction..........   408
      Section 3118--Limitation on Availablity of Funds for 
        Acceleration of Nuclear Weapons Dismantlement............   408
      Section 3119--Annual Certification of Shipments to Waste 
        Isolation Pilot Plant....................................   409
    Subtitle C--Plans and Reports................................   410
      Section 3121--Clarification of Annual Report and 
        Certification on Status of Security of Atomic Energy 
        Defense Facilities.......................................   410
      Section 3122--Annual Report on Service Support Contracts of 
        the National Nuclear Security Administration.............   410
      Section 3123--Repeal of Certain Reporting Requirements.....   410
      Section 3124--Independent Assessment of Technology 
        Development under Defense Environmental Cleanup Program..   410
      Section 3125--Updated Plan for Verification and Monitoring 
        of Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons and Fissile Material.   411
TITLE XXXII--DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD.............   412
  OVERVIEW.......................................................   412
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   412
      Section 3201--Authorization................................   412
TITLE XXXIII--NUCLEAR ENERGY INNOVATION CAPABILITIES.............   412
      Section 3301--Short Title..................................   412
      Section 3302--Nuclear Energy...............................   412
      Section 3303--Nuclear Energy Research Programs.............   413
      Section 3304--Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative...............   413
      Section 3305--University Nuclear Science and Engineering 
        Support..................................................   413
      Section 3306--Department of Energy Civilian Nuclear 
        Infrastructure and Facilities............................   413
      Section 3307--Security of Nuclear Facilities...............   413
      Section 3308--High-Performance Computation and Supportive 
        Research.................................................   413
      Section 3309--Enabling Nuclear Energy Innovation...........   413
      Section 3310--Budget Plan..................................   413
      Section 3311--Conforming Amendments........................   414
TITLE XXXIV--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES............................   414
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   414
      Section 3401--Authorization of Appropriations..............   414
TITLE XXXV--MARITIME ADMINISTRATION..............................   414
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   414
      Non-Availability of Vessels................................   414
      Recycling United States Vessels in the United States.......   414
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   415
      Section 3501--Authorization of the Maritime Administration.   415
      Section 3502--Authority to Make Pro Rata Annual Payments 
        Under Operating Agreements for Vessels Participating in 
        Maritime Security Fleet..................................   415
      Section 3503--Authority to Extend Certain Age Restrictions 
        Relating to Vessels in the Maritime Security Fleet.......   415
      Section 3504--Corrections to Provisions Enacted by Coast 
        Guard Authorization Acts.................................   415
      Section 3505--Status of National Defense Reserve Fleet 
        Vessels..................................................   415
      Section 3506--NDRF National Security Multi-Mission Vessel..   415
      Section 3507--United States Merchant Marine Academy........   416
      Section 3508--Use of National Defense Reserve Fleet 
        Scrapping Proceeds.......................................   416
      Section 3509--Floating Dry Docks...........................   416
TITLE XXXVI--BALLAST WATER.......................................   416
      Section 3601--Short Title..................................   416
      Section 3602--Definitions..................................   416
      Section 3603--Regulation and Enforcement...................   416
      Section 3604--Uniform National Standards and Requirements 
        for the Regulation of Discharges Incidental to the Normal 
        Operation of a Vessel....................................   416
      Section 3605--Treatment Technology Certification...........   416
      Section 3606--Exemptions...................................   416
      Section 3607--Alternative Compliance Program...............   417
      Section 3608--Judicial Review..............................   417
      Section 3609--Effect on State Authority....................   417
      Section 3610--Application with Other Statutes..............   417

DIVISION D--FUNDING TABLES.......................................   417
      Section 4001--Authorization of Amounts in Funding Tables...   417
      Summary of National Defense Authorizations for Fiscal Year 
        2017.....................................................   417
      National Defense Budget Authority Implication..............   424
TITLE XLI--PROCUREMENT...........................................   426
      Section 4101--Procurement..................................   426
      Section 4102--Procurement for Overseas Contingency 
        Operations...............................................   466
      Section 4103--Procurement for Overseas Contingency 
        Operations for Base Requirements.........................   479
TITLE XLII--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION..........   489
      Section 4201--Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation..   489
      Section 4202--Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation 
        for Overseas Contingency Operations......................   523
      Section 4203--Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation 
        for Overseas Contingency Operations for Base Requirements   525
TITLE XLIII--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE...........................   527
      Section 4301--Operation and Maintenance....................   528
      Section 4302--Operation and Maintenance for Overseas 
        Contingency Operations...................................   545
      Section 4303--Operation and Maintenance for Overseas 
        Contingency Operations for Base Requirements.............   558
TITLE XLIV--MILITARY PERSONNEL...................................   566
      Section 4401--Military Personnel...........................   566
      Section 4402--Military Personnel for Overseas Contingency 
        Operations...............................................   567
      Section 4403--Military Personnel for Overseas Contingency 
        Operations for Base Requirements.........................   567
TITLE XLV--OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS..................................   568
      Section 4501--Other Authorizations.........................   568
      Section 4502--Other Authorizations for Overseas Contingency 
        Operations...............................................   571
      Section 4503--Other Authorizations for Overseas Contingency 
        Operations for Base Requirements.........................   573
TITLE XLVI--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION................................   573
      Section 4601--Military Construction........................   573
      Section 4602--Military Construction for Overseas 
        Contingency Operations...................................   585
      Section 4603--Military Construction for Overseas 
        Contingency Operations for Base Requirements.............   587
TITLE XLVII--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY PROGRAMS.....   587
      Section 4701--Department of Energy National Security 
        Programs.................................................   588

DIVISION E--MILITARY JUSTICE.....................................   600
  OVERVIEW.......................................................   600
TITLE LX--GENERAL PROVISIONS.....................................   601
      Section 6001--Definitions..................................   601
      Section 6002--Clarification of Persons Subject to UCMJ 
        while on Inactive-Duty Training..........................   601
      Section 6003--Staff Judge Advocate Disqualification Due to 
        Prior Involvement in Case................................   601
      Section 6004--Conforming Amendment Relating to Military 
        Magistrates..............................................   601
      Section 6005--Rights of Victim.............................   602
TITLE LXI--APPREHENSION AND RESTRAINT............................   602
      Section 6101--Restraint of Persons Charged.................   602
      Section 6102--Modification of Prohibition of Confinement of 
        Armed Forces Members with Enemy Prisoners and Certain 
        Others...................................................   602
TITLE LXII--NON-JUDICIAL PUNISHMENT..............................   602
      Section 6201--Modification of Confinement as Non-Judicial 
        Punishment...............................................   602
TITLE LXIII--COURT-MARTIAL JURISDICTION..........................   603
      Section 6301--Courts-Martial Classified....................   603
      Section 6302--Jurisdiction of General Courts-Martial.......   603
      Section 6303--Jurisdiction of Special Courts-Martial.......   603
      Section 6304--Summary Court-Martial as Non-Criminal Forum..   603
TITLE LXIV--COMPOSITION OF COURTS-MARTIAL........................   603
      Section 6401--Technical Amendment Relating to Persons 
        Authorized to Convene General Courts-Martial.............   603
      Section 6402--Who May Serve on Courts-Martial; Detail of 
        Members..................................................   604
      Section 6403--Number of Court-Martial Members in Capital 
        Cases....................................................   604
      Section 6404--Detailing, Qualifications, etc. of Military 
        Judges...................................................   604
      Section 6405--Qualifications of Trial Counsel and Defense 
        Counsel..................................................   604
      Section 6406--Assembly and Impaneling of Members; Detail of 
        New Members and Military Judges..........................   604
      Section 6407--Military Magistrates.........................   605
TITLE LXV--PRE-TRIAL PROCEDURE...................................   605
      Section 6501--Charges and Specifications...................   605
      Section 6502--Preliminary Hearing Required before Referral 
        to General Court-Martial.................................   605
      Section 6503--Disposition Guidance.........................   605
      Section 6504--Advice to Convening Authority before Referral 
        for Trial................................................   605
      Section 6505--Service of Charges and Commencement of Trial.   606
TITLE LXVI--TRIAL PROCEDURE......................................   606
      Section 6601--Duties of Assistant Defense Counsel..........   606
      Section 6602--Sessions.....................................   606
      Section 6603--Technical Amendments Relating to Continuances   606
      Section 6604--Conforming Amendments Relating to Challenges.   606
      Section 6605--Statute of Limitations.......................   606
      Section 6606--Former Jeopardy..............................   606
      Section 6607--Pleas of the Accused.........................   607
      Section 6608--Contempt.....................................   607
      Section 6609--Depositions..................................   607
      Section 6610--Admissibility of Sworn Testimony by Audiotape 
        or Videotape from Records of Courts of Inquiry...........   607
      Section 6611--Conforming Amendment Relating to Defense of 
        Lack of Mental Responsibility............................   607
      Section 6612--Voting and Rulings...........................   607
      Section 6613--Votes Required for Conviction, Sentencing, 
        and Other Matters........................................   607
      Section 6614--Plea Agreements..............................   608
      Section 6615--Record of Trial..............................   608
TITLE LXVII--SENTENCES...........................................   608
      Section 6701--Sentencing...................................   608
      Section 6701A--Minimum Confinement Period Required for 
        Conviction of Certain Sex-Related Offenses Committed by 
        Members of the Armed Forces..............................   608
      Section 6702--Effective Date of Sentences..................   608
      Section 6703--Sentence of Reduction in Enlisted Grade......   609
TITLE LXVIII--POST-TRIAL PROCEDURE AND REVIEW OF COURTS-MARTIAL..   609
      Section 6801--Post-Trial Processing in General and Special 
        Courts-Martial...........................................   609
      Section 6802--Limited Authority to Act on Sentence in 
        Specified Post-Trial Circumstances.......................   609
      Section 6803--Post-Trial Actions in Summary Courts-Martial 
        and Certain General and Special Courts-Martial...........   609
      Section 6804--Entry of Judgment............................   610
      Section 6805--Waiver of Right to Appeal and Withdrawal of 
        Appeal...................................................   610
      Section 6806--Appeal by the United States..................   610
      Section 6807--Rehearings...................................   610
      Section 6808--Judge Advocate Review of Finding of Guilty in 
        Summary Court-Martial....................................   610
      Section 6809--Transmittal and Review of Records............   610
      Section 6810--Courts of Criminal Appeals...................   610
      Section 6811--Review by Court of Appeals for the Armed 
        Forces...................................................   611
      Section 6812--Supreme Court Review.........................   611
      Section 6813--Review by Judge Advocate General.............   611
      Section 6814--Appellate Defense Counsel in Death Penalty 
        Cases....................................................   611
      Section 6815--Authority for Hearing on Vacation of 
        Suspension of Sentence to be Conducted by Qualified Judge 
        Advocate.................................................   611
      Section 6816--Extension of Time for Petition for New Trial.   611
      Section 6817--Restoration..................................   612
      Section 6818--Leave Requirements Pending Review of Certain 
        Court-Martial Convictions................................   612
TITLE LXIX--PUNITIVE ARTICLES....................................   612
      Section 6901--Reorganization of Punitive Articles..........   612
      Section 6902--Conviction of Offense Charged, Lesser 
        Included Offenses, and Attempts..........................   612
      Section 6903--Soliciting Commission of Offenses............   612
      Section 6904--Malingering..................................   612
      Section 6905--Breach of Medical Quarantine.................   612
      Section 6906--Missing Movement; Jumping from Vessel........   613
      Section 6907--Offenses Against Correctional Custody and 
        Restriction..............................................   613
      Section 6908--Disrespect Toward Superior Commissioned 
        Officer; Assault of Superior Commissioned Officer........   613
      Section 6909--Willfully Disobeying Superior Commissioned 
        Officer..................................................   613
      Section 6910--Prohibited Activities with Military Recruit 
        or Trainee by Person in Position of Special Trust........   613
      Section 6911--Offenses by Sentinel or Lookout..............   613
      Section 6912--Disrespect Toward Sentinel or Lookout........   613
      Section 6913--Release of Prisoner without Authority; 
        Drinking with Prisoner...................................   614
      Section 6914--Penalty for Acting as a Spy..................   614
      Section 6915--Public Records Offenses......................   614
      Section 6916--False or Unauthorized Pass Offenses..........   614
      Section 6917--Impersonation Offenses.......................   614
      Section 6918--Insignia Offenses............................   614
      Section 6919--False Official Statements; False Swearing....   614
      Section 6920--Parole Violation.............................   614
      Section 6921--Wrongful Taking, Opening, Etc. of Mail Matter   615
      Section 6922--Improper Hazarding of Vessel or Aircraft.....   615
      Section 6923--Leaving Scene of Vehicle Accident............   615
      Section 6924--Drunkenness and Other Incapacitation Offenses   615
      Section 6925--Lower Blood Alcohol Content Limits for 
        Conviction of Drunken or Reckless Operation of Vehicle, 
        Aircraft, or Vessel......................................   615
      Section 6926--Endangerment Offenses........................   615
      Section 6927--Communicating Threats........................   615
      Section 6928--Technical Amendment Relating to Murder.......   616
      Section 6929--Child Endangerment...........................   616
      Section 6930--Deposit of Obscene Matter in the Mail........   616
      Section 6931--Fraudulent Use of Credit Cards, Debit Cards, 
        and Other Access Devices.................................   616
      Section 6932--False Pretenses to Obtain Services...........   616
      Section 6933--Robbery......................................   616
      Section 6934--Receiving Stolen Property....................   616
      Section 6935--Offenses Concerning Government Computers.....   616
      Section 6936--Bribery......................................   617
      Section 6937--Graft........................................   617
      Section 6938--Kidnapping...................................   617
      Section 6939--Arson; Burning Property with Intent to 
        Defraud..................................................   617
      Section 6940--Assault......................................   617
      Section 6941--Burglary and Unlawful Entry..................   617
      Section 6942--Stalking.....................................   617
      Section 6943--Subornation of Perjury.......................   618
      Section 6944--Obstructing Justice..........................   618
      Section 6945--Misprision of Serious Offense................   618
      Section 6946--Wrongful Refusal to Testify..................   618
      Section 6947--Prevention of Authorized Seizure of Property.   618
      Section 6948--Wrongful Interference with Adverse 
        Administrative Proceeding................................   618
      Section 6949--Retaliation..................................   618
      Section 6950--Extraterritorial Application of Certain 
        Offenses.................................................   618
      Section 6951--Table of Sections............................   619
TITLE LXX--MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS..............................   619
      Section 7001--Technical Amendment Relating to Courts of 
        Inquiry..................................................   619
      Section 7002--Technical Amendment to Article 136...........   619
      Section 7003--Articles of Uniform Code of Military Justice 
        to be Explained to Officers Upon Commissioning...........   619
      Section 7004--Military Justice Case Management; Data 
        Collection and Accessibility.............................   619
TITLE LXXI--MILITARY JUSTICE REVIEW PANEL AND ANNUAL REPORTS.....   620
      Section 7101--Military Justice Review Panel................   620
      Section 7102--Annual Reports...............................   620
TITLE LXXII--CONFORMING AMENDMENTS AND EFFECTIVE DATES...........   620
      Section 7201--Amendments to UCMJ Subchapter Tables of 
        Sections.................................................   620
      Section 7202--Effective Dates..............................   620

Department of Defense Authorization Request......................   620
Communications from Other Committees.............................   624
Congressional Budget Office Estimate.............................   637
Statement Required by the Congressional Budget Act...............   640
Committee Cost Estimate..........................................   640
Advisory of Earmarks.............................................   640
Oversight Findings...............................................   640
General Performance Goals and Objectives.........................   640
Statement of Federal Mandates....................................   642
Federal Advisory Committee Statement.............................   642
Applicability to the Legislative Branch..........................   642
Duplication of Federal Programs..................................   642
Disclosure of Directed Rule Makings..............................   642
Committee Votes..................................................   642
Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported............   668
Additional Views.................................................   669









114th Congress   }                                      {       Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session      }                                      {      114-537

======================================================================



 
        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2017

                                _______
                                

  May 4, 2016.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

  Mr. Thornberry, from the Committee on Armed Services, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 4909]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Armed Services, to whom was referred the 
bill (H.R. 4909) to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 
2017 for military activities of the Department of Defense and 
for military construction, to prescribe military personnel 
strengths for such fiscal year, and for other purposes, having 
considered the same, reports favorably thereon with amendments 
and recommends that the bill as amended do pass.
    The amendments are as follows:
    The amendment strikes all after the enacting clause of the 
bill and inserts a new text which appears in italic type in the 
reported bill.
    The title of the bill is amended to reflect the amendment 
to the text of the bill.

                       PURPOSE OF THE LEGISLATION

    The bill would: (1) Authorize appropriations for fiscal 
year 2017 for procurement and for research, development, test, 
and evaluation (RDT&E;); (2) Authorize appropriations for fiscal 
year 2017 for operation and maintenance (O&M;) and for working 
capital funds; (3) Authorize for fiscal year 2017: (a) the 
personnel strength for each Active Duty component of the 
military departments; (b) the personnel strength for the 
Selected Reserve for each Reserve Component of the Armed 
Forces; (4) Modify various elements of compensation for 
military personnel and impose certain requirements and 
limitations on personnel actions in the defense establishment; 
(5) Authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2017 for military 
construction and family housing; (6) Authorize appropriations 
for Overseas Contingency Operations; (7) Authorize 
appropriations for fiscal year 2017 for the Department of 
Energy national security programs; and (8) Authorize 
appropriations for fiscal year 2017 for the Maritime 
Administration.

                    RATIONALE FOR THE COMMITTEE BILL

    H.R. 4909, the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017, is a key mechanism through which Congress 
fulfills one of its primary responsibilities as mandated in 
Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution of the United States, 
which grants Congress the power to provide for the common 
defense, to raise and support an Army, to provide and maintain 
a Navy, and to make rules for the government and regulation of 
the land and naval forces. Rule X of the House of 
Representatives provides the House Committee on Armed Services 
with jurisdiction over the Department of Defense generally and 
over the military application of nuclear energy. The committee 
bill includes the large majority of the findings and 
recommendations resulting from its oversight activities in the 
current year, conducted through hearings, briefings, and 
roundtable discussions with Department of Defense and 
Department of Energy civilian and military officials, 
intelligence analysts, outside experts, and industry 
representatives, and informed by the experience gained over the 
previous decades of the committee's existence.
    The security environment framing the committee's 
deliberations on H.R. 4909 is, as stated by the Director of the 
Defense Intelligence Agency, a world that ``is far more 
complicated, it's far more destabilized, it's far more complex 
than at any time that I've seen it.'' The Islamic State of Iraq 
and the Levant (ISIL) has carried out terror attacks in Paris, 
Brussels, and Istanbul, while also continuing to expand 
throughout the Middle East, Africa, and Southeast Asia. 
Instability and the breakdown of nation-states across the 
Middle East and Africa continue to grow. The Russian 
Federation, the People's Republic of China, the Islamic 
Republic of Iran, and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea 
all continue to take actions that threaten their neighbors and, 
in some cases, directly threaten the United States. 
Additionally, with the continued diffusion of advanced 
technology, U.S. military technological superiority is no 
longer assumed and the dominance U.S. forces have long enjoyed 
across the land, air, sea, space, and cyberspace domains is no 
longer assured.
    These security trends demand agility and strength from the 
Nation's Armed Forces to defend U.S. interests, deter would-be 
aggressors, and reassure allies and partners. They also require 
that the United States military be prepared for everything from 
nuclear conflict to hybrid warfare to terrorism. However, the 
committee is concerned that the U.S. Armed Forces continue to 
be asked to do more with less. The U.S. military continues to 
operate at a high tempo and, as stated in testimony by the 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the joint force will be 
stressed to execute a major contingency operation. Furthermore, 
the committee has received testimony from each of the military 
services on the readiness shortfalls across the force.
    H.R. 4909 reflects the committee's steadfast support of the 
courageous, professional, and dedicated men and women of the 
U.S. Armed Forces and the committee's appreciation for the 
sacrifices they make to accomplish their required missions. The 
committee understands that the capabilities of the Armed Forces 
are underpinned by the dedicated civilian employees of the 
Department of Defense and the Department of Energy's National 
Nuclear Security Administration, as well as the defense 
industrial base. Each of these elements is required to enable 
the U.S. military to be the guarantor of peace and economic 
security that it has been for generations.
    In addition to providing the vital funding and authorities 
the Nation's military requires, the bill would prioritize 
resources to address readiness shortfalls across the services. 
The committee believes that it is fundamentally wrong to send 
service members out on missions for which they are not fully 
prepared or fully supported. The bill would also implement 
major reforms within the Department of Defense, as the 
committee recognizes the need to get more defense for the 
dollar regardless of the fiscal environment. The bill also 
seeks to provide the funding required to enhance the quality of 
life of military service members and their families; support 
ongoing military operations and U.S. presence in the Republic 
of Iraq, the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, Europe, and 
elsewhere across the globe; sustain and improve the Armed 
Forces; and properly safeguard the national security of the 
United States.
    While the funding authorized in the bill matches the 
President's request, the committee acknowledges that this level 
is insufficient to restore readiness, fully fund overseas 
contingency operations, and invest in critical capabilities. It 
further acknowledges that, at this funding level, the 
Department of Defense is at risk of being unable to execute the 
current defense strategy, much less address emerging threats. 
The committee believes that sequestration must be addressed and 
the committee will continue its bipartisan work to ensure that 
resources provided for the Nation's defense are sufficient to 
protect the safety and security of the American people and our 
vital interests around the world.

Reforming the Department of Defense

    The committee believes that reform of the Department of 
Defense is necessary to increase the effectiveness and 
efficiency of the defense enterprise to get more defense for 
the dollar. But more importantly, reform is necessary to 
improve the military's agility and the speed at which it can 
adapt and respond to an increasingly complex security 
environment and unprecedented technological challenges. The 
bill reflects five major reform initiatives undertaken by the 
committee in H.R. 4909: (1) acquisition reform, (2) healthcare 
reform; (3) commissary reform, (4) military justice reform, and 
(5) Goldwater-Nichols reform. These reform proposals build upon 
the committee's previous legislative activities and reflect its 
further oversight in these areas through multiple hearings and 
briefings, as well as consultation with Department of Defense 
officials, outside experts, industry representatives, and other 
stakeholders. The committee recognizes that instituting lasting 
reform is a long-term, collaborative effort, and therefore, it 
looks forward to working with all key stakeholders to build 
upon these proposals.
    In the area of defense acquisition reform, H.R. 4909 seeks 
to create an engine of experimentation and innovation within 
the core acquisition system, while further strengthening 
acquisition planning and accountability. Specifically, the bill 
requires major defense acquisition programs, to the maximum 
extent practicable after January 1, 2019, to be designed with 
modular, open-system approaches that enable weapon system 
components to be more easily upgraded as technology and threats 
evolve. The bill authorizes the military services, rather than 
specifying projects two years beforehand through the 
traditional budget process, to budget flexible funds with which 
to experiment with and rapidly field emerging technologies 
during the year of execution. It aligns intellectual property 
rights to an open-system approach and rebalances property 
rights so the government continues to receive necessary 
technical data while encouraging companies to do business with 
the Department. Regarding program planning and oversight, the 
bill requires the Secretary of Defense, or the Secretary's 
designee, to establish cost and fielding targets at program 
inception against which the military services can be held 
accountable for program management. Milestone decision 
authority for joint programs would be delegated to the military 
services after January 1, 2019, while independent assessments 
of technical readiness and cost would inform a new 
``acquisition scorecard'' to improve transparency in key 
program decisions.
    In the area of healthcare reform, the committee is 
steadfast in maintaining a robust Military Health System with 
the primary responsibility of readiness of the force. To 
accomplish this goal, the committee undertook a comprehensive 
review of the Military Health System to identify necessary 
reforms to sustain the long term viability of the System. To 
that end, the committee seeks to ensure the Military Health 
System can sustain trained and ready healthcare providers to 
support the readiness of the force and a quality healthcare 
benefit that is valued by its beneficiaries. The committee's 
efforts were focused in three areas: the Military Health System 
structure, medical readiness, and the TRICARE benefit.
    In the area of commissary reform, H.R. 4909 authorizes the 
Secretary of Defense to develop and implement a comprehensive 
strategy across the defense resale system and the Defense 
Commissary Agency to optimize practices across the defense 
commissary and exchange system. The objective of such strategy 
would be to reduce the reliance of the system on appropriated 
funds without reducing the benefits to the patrons of the 
system or the revenue generated by non-appropriated fund 
instrumentalities (NAFI) of the Department of Defense for the 
morale, welfare, and recreation of members of the Armed Forces. 
Under this authority, the commissaries would be able to use 
flexible product pricing, while ensuring that the level of 
savings to commissary patrons is consistent with the current 
level of savings. The bill also authorizes the Secretary to 
convert the commissary system to a NAFI if the benchmarks for 
success (specifically including required savings levels for 
beneficiaries) have been met. Congressional oversight would be 
maintained as it requires quarterly briefings from the 
Department, which would include: ongoing savings assessment, 
NAFI implementation status, viability of variable pricing and 
private label program, and other matters the committee deems 
necessary. Lastly, the Secretary of Defense would not be able 
to move forward with any action that would: establish a market 
basket of goods, establish a private label/variable pricing 
system, or convert to a NAFI until 30 days have elapsed 
following a briefing on each action.
    In the area of military justice, the bill includes the 
first comprehensive reform of the Uniform Code of Military 
Justice in decades. These provisions, which incorporate 
recommendations from the Military Justice Review Group, reflect 
the committee's sustained commitment to making the military 
justice system just, efficient, and effective. The bill would 
enhance the rights of victims, improve transparency, and 
modernize the post-trial process. Given the scope of the 
proposed reform, these provisions would not take effect until 
two years after enactment, giving the President and the 
Department of Defense sufficient time to draft implementing 
rules and execute training.
    Lastly, in the area of Goldwater-Nichols reform, the 
committee believes that 30 years after the initial Goldwater-
Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act (Public Law 
99-433), the time is right to review and reevaluate that 
legislation. The committee recognizes that security challenges 
have become more transregional, multi-domain, and multi-
functional; that U.S. superiority in key warfighting areas is 
at risk with other nations' technological advances; and that 
the Department of Defense lacks the agility and adaptability 
necessary to support timely decisionmaking and the rapid 
fielding of new capabilities. The proposals contained in title 
IX are focused on increasing accountability and oversight, 
enhancing global synchronization and joint operations, and 
strengthening strategic thinking and planning, while preserving 
civilian control of the military and the role of the Chairman 
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff as the principal, independent 
military advisor to the President and Secretary of Defense.

Resources for Warfighters and Families

    The committee believes that caring for the troops and their 
families is the cornerstone of readiness. H.R. 4909 builds upon 
the bipartisan work of the Subcommittee on Military Personnel 
in providing the troops the benefits they need, deserve, and 
have earned. As always, the guiding consideration for the 
committee's work is the viability and readiness of the All-
Volunteer Force while ensuring that the Nation does not break 
faith with U.S. service members, retirees, their family 
members, and survivors.
    H.R. 4909 authorizes a fully funded, by-law pay raise for 
all U.S. service members at 2.1 percent. To lessen the stress 
and strain on the force and their families, the bill also halts 
and begins to reverse the drawdown of military end strength, by 
preserving the active duty Army at 480,000, and adding 3,000 
Marines, 1,715 sailors, and 4,000 airmen in fiscal year 2017.
    As discussed elsewhere in this section, H.R. 4909 proposes 
a series of reforms to improve benefits earned by service 
members and their families. The committee approached these 
reforms from the perspective of the beneficiary and the effects 
that change could have on the value and sustainability of the 
benefit. The committee also elicited perspectives from current 
and retired service members, military families, the military 
service organizations, the Department of Defense, the Military 
Compensation and Retirement Modernization Commission, and many 
others.
    The healthcare reform package reflects the committee's 
commitment to ensure that the Military Health System can 
sustain the readiness of both Department of Defense military 
healthcare providers and the overall force, while providing a 
quality health benefit that is valued by its beneficiaries. The 
commissary reform proposal is done in a way that preserves the 
benefit while also improving the system so it remains a value 
for shoppers. And, finally, the bill modernizes the Uniform 
Code of Military Justice to address issues identified by the 
Military Justice Review Group. This group of provisions would 
improve the system's efficiency and transparency, while also 
enhancing victims' rights.

Readiness, Force Structure, and Support to Ongoing Military Operations

    The committee recognizes that the current threat 
environment is placing growing demands on the U.S. Armed 
Forces, and continues to require the Armed Forces to be called 
upon to support military operations across the globe. In the 
Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, deployed U.S. forces are 
continuing to conduct training and assistance, as well as 
counterterrorism operations, as part of Operation Freedom's 
Sentinel and Operation Resolute Support. In the Republic of 
Iraq and Syrian Arab Republic, deployed U.S. forces are 
participating in coalition operations against the Islamic State 
of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), conducting airstrikes, and 
providing training and assistance to Iraqi security forces and 
vetted moderate Syrian opposition forces as part of Operation 
Inherent Resolve. U.S. forces are also forward-deployed across 
the Greater Middle East to enable these ongoing military 
operations; to enhance the defense of regional allies and 
partners against the ballistic missile and malign military 
activities of the Islamic Republic of Iran; and to protect U.S. 
interests in the region.
    On the Continent of Africa, deployed U.S. forces continue 
to conduct counterterrorism operations and provide training and 
assistance to partners combating violent extremist 
organizations. In Europe, U.S. forces and capabilities have 
been enhanced as part of Operation Atlantic Resolve to deter 
aggression by the Russian Federation and reassure U.S. allies 
and partners in Europe. In Asia, U.S. forces are forward-
deployed to reassure allies and partners concerned about the 
territorial assertiveness by the People's Republic of China and 
the nuclear and ballistic missile capabilities of the 
Democratic People's Republic of Korea. In Central and South 
America, U.S. forces are providing key capabilities to detect 
and interdict illicit trafficking that has driven violence and 
instability to the southern border of the United States. 
Meanwhile, U.S. forces stationed at home are working to 
maintain force readiness and are defending the homeland.
    The committee recognizes that while the Department's 
missions and requirements have increased, its resources have 
decreased and readiness has suffered. The Chief of Staff of the 
Army testified, ``Right now the readiness of the United States 
Army . . . is not at a level that is appropriate for what the 
American people would expect to defend them.'' The Assistant 
Commandant of the Marine Corps testified, ``Our deployment-to-
dwell-time ratio continues to exceed the rate that we consider 
sustainable . . . The strains on our personnel and our 
equipment are showing in many areas.'' And, the Air Force 
Secretary testified, ``Less than half of our combat forces are 
ready for . . . a high-end fight.'' These readiness shortfalls 
in the services ultimately lead to a joint force that is, as 
stated in testimony by the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff, ``stressed to execute a major contingency operation'' 
and on a path towards being ``unable to execute the current 
defense strategy.''
    The committee believes that it is fundamentally wrong to 
send service members out on missions for which they are not 
fully prepared or fully supported. The committee shares the 
responsibility of reducing the risk for the Nation's 
warfighters by ensuring that they are well-trained and 
supported, and that the equipment they use is properly 
maintained and combat-ready. Therefore, H.R. 4909 would 
prioritize resources to address readiness shortfalls across the 
services and, as discussed elsewhere in this report, reverse 
end strength cuts to the Army, Marine Corps, and Air Force.
    The bill would include more than $5.0 billion in additional 
funds for ship and aircraft depot maintenance; aviation 
training and readiness; and long-neglected facilities 
sustainment, restoration, and modernization accounts--all of 
which were identified as unfunded requirements by the military 
services. The bill would direct several assessments on the 
military departments' plans to rebuild readiness, enhance 
exercises, and modernize training requirements, and prohibit 
the Department of Defense from implementing another round of 
Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) in the absence of an 
accurate end-strength assessment.
    H.R. 4909 also responds to numerous other unfunded, yet 
critical, requirements identified by the services. The bill 
funds 11 additional F-35s and 14 F-18s to address a critical 
fighter shortfall; three C-130Js, four C-40s, and two V-22 
aircraft; and 36 UH-60 Black Hawk and five Apache helicopters. 
It restores a Carrier Air Wing, funds Navy cruiser 
modernization, and invests nearly $600.0 million to address war 
reserve shortfalls in critical munitions. The bill would also 
authorize additional funding for the National Nuclear Security 
Administration's (NNSA) nuclear weapons activities, including 
critical programs to modernize the nuclear weapons stockpile, 
and take action to address the $3.7 billion backlog of deferred 
maintenance at NNSA that is threatening worker safety and 
mission performance.
    While the committee recognizes tough choices have to be 
made in the allocation of limited resources, the committee 
believes it has taken prudent steps to begin to restore 
readiness and invest in needed capabilities for the warfighter. 
However, should sequestration-level budget caps return after 
fiscal year 2017, the committee recognizes that even harder 
choices will have to be made. The committee agrees with the 
conclusion reached by the 2014 independent, bipartisan National 
Defense Panel, that ``significant cuts to our defense budgets 
will not solve our fiscal woes, but will increasingly 
jeopardize our international defense posture and ultimately 
damage our security.''

Addressing Emerging Threats and Challenges

    The committee recognizes that it must focus not only on 
addressing current threats, but also on preparing for emerging 
and evolving challenges in an increasingly uncertain global 
security environment, and it must ensure that defense resources 
are balanced between the two objectives. In particular, with 
the continued diffusion of advanced technology, U.S. military 
technological superiority is no longer assumed.
    The committee recognizes that the cyber domain of modern 
warfare continues to grow in scope and sophistication. H.R. 
4909 fully funds the budget request for cyber operations and 
prioritizes the readiness of the cyber mission forces. The bill 
provides special procurement authority to facilitate recovery 
from a cyber attack, as well as increases resiliency for 
Department of Defense networks, weapon systems, and 
capabilities. As part of its reform proposals, H.R. 4909 would 
elevate U.S. Cyber Command to a unified command to provide 
greater military readiness and preparedness to carry out 
assigned missions.
    The committee also believes that robust military 
intelligence collection and analysis are essential to ensuring 
the Department of Defense is postured to address current and 
future threats, is investing in the right capabilities, and 
able to protect its forces in the field. The bill provides 
resources for the Grey Eagle, MQ-9 Reaper, and Triton MQ-4 
unmanned aerial vehicles. It would also require options to 
accelerate the development of a new Joint Surveillance Target 
Attack Radar System (Joint STARS) platform. Reflecting the 
committee's investigation into allegations that senior 
officials at U.S. Central Command improperly influenced 
intelligence analysis, the bill also directs several actions to 
improve the documentation of intelligence processes and 
procedures.
    The committee remains focused on assuring access to space, 
given the military's dependence on the capabilities provided 
from satellites. Thus, it remains concerned about the 
Department's continuing reliance on Russian-designed RD-180 
rocket engines. The bill would authorize funds for the 
development of a new American engine to replace the RD-180 by 
2019, and provide funds for launch system investments.
    In the area of missile defense, the bill would require the 
Department of Defense to develop a new missile defeat strategy, 
including ballistic missile and cruise missile defense; provide 
additional funds for Israeli missile defense; and require the 
Army to develop an acquisition strategy for the replacement of 
the Patriot radar system.
    Lastly, the committee report reflects the committee's 
general support for the Department's Third Offset Strategy 
development effort. The committee believes that the Third 
Offset is a useful vehicle for focusing the Department on how 
to deter and counter the Russian Federation and the People's 
Republic of China. The report notes that, while much of the 
focus is on technology, the committee also believes that 
further attention should be given to strategic thinking about 
deterrence, including the relationship between conventional and 
nuclear deterrence. Further, while greater innovation is a 
necessary element of such a strategy, the committee expects the 
Department to simultaneously address incentives and barriers to 
entry for private sector partnerships and impediments to 
transfer of innovative technologies to the military.

                                HEARINGS

    Committee consideration of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 results from posture and 
budget-related hearings that began on February 9, 2016, and 
that were completed on April 14, 2016. The full committee 
conducted 6 hearings and the 6 subcommittees conducted a total 
of 23 sessions during this time period. Additionally, over the 
past year, the committee conducted numerous policy and program 
oversight hearings, including hearings in support of its reform 
initiatives, to inform its development of the legislative 
proposals contained in this Act.

                           COMMITTEE POSITION

    On April 27, 2016, the Committee on Armed Services, a 
quorum being present, approved H.R. 4909, as amended, by a vote 
of 60-2.

                EXPLANATION OF THE COMMITTEE AMENDMENTS

    The committee adopted an amendment in the nature of a 
substitute during the consideration of H.R. 4909. The title of 
the bill is amended to reflect the amendment to the text of the 
bill. The remainder of the report discusses the bill, as 
amended.

            RELATIONSHIP OF AUTHORIZATION TO APPROPRIATIONS

    The bill does not provide budget authority. This bill 
authorizes appropriations; subsequent appropriations acts will 
provide budget authority. However, the committee strives to 
adhere to the recommendations as issued by the Committee on the 
Budget as it relates to the jurisdiction of this committee.
    The bill addresses the following categories in the 
Department of Defense budget: procurement; research, 
development, test, and evaluation; operation and maintenance; 
military personnel; working capital funds; and military 
construction and family housing. The bill also addresses the 
Armed Forces Retirement Home, Department of Energy National 
Security Programs, the Naval Petroleum Reserve, and the 
Maritime Administration.
    Active Duty and Reserve personnel strengths authorized in 
this bill and legislation affecting compensation for military 
personnel determine the remaining appropriation requirements of 
the Department of Defense. However, this bill does not provide 
authorization of specific dollar amounts for military 
personnel.

          SUMMARY OF DISCRETIONARY AUTHORIZATIONS IN THE BILL

    The President requested discretionary budget authority of 
$602.2 billion for programs within the jurisdiction of the 
committee for fiscal year 2017. Of this amount, $524.0 billion 
was requested for ``base'' Department of Defense programs, 
$58.8 billion was requested for Overseas Contingency Operations 
requirements covering the entire fiscal year, $19.2 billion was 
requested for Department of Energy national security programs 
and the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, and $0.2 
billion was requested for defense-related activities associated 
with Maritime Administration.
    To comport with the Budget Control Act of 2011 (Public Law 
112-25), the committee recommends an overall discretionary 
authorization of $602.2 billion in fiscal year 2017. The base 
committee authorization of $543.4 billion is a $28.4 billion 
increase above the levels provided for in the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92). The 
authorization provided in title XV totals $58.8 billion for 
Overseas Contingency Operations, of which $23.1 billion is 
authorized in support of base budget requirements.
    The table preceding the detailed program adjustments in 
division D of this report summarizes the committee's 
recommended discretionary authorizations by appropriation 
account for fiscal year 2017 and compares these amounts to the 
President's request.

                      BUDGET AUTHORITY IMPLICATION

    The President's total request for the national defense 
budget function (050) in fiscal year 2017 is $618.9 billion, as 
estimated by the Congressional Budget Office. In addition to 
funding for programs addressed in this bill, the total 050 
request includes discretionary funding for national defense 
programs not in the committee's jurisdiction, discretionary 
funding for programs that do not require additional 
authorization in fiscal year 2017, and mandatory programs.
    The table preceding the detailed program adjustments in 
division D of this report details changes to the budget request 
for all aspects of the national defense budget function.

            DIVISION A--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AUTHORIZATIONS

                          TITLE I--PROCUREMENT

                       Aircraft Procurement, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Brigade combat team utilization of unmanned aircraft systems in 
        training operations

    The budget request contained $55.4 million for MQ-1C Gray 
Eagle unmanned aircraft systems, but contained no funds for the 
additional procurement of ground mounted airspace deconfliction 
radars to directly support brigade combat teams during training 
event operations with unit organic unmanned aircraft systems 
(UAS).
    The committee notes that multiple U.S. Army posts, which 
have brigade combat teams (BCT) stationed to operate unit 
organic medium or large UAS aircraft within continental United 
States (CONUS) and outside CONUS airspace, lack adequate and 
certified ground radar facilities and capabilities to provide 
realistic training operations involving the employment of UAS 
aircraft. Army posts affected by this training environment 
limitation include: Ft. Hood, Texas; Ft. Stewart, Georgia; Ft. 
Riley, Kansas; Ft. Campbell, Kentucky; Ft. Bragg, North 
Carolina; Ft. Drum, New York; Ft. Huachuca, Arizona; Ft. Polk, 
Louisiana; Ft. Carson, Colorado; Ft. Wainwright, Alaska; and 
Kunsan Air Base, South Korea. The committee is concerned that 
BCT units that must rely on maintaining visual sight of the 
UAS, or that have to procure chase aircraft services to 
maintain situational awareness of the UAS, are not able to 
fully optimize training as a result of the inability to create 
realistic combat environments to conduct employment of UAS 
doctrine, tactics, techniques, and procedures in support of the 
BCT. The committee believes that BCT training with unit organic 
UAS aircraft could be made more efficient and effective with 
the use of ground-based radar capabilities and facilities to 
alleviate reliance upon visual sight or chase aircraft procured 
services. The committee also notes that ground-based radar 
facilities supporting Army UAS training operations for BCTs are 
a high-priority and unfunded requirement of the Army.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $85.0 million, an 
increase of $29.6 million, for procurement of ground mounted 
airspace deconfliction radars to support BCT unit organic UAS 
training operations.

                       Missile Procurement, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Joint air-to-ground missile increment 2 acquisition strategy

    The committee understands the joint air-to-ground missile 
(JAGM) program is a new generation of air-launched, ground-
attack tactical missiles that will complement and replace the 
Army's legacy inventory of Hellfire missiles.
    The committee is aware the Army is pursuing an incremental 
approach to JAGM acquisition. The committee understands the 
program consists of two increments, with Increment I beginning 
low-rate production in fiscal year 2017 and consisting of a 
dual-mode seeker tactical missile capable of attacking 
stationary and moving targets. The committee is concerned over 
the lack of clarity and funding in the Army's budget request 
for the JAGM Increment II program.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives by February 1, 2017, on the status of the JAGM 
Increment II program that shall include the program's 
requirements, acquisition strategy, and funding profile.

        Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Army National Guard M2 Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle upgrades

    The committee notes that the Army intends to maintain two 
versions of the M2 Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle (IFV) for 
the foreseeable future, with the M2A3 equipping Active Duty 
armored brigade combat teams (ABCT) and the M2A2 Operation 
Desert Storm Situational Awareness variant in the Army National 
Guard. While the committee understands the funding constraints 
that have led to this mixed fleet approach, the committee 
continues to be concerned about the potential divergence in 
capability between Active Duty ABCTs and Army National Guard 
ABCTs. Therefore, the committee encourages the Army to continue 
to work toward a pure fleet approach to M2 Bradley Infantry 
Fighting Vehicles in the Army. However, if funding is not 
available for that goal, the committee encourages the Army to 
continue to modernize M2 Bradley IFVs in the Army National 
Guard to the maximum extent possible.

M240 medium machine gun modernization

    In the committee report (H. Rept. 114-102) accompanying the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016, the 
committee directed the Secretary of the Army to brief the House 
Committee on Armed Services on the Army's long-term sustainment 
strategy and life-cycle sustainment plans for the M240 medium 
machine gun. The committee appreciates the briefing provided by 
the Army regarding the sustainment of the industrial base for 
the M240 medium machine gun, but has concerns that industry was 
not consulted in the preparation of the sustainment plan. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of the 
Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology to develop a 
plan, with input from the M240 original equipment manufacturer, 
that would consider the advisability and feasibility of 
establishing an M240 recapitalization program, and provide the 
House Committee on Armed Services with a briefing on this plan, 
including its associated costs and timelines, not later than 
September 30, 2016. The committee expects this briefing to also 
detail the plans to ensure the sustainment of the domestic 
small arms industrial base, including both original equipment 
and spare parts manufacturers.

Multi-Role Anti-Armor Anti-Personnel Weapon System

    The committee understands the M3 Carl Gustaf Multi-Role 
Anti-Armor Anti-Personnel Weapon System (MAAWS) 84mm recoilless 
rifle is a multipurpose, medium-range weapon system designed 
specifically to engage structural targets at ranges up to 500 
meters, lightly armored targets at ranges up to 700 meters, and 
soft targets at ranges up to 1,000 meters. The committee is 
also aware that the Army has finalized a program of record for 
M3 MAAWS and is synchronizing program activities for Type 
Classification of combat and training ammunition, the M3 and 
lightweight M3A1 gun variants, as well as leveraging 
acquisition and logistics functions with U.S. Special 
Operations Command. The committee also notes the Marine Corps 
is procuring a similar system, which is the follow-on to the 
Shoulder Launched Multipurpose Assault Weapon (SMAW).
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 
2017, on the MAAWS capabilities, including: whether size and 
weight issues continue to be a factor in combat effectiveness; 
capability to safely fire from enclosures; and the Army's 
assessment of current Marine Corps SMAW programs, and whether 
these systems could potentially meet Army operational 
performance requirements.

                    Procurement of Ammunition, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Ammunition industrial base investment strategies

    The committee notes that the Army has reported that a 
steady-state funding of approximately $250.0 million per year 
is required to properly modernize and sustain the eight 
government-owned, contractor-operated (GOCO) Army Ammunition 
Plants (AAPs), as well as the government-owned, government-
operated (GOGO) AAPs, many of which were built during World War 
II. The committee notes that the budget request actually 
exceeded this annual baseline investment across the Future 
Years Defense Program. The committee also notes, however, that 
despite this commitment, significant safety, environmental, and 
operational discrepancies exist among the four largest AAPs, 
which could require investments exceeding what is currently in 
the Army's long-term modernization plan for the ammunition 
industrial base. The committee is concerned about this 
discrepancy between documented need and planned investment. 
Therefore, the committee encourages the Secretary of the Army 
to reevaluate its AAP funding investment model and the 
underlying recapitalization assumptions in order to determine a 
more accurate steady-state funding baseline for all GOCO AAPs 
and GOGO AAPs.

Small guided munitions acquisition strategy

    The committee commends the Army for rapidly fielding small 
guided rockets for the AH-64D Apache Attack Helicopter in 2015. 
Furthermore, the committee understands the Marine Corps 
continues to qualify guided rockets on the AV-B Harrier, AH-1 
Cobra attack helicopter, and UH-1 utility helicopter, while the 
Air Force is rapidly moving forward to qualify small guided 
rockets on the F-16 and A-10 platforms.
    The committee notes that while not a replacement for 
heavier guided missile munitions, small guided rockets could 
provide an affordable precision guided weapon capability to 
prosecute targets that have been routinely engaged in recent 
years by heavier and more expensive guided munitions. The 
committee also recognizes that precision delivery of the 
munition does not always equate to lethality at the target, and 
encourages the Department of Defense to consider fielding the 
most capable and lethal warhead technology available to 
maximize capability on small guided rockets.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, to 
provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives by August 31, 2016, on the joint 
requirements for small guided rocket munitions, the long term 
acquisition strategy for small guided rocket systems, the plans 
for maximizing lethality of these systems, the potential for 
integrating these systems on unmanned aerial systems, and to 
provide options to streamline the procurement and fielding of 
these critically needed systems across the military services.

                        Other Procurement, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Accelerate fielding of personal dosimeters

    The committee remains concerned about the increasing 
chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) threats 
to our soldiers. Maintaining adequate modern protective 
equipment is of critical importance for the safety of U.S. 
forces in CBRN environments. Modern dosimeters also establish a 
legal dose of record for service members, which the services 
can track for safety and liability purposes. The committee 
remains concerned that shortfalls in fielding the most current 
radiation detection devices, specifically personal dosimeters, 
continue to exist, most notably within the Army National Guard 
force structure. To ensure our troops and domestic homeland 
first responders are provided with the best possible protection 
to monitor against nuclear exposure, the committee strongly 
encourages the Secretary of Defense to expedite and complete 
the fielding of modern radiation detection equipment across the 
force to meet existing, critical requirements for personal 
dosimeters.

Army small-scale experimentation

    The committee notes that senior Army leadership has 
expressed a desire to increase the amount of innovation and 
experimentation within the Department of the Army, and make 
Army acquisition faster and more responsive. The committee also 
notes that although large-scale Army experiments, such as the 
Network Integration Evaluation and Army Warfighting Assessment 
are beneficial, they take considerable time and resources to 
organize, conduct, and assess. Therefore, the committee 
encourages the Secretary of the Army to consider the creation 
of smaller-scale, quicker-turn experimentation units and 
exercises focused on addressing Army Warfighting Challenges and 
near-term capability gaps with commercial and government off-
the-shelf technologies.

Army tactical communications waveforms

    The committee supports the Army's Non-Developmental Item 
(NDI) procurement strategy for software defined radios. 
Furthermore, the committee recognizes the critical role radio 
waveforms play in battlefield communications and network 
capability, and how an NDI procurement approach can save money 
and deliver communications technology rapidly to the 
warfighter. The committee encourages the Army to expand its NDI 
procurement policy to include new software technology for 
innovative commercial waveforms. The committee is further aware 
and interested in seeking more information about the Defense 
Technology Security Administration's (DTSA) consideration of 
polices that could lead to additional regulations regarding the 
export of software defined radios. The committee believes that 
both of these approaches have the potential to impact the 
availability of radios to warfighters.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
and the Director of the Defense Technology Security 
Administration to provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed 
Services of the House of Representatives not later than 
September 30, 2016, on the potential use of new radio waveforms 
for tactical communications that may be available via an NDI 
acquisition approach and the potential effects of U.S. 
government policy changes on this industrial sector and on the 
ability of warfighters and our international partners to access 
innovative radio technologies.

Bridge Erection Boat program

    The committee is aware that the new XM30 Bridge Erection 
Boat (BEB), which will replace the 30-year-old legacy Mk II BEB 
platform, represents an essential readiness capability and an 
important part of the Army's incremental modernization efforts. 
The XM30 BEB will be fielded to Active Army, Reserve, and 
National Guard Multi-Role Bridging Companies (MRBCs) and used 
to transport weapon systems, troops, and supplies over water 
when permanent bridges are not available. The XM30 BEB will 
also provide MRBCs significantly enhanced capabilities for 
diving support, rafting transport, and patrols. The Army 
Acquisition Objective for the XM30 BEB is 379 vessels. However, 
the program currently remains in low-rate initial production 
with a transition to full-rate production expected during 
fiscal year 2017. Therefore, the committee continues to support 
this program and encourages the Secretary of the Army to 
program sufficient funds to support the Army Acquisition 
Objective for the XM30 BEB and to provide a more efficient 
funding profile that avoids large variations in quantity 
ordering.

Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Response Enterprise 
        Information Management System

    The committee is aware that the National Guard Bureau 
Weapons of Mass Destruction-Civil Support Teams (CST) currently 
field a system, the CST Information Management System (CIMS), 
to provide a common operating picture, promote information 
sharing and real-time collaboration in an emergency situation, 
and support the CST mission of assisting and advising first 
responders and facilitating communications with other Federal 
resources. The committee is also aware that the CIMS system is 
being modified to establish an enterprise-capable tool, 
referred to as the National Guard Chemical, Biological, 
Radiological, and Nuclear Response Enterprise Information 
Management System 2018+ (NG CIMS 2018+), that will expand the 
capabilities of the CIMS to support the other National Guard 
Bureau forces, such as the Chemical, Biological, Radiological, 
Nuclear, and High-Explosive Enhanced Response Force Package and 
Homeland Defense Response Force units.
    The committee believes it is important that this enhanced 
CIMS capability be fielded quickly and efficiently by utilizing 
prior investments to expand and enhance communication 
capability. The committee is aware of the plan to develop and 
establish the NG CIMS 2018+ through a multi-phase approach, 
including establishing initial operational capability in fiscal 
year 2016 and proving full operational capability in fiscal 
year 2018. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed 
Services of the House of Representatives by December 1, 2016, 
detailing the status of the development of the NG CIMS 2018+ 
tool to date, as well as a description of the progress on 
providing the initial operational capability and an update on 
the future plans and milestones to establishment of full 
operational capability.

Ground mobility vehicle

    The budget request contained $4.9 million for 10 low-rate 
production ground mobility vehicle (GMV) systems and associated 
test and evaluation activities.
    The GMV provides ``enhanced tactical mobility'' for a 9-
soldier infantry squad with their associated equipment to move 
quickly around the battlefield, and was initiated as an urgent 
operational need by the 82nd Airborne Division and endorsed by 
the 18th Airborne Corps and U.S. Army Forces Command. The 
current acquisition objective for GMV is 150 systems, broken 
out as 3 battalion sets of 50 systems each for infantry brigade 
combat team units in support of the global response force 
mission.
    The committee understands the Army is conducting an 
analysis of alternatives that should be complete in June 2016. 
The committee is aware that current market research has 
identified several possible vendors, and the Army has 
identified that the solution will most likely be a commercial/
non-developmental item with procurement based on best value, 
full and open competition. According to the current acquisition 
schedule, a low-rate production contract award is scheduled for 
fourth quarter fiscal year 2017, with the first unit equipped 
by third quarter fiscal year 2019.
    The committee remains concerned about this timeline. The 
committee encourages the Army to develop ways to accelerate and 
streamline this acquisition in order to more rapidly address 
the critically urgent operational need as stated by the 82nd 
Airborne Division.

High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle ambulance recapitalization

    The committee recognizes the tactical importance of the 
High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) fleet and 
the enduring requirement to maintain a capable HMMWV fleet 
supporting multiple relevant mission roles for Active and 
Reserve Component units. The committee notes that Congress has 
provided an additional $520.0 million over the past 3 years to 
address unfunded modernization requirements for the Army 
Reserve (USAR) and Army National Guard (ARNG) HMMWV fleets.
    The committee also recognizes the critical medical ground 
evacuation mission role provided by the HMMWV ambulance 
variant. The committee is concerned that the Army's current 
fleet of Active Component HMMWV ambulances are now on average 
27 years old, exceeding the expected useful life of the vehicle 
by 12 years. The committee also understands the Army does not 
have a fully funded reset, recapitalization, or replacement 
plan in place for the entire HMMWV ambulance fleet. The 
committee is aware of the successful effort already underway to 
modernize the HMMWV ambulance fleet for the ARNG and USAR 
through new production vehicles, the M997A3 variant. The 
committee believes the Army should consider a similar effort 
for the Active Component. The committee directs the Secretary 
of the Army to develop an acquisition strategy to modernize the 
current fleet of HMMWV ambulances for the Active Component and 
to provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives by March 1, 2017, on the details of 
this acquisition strategy.

Material handling equipment modernization strategy

    The committee is concerned that the budget request did not 
include funding for the Rough Terrain Container Handler (RTCH), 
a material handling equipment system considered vital and 
critical to Department of Defense expeditionary logistics. The 
committee understands the RTCH system, along with other 
material handling equipment logistic systems, provides 
strategic capability to set the theater, strategic agility to 
the joint force, and maintains freedom of movement and action 
during sustained and high tempo operations at the end of 
extended lines of communication in austere environments. The 
committee is concerned by the number of RTCH systems that are 
combat worn, and notes there is neither a formal reset and 
recapitalization program for these systems, nor a long-term 
strategy to modernize a fleet that entered service in 2001. 
Accordingly, the committee encourages the Secretary of the Army 
to develop plans to recapitalize and modernize RTCH systems and 
other material handling equipment systems in a timely manner, 
as well as resource this effort across the Future Years Defense 
Program.

Mid-Tier Networking Vehicular Radio

    The budget request contained $25.1 million in Other 
Procurement, Army, for procurement of Mid-Tier Networking 
Vehicular Radio (MNVR) systems.
    The committee supports the goals of the MNVR program and 
believes that modernizing battlefield communications is a 
critical priority for the Army. The committee notes that the 
MNVR is intended to provide the terrestrial backbone for the 
Army's tactical network, connecting lower-echelon radios, like 
Manpack and Rifleman radios, with the upper tier at the brigade 
and battalion level. This terrestrial backbone is designed to 
provide a critical capability to the Army, and reduces reliance 
on satellite communications for command and control capability. 
The committee is aware that the MNVR radio has completed 
initial test activities and is expected to move to full-rate 
production after testing in the summer of 2016. The committee 
encourages the Army to maintain its testing schedule and, if 
testing proves successful, its production schedule in order to 
meet fielding requirements.
    The committee recommends $25.1 million, the full amount 
requested, in Other Procurement, Army for MNVR systems.

Tactical Communication and Protective System

    The budget request contained $3.6 million for 983 tactical 
communication and protective hearing systems (TCAPS) and 1,127 
TCAPS-Lite systems.
    The committee is aware that the Army has been updating 
standards pertaining to the TCAPS program, and understands the 
Army conducts annual assessments of technology to acquire the 
best that is available to meet Army requirements for hearing 
protection. The committee is aware that as a result of the 
annual relook of technology in 2014, the Army identified a 
TCAPS-Lite solution which would provide the same level of 
active hearing protection at an 85 percent reduction in unit 
cost for soldiers that do not have the need to connect to 
radios. The committee notes that TCAPS-Lite enables soldiers to 
communicate in combat environments while simultaneously 
providing active hearing protection from harmful steady-state 
and impulse noise. The committee supports the Army's current 
strategy to begin procurement of TCAPS-Lite starting in fiscal 
year 2016, and notes fielding is scheduled for the fourth 
quarter of fiscal year 2017. The committee encourages the Army 
to accelerate fielding of TCAPS-Lite, and expects the Army to 
resource TCAPS-Lite across the Future Years Defense Program.
    The committee recommends $3.6 million, the full amount 
requested, for TCAPS and TCAPS-Lite.

                       Aircraft Procurement, Navy


                       Items of Special Interest


MQ-8 Fire Scout aircraft

    The budget request contained $72.4 million for the MQ-8 
Fire Scout program.
    The committee is concerned that the budget request does not 
meet the minimum production rate of five aircraft per year. The 
committee believes that procuring only one aircraft per year 
significantly increases the aircraft cost per unit and will 
lead to a break in the production line. Specifically, the 
committee understands that the unit cost for procuring five 
aircraft will result in a $24.0 million per aircraft unit cost 
as compared to $72.4 million when buying one aircraft.
    The committee recommends $119.9 million, an increase of 
$47.5 million, to purchase five aircraft for the MQ-8 Fire 
Scout program.

V-22 Osprey

    The committee notes that in the 9 years since the 
establishment of an initial operational capability, the V-22 
Osprey has provided the U.S. Marine Corps and the U.S. Air 
Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) with a unique and 
revolutionary vertical lift capability due to its superior 
airspeed, range, and survivability. The operational tempo for 
both Marine and Air Force Ospreys has grown over the years and 
is expected to continue to increase as combatant commanders 
more fully exploit the attributes of the tilt-rotor platform in 
helping to meet national security challenges posed by 
traditional nation-states and terrorist organizations. 
Recently, the U.S. Navy selected the Osprey to perform the 
carrier on-board delivery mission that will transform the 
concept of logistic support at sea. The committee understands 
that the Navy plans to begin their purchase of 44 aircraft 
beginning in fiscal year 2018. The committee also understands 
that U.S. Special Operations Command may have unmet 
requirements for additional attrition reserve CV-22 platforms 
that are not accounted for within current Department of the Air 
Force multiyear procurements (MYPs).
    The committee notes that the first and second V-22 MYPs 
have generated approximately $1.25 billion in savings over 
year-to-year procurements, and that a third, and last, MYP is 
under consideration for fiscal year 2018. As this new 
procurement window opens in 2018, the committee encourages the 
Department of Defense, particularly the Department of the Air 
Force, to take advantage of this opportunity to generate 
further savings over year-to-year procurements. Should there be 
a plan for additional Ospreys to meet the increased demand, the 
committee encourages participation in the third MYP. The 
committee believes that the third MYP CV-22 unit pricing will 
be lower than independent year-to-year procurements in the 
future. Air Force participation would also help drive down unit 
pricing for the Department of Defense and partner nation 
aircraft.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to brief the House Committee on Armed Services by November 1, 
2016, on the current operational tempo for V-22 aircraft, 
forecasted demand for the aircraft in the future, and any V-22 
procurement strategies under consideration.

                       Weapons Procurement, Navy


                       Items of Special Interest


Littoral Combat Ship Over-the-Horizon Missile

    The budget request contained no funds for the Littoral 
Combat Ship Over-the-Horizon Missile.
    The committee notes that the Department of the Navy has 
decided to accelerate backfitting of the Over-the-Horizon 
missiles on Littoral Combat Ships to improve their lethality. 
The committee further notes that this funding would procure 
eight missiles and launcher installation, integration, and 
testing to allow outfitting of the LCS 3 and LCS 5 in fiscal 
year 2017 prior to their next deployment. Finally, the 
committee notes that this element was included in the Chief of 
Naval Operations' Unfunded Priorities List.
    The committee recommends $43.0 million, an increase of 
$18.1 million in Weapons Procurement, Navy, for procurement of 
8 missiles, and an increase of $24.9 million in Other 
Procurement, Navy, for procurement, integration, and 
installation of a launcher.

Tomahawk Block IV

    The budget request contained $186.9 million in Weapons 
Procurement, Navy for procurement of 100 Tomahawk missiles, 
which are 98 missiles below the minimum sustaining rate. The 
budget request would also terminate Tomahawk Block IV 
procurement beginning in fiscal year 2018.
    The committee is concerned by the Secretary of the Navy's 
recommendation to terminate procurement of the Nation's only 
long-range, surface-launched land-attack cruise missile 
production capability prior to finalizing concept development 
of the Next Generation Land Attack Weapon, which is not planned 
to be operationally fielded until 2024 at the earliest. 
Furthermore, the committee is concerned that the capability to 
recertify current inventory Block IV Tomahawk missiles could be 
put at risk if the Secretary of the Navy decides to shutter the 
Tomahawk Block IV production line in fiscal year 2018. The 
committee is concerned that the Navy is well below necessary 
categories of inventory requirements.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $262.9 million, an 
increase of $76.0 million, in Weapons Procurement, Navy for 
procurement of 198 Tomahawk missiles and to reduce risk to the 
Tomahawk missile industrial base. The committee supports 
continuing the minimum sustaining rate of Tomahawk Block IV to 
fully satisfy inventory requirements and bridge transition to 
Tomahawk Block IV recertification and modernization.

                   Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy


                       Items of Special Interest


Arleigh Burke-class destroyer

    The budget request included $3.21 billion for two Arleigh 
Burke-class destroyers.
    The committee notes that the Consolidated Appropriations 
Act, 2016 (Public Law 114-113) included $1.00 billion for a 
third Arleigh Burke-class destroyer in fiscal year 2016 but 
these funds are insufficient to procure the entire ship. The 
committee also notes that the Chief of Naval Operations 
included $433.0 million on his fiscal year 2017 unfunded 
requirements list in order to fully fund the balance of this 
Arleigh Burke-class destroyer.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $3.64 billion, an 
increase of $433.0 million, for procurement of an additional 
Arleigh Burke-class destroyer.

Cruiser replacement strategy

    The committee notes that the Secretary of the Navy's 
reluctance to implement congressional direction regarding 
modernization of the guided missile Ticonderoga-class cruisers 
is jeopardizing the long-term viability and recapitalization of 
these ships. Specifically, the committee is concerned that the 
Secretary's request to obviate the ``2-4-6'' cruiser 
modernization plan is hindering efforts to develop a 
replacement capability for these cruisers, which the Navy has 
assessed will begin to retire in 2035. The committee supports 
the Navy's Future Surface Combatant Capability Based Assessment 
that has been proposed for funding in Cross Platform System 
Development Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy 
PE 0603563N. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
the Navy to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by March 1, 2017, regarding the overall timeline to 
develop a replacement strategy for the Ticonderoga-class 
cruisers in accordance with the retirement timelines included 
in the ``2-4-6'' cruiser modernization strategy.

CVN-81 advance procurement

    The budget request contained no funds for advance 
procurement associated with the CVN-81 Carrier Replacement 
Program.
    The committee believes that the Ford-class carrier 
replacement program is tracking to deliver more efficiently 
with each proceeding aircraft carrier. For example, the 
committee is anticipating a savings of over $1.40 billion 
between CVN-78 and CVN-79. The committee notes the second year 
of advance procurement for CVN-80 has been included in the 
budget request. While the committee believes that a more 
efficient learning curve will be obtained with CVN-80 that will 
provide more savings, the committee also believes additional 
savings could be obtained by procuring economic order quantity 
material for CVN-80 and CVN-81.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $263.0 million for 
advance procurement associated with CVN-81 Carrier Replacement 
Program in Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy, to procure CVN-81 
economic order quantity material.

Expeditionary Mobile Base ship

    The committee notes that the flexible capabilities of the 
recently-renamed Expeditionary Mobile Base (ESB, formerly AFSB) 
class of ships are increasingly important to Navy and Marine 
Corps leaders and planners, as is the attractive affordability 
of this platform. USNS Lewis B. Puller, the first ESB, was 
delivered in 2015 and represents a flexible platform for a 
wide-range of missions, including U.S. Marine Corps Special 
Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force-Crisis Response (SPMAGTF-
CR) and special operations. Three AFSB-ESBs have been funded to 
date, in addition to two Mobile Landing Platforms (MLPs), 
formally renamed Expeditionary Transfer Docks. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 
2017, as to how the procurement of additional ships of this 
class would provide multiple mission requirements around the 
globe including SPMAGTF-CR and special operations. The 
committee specifically requests additional analysis as to how 
this capability is integrated into the overall Navy force 
structure assessment.

Frigate

    In December 2015, citing concerns with the Navy's balance 
between capability and quantity of platforms, the Secretary of 
Defense directed the Secretary of the Navy, among other 
actions, to procure 40 Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) and 
frigates, a reduction of 12 ships. In response to this 
direction, the Navy modified the LCS procurement and initiated 
acquisition of the frigate based on a modified LCS in 2018, a 
year earlier than planned in the Navy's budget request for 
fiscal year 2016. The committee notes that there is 
considerable uncertainty in the frigate program, as reported by 
the U.S. Government Accountability Office. The committee notes 
that over $8.00 billion in investment remains to procure the 
frigate. Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller 
General of the United States to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees by March 1, 2017, as to the 
following items relating to the frigate production:(1) Plans to 
develop and mature the frigate design prior to starting 
production;(2) The strategy for acquiring the frigate;(3) 
Realism of frigate cost estimates; and (4) Planned capability 
of the frigate and the degree to which it will meet the Navy's 
small surface combatant needs.

Landing Craft Air Cushion Service Life Extension Program

    The budget request contained no funds for the Landing Craft 
Air Cushion (LCAC) Service Life Extension Program.
    The committee notes that the Department of the Navy budget 
request for fiscal year 2016 anticipated four craft from the 
Landing Craft Air Cushion Service Life Extension Program would 
be included in the budget request for fiscal year 2017, but due 
to budgetary constraints the craft were removed during budget 
deliberations. The committee is concerned about the Department 
of the Navy's amphibious lift capacity and believes that 
additional service life extension of existing LCAC assets is 
warranted.
    The committee recommends $80.3 million for the Landing 
Craft Air Cushion Service Life Extension Program.

Littoral Combat Ship

    The budget request included $1.13 billion for two Littoral 
Combat Ships (LCS).
    The committee notes that the Navy has entered into a block 
procurement contract with two shipbuilders that maximizes 
efficiency and minimizes costs for the LCS seaframe. 
Unfortunately, the committee also notes that the administration 
has not requested sufficient funding in fiscal year 2017 to 
take advantage of the competitive pricing, which could lead to 
a 20 percent increase in the unit cost.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $1.51 billion, an 
increase of $384.7 million, for procurement of a third Littoral 
Combat Ship. The committee notes that the Navy completed a 
Force Structure Assessment based on projected threats and 
determined that 52 small surface combatants were necessary. 
Senior Navy officials reaffirmed the 52 small surface combatant 
requirement in testimony before the committee earlier this 
year. Therefore, the committee is perplexed by the 
administration's statements that sufficient forces are 
available to support a reduction in the numbers of the small 
surface combatants to 40 ships. The Department of Defense 
briefed the committee as to options that they would pursue to 
mitigate the lower number of small surface combatants. The 
committee was unimpressed with the depth of this review. The 
committee is not willing to take risks in warfighting 
requirements and remains supportive of the Department of the 
Navy's Force Structure Assessment.

LX(R) Dock Landing Ship Replacement Program

    The budget request contained no funds for advance 
procurement associated with LX(R) Dock Landing Ship Replacement 
Program.
    The committee notes that the Secretary of the Navy, the 
Chief of Naval Operations, and the Commandant of the Marine 
Corps have agreed to support the LX(R) as a derivative of the 
LPD-17 San Antonio-class hull form. The committee also notes 
that the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2016 (Public Law 114-92) and the Consolidated Appropriations 
Act, 2016 (Public Law 114-113) both included $250.0 million to 
begin detailed design and construction of the LX(R) amphibious 
warship. The committee believes that it is imperative to 
continue the construction of LPD-17 class derivative in line 
with current construction efforts rather than the current Navy 
program of record of fiscal year 2020.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $856.0 million in 
Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy, for construction of 
amphibious vessels.

Modular ship design

    The committee notes that in recent decades the Department 
of the Navy has placed increased emphasis on commonality in 
combat systems, open architecture and common object software 
code, and derivative ship designs. The committee also notes 
that recent Department of the Navy ship designs have 
incorporated elements of flexibility and modularity, such as 
the Littoral Combat Ship mission packages, CVN-78 flexible 
infrastructure, and DDG-1000 Electronic Modular Enclosures, 
although these remain specific to these ship classes. The 
committee believes that ship design is changing to realize 
life-cycle benefits in common and flexible fleet architectures. 
The committee also believes that modular, adaptable, and 
flexible ship designs can provide advantages in the domestic 
and export marketplace, facilitate use of off-the-shelf 
technology, incentivize innovation, and accelerate the fielding 
of new capabilities.
    Therefore, the committee encourages the Secretary of the 
Navy to increase commonality, modularity, scalability, and 
flexibility in future ship construction, modernization, and 
conversion plans across the fleet architecture. The committee 
encourages the Secretary to solicit input from the commercial 
and naval ship design communities to optimize best design 
practices.

Service Craft

    The committee notes that the budget request for fiscal year 
2017 included $65.2 million for ``Service Craft,'' which 
consists of $39.0 million for one Auxiliary Personnel Lighter 
and $26.2 million for two Harbor Tugs. The committee is pleased 
to note the Department of the Navy is addressing the need for 
Auxiliary Personnel Lighter Berthing Barges and Harbor Tugs. 
The committee encourages the Navy to consider appropriate small 
business set-asides for these efforts to maintain the small 
shipyard industrial base.

Ship to Shore Connector

    The budget request included $128.1 million for two Ship to 
Shore Connectors.
    The committee notes that the Department of the Navy budget 
request for fiscal year 2016 anticipated five Ship to Shore 
Connectors being requested to support an efficient construction 
build strategy in fiscal year 2017. However, the committee 
notes that this program was reduced in the fiscal year 2017 
budget request because of budgetary constraints. The committee 
is concerned about the Department of the Navy's amphibious lift 
capacity and believes that additional Ship to Shore Connectors 
are warranted. The committee notes that an additional three 
Ship to Shore Connectors were also included in the Chief of 
Naval Operations' unfunded requirements list.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $293.1 million, an 
increase of $165.0 million, for procurement of five Ship to 
Shore Connectors.

Strike capability assessment from surface amphibious forces

    The committee notes that the administration is assessing an 
``arsenal plane'' as an option to expand the capabilities of 
existing aircraft. The committee is supportive of these 
inventive methods to better employ developing technologies with 
existing capabilities. The committee also notes that similar 
concepts could be employed on the surface Navy forces to 
augment a loss of land attack strike capability that will 
result with the retirement of the guided missile submarines. 
While the Virginia Payload Module (VPM) that is being 
incorporated into the Block V Virginia-class submarines will 
partially offset the loss to the land attack strike capability, 
the committee notes the Navy will still realize a net loss of 
strike capacity with the retirement of these guided missile 
submarines. The committee also notes that the lack of 
flexibility within the Navy surface forces to reload at sea 
also complicates salvo responses. Finally, the committee notes 
that there is potential for some of our amphibious force assets 
to accommodate additional capabilities in terms of space, 
weight, and machinery capacity. The committee believes that the 
Secretary of the Navy should review other alternatives to 
manage the loss of naval strike capacity including an option 
that could include the addition of the MK 41 Vertical Launch 
System on the Landing Platform/Dock (LPD) hull form to support 
other naval combatants with an ``engage on remote'' capability. 
The committee also believes that additional strike capability 
from surface amphibious forces appears to be consistent with 
the Navy's pursuit of distributed lethality and complicates 
potential enemy targeting solutions of our forces.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by October 1, 2016, that includes an assessment of options to 
optimally provide strike and missile defense from naval 
amphibious forces. Such an assessment should include options to 
insert the MK 41 Vertical Launch System on an LPD hull form.

TAO(X) oiler shipbuilding program

    The committee notes that the budget request seeks to 
execute a block buy for TAO(X) ships and includes $73.0 million 
in fiscal year 2017 Advance Procurement (AP) funding, as well 
as similar amounts in subsequent years to leverage the cost 
efficiency of a block buy for these required assets. The 
program's first ship was authorized in fiscal year 2016, and 
section 127 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92) provided the Navy the 
authority for use of a block buy for the program. The committee 
further notes that the 1-ship-per-year TAO(X) procurement rate 
planned beginning in fiscal year 2018 will result in a lengthy 
period to fulfill the 17-ship requirement and will not 
optimally utilize the industrial base, which has the capacity 
to produce at least 2 ships per year. Accelerating this 
procurement may serve to reduce overall program costs and 
minimize the time that the Navy has to continue to operate 
single-hulled fleet oilers.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees 
concurrent with the date on which the budget for fiscal year 
2018 is submitted to Congress pursuant to section 1105 of title 
31, United States Code, on the potential benefits and program 
savings that could be achieved by increasing the program 
procurement rate to two ships per year as well as by taking 
continued advantage of block-buy procurement. The Secretary is 
further directed to report on the industrial base capacity to 
construct two TAO(X) fleet oilers per year.

Undersea Mobility for Special Operation Forces

    The committee notes that the Department of the Navy has 
proposed the retirement of the guided missile submarines 
starting in the 2020s. The committee further notes that U.S. 
Special Operations Forces (SOF) significantly leverage the 
capabilities resident in these assets, and that a loss of this 
mobility capacity will significantly impact future clandestine 
undersea mobility operations. Therefore, the committee directs 
the Secretary of the Navy, in coordination with the Commander, 
U.S. Special Operations Command, to prepare a report to the 
congressional defense committees by March 1, 2017. The report 
shall address the Navy's plan to continue to support 
clandestine SOF undersea mobility requirements. The Secretary's 
plan shall specify Department of the Navy's efforts to address 
the following elements: (1) sustaining the capability to deploy 
twin dry deck shelters; (2) deployment of a dry combat 
submersible from a low-or-no visibility transport; (3) enhanced 
lockout capabilities to support an expanded array of dive 
missions; and (4) maximizing berthing space for special 
operators to train underway.
    The Secretary is encouraged to present multiple means of 
enhancing the Navy's support of SOF undersea mobility 
requirements, including potential designs for a SOF-optimized 
submarine based on the SSBN(X) class submarine to be built 
after the Sea-based Strategic Deterrence program has met all 
commitments to the nuclear triad. This report shall be 
submitted in unclassified form, but may include a classified 
annex.

Virginia Class Submarine

    The budget request included $1.77 billion for the Virginia 
Class Submarine Advance Procurement.
    In fiscal year 2017, advance procurement is necessary to 
support procurement of long lead time materials and advanced 
manufacturing efforts for a total of four ships: the SSN800 and 
SSN801 (from the existing Block IV multiyear procurement 
contract) and the SSN802 and SSN803 (from the anticipated Block 
V multiyear procurement contract). It is anticipated that the 
Block V contract will include, for the first time, the Virginia 
Payload Module, a new hull section which contains four large-
diameter payload tubes for increased Tomahawk missile capacity. 
The committee believes that additional funding is necessary to 
support advanced construction for the Virginia-class submarine 
program in fiscal year 2017 to maintain cost, schedule, and 
contractual requirements.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $1.85 billion, an 
increase of $85.0 million, for the Virginia Class Submarine 
Advance Procurement.

Virginia class submarine industrial base capacity

    The committee notes that since the end of the Cold War, the 
United States has produced an average of less than one attack 
submarine (SSN) per year. Over the next 20 years, submarine 
production is planned to average two submarines per year, and, 
for most of those years, one of the two submarines will be an 
Ohio Replacement ballistic missile submarine (SSBN), which is 
roughly two and a half times larger than the attack submarines 
currently under construction. The committee believes that this 
sustained annual submarine production workload at the nation's 
two nuclear shipbuilders and their vendor base will double from 
what it has been in the recent past. Managing this increase in 
production to be both affordable and executable in delivering 
critically needed capabilities to the fleet will require 
careful planning and attention, as well as continued 
coordination with the carrier programs.
    While SSBN requirements will be met under current 
shipbuilding plans, attack submarine force levels will fall 
below the Navy requirement of 48 SSNs in 2025, and reach a 
nadir of 41 attack submarines in 2030. The committee is 
concerned that this unprecedented shrinkage in undersea force 
structure will come at a time of growing demand for naval 
forces, particularly for the assured access and capabilities 
provided by submarines. The committee has received testimony 
from a wide range of military leaders and experts about the 
strain that the submarine force is under today, and the need to 
mitigate the projected reduction in the fleet. Given the 
increasing demand on undersea capabilities, the committee 
firmly supports the sustainment of the current two a year 
production rate of new attack submarines to include during the 
procurement years of Ohio Replacement submarines which begins 
in 2021.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees by 
March 1, 2017, as to the submarine industrial base and the 
viability of producing additional attack submarines beyond the 
fiscal year 2017 shipbuilding plan in the 2017-2030 timeframe. 
This report should address the following specific elements:
    (1) The capacity of the submarine shipyards and vendor base 
and factors limiting submarine production;
    (2) The viability of adding SSNs to Navy shipbuilding 
plans;
    (3) The impact of increasing attack submarine production 
during the 2017-2030 timeframe on Navy undersea force levels;
    (4) The impact of increasing attack submarine production on 
overall Virginia and Ohio Replacement program costs and 
workload profiles; and
    (5) Potential efficiencies and economies that might be 
achieved in increasing SSN production.

                        Other Procurement, Navy


                       Items of Special Interest


Destroyer modernization

    The budget request contained $367.8 million in Other 
Procurement, Navy for destroyer modernization.
    The committee is concerned that the Secretary of the Navy 
has applied insufficient resources toward modernization efforts 
and that a dearth of capabilities will result when compared 
against needed capabilities outlined in the most recent Navy 
Force Structure Assessment. The committee notes that one 
destroyer combat system modernization, valued at $65.0 million, 
was included in the Navy Unfunded Requirements list.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $432.8 million, an 
increase of $65.0 million, in Other Procurement, Navy for an 
additional destroyer modernization.

Joint Strike Fighter integration on amphibious ships

    The committee notes that the Department of the Navy will 
begin deployments of the F-35B on amphibious ships in the near 
future. However, the committee also notes that all the 
accompanying communication system upgrades necessary to fully 
utilize the F-35B capabilities have not been programmed to be 
fielded for the entirety of the amphibious force structure. The 
committee believes that limited amphibious ship communications 
system capability may limit the capabilities provided to the 
fleet by the F-35B. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Navy to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2017, detailing F-35B 
integration for amphibious ships. This briefing should 
specifically include the F-35B deployment schedule, the 
proposed amphibious ship modernization plan, and the proposed 
integrated communications architecture that is being developed 
to support F-35B.

Navy Communications

    The committee believes that Navy activities associated with 
underway replenishments, aircraft launch and recovery, fuel and 
ordnance handling and small boat operations represent some of 
the most hazardous operations conducted at sea and are 
increasingly difficult during conflict. The committee also 
believes that these activities are further complicated during 
Emissions Control (EMCON) operations when the Navy is 
responding to emerging threats. To address communications 
requirements when performing these activities, the committee 
notes that the Navy has initiated a phone distance line 
replacement program that allows the Navy to securely 
communicate using infrared light, enabling simultaneous data, 
video and voice communications in environments where 
communication would be impossible or undesirable. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to prepare a 
brief to the House Committee on Armed Services by August 1, 
2016, that details implementation of a Phone Distance Line 
Replacement that could be used in EMCON environments.

Navy expeditionary combat patrol boat requirements

    The budget request contained $43.7 million in Other 
Procurement, Navy, for standard boats.
    The committee is concerned that the Department of the Navy 
has not fully defined its requirement for expeditionary combat 
patrol boats, which has led to an inconsistent acquisition 
strategy for the procurement of such boats. This inconsistent 
strategy prevents the government from taking advantage of 
stable procurement lines that provide the best pricing. It also 
fails to provide industry with the ability to make long-term 
planning decisions in order to provide the most competitive 
pricing.
    The committee recommends $63.7 million, an increase of 
$20.0 million, for the acceleration of a request for proposals 
for the procurement of additional patrol boats in fiscal year 
2017.
    The committee also directs the Secretary of the Navy to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees, 
concurrent with the date on which the budget for fiscal year 
2018 is submitted to Congress pursuant to section 1105 of title 
31, United States Code, as to expeditionary combat patrol boat 
requirements to include the following elements:
    (1) The number of expeditionary combat patrol boats 
required to carry out the naval strategy, National Military 
Strategy, and meet joint and combined warfighting requirements 
relating to crisis response, overseas posture, and support to 
contingency operations;
    (2) The annual funding necessary to procure the 
expeditionary combat patrol boats required by the naval 
strategy and National Military Strategy;
    (3) The quantity of expeditionary combat patrol boats that 
are funded for procurement in the President's budget for fiscal 
year 2018 and in the current Future Years Defense Program;
    (4) A long-range expeditionary combat patrol boat building 
plan for the Department of the Navy, through fiscal year 2022, 
that includes annual quantities of each type of patrol boat to 
be procured; and
    (5) A detailed discussion of the risks associated with any 
deviation from the long-range expeditionary combat patrol boat 
building plan required in paragraph (4), to include the 
implications of such a deviation for the following areas: (a) 
warfighting requirements; (b) crisis response and overseas 
posture missions; and (c) contingency operations.

Ship's Signal Exploitation Equipment Program

    The committee recognizes the importance of continued 
funding for the Ship's Signal Exploitation Equipment (SSEE) 
modification program that will continue development of an 
electronically steered multi-beam antenna array that can 
operate over a very broad frequency and transmit high power for 
multiple functions while maintaining a low radar cross-section. 
The Navy's SSEE program represents the latest technology 
advancement in Naval Information Operations. Threat evolution 
mandates higher power, frequency agility, wide band, lower 
weight, decreased maintenance and ease of shipboard 
installation and integration. The current and future protection 
of Navy sailors is dependent upon battlespace awareness and 
assessing hostile threats. Navy ships require wideband, multi-
function antennas that can operationally support high power 
signals anywhere in the hemisphere of the ships' field of view. 
These ships are also required to have a low radar cross-
section, and utilize antennas for more than one function. 
Current technology has provided those capabilities for the Navy 
but requires critical, threat-driven improvements to ensure 
ship and sailor safety. The currently deployed Naval 
Information Operations system provides wideband, high-power 
transmit capability using a dish antenna. However, this limited 
system can only produce a single beam at any given time, 
limiting operations in a multi-dimensional battlespace. SSEE 
fulfills an urgent fleet requirement to provide frequency 
extension and counter intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance enhanced capabilities. Therefore, the committee 
encourages the Secretary of the Navy to continue development 
and funding of the Ship's Signal Exploitation Equipment 
modification program.

                       Procurement, Marine Corps


                       Items of Special Interest


Marine Corps fielding of Enhanced Combat Helmet

    The budget request contained no funding for procurement of 
Enhanced Combat Helmets for the Marine Corps.
    The committee notes that in 2009 the Marine Corps received 
an urgent need statement for a helmet with enhanced ballistic 
protection from selected small-arms ammunition and 
fragmentation. Working in collaboration with the Army, the 
Enhanced Combat Helmet (ECH) was ultimately developed and 
deployed beginning in 2014. By utilizing the latest lightweight 
material technology, the ECH provides increased small-arms 
protection above what is currently provided by the Marine 
Corps' Lightweight Helmet and the Army's Advanced Combat 
Helmet. The committee understands that the Marine Corps has now 
deployed approximately 80,000 ECHs, but requires further 
funding to ensure the ECH is more broadly fielded to Marines. 
The committee also notes the Commandant of the Marine Corps has 
identified an unfunded requirement of $22.0 million for helmets 
in fiscal year 2017.
    In addition, the committee notes that in the committee 
report (H. Rept. 113-446) accompanying the Howard P. ``Buck'' 
McKeon National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015, 
the committee indicated there was a need to ensure at least two 
vendors are capable of producing combat helmets, soft armor, 
and hard armor components in order to maintain competition for 
better body armor technology and retain surge capacity for a 
large-scale conflict.
    The committee remains concerned that the Marine Corps has 
not more widely fielded the ECH due to funding limitations and 
that there remains a risk to the domestic advanced combat 
helmet industrial base. Therefore, the committee recommends 
$22.0 million, an increase of $22.0 million, in Operation and 
Maintenance, Marine Corps, for the procurement of additional 
Enhanced Combat Helmets for the Marine Corps and to address the 
unfunded requirement identified by the Commandant of the Marine 
Corps.

Mobile User Objective System capability

    The committee notes that the Mobile User Objective System 
(MUOS) program has established a satellite constellation on 
orbit, but that only a limited number of communications 
terminals or radios carry MUOS waveform software. The committee 
is concerned about the delays in incorporating the MUOS 
waveform into Marine Corps and Air Force communications 
terminals. The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy and 
the Secretary of the Air Force to provide briefings to the 
Committee on Armed Services of the House of Representatives by 
September 1, 2016, on their current plans for integrating the 
MUOS waveform upgrades and associated equipment for current 
radios. To the maximum extent possible, these briefings should 
include detailed projections for delivery schedules, and 
fielding schedules for such equipment.

Non-lethal ocular interruption capabilities

    The committee continues to support the Department's efforts 
for accelerated development, fielding, and deployment of non-
lethal technologies for both force application and force 
protection missions. The committee is encouraged by the Marine 
Corps' efforts to modernize and procure hail and warning, laser 
dazzlers, and other escalation of force systems. The committee 
recognizes that these materiel solutions allow personnel 
engaged in combat, stability and support, security, and force 
protection operations to employ visual technologies to non-
lethally intercept and interdict personnel at safe standoff 
distances. These solutions provide commanders with a non-lethal 
hailing and warning capability applicable across the range of 
military operations to support Marine Corps missions when the 
minimization of civilian casualties and collateral damage is 
essential to mission success. The committee is concerned that 
the funding reductions over the past few years to both the 
Department's Non-Lethal Weapons program, and the services' 
procurements for non-lethal systems, will not be able to 
support the readiness need for escalation of force capabilities 
that may be needed for humanitarian relief efforts, non-
combatant evacuation operations, and peacekeeping. The 
committee, therefore, directs the Secretary of the Navy to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
November 1, 2016, on actions being taken to ensure sufficient 
procurement of such equipment to meet projected operational 
needs. This briefing should include details on the programming, 
planning, and budgeting for procurement of hail and warning, 
and other escalation of force systems.

                    Aircraft Procurement, Air Force


                       Items of Special Interest


A-10 aircraft

    The committee notes that the Department of the Air Force 
plans for the F-35A aircraft, a fifth-generation multi-role 
fighter, to replace A-10 and F-16 aircraft. The committee 
further notes that mission sets for F-35A include, but are not 
limited to, missions currently performed by the A-10, which are 
primarily close air support (CAS), combat search and rescue 
(CSAR), and forward air controller-airborne (FAC-A). The Air 
Force has taken the equivalent of four A-10 squadrons out of 
service over the last 4 years, and only nine operational A-10 
squadrons remain across the Active Duty and Air Reserve 
Components, while the A-10 is currently deployed to three 
overseas locations including the Republic of Korea, Europe, and 
for Operation Inherent Resolve against the Islamic State of 
Iraq and the Levant.
    The committee also notes that the Department of Defense has 
made contradictory statements about the Future Years Defense 
Program for activation of F-35A units and divestiture of A-10 
units. These contradictory statements, including the current 
plan to begin retiring more A-10s before there is a proven 
replacement for its capabilities, create uncertainty over the 
Department of the Air Force's ability to provide continuous 
CAS, CSAR, and FAC-A capabilities to the joint force.
    The committee believes that the Department of the Air Force 
continues to suffer from capacity shortfalls in its fighter 
aircraft fleets, and that these shortfalls are being 
exacerbated by the near-term readiness challenges that are 
systemic across all the military services. As such, the 
committee believes that retiring any more A-10s without a 
proven replacement to its unique capabilities, or proof that 
the F-35A can replace the A-10's mission capabilities, is an 
unacceptable risk.
    The committee understands the F-35 is scheduled to complete 
an initial operational test and evaluation (IOT&E;) in fiscal 
year 2018 or in early fiscal year 2019. Elsewhere in this Act, 
the committee includes a provision that would prohibit the 
retirement of A-10 aircraft until the Director of Operational 
Test and Evaluation (DOT&E;) provides a report to the 
congressional defense committees on the results of the IOT&E.; 
The IOT&E; would include, but would not be limited to, a 
comparison test and evaluation that examines the capabilities 
of the F-35A and A-10C in conducting CAS, CSAR, and FAC-A 
missions. This provision would also require the Secretary of 
the Air Force to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees on the Secretary's views of the results of this 
IOT&E;, which should include any issues or concerns from the 
DOT&E; report, a path forward for addressing any deficiencies or 
corrective actions identified by DOT&E;, and the near- and long-
term strategy for preserving the Air Force's capabilities in 
CAS, CSAR, and FAC-A.
    The committee believes that to ensure combat realism, the 
comparative testing should include, but not be limited to, both 
pre-planned and emergency divert missions to address 
effectiveness in realistic, complex ground firefight scenarios. 
These scenarios should include those in which enemy forces are 
in close proximity to friendly forces where the pilot is 
required to visually identify the target and friendly forces in 
day and night conditions; armored targets; scenarios requiring 
continuous weapons delivery, command and control (C2), extended 
time over target, and simulated collateral damage restrictions; 
deception scenarios with degraded visual environments; low-
altitude employment, including ``shows of force'' and strafe; 
survivability from simulated direct hits by small arms fire, 
light anti-aircraft artillery, and man-portable air defense 
systems; scenarios in which simulated aircraft systems are 
damaged; scenarios conducted without joint tactical air 
controller or higher headquarters control to test CAS aircraft 
suitability for forward air controller-airborne deconfliction 
of fires; and scenarios including joint fires coordination and 
timing, including Joint Air Attack Team attacks with Department 
of the Army aviation assets and artillery deconfliction. CSAR 
missions should compare effectiveness in the rescue mission 
commander role, coordinating all aspects of an extended CSAR 
mission, including but not limited to: locating and protecting 
the isolated personnel with continuous firepower; controlling 
other fighters as FAC-A; coordinating electronic attack; 
intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; aerial 
refueling; C2; and rescue vehicle escort. The committee notes 
that previous aircraft programs such as the F-22 also conducted 
comparison testing as part of IOT&E.; The committee also notes 
that at a hearing held by the House Committee on Armed 
Services' Subcommittee on Tactical Air and Land Forces on March 
23, 2016, the Director of Operational Test and Evaluation 
testified that the cost of the F-35 and A-10 comparative 
testing would be between $3.5 million and $5.2 million, and 
that he was working to ensure that the F-35 and A-10 
comparative testing is accomplished within the established 
budget for IOT&E.;
    Additionally, the committee expects that the Department of 
Defense will provide the report required by section 142 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92) on time, and based on that report, the committee 
may take further action on options for an A-10 replacement 
program.

Aerial refueling recapitalization

    The committee notes that the nation's ability to meet its 
air-refueling requirements must not be placed at increased risk 
while the Department of Defense executes its strategic aerial 
refueling recapitalization strategy.
    Specifically, the committee notes that the Department is 
currently executing its KC-46A Pegasus acquisition program to 
replace a number of aging KC-135 Stratotankers and that KC-46As 
will eventually replace the KC-10 Extender fleet.
    The committee strongly reiterates the importance of 
ensuring that the Department's execution of the phase-out and 
replacement portion of its aerial refueling recapitalization 
strategy does not compromise its ability to meet stated short- 
or long-term air-refueling requirements.

Air Force Command, Control, Intelligence, Surveillance, and 
        Reconnaissance (C2ISR) Fleet

    The committee is aware that the Department of the Air 
Force's critical manned C2ISR aircraft are high-demand assets 
facing low availability rates, end-of-life issues, and growing 
sustainment costs. The committee is supportive of the Air 
Force's plan to replace the JSTARS fleet with an affordable 
commercially available platform under a full and open 
competition. When recapitalizing the rest of the manned C2ISR 
fleet, the committee believes the Department of the Air Force 
should use a similar acquisition strategy as the one used with 
JSTARS, and consider a full and open competition. The term 
``C2ISR fleet'' is defined as predominantly 707/C-135 platforms 
which are approaching end of service life. The committee 
directs the Secretary of the Air Force to provide a briefing 
not later than September 1, 2016, on the Air Force's current 
plans for recapitalization of these aircraft.

Air National Guard F-16 mission training centers

    The budget request contained $15.2 million for F-16 
aircraft support equipment and facilities, but contained no 
funding for the procurement of additional F-16 mission training 
centers (MTC) for the Air National Guard.
    The committee notes that an F-16 MTC allows pilots to train 
in scenarios that are either impossible or too expensive to 
conduct in home-station flying training, and believes that the 
MTC environment significantly improves F-16 pilot skill and 
readiness to perform actual combat missions with increased 
effectiveness. Each MTC includes high-fidelity simulator 
cockpits, instructor operator stations, a threat server, and 
briefing and debriefing capabilities. The MTC is also capable 
of linking and integrating into geographically distributed 
high-fidelity combat and combat support training devices that 
include command and control and intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance systems. This capability allows F-16 pilots at 
home stations to exercise and train at the operational and 
tactical levels of war, as well as conduct networked unit-level 
training, in large force employment scenarios with other Air 
Force aircraft integrated into the distributed mission 
operating architecture.
    The committee understands that F-16 MTCs are currently 
planned for Hill Air Force Base (AFB), Utah; Shaw AFB, South 
Carolina; and Holloman AFB, New Mexico. The committee further 
understands that other F-16 pilots based in the United States 
would be required to travel to one of the three MTC locations 
to take advantage of its capabilities, and believes an 
additional MTC would avoid travel costs and make the F-16 block 
MTC more accessible to Total Force F-16 pilots, enabling the 
Air Force's current state of low readiness for full-spectrum 
combat capability to more quickly recover.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $40.0 million, an 
increase of $24.8 million, in F-16 aircraft support equipment 
and facilities for the procurement and installation of an 
additional F-16 MTC for the Air National Guard and utilization 
by all Total Force F-16 pilots.

Aircraft urethane sealant upgrades

    The committee notes that the KC-135 and B-52 fleets 
experience chronic leaks primarily in the wing cavities. 
Current wet cavity sealing technology is specified for 
polysulfide. The committee understands that polysulfide becomes 
brittle over a short period of time and cracks, which results 
in repeated removals and replacements of the material to try to 
repair leaks, or more commonly maintainers add more polysulfide 
sealant over the cracked material and significantly increase 
the aircraft weight.
    In order to better assess this issue, the committee directs 
the Secretary of the Air Force to conduct a study into the 
value of using the polyurethane Integral Fuel Tank sealant to 
correct chronic leaks in KC-135 and B-52 military aircraft, and 
brief the House Committee on Armed Services by September 30, 
2016, on the results of the study. The study should include an 
evaluation of the long-term savings in maintenance and 
operating costs using dollars per pound per flight hour.

B-21 bomber

    The committee received independent testimony stating that 
the Air Force should procure between 174 and 205 B-21 bombers 
to ensure that enough aircraft are available to meet combatant 
commander, training, test, back-up inventory, and attrition 
reserve requirements. Additionally, the Global Strike commander 
indicated that the previously announced 100 B-21 bombers should 
be treated as the lower limit of the total required number.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees by 
February 1, 2017, that estimates the number of B-21 bomber 
aircraft needed to meet the combatant commander requirements. 
The report, which may include a classified annex, shall include 
the following elements:
    (1) A detailed explanation of the strategy and associated 
force sizing and shaping constructs, associated scenarios and 
assumptions used to conduct the analysis;
    (2) A range of numbers to meet requirements for B-21 
bombers given best case and worst case assumptions and the 
associated risk based on Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff 
risk management classifications; and
    (3) A detailed transition plan that integrates the B-21 
into the current bomber fleet through 2040.

B-21 Development Progress Matrix

    The committee notes that the Air Force, through the Rapid 
Capabilities Office (RCO), entered into a contract for the 
Engineering, Manufacturing, and Development (EMD) phase 
associated with the B-21 bomber. The committee is pleased to 
see progress on this program and believes that this program has 
stable requirements in place. However, the committee is 
concerned that, given the length of time associated with the 
EMD phase and the amount of resources planned for this phase, 
the congressional defense committees need an improved ability 
to track annual progress and cost throughout the development. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force 
to submit an initial B-21 Development Progress Matrix to the 
congressional defense committees, concurrent with the budget 
request for fiscal year 2018 that includes. The matrix should 
provide milestones and metrics for measuring progress made in 
technology, design, software, manufacturing, testing, and 
product reliability maturity in relationship to the resources 
that are planned and expended. The committee may consider 
requesting annual updates to the matrix in the future.

Basing priorities for future Air National Guard Modular Airborne 
        Firefighting Systems missions

    The committee is concerned about the current positions of 
Modular Airborne Firefighting Systems (MAFFS) that are operated 
by Air National Guard (ANG) C-130s. As shown in the National 
Guard Bureau's brief to the committee on MAFFS, there is a 
current gap in northwest States based on the current allocation 
of existing MAFFS unit locations. Additionally, the committee 
understands that the year 2015 was one of the most devastating 
fire seasons on record and, according to the National 
Interagency Fire Center, the most destructive forest fires 
occurred in the northwestern States of Montana, Oregon, Idaho, 
and Washington. One of the most important factors for fire 
suppression in high-density forested areas is the ability to 
contain forest fire immediately before the fire grows to 
catastrophic size. The committee believes that MAFFS units 
should be located in areas that have the ability to rapidly 
respond to areas with a high propensity for high-density forest 
fires.
    The committee concurs with the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service recommendations that the 
location of MAFFS units should be in close proximity to fire-
prone States, not located on the East Coast. The committee 
believes that these recommendations would be able to prevent a 
repeat of the 2015 fires season where over $1.70 billion was 
spent by the USDA Forest Service alone for fire suppression.
    The committee believes that when making future basing 
decisions with regard to MAFFS units, the Air Mobility Command 
should consider geographical gaps of MAFFS units, and give 
preference to areas that are prone to high-density catastrophic 
forest fires.

Battlefield Airborne Communications Node

    The committee notes that since its fielding, the 
Battlefield Airborne Communications Node (BACN) system has 
provided critical communications and information-sharing 
capability between different tactical data and voice networks 
in support of operations in the Republic of Iraq, the Islamic 
Republic of Afghanistan, Libya, and other areas. The BACN 
program continues to act as a critical communications gateway 
and data relay, flying on EQ-4B and E-11A aircraft in support 
of Operation Freedom's Sentinel throughout the United States 
Central Command's area of responsibility and elsewhere in 
support of joint urgent operational requirements.
    In addition, the committee recognizes the Department of the 
Air Force's efforts to establish a program of record, and 
continues to believe that doing so is important to preserve 
previous investments and operational experience to meet ongoing 
operational requirements. Therefore, the committee encourages 
the Secretary of the Air Force to continue the planning and 
establishment of a BACN Program of Record, while continuing to 
meet ongoing warfighter requirements in theater. In addition, 
the committee encourages including modernization planning in 
support of anticipated future requirements across multiple 
theaters. This would ensure that this capability is maintained 
in the Department of the Air Force for the long term to support 
joint operational communications, fifth-generation aircraft 
communications, combat cloud, and data networking requirements.

C-130H Modernization

    The budget request contained $9.2 million for C-130 
modernization for the Avionics Modernization Program (AMP) 
Increment 1 program. This program will provide the mandated 
radios, Automated Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) Out 
and enhanced Mode S capabilities necessary to operate in 
international airspace by the year 2020. The committee fully 
supports this request and is committed to ensuring the long-
term viability of the C-130H aircraft in the Air Force's 
Regular, Guard, and Reserve Components until they reach their 
expected service life or are recapitalized. By most estimates, 
with proper avionics upgrades, the roughly 172-aircraft C-130H 
fleet is viable until at least 2040.
    However, AMP Increment 1 only addresses 4 of the 12 
Communication, Navigation, and Surveillance/Air Traffic 
Management compliance mandates and does not resolve the cockpit 
avionics obsolescence that limits the long-term viability of 
the aircraft. The planned follow-on AMP Increment 2 effort will 
replace the current cockpit with a modern digital ``glass 
cockpit.'' This will allow the Air Force's fleet to be 
supported well into the future, resolve diminishing 
manufacturing sources, and increase mission availability. It 
will also provide upgraded Automatic Flight Control System 
capabilities to take advantage of more efficient airspace 
management capabilities, and eliminate some maintenance and 
readiness issues.
    The committee is aware of commercially available, non-
developmental Increment 1 and Increment 2 solutions for C-130-
derivative aircraft. The committee encourages the Secretary of 
the Air Force to fully pursue full and open competitions for 
both the Increment 1 and Increment 2 programs. The committee is 
encouraged by the Air Force's renewed commitment to upgrading 
C-130H aircraft and expects both AMP Increments 1 and 2 to 
continue to be fully funded in future budget requests.
    In addition to avionics upgrades, the committee continues 
its strong support for C-130H propulsion and propeller system 
upgrades. The committee believes that these upgrades will 
provide cost savings through increased fuel efficiency and 
reduced maintenance requirements.
    The committee recommends $81.7 million, an increase of 
$72.5 million, for C-130H propulsion and propeller system 
upgrades.

C-130J Hercules aircraft

    The budget request contained $146.0 million for the C-130J 
program. The committee is concerned by the Air Force plans to 
procure only two C-130Js in fiscal year 2017.
    The committee is concerned that the Air Force reduced two 
C-130J aircraft from the President's budget request due to 
fiscal constraints. These reductions have also put the 
initiation of Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve C-130H-
to-J fleet recapitalization at increased risk. The committee 
notes that the Active Duty combat delivery fleet has 
essentially completed its replacement of legacy C-130H aircraft 
with the C-130J. Likewise, it is noted that the Air Force 
Special Operations Command and U.S. Marine Corps, including the 
U.S. Marine Corps Reserves, are also well on their way to C-
130J recapitalization completion.
    The committee recommends $417.5 million, an increase of 
$271.5 million, for the procurement of three additional C-130J 
aircraft.

C-40A Clipper aircraft

    The budget request contained no funds for the Navy and 
Marine Corps C-40A program.
    The committee notes that the Navy has stated that it has a 
warfighting requirement of 23 C-40A aircraft with a fiscally 
constrained inventory objective of 17 aircraft that will 
provide adequate capacity at acceptable risk. The current fleet 
inventory is 14 aircraft with 1 on order. The addition of two 
aircraft will complete the minimum inventory objective. This 
will allow the Navy to better execute the Navy Unique Fleet 
Essential Aircraft mission and provide combatant and component 
commanders with short-notice, quick response, intra-theater air 
logistics support, as well as direct support of fleet 
requirements. While the Navy has recapitalized its fleet of C-
9B aircraft, the Marine Corps is still operating two aging C-9B 
aircraft that are the only two in the Department of the Navy 
inventory, which greatly increases their maintenance and 
sustainment costs. The procurement of two C-40A aircraft for 
the Marine Corps would allow them to provide critical, 
reliable, highly flexible airborne logistics capabilities to 
deployed Marine Air-Ground Task Forces. Finally, the committee 
notes that these four aircraft were included in the Chief of 
Naval Operations' and the Commandant of the Marine Corps' 
unfunded priorities list.
    The committee recommends $415.0 million for the procurement 
of four aircraft for the Navy and Marine Corps C-40A program.

Demonstration of high performance unmanned jet aircraft

    The committee is encouraged by the success of recent system 
demonstration flights at the Navy test range at China Lake, 
California, of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) capable of 
tactical speeds and maneuverability, coupled with substantial 
autonomy and multi-aircraft collaboration.
    The committee notes that legacy UAS continue to rely 
heavily on human operators, and it supports ongoing research to 
develop a more seamless human-machine environment. The 
committee also recognizes the potential force multiplier 
effects provided by a UAS with fighter-like performance 
operating collaboratively with manned aircraft, specifically in 
support of the suppression of enemy air defenses.
    Furthermore, the committee notes that the characteristics 
of this advanced capability are consistent with those the Navy 
has identified for acquisition through use of rapid prototype 
development and experimentation in order to explore and 
expedite innovative operational concepts to the fleet.
    As such, the committee believes the Navy should pursue an 
industry-developed low-cost, reusable, penetrating, unmanned 
semiautonomous tactical combat aircraft capable of being 
launched from multiple platforms and performing a broad range 
of missions in a nonpermissive environment, to include 
electronic attack, and encourages the Navy to demonstrate the 
capability at an exercise no later than fiscal year 2017.

E-8C prime mission equipment diminishing manufacturing sources kits

    The budget request contained $6.2 million for E-8C 
modifications, but included no funds for prime mission 
equipment diminishing manufacturing sources (PME-DMS) kits.
    The committee understands that PME-DMS kit procurement and 
installation is a top issue for E-8C fleet viability, and is 
required to maintain the E-8C's net-centric warfighter 
capabilities, including the ground moving target indicator and 
battle management command and control, as specified in the 
operational requirements document. Of the fleet of 16 
operational E-8C aircraft, the committee notes that only 14 
aircraft have been budgeted to receive PME-DMS kits, and the 
committee believes that all 16 aircraft should be configured 
with the PME-DMS kit so that all operational E-8C aircraft are 
maintained in the most up-to-date configuration.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends $23.7 million, an 
increase of $17.5 million, for E-8C modifications, for 
procurement of two PME-DMS kits.

EC-130H Compass Call recapitalization

    The budget change request contained $165.7 million across 
multiple appropriations for the Air Force's Compass Call 
program.
    The committee received a letter from U.S. Air Force 
requesting a technical adjustment to the fiscal year 2017 
budget request and a new start authorization to re-host the EC-
130H Compass Call mission equipment onto a new platform. The 
U.S. Air Force stated that the only option that does not 
require development and/or certification work is a Gulfstream 
G550 Conformal Airborne Early Warning airframe, which will be 
designated the EC-37B.
    While the committee supports the Air Force's need to 
accelerate fielding a replacement aircraft that meets its 
requirement, the committee is concerned about the U.S. Air 
Force's 10-year acquisition strategy that acquires one EC-37B 
per year and results in a 6-year period where the Air Force is 
operating a mixed fleet of EC-130s and EC-37Bs. The committee 
does not believe this is the most efficient or cost effective 
way to cross-deck the capability. The committee encourages the 
Air Force to optimize the divesture of the EC-130s and 
accelerate the fielding of the EC-37B.
    The committee recommends $165.7 million in PE 27253F for 
Aircraft Procurement, Air Force; Research Development Test and 
Evaluation; Operations and Maintenance; and Operations and 
Maintenance, Overseas Contingency Operations, for the Compass 
Call program.

F-22 production restart assessment

    The committee notes that production of the F-22 fifth-
generation tactical aircraft concluded in 2009, and notes 187 
aircraft were produced, far short of the initial program 
objective of 749 aircraft, as well as the Air Combat Command's 
stated requirement of 381 aircraft. The committee also 
understands there has been interest within the Department of 
the Air Force, Department of Defense, and Congress in 
potentially restarting production of the F-22 aircraft. In 
light of growing threats to U.S. air superiority as a result of 
adversaries closing the technology gap and increasing demand 
from allies and partners for high-performance, multi-role 
aircraft to meet evolving and worsening global security 
threats, the committee believes that such proposals are worthy 
of further exploration.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to conduct a comprehensive assessment and study of the 
costs associated with resuming production of F-22 aircraft and 
provide a report to the congressional defense committees, not 
later than January 1, 2017, on the findings of this assessment. 
The committee expects the report to be unclassified, but may 
contain a classified annex. Further, the committee directs that 
the assessment and report consider and address the following:
    (1) Anticipated future air superiority capacity and 
capability requirements, based on anticipated near-term and 
mid-term threat projections, both air and ground; evolving F-22 
missions and roles in anti-access/area-denial environments; F-
15C retirement plans and service-life extension programs; 
estimated next-generation aircraft initial operating capability 
dates; and estimated end-of-service timelines for existing F-
22As;
    (2) Estimated costs to restart F-22 production, including 
the estimated cost of reconstituting the F-22 production line, 
and the time required to achieve low-rate production; the 
estimated cost of procuring another 194 F-22 aircraft to meet 
the requirement for 381 aircraft; and the estimated cost of 
procuring sufficient F-22 aircraft to meet other requirements 
or inventory levels that the Secretary may deem necessary to 
support the National Security Strategy and address emerging 
threats;
    (3) Factors impacting F-22 restart costs, including the 
availability and suitability of existing F-22A production 
tooling; the estimated impact on unit and total costs of 
altering the total buy size and procuring larger and smaller 
quantities of aircraft; and opportunities for foreign export 
and partner nation involvement if section 8118 of the Defense 
Appropriations Act, 1998 (Public Law 105-56) prohibiting export 
of the F-22 were repealed;
    (4) Historical lessons from past aircraft production 
restarts; and
    (5) Any others matters that the Secretary deems relevant.

F-35 Lightning II aircraft program

    The F-35 Lightning II is the Department of Defense's 
largest acquisition program, which will eventually deliver 
2,443 F-35 aircraft to the Departments of the Navy and Air 
Force. The committee believes that the F-35 will form the 
backbone of U.S. air combat superiority for decades to come, 
replacing or complementing the legacy tactical fighter fleets 
of the Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps with a dominant, 
multi-role, fifth-generation aircraft capable of projecting 
U.S. power and deterring potential adversaries. The committee 
notes that for the F-35 program's international partners and 
foreign military sales customers, who are participating in the 
program, the F-35 will become a cornerstone for future 
coalition operations. The committee believes that the F-35 will 
help to close a crucial capability gap that will enhance the 
strength of our security alliances. Therefore, the committee 
continues its strong support of this crucial aircraft 
development and procurement program.
    The F-35 Lightning II program is approximately 80 percent 
through its flight test program which is planned to be 
completed in the first quarter of fiscal year 2018. At a 
hearing held by the Subcommittee on Tactical Air and Land 
Forces of the House Committee on Armed Services on March 23, 
2016, the F-35 Program Executive Officer (PEO) testified that 
the F-35 program is executing well across the spectrum of 
acquisition. However, the committee notes that the F-35 PEO has 
identified the software development for the final development 
software block, known as block 3F, as an area with some risk 
remaining that could result in a 4-month delay in delivery of 
software block 3F. This delay will not affect the Department of 
the Navy's initial operational capability for the F-35C in 
2018. At that hearing on March 23, 2016, the F-35 PEO also 
identified the next version of the autonomic logistics 
information system (ALIS) as an area with some schedule risk. 
The Government Accountability Office's Director of Acquisition 
and Sourcing Management, who also testified at that hearing, 
likewise identified both completion of software block 3F and 
ALIS as risk areas. Accordingly, the committee continues to 
closely monitor both software progress and ALIS development.
    Looking toward the future, the committee is concerned about 
plans for F-35 sustainment. Consequently, elsewhere in this Act 
the committee includes a provision that would require the 
Comptroller General of the United States to provide a report to 
the congressional defense committees on the F-35 Lightning II 
aircraft program's sustainment support structure.

MQ-9 production funding in Future Years Defense Program

    The budget request contained $575.6 million in Aircraft 
Procurement, Air Force, for MQ-9 Reaper unmanned aerial systems 
(UAS).
    The committee supports the President's budget request for 
fiscal year 2017. However, the committee is concerned that 
there is no additional funding for procurement of additional 
MQ-9 UAS in the Future Years Defense Program. The committee 
notes that the Air Force recently announced a plan to increase 
intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) capacity 
through a $3.0 billion plan that includes basing expansions, 
increased manning, and procurement of additional MQ-9s. The 
committee understands that this plan may include establishment 
of up to 9 additional squadrons and 3,500 more personnel. Given 
this expansive new plan to increase ISR capacity, the committee 
encourages the Air Force to reconsider its Future Years Defense 
Program projections for the MQ-9 to ensure it includes the 
appropriate amount of new systems to support planned growth in 
ISR capacity.
    The committee recommends $575.6 million, the full amount 
requested, in Aircraft Procurement, Air Force, for MQ-9 Reaper 
unmanned aerial systems.

Reporting requirement for C-130H recapitalization and modernization

    The committee notes that the Air Force Reserve and Air 
National Guard, as well as the Special Operations Command, U.S. 
Marine Corps, and U.S. Coast Guard, are all well on their way 
to recapitalize their legacy C-130Hs with the newer, more cost 
effective, and more operationally capable, C-130Js. The Air 
Force has stated that some C-130H units within the Guard and 
Reserve will be modernized with upgraded avionics, while others 
will be recapitalized with C-130Js. What remains unclear at 
this point is which units will be modernized and which ones 
will be recapitalized.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees by February 28, 2017, on C-130H recapitalization and 
modernization that shall include the following elements:
    (1) C-130H to C-130J recapitalization timeline by unit for 
the Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve;
    (2) C-130H Avionics Modernization Program Increment 1 and 
Increment 2 fielding timeline by unit for the Air National 
Guard and Air Force Reserve; and
    (3) C-130H propulsion system upgrades: T56 3.5 engine 
modification, NP 2000 8-bladed propeller, and electronic 
propeller controller system, timeline by unit for the Air 
National Guard and Air Force Reserve.

UH-1N replacement program

    The budget request contained $14.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force, and $18.3 million 
in Aircraft Procurement, Air Force, for the UH-1N replacement 
program. The UH-1N replacement program would replace the 
Department of the Air Force UH-1N fleet by acquiring a non-
developmental commercial or U.S. Government vertical lift 
aircraft.
    In the committee report (H. Rept. 114-102) accompanying the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016, the 
committee noted that the current UH-1N aircraft fleet fails to 
meet speed, range, payload, and defensive system requirements. 
The committee also noted that modifications to the existing 
fleet will not enable the UH-1N to meet mission requirements, 
and that the Department of the Air Force was assessing 
requirements for the UH-1N replacement, conducting market 
research, and developing UH-1N replacement acquisition 
alternatives. Since last year, the committee learned that 
nuclear weapons surety studies have highlighted a critical 
requirement for the replacement of the current fleet of UH-1N 
helicopters supporting the nuclear mission. However, while the 
committee notes that there is no validated Joint Urgent 
Operational Needs Statement (JUONS) associated with this 
requirement, the committee understands that a JUONS only 
applies to situations where U.S. military forces are actively 
engaged with enemy forces. Nevertheless, the committee believes 
that replacement of the helicopters performing the nuclear 
mission is now an urgent need based, in part, on the warning of 
the Commander of U.S. Strategic Command in an August 6, 2015, 
Memorandum to the Deputy Secretary of Defense and the Vice 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
    In recent hearing testimony, Air Force officials stated 
that, in response to the concerns of operational commanders, 
the Air Force was considering a range of options to more 
quickly address the requirement for UH-1N replacement aircraft. 
The committee understands that these options include deployment 
of existing units to provide additional capability through a 
formal Request for Forces to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs 
of Staff, and a possible use of an Economy Act (31 U.S.C. 1535) 
decision, based on an ``urgent and compelling need,'' to 
procure UH-60M Black Hawk helicopters through the Department of 
the Army. The committee notes that in this case, an Economy Act 
decision to opt out of a competition would potentially allow 
for a sole-source contract award exceeding $1.5 billion in 
value. However, the committee recognizes that the Secretary of 
the Air Force may proceed with such a non-competitive award if 
the Secretary determines the statutory requirements for doing 
so are met. The committee assumes that, if an Economy Act 
decision is made, procurement of the UH-60M aircraft could 
begin in fiscal year 2017, which would require more funding 
than requested in the budget request.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $14.1 million, the full 
amount requested, in Research, Development, Test, and 
Evaluation, Air Force, and $98.3 million, an increase of $80.0 
million, in Aircraft Procurement, Air Force, for the UH-1N 
replacement program. The committee expects these additional 
funds to be used to accelerate the program's schedule if an 
Economy Act decision is made to procure UH-60M Black Hawk 
helicopters in lieu of conducting a competition.

U.S. Air Force combat search and rescue

    In the committee report (H. Rept. 113-102) accompanying the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014, the 
committee encouraged the Department of Defense to adopt 
concurrent and balanced fielding of new equipment between the 
Active Component (AC) and Reserve Component (RC). The committee 
believes that in many cases, concurrent and balanced fielding 
can better integrate AC and RC units and help ensure the RC 
remains an operational reserve. Furthermore, the committee 
notes that many major defense acquisition programs have 
followed concurrent and balanced fielding, including the F-35 
Joint Strike Fighter.
    The committee understands that the Air Force intends to 
field refurbished and upgraded HH-60G operational loss 
replacement (OLR) aircraft to RC combat search and rescue units 
in fiscal year 2018, and that these same units will receive new 
HH-60W combat rescue helicopter aircraft in the fiscal year 
2027 to 2029 timeframe. The committee supports the plan to 
provide these OLR aircraft to RC units as soon as possible. 
However, the committee is concerned that there does not appear 
to be a plan to concurrently field the HH-60W to both AC and RC 
units, and that there is a potential 10-year gap between RC 
units receiving HH-60G OLR aircraft and the new HH-60W 
aircraft.
    Additionally, the committee understands that the Department 
of the Air Force is undertaking an ongoing review to determine 
whether primary responsibility for combat search and rescue 
(CSAR) will remain with Air Combat Command or be moved to Air 
Force Special Operations Command. The committee notes the 
importance of the CSAR mission as the primary personnel 
recovery method for service men and women in extremis, as well 
as the complex nature of these operations that often require 
multi-service, dedicated, and fully trained forces. As the Air 
Force reviews this mission, the committee encourages an 
analysis of current and anticipated geographic combatant 
commander requirements and whether current force structure is 
capable of meeting those requirements with existing HH-60 and 
V-22 platforms.
    To address committee concerns, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Air Force and relevant subordinate commands to 
brief the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives not later than September 1, 2016, on Department 
of the Air Force plans for fielding the HH-60W to the AC and 
RC, and the status of the ongoing review for responsibility for 
the CSAR mission.

U.S. Marine Corps C/KC-130 digital interoperability

    The committee recognizes the importance of the Marine 
Corps' efforts to achieve Digital Interoperability (DI) as 
outlined in the 2016 U.S. Marine Corps Aviation Plan and is 
supportive of those efforts. The committee also understands 
that the integration costs to incorporate many new DI 
technologies across all of the U.S. Marine Corps aviation 
platforms is unaffordable given current and projected 
resources. The committee believes the Marine Corps should 
leverage as much government-owned technology as technically 
feasible before making investments in costly systems or 
developmental technology.
    Therefore, the committee encourages the Secretary of the 
Navy to accelerate the integration and testing of existing 
interoperability capabilities for the C/KC-130, such as TACPOD, 
which is an existing government-owned, government-tested asset. 
TACPOD is a mature technology that has been tested to a 
Technology Readiness Level 8 and could potentially augment 
existing C/KC-130 interoperability capabilities with minimal 
integration efforts. Further, such capability could provide the 
Marine Corps' C/KC-130 expanded mission capability, 
specifically in support of the Special Purpose Marine Air-
Ground Task Force-Crisis Response mission.

                  Procurement of Ammunition, Air Force


                       Items of Special Interest


25 millimeter ammunition for the F-35 program

    The committee recognizes the critical role that the F-35 
will play in both air-to-air and air-to-ground combat 
capability, and believes that the 25 millimeter gun will be a 
critical part of the F-35's overall weapons lethality. 
Consequently, the committee encourages the Department of 
Defense to consider all ammunition solutions to meet the 
lethality requirement for the F-35's 25 millimeter gun.
    To further the committee's understanding of the 
Department's F-35 25 millimeter ammunition plans, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the 
Committee on Armed Services of the U.S. House of 
Representatives by August 1, 2016, on the requirements and 
acquisition strategy for 25 millimeter ammunition.

                      Other Procurement, Air Force


                       Items of Special Interest


Civil engineers construction, surveying, and mapping equipment

    The budget request contained $6.8 million for base procured 
equipment. Of this amount, no funds were requested for 
modernization of equipment used by base civil engineer units or 
Red Horse squadron (RHS) engineer units.
    Red Horse squadrons provide the Air Force with a highly 
mobile civil engineering response force to support contingency 
and special operations worldwide. In the committee report (H. 
Rept. 114-102) accompanying the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2016, the committee noted that 
approximately 66 percent of existing engineering equipment is 
known to be discontinued, with some individual components 
ranging as high as 94 percent; therefore, maintenance 
requirements for this legacy equipment could potentially be 
cost prohibitive. The committee is concerned that the long-term 
replacement and modernization strategy for legacy engineering 
equipment remains under-resourced across the Future Years 
Defense Program. The committee believes additional funds would 
help to accelerate the modernization of legacy civil 
engineering equipment, and expects these funds would be 
obligated under full and open competition to provide the best-
value equipment to Air Force base civil engineer units and RHS 
units.
    The committee recommends $11.8 million, an increase of $5.0 
million, to competitively procure modernized engineer equipment 
and address any unfunded requirements.

                       Procurement, Defense-Wide


                       Items of Special Interest


Replacement of MH-60M for United States Special Operations Command

    The budget request contained $6.4 million for MH-60M Block 
Upgrades in PE 116048BB, Rotary Wing Upgrades and Sustainment. 
The committee understands that an MH-60M within U.S. Special 
Operations Command (USSOCOM) sustained heavy damage, with main 
rotor strike, after a hard deck landing off the coast of 
Okinawa aboard United States Naval Ship Red Cloud. The Army 
Aviation and Missile Life Cycle Management Command determined 
the aircraft to be a total loss, based on the estimated cost of 
damage. The committee understands that an additional $18.6 
million is needed for special operations-peculiar modifications 
to a replacement MH-60M aircraft being provided by the U.S. 
Army. This additional aircraft with modifications would restore 
USSOCOM to a basis of issue of 72 MH-60M aircraft. Therefore, 
the committee recommends $25.0 million, an increase of $18.6 
million, for MH-60M Block Upgrades in PE 116048BB, Rotary Wing 
Upgrades and Sustainment.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations


              Section 101--Authorization of Appropriations

    This section would authorize appropriations for procurement 
at the levels identified in section 4101 of division D of this 
Act.

                       Subtitle B--Army Programs


    Section 111--Multiyear Procurement Authority for AH-64E Apache 
                              Helicopters

    This section would authorize the Secretary of the Army to 
enter into one or more multiyear contracts for AH-64E Apache 
helicopters beginning in fiscal year 2017, in accordance with 
section 2306b of title 10, United States Code.

  Section 112--Multiyear Procurement Authority for UH-60M and HH-60M 
                         Black Hawk Helicopters

    This section would authorize the Secretary of the Army to 
enter into one or more multiyear contracts for UH-60M and HH-
60M Black Hawk helicopters beginning in fiscal year 2017, in 
accordance with section 2306b of title 10, United States Code.

 Section 113--Assessment of Certain Capabilities of the Department of 
                                the Army

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Secretary of the Army and the Chief of 
Staff of the Army, to provide an assessment to the 
congressional defense committees by April 1, 2017, of the ways, 
and associated costs, to reduce or eliminate shortfalls in 
responsiveness and capacity of the following capabilities:
    (1) AH-64-equipped Attack Reconnaissance Battalion capacity 
to meet future needs;
    (2) Air defense artillery (ADA) capacity, responsiveness, 
and the capability of short range ADA to meet existing and 
emerging threats (including unmanned aerial systems, cruise 
missiles, and manned aircraft), including an assessment of the 
potential for commercial-off-the-shelf solutions;
    (3) Chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear 
capabilities and modernization;
    (4) Field artillery capabilities and the changes in 
doctrine and war plans resulting from the memorandum of the 
Secretary of Defense dated June 19, 2008, regarding the 
Department of Defense policy on cluster munitions and 
unintended harm to civilians, as well as required modernization 
or munition inventory shortfalls;
    (5) Fuel distribution and water purification capacity and 
responsiveness;
    (6) Army watercraft and port opening capabilities and 
responsiveness;
    (7) Transportation (fuel, water, and cargo) capacity and 
responsiveness;
    (8) Military police capacity; and
    (9) Tactical mobility and tactical wheeled vehicle capacity 
and capability, to include adequacy of heavy equipment prime 
movers.

                       Subtitle C--Navy Programs


    Section 121--Procurement Authority for Aircraft Carrier Programs

    This section would provide economic order quantity 
authority for the construction of two Ford-class aircraft 
carriers and incremental funding authority for the nuclear 
refueling and complex overhaul of five Nimitz-class aircraft 
carriers.

    Section 122--Sense of Congress on Aircraft Carrier Procurement 
                               Schedules

    This section would provide the sense of Congress that the 
Secretary of the Navy's schedule to procure 1 aircraft carrier 
every 5 years will reduce the overall aircraft carrier 
inventory to 10 aircraft carriers, a level insufficient to meet 
peacetime and war plan requirements. The section also 
recommends that the Secretary begin construction for the Ford-
class aircraft carrier designated CVN-81 in fiscal year 2022 
and align advance procurement activities with this accelerated 
programming.

Section 123--Design and Construction of LHA Replacement Ship Designated 
                                 LHA 8

    This section would authorize the Secretary of the Navy to 
enter into and incrementally fund a contract for design and 
construction of the LHA Replacement ship designated LHA 8.

 Section 124--Design and Construction of Replacement Dock Landing Ship 
    Designated LX(R) or Amphibious Transport Dock Designated LPD-29

    This section would authorize the Secretary of the Navy to 
enter into and incrementally fund a contract for design and 
construction of the replacement dock landing ship designated 
LX(R) or the amphibious transport dock designated LPD-29.

              Section 125--Ship to Shore Connector Program

    This section would authorize the Secretary of the Navy to 
enter into a contract for the procurement of up to 45 Ship to 
Shore Connector vessels.

 Section 126--Limitation on Availability of Funds for Littoral Combat 
                       Ship or Successor Frigate

    This section would prohibit the Department of the Navy from 
selecting a single contractor for the Littoral Combat Ship or 
frigate program until the Secretary of the Navy certifies to 
the congressional defense committees that such a selection of a 
single contractor is conducted using competitive procedures and 
is performed for the purpose of constructing a frigate class 
ship.

                     Subtitle D--Air Force Programs


    Section 131--Elimination of Annual Report on Aircraft Inventory

    This section would strike the requirement from section 231a 
of title 10, United States Code, for the Secretary of Defense 
to deliver an annual report on the military services' aircraft 
inventory to the congressional defense committees.

Section 132--Repeal of the Requirement To Preserve Certain Retired C-5 
                                Aircraft

    This section would amend section 141 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (Public Law 112-
239) to terminate the requirement for the Secretary of the Air 
Force to continue to preserve certain C--5 aircraft in a 
storage condition that would allow a recall of retired aircraft 
to future service in the Air Force Reserve, Air National Guard, 
or Active Force structure.

 Section 133--Repeal of Requirement To Preserve Certain Retired F-117 
                                Aircraft

    This section would amend section 136 of the John Warner 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2007 (Public 
Law 109-364) by striking subsection (b), which would remove the 
requirement that certain F-117 aircraft be maintained in a 
condition that would allow recall of those aircraft to future 
service.

 Section 134--Prohibition on Availability of Funds for Retirement of A-
                              10 Aircraft

    This section would prohibit funds authorized to be 
appropriated by this Act, or otherwise made available for 
fiscal year 2017, for the Department of the Air Force to 
retire, prepare to retire, or place in storage any A-10 
aircraft. This section would also maintain a minimum of 171 A-
10 aircraft designated as primary mission aircraft inventory, 
and prohibit the Secretary of the Air Force from making any 
significant reductions to manning levels with respect to any A-
10 aircraft squadron or division until the Director of 
Operational Test and Evaluation, and the Secretary of the Air 
Force, submit reports to the congressional defense committees 
on the results and findings of the initial operational test and 
evaluation of the F-35 aircraft program, as well as the 
comparison test and evaluation that examines the capabilities 
of the F-35A and A-10C.

  Section 135--Prohibition on Availability of Funds for Retirement of 
         Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System Aircraft

    This section would prohibit retirement of Joint 
Surveillance Target Attack Radar System aircraft in fiscal year 
2018.

       Subtitle E--Defense-Wide, Joint, and Multiservice Matters


   Section 141--Termination of Quarterly Reporting on Use of Combat 
                       Mission Requirements Funds

    This section would amend the quarterly report requirement 
in section 123 of the Ike Skelton National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2011 (Public Law 111-383), to 
sunset the requirement for such reports on September 30, 2018.

   Section 142--Fire Suppressant and Fuel Containment Standards for 
                            Certain Vehicles

    This section would require the Secretary of the Army, or 
his designee, and the Secretary of the Navy, or his designee, 
to establish and maintain policy guidance regarding the 
establishment of, and updates to, fire suppressant and fuel 
containment standards that meet survivability requirements 
across various classes of vehicles, including light tactical 
vehicles, medium tactical vehicles, heavy tactical vehicles, 
and ground combat vehicles for the Army and Marine Corps. This 
section would also require the Secretary of the Army and the 
Secretary of the Navy to provide a report to the congressional 
defense committees, not later than 180 days after the date of 
the enactment of this Act, that contains policy guidance for 
each class of vehicle including armor, fire suppression 
systems, self-sealing material and containment technologies, 
and any other information as determined by the Secretaries.
    The committee believes that operational performance 
requirements should be based on the vehicle type, mission, and 
employment. The committee notes that inclusion of fire 
suppression in performance specifications should be by vehicle 
design and risk driven.

Section 143--Report on Department of Defense Munitions Strategy for the 
                           Combatant Commands

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit to the congressional defense committees by April 1, 
2017, a report on the munitions strategy for each of the United 
States combatant commands. It shall include an identification 
of munitions requirements, an assessment of munitions gaps and 
shortfalls, and necessary munitions investments. Such strategy 
shall cover the 10-year period beginning with 2016.
    The committee notes that section 1254 of the Carl Levin and 
Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291) required the 
Secretary of Defense to submit to the congressional defense 
committees a report on the munitions strategy for the U.S. 
Pacific Command (USPACOM). The committee has reviewed this 
report and commends the Secretary of Defense and Chairman of 
the Joint Chiefs of Staff in their detailed assessment. As the 
Secretary completes the broader report on the munitions 
strategy for the combatant commands required by this section, 
the committee expects the Secretary only to provide updates 
where necessary to the munitions strategy of USPACOM previously 
submitted pursuant to Public Law 113-291.

 Section 144--Comptroller General Review of F-35 Lightning II Aircraft 
                          Sustainment Support

    This section would require the Comptroller General of the 
United States to conduct an analysis of status of and 
approaches considered in the sustainment support strategy for 
the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program. This section would also 
require the Comptroller General to submit a report of the 
analysis to the congressional defense committees by April 1, 
2017. The committee encourages the Comptroller General to 
consider best practices for contractor logistic support during 
the conduct of this review.

         TITLE II--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION

           Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Armored vehicle fuel tank and bladder safety

    The committee notes that armored vehicles carry a 
significant amount of fuel, which can become a hazard to the 
crew in combat. The committee commends the work that the Army 
has done to improve crew safety, including the development of 
technologies that reduce risk of fuel spills when a fuel tank 
is punctured or ruptured, and efforts to render fuel inert 
where possible. Such efforts may reduce catastrophic injuries 
to soldiers.
    However, the committee is aware of self-sealing polymers 
and other materials with self-healing capabilities that, 
combined with passive fire suppression blankets, may provide 
additional safety to crews within armored vehicles. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide a 
briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives by March 1, 2017, on candidate technologies 
that could be used to improve the fuel containment and safety 
capability of legacy armored vehicle platforms and armored 
vehicle platforms currently in development.

Army advanced body armor research and development

    The committee has consistently supported the need to 
provide soldiers with the most advanced body armor. The 
committee believes that body armor, which provides desired 
protection levels at the lightest possible weight, ensures 
greater soldier survivability and reduces injuries, while 
improving mission performance and effectiveness. The committee 
is aware that the Army's Soldier Protection System (SPS) 
program is seeking to reduce the weight of body armor by 10 
percent, while maintaining or improving current ballistic 
capabilities, and would use a more holistic and systems-based 
approach to developing an integrated personal protective 
equipment kit for soldiers. The committee supports the Army's 
SPS effort. However, the committee believes that even as 
manufacturers are developing hard body armor components that 
achieve SPS requirements, it is also important that research 
and development continue on hard body armor components with 
even greater capabilities. The committee also believes this 
effort should be resourced and programmed in order to ensure 
that more dramatic improvements are readily available for 
soldiers in the near future, given the emerging threats in the 
global environment.
    Specifically, the committee believes that a goal of 
doubling the current SPS requirement (a 20 percent reduction in 
weight while maintaining or improving current ballistic 
capabilities) would ensure that soldiers have the most advanced 
hard armor possible to better address emerging and future 
threats. Such an improvement will require a holistic approach 
to improving body armor; therefore, the committee believes that 
a new research and development project should be established by 
the Army that allows qualified manufacturers to compete to 
study new materials, manufacturing technologies, assembly 
processes, ballistic impacts, predictive modeling, and crack 
sensor technologies. In addition, the committee believes that 
such a program will also encourage body armor manufacturers to 
investigate high-risk technologies and processes, which are 
likely essential for ensuring that such a change in capability 
is possible.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives not later than September 30, 2016, on 
the advisability and feasibility to the Army of establishing 
such a research and development project. The briefing should 
also include an estimate for any additional funding needed in 
fiscal year 2017 to establish such a research effort.

Army network integration evaluations and army warfighting assessments

    The committee acknowledges the importance of the Department 
of the Army's Network Integration Evaluation (NIE) exercises 
conducted at Fort Bliss, Texas, and White Sands Missile Range, 
New Mexico. The committee notes that, through this program, the 
Army has been able to test equipment in a realistic battlefield 
environment in the hands of soldiers, and the Army has been 
able to save billions of taxpayer dollars after the NIE proved 
that several programs were not operationally effective. The 
committee also acknowledges the importance of the new Army 
Warfighting Assessments (AWA), also currently planned to occur 
at Fort Bliss and White Sands Missile Range. The committee 
believes that these exercises help the Army to shape 
requirements for Army acquisitions, create new capabilities 
from existing technology, and promote interoperability between 
service branches and U.S. allies.
    The committee acknowledges the investments already made in 
the Brigade Modernization Command and Fort Bliss, Texas, for 
the NIE and AWA missions. The committee also acknowledges that 
both the NIE and AWA should be, if possible, brigade-level 
exercises to ensure mission command requirements are met, and 
that any systems tested will be fully capable of deployment at 
the brigade level. The committee believes that the most 
efficient method for conducting the NIE's and AWA's is to 
assign a dedicated brigade to the NIE and AWA missions. 
However, the committee understands that the Army must use all 
available force structure to meet current demands for forces to 
support combatant commanders. The committee encourages the Army 
to continue to pursue both the NIE and the AWA, so that the 
Army can continue to save money, fully utilize its previous 
investments, adequately test and shape its acquisition 
programs, and maintain technological superiority.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, 
not later than September 1, 2016, on the Army's long-term plans 
and budget figures for conducting NIE and AWA events. This 
briefing should also include any data available on cost savings 
the Army has accrued due to past NIE and AWA events. In 
addition, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army to 
determine the most cost effective means to execute the NIE and 
AWA missions, and to provide this information as part of the 
long-term plans in the aforementioned briefing.

Blast mitigation technologies for combat and tactical vehicles

    The budget request contained $122.1 million in PE 63005A 
for Combat Vehicle and Automotive Advanced Technology, but 
contained no funding for active blast mitigation technology 
development and demonstration.
    The committee understands that active blast mitigation 
systems are designed to detect and react to underbody blast 
events encountered by combat and tactical vehicles, and notes 
that the Army performed tests on two prototype vehicles 
equipped with active blast mitigation systems in 2015. In the 
committee report (H. Rept. 114-102) accompanying the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016, the committee 
directed the Secretary of the Army to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services on the results of testing on 
blast mitigation technology that could detect and autonomously 
respond to underbody explosive incidents. The briefing 
indicated that ``based on limited testing, the incorporation of 
active blast mitigation technology could reduce injuries, 
reduce the forces and damage to other vehicle technologies, and 
may avoid costly retrofits to the legacy vehicle fleet when 
upgrading to meet increasing blast threats.'' The committee 
believes that given these promising test results, the Army 
should continue to evaluate this technology and that additional 
testing and analysis of this technology using a variety of 
vehicle platforms is justified.
    The committee notes that while the Army is encouraged by 
this technology, no funding for it is programmed in the Future 
Years Defense Program. The committee encourages the Army to 
continue its evaluation of this technology, and if funds are 
not available, the committee expects the Army to reprogram the 
necessary funds to continue these tests and demonstrations on 
additional vehicle platforms.
    The committee recommends $122.1 million, the full amount 
requested, in PE 63005A for Combat Vehicle and Automotive 
Advanced Technology.

Helicopter seating systems

    In the committee report (H. Rept. 114-102) accompanying the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016, the 
committee expressed concern over outdated requirements and 
standards for helicopter seating systems (HSS). Specifically, 
the committee noted that there appeared to be a lack of 
ergonomic design considerations, a detailed understanding of 
long-duration seat vibration on the body, and a lack of 
appropriate anthropomorphic data incorporated into helicopter 
seating system requirements. In response, the Director, 
Operational Test and Evaluation, provided a report to the 
committee on February 10, 2016, addressing these issues. The 
report confirmed many of the concerns expressed by the 
committee.
    The committee understands that the Department of Defense 
and the Army are studying current HSS designs and have 
identified a need to improve current systems. The committee is 
aware that the Joint Aircraft Survivability Program Office and 
the Army are now identifying and developing new technologies in 
order to mitigate or eliminate deficiencies in current HSS 
performance. The committee believes the Department should 
accelerate development of new technologies that could provide 
increases in force protection and survivability, as well as 
reduce potential long-term disability issues for aviators. The 
committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide a 
briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives by January 15, 2017, on current HSS research 
and development programs.

Improved refrigeration and cooling technology

    The committee supports continued research and development 
to improve efficiency and reduce costs of the equipment used to 
store food for U.S. service members stationed overseas. In 
locations not on a permanent installation, food is typically 
stored in large refrigerated container systems. The 
conventional technology powering these systems can be 
incredibly maintenance-intensive and expensive due to fuel 
costs. Reliance on fuel also increases personal safety risks to 
U.S. forces that have to transport this fuel to remote and 
austere locations. Therefore, the committee encourages 
additional investment to improve efficiency, reduce cost, and 
reduce risk associated with current systems.

Improved Turbine Engine Program

    The budget request contained $126.1 million in PE 67139A 
for the Improved Turbine Engine Program (ITEP).
    The committee continues to support the Army research and 
development budget request for ITEP, as well as the acquisition 
strategy included in the request. ITEP is a competitive 
acquisition program that is designed to develop a more fuel 
efficient and powerful engine for the current Black Hawk and 
Apache helicopter fleets. This new engine will increase 
operational capabilities in high/hot environments, while 
reducing operating and support costs. The committee 
acknowledges the benefits of improved fuel efficiencies through 
lower specific fuel consumption that ITEP will bring to the 
battlefield. In addition, the committee encourages the Army to 
prioritize maintenance and sustainment cost savings for ITEP to 
ensure the continued affordability of the program.
    The committee notes that the fiscal year 2017 budget 
request reflects an increase over last year's projection, which 
is an indication of the Army's support for this capability. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
February 15, 2017, on potential options to accelerate the 
development and fielding of the engine so that the benefits can 
be realized sooner than currently planned.
    The committee recommends $126.1 million, the full amount 
requested, in PE 67139A for the ITEP program.

Land-Based Anti-Ship Missile program

    The committee understands the U.S. Army Aviation and 
Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center is 
developing concepts and technologies to enable the U.S. Army to 
conduct land-based offensive surface warfare. This includes 
adapting existing Army and Marine Corps High Mobility Artillery 
Rocket Systems and Multiple Launch Rocket System missile 
systems for this land-based offensive surface warfare 
capability. The committee supports the Army's Land-Based Anti-
Ship Missile (LBASM) effort and understands the Army has 
programmed funding across the Future Years Defense Program in 
order to continue to integrate and demonstrate this capability 
through live-fire testing.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army, or the 
appropriate designee, to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by February 1, 2017, on the LBASM 
concept development effort, to include schedule and funding 
requirements.

Lightweight metal matrix composite technology for combat and tactical 
        vehicles

    The committee understands the U.S. Army Tank Automotive 
Research Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) continues 
to invest in applied research, development, and demonstration 
programs for advanced materials technology to reduce the weight 
of component parts for combat and tactical vehicles. The 
committee supports this ``lightweighting'' technology 
development effort and is particularly encouraged by the 
versatility and broad application that metal matrix composite 
(MMC) technology could provide in reducing the weight of 
components and parts for military vehicles. The committee is 
aware that MMC technology could potentially increase the 
service life of drivetrains, braking systems, wheel ends, 
motive components, and other parts and assemblies by three to 
four times that of traditional steel components. The committee 
notes that substitution of traditional steel with MMC material 
technology is increasing due to greater demand for lower weight 
and costs for parts and components. The committee expects 
TARDEC to continue to resource, develop, and test advanced MMC 
technology and MMC manufacturing processes for military ground 
vehicles.

Lithium ion super-capacitors

    The committee notes recent investments made by the 
Department of the Army in the energy technology lithium ion 
super-capacitors have resulted in notable achievements and 
technological advances. The committee is aware that continued 
research and development on lithium ion super-capacitors could 
potentially produce a hybrid lithium ion battery (LIB)/lithium 
ion capacitor (LIC) and is aware of the Army's interest in 
utilizing this hybrid as a possible replacement for the current 
12V lead acid battery due to its limited operational 
temperatures and a high rate of failure in the field. The 
committee notes results to-date with both lithium ion 
capacitors (LIC) and with this promising new hybrid LIC/LIB 
technology, and encourages the Department of the Army to 
continue to pursue and to invest in these important 
technologies.

Long Range Precision Fires

    The committee understands the Long Range Precision Fires 
(LRPF) program is being developed to field a new surface-to-
surface missile system that can attack a broad spectrum of 
targets up to 499 kilometers in range. The LRPF program would 
be a replacement for the legacy Army Tactical Missile System 
that would be considered non-compliant with current Department 
of Defense policy regarding cluster munitions and unintended 
harm to civilians. The committee understands the current 
notional schedule has the program entering the engineering and 
manufacturing development (EMD) phase in fiscal year 2020.
    The committee supports the LRPF program and concurs with 
the analysis of alternatives completed in 2015 that recommended 
a new missile solution to meet LPRF requirements. The committee 
encourages the Secretary of the Army to develop ways to 
potentially accelerate the EMD phase of the program, and to 
fully fund the overall program to support its planned 
acquisition strategy.

Long-range Army surface-to-air missile capability

    The committee notes that the Army's current surface-to-air 
missile (SAM) systems have significantly less range against 
aircraft targets than many foreign threat systems, including 
the SA-20 Gargoyle, SA-21 Growler, and HQ-9. The committee also 
notes that over time, these weapon systems may proliferate 
around the world. The committee is concerned that this over-
match by potential adversaries may place U.S. forces at 
significant risk in combat scenarios against near-peer military 
forces equipped with advanced fifth generation aircraft armed 
with precision-guided standoff weapons. The committee is also 
concerned that this over-match may place an excessive burden on 
U.S. tactical fighter aircraft operating in a defensive 
counter-air role. The committee believes that longer-range U.S. 
Army SAM capability may provide a significant upgrade to the 
overall U.S. military's ability to defend friendly airspace 
against advanced aircraft threats and deter potential 
adversaries. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
the Army to provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed 
Services of the U.S. House of Representatives not later than 
September 1, 2016, on the potential requirement for longer-
range Army SAM systems in the future, including the potential 
upgrade of current systems or an entirely new system.

Modular Handgun System

    The committee understands the Modular Handgun System (MHS) 
is projected to be a non-developmental item, commercial-off-
the-shelf replacement handgun for the current M9 pistol. In the 
committee report (H. Rept. 114-102) accompanying the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016, the committee 
noted its continued support for the MHS program, as well as the 
need to modernize small arms through new procurements and 
incremental product improvement programs. The committee 
continues to support the MHS program and understands the 
program remains on cost, on schedule, and is under source 
selection. The committee understands the Chief of Staff of the 
Army is conducting a review of the program, consistent with new 
authorities provided in section 802 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92).
    The committee is aware of the Chief of Staff of the Army's 
concerns regarding the extended length and cost of the required 
test and evaluation program, and also the overly complex 
performance requirements. For example, the committee 
understands that the final request for proposals was an 
extensive document, reaching 351 pages, but the technical 
specifications required for the handgun system were only 39 
pages. The committee encourages the Army to continue to work to 
develop ways to streamline the existing test program in order 
to accelerate fielding of this capability to the warfighter.
    The committee is also aware that the Army has not 
officially updated the small arms capability based assessment 
(CBA) used since 2008 to identify requirements and capability 
gaps for small arms. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Army, in coordination with the Chief of Staff 
of the Army, to update the small arms CBA from 2008, and to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
February 1, 2017, on the results of the update. The committee 
does not believe this update would have any programmatic or 
schedule impacts to the MHS program, and expects that if 
impacts to the MHS program should occur, these would be a 
product of any potential outcomes resulting from the Chief of 
Staff of the Army's ongoing review of the program.

Next generation signature management technology

    The budget request contained $75.0 million in PE 64804A for 
Logistics and Engineer Equipment-Engine Development, but 
contained no funding for the continued development of next 
generation signature management camouflage systems for military 
vehicles and shelters.
    The committee is encouraged by recent research and the 
approval of the updated requirements document for next 
generation signature management systems. In the committee 
report (H. Rept. 114-102) accompanying the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016, the committee noted the 
importance of this low cost defensive capability against 
current and emerging threats, particularly in Europe, and 
encouraged the Department to accelerate development, 
procurement, and fielding of this advanced camouflage net 
system to meet warfighter requirements. The committee is aware 
of the high demand for this capability by forward deployed 
units, most notably by U.S. Army Europe, U.S. Army Alaska, 2nd 
Cavalry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, 10th Mountain 
Division, and U.S. Special Operations Command. The committee 
believes the Army requires additional funding in fiscal year 
2017 to continue accelerated development of its next generation 
signature management camouflage net systems to ensure continued 
overmatch against advanced sensor threats.
    The committee recommends $86.1 million, an increase of 
$11.1 million, in PE 64804A for Logistics and Engineer 
Equipment-Engine Development for the continued accelerated 
development and testing of next generation signature management 
camouflage net systems to address the operational needs of the 
warfighter.

Personal protective equipment development for female soldiers

    The committee is aware that recent determinations by the 
Secretary of Defense have opened all combat positions to female 
warfighters. The committee is concerned that currently 
available items of personal protective equipment (PPE) and 
organizational clothing and individual equipment (OCIE) do not 
meet the specific and unique requirements for female combat 
troops. These items of equipment continue to overly burden all 
combat troops with excessive weight.
    The committee believes that the new Department of Defense 
policy presents an opportunity for the military services to 
focus on the ``warfighter as a system'' and properly address 
the unique needs of female service members through a holistic 
acquisition strategy. The committee notes that the Army is 
currently developing a complete Soldier Protection System (SPS) 
to provide soldiers with modular, scalable, and mission 
tailorable protection to reduce weight and increase mobility, 
while optimizing protection. The Army has set an overall weight 
reduction goal of 10 percent for SPS. The committee supports 
the SPS effort and expects the program to consider the unique 
physical requirements of female service members.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 
2017, that outlines the plans to provide PPE and OCIE developed 
specifically for female service members. The briefing should 
include, but not be limited to: (1) plans for programming, 
budgeting, requirements, and procurement of female specific 
equipment including helmets, combat clothing, body armor, 
footwear, and other critical safety item equipment categories, 
and (2) detailed plans on integrating commercially available 
materials and advanced product design to reduce the load for 
all service members.

Review of ballistic testing policy for body armor

    The committee encourages the Secretary of the Army to 
reevaluate the February 2009 policy instructing the Army Test 
and Evaluation Command to conduct all body armor first article 
and lot acceptance tests. The committee notes this policy may 
have resulted in significant program costs, and in turn 
schedule delays from inadequate capacity at the Government test 
centers. The committee encourages the Army to assess how it can 
better use independent testing facilities to improve 
efficiency, timing, and costs associated with ballistic test 
and evaluation.

Small Unit Support Vehicle

    The committee notes that the Army family of Small Unit 
Support Vehicle (SUSV) fleet is used by Army units that train 
and operate in extreme cold weather conditions, and that it 
provides those units with unique capabilities not found 
elsewhere in the Army. In addition, while the committee is 
aware of the Army's effort to refurbish some of the fleet, the 
committee notes that legacy SUSVs are beyond their economic 
useful life, and have become increasingly difficult to 
maintain. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army to provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services 
of the U.S. House of Representatives not later than September 
1, 2016, on the potential requirement for a replacement to the 
SUSV fleet. The briefing should include potential options for 
increasing the capability beyond the current vehicles, such as 
additional carrying capacity, armament, and survivability.

Telemedicine capabilities

    The committee is aware that the Department of Defense is 
developing capabilities that would provide telemedicine and 
remote physiological monitoring for casualty care of deployed 
forces. The committee recognizes that such telemedicine 
capabilities can provide useful reach-back support for complex 
injuries, especially for sensitive organs where combat medics 
and surgeons may not have in-depth specialty training, such as 
ophthalmic injuries. However, the committee notes that the 
military services lack an effective telemedicine system that 
communicates patient information and condition across the 
entire continuum of care beginning at the point of injury and 
continuing until arrival at a medical care facility.
    The committee encourages the Department to continue to 
experiment with and examine ways to utilize emerging 
telemedicine capabilities to allow for consultation with 
outside experts or specialty institutions to provide soldiers 
on the battlefield with access to high-quality care for complex 
and difficult injuries, such as ophthalmic or cranial injuries. 
Further, the committee believes the Department should examine 
existing technology and requirements for in-transit 
telemedicine capabilities to determine how best to leverage 
best-of-breed existing capabilities to support current needs. 
Additionally, the committee supports the idea of partnering 
with subject matter experts in order to provide direct, real-
time consultation between geographically dispersed military and 
civilian medical personnel; this would support complex 
diagnostic and surgical problems, as well as allow conferencing 
for complicated, but less urgent patient management decisions, 
and virtualized training and continuing medical education.

Vehicle active protection systems

    The committee is encouraged by the Army's current strategy 
for vehicle active protection system (APS) tests and 
integration. The committee believes this strategy will allow 
the Army to better address the threats posed by the growing 
proliferation of anti-tank guided missiles and rocket-propelled 
grenades. The committee is aware of the importance of vehicle 
APS capabilities for forward-deployed units, specifically those 
units in the U.S. European Command area of operations. The 
committee supports this effort and encourages the Army to 
expedite deployment and fielding of vehicle APS technology on 
ground combat vehicles that will form an essential element of 
the European Reassurance Initiative.
    The committee notes that the Army plans to conduct 
demonstration testing of mature vehicle APS capabilities on the 
Abrams main battle tank, the Bradley fighting vehicle, and 
Stryker combat vehicle. The committee encourages the Army to 
analyze options for incorporating vehicle APS solutions on 
additional vehicles, including the Joint Light Tactical 
Vehicle, and to identify the APS solutions that are best suited 
for deployment on lighter-weight combat and tactical vehicles.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives by March 1, 2017, on the status of plans to 
deploy and integrate mature vehicle APS technology on deployed 
ground combat vehicles.

Warfighter Technology

    The committee is aware of the work being done by the 
Warfighter Technology directorate of the Natick Solider 
Research, Development, and Engineering Center in improving the 
protection, survivability, mobility, and combat effectiveness 
of the U.S. Army. The committee supports the research and 
development in areas of advanced ballistic polymers for body 
armor, fibers to make uniforms more fire resistant, and 
lightweight structures for advanced shelters benefiting all 
ground troops. In order to ensure the Army remains at the 
cutting edge of technology in these critical areas, the 
committee urges continued consistent investment in improving 
warfighter capabilities.

Weight reduction for personal protective equipment

    The committee supports the efforts of the Army and the 
Marine Corps to reduce the weight of personal protective 
equipment (PPE) and organizational clothing and individual 
equipment (OCIE). However, the committee remains concerned that 
the military services are not capitalizing on the commercial 
industry's investments in textile materials to reduce the load 
carriage systems for ground combat forces.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army, in 
coordination with the Secretary of the Navy, to conduct a 
market survey and analysis of the commercial sectors' 
technology and products that could be applied to current weight 
reduction initiatives for PPE and OCIE. The committee further 
directs the Secretary of the Army, in coordination with the 
Secretary of the Navy, to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2017, which summarizes 
the findings of the market survey.
    Additionally, the committee directs the Comptroller General 
of the United States to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees by April 1, 2017, that reviews the efforts 
of the Army and the Marine Corps to reduce weight for PPE and 
OCIE. The report should identify the services' current weight 
reduction initiatives, establish a baseline for future 
evaluations, and assess the effectiveness of current efforts. 
The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
December 1, 2016, on the Comptroller General's preliminary 
findings.

           Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy


                       Items of Special Interest


Advanced Low Cost Munitions Ordnance

    The committee continues to support development of the 
Advanced Low Cost Munition Ordnance (ALaMO). The ALaMO is a 
guided 57mm projectile, with fire-and-forget capability that 
requires no Littoral Combat Ship fire control system changes to 
counter threats against small boat swarms, unmanned aerial 
systems, and other emerging threats.
    The committee directs the Assistant Secretary of the Navy 
for Research, Development, and Acquisition to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by August 30, 
2016, on achieving the objective of an initial operational 
capability decision in 2019. The briefing should also include, 
but not be limited to, an evaluation of the current funding 
profile of this program across the Future Years Defense 
Program, as well as discuss potential courses of action to 
accelerate or streamline the current program strategy.

Aegis radar solid state improvements

    The budget request contained $85.9 million in PE 64501N for 
Advanced Above Water Sensors.
    The U.S. Navy has 90 destroyers and cruisers in the fleet 
which are equipped with the Aegis Weapon System. The heart of 
the system is the AN/SPY-1, automatic detect and track, 
multifunction phased-array radar. The existing Aegis SPY-1 
radar system is based on dated technology vacuum electronic 
device components, such as cross field amplifiers and 
travelling wave tube transmitters. Each Aegis destroyer has 
over 70 microwave vacuum tubes in the transmitter. The current 
technology in the Aegis SPY-1 radar has the highest failure 
rate of components in the ship's radar system.
    The committee believes that there are newer, more efficient 
transmitters available that provide significant performance 
advantages in terms of very low out of band emission, very low 
phase noise, higher clutter improvement factor, increased range 
and Electronic Counter-Countermeasures capability. 
Specifically, additional funding could provide prototype 
hardware to further research and field a replacement to 
outdated transmitters currently in place. The U.S. Navy's DDG-
51 and CG-47 fleet face operational affordability, fleet 
readiness, and sustainment cost challenges. Repair and 
maintenance of this system requires shutdown for several hours 
every 1 to 2 days, and on some occasions has required outside 
contractor support to repair and maintain. It is estimated that 
operational maintenance cost to maintain these radars to the 
required operational readiness standards is up to $1.0 million 
per year, per ship. An upgrade to a solid state transmitter 
could achieve 10 times better reliability while reducing the 
operations and maintenance cost by 90 percent.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends $105.9 million, an 
increase of $20.0 million, in PE 64501N for Advanced Above 
Water Sensors.

Aircraft carrier design

    The budget request contained $30.1 million in PE 64567N to 
support improved affordability for new construction aircraft 
carriers by providing additional design for affordability 
support.
    The committee supports continued efforts by the Department 
of the Navy and the shipbuilder to better manage total 
ownership costs and reduce manning requirements and believes 
additional efforts will result in additional CVN 80/81 cost 
savings.
    The committee recommends $50.1 million, an increase of 
$20.0 million, in PE 64567N for new construction aircraft 
carrier affordability initiatives.

Alternative energy programs

    The committee is aware of the Department of the Navy's 
Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation efforts on 
operational energy programs. These investments include targeted 
efforts aimed at reducing fuel consumption to extend the range 
of aviation platforms, developing new propulsion systems for 
unmanned underwater vehicles, testing and qualifying 
alternative fuels, improving ship hull hydrodynamics, and 
improving energy storage capabilities. The committee remains 
supportive of cost-efficient alternative energy investments 
aimed at enhancing combat capabilities, strengthening mission 
assurance, and reducing operating costs for the Department. 
Therefore, the committee encourages the Department of the Navy, 
when prioritizing investments in alternative energy, to 
continue focusing on technologies that achieve these 
objectives.

Amphibious Ship Replacement Program

    The budget request contained $6.3 million in PE 64454N for 
the Amphibious Ship Replacement Program (LX(R)).
    The committee is concerned about the ability of the Marine 
Corps to project amphibious warfare power in a contested 
environment because of limitations associated with the 
amphibious ship force structure. The committee remains 
committed to ensuring sufficient funds are available to 
accelerate the programmed construction of the Amphibious Ship 
Replacement Program.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends $25.3 million, an 
increase of $19.0 million, in PE 64454N for LX(R).

Automated testing

    The budget request contained no funding in PE 63597N for 
the automated test and analysis program.
    The committee is aware that the Navy's Automated Testing 
and Analysis (ATA) program was established to expand the use of 
automated test methods currently in use by the Navy, such as 
Automated Test and Re-Test, and adds new methods of testing, 
promotes the use of automated test technologies, and 
standardizes automated test practices, methods, and tools. In 
addition, funding supports the development of enterprise level 
strategies to apply ATA technology to a broad range of 
software-intensive acquisition programs. However, the committee 
is concerned that this program was not funded in the fiscal 
year 2017 budget request, and does not believe that the Navy 
has an effective strategy for how to best utilize these 
technologies. Without that, the committee fears that the Navy 
will not have a manner to measure the effectiveness of these 
efforts, or to understand the full requirement across the Navy 
enterprise.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
on the status of this program by July 1, 2016. This update 
should include the current schedule for development, projected 
use of these tools and requirements across the Future Years 
Defense Program, and efforts to extend the use of these tools 
to other service, agency, and interagency partners. This 
briefing should also identify a set of metrics for assessing 
the programs efforts, including quantitative goals for the 
reduction of time and improvements in the quality of tested 
software across the Navy enterprise.
    The committee recommends $8.0 million, an increase of $8.0 
million, in PE 63597N to support and expand automated testing 
practices and capabilities across the Navy, and where relevant, 
with other service and interagency partners.

Autonomous Undersea Vehicles

    The committee notes that the Chief of Naval Operations 
provided a comprehensive assessment of the desired capabilities 
of Autonomous Undersea Vehicles projected to 2025 in the 
February 2016 report to Congress entitled ``Autonomous Undersea 
Vehicle Requirement for 2025.'' The committee also notes that 
the Department of the Navy is performing a gap analysis of 
autonomous undersea vehicle requirements ``to determine the 
inventory requirements of 2025 and beyond.'' In addition, the 
committee is aware that the Secretary of the Navy is developing 
an Unmanned Systems roadmap strategy in 2016 to help inform 
future inventory requirements and investment decisions.
    The committee remains interested in maintaining a 
significant peer advantage in the undersea domain and believes 
autonomous undersea vehicles represent an asymmetric 
opportunity to leverage atypical capabilities. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide a report 
to the congressional defense committees, concurrent with the 
date on which the budget for fiscal year 2018 is submitted to 
Congress pursuant to section 1105 of title 31, United States 
Code, that details the Unmanned Systems roadmap strategy and 
the program objective memorandum 2018 investment strategy to 
obtain such a capability.

Briefing on advanced flight control software for carrier landings

    The committee is aware that the Department of the Navy has 
performed flight tests with advanced flight control software 
for the F-35, F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet and E/A-18G Growler. This 
software, Maritime Augmented Guidance with Integrated Controls 
for Carrier Approach and Recovery Precision Enabling Techniques 
(MAGIC CARPET) will help aviators maintain constant guide slope 
throughout approach. The committee is supportive of the Navy's 
efforts to reduce the workload on pilots and landing signal 
officers (LSO) associated with performing a carrier landing. 
And by increasing the automation of these operations, MAGIC 
CARPET could allow the Navy to achieve savings without harming 
readiness by safely reducing the training associated with 
certification for carrier operations. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Navy to brief the House Committee 
on Armed Services no later than September 30, 2016, on MAGIC 
CARPET software development, flight testing, the impact on 
pilot and LSO workloads, potential reduction in training 
missions and associated savings, and a notional timeline for 
delivery to the fleet.

Common mount for electromagnetic railgun

    The budget request contained $96.4 million in PE 63114N for 
power projection advanced technology. Of this amount, $15.4 
million was included for the Navy's electromagnetic railgun 
prototype.
    The committee remains supportive of the Navy's program for 
developing and deploying an electromagnetic railgun. The 
committee recognizes the growing imperative for the Navy to 
field this type of weapon, not only to increase capabilities 
for naval surface fire support and ballistic missile defense, 
but to also decrease the cost exchange model when comparing the 
railgun to conventional missiles or guns. However, the 
committee is increasingly concerned that the shift in emphasis 
to the hypervelocity projectile by the Strategic Capabilities 
Office has left the Navy with a funding gap in developing the 
requirements and design for a common mount, which is a 
necessary prerequisite to getting this capability into 
operational use. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary 
of the Navy to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services by February 15, 2017, on the plan and milestone 
schedule for demonstrating and deploying a common railgun mount 
for sea- and land-based applications.
    The committee recommends $106.4 million, an increase of 
$10.0 million, in PE 63114N to support the development of a 
common mount for the sea-based and land-based electromagnetic 
railgun.

Deployable and interoperable communications

    The committee recognizes the critical and lifesaving role 
of enhanced and reliable communications systems in the 
battlespace. The committee commends the Marine Corps and Marine 
Corps Systems Command for working to test and evaluate 
deployable, man-portable Fourth Generation Long-Term Evolution 
(4G LTE) and 4G LTE Advanced (LTE-A) capabilities with the 
ability to integrate with other multimedia communications 
systems that are based on commercially available technology, 
and demonstrated interoperability in a multiservice and 
multiagency context. The committee encourages the Marine Corps 
Systems Command to find opportunities to further evaluate and 
experiment with such technology to better understand the 
performance characteristics in real-world and field exercise 
situations.

F/A-18 fleet physiological event rate

    The committee notes with concern the increasing rates of 
physiological events (PE) experienced by F/A-18 pilots over the 
past 5 years. In fiscal year 2015, PE events experienced by F/
A-18 pilots averaged no less than 28 incidents per 100,000 
flight hours across 3 F/A-18 platforms. Of concern to the 
committee is whether this rate is an indicator that the Navy's 
efforts to address the problem are ineffective, or reflects an 
increase in reporting by aircrew. While these PE events cover a 
wide range of potential causal factors, the committee notes 
that the potential for aircraft mishap caused by a lack of 
oxygen or contamination of the on-board oxygen generation 
system (OBOGs) is real and should be addressed. The committee 
acknowledges and supports the Department of the Navy's 
establishment of PE teams to work with industry partners to 
collect, examine, and test potential solutions.
    While the committee recognizes that there has not yet been 
a confirmed loss of an aircraft or pilot due to these events, 
and that physiological events experienced by F/A-18 pilots 
appear to be occurring at a rate lower than those experienced 
by the F-22 fleet from fiscal years 2010-14, the committee 
remains concerned about the apparent increasing F/A-18 
physiological event rate, which poses risk to pilots and fleet 
operations. As a result, elsewhere in this Act, the committee 
includes a provision that would establish an independent review 
of the Navy's efforts to date to address this issue, with a 
report date of December 1, 2017.
    In addition, the committee notes that two critical elements 
of the Air Force's effort to reduce the rate of similar events 
in the F-22 fleet included changes to pilot flight equipment 
and the installation of an automatic backup oxygen system 
(ABOS). The ABOS could provide an increase in backup oxygen 
supply as compared to the installed manual backup oxygen 
carried in F/A-18 aircraft. The committee acknowledges that the 
F-22 system was already an existing design, and that in 
contrast the Navy would have to study and design an automatic 
system, working with the F/A-18 contractor. The committee 
believes that no one fix is likely to address all the issues 
causing physiological events. Given the in-depth research and 
mitigation efforts that the Navy is conducting, the committee 
believes that examination of the feasibility of design and 
installation of an ABOS of some kind in F/A-18 aircraft may be 
an important element to reduce the rate of incidents and 
preserve pilot confidence in the aircraft's overall life 
support system. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary 
of the Navy to conduct a detailed engineering and cost analysis 
on the potential installation of an automatic backup oxygen 
system in the F/A-18 fleet, and to provide a report, not later 
than March 15, 2017, to the congressional defense committees on 
the findings and conclusions of this analysis.

Five-inch precision guided projectile development for naval surface 
        fire support

    In the committee report (H. Rept. 114-102) accompanying the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016, the 
committee noted ``that current surface Navy gunnery 
requirements are outdated and that new technologies such as 
railgun and directed energy weapons are nearing readiness for 
technology transition.'' The committee referenced the Advanced 
Naval Surface Fires (ANSF) initiative and noted the ANSF was 
assessing options for providing a near-term 5-inch guided 
munition capability. The committee understands this capability 
would provide for improved and extended-range naval surface 
fire support. The committee continues to support the need for 
this precision guided capability and is also aware of the 
Hypervelocity Gun Weapon System (HGWS) program that is 
currently under consideration by the Strategic Capabilities 
Office (SCO). The committee notes the HGWS program would ``flip 
the cost equation using conventional guns to defend forward 
bases against raids of advanced cruise and ballistic 
missiles''' and believes there could be applications for use in 
5-inch gun systems for naval surface fires support. The 
committee is encouraged by the development of both of these 
initiatives and expects the Navy and SCO to coordinate on these 
capabilities. The committee also expects the Navy to proceed 
forward with an accelerated development and acquisition 
strategy for this needed capability that is consistent with 
acquisition reform principles.

Integrated surveillance system

    The committee believes that the ability to obtain acoustic 
intelligence on foreign submarines is a critical national 
security need. The committee is aware of ongoing research and 
development efforts within the Office of Naval Research to 
develop and demonstrate the technology to enable autonomous 
installation of passive acoustic arrays that would support the 
Navy's littoral undersea surveillance needs in detecting and 
reporting submarines. These technologies would provide the 
capability to autonomously classify and report on a variety of 
specific submarine targets of interest. The committee 
encourages the Office of Naval Research to continue research 
and development efforts to satisfy urgent requirements of the 
combatant commanders for additional maritime intelligence, 
surveillance, and reconnaissance capabilities.

Joint metallurgical technology for combat and tactical vehicle hulls

    The committee notes that in-service cracks are developing 
in the armor hull structures of Marine Corps and Army heavy 
tactical vehicles, to include mine resistant ambush protected 
vehicles (MRAPs) that were constructed from MIL-A-46100 High 
Hard Armor Steel. The committee believes the military services 
should consider resourcing a joint metallurgical technology 
program to develop solutions which provide reasonable, cost 
effective solutions to help repair and mitigate these types of 
cracks. The committee anticipates that this program would help 
to identify, develop, and evaluate potential alternatives, 
models, processes, and procedures to eliminate the cracking 
issue in the current fleet of MRAPs and newly acquired tactical 
vehicles, as well as to help to reclaim lost legacy vehicle 
assets as a result of severe cracking in vehicle hulls.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy, in 
coordination with the Secretary of the Army, or their 
appropriate designees, to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by February 1, 2017, on the 
advisability and feasibility of pursuing metallurgical 
technology to address vehicle hull cracks and repair for combat 
and tactical vehicles.

Marine Corps unmanned rotary utility aircraft

    The committee recognizes the successful deployment in 
Afghanistan of the K-MAX CQ-24A unmanned rotary utility 
aircraft. The committee encourages the Marine Corps to continue 
to explore this capability by implementing a program to provide 
the CQ-24A with multi-mission upgrades, especially those that 
provide improved intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance 
capabilities and greater range. If additional test activities 
show promise, the committee also encourages the Marine Corps to 
establish a program of record in fiscal year 2018 for CQ-24A.

MH-60R/S multi-mission helicopter programs

    The budget request contained $49.3 million in PE 72207N for 
depot maintenance systems development, and $11.0 million for 
the MH-60 service-life assessment program, but contained no 
funding to support defining a MH-60 mid-life upgrade.
    The committee understands that the Department of the Navy's 
fleet of MH-60 helicopters are rapidly approaching currently 
approved service-life limits due to high fleet demand and 
operations tempo. Based on the current MH-60 utilization tempo, 
the MH-60 fleet could exceed its useful service-life prior to 
the future vertical lift aircraft achieving initial operational 
capability in 2034, creating a significant helicopter inventory 
gap within the Department of the Navy.
    The committee notes that the Department of the Navy is 
preparing to conduct a MH-60 service-life assessment program 
(SLAP) that will evaluate the rotorcraft's aircraft structures 
and sub-systems to identify the critical structures, 
components, and sub-systems that can achieve extended service-
life limit goals. However, the committee is concerned that the 
SLAP will not include an assessment to determine the 
requirements for a mid-life upgrade that would keep the 
rotorcraft relevant by mitigating obsolescence issues and 
enhancing the rotorcraft maneuvering performance and mission 
systems. Rotorcraft mid-life upgrades could include such items 
as next-generation rotor blades and tail rotor, digital 
automated flight control system, and mission systems hardware 
and software improvements to increase lethality and combat 
effectiveness.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $54.3 million, an 
increase of $5.0 million, in PE 72207N for MH-60S and MH-60R 
fleet mid-life upgrades. The committee also directs the 
Secretary of the Navy to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by February 1, 2017, that assesses 
and defines which MH-60S and MH-60R rotorcraft systems, sub-
systems, mission systems, and avionics should be included in a 
mid-life upgrade to mitigate obsolescence issues and enhance 
the MH-60 fleets from both maneuvering performance and combat 
capability perspectives. The committee also expects the 
Secretary of the Navy to integrate the mid-life upgrade plan 
into the MH-60S and MH-60R service-life extension program that 
is scheduled to commence in 2023.

Non-imaging millimeter wave radar technology

    The committee is aware that the Department of Defense has 
invested significant funding over the last 10 years for 
development, testing, and deployment of low-power, non-imaging 
millimeter wave radar technology for safely detecting concealed 
threats under clothing, such as suicide vests, weapons, or 
other contraband, at stand-off distances of up to 100 meters. 
Most recently, the Department invested to reduce the size, 
weight, and power of the system by 50 percent while also 
enhancing its operational capabilities. The result of this 
investment is a prototype system that exceeds desired 
requirements, reducing the size, weight, and power by 80 
percent, and decreasing acquisition costs by 25 percent. 
However, the committee notes that no additional funding has 
been identified by the Department to complete the prototype to 
the point where it would be ready for testing in an operational 
environment, or any form of military user assessment. The 
committee believes that this technology has the potential to 
not only enhance force protection at U.S. military bases and 
embassy checkpoints in high threat regions around the world, 
but it could also be used in public settings to protect against 
terrorist attacks domestically. The committee encourages the 
Department to continue to invest in the development of this 
prototype to the point where it could be evaluated for military 
utility in a suitable operational environment.

Ocean warfighting environment applied research

    The committee believes that superiority in undersea and 
maritime environments depends on rapid access and application 
of the latest science and technology to ever-changing mission 
sets. The committee understands the importance of basic 
research on the natural sea environment that can be transformed 
into technological developments that provide new or enhanced 
warfare capabilities for the battlespace environment by 
measuring, analyzing, modeling and simulating, and applying 
environmental factors. The committee supports the use of 
natural environmental applied research for all fleet operations 
and for current or emerging systems. This information is also 
used to provide timely information about the natural 
environment for all fleet operations. The committee urges the 
Secretary of the Navy to continue research efforts into the 
natural sea environment to support technological developments 
that contribute to meeting top joint warfare capabilities.

Service life extension program for Auxiliary General Purpose 
        Oceanographic Research

    The budget request contained $42.6 million in PE 62435N for 
the Ocean Warfighting Environment Applied Research program.
    For academic research, the Navy operates and maintains 
Auxiliary General Purpose Oceanographic Research (AGOR) 
vessels, and these vessels require a mid-life overhaul. The 
committee notes that funding provided to date does not fully 
support all of the items that the Navy has determined are 
necessary to fully extend the life of these AGOR ships to 40-45 
years.
    The committee continues to believe that oceanographic 
research is a core function of the Navy and remains committed 
to ensuring the ability of the Navy to sustain its research 
priorities, even in the face of fiscally constrained budgets. 
The committee is concerned that the Navy has been decreasing 
funding in oceanographic research, especially sea-going 
research, and is concerned about the negative long-term 
implications these trends are likely to have on areas like 
anti-submarine warfare and battlespace awareness. Navy science 
and technology funding also plays a key role in information 
stewardship, including ocean mapping, oceanographic and 
meteorological data, that supports Navy, national, and 
international scientific goals.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends $74.6 million, an 
increase of $32.0 million, in PE 62435N for Ocean Warfighting 
Environment Applied Research, to procure the third major 
overhaul in the class of three AGORs. The committee notes that 
the inclusion of this authorization of appropriations is 
predicated on the Navy's use of merit-based selection 
procedures in accordance with the requirements of section 
2304(k) and 2374 of title 10, United States Code, or on 
competitive procedures, to conduct these overhauls.

Submarine acoustic warfare development

    Considering the increasing and evolving undersea threats, 
the committee believes the Department of the Navy must continue 
to develop next generation countermeasures, including a mix of 
internal and external expendable acoustic countermeasures, to 
maintain and improve the survivability of all U.S. submarine 
classes in response to torpedo attack. While the committee 
acknowledges that the budget request for fiscal year 2017 
included an increase of $3.4 million to stabilize the Next 
Generation Countermeasure Program and associated Submarine 
Acoustic Warfare System research and development efforts, the 
committee supports the planned requirement for a fully capable, 
reactive, and mobile device constrained in size to 3 inches in 
diameter and 39 inches in length. However, the committee is 
concerned that the current next generation countermeasure 
requirement requires a single 3-inch device to be launched from 
both internal and external launchers, despite the fact that the 
latter currently deploys a 6-inch device. The committee urges 
Navy officials to consider a more diversified approach that 
allows for a next generation, 6-inch externally launched 
countermeasure, as well as an enhanced Acoustic Device 
Countermeasure (ADC) MK2 device for internal launch, which 
could be fielded sooner and at a much more affordable cost than 
the Navy's current plan.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than September 30, 2016, on the Navy's plan to 
achieve the most cost effective and advanced torpedo defense 
capability for its submarine fleet. The briefing shall include, 
but not be limited to: the rationale underpinning the Navy's 
plan to focus on smaller devices that require adaptation to 
launch from external tubes, with specific attention paid to the 
inherent limitations of internally launched countermeasures; a 
detailed description of plans to incrementally enhance existing 
internal countermeasures, such as ADC MK2; any plans to develop 
a fully capable 6-inch next generation countermeasure, with 
mobility and communications capabilities, to be launched from 
external launchers; and an assessment of risk and unit 
production costs of each of the three aforementioned program 
sets.

UCLASS, CBARS, RAQ-25, MQ-25, MQ-XX

    The committee is encouraged that the Department of Defense 
has completed its review of the Unmanned Carrier Launched 
Surveillance and Strike (UCLASS) program and has decided to 
move forward with a slight variation that will include airborne 
tanking as an additional requirement. While this new capability 
was not identified as a requirement in the UCLASS Initial 
Capabilities Document (ICD) or the draft Capabilities 
Development Document (CDD) that had been previously validated 
by the Chief of Naval Operations, the committee recognizes the 
need for the enhanced capability and the positive impact it 
could have on the overall Carrier Air Wing (CVW). A requirement 
that was included in both the UCLASS ICD and CDD was the need 
for persistent, carrier-based intelligence, surveillance, 
reconnaissance (ISR) and precision strike. Furthermore, as 
stated in the Carrier Based Aerial Refueling System (CBARS) 
budget documents, ``The CBARS requirements are aligned with the 
UCLASS which highlights the need for a persistent, carrier-
based ISR, and precision strike asset.'' The budget documents 
go on to note in the Air Segment Product Development 
description that the unmanned vehicle will be ``capable of 
aerial refueling (give) and persistent Intelligence 
Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) operations with future 
precision strike.''
    The committee is concerned that while the follow on program 
continues to leverage the UCLASS ICD as its requirements 
justification and seems to have clear justification for the 
need for this platform to possess a precision strike 
capability, the final Request for Proposals that goes to 
industry may not include this as a required capability. The 
committee believes that, should this be the case, the Navy may 
be excluding a critical capability and precluding future growth 
in a platform that will likely be integrated into the carrier 
air wing for the next 30 years. In order to stay consistent 
with the requirements of the UCLASS ICD, the committee 
encourages the Secretary of the Navy to ensure that precision 
strike is a requirement of any follow-on platform that attempts 
to leverage the UCLASS ICD.
    Additionally, the committee notes that the Joint 
Explanatory Statement to Accompany S. 1356, the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Committee Print 
No. 2) indicated that the Navy should develop a penetrating, 
air refuelable, unmanned carrier-launched aircraft capable of 
performing in a non-permissive environment. The committee 
continues to believe that the effectiveness of the carrier and 
its air wing would be enhanced by the development of an 
unmanned carrier-based aircraft capable of penetrating in non-
permissive environments and conducting strike. The committee 
encourages the Secretary of the Navy to pursue the development 
and fielding of this capability.
    Finally, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to provide a report to the congressional 
defense committees by March 1, 2017, on the Navy's carrier 
based unmanned aircraft acquisition program(s). The report 
shall include the following:
    (1) The Navy's requirements and acquisition strategy for 
the program(s), including whether the strategies are consistent 
with acquisition management best practices identified by the 
Comptroller General;
    (2) The extent to which the program(s) have established and 
are meeting cost, schedule, and performance goals, including 
test plans and progress;
    (3) The extent to which critical technologies are mature; 
system and subsystem designs are stable; and manufacturing 
processes are understood and have demonstrated capability to 
efficiently produce reliable, high quality systems; and
    (4) Any additional matters that the Comptroller General 
considers appropriate to fully inform the congressional defense 
committees of the status of relevant naval carrier based 
unmanned aircraft acquisition program(s).

Warfighter sustainment applied research

    Warfighter exposure to extreme environments requires 
critical research that is funded to study and mitigate the 
effects of undersea stresses on human safety, resiliency, and 
performance. The Navy's Warfighter Sustainment Applied Research 
Medical Technologies Program is directed by the Office of Naval 
Research, and conducts important research in this field. 
Research in this area includes reducing decompression sickness, 
arterial gas embolism, preventing hyperbaric oxygen toxicity, 
and exploring other ways to optimize submariner health. The 
committee believes the health and well-being of the force is 
imperative and encourages the Department of the Navy to 
continue investments in this field.

         Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force


                       Items of Special Interest


Adaptive engine transition program

    The budget request contained $285.0 million in PE 64858F 
for the adaptive engine transition program (AETP).
    The committee continues to support research and development 
in the next generation of turbine engine technology. AETP will 
mature fuel-efficient adaptive cycle engine technologies while 
reducing associated technical and manufacturing risks in 
preparation for next-generation propulsion system development 
for multiple combat aircraft applications. The committee 
understands that significant technical accomplishments have 
been achieved by the Air Force Research Laboratory through a 
previous program, known as the adaptive versatile engine 
technology program, and the current AETP. The committee 
encourages the Department of the Air Force to continue making 
the necessary investments in these critical technologies and 
engine architectures to maintain the Nation's technological 
superiority over potential advanced adversaries.
    The committee is encouraged that the Department of the Air 
Force has requested funding to award multiple contracts in 
fiscal year 2017, and to continue adaptive cycle engine 
maturation and demonstration efforts as a precursor to entering 
into future engineering and manufacturing development programs.
    The committee recommends $285.0 million, the full amount 
requested, in PE 64858F to continue the AETP program. The 
committee encourages the Department of the Air Force to 
initiate development planning efforts for transitioning these 
technologies into current and future combat aircraft systems.

Air Force directed energy initiatives

    The committee is aware that the Department of the Air Force 
established a Directed Energy Weapons (DEW) Integrated Product 
Team (IPT) in March 2016 to focus on operationalizing directed 
energy (DE) technologies. In addition to addressing technology 
development risks through science and technology efforts, the 
IPT will focus on policy issues, establishment of kinetic 
concepts of operation, opportunities for prototypes and 
experimentation, limitations, constraints, transition 
milestones, and critical decision points for Air Force 
strategic investment from 2016 to 2036. In addition, the DEW 
IPT will identify required test capabilities and acquisition 
infrastructure to support operationalizing DE. This information 
will be formalized in an Air Force DE Flight Plan.
    The committee supports the effort to operationalize DE and 
recognizes the challenges, specifically the integration of DE 
on airborne platforms and resolution of policy issues, in 
achieving this goal. The committee understands that in 
producing the Air Force DE Flight Plan, initial concepts may 
prove unfeasible or not conducive to the overall Air Force 
Strategic Plan. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary 
of the Air Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee 
on Armed Services by July 15, 2016, on the establishment of the 
IPT and efforts and progress to date. The briefing should 
include a discussion of any DE requirements as identified by 
U.S. Air Force Special Operations Command, including any AC-130 
gunship requirements, such as those included in the unfunded 
priorities list submitted to the committee. Finally, the 
committee expects to be provided a copy of the Air Force DE 
Flight Plan upon its completion in October 2016.

Air traffic control and landing systems

    The budget request contained $9.8 million in PE 35114F for 
development of air traffic control and landing systems. Of this 
amount, $5.0 million was requested for development of a next 
generation air transportation system (NextGen ATS).
    NextGen ATS is an interagency effort designed to enable the 
transition from a ground-infrastructure dominated air traffic 
management capability for the U.S. national airspace system to 
a capability that leverages advances in performance-based 
navigation, non-radar based surveillance services. NextGen ATS 
would also transition from solid-state analogue voice 
communications to networked digital voice and data exchange. As 
part of this effort, the committee notes that the Air Force 
Flight Standards Agency will continue efforts to examine new 
civil air traffic control and landing system technologies that 
may have military utility, such as a remote virtual air traffic 
control tower capability. A remote virtual air traffic control 
tower system would integrate high-definition cameras providing 
360 degree field of view, surveillance and meteorological 
sensors, microphones, signal light guns, and other devices for 
deployment at an airport. Inputs from these sensors could be 
transmitted via data network to a remote tower center to be 
displayed in real time where a controller would have the tools, 
in addition to live video, to operate the airport in a similar 
manner as if located in a traditional air traffic control 
tower. The committee believes that a remote virtual air traffic 
control tower capability could provide a cost-effective 
alternative to traditional fixed-base air traffic control 
towers. Therefore, the committee encourages the Department of 
the Air Force to conduct an operational utility evaluation of 
the virtual air traffic control tower capability in fiscal year 
2017 to determine whether such a system could be an alternative 
to current air traffic control facilities for fixed-base and 
expeditionary operations.
    The committee recommends $9.8 million, the full amount 
requested, in PE 35114F, for development of air traffic control 
and landing systems.

Deployable air traffic control

    The committee recognizes the important research and 
development work the Air Force conducts to support air traffic 
control and landing systems that enable their ability to deploy 
and operate worldwide. The committee notes that a portion of 
that work has been focused on developing a Deployable Radar 
Approach Control system. The committee believes such a system 
will not only allow Air Force units to be rapidly deployable or 
recoverable in austere and denied environments, but that it is 
also a critical component in Department of Defense capabilities 
for humanitarian assistance and disaster response scenarios. 
Additionally, as noted elsewhere in this report, the committee 
understands remote tower systems can provide a cost-effective 
alternative to traditional fixed-based air traffic control 
towers.
    However, the committee is concerned that current efforts do 
not adequately address future air traffic control tower 
requirements, or how capabilities for fixed and deployable air 
traffic systems might be rationalized. The Air Force operates 
air traffic control towers at approximately 90 fixed 
installations and deploys air traffic control services in 
support of contingency operations and crisis response under the 
Defense Support to Civil Authority mission. Aging 
infrastructure and obsolete mobile systems will be a great 
challenge to the Department. These challenges are compounded by 
the growing need to be able to rapidly reconstitute airfields 
that are held at risk by cruise and ballistic missile threats 
in foreign theaters. Thus, the ability to provide deployable 
air traffic control has the potential to contribute to 
deterrence, and supports the ability to convincingly project 
power.
    Recognizing the cost and operational benefits from this 
kind of research and development, the committee encourages the 
Air Force to explore opportunities, including through 
experimentation and concept development, to leverage this 
technology in order to address the range of challenges facing 
the Air Force. In addition to understanding the potential 
savings in construction and manpower, the committee encourages 
the Air Force to find experimentation or exercise venues to 
better understand how such technology might contribute to new 
and innovative warfighting concepts for the future.

High efficiency heat exchangers

    High efficiency heat exchangers are becoming increasingly 
necessary for engines and aircraft, such as the F-35, that 
generate more heat as more advanced capabilities, and thus 
increased weight, are added to the platform. The committee is 
aware that current thermal management systems (TMS) may be 
limited by traditional manufacturing processes, and that 
additive manufacturing is crucial to next-generation TMS. 
Therefore, the committee encourages the Air Force to make 
investments in additive manufactured TMS.

Human-machine teaming

    The budget request contained $111.6 million in PE 62202F 
for human effectiveness applied research.
    The committee notes that autonomy research is a significant 
component of the Department of Defense's new third offset 
strategy, and will likely provide a decisive future warfighting 
advantage to U.S. forces. The integration of manned and 
unmanned aerial systems appears prominently in future concepts 
for next-generation air dominance, but will continue to rely 
heavily on human operators and their abilities to take on 
increasingly cognitive loads. The committee has supported 
increased funding in the past for ongoing research to develop 
more comprehensive methods to train and rehearse warfighters 
for a more realistic and seamless human-machine autonomous 
command and control environment. The committee encourages the 
Air Force to continue to pursue improved continuous learning 
strategies for airmen and mission performance by creating, 
blending, and personalizing Live, Virtual, and Constructive 
simulation environments.
    The committee recommends $116.6 million, an increase of 
$5.0 million, in PE 62202F to expand research in human-machine 
teaming.

Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System recapitalization

    The budget request contained $128.1 million for the Joint 
Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (JSTARS) 
recapitalization program.
    The committee notes that the fiscal year 2017 budget 
request projects a delay of at least 1 month in the engineering 
and manufacturing development (EMD) contract award, from the 
fourth quarter of fiscal year 2017 to the first quarter of 
fiscal year 2018, and a 1-year delay in Initial Operational 
Capability (IOC) from fiscal year 2023 to 2024 in the 
recapitalization of the JSTARS fleet. The committee believes 
JSTARS recapitalization offers significant advantages: it will 
decrease the logistics footprint, reduce sustainment costs, 
increase operational flexibility, and extend operations into 
anti-access/area denial environments. The committee recognizes 
that the overall delay is a consequence of: (1) a delay in the 
milestone A decision; and (2) analysis conducted by both the 
Department of the Air Force and the Office of the Secretary of 
Defense that indicates the EMD schedule will require 4 to 5.5 
years.
    The committee supports and understands the need for a 
technology maturation and risk reduction (TMRR) phase as part 
of the JSTARS recapitalization program, as a means to decrease 
cost, schedule, and performance risk prior to entering the EMD 
phase. The committee understands that the Air Force's 
acquisition strategy includes considering two radar 
alternatives as part of the TMRR phase. The committee believes 
that the TMRR phase is the appropriate place to pursue such a 
strategy. However, the committee also believes that pursuing 
multiple radar technologies concurrently within the program of 
record into the follow-on development phase would be 
inconsistent with the committee's acquisition reform 
initiatives. The committee expects the Air Force to down select 
to one radar solution as part of the EMD phase in order to 
ensure the program does not continue to be delayed. If the Air 
Force believes that alternative radar capabilities should be 
pursued for risk mitigation or capability enhancements in the 
future, the Air Force should pursue such an approach outside of 
the program of record with the ability to incrementally 
integrate in the future if necessary.
    The committee has continually expressed concern that a 
protracted acquisition program will result in a multiyear 
capabilities gap, which will leave combatant commanders without 
an acceptable level of ground moving target indicators and 
battle management command and control capability. The committee 
also believes that the use of existing technology combined with 
a commercially available jet aircraft can result in a 
significantly faster acquisition program. The committee notes 
this approach would be consistent with current acquisition 
reform policies that direct a more streamlined and incremental 
approach for major defense acquisition programs. While the 
committee understands that the Department of the Air Force is 
conducting a study to determine the E-8's widespread airframe 
fatigue risk, which will be complete in March 2017, the 
committee notes that under the most optimistic scenarios, the 
Department can expect a shortfall of 10 JSTARS aircraft in its 
fleet of 16 operational aircraft by late fiscal year 2025.
    Accordingly, the committee encourages the Secretary of the 
Air Force to develop a plan, including incentives in the JSTARS 
recapitalization EMD and procurement contracts, to accelerate 
the development, procurement, and fielding of JSTARS 
recapitalization program. In addition, the committee believes 
the Air Force should program necessary funds in its future 
budget requests to accelerate the JSTARS recapitalization 
program in the Future Years Defense Program, and to eliminate 
the delay in delivering initial operational capability. The 
committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, not later 
than December 1, 2016. The briefing should include one option 
that would accelerate the IOC to fiscal year 2022, and a second 
option that would accelerate the IOC to fiscal year 2023.
    The committee recommends $128.1 million, the full amount 
requested, for the JSTARS recapitalization program.

KC-46 aerial refueling tanker aircraft program

    The budget request contained $261.7 million in PE 65221F 
for KC-46 tanker development.
    The committee continues its long-standing support of the 
KC-46 tanker aircraft program. The committee notes that the 
program has had no engineering change proposals and program 
officials have stated that they do not expect any engineering 
change proposals for the remainder of the fiscal year. The 
committee also notes that the program has not incurred any 
additional or unexpected test support costs. Because the 
program continues to demonstrate stable requirements and has 
had no requested engineering change proposals or test support 
cost growth, the Government Accountability Office identified 
$140.0 million of the remaining $170.0 million set aside in 
fiscal year 2016 for unknown risks as excess funds that could 
be used to offset fiscal year 2017 risk mitigation.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $121.7 million, a 
decrease of $140.0 million, in PE 65221F for KC-46 tanker 
development.

MQ-9 automatic takeoff and landing capability

    The budget request contained $151.4 million in PE 25219F 
for development of MQ-9 capabilities, but contained no funding 
for development of the MQ-9 automatic takeoff and landing 
capability (ATLC).
    MQ-9 ATLC is a software-based autopilot system for takeoff 
and landing operations for MQ-9 aircraft. The committee 
understands that the system will allow takeoffs and landings at 
full operational limits, and provide auto-abort and divert 
capabilities not currently resident in the MQ-9. The committee 
further understands that initial MQ-9 ATLC development efforts 
began in 2011 and ran through 2013 with a total of 146 test 
landings, but that due to higher priorities, no additional 
testing has occurred since then. The committee notes that the 
Department of the Air Force currently plans to restart 
development of the MQ-9 ATLC in fiscal year 2018, but 
understands that acceleration of this effort will facilitate 
the transition away from line-of-sight operations for takeoffs 
and landings, improve operational flexibility by providing 
ability to land at divert fields, prevent the loss of aircraft 
due to loss of the command and control link, and increase 
takeoff and landing operational capability in conditions of 
poor visibility.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $35.0 
million in PE 25219F for development of the MQ-9 ATLC.
    Additionally, the committee notes some Department of 
Defense organizations use contractor support for unmanned 
aerial system (UAS) takeoff and landing operations when forward 
deployed, and believes that the Department of the Air Force 
should consider contractor support for its MQ-9 takeoff and 
landing operations to mitigate the demand on Department of the 
Air Force personnel assigned to the UAS career field. 
Consequently, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services and the House Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence, not later than November 1, 2016, on contractor 
support to UAS takeoff and landing operations.

MQ-9 unmanned aircraft vehicle tactical datalink integration

    The budget request contained $151.4 million in PE 25219F 
for the research and development of the MQ-9 unmanned aircraft 
vehicle, but contained no funding to develop and integrate a 
tactical datalink capability onto the platform.
    The committee notes that the MQ-9 aircraft lacks the means 
to establish and maintain direct tactical datalink (TDL) 
communications with command and control, tactical agencies, and 
other TDL users. The committee understands that TDLs are 
critical capabilities used to share aircraft position, 
targeting data, sensor points of interest, cursor-on-target 
data, and target-track information derived from various 
intelligence sources via an airborne network of manned and 
unmanned aircraft. The lack of TDL single-point reception and 
transmission capability on board an aircraft can delay 
prosecution of the kill chain, impact supported commanders' 
time-sensitive decision-making processes, and pose an 
unnecessary safety issue with regard to aircraft position and 
airspace deconfliction. Current MQ-9 TDL communication and 
information transfers are not routed directly through the 
existing airborne TDL network, but instead are routed through 
multiple ground-based servers outside of the remotely piloted 
aircraft architecture. This method of TDL data routing causes 
significant delays of critical information, such as aircraft 
position and targeting data. An aircraft TDL radio is needed by 
MQ-9 operators that is compatible with all current datalink 
architectures in both domestic and combat areas of 
responsibility. The TDL radio and system should include 
provisions for consistent, reliable, timely, and unrestricted 
TDL communications, and have open architecture to allow for 
growth and advances in the TDL technology.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $14.0 
million in PE 25219F for the development, non-recurring 
engineering, and integration of a tactical datalink capability 
onto the MQ-9 platform. This funding increase directly supports 
a capability requirement validated in the MQ-9 capability 
development document, and directly supports a ``critical 
requirement'' identified as an MQ-9 capability shortfall by the 
Air National Guard.

Open architecture Distributed Common Ground System

    The committee is aware that the Air Force has been pursuing 
an effort to modernize its version of the Distributed Common 
Ground System (DCGS) by implementing an open architecture 
version. The committee is generally supportive of increasing 
uses of open architecture approaches for system development, as 
well as of this effort specifically. The committee believes 
that open architecture has the potential to increase 
flexibility and agility for both development and deployment of 
DCGS capabilities, as well as potentially faster development 
and integration of applications.
    However, the committee is concerned that the current 
program is not well organized to accept these open architecture 
modifications. The 2015 Annual Report of the Director of 
Operational Test and Evaluation (DOT&E;) found that the current 
version of the program lacks current requirements and 
architecture documents, a rigorous and comprehensive software 
problem tracking and reporting procedure, and an accurate 
description of the architecture and interfaces for the Test and 
Evaluation Master Plan (TEMP). Without remediating these 
problems, the committee is concerned that the program will be 
unable to fully move to an open architecture baseline. 
Additionally, for the open architecture development effort, the 
committee believes that there is insufficient documentation in 
specific program milestones, and that it remains unclear how 
the Air Force will effectively leverage an open architecture 
without additional changes in contracting strategy for 
applications running on the new architecture.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services and the House Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence by January 9, 2017, on the roadmap for development 
and fielding of the open architecture version of the 
Distributed Common Ground System for the Air Force. The roadmap 
should include:
    (1) A plan for achieving an open architecture, including 
identification of key milestones and decision points;
    (2) A timeline for addressing the recommendations of the 
2015 DOT&E; Annual Report, including the updating of 
requirements and architecture documents, a process for 
documenting and redressing software and cybersecurity problems, 
and an update of the TEMP; and
    (3) Recommendations for updating the acquisition strategy 
and contracting mechanisms for open architecture components of 
the updated DCGS system.

Precision metrology tools

    The budget request contained $126.2 million in PE 62102F 
for materials research and development.
    The committee recognizes that metrology, or the development 
of precise measurement tools, is an important aspect of 
materials research. As the ability to manipulate materials at 
the subatomic scale, and to generate new and novel materials 
from computational design, continues to advance, it will also 
require further development of precision measuring tools. The 
committee encourages the Air Force to explore new and novel 
methods to develop and provision for these tools, including 
through public-private partnerships to develop, field, and 
maintain cutting-edge metrology systems.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $131.2 million, an 
increase of $5.0 million, in PE 62102F to support the 
development of advanced, precision metrology tools to support 
enhanced materials development work of the Air Force and its 
partner organizations.

Reusable hypersonic vehicle structures development

    The budget request contained $122.8 million in PE 62201F 
for aerospace vehicle technologies.
    The committee understands that hypersonic vehicles are a 
significant area of investment for both the Air Force and the 
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), and have the 
potential to provide game-changing capabilities for the 
Department of Defense. The committee is aware that the 
Department's third offset strategy includes additional 
investments that will support accelerating development, 
testing, and fielding of hypersonic capabilities. The committee 
believes that such investments are critical to posturing the 
Department for the future warfighting environment. However, the 
committee is concerned that the emphasis on strike technologies 
has resulted in little investment to cover the research needs 
for reusable hypersonic vehicles. The committee is aware that 
past efforts, such as the Hypersonic Test Vehicle-2 flight 
tests, illustrate the need to better characterize the 
aerothermal effects on flight bodies. The committee believes 
that if the Department intends to develop reusable hypersonic 
platforms, there is a need to invest in the near term to do the 
characterization and materials research needed to support those 
future missions.
    The committee recommends $127.8 million, an increase of 
$5.0 million, in PE 62201F to support the development of 
reusable hypersonic vehicle structures.

Silicon carbide for aerospace power applications

    The budget request contained $94.6 million in PE 63216F for 
aerospace propulsion and power.
    The committee notes that recent research in aerospace power 
electronics has concentrated on fundamental materials, devices, 
and power-handling capability. The committee believes that the 
Air Force should look for opportunities to accelerate the 
development of actual components to go into aircraft electrical 
systems, especially very high-current silicon carbide power 
modules. The committee recognizes that the increasing 
sophistication and energy requirements for new systems, like 
avionics, computing, sensors, and even high-energy lasers, will 
place increasing demands on the power architectures available 
to the constrained size and weight of aircraft. The committee 
also believes that such advances will have beneficial effects 
when applied to legacy, as well as future generation, air 
platforms.
    The committee recommends $99.6 million, an increase of $5.0 
million, in PE 63216F to support the development of 
application-specific power circuit development using silicon 
carbide modules.

T-X program

    The budget request contained $12.4 million in PE 65223F for 
advanced pilot training, also known as the T-X program.
    The Department of the Air Force's current advanced jet 
trainer aircraft, the T-38C, initially entered the Air Force 
inventory in 1961. The average age of the fleet is 50 years 
old, with an average of over 16,000 flight hours on each 
aircraft. Although the T-38C fleet has undergone costly 
structural life extensions and avionics upgrades, the committee 
believes that the aircraft is unable to address the training 
gaps that have grown with the introduction of fourth and fifth 
generation fighter aircraft. The committee also believes that 
the T-X aircraft and its associated ground-based training 
system, collectively known as the advanced pilot training 
family of systems (APT FoS), will affordably address training 
gaps that have been identified by the Air Education and 
Training Command, ensuring that student pilots have the 
necessary skills to fly and employ current and future advanced 
combat aircraft. The committee notes that initial operating 
capability for the APT FoS is planned for 2024, and understands 
that full operational capability is scheduled for 2029.
    The committee also understands that the costs of sustaining 
the T-38C fleet are growing even as aircraft availability is 
decreasing, and that the T-38 was originally intended to 
undergo replacement in the mid-1990s. Therefore, the committee 
believes that any delay to the APT FoS program will place the 
Department of the Air Force combat readiness at risk, and that 
maintaining or accelerating the current APT FoS program 
schedule is required to ensure safe and effective training of 
Department of the Air Force combat pilots.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends $12.4 million, the 
full amount requested, in PE 64233F to continue the T-X 
program. The committee also directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than November 1, 2016, on plans to fairly 
evaluate the Advanced Pilot Training Family of Systems design 
solutions that are based off of newly designed aircraft and 
existing aircraft, and potential options to accelerate the T-X 
program.

Technology transfer

    The committee supports the Department of Defense's efforts 
to facilitate the transfer of laboratory-generated technology 
to industry partners for military and commercial use. Increased 
resourcing by Congress to transfer technology programs executed 
by the Air Force Research Laboratory has progressed, resulting 
in speeding up the flow of intellectual property from the 
laboratory and the launch of new companies based on laboratory 
technologies. This includes the formation of high growth 
potential technology startups with the promise of making gains 
for both the military and commercial sectors. The committee 
encourages the Air Force to continue to facilitate the timely 
transfer of intellectual property. Facilitating such transfers 
allows for significant advances in critical mission areas and 
provides the necessary resources in future budget requests for 
a robust program.

Wide-area motion imagery

    The budget request contained $3.8 million in PE 35206F for 
development of airborne reconnaissance systems, but contained 
no funding for development of wide-area motion imagery (WAMI) 
beyond line-of sight (BLOS) capabilities. The committee notes 
that persistent day and night WAMI capability is considered by 
operational commanders to be a critical intelligence, 
surveillance, and reconnaissance program for combat units, and 
has contributed to saving U.S. and allied soldiers' lives.
    The committee understands that a recently validated joint 
urgent operational need (JUON) requires the development of WAMI 
BLOS capabilities.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends $18.8 million in PE 
35206F, an increase of $15.0 million, for development of WAMI 
BLOS capabilities.

       Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-Wide


                       Items of Special Interest


Academia and university affiliated research center support for chemical 
        and biological defense

    The committee understands the dynamic and ever-expanding 
chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) threats, 
and is aware of the defensive capabilities that the Department 
of Defense Chemical and Biological Defense program (CBDP) 
develops to stay ahead of the evolving threat. The broad 
portfolio of the CBDP includes support for early warning 
through the development of biosurveillance and advanced 
diagnostics, avoiding, preventing, and preparing for surprise 
through technology development. These technologies address non-
traditional agents and synthetic biology, and integrated, 
layered defense through investing in medical countermeasures, 
protective equipment, detectors and sensors, and hazard 
mitigation. The committee supports ongoing efforts of the 
Department of Defense to ensure that currently available and 
cutting edge technologies are harnessed to provide improved 
capabilities in the future.
    The committee also understands the critical role of the 
Department of Defense in the larger U.S. Government efforts to 
addressing CBRN threats, as shown by the Department of 
Defense's role in the recent Ebola crisis. The committee 
encourages prioritizing and aligning investments in CBRN 
countermeasures, including medical ones, among all of the 
Federal stakeholders to ensure that effective countermeasures 
are developed to meet both military and civilian needs, and to 
prevent potential duplication of efforts. The committee 
encourages the Department of Defense to leverage a broad set of 
partners to meet these needs, including academia and university 
affiliated research centers (UARCs). The committee supports 
utilizing the engineering and technology capabilities provided 
and established within academia and UARCs, and recommends that 
the Department of Defense increase efforts to ensure that the 
capabilities at these organizations are coordinated with the 
broad CBRN priorities within the Department of Defense, and 
with the larger civilian priorities through the Public Health 
Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise. The committee 
also recommends that the Department of Defense increase 
coordination of the Advanced Development and Manufacturing 
facility with the capabilities available in academia and at 
UARCs to ensure efficient and rapid development of medical 
countermeasures to the evolving CBRN threats.

Additive manufacturing

    The committee recognizes the important developments 
occurring in the area of additive manufacturing, also known as 
3D printing. Like any new technology discipline, the Department 
of Defense should stay actively involved in this community to 
understand and develop a better appreciation for both the 
opportunities it could provide, as well as the threats it could 
pose in the hands of a resourceful adversary. As the technology 
becomes more mature, and the cost for such equipment continues 
to drop, the committee expects the Department to find new and 
novel ways to utilize this technology for military uses. The 
committee also encourages the Department to leverage existing 
organizations, such as the National Additive Manufacturing 
Innovation Institute, as well as expand that community to 
include other universities, non-profit research institutes, and 
other industry partners to expand the state of the art for the 
use of additive manufacturing technology.

Alternative solutions to multidrug resistant bacteria

    The rise in infections caused by multidrug resistant (MDR) 
bacteria represents a serious threat to public health and poses 
a great challenge to the care of wounded military personnel. 
These infections prolong hospitalization, and in some, can lead 
to increased limb loss, sepsis, and death. Since some MDR 
bacteria are becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics, 
researchers are working to develop alternative solutions, 
including engineered bacteriophage (phage) that can be 
standardized, manufactured, and administered similar to 
antibiotics.
    The committee is aware of the Department of Defense's on-
going efforts to develop countermeasures to MDR bacteria that 
leverage the whole-of-government anti-microbial resistant 
investments. The committee encourages the Department to 
continue its efforts to work with key stakeholders to develop 
and deploy alternative treatments, particularly phage therapy, 
against MDR bacteria.

Better Gender Reporting in Grantmaking

    The committee is aware recent research illustrates women 
continue to face challenges in educational and career 
advancement in science, technology, mathematics and engineering 
(STEM) fields. In a December 2015 report entitled ``Women in 
STEM Research'' the United States Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) determined, through analysis of available but 
limited data, there were discrepancies in the number of grants 
awarded to women and men at the Department of Defense within 
certain components. The committee notes this differentiation in 
success rates does not mean the Department is using 
discriminatory practices when awarding grants. The committee 
further acknowledges GAO reported the lack of data available to 
analyze limited their ability to gauge the success rates of men 
and women.
    The committee believes the lack of complete award data 
containing demographic information at certain Department 
agencies and components impacts the ability to fully evaluate 
and understand if the most qualified individuals are being 
funded, regardless of demographics. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, 
Technology, and Logistics to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than January 1, 2017, on 
improving data collection efforts within the Department in 
order to provide complete and analyzable records for grant 
awards.

Broad-spectrum antiviral drug modeling

    The committee understands the importance of developing 
efficient and effective countermeasures against a growing list 
of lethal pathogens, many of which have different variants. The 
committee is supportive of efforts to develop broad-spectrum 
antiviral drugs that can be used against many different 
pathogen threats. The committee further believes that rapid 
development of these drugs can be improved by using modeling 
software of the drug/virus interaction to perform high 
throughput screening of potential candidate drugs, leading to 
decreased development time. After candidate drugs have been 
identified, it is also important to establish partnerships with 
biosafety level 4 facilities to allow testing of the efficacy 
of these drugs. The committee understands that partnerships 
with not-for-profit 501C3 applied research facilities can 
provide unique capabilities and expertise throughout the drug 
development process.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by September 30, 2016, on the current and planned use of drug/
virus interaction modeling software for high throughput 
screening of potential small molecule drugs. The briefing 
should also include a list of the current and potential 
partnerships with not-for-profit 501C3 applied research 
facilities, and the potential for partnerships between these 
501C3 applied research facilities and the Department of Defense 
Advanced Development and Manufacturing facility.

Cellular and broadband signals exploitation

    The committee is aware of the United States Special 
Operations Command's (SOCOM) ongoing efforts to utilize 
commercial technology to conduct cellular and broadband survey, 
active interrogation, and directional finding capabilities from 
unmanned aerial systems. Such capabilities have been highly 
successful in prosecuting operations to find, fix, and finish 
enemy combatants and other high-value targets on the 
battlefield. The committee believes there will be a continuing 
need as such missions are prosecuted in the future. The 
committee encourages SOCOM to expedite the integration, 
testing, and limited fielding of such cellular and broadband 
signature exploitation capabilities for future missions.

Comptroller General review of commercial practices for trust in 
        microelectronics

    The committee remains concerned with the Department of 
Defense's ability to ensure access to cutting-edge 
microelectronics with the requisite level of verifiable trust 
incorporated. The committee recognizes that the Department's 
ability to provide superior capabilities to the warfighter is 
dependent, in part, on its ability to incorporate rapidly 
evolving, leading-edge microelectronic devices into its defense 
systems, while also balancing national security concerns. 
Currently, the Department processes for ensuring trust rely on 
assessing the integrity of the people and processes used to 
design, generate, manufacture, and distribute national security 
critical microelectronics. For over a decade, the Department 
has relied on a single domestic source for trusted leading edge 
microelectronics.
    However, due to market trends, supply chain globalization, 
and manufacturing costs, the Department's future access to 
U.S.-based microelectronics sources is uncertain. As such, the 
Department is considering various potential approaches that 
would allow it to access commercial non-trusted sources in the 
global microelectronics marketplace, while still ensuring 
trust. Given the Department's reliance on a single source for 
trusted leading-edge microelectronics, and the dwindling number 
of domestic microelectronics manufacturers on which the 
Department can rely, the committee believes that there should 
be a better understanding of what trust capabilities exist and 
are in use by the commercial marketplace.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to provide a report to the House Committee on 
Armed Services by March 30, 2017, that evaluates how selected 
commercial microelectronics businesses ensure trust. As part of 
this evaluation, the Comptroller General should address the 
following:
    (1) How do selected commercial companies incorporate trust 
into their leading-edge microelectronics, including techniques 
to protect intellectual property and prevent malicious content 
in devices?
    (2) To what extent could the Department of Defense leverage 
these practices, and what are the challenges associated with 
implementing these practices for defense systems?

Counter-unmanned aerial systems roadmap

    The committee believes that the proliferation of unmanned 
aerial systems (UAS), particularly small hobby systems that can 
be bought commercially, pose a significant challenge to the 
Department of Defense's capabilities to detect, track, and 
neutralize such threats. The committee is aware that the Army 
has conducted a technology red team to understand how such 
systems might be used against U.S. forces, focusing on 
potential adversarial employment and methods for avoiding 
detection. The committee is also aware that there has been some 
preliminary development of counter-UAS capabilities, and that 
organizations, from the Combating Terrorism Technology Support 
Office and the Joint Improvised-Threat Defeat Organization, are 
investigating technology solutions.
    However, the committee is increasingly concerned that such 
efforts are not adequately coordinated, and have focused on 
near-term capabilities without taking a long-term, integrated 
view to developing countermeasures. The committee is also 
concerned that the current focus does not provide an adequate 
variety of tools and technologies available at the tactical 
unit level to detect, track, and neutralize small UAS threats. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
develop a technology roadmap for addressing gaps to counter the 
potential threats from terrorist or state actor uses of small 
UAS technology, with an emphasis on technology to support 
tactical level units, and fixed, high-value defense assets. The 
committee further directs the Secretary to provide a briefing 
to the House Committee on Armed Services by June 1, 2017, on 
this roadmap.

Department of Defense medical countermeasures Advanced Development and 
        Manufacturing facility roadmap

    The committee understands the importance of maintaining a 
broad portfolio of medical countermeasures, including 
therapeutic and pre-treatment efforts, to address high priority 
threats to the warfighter. The committee also understands the 
challenges faced by the Department of Defense medical 
countermeasure development due to the low quantities procured 
and other acquisition challenges. The committee is aware of and 
has been monitoring the Department of Defense Advanced 
Development and Manufacturing (ADM) capability, which includes 
a dedicated facility to support the development, licensure, and 
manufacturing of medical countermeasures. This facility is 
planned to achieve full operational capability by the end of 
fiscal year 2016. The committee is also aware of complementary 
capabilities provided by the Department of Health and Human 
Services Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority 
(BARDA) Centers for Innovation in Advanced Development and 
Manufacturing.
    The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 
(Public Law 114-92) required the Secretary of Defense to submit 
a report on the Department of Defense ADM that included cost-
benefit analysis of the manufacturing and construction of the 
facility. The committee continues to be concerned about the 
potential for long-term operations and maintenance sustainment 
costs of the Department of Defense ADM facility, and about the 
possibility for duplication of efforts between the Department 
of Defense ADM facility and the Department of Health and Human 
Services ADM facilities. The committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to develop and submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees by December 1, 2016, on the sustainment of 
the Department of Defense ADM facility. The report should 
include an estimate of sustainment costs and a roadmap for 
planned work at the Department of Defense ADM facility over the 
next 10 years, as well as details on the planned business model 
for ensuring continued sustainment of the facility. The roadmap 
should also address partnerships and use of complementary 
capabilities between the Department of Defense ADM and the 
Department of Health and Human Services BARDA Centers for 
Innovation in Advanced Development and Manufacturing.

Desalination technology

    The committee is aware the Department of Defense has made 
advances in desalination technology over the last 15 years in 
support of large numbers of deployed forces in the Middle East. 
The committee recognizes that the inability to access clean 
water is a factor in destabilization around the world. The 
committee believes sharing desalination technologies with 
appropriate agencies, like the Department of State, to ensure 
advances are leveraged in development efforts is an important 
tool for stability and conflict avoidance. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense for 
Research and Engineering to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than March 1, 2017, on 
recent advances in desalination technologies, and how those 
advances have been shared with other U.S. Government agencies.

Explosive Ordnance Disposal equipment technology upgrades

    The budget request contained $73.0 million in PE 63122D8Z 
for Combating Terrorism Technology Support (CTTS). Of this 
amount, $5.7 million was requested for Improvised Device Defeat 
and Explosive Countermeasures.
    The committee notes that conventional Explosive Ordnance 
Disposal (EOD) units across the military services require 
upgraded equipment and technology enhancements, particularly 
for routine inspection and search activities. The committee 
believes that conventional Joint Service EOD units would 
benefit from rapid acquisition of EOD equipment, which have 
high-definition resolution and encrypted signals, among other 
upgraded capabilities. The committee understands that the 
Department of Defense canceled the Explosive Ordnance Disposal/
Low Intensity Conflict program element which formerly developed 
and delivered Joint Service EOD advanced capabilities. The 
committee understands the CTTS program will absorb this mission 
area within the Improvised Defeat Device and Explosive 
Countermeasures subgroup activity.
    The committee recommends $85.0 million, an increase of 
$12.0 million, in PE 63122D8Z for EOD equipment upgrades. 
Further, the committee encourages the Director of the CTTS 
program to prioritize the increased funding toward delivering 
advanced capabilities for conventional Joint-Service EOD units.

Foundational Intelligence Modernization

    The foundational intelligence analytic mission is critical 
to enabling combatant command situational awareness and mission 
planning activities. The committee understands the Defense 
Intelligence Agency (DIA) has initiated the Foundational 
Intelligence Modernization Program (FIM) to revolutionize the 
tools required for this mission. FIM consists of highly 
automated capabilities and infrastructure including database 
transformation, system analysis features, and other advanced 
products. The committee supports the effort to achieve more 
effective analytic capabilities required to process, exploit, 
and disseminate intelligence information, and encourages DIA to 
utilize commercial-off-the-shelf products, when appropriate, to 
fulfill the requirement.

Future Vertical Lift

    The committee recognizes that incremental improvements or 
upgrades to current Department of Defense rotorcraft will not 
fully meet future joint service operational requirements. With 
the exception of the V-22 Osprey, all U.S. rotorcraft deployed 
in the Republic of Iraq and the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan 
were designed during or before the Vietnam War. The committee 
continues to support the development of future vertical lift 
aircraft and encourages the Department to expand the 
prototyping program. Future Vertical Lift (FVL) is a joint 
program, with support from the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine 
Corps, Special Operations Command, and Coast Guard.
    The committee understands that a key aspect of the FVL 
program is the Army's Joint Multi-Role (JMR) Technology 
Demonstrator. The JMR program includes related research on 
next-generation rotors, drivetrains, engines, sensors, and 
survivability that all feed into the FVL program. The committee 
notes that fiscal year 2017 is a critical year for technology 
development, with first flights of two demonstrator aircraft. 
Furthermore, wind-tunnel testing and other key milestones will 
reduce risk for the program of record and inform the FVL 
analysis of alternatives, which is expected to occur in the 
second half of 2017. However, the committee is concerned, due 
to the current resource constrained environment, that current 
funding levels are inadequate.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by January 31, 2017, on the status of both the prototype air 
vehicle demonstrations and supporting initiatives. The briefing 
should include potential options and required resources for 
accelerating the FVL program.

Handheld explosive and chemical detectors

    The committee understands the importance of U.S. military 
personnel having sufficient handheld explosive and chemical 
weapons capabilities available to detect both conventional and 
homemade explosive and chemical threats. Traditional detection 
methods are less effective for homemade explosives (HMEs) and 
munitions grade chemical warfare agents (CWAs) containing 
impurities. Providing detectors to the U.S. military that can 
meet the growing threat of HMEs and CWAs is important to 
reducing the risk of U.S. soldier and civilian casualties in 
areas such as the Republic of Iraq and the Islamic Republic of 
Afghanistan, as well as the risk of terrorist attacks on the 
United States.
    The committee is aware of new raman laser technologies that 
may provide improved detection capabilities, which could be 
used to detect both HMEs and CWAs. The committee supports 
evaluation of this technology to meet critical detection 
requirements.

High-speed aerothermal effects

    The committee recognizes that the development of hypersonic 
technologies will be a significant contributing factor to 
future military technological superiority. The development of 
hypersonic technologies by our adversaries continues at a rapid 
pace and represents a significant emerging threat. As noted 
elsewhere in this report, the committee believes that the 
Department of Defense should be examining reusable hypersonic 
flight structures, in addition to the strike systems that are 
currently being pursued. The committee is aware that past 
efforts, such as the Hypersonic Test Vehicle-2 flight tests, 
illustrate the need to better characterize the aerothermal 
effects on flight bodies, and fiscal constraints cannot support 
learning such lessons through expensive trial and error. The 
committee encourages the Department to examine opportunities to 
better conduct aerothermal effects testing, and development for 
supporting thermal protection systems. Any efforts that the 
Department pursues should look to address manufacturability, 
risk reduction and maturation, and coordination with 
interagency partners and industry.

Human systems integration activities

    The committee is concerned that military service personnel 
are required to use systems that are inadequate to their 
physical, behavioral, and cognitive needs. The committee 
recognizes that senior service leadership encourages the use of 
human systems integration research and development methods in 
response to the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2008 (Public Law 110-181). Despite this, human performance 
research is not routinely transitioning to defense acquisition 
programs. Also, with no specifications required for human 
systems integration in acquisition programs, Requests for 
Proposals seldom include evaluation criteria for it, and it is 
ignored by program managers. Nevertheless, the committee notes 
that individual and team performance is the foundation of an 
effective military force. Ensuring that systems account for 
human performance abilities can make acquisitions more cost-
effective, strengthen force protection, reduce potential for 
re-engineering, and cut time and costs of training and re-
training, among many other benefits. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, 
Technology, and Logistics to examine Department of Defense 
policies related to human systems integration within defense 
acquisitions and to provide a briefing to the House Armed 
Services Committee by February 15, 2017, on the findings and 
recommendations necessary to improve inclusion of human system 
integration research in acquisition programs.

Hydrocephalus research

    The committee is concerned that some of the estimated 
294,000 service members who have sustained a traumatic brain 
injury in Operation Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom are at 
higher risk for developing hydrocephalus in the future. The 
committee recognizes that hydrocephalus, an increased 
accumulation of fluid in the brain, often has a delayed onset 
and can easily be misdiagnosed as dementia or other aging 
related diseases. Given that there is currently no cure for 
hydrocephalus, and current treatment options are limited and 
have high failure rates, the committee encourages the 
Department of Defense to increase its investments in 
hydrocephalus research.

Hyperspectral imaging technology

    The committee recognizes the importance of stand-off 
hyperspectral imaging (HSI) technologies for the detection of 
improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and explosive constituent 
chemicals and other materials used in the manufacture of IEDs 
such as nitrates, nitrites, phosphates, and ammonia. Therefore, 
the committee encourages development of new and emerging HSI 
technologies--these technologies include those that utilize 
coherent spectral imaging technology to provide real-time 
detection hardware and software for situational awareness, and 
provide a complete automated target detection capability to 
enable end users tasked with vital threat identification 
capability for time-sensitive responses. The committee further 
encourages development of these capabilities with manufacturers 
that have demonstrated airborne sensor hardware and software 
development.

Immersive operator control stations

    The committee recognizes the importance and usefulness of 
current and next-generation immersive operator control stations 
(IOCS) technologies. These technologies significantly decrease 
the burden on operators for unmanned systems and reduce 
training time. IOCS technologies also allow for decreased 
operation and maintenance costs while maximizing mission 
effectiveness and safety. Therefore, the committee supports 
advancement of next-generation IOCS that includes scalable 
architecture and designs to better meet the current and future 
needs of the Air Force, Navy, National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration, and other agencies.

Incentives for increasing private sector medical countermeasures 
        development

    The committee is aware of the importance of medical 
countermeasures, including prophylactics, pre-treatments, 
diagnostics, and therapeutics, to protect the warfighter from 
chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear threats. The 
committee is also aware of the difficulty in engaging industry 
partners to develop medical countermeasures due to the low 
profitability, lengthy process, and costs for doing this 
contract work for the Government. The committee recognizes that 
strategies and incentives should be developed to stimulate 
private sector medical countermeasures development. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by February 
1, 2017, on potential incentives that would improve private 
sector, academia, non-profit, and other organization 
participation in medical countermeasures development. The 
briefing should identify any incentives that would require 
additional congressional authorities.

Interagency unmanned aerial system research

    The committee notes that important progress has been made 
toward integrating unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) into the 
National Airspace System. Focus areas for the committee 
continue to be the development of sense and avoid systems, 
airworthiness certification, and safe integration of UAS into 
the National Airspace System. The committee recognizes that 
resolution of these issues continues to require a collaborative 
effort between the Department of Defense, the Federal Aviation 
Administration (FAA), and the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration (NASA). Provisions in previous National Defense 
Authorization Acts have encouraged collaboration among those 
three organizations, including section 1052 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (Public Law 112-
239), and section 1087 of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2014 (Public Law 113-66). Through this 
collaboration, the committee believes that the Department of 
Defense can benefit from sharing human performance data and 
advanced sensor technology for applications in a civil 
environment, including next-generation integration, development 
of minimally manned large cargo aircraft systems, optionally 
piloted systems, and highly integrated UAS sensor systems and 
control stations. The committee understands that the Department 
of Defense and NASA will develop airworthiness certification 
processes for these advanced capabilities, which the committee 
believes will facilitate FAA development of civil standards, 
and increase the number of commercial products available to the 
Department of Defense, all while improving the competitiveness 
of the U.S. aviation industrial base.
    Accordingly, the committee encourages the Department of 
Defense, the FAA, and NASA to continue collaborative efforts to 
solve UAS research issues.

Intestinal mucosal barrier research to address chemical and biological 
        threats

    The committee is aware of the breakdown complications of 
the intestinal mucosal barrier associated with nuclear, 
chemical, and biological threats. The intestinal mucosal 
barrier is believed to play a key role in severe medical 
conditions that occur following trauma, burns, and chemical and 
biological exposures by containing digestive enzymes within the 
intestine. The breakdown of the intestinal mucosal barrier may 
influence a range of serious health conditions after a trauma 
when the digestive enzymes leak through the intestinal mucosal 
barrier, initiating shock and organ failure. The committee 
encourages the Department of Defense Chemical and Biological 
Defense program to evaluate establishing research activities 
regarding the intestinal mucosal barrier to investigate 
alternative therapeutic treatments to respond to a broad 
spectrum of chemical and biological agent exposure.

Laboratory Quality Enhancement

    The committee is aware that the Laboratory Quality 
Improvement Program, later renamed the Laboratory Quality 
Enhancement Program (LQEP), was chartered in 1994 to propose 
initiatives for improving Department of Defense laboratories. 
Over time, the primary focus on this effort has been on the 
personnel panel, which has proposed many valuable ideas for 
sustaining and improving the laboratory workforce.
    However, the committee believes that the LQEP has not been 
utilized to its full potential, in part because of the 
organization mismatch in its reporting chain, as well as the 
sole focus on personnel issues, and the lack of direct 
participation from the laboratory directors. Elsewhere in this 
Act, the committee includes a provision that would codify and 
expand the roles and responsibilities of the LQEP to ensure its 
sustained attention on these issues. The committee believes 
codification of LQEP will provide an instrument to support both 
Department needs for ideas to sustain and grow the technical 
community in the Department of Defense, as well as provide a 
vital link and demand signal within the congressional oversight 
committees, which is necessary to carry out any recommendations 
requiring statutory modification.
    Furthermore, the committee believes that by including 
representation from the laboratory directors and the 
operational community in these panels, LQEP can be an even more 
effective tool for recommending changes to Department processes 
and regulations. For example, by including the installations 
and facilities management community into the facilities panel, 
participants can better navigate existing processes, while also 
identifying areas or issues where existing processes are 
insufficient to the needs of the laboratory community.

Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) Briefing

    The committee is aware of recent positive developments in 
developing low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR), which produce 
ultra-clean, low-cost renewable energy that have strong 
national security implications. For example, according to the 
Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), if LENR works it will be a 
``disruptive technology that could revolutionize energy 
production and storage.'' The committee is also aware of the 
Defense Advanced Research Project Agency's (DARPA) findings 
that other countries including China and India are moving 
forward with LENR programs of their own and that Japan has 
actually created its own investment fund to promote such 
technology. DIA has also assessed that Japan and Italy are 
leaders in the field and that Russia, China, Israel, and India 
are now devoting significant resources to LENR development. To 
better understand the national security implications of these 
developments, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing on the military utility of recent U.S. 
industrial base LENR advancements to the House Committee on 
Armed Services by September 22, 2016. This briefing should 
examine the current state of research in the United States, how 
that compares to work being done internationally, and an 
assessment of the type of military applications where this 
technology could potentially be useful.

Minority-serving institutions and minority-owned businesses

    The committee recognizes the near-term, mid-term, and long-
term impact that science and technology collaboration has on 
our warfighting capabilities and overall defense posture. 
Industry, academia, other non-governmental organizations, and 
Defense Department research, development, and prototyping 
entities, such as the Defense Advanced Research Projects 
Agency, all play a critical role in advancing national 
security. The committee is aware of the Department's efforts to 
harness the talent and innovation taking place in minority-
owned businesses, veteran-owned businesses, small businesses, 
and minority-serving institutions such as Historically Black 
Colleges and Universities, and Hispanic-Serving Institutions. 
The committee encourages the Department to continue to 
collaborate with minority-serving institutions and minority-
owned businesses. Additionally, the committee urges the 
Department to increase opportunities for partnerships in 
science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education 
programs, research and development efforts, and other areas 
across the Department's science and technology enterprise.

Monoclonal antibody therapeutics

    The committee is aware of the recent work by the Department 
of Defense Chemical and Biological Defense Program in 
developing monoclonal antibody therapeutic drugs to treat the 
Zaire strain of the Ebola virus. The monoclonal antibody 
development by the Department of Defense was incorporated into 
the ZMapp therapeutic for Ebola that was used experimentally to 
treat some people with Ebola virus disease during the 2014 West 
African Ebola outbreak, and is currently undergoing further 
development. The committee encourages the Department of Defense 
to continue research into monoclonal antibody therapies for use 
as medical countermeasure to other biological agents, including 
diseases such as smallpox or the Sudan strain of Ebola.

MQ-9 anti-icing capability

    The committee notes that an anti-icing capability for the 
MQ-9 unmanned aerial system has been pursued by the Department 
of Defense, and specifically U.S. Air Force Air Combat Command, 
U.S. Special Operations Command, and U.S. Air Force Special 
Operations Command (AFSOC). However, the committee is concerned 
that a lack of capability prioritization and technical issues 
have delayed initial fielding times.
    The committee notes that a recent Laboratory Innovation 
Crowdsourcing (LINC) requirement solicited by the Department's 
Combating Terrorism Technology Support Office (CTTSO) stated 
that, ``The current MQ-9 was fielded without the exact 
understanding of how it was affected by icing.'' The report 
continued that, ``Due to the lack of data, the Air Force 
imposed conservative flight restrictions in order to reduce the 
risk to the weapons system . . . AFSOC is interested in the 
development and testing of innovative de-ice technologies that 
allow the MQ-9 to cruise in light icing and visible moisture.'' 
This LINC initiative solicited by CTTSO for outside approaches 
reinforces the committee's belief that the Department's current 
approach to satisfying this operational requirement is 
disjointed and uncoordinated.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in coordination with the Commander, U.S. Air Force Air Combat 
Command and the Commander, U.S. Special Operations Command, to 
brief the Committee on Armed Services of the U.S. House of 
Representatives not later than October 1, 2016, on the 
Department's efforts to field an anti-icing capability for the 
MQ-9. This briefing shall be in classified form as required.

Nanomaterials in Combat Systems

    The committee is aware that nanomaterials are being 
incorporated with increasing frequency in many commercial 
products and processes because of their ability to make 
materials stronger, lighter, more durable, more reactive, more 
porous, or more conductive, among other things. The committee 
is also aware that the Department of Defense has been 
leveraging that commercial research, as well as investing in 
other areas with specific defense-related applications. The 
committee believes that the Department should be pursuing 
additional opportunities to transition that research into 
military combat systems. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to brief the House Committee on Armed 
Services by March 1, 2017, on the potential military 
applications of nanomaterials in combat systems. The briefing 
should outline the use of emerging technology with 
nanomaterials to identify areas where possible enhancements or 
improvements to equipment used by each of the service branches 
might be possible.

Non-destructive counterfeit parts detection tools

    The committee is aware that the Department of Defense has 
made significant progress since 2012 to reduce the risk of 
counterfeit electronic parts entering into the Department's 
weapon systems' supply chain. However, the committee recognizes 
that much work remains to improve the Department's ability to 
identify and mitigate such risks. Although responsibility for 
eliminating risk of counterfeit parts belongs to industry 
suppliers to the Department of Defense at all tiers, the 
committee encourages the Department to be proactive about 
identifying, developing, and validating independent tools that 
defense suppliers could easily use to rapidly identify 
counterfeit electronics in the supply chain accurately and at 
low cost. The committee believes that the Department should 
evaluate the need to identify or develop best-of-breed, non-
destructive counterfeit parts detection tools that it can use, 
or that could be made available to defense industrial base 
suppliers, to support the overall mission of ensuring the 
integrity of electronic components of defense weapon systems.

Prioritization of joint test activities

    The committee recognizes that developmental and operational 
test and evaluation activities are critical steps in research 
and development programs. Joint programs can be especially 
complex, and thus substantially more difficult to manage, with 
competing demands for resources, personnel, service priority, 
and the need to coordinate over multiple bureaucracies. The 
committee is concerned that the Department of Defense does not 
adequately prioritize research and development projects; 
unfortunately, there are instances when expensive projects from 
one military department may receive a low priority for testing 
time and resources at facilities operated by different military 
departments.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Director of the Test 
Resource Management Center to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by December 1, 2016, on the 
policies and processes for coordinating test and evaluation 
resources for joint and multi-service research and development 
projects. The briefing should include recommendations for 
improving the Department's ability to make cross-service 
prioritization decisions related to test and evaluation 
facilities for joint and multi-service programs.

Program intermediary agreements

    The committee recognizes that Partnership Intermediary 
Agreements (PIAs), as defined in section 3715 of title 15, 
United States Code, have been useful tools for the Department 
of Defense to engage with and leverage small and non-
traditional businesses. As the Department continues to expand 
its efforts to seek out, assess, and engage non-traditional 
small business vendors in the Department of Defense's 
development and acquisition efforts, the committee believes 
that PIAs could be more effectively used as a tool for engaging 
this community. For example, the committee is aware that a PIA 
was used by the commander of U.S. Special Operations Command to 
establish its SOFWERX initiative, which the committee views as 
a rapid, highly effective, and highly cost-effective way of 
engaging with the vendor community to meet special operations 
forces capability needs. The committee encourages the 
Department to examine new and innovative ways to use PIAs, such 
as providing technology assessments or design reviews to 
understand manufacturability, fitness for use, material 
availability, and other assessments that can reduce development 
cycle times.

Ribonucleic acid technology research

    The committee recognizes that the Department of Defense 
faces significant challenges with infectious diseases, which 
hospitalize more service members each year than those wounded 
in combat. Effective prevention and rapid treatment are key 
elements in controlling outbreaks of infectious disease. The 
committee is encouraged by the progress the Department has made 
to address the treatment for infectious diseases that can 
benefit our warfighters, as well as affected civilian 
communities throughout the world, based on techniques utilizing 
ribonucleic acid that would be delivered directly to the body 
to produce a desired antigen or specific antibody. The 
committee encourages the Department to continue its research in 
this area and to look for further applications of this 
technology, which could lead to the ability to rapidly and 
inexpensively produce antigens and antibodies via chemical 
synthesis.

Rotorcraft degraded visual environment

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense 
Appropriations Act, 2015 (division C of Public Law 113-235) 
appropriated an increase of $20.0 million above the budget 
request for the development or procurement of a degraded visual 
environment (DVE) system for rotorcraft programs. The committee 
is aware of the challenges that the military services face in 
regards to operating rotary winged aircraft in austere 
environmental conditions, including brown-out landings and 
marginal weather, while operating in difficult terrain. 
According to the Army, degraded visual environment conditions 
contribute to approximately 25 percent of its rotary wing 
mishaps. The committee notes that the Army's Special Operations 
Command (SOCOM) has made DVE a top priority, and that the Army 
is looking at leveraging the work that SOCOM has already 
performed in order to accelerate this capability across Army 
rotorcraft programs.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Defense to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by December 1, 2016, that includes an update on Army, 
Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force plans to integrate DVE 
capabilities into their respective rotorcraft and tilt-
rotorcraft programs.

Secure cellular communications for senior leaders

    The budget request contained $14.0 million in PE 33126K for 
long haul communications, including for the development and 
fielding of senior leader communications and mobility systems.
    The committee is aware that the Defense Information Systems 
Agency (DISA) is responsible for developing, fielding and 
sustaining senior leader communications systems for the 
Department of Defense, the President and other senior leaders 
throughout the executive branch. This includes the Department's 
mobility program, which seeks to leverage commercial carrier 
infrastructure to provide entry points for both classified and 
unclassified wireless capabilities. The committee understands 
that in fiscal year 2017, DISA plans to continue testing and 
evaluation of mobile device management capabilities, and full 
deployment of the Device Mobility Classified Capability. The 
committee is concerned that the current fielding plan is not 
being fully implemented with the priority such capabilities 
require. Therefore, the committee directs the Director of DISA 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Service 
and the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence on the 
status of this program by July 1, 2016. This update should 
include the current schedule for development, identification of 
the requirement for the needed number of devices, and the 
fielding schedule to users for the next 24 months. This 
briefing should also address any funding challenges, or policy 
impediments to fielding that satisfies the full articulated 
requirement.
    The committee recommends $19.0 million, an increase of $5.0 
million, in PE 33126K to support the development and 
implementation of a top secret secure voice cellular solution 
for senior government leaders.

Small turbine engines for missile programs

    The committee understands the critical importance of small 
turbine engines in missile programs, and believes that 
continued innovation in this technology will help the United 
States to better maintain its technological edge in the area of 
precision guided missile systems. In order to encourage 
innovation, the committee supports robust competition in this 
area. While foreign competition does exist, the committee 
believes that the United States needs to retain a technology 
leadership role in this strategic technology sector. The 
committee notes that small turbine engines are in many ways 
more challenging than large turbine engines because of high 
rotational speeds, limited volume for combustion, larger 
leakage paths relative to the size of the turbomachinery, 
storage requirements, and on-wing starting requirements. 
Therefore, the committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to 
explore ways to create additional competition among domestic 
suppliers in the area of small turbine engines, and in 
particular small turbine engines for missile programs.

Social media analysis cell

    The budget request contained $148.2 million in PE 63648D8Z 
for joint concept technology demonstrations (JCTD).
    The committee is aware that the mission of the Joint 
Concept Technology Demonstration program is to support the 
identification, development, and demonstration of forward 
looking concepts to satisfy multiservice and combatant command 
priorities through rapid prototyping and experimentation. The 
JCTD program has a track record of exploring new concepts and 
technologies at low risk, but with major payoff to testing 
these concepts without the risks and cost associated with new 
acquisition programs. In addition to providing some limited 
residual capability for users, JCTDs can be useful in informing 
requirements and reducing the risk for future, follow-on 
acquisition efforts.
    The committee further notes that an area of growing concern 
is the monitoring and assessment of adversarial propaganda and 
misinformation, which can be highly effective at masking the 
intent and activities of adversarial actors. The committee is 
concerned that there has been limited application of new 
technologies or concepts in this space, especially in the use 
of ever-increasing data from social media sources that can be 
leveraged to amplify and inform other warning, force protection 
and battlespace awareness activities of the Department of 
Defense. The committee believes that the use of social media 
analysis capabilities should be explored in a relevant 
operational environment to experiment and determine the 
possible value to military operations.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $158.2 million, an 
increase of $10.0 million, in PE 63648D8Z to demonstrate 
technologies and concepts for a social media analysis 
capability to support the needs of the Commander of U.S. 
European Command.

Strategic Capabilities Office

    The budget request contained $844.9 million in PE 64250D8Z 
for development activities of the Strategic Capabilities Office 
(SCO).
    Created in 2012 by the Deputy Secretary of Defense, SCO has 
the mission to identify, analyze, demonstrate, and transition 
game-changing applications of existing and near-term technology 
to shape and counter emerging threats. SCO is comprised of a 
relatively small number of personnel and relies on other 
program office personnel and resources to execute its mission. 
The committee appreciates the nature of SCO's mission and 
sustained leanness of the organization; however, the committee 
notes the budget for SCO has grown exponentially each fiscal 
year. For example, the fiscal year 2017 budget request is 
nearly double the request for fiscal year 2016.
    The committee is concerned that such rapid budget growth 
may bring with it some risks, including the demands on SCO's 
small staff, demands on other Department of Defense personnel, 
and impact of SCO decisions on existing programs. For example, 
the committee is aware of SCO's inclusion on the 
electromagnetic railgun development, and subsequent 
reprioritizing of its planned investment in that program for 
fiscal year 2017, resulting in a funding gap that could not be 
covered by the program office.
    Additionally, the committee remains concerned that the 
transition of technologies from SCO has not been adequately 
captured and conveyed to the oversight committees. The report 
required by the committee report (H. Rept. 114-102) 
accompanying the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2016 has not been delivered and is now almost 6 months 
late. In order to support prudent use of taxpayer resources, 
and to ensure proper oversight of these activities, the 
committee believes this report should be provided and concerns 
addressed before supporting full funding of planned activities.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $804.9 million, a 
decrease of $40.0 million, in PE 64250D8Z for development 
activities of the Strategic Capabilities Office.

Technology enablers for directed energy weapon systems

    The committee is aware that the Department of Defense has 
made significant advances in the development and operational 
demonstration of directed energy weapons systems. Each military 
department has demonstrated a marquee program in this area, 
such as the Navy's Laser Weapon System deployed on the USS 
Ponce, the Army High Energy Laser Mobile Demonstrator, and the 
Marine Corps' Ground Based Air Defense System. Along with 
technology demonstration activities like the Robust Electric 
Laser Initiative and the High Energy Liquid Laser Area Defense 
System, each of these programs demonstrated the increased power 
output and power on target necessary to develop a militarily 
useful directed energy weapon.
    However, as the Department has made progress in raising the 
power levels of these systems, it has also demonstrated the 
need for emphasis on development in other technology areas 
necessary to realize the full potential of laser weapons. For 
example, higher power output requires improved beam control to 
engage targets at greater distances, as well as better thermal 
management systems to dissipate the increased heat load. As the 
Department has been overcoming foundational technical 
challenges, new challenges have emerged that will impact the 
operational uses for directed energy weapons.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Research and Engineering, in coordination with the 
research components of the military departments and the High 
Energy Laser Joint Technology Office, to provide a briefing to 
the House Committee on Armed Services by January 20, 2017. This 
briefing should provide a roadmap for enabling technologies, 
including:
    (1) Beam directors and adaptive optics, including 
deformable mirrors;
    (2) Thermal management needs and capabilities;
    (3) Integration challenges with fire control systems, 
including potential future needs for fire control for laser 
systems;
    (4) Power architectures and power electronics needs;
    (5) Facilities and test range capabilities; and
    (6) Other areas as deemed by the Secretary.

Third Offset Strategy

    The committee supports the Department of Defense Third 
Offset Strategy development efforts. As the Deputy Secretary of 
Defense has described it, the Third Offset Strategy is focused 
on strengthening conventional deterrence against great powers 
through targeted technology investments and new operational and 
organizational constructs.
    The committee is encouraged by the Department's technology 
investments, including those within the Strategic Capabilities 
Office (SCO) that adapt existing weapon systems in new ways to 
get game-changing capabilities into the field more quickly. 
These efforts align well with the committee's acquisition 
reform initiatives discussed elsewhere in this Act. The 
committee is also encouraged by the Department's increased 
emphasis on wargaming and on strategic initiatives to better 
understand Russian and Chinese military thinking.
    The committee believes that the Third Offset Strategy 
effort is a useful vehicle for focusing the Department on how 
to deter and counter the Russian Federation and the People's 
Republic of China. Much of this focus has been on technology; 
however, the committee also believes that further attention 
must be given to strategic thinking about deterrence, including 
the relationship between conventional and nuclear deterrence, 
and the relationship between deterrence and assurance.
    The committee encourages the Secretary to review the 
Department's ability to support rapid decision making and agile 
force employment, as the committee recognizes that future near-
peer conflicts are likely to unfold faster, across multiple 
regions and warfighting domains. The committee also encourages 
the Secretary to engage the military services as it recognizes 
that, for the Third Offset effort to be successful, the 
military services must embrace it.
    Lastly, the committee is concerned about any Third Offset 
efforts that distract from the primary focus on deterring 
Russia and China. While the committee acknowledges the benefits 
of Silicon Valley outreach for technology innovation, 
particularly through the Defense Innovation Unit Experimental 
(DIUx), it believes that such commercial technology will not 
provide an enduring warfighting advantage over near-peer 
adversaries.

Transition of biosurveillance prototype

    The committee understands the importance of biosurveillance 
tools at U.S. military installations throughout the world to 
provide installation commanders with early, high-confidence 
detection and increased situational awareness. The committee is 
aware of the recent efforts by the Department of Defense to 
develop a 3-year advanced technology demonstration of 
biosurveillance technology for deployment on the Korean 
Peninsula, known as the Joint U.S. Forces in Korea Portal and 
Integrated Threat Recognition (JUPITR).
    The committee supports the Department of Defense's efforts 
to rapidly integrate, test, and demonstrate cutting-edge 
technologies to develop strengthened biosurveillance 
capabilities to meet these critical force protection needs. The 
committee encourages the Department of Defense to continue to 
use advanced technology demonstrations to rapidly integrate and 
evaluate emerging technologies in biological and chemical 
defense. The committee also encourages the Department of 
Defense to leverage the advanced technology demonstration 
efforts to quickly field JUPITR to the U.S. Forces Korea, and 
to ensure that relevant technologies from JUPITR are 
transitioned into programs of record. The committee recommends 
that the Department of Defense collaborate with other U.S. 
Government partners, including the Department of Homeland 
Security, to share the results of the JUPITR demonstration with 
relevant programs implementing biosurveillance to meet homeland 
security requirements.

Treatment of traumatic brain injury

    The committee is aware of the magnitude of traumatic brain 
injuries (TBI) sustained by service members, both in deployed 
and non-deployed environments. TBI accounts for approximately 
20 to 25 percent of documented combat casualties in the wars in 
the Republic of Iraq and the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. 
The committee continues to support the Department of Defense's 
many efforts to investigate the mechanisms of traumatic brain 
injuries and develop mitigation/prevention strategies. The 
committee is aware that pre-clinical research has recently 
demonstrated that induced therapeutic hypothermia is a 
promising neuroprotective strategy for treating TBI by 
effectively reducing increases in intracranial pressure and 
cellular damage caused by injury/trauma. The committee 
encourages the Department to continue their diverse TBI 
research programs, and supports the development and deployment 
of technologies that can be used to provide additional TBI 
treatments, including induced therapeutic hypothermia, to our 
service members. Further, the committee remains concerned about 
the long-term effects of TBI, particularly multiple occurrences 
of TBI, on members of the Armed Forces. Peer-reviewed research 
has demonstrated a link between multiple traumatic brain 
injuries and the onset of dementia, and has suggested a link to 
Alzheimer's disease later in life. The committee understands 
that the Department of Defense has undertaken research to 
investigate the relationship between traumatic brain injury and 
Alzheimer's disease. The committee commends this effort and 
encourages the Department to continue funding such projects.

United States-Israel Anti-tunnel cooperation

    The committee notes that section 1606 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92) authorized a new, joint United States-Israel anti-tunneling 
program to protect United States and Israel forces from 
terrorist attacks.
    The Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for 
Special Operations/Low-Intensity Conflict stated during a March 
1, 2016, House Committee on Armed Services Subcommittee on 
Emerging Threats and Capabilities hearing that the U.S. and 
Israel plan to execute 17 counter-tunnel projects for tunnel 
detection, tunnel mapping, and intelligence collection. At the 
same hearing, the Commander of U.S. Special Operations Command 
stated that the subterranean threat is used by terrorists, but 
also affects other mission areas. The committee continues to 
support this program; however, the committee is aware that none 
of the funds authorized and appropriated in fiscal year 2016 
have been executed as of April 27, 2016.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than June 30, 2016, as to the status of United 
States-Israel anti-tunnel cooperation, including:
    (1) The status of the Memorandum of Agreement;
    (2) The full plan for project development;
    (3) The current plan for expenditure of funds, including an 
identification of entities that will be receiving or have 
received funds; and
    (4) A clarification of future requirements.

Unmanned advanced capability combat aircraft and ground combat vehicles

    Section 220 of the Floyd D. Spence National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001 (Public Law 106-398) 
mandated a goal, regarding unmanned advanced capability combat 
aircraft and ground combat vehicles, that by the year 2010, 
one-third of the aircraft in the operational deep strike force 
fleet would be unmanned, and that by year 2005, one-third of 
the operational ground combat vehicles would be unmanned.
    Congress subsequently requested reports outlining the 
Department's progress towards achieving these goals in 2006 and 
2008. The committee notes that there has been no update 
provided by the Department since 2008.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, 
no later than September 15, 2016, on the Department's progress 
in meeting the congressionally mandated goal. The briefing 
shall include an assessment of progress towards meeting the 
goals identified for the subset of unmanned air and ground 
systems established in section 220 of Public Law 106-398, as 
well as an assessment of existing, viable unmanned ground 
vehicle technologies that can be economically used for making 
significant progress toward the achievement of the 2001 goal 
within the next 5 years.

U.S. Special Operations Command rapid prototyping and SOFWERX 
        initiative

    The committee notes that the SOFWERX initiative and 
facility within U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) 
creates a forum for accelerating the delivery of innovative 
capabilities to U.S. Special Operations Forces (USSOF) by 
engaging industry, academia, and Government laboratories, as 
well as hosting innovation and rapid prototyping sessions 
designed to overcome seemingly intractable problems. The 
committee notes that these sessions have started to refine and 
inform current and future USSOF requirements, as well as 
acquisition and engineering decisions, while increasing the 
potential to field capabilities faster. The committee applauds 
this revolutionary approach, which was established by USSOCOM 
in September 2015 using a Partnership Intermediary Agreement, 
as defined within section 3715 of title 10, United States Code.
    The committee understands that each project within the 
SOFWERX facility is funded via related research, development, 
test, and evaluation (RDT&E;) programs, including $0.5 million 
funded by the Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit effort, and 
an additional $2.0 million for fiscal year 2016 within PE 
1160402BB, Advanced Technology Demonstrations. For fiscal year 
2017, the committee notes that USSOCOM expects to spend $2.5 
million from the Operations and Maintenance, Defense-Wide 
account for SOFWERX facility and support, although RDT&E; 
efforts are not defined. While these initial investments for 
SOFWERX appear to be low-dollar thresholds, the committee 
encourages USSOCOM to seek cost-sharing agreements and cost-
saving measures with other Department of Defense entities, such 
as those within each military service, the Defense Advanced 
Research Projects Agency, or other non-traditional funding 
sources when appropriate. The committee encourages USSOCOM to 
limit growth and overhead of this initiative to ensure 
affordability across the Future Years Defense Program, and 
expects to be kept fully and currently informed of the many 
initiatives expected to spiral from SOFWERX. The committee also 
expects to be informed of how USSOCOM is sharing technological 
advances and lessons learned about incentivizing innovation 
across the Department. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Commander, U.S. Special Operations Command to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by September 
1, 2016, on SOFWERX and associated RDT&E; efforts.

Utilization of electromagnetic spectrum

    The committee is aware of and encouraged by Department of 
Defense efforts to better utilize the electromagnetic spectrum 
(EMS) to meet both current and future requirements. The 2014 
Department of Defense EMS Strategy and efforts by the Defense 
Information Systems Agency recognize that appropriate spectrum 
utilization is critical to efficient operations across all 
warfighting domains. To meet these challenges, the Department 
has appropriately set objectives that expedite the development 
of technologies that allow spectrum sharing, increase spectrum 
efficiency gains, and access wider frequency ranges. The 
committee is also aware that pursuant to the Bipartisan Budget 
Act of 2015 (Public Law 114-72), $500.0 million in spectrum 
relocation fund proceeds were made available to all Federal 
agencies for activities intended to improve the efficiency and 
effectiveness of spectrum use. The committee encourages the 
Department to utilize this and other funding to develop and 
deploy EMS mitigating technology, such as solid state 
transmitters, which have the potential to address known 
spectrum sharing and spillage issues with Navy radar systems.

V-22 defensive weapons integration analysis

    The budget request contained $174.4 million in PE 64262N 
for V-22 research and development, but contained no funds for 
development and integration of defensive weapon systems.
    The committee notes that various models of the V-22 support 
tactical airlift requirements for special operations and 
general purpose forces of the Department of Defense. However, 
the committee is concerned that given the emerging flexibility 
the V-22 has exhibited in multiple contingency and training 
operations, the aircraft may be unintentionally limited by its 
lack of defensive weapons and having to rely upon other 
airborne armed assets to provide escort during tactical airlift 
infiltration and exfiltration operations. The committee 
understands that options may exist to develop and integrate 
defensive weapons capability onto V-22 platforms, but the 
Department has not coalesced in deriving mutual requirements 
that could satisfy each of the services within the Department 
that utilize the capabilities of the V-22.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force, in coordination with the Secretary of the Navy and the 
Commander of U.S. Special Operations Command, to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by December 
1, 2016, that specifies all requirements for V-22 defensive 
weapon capabilities within the Department of Defense, and 
provides an analysis of viable alternatives that could be 
implemented to fulfill those requirements. The analysis should 
examine alternatives that could ensure a full, fair, and open 
competition among qualified vendors that utilizes an expedited 
timeline, encouraging innovation, affordability, and enhancing 
the versatility of the V-22.

Vector geo-location technologies for Special Operations Command

    The committee recognizes that the Joint Threat Warning 
System (JTWS) provides credible threat warning and intelligence 
information to special operations forces (SOF) that is key to 
providing enhanced situational awareness, force protection, and 
time-sensitive intelligence for targeting to supported SOF 
elements. The committee is concerned that the current JTWS-Air 
Variant System provides Precision Geo-location (PGL) coverage 
only in the very high frequency (VHF)/ultra high frequency 
(UHF) bands, and does not provide PGL coverage in the high 
frequency (HF) band, a band being increasingly utilized 
globally to target and compromise SOF missions. The committee 
is concerned that traditional geo-location techniques do not 
provide time-critical, instantaneous, and accurate results, and 
often require the use of two or more SOF aircraft.
    The committee understands that a new technology, called 
Vector Geo-location (VGL), has been successfully demonstrated 
in the HF band in a single airborne platform. Although one of 
the prototypes was capable of operating in a tri-band mode, it 
has not been demonstrated in the VHF or UHF band due to 
insufficient development of calibration techniques in those 
bands. The committee is encouraged by these results and 
believes that the U.S. Special Operations Command should 
continue to develop VGL technologies for use in all three 
bands, including completing development of calibration 
techniques in the VHF/UHF bands, ruggedizing the system, and 
completing final flight testing.

                Operational Test and Evaluation, Defense


                       Items of Special Interest


Range capabilities for emerging advanced technologies

    The committee recognizes that the Major Range and Test 
Facility Base (MRTFB) is a critical component to military 
technological superiority, and key to ensuring U.S. warfighting 
capability. This designated core set of Department of Defense 
Test and Evaluation (T&E;) infrastructure, and its associated 
workforce, is a critical capability to be preserved in order to 
conduct necessary T&E; analyses to support the Department's 
acquisition process. The committee recognizes that the MRTFB 
must remain sized, operated, and maintained to preserve core, 
governmental T&E; capabilities, but should also be developed 
over time to meet future technology needs of the Department.
    The committee is concerned that due to the increased need 
for protected airspace, as well as increasingly outmoded range 
technology, many test facilities are difficult to maintain. For 
example, the open-air test ranges of the MRTFB are not capable 
of supporting the full spectrum of development testing required 
for fifth and sixth generation weapon systems, including 
testing of hypersonic systems, which have been identified as 
critically important to the third offset strategy. These 
systems require significant increases in size of contiguous 
airspace availability, test tracking and data acquisition 
capabilities, and threat capabilities that exceed current 
ranges capabilities.
    Across the military services, the gaps in range 
capabilities to meet evolving requirements are growing rapidly. 
The military services are under pressure to manage 
modernization of range capabilities to budgets that do not 
always account for changing technology needs to meet future 
requirements. Additionally, it is anticipated that the need for 
increased use of the MRTFB's ranges with large airspace 
footprints will continue to increase, to support realistic 
training environments critical to readiness of operational 
forces. This presents the ranges with growing scheduling 
capacity challenges, pitting priorities for operational 
readiness of today's forces against priorities of fielding new 
system capabilities required to sustain air dominance into the 
future.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Director of the Test 
Resource Management Center (TMRC) to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2017, on the 
results of a comprehensive assessment of MRTFB needs and 
investments to meet testing required for fifth and sixth 
generation aircraft and air armament, including hypersonic 
strike weapons. This assessment should include the projected 
requirements of operational forces and other users dependent 
upon these ranges. The briefing should also include the 
estimated costs to implement capabilities required to support 
current and projected future operations, and a plan for 
ensuring sufficient capacity through a MRTFB range investment 
plan. Additionally, the committee encourages the TRMC to use 
the results of this assessment to inform future budget 
certifications from the military departments and Department of 
Defense agencies.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations


              Section 201--Authorization of Appropriations

    This section would authorize appropriations for Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation at the levels identified in 
section 4201 of division D of this Act.

    Subtitle B--Program Requirements, Restrictions, and Limitations


          Section 211--Laboratory Quality Enhancement Program

    This section would require the establishment of a 
Laboratory Quality Enhancement Program (LQEP) to support the 
analysis and implementation of current policies, as well as 
make recommendations for new initiatives to support the 
improvement and enhancement of the Department of Defense's 
Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratories. This section 
would also place responsibility for LQEP under the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering (ASD(R&E;)), 
and would modify section 1114(a)(2)(C) in the Floyd D. Spence 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001 (Public 
Law 106-398) to align management of the laboratory 
demonstration program with the ASD(R&E;).

 Section 212--Mechanisms to Provide Funds for Defense Laboratories for 
     Research and Development of Technologies for Military Missions

    This section would modify the authorities set forth by 
section 219 of the Duncan Hunter National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2009 (Public Law 110-417), as amended by 
section 262 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2014 (Public Law 113-66), to set the level of 
funding at 3 percent of funds available; eliminate the 
termination date for this authority; and allow certain 
federally funded research and development centers to utilize 
this authority.

 Section 213--Notification Requirement for Certain Rapid Prototyping, 
             Experimentation, and Demonstration Activities

    This section would require the Secretary of the Navy to 
provide written notification to the congressional defense 
committees within 10 days before initiating a rapid 
prototyping, experimentation, or demonstration activity using 
funds from PE 63382N.

   Section 214--Improved Biosafety for Handling of Select Agents and 
                                 Toxins

    This section would direct the Department of Defense to 
implement several improvements for handling of select agents 
and toxins, as recommended from an Army 15-6 investigative 
report on the individual and institutional accountability for 
the shipment of viable Bacillus Anthracis from Dugway Proving 
Ground. This section would require the Department to implement 
a quality assurance and quality control program for any 
facility producing biological select agents and toxins, and for 
the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees by February 1, 2017, on the 
potential consolidation of facilities that work with biological 
select agents and toxins. This section would also require the 
Comptroller General of the United States to submit a report to 
the congressional defense committees by September 1, 2017, on 
the effectiveness and completeness of the Department of 
Defense's actions taken to address the findings and 
recommendations of the Army 15-6 investigation.

Section 215--Modernization of Security Clearance Information Technology 
                              Architecture

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
develop and sustain a new security clearance information 
technology architecture to replace the legacy system of the 
Office of Personnel Management. Further, this section would 
require the Secretary of Defense, Director of National 
Intelligence, and Director of the Office of Personnel 
Management to issue a governance charter to delineate 
responsibilities between organizations, as well as to review 
and revise as necessary the executive orders, statutes, and 
other authorities related to personnel security. This section 
would also require quarterly notifications to designated 
congressional committees until September 30, 2019.

   Section 216--Prohibition on Availability of Funds for Countering 
            Weapons of Mass Destruction System Constellation

    This section would prohibit the Department of Defense from 
obligating or expending any funds in fiscal year 2017 for 
research, development, and prototyping of the countering 
weapons of mass destruction situational awareness information 
system, known as ``Constellation.'' This section would also 
require the Chief Information Officer of the Department of 
Defense, in consultation with the Director of the Defense 
Information Systems Agency, to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees by February 1, 2017, on the 
requirements and program plan for the Constellation system.

Section 217--Limitation on Availability of Funds for Defense Innovation 
                           Unit Experimental

    This section would limit the amount of authorized funds 
available to be obligated or expended for the Defense 
Innovation Unit Experimental (DIUx) until the Secretary of 
Defense provides a report to the congressional defense 
committees on the charter for and the use of funds to establish 
and expand DIUx.
    The committee is aware of the Department of Defense's 
efforts to increase outreach to and collaboration with sources 
of commercial innovation throughout the United States. The 
committee recognizes that commercial innovation is not only a 
significant driver for the economy, but also provides 
significant contributions to national security. The committee 
has been supportive of mechanisms for tapping into the 
nontraditional defense contractor community, which includes 
commercial start-ups and other companies that have not 
typically focused on the defense market. The committee notes 
that the administrative and regulatory barriers that are in 
place within the acquisition system often act as moats to keep 
these innovation players out, rather than a bridge into the 
national security sector.
    The committee believes DIUx to be a helpful step in 
bridging those communities, but is concerned by the pinpoint 
focus on one geographic region, as well as the dedication of 
significant funding at such a nascent period in the development 
of this organization and the concept on which it was founded. 
The committee is concerned that outreach is proceeding without 
sufficient attention being paid to breaking down the barriers 
that have traditionally prevented nontraditional contractors 
from supporting defense needs, like lengthy contracting 
processes and the inability to transition technologies. 
Furthermore, the committee is concerned that the focus on this 
initiative is occurring without sufficient guidance, oversight, 
and coordination with and into the various laboratories, 
engineering centers, and existing state and local innovation 
centers that by necessity must also bridge into this community. 
The committee believes that focusing on laying a solid 
foundation for DIUx and its interaction with communities and 
the Department of Defense enterprise is critical to ensuring 
effectiveness, especially if such initiatives will be expanded 
to include other locations.

 Section 218--Limitation on Availability of Funds for Tactical Combat 
                      Training System Increment II

    This section would limit the obligation or expenditure of 
20 percent of the funds for the Tactical Combat Training System 
(TCTS) Increment II program until the Secretary of the Navy and 
Secretary of the Air Force comply with section 235 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92).
    Public Law 114-92 required the Secretary of the Navy and 
the Secretary of the Air Force to submit a detailed report to 
the congressional defense committees by January 29, 2016, on 
the baseline and alternatives to the TCTS Increment II program 
of the Navy. The report was to include cost estimates and 
schedule comparisons, as well as a review of joint Department 
of the Air Force and Department of the Navy investment in live, 
virtual, constructive, advanced air combat training. The 
committee notes that failure to comply with this reporting 
requirement in a timely manner has impacted the committee's 
ability to conduct needed oversight on this program's 
acquisition strategy. The committee is aware the Navy expects 
to award an engineering and manufacturing development contract 
for TCTS Increment II in fiscal year 2016. The committee 
expects this award will be executed through full and open 
competition in order to allow for the maximum number of 
proposals.

 Section 219--Restructuring of the Distributed Common Ground System of 
                                the Army

    This section would require the Secretary of the Army to 
discontinue development efforts for any component of the 
Distributed Common Ground System (DCGS) of the Army after 
Increment 1 where commercial software exists that is capable of 
fulfilling at least 80 percent of the system requirements. This 
section would also require a review of the acquisition strategy 
to ensure commercial software procurement is the preferred 
method to meet program requirements. This section would also 
prohibit the development of any capability for DCGS if such 
capability is available for purchase in the commercial market.

Section 220--Designation of Department of Defense Senior Official with 
          Principal Responsibility for Directed Energy Weapons

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
designate a senior official already serving within the 
Department of Defense as the official with principal 
responsibility for the development and demonstration of 
directed energy weapons for the Department, as well as any 
other responsibilities set forth by the Secretary.

                 Subtitle C--Reports and Other Matters


  Section 231--Strategy for Assured Access to Trusted Microelectronics

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
develop and implement a strategy for developing and acquiring 
trusted microelectronics from various sources by 2020. This 
section would further require the Secretary to submit such a 
strategy to the congressional defense committees not later than 
1 year after the date of the enactment of this Act. The 
Secretary of Defense would also be required to certify by 
September 30, 2020, that the Department has implemented the 
recommendations of the strategy, and has created an assured 
means of accessing sufficient supply of trusted 
microelectronics.

  Section 232--Pilot Program on Evaluation of Commercial Information 
                               Technology

    This section would require the Defense Information Systems 
Agency to establish a pilot program to evaluate commercially 
available information technology tools to better understand and 
characterize their potential impact on Department of Defense 
networks and computing environments through prototyping, 
experimentation, operational demonstration, military user 
assessment, or other means to get quantitative and qualitative 
feedback on the commercial item.

Section 233--Pilot Program for the Enhancement of the Laboratories and 
        Test and Evaluation Centers of the Department of Defense

    This section would allow the Assistant Secretaries of the 
Army, Navy, and Air Force to jointly carry out a pilot program 
to demonstrate methods for the more effective development of 
research, development, test, and evaluation functions.

Section 234--Pilot Program on Modernization of Electromagnetic Spectrum 
             Warfare Systems and Electronic Warfare Systems

    This section would allow the Secretary of Defense to carry 
out a pilot program on the modernization of spectrum warfare 
systems and electronic warfare systems.

 Section 235--Independent Review of F/A-18 Physiological Episodes and 
                           Corrective Actions

    This section would require the Secretary of the Navy to 
establish an independent review team to review the Navy's data 
on, and mitigation efforts related to, the increase in F/A-18 
physiological events since January 1, 2009. This section would 
also require the Secretary to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees by December 1, 2017, on the 
findings of the review team.

   Section 236--Study on Helicopter Crash Prevention and Mitigation 
                               Technology

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
enter into a contract with a federally funded research and 
development center to conduct a study on technologies with the 
potential to prevent and mitigate helicopter crashes.

         Section 237--Report on Electronic Warfare Capabilities

    This section would require the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics, acting through the 
Electronic Warfare Executive Committee, to submit to the 
congressional defense committees a report by April 1, 2017, on 
future electronic warfare concepts and technologies.

                  TITLE III--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

                                OVERVIEW

    Due to the consistently high pace of operations, coupled 
with significant downsizing of some of the military services, 
the committee over the past several years has witnessed a 
disturbing decline in readiness of U.S. forces to meet their 
core missions. The Joint Chiefs of Staff have stated that 
rebuilding readiness is an overarching priority, and last year 
submitted to Congress plans for readiness recovery.
    The committee is concerned that the relentless high 
operational tempo continues to challenge the military services' 
readiness recovery plans. The committee was alarmed to hear, in 
testimony before the committee this year, increasingly blunt 
warnings from Department of Defense officials about the impact 
this tempo is having on a smaller force with limited resources. 
While the military service chiefs claim they can adequately 
respond to the current requirement for forces, they warn that 
the risks in meeting the time-phased requirements of some 
critical operational plans have increased and will continue to 
increase over time as their forces shrink.
    In order to address the Department's readiness concerns and 
mitigate at least some of this risk, this Act would provide 
additional budget authority for multiple unfunded priorities of 
the military departments, to include additions to all of the 
military services' training and maintenance accounts, 
particularly aviation readiness. Facilities sustainment, 
restoration, and modernization accounts, an area the Department 
has underfunded for years, also would receive sizeable 
increases in funding.
    This Act also would make several policy changes to enhance 
readiness and improve oversight. For example, it would provide 
shipyards, depots, and arsenals temporary direct and other 
hiring authorities to allow these facilities to quickly fill 
critical civilian manpower shortages. It also directs several 
assessments of the military departments' plans to build 
readiness, enhance exercises, and modernize training 
requirements.

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                       Budget Request Adjustments


       Base Realignment and Closure Request for Fiscal Year 2019

    The budget request included $3.53 million, in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-Wide, to support a request to conduct a 
new round of Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) to align 
infrastructure with planned force structure changes. The 
requested funds would be used to develop recommendations and to 
manage BRAC efforts.
    The committee recommends no funds to support the 
development of infrastructure recommendations prepared in the 
context of a new BRAC authorization.

             Ship Repair Capability in the Western Pacific

    The Asia-Pacific rebalance strategy has increased forward 
deployment of U.S. Navy forces in the Western Pacific region, 
including the homeporting of additional Los Angeles and 
Virginia class fast-attack submarines and a second submarine 
tender, as well as the deployment of additional ballistic 
missile destroyers and a near-permanent rotation of Littoral 
Combat Ship vessels in the region. However, the committee notes 
that dry-docking capabilities have not followed ship 
deployments. Dry-docking capabilities currently exist only in 
Hawaii and on the West Coast of the United States, requiring 
surface and subsurface vessels to be removed from the Western 
Pacific theater for at least an additional 2 to 3 weeks. The 
commander of U.S. Pacific Command testified in February 2016 
that dry-docking capabilities in the Western Pacific are a 
matter of strategic importance and an operational necessity for 
Pacific Fleet. The committee, therefore, recommends an increase 
of $9.5 million in Operation and Maintenance, Navy, Ship Depot 
Maintenance, to be applied to chartering a dry dock to meet 
maintenance requirements for the Western Pacific fleet.

                             Energy Issues


                 Alternatively Financed Energy Projects

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense is the 
largest energy consumer in the Federal Government. According to 
the Department's 2015 Annual Energy Management Report, the 
Department spent $4.20 billion on facilities energy in fiscal 
year 2014. The Department has reported that its dependence on 
the commercial power grid leaves the Department vulnerable to 
service disruptions that can impact core military and national 
defense missions involving power projection. To mitigate the 
potential impacts to critical mission functions, the Department 
has leveraged a variety of authorities to diversify the supply 
of energy through renewable and alternative sources and improve 
energy security by addressing the threat of commercial grid 
disruption with on-site generating capacity and the development 
of microgrids.
    The Department has increasingly used alternative financing 
arrangements to fund infrastructure related to renewable and 
alternative energy generation, energy efficiency, and energy 
security of military installations. These alternative financing 
arrangements rely on private capital of energy service 
companies to fund the upfront investment of such projects in 
lieu of using appropriated funds. Generally, the installation 
repays the cost of the project using appropriated funds based 
on the cost savings attributable to the energy project or on 
the utility rates paid by the Department. For example, in 2012 
the Government Accountability Office reported in ``Renewable 
Energy Project Financing: Improved Guidance and Information 
Sharing Needed for DOD Project-Level Officials''' (GAO-12-401) 
that a naval air station relied on an energy services company 
to use an energy savings performance contract to obtain private 
capital to fund installation of ground source heat pumps, and 
an Army base financed a wind turbine project using a utility 
energy services contract. The Government Accountability Office 
more recently reported, in ``Energy Savings Performance 
Contracts: Additional Actions Needed to Improve Federal 
Oversight'' (GAO-15-432), that in more than half of the cases 
reviewed, contractors overstated the savings attributable to 
energy savings performance contracts.
    The Government Accountability Office findings raise 
concerns about the financial performance of these projects and 
the extent of fiscal exposure the Department is experiencing by 
using appropriated funds in their budgets to repay contractors 
on these alternative financing arrangements. In order to better 
understand the extent of this exposure and any benefits 
obtained, the committee directs the Comptroller General of the 
United States to review the extent to which the Department of 
Defense is effectively leveraging appropriations to repay 
developers for alternatively financed energy savings, 
efficiency, or generating capacity projects, and at a minimum 
answer the following questions:
    (1) What energy savings, efficiency, or generating capacity 
projects have been financed with alternative financing 
arrangements since 2012 and what is known about the estimated 
value of the projects?
    (2) What is known about the extent to which estimated 
savings or other efficiencies have materialized for these 
alternatively financed projects since 2012?
    (3) How does the Department protect its financial interests 
by ensuring that the savings reported by the contractors in 
alternatively financed energy projects accurately reflect 
project financial and efficiency performance?
    (4) Since 2012, what proportion of the installations' 
utilities budgets have been encumbered to repay contractors in 
energy savings performance contracts, utilities energy services 
contracts, or other alternative project financing and for how 
many years, and what has the trend been since that time?
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
submit the study results to the congressional defense 
committees by April 17, 2017.

               Energy Assurance for Department of Defense

    The committee notes the importance for the Department of 
Defense to have the ability to recover from utility disruptions 
that impact mission assurance on its installations. In a 
globally linked battlespace, the committee recognizes that a 
disruption to the electrical supply at an installation in the 
United States can impact core military and national defense 
missions involving power projection, defense of the homeland, 
or operations that are forward deployed. Therefore, the 
committee is supportive of efforts by the Department of Defense 
and encourages the Department to leverage and integrate 
existing authorities to ensure installations have resilient, 
available, reliable, and continuous power during disruptions to 
the electrical supply. Such actions and investments should 
prioritize facilities supporting mission critical functions and 
be done through an enterprise approach and in a manner that is 
cost-effective and based on assessed vulnerabilities.

                 Expeditionary Power Management Systems

    The committee recognizes the unique requirements that the 
Department of Defense has for powering equipment and weapon 
systems operating in a deployed environment. Many of these 
systems rely on batteries as their sole source of power, which 
may require a deployed unit to carry numerous replacement 
batteries while out on mission, or rely on more frequent 
resupply to support an operation. The committee is aware that 
the services, particularly the Army and the Marine Corps, have 
been focused on the development and fielding of energy-related 
technologies aimed at extending range and endurance, increasing 
flexibility, resilience, and force protection, while enhancing 
mobility and freedom of action in a deployed environment. The 
committee is supportive of these efforts and believes the 
Department should continue to focus on cost-effective 
investments that enhance combat capabilities and strengthen 
energy resiliency.

             Integration of Installation Energy Authorities

    The committee recognizes that the Department of Defense has 
a variety of statutory authorities that can be used to fulfill 
the Department's installation energy needs, including 
authorities ranging from third-party financing to capital 
investment using appropriated dollars. The committee notes that 
the Department of Defense's Annual Energy Management Report, 
issued in May 2015, states that the Department's first priority 
for its energy program is supporting the ability of the 
Department to carry out the mission, focusing its efforts 
through three pillars: expanding supply, reducing demand, and 
adapting future forces and technology. While the committee 
supports the mission assurance priority, the committee is 
concerned that the initiatives being pursued by the Department 
have not fully integrated these three pillars into a unified 
line of effort. The committee encourages the Department to 
interpret and integrate its existing authorities to support a 
holistic approach, focusing on projects and initiatives that 
integrate efficiencies, generation, storage, and infrastructure 
modernization at military installations.

                   Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology

    The committee commends the U.S. Navy's exploration of ocean 
renewable energy, including marine and hydrokinetic energy 
systems, and notes the value of investing in alternative energy 
research with potential operational and fiscal benefits. The 
Navy is encouraged to continue its support for development of 
marine and hydrokinetic technologies, including research, 
testing, and demonstration of maritime security systems, at-sea 
persistent surveillance and communications systems, and 
exploring opportunities to reduce the cost of energy and 
increase tactical energy security at coastal Department of 
Defense facilities and forward deployed assets. Further, the 
Navy is encouraged to support research, testing, and 
demonstration activities of marine and hydrokinetic energy 
systems at existing U.S. open ocean test facilities and 
Department of Energy designated National Marine Renewable 
Energy Centers, which are capable of scale and full-scale 
device testing.

                    Procurement of Alternative Fuels

    The committee continues to believe that the procurement of 
alternative fuels for operational purposes by the Department of 
Defense should be pursued only when the fully burdened cost of 
such fuels is cost-competitive with conventional fuels. Most 
recently, section 311 of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92) codified this 
requirement, which was previously a non-binding policy of the 
Department. The committee is aware that prior to the enactment 
of Public Law 114-92, the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) 
awarded bulk fuel contracts for the Rocky Mountain/West Coast 
2015 purchase program that included alternative fuel. While DLA 
has stated that procurement of this alternative fuel was cost-
competitive with conventional fuels, the committee believes 
additional information is needed to understand how DLA 
determines how the price of a fuel is cost-competitive in 
compliance with the requirements of section 311 of Public Law 
114-92.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Director of the 
Defense Logistics Agency to provide a briefing to the House 
Armed Services Committee not later than March 1, 2017, that 
addresses, at a minimum, how DLA evaluates and determines 
whether an alternative fuel is cost-competitive with 
conventional fuels, what criteria are used to calculate the 
fully burdened cost of fuel, and how funds provided by the 
Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) of the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture factor into DLA's analysis of whether an 
alternative fuel is cost-competitive. The briefing should also 
include the total amount of CCC funds that have been used by 
the Department of Defense to adjust the final laid down price 
of bulk fuel procurement.

                         Small Modular Reactors

    The committee recognizes that nuclear power is a reliable 
alternative power source and understands that small modular 
reactors (SMRs) under development may also provide safe and 
reliable nuclear power sources for the Department of Defense. 
The committee believes that the use of SMRs could be useful in 
meeting the Department's energy assurance goals by helping 
ensure installations have resilient, available, reliable, and 
continuous power. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to conduct an evaluation of and provide a 
report to the House Committee on Armed Services by September 
30, 2017, on the life-cycle cost effectiveness of using SMRs to 
power military installations through a commercial power supply 
arrangement. At minimum, the evaluation and report should 
address the economic feasibility of siting SMRs on the 
commercial electric grid and supplying power to military 
installations with peak power demands of 40 megawatts or 
greater and review the use of power purchase agreements needed 
to facilitate utility ownership of SMRs that supply power to 
those military installations. The Secretary should scope the 
evaluation as necessary to include the most practical and 
feasible military installations in question, and focus on those 
SMR technologies that are likely to become commercially 
available before 2025.

                    Logistics and Sustainment Issues


                         Defective Spare Parts

    The Department of Defense Inspector General (DODIG) found, 
in a report dated February 23, 2016, that Defense Logistics 
Agency (DLA) Aviation did not pursue and obtain appropriate 
restitution for a projected 269 stock numbers and at least 
$12.3 million in costs for which contractors supplied defective 
parts. The DODIG reported this occurred because DLA Aviation 
lacked sufficient controls and oversight. In addition, the 
DODIG found that defective parts were left unaccounted for in 
the Department of Defense supply system, negatively affecting 
warfighter readiness and safety.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to evaluate the implementation and 
effectiveness of the DLA plan to address problems identified in 
the February 2016 DODIG report and submit the report to the 
congressional defense committees by February 1, 2017. 
Specifically, the report should assess whether the plan 
includes sufficient controls and oversight to ensure DLA 
Aviation logistics and acquisition personnel:
    (1) Coordinate to pursue restitution from contractors that 
provide defective parts, to the extent that such efforts are 
cost effective;
    (2) Adequately search the Department of Defense inventory 
to identify and remove defective parts;
    (3) Return defective parts to responsible contractors for 
replacement; and
    (4) Track the status of defective parts shipped back to 
contractors and ensure that appropriate restitution is provided 
in the form of replacement parts.
    Additionally, the committee directs the DLA Director to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, 
not later than October 1, 2016, on a plan of action, with 
milestones, to improve DLA Aviation's process to identify 
defective spare parts and for requesting repair and replacement 
of the defective parts. The briefing also should include the 
results of DLA's review of all stock numbers with associated 
product-quality deficiency reports closed between January 2014 
and November 2015 where DLA's investigation concluded that the 
contractor provided defective parts. The briefing should 
include how DLA focused on high-value items as well as mission-
critical items and what actions are being taken to pursue 
appropriate restitution and remove all defective parts from the 
Department of Defense supply system.

       Discrepancies in the Transportation of Hazardous Material

    The committee remains concerned about documentation and 
packaging discrepancies in the Department of Defense's system 
for transportation of hazardous material. In the Department's 
response to Government Accountability Office (GAO) Report 14-
375 (``DOD Needs to Take Actions to Improve the Transportation 
of Hazardous Material''), the Department reported that some 
Department of Defense personnel and commercial shippers lack 
experience and training on hazardous material documentation and 
packaging. For example, contracts do not specify when vendors 
must prepare hazardous material for air shipment or how to 
prepare required documentation and packaging, and they are not 
instructed to use a standardized virtual shipping module 
website. GAO noted human error is the principal cause for 
inaccurate, incorrect, or incomplete hazardous material 
shipment documentation.
    Therefore, the committee urges the Department to implement 
a uniform, commercially available automated solution that will 
enable hazardous material shippers to manage, document, and 
ship material to and from Department of Defense facilities in 
full compliance with regulations while minimizing delays, lost 
time, confusion, and paperwork. The automated solution system 
should be one that can be continuously updated with the latest 
regulations and allow shippers to store data including 
classification information, safety data sheets, and the 
emergency response guidebook. The committee notes that a 
commercially available automated solution could help shippers 
save time by storing contracts, auto-filling templates for 
shipped materials, and validating shipping forms for error-free 
transport and reception.

       Enhanced Decision Analysis for Weapons System Sustainment

    The committee supports the Navy's commitment to measure 
proficiency as a critical gauge of readiness through the use of 
enhanced decision analysis capabilities for weapons system 
sustainment such as the Readiness Cost Analysis Tool (RCAT) 
initiative. The committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
the Navy (Research, Development, and Acquisition) to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by August 30, 
2016, on the benefits gleaned from RCAT analysis. The briefing 
should include, but not be limited to, a statement of the 
current funding profile of this initiative as well as potential 
courses of action to accelerate or streamline the current 
strategy for further implementation of this initiative.

                            F-35 Sustainment

    The committee recognizes the importance of the F-35 
Lightning II Program as the future of tactical air for the 
Department of Defense. With total life-cycle costs estimated to 
be more than $1.2 trillion, just under $900.00 billion of those 
costs are estimated to come from the operation and support of 
the aircraft. In July 2015, the Marine Corps declared its F-35B 
aircraft both operational and deployable. However, the 
committee notes this declaration was made without meeting 
certain operational criteria required by the Marine Corps and 
without comprehensive deployability testing of the aircraft. 
The Marine Corps' deployment of its first squadron of aircraft 
to Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, in 2017, will be 
the first opportunity to prove operational concepts not only 
for the Marine Corps, but also global sustainment concepts for 
the Air Force and Navy, who will deploy the F-35 after the 
Marine Corps.
    Given the significance of the F-35 program to the future of 
tactical air for the military, and the Department's need to 
operate and deploy the F-35 on a widespread basis in the coming 
years, the committee directs the Comptroller General of the 
United States to provide a preliminary briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services on the following factors, not later 
than January 17, 2017, with a report to follow. The briefing 
and report should review the Department's ongoing F-35 
deployment planning efforts and include:
    (1) To what extent has the Department developed plans to 
support its initial F-35 deployment to Marine Corps Air Station 
Iwakuni, including those related to personnel, aircraft support 
equipment, infrastructure, and spare parts;
    (2) To what extent will the Marine Corps' initial 
deployment to Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni enable U.S. 
Pacific Command to meet its operational requirements;
    (3) What challenges does the F-35 program face with its 
initial deployment to Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni and to 
what extent does the Department have plans to measure success, 
challenges, and share lessons learned with the Air Force and 
Navy; and
    (4) To what extent is F-35 support equipment, including the 
Autonomic Logistics Information System, prepared to deploy to 
overseas and austere locations.

              Funding for Corrosion Control and Prevention

    The committee has long supported the activities of the 
Office of Corrosion Policy and Oversight and the military 
departments' corrosion control and prevention executives in 
preventing and mitigating corrosion of the military equipment 
and infrastructure of the Department of Defense. One of the 
duties set forth in section 2228 of title 10, United States 
Code, for the director of the Office of Corrosion Policy and 
Oversight is to review the programs and funding levels proposed 
by the Secretary of each military department during the annual 
internal Department of Defense budget review process, as those 
programs and funding proposals relate to programs and funding 
for the prevention and mitigation of corrosion, and submit 
recommendations regarding those programs and proposed funding 
levels.
    The committee is concerned that beginning with the fiscal 
year 2013 report to Congress, the Department no longer reported 
the number and costs of anti-corrosion projects submitted by 
the military departments to the Office of Corrosion Policy and 
Oversight that remained unfunded in the annual budget 
submission. Therefore, to ensure that Congress has the accurate 
and comprehensive information it needs to exercise its 
oversight responsibilities, the committee directs the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics 
to provide in the annual corrosion budget report to Congress a 
more detailed explanation of the development of the Department 
of Defense's corrosion-related funding requirements.
    Additionally, to enhance the Department's ability to make 
consistent and informed decisions in its management of the 
Technical Corrosion Collaboration (TCC) program in accordance 
with internal control standards, the committee directs the 
director of the Office of Corrosion Policy and Oversight to 
track and maintain accurate records that include funds used for 
the TCC program and retain such records in a format that can be 
easily examined to ensure that funding data will be accurately 
accounted for and reported in future reports, such as the 
annual budget report to Congress.

               Implementation of Product Support Managers

    Section 805 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2010 (Public Law 111-84) requires that product 
support managers (PSMs) be assigned to all major weapon systems 
and identifies key responsibilities for these individuals. PSMs 
are assigned to each major weapon system to help the Department 
of Defense ensure that it has effective sustainment strategies 
and processes to support the goals of maintaining its weapon 
systems' readiness and controlling costs throughout the life 
cycle of a system.
    In April 2014, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) 
reported that the Department of Defense and the military 
services had taken steps to implement PSMs for major weapon 
systems, but certain aspects of the implementation process 
remain incomplete. For example, the Department does not fully 
know how, or to what extent, PSMs are affecting life-cycle 
sustainment decisions because it has not systematically 
collected and evaluated information on the effects PSMs are 
having on their assigned weapon systems. Also, the committee is 
aware of specific challenges the Army has faced in implementing 
PSMs, and GAO recommended that the Army needed to clarify the 
roles and responsibilities of certain personnel who support 
PSMs. This includes the reporting relationships of Army 
Materiel Command product support personnel assigned to Army 
weapon system program offices.
    Given that operating and support costs historically account 
for about 70 percent of a weapon system's total life-cycle cost 
and the critical nature of the PSM in affecting life-cycle 
sustainment decisions, the committee directs the Comptroller 
General of the United States to assess the following and 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, 
not later than February 1, 2017, on preliminary findings of the 
Comptroller General's evaluation and to submit a final report 
to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House 
of Representatives on a date agreed to at the time of the 
briefing:
    (1) How early and how often the Army and the other services 
are integrating PSMs into the development and acquisition of 
weapon systems;
    (2) How the Army and the other services are integrating 
PSMs into the life-cycle management of weapon systems; and
    (3) To what extent the Department of Defense and the Army 
have addressed GAO's prior recommendations concerning the 
implementation of PSMs, including measuring their impact on 
life-cycle sustainment decisions and clarifying PSM roles, 
responsibilities, and reporting relationships.

 Integration of Operational Contract Support Matters in Joint Training 
                                Programs

    The committee is aware that the Department of Defense 
recently conducted its third Joint Staff-sponsored Operational 
Contract Support (OCS) exercise. The committee applauds efforts 
by the Joint Staff Director of Logistics to advance senior-
leader awareness of OCS and the need to integrate consideration 
of OCS into doctrine, policy, and strategic guidance. However, 
the committee is concerned that while the joint force commander 
is undeniably reliant on contract support to accomplish 
strategic and operational ends, consideration of OCS, and its 
associated risks and benefits, has yet to be integrated into 
the organizational structure of the geographic and functional 
combatant commands. As a result, the commanders and their 
staffs lack the ability to integrate OCS requirements into 
operational plans, assess OCS readiness, and identify 
operational and strategic risks associated with reliance on 
contract support. Furthermore, exercise and training activities 
related to OCS have been focused on the acquisition and 
logistics communities, with little warfighter awareness, 
interest, or involvement.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Chairman of the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff to incorporate OCS matters (such as planning, 
requirements determination, risk analysis, contract support 
integration, readiness assessments, and contractor management) 
into all joint training programs designed to establish 
foundational competence in the conduct of campaigns and major 
operations. The committee believes that this directed focus on 
OCS in joint training programs will enable the joint force to 
leverage contract support to achieve operational and strategic 
effects and may reduce risks associated with reliance on 
contracting in contingency operations.

            Item Unique Identification Policy Implementation

    The committee is closely monitoring the Department of 
Defense's strategy for improving asset tracking and in-transit 
visibility and supports the Department's goal of enhancing 
asset visibility through item unique identification (IUID) and 
automatic identification technology (AIT)/automatic 
identification and data capture (AIDC) processes. The committee 
remains concerned, however, about the level of the Department's 
compliance with its own IUID policy as outlined in Department 
of Defense Instruction (DODI) 8320.04 issued September 3, 2015. 
The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to present a 
consolidated briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than December 1, 2016, regarding efforts to address 
the following responsibilities, as outlined in DODI 8320.04:
    (1) The efforts of the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics to ensure IUID is 
integrated into acquisition programs;
    (2) The efforts of the director of the Defense Logistics 
Agency to ensure their managed items identified as requiring 
IUID are appropriately marked and recorded in the Department of 
Defense IUID Registry;
    (3) The efforts of the Deputy Chief Management Officer and 
the Department of Defense Chief Information Officer to 
integrate IUID policy and the Department of Defense IUID 
Registry into the Department of Defense Business Enterprise 
Architecture; and
    (4) The efforts of the Secretaries of the military 
departments to identify focal points for IUID planning and 
implementation and efforts to ensure that service or agency 
managed items identified as requiring IUID are appropriately 
marked and recorded in the Department of Defense IUID Registry.
    Elsewhere in this Act, the committee includes a legislative 
provision that would limit funding to the Defense Contract 
Management Agency (DCMA) until the DMCA director provides a 
briefing to the congressional defense committees on the 
agency's plan to foster the adoption, implementation, and 
verification of the Department's revised IUID policy across the 
Department and the defense industrial base.

                  Sustainment of Major Weapon Systems

    The Department of Defense spends billions of dollars 
annually to sustain its major weapon systems in an effort to 
simultaneously support today's military operations and maintain 
the capability to meet future defense requirements. However, 
the committee recognizes that many of the Department's major 
weapon systems are aging and present sustainment challenges, 
including depot maintenance and supply support. For example, 
the Air Force is already operating many of its fighter and 
bomber aircraft well beyond their original designed service 
lives. Over the past several years, the Navy also has been 
confronted by serious sustainment challenges with the aging F/
A-18 Hornet. The Army and the Marine Corps also have weapon 
systems, such as helicopters and amphibious assault vehicles 
that present similar sustainment challenges.
    The Government Accountability Office currently conducts 
annual assessments of the Department's major defense 
acquisition programs, including information on the costs and 
schedule performance of selected major weapon systems. The 
committee finds these assessments invaluable in evaluating the 
Department's procurement of major weapon systems. The committee 
believes an examination of key aspects of the sustainment of 
selected major weapon systems would further complement this 
existing body of work.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to submit a report to the House Committee on 
Armed Services and the Senate Committee on Armed Services that 
evaluates:
    (1) The condition of and sustainment strategies for 
selected major weapon systems;
    (2) Major sustainment challenges affecting the condition of 
the selected major weapon systems;
    (3) The Department's current and planned actions to address 
any identified challenges (for example, depot maintenance 
enhancements and efficiencies, supply support improvements, 
funding strategies); and
    (4) Other related matters the Comptroller General deems 
appropriate.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
brief the House Committee on Armed Services not later than 
February 1, 2017, on preliminary findings of the Comptroller 
General's evaluation, with the report to follow at a date to be 
determined at the time of the briefing.

                            Readiness Issues


                       Air Refueling Requirements

    The committee notes that section 1054 of the Carl Levin and 
Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291) required the 
Secretary of the Air Force to provide a business case analysis 
on converting the 168th Air Refueling Wing at Eielson Air Force 
Base, Alaska, to an Active Associate Wing. Congress has not 
received this report, which was to be delivered 60 days after 
the date of the enactment of Public Law 113-291. The committee 
remains concerned that air refueling requirements may exceed 
capacity at Eielson Air Force Base. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Air Force to provide a briefing to 
the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives, not later than October 14, 2016, on the impact 
of air refueling operations at Eielson Air Force Base, an 
estimate of the ability to achieve air refueling requirements 
following the establishment of two F-35 squadrons in fiscal 
year 2020, and a business case analysis of the impact of these 
additional aircraft on refueling operations in the Alaska area-
of-operations.

    Armed Forces Sports Program and Service Academy Athletic Interns

    The committee notes the significant end strength reductions 
the military services will continue to implement through fiscal 
year 2017. Although the committee provides the Department with 
a wide latitude of authority in order for the military services 
to execute their end strength reductions, the committee is 
concerned by the prioritization of some military sports 
programs. The committee believes these programs should be 
analyzed to determine the impact they may have on the readiness 
of units by allowing personnel to spend an extended period of 
time participating in sports programs instead of serving in 
their military occupational skill.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to provide a briefing to the Senate Committee 
on Armed Services and the House Committee on Armed Services by 
February 1, 2017, on the impact that the Armed Forces Sports 
program has on the military services' readiness.
    The committee further directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the Senate Committee on Armed Services 
and the House Committee on Armed Services by December 1, 2016, 
on the Armed Forces Sports program. At a minimum, the briefing 
shall include:
    (1) The purpose of the program;
    (2) Its measures of performance and effectiveness;
    (3) The number of service members participating in the 
program;
    (4) The cost of the program; and
    (5) The number of days service members spend in the 
program.
    Additionally, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a briefing to the Senate Committee on Armed 
Services and the House Committee on Armed Services by December 
1, 2016, on service academy athletic interns. At a minimum, the 
briefing shall include:
    (1) The purpose of service academy graduate athletic 
interns;
    (2) The number of service academy graduates who remain at 
the service academies for a full or partial year as an athletic 
intern;
    (3) How the academies measure the performance and 
effectiveness of athletic interns;
    (4) The cost to the academies to maintain graduate athletic 
interns; and
    (5) The career impact to those who remain at the academies 
as athletic interns.

              Army Aviation Multi-Component Pilot Program

    The National Commission on the Future of the Army (NCFA) 
recommended the Army develop ``a substantial pilot program'' to 
test multi-component approaches in the Army's aviation units. 
The committee believes that multi-component aviation units can 
improve readiness and enhance force integration by exploiting 
the differing strengths of the Regular Army and Reserve 
Components. The Army has begun limited use of multi-component 
approaches in aviation units with fixed-wing C-12 aircraft. 
Other co-located units, such as Black Hawk and Chinook 
helicopters in some States, allow units from different 
components to train together. The committee understands the 
Army is already pursuing implementation of the NCFA 
recommendation and is in the design phase of the pilot program. 
The committee applauds the Army's efforts to test the aviation 
multi-component approach and expects the Army to provide 
progress reports as requested by the committee on the 
initiative as it moves forward.

       Assessment of Navy and Marine Corps Training Requirements

    In the coming years, the Navy and Marine Corps will 
confront an increasingly complex security environment that will 
demand a wide range of missions, such as defeating terrorist 
organizations and responding to worldwide humanitarian crises. 
To meet these evolving challenges, the military services have 
developed plans to synchronize training and deployment 
schedules to improve readiness and are reemphasizing core 
training skills that degraded during a decade of 
counterinsurgency operations. However, factors such as 
equipment availability and access to training ranges can affect 
the services' ability to conduct training for their core 
capability areas. Moreover, the military services continue to 
face an environment of uncertain and constrained budgetary 
resources for the foreseeable future.
    The committee is aware that some targeted investments have 
been made since fiscal year 2013 to improve training readiness 
but remains concerned about the ability of the Navy and the 
Marine Corps--to include Navy and Marine Corps Reserve--to 
balance training investments with available resources. As a 
result, the committee believes the services will need to re-
examine the requirements for training their forces and explore 
whether they can achieve additional efficiencies or cost 
savings in their training approaches, such as by increasing 
reliance on virtual or simulator technologies to meet some 
training tasks.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to evaluate Navy and Marine Corps training 
requirements and provide a preliminary briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by February 1, 2017, with an 
assessment of the following:
    (1) To what extent do the Navy and Marine Corps processes 
establish requirements and resource needs to train forces for 
core capability areas?
    (2) To what extent have the Navy and Marine Corps conducted 
training for core capability areas and identified any factors 
that limit this training?
    (3) To what extent have the Navy and Marine Corps taken 
steps to integrate the use of virtual or simulated training to 
prepare forces for the full range of military operations?
    Any remaining work and a final report will be completed 
within a time as subsequently agreed upon with the committee.

              C-130 Aircraft Maintenance and Modernization

    Given current and future depot-level C-130 maintenance 
requirements, the likelihood of additional unscheduled 
requirements, depot capacity, the shortfall in depot 
maintainers, and broader responsibility for other military 
service C-130 maintenance requirements, the committee directs 
the Secretary of the Air Force to provide an unclassified 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, not later 
than September 30, 2016, on the service's approach to C-130 
maintenance, service life extension, and modernization 
requirements over the next 5 years.

           Condition-Based Maintenance on Navy Surface Ships

    The committee notes that in 2013, the Department of the 
Navy established policy directing the integration of Condition-
Based Maintenance (CBM) on ships, ship systems, and equipment. 
The committee understands that CBM has been successfully 
implemented on aircraft, helicopters, military and commercial 
vehicles, and trains and has demonstrated cost savings and 
increased operational readiness. However, the committee has 
learned that, with the exception of Littoral Combat Ships 
(LCS), the Navy has not implemented condition-based maintenance 
on its surface ships. The committee further notes that the CBM 
demonstration initiative for amphibious ships to address long-
standing diesel readiness issues has been stalled for more than 
3 years.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to brief 
the House Committee on Armed Services by June 30, 2016, on the 
status of implementing CBM on Navy surface ships. The committee 
expects this briefing, at a minimum, to address the 
implementation plan for amphibious ships.

  Corrective Actions in Response to the Temporary Detention of United 
                         States Sailors by Iran

    The committee remains concerned regarding the totality of 
circumstances that contributed to the temporary detention of 
ten United States Navy sailors by force of the Islamic Republic 
of Iran in January 2016. The committee directs the Chief of 
Naval Operations to notify the committee upon the conclusion of 
the ongoing investigation stemming from the events in question. 
The committee also directs the Chief of Naval Operations to 
provide a briefing to the congressional defense committees no 
later than 90 days following the conclusion of the 
investigation to provide an update on corrective actions taken, 
including any administrative actions or judicial proceedings 
initiated against any service member as a result of that 
investigation.

    Defense Language Institute Support to the Intelligence Community

    The committee remains interested in ensuring that the 
Intelligence Community recruits, trains, and retains the most 
capable language experts. In light of ongoing global conflicts 
in the Middle East and North Africa, and the challenges posed 
by near-competitor states such as the Russian Federation and 
the People's Republic of China, it is critical that the 
Department of Defense continue to adequately fund and support 
foreign language programs, especially the Defense Language 
Institute (DLI).
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army, 
in coordination with the Director of National Intelligence and 
the Director of the National Security Agency, to:
    (1) Conduct an updated manpower study of the Defense 
Language Institute to determine the Institute's faculty and 
staff manning needs given increased requirements levied upon 
them by the Intelligence Community and the Department of 
Defense; and
    (2) Develop a plan to modernize the 1996 Defense Language 
Institute pay structure, taking into account the significant 
variation between the DLI and other Department of Defense 
educational institutions and local colleges, including 
California community colleges. The new pay structure should 
appropriately reflect the capabilities of the DLI workforce and 
should seek to provide competitive salaries to Defense Language 
Institute Foreign Language Center instructors.
    The committee further directs the Secretary of the Army, in 
coordination with the Director of National Intelligence and the 
Director of the National Security Agency, to provide a briefing 
to the House Committee on Armed Services and the House 
Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, by March 1, 2017, 
on the status of the manpower study and the new pay structure 
plan detailed above, as well as the status of efforts to meet 
the increased Intelligence Community and Department of Defense 
language expert requirements.

                         Defense Travel System

    The committee is concerned that the Defense Travel System 
(DTS) is challenging for many service members to use, 
particularly among the Reserve Component. The committee has 
received information that the DTS process for booking travel, 
such as to-and-from drill locations, is often cumbersome and 
time consuming. The committee believes that the Department of 
Defense should explore ways to reform the DTS to make the 
system more user-friendly. The committee notes that the Defense 
Travel Management Office was established in 2006 as the single 
focal point for commercial travel within the Department. The 
committee directs the Director of DTS to provide a briefing to 
the House Committee on Armed Service not later than September 
1, 2016, on ways to improve DTS to ensure it better meets the 
needs of Department of Defense travelers.

                          Force of the Future

    The committee is aware of the Department of Defense's 
personnel reforms collectively known as ``Force of the 
Future.'' These reforms are ``designed to provide the military 
services a balanced set of force management tools that will 
allow them to improve their return on investment in human 
capital, improving military readiness in the long-run, while 
preserving military readiness and acknowledging operational 
demands in the near-term.'' The Department has to date issued 
two tranches of these reform proposals and plans to deliver 
more as they are ready for implementation. The committee 
supports the Department's efforts to address shortcomings in 
its military and civilian personnel systems and encourages its 
attempts to find innovative solutions to attract and maintain 
quality personnel. However, the committee is concerned that the 
readiness implications of many of these proposals have not been 
adequately addressed.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the Senate Committee on Armed Services 
and the House Committee on Armed Services by December 1, 2016, 
on the readiness impacts of each of the approved and pending 
Force of the Future proposals. At a minimum, the briefing shall 
include the estimated cost of each proposal across the Future 
Years Defense Program; the estimated loss of days, by service, 
of both military and civilian personnel; and details of how the 
Department plans to measure the performance and effectiveness 
of each proposal.

                    Global Response Force Readiness

    In January 2012, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff 
published his Joint Operational Access Concept, which describes 
in broad terms his vision for how joint forces will operate in 
response to emerging anti-access and area-denial security 
challenges. Subsequently, in ``Sustaining U.S. Global 
Leadership: Priorities for 21st Century Defense,'' the 
Secretary of Defense posits that the U.S. military will invest 
as required to ensure its ability to operate effectively in 
anti-access and area-denial environments, which would include 
implementing the Chairman's Joint Operational Access Concept. 
At the heart of that concept is the Global Response Force 
(GRF), an airborne brigade combat team prepared to deploy 
anywhere in the world within 96 hours of notification. Formed 
around an airborne infantry brigade, the Global Response Force 
also includes artillery, reconnaissance, Strykers, M2 Bradley 
Fighting Vehicles, combat aviation, and other support, 
engineering, and logistical assets as needed.
    According to the Army's fiscal year 2017 budget estimate 
justification documents, forces dedicated to Global Response 
Force requirements will remain ready. Recognizing that a 
critical aspect of maintaining a ready force is training, the 
committee is concerned that the Department's 2017 European 
Reassurance Initiative budget request allocates $25 million to 
exercising the Global Response Force, a figure that is less 
than half of what was enacted in fiscal year 2016. The 
committee believes a minimum of four joint, collective training 
opportunities during the fiscal year focusing on ``no-notice'' 
alert, marshal, and deploy operations is necessary to fully 
exercise installation nodal and outload capabilities, ensure 
joint interoperability between the Army and the Air Force, and 
validate the overall combat readiness of the GRF. Given the 
decrement in fiscal year 2017, the committee is also concerned 
that other aspects of GRF readiness, such as manning, 
equipping, local training, or logistical or other support may 
likewise be adversely affected by present fiscal pressures, 
budgetary constraints, and competition for resources. In order 
to better understand the challenges that the Department may be 
facing with regard to the GRF and the impact they may have on 
the GRF's readiness, the committee directs the Comptroller 
General of the United States to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees by February 1, 2017, that 
assesses the following:
    (1) The factors, if any, that may affect the ability of the 
GRF to carry out its intended missions;
    (2) The extent to which the GRF's available support 
capabilities (including logistics, command and control, 
engineer, and intelligence) address operational requirements; 
and
    (3) The impact, if any, that fiscal pressures or other 
challenges, such as the competition for resources, have had on 
GRF manning, equipping, and training.

                            Green Flag East

    The committee is encouraged by the Department of Defense's 
commitment to invest $1.00 billion over 5 years in Red Flag and 
Green Flag exercises, resulting in no fewer than 34 major 
exercises. The committee report (H. Rept. 114-102) accompanying 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 
required the Secretary of the Air Force to assess the adequacy 
of aviation resources provided during Green Flag East exercises 
at the Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC). The committee 
remains concerned that Green Flag East continues to experience 
a lack of variety of air assets. The committee recommends the 
Secretary of the Air Force consider allocating a dedicated 
fixed-wing unit, manned or unmanned, to Green Flag East to 
support the anticipated increase in training days at the JRTC, 
including a potential doubling of Reserve Component rotations.

   Impact of Mandatory Training Requirements on Achieving Increased 
                               Readiness

    The committee understands that mandatory training 
requirements in the military services can range from training 
for nuclear, biological, and chemical defense to marksmanship 
qualification, suicide prevention, physical fitness, and sexual 
assault prevention, among others. A 2002 study at the Army 
company commander level found there were 297 days of annual 
mandatory training requirements for 256 available training 
days. Discussions across the force confirmed that commanders 
receive additional mandatory training requirements regardless 
of their units' ability to actually comply with the totality of 
the requirements. The Department of the Army Inspector General 
in 2012 reported that at none of the 16 locations inspected 
were companies in the Army Force Generation process able to 
complete all mandatory training.
    The Army responded to a February 2015 study for the U.S. 
Army War College, which stated overwhelming training 
requirements may contribute to military personnel exaggerating 
or falsely reporting compliance in meeting statistical training 
requirements, by undertaking the ``Objective T'' initiative. 
``Objective T'' seeks to reset mandatory training for 
appropriate individual-, leader-, and unit-level training; 
shift selected mandatory training tasks to ``as-required'' 
elements of command responsibility; establish a biennial cycle 
for select mandatory training tasks for the Reserve Components; 
and adopt new standards for mandatory training.
    While the Army War College study focused on Army personnel, 
testimonies indicate this is a problem facing all branches of 
the U.S. military. The committee is concerned that the ever-
increasing training demand forces military leaders at multiple 
levels in the chain of command to make ethical decisions 
between actually training to standard or falsifying reporting, 
as well as choosing between training for mission essential 
tasks and those perceived to be of lesser value.
    In light of these concerns, the committee directs the 
Comptroller General of the United States to submit a report to 
the Senate Committee on Armed Services and the House Committee 
on Armed Services by February 1, 2017, addressing each of the 
following issues:
    (1) What is the level and range of mandatory training 
required annually in each of the military services, and do the 
requirements derive from law, policy, or guidance;
    (2) What processes do the military services use to 
establish and track mandatory training requirements for service 
members;
    (3) To what extent do the military services review and 
validate existing mandatory training requirements and assess 
the effectiveness of training strategies in meeting intended 
training objectives;
    (4) To what extent do the military services have processes 
in place to analyze the impact of mandatory training 
requirements and compliance checks on the training readiness 
and capabilities of their forces; and (5) To what extent do 
individual commanders have flexibility to prioritize mandatory 
training requirements in light of the amount of time available 
to complete individual and unit training.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than December 1, 2016, on preliminary findings of the 
Comptroller General's study.

                           Language Training

    The committee believes that foreign language proficiency, 
including immersive regional and cultural training, is a major 
force multiplier and a key component of national defense. The 
committee therefore supports the fiscal year 2017 budget 
request for the Defense Language Institute (DLI) Foreign 
Language Center. The committee believes the fiscal year 2017 
funding level will allow the DLI to address capability gaps in 
advanced foreign language training that otherwise would hamper 
the Department's ability to attain strategic national security 
objectives.
    Further, due to recent Russian Federation activities in 
Eastern Europe, the committee believes the Department of 
Defense should examine whether training for U.S. service 
members in Russian language, regional expertise, and culture 
are sufficient to ensure service members deploying to Eastern 
Europe are prepared to effectively fulfill mission 
requirements. The committee urges the Director of the Defense 
Language and National Security Education Office (DLNSEO) to 
assess the need for additional courses in Russian language, 
regional expertise, and culture training.
    As the Department continues to engage with allies across 
the combatant commands through security cooperation events, the 
committee encourages the Department to build awareness of 
foreign cultures and fluency in foreign languages and to 
provide opportunities for allies to experience American culture 
and improve their English-language proficiency. Among the 
opportunities the committee recommends exploring are expanding 
Army Cadet Command's Cultural Understanding and Language 
Proficiency program to the other military services, expanding 
the number of allied English-language instructors who receive 
instruction annually at the DLI, temporary overseas assignments 
for DLI instructors to teach English to allied students, and 
partnerships with U.S. colleges and universities who have 
degree programs for English-as-a-foreign-language studies. 
Accordingly, the committee directs the Director of the DLNSEO 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than September 30, 2016, on the feasibility and 
estimated costs of these opportunities and provide a suggested 
list of developing countries prioritized for engagement and 
instruction.

                 Management Software for Navy Training

    The committee recognizes the importance of providing 
software applications designed to support visibility of 
readiness levels for individual service member training and 
qualifications. The committee notes that the Advanced Skills 
Management (ASM) system used by the Department of the Navy is a 
software application designed to identify job tasking 
requirements, assist in determining proficiencies, document 
qualifications and certifications, and track completed 
technical training. The committee notes that the Fleet 
Management and Planning System (FLTMPS) used by the Department 
of the Navy is a software application designed to assist in 
monitoring and managing training requirements, unit manning, 
and personnel and training status. The committee is aware of 
commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) software alternatives that may 
offer existing capabilities at a cost savings to the Navy. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, 
not later than August 1, 2016, that includes:
    (1) Market research conducted by the Navy to identify 
commercial software solutions for support training and manning 
requirements;
    (2) A cost-benefit analysis of integration of ASM 
capabilities into FLTMPS;
    (3) A cost-benefit analysis of available COTS and 
government-off-the-shelf software solutions for training and 
manning requirements;
    (4) A review of the Department's acquisition strategy to 
enhance ASM and FLTMPS; and
    (5) The long-term acquisition strategy for a software 
application designed to measure individual service member 
readiness as a critical gauge of readiness.

                             Military Bands

    While the committee provides the Department of Defense with 
a wide latitude of authority for the military services to 
execute the end strength reductions that are continuing through 
fiscal year 2017, the committee is concerned by the 
prioritization of some military units. The committee believes 
that the services may be able to conserve end strength by 
reducing the number of military bands.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to submit a report to the Senate Committee on 
Armed Services and the House Committee on Armed Services by 
February 1, 2017, on the Department of Defense requirement for 
military bands.
    The committee further directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the Senate Committee on Armed Services 
and the House Committee on Armed Services by December 1, 2016, 
on military bands. At a minimum, the briefing shall include:
    (1) The number of military bands, by service, and their 
location;
    (2) The cost of military bands (including recruitment, 
training, facilities, and transportation);
    (3) The number of service members assigned to military 
bands;
    (4) The history of reductions in military bands over the 
past 5 years; and (5) The feasibility of combining military 
bands at joint locations.

        Mobility Support for Operations on the Korean Peninsula

    U.S. and Republic of Korea forces train and plan together 
to deter and defeat aggression emanating from the Democratic 
People's Republic of Korea. As a result of this longstanding 
alliance, operational and contingency plans have been codified, 
coordinated, and exercised. Over time those plans have evolved 
to meet changing conditions, enhance readiness, and strengthen 
the alliance's ability to defend the Republic of Korea and 
maintain stability on the Korean Peninsula. Plans for rapidly 
reinforcing U.S. forces already on the peninsula would require 
U.S. Transportation Command to undertake the rapid movement to 
the Korean Peninsula of forces and capabilities presently 
located in the continental United States and elsewhere. In 
light of new and increasingly threatening dynamics, the 
committee directs the Comptroller General of the United States 
to assess the following:
    (1) The factors, if any, that may affect U.S. 
Transportation Command's ability to carry out its wartime 
mission with respect to operations on the Korean Peninsula;
    (2) The extent to which U.S. Transportation Command's plans 
and capabilities are postured to support the outbreak of 
hostilities on the Korean Peninsula;
    (3) The readiness of U.S. Transportation Command's assets 
(air, land, and sea) to carry out its wartime mission; and
    (4) Any other issues the Comptroller General determines 
appropriate with respect to U.S. Transportation Command's 
support of operations on the Korean Peninsula.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than February 1, 2017, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings and to submit a final report to the 
congressional defense committees on a date agreed to at the 
time of the briefing.

                     Output-Based Readiness Metrics

    The committee notes that current readiness metrics largely 
focus on inputs rather than outputs, such as the amount of 
training completed, the number of personnel assigned to units, 
or the maintenance level of equipment. The committee is 
interested in how output-based readiness metrics, including 
objective measures of how well units and personnel perform 
during realistic training and exercises, could offer 
alternative measures of the ability of forces to perform the 
missions assigned to them and could help to improve the ways in 
which readiness is measured and resourced. The committee 
encourages the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and 
Readiness to consider developing output-based readiness metrics 
that could be used to assess the ability of units to perform 
the tasks specified in their mission essential task lists and 
to consider how data related to these metrics could be 
appropriately collected and retained during relevant operations 
or training exercises.

Refinement of Joint Staff Input Into the Quarterly Readiness Report to 
                                Congress

    The committee is aware that the Chairman of the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff, in complying with the Quarterly Readiness 
Report to Congress (QRRC) required by section 482 of title 10, 
United States Code, is seeking to refine the Joint Staff's 
input into the QRRC required through section 117 of title 10, 
United States Code, in order to improve relevance and 
timeliness in reporting while minimizing redundancy and 
overlapping processes. The committee itself, in previous 
authorization acts, has sought to increase the QRRC's value to 
the committee through the selective addition of information 
regarding preparation for, and support to, contingency 
operations and by eliminating portions of the QRRC which are 
available from other sources or no longer deemed important to 
congressional decision making. In light of current concerns 
about the readiness of U.S. military forces, the committee 
supports the Chairman's efforts to refine readiness information 
and reporting requirements and to streamline processes to meet 
the 45-day QRRC statutory deadlines, including consideration of 
separating and alternating semiannual assessments with 
semiannual reports.

                    Regional Air Ranges and Exercise

    The committee notes that each military service relies on 
major national air ranges and military operating areas to 
provide realistic combined-arms pilot training against a 
variety of targets and simulated threats. The committee 
believes these ranges provide critical and efficient 
opportunities for small and large units to train together as a 
joint force on a variety of air-to-air and air-to-ground 
scenarios in increasing levels of complexity. The committee 
also believes that the integration of fourth- and fifth-
generation combat capabilities on regional ranges during 
frequent local exercises is critical to maintain the readiness 
and proficiency of aircrews to meet combatant commanders' 
requirements across the entire spectrum of potential 
operations.
    The committee notes that diminished training resources 
require a prioritization of investments in training 
infrastructure. The committee believes that regional, jointly 
managed air ranges, and frequent, locally planned exercises 
would result in training opportunities for each service that 
are realistic, efficient, and effective. Looking ahead, the 
committee believes that the services must address common 
concerns about limited airspace to meet training requirements 
for fifth-generation aircraft and standoff precision-guided 
munitions by collaborating on the establishment and management 
of joint regional ranges consisting of connected, existing 
service-specific ranges. The committee also believes that 
regional ranges must be equipped with mobile joint threat 
emitters designed as a multi-threat, high-fidelity simulator 
with realistic, effective radiated power levels to help train 
aircrews to identify and counter enemy missile or artillery 
threats, as well as integrated air defense systems in a war-
like training environment.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to establish an investment strategy for the preservation and 
enhancement of regional ranges and exercises needed to provide 
adequate live training for aircrews across the full spectrum of 
operations. The committee notes that the Department's annual 
sustainable ranges report should inform this report and may 
facilitate development of an investment strategy. The strategy 
shall include:
    (1) An assessment of the importance of regional ranges and 
exercises;
    (2) A review of existing threats to continued operation or 
limits of regional ranges;
    (3) A review of measures taken to date to preserve the 
capabilities of each regional range;
    (4) A prioritized list of specific actions needed to 
promote compatible development in areas around each regional 
range;
    (5) A prioritized list of proposed investments, including 
installation of joint threat emitter systems; and
    (6) Specific actions proposed to enhance the training 
opportunities by combining existing regional ranges, enlarging 
operating areas, and establishing joint range management 
entities.
    The committee further directs the Secretary to submit a 
report to the House Committee on Armed Services, not later than 
December 11, 2016, that includes the investment strategy and 
descriptions of other initiatives to improve regional 
opportunities for realistic, joint training of military 
aircrews.

                Regional Biosecurity Plan Implementation

    The committee notes that in March 2015, the Department of 
the Navy released the ``Regional Biosecurity Plan for 
Micronesia and Hawaii.'' This document provided recommendations 
that, if appropriately implemented, will minimize the harmful 
ecological, social, cultural, and economic impacts of invasive 
species through the prevention and management of such species' 
introduction, expansion, and dispersal within the region. With 
the influx of permanent and rotational U.S. military personnel 
and equipment in the region, the committee understands that the 
Department of the Navy agreed to fund the development of this 
plan in part to assist with minimizing the risk of introduction 
and spread of invasive species to and within the region. The 
committee notes that the document contains numerous 
recommendations and action items at different priority levels 
for the Department of Defense.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in coordination with other Federal agencies as appropriate, to 
provide a briefing to the House Armed Services Committee, not 
later than February 1, 2017, regarding the Department's 
implementation of the Regional Biosecurity Plan for Micronesia 
and Hawaii. In addition to the steps that are being taken to 
implement the recommendations and action items, the briefing 
may include an estimate of the additional costs associated with 
continued implementation, to include specifying in detail the 
cost for each component and program of the Department of 
Defense.

                    Report on Small Boat Maintenance

    The committee is aware that some of the small boats and 
watercraft of the Navy Installation Command (CNIC) and United 
States Naval Academy do not utilize the Navy's Maintenance and 
Material Management (3M) program or are partially covered. The 
committee recognizes that over the life of these small 
watercraft, on-time performance maintenance inspection actions 
are necessary to optimize performance, reduce equipment failure 
and breakdowns, and ensure operational availability of these 
assets.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide an unclassified briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services, not later than August 31, 2016, on the 
service's approach to small boat and small watercraft 
maintenance. This briefing shall include, at a minimum:
    (1) An inventory of Navy Installation Command and United 
States Naval Academy small boats and watercraft;
    (2) The maintenance routine and inspections for these small 
watercraft and boats; and
    (3) A review of existing Navy maintenance programs and 
commercially available maintenance products used with other 
small boats and watercraft.

     Review of the Readiness of Military Sealift Command Ships and 
                            Employment Plans

    The committee understands the Navy has called for a fleet 
with more distributed lethality to extend the global reach of 
its combatant ships. Concurrently, the Military Sealift Command 
(MSC) fleet will need to provide the logistics support required 
by globally distributed operations. These demands will be in 
addition to new tasking to the MSC fleet, given the declining 
numbers of combat ships in the fleet. In some mission areas, 
such as amphibious operations, MSC platforms are taking on new 
roles. For example, the Expeditionary Fast Transport (formerly 
designated the Joint High Speed Vessel) and the Afloat Forward 
Staging Base are providing some amphibious capabilities, 
including rapid transport of troops and equipment and forward 
logistics support and command and control to other Navy ships 
and helicopters in operational areas. The committee notes the 
Navy has introduced these ships into the fleet but has not yet 
provided a comprehensive account of the missions they are 
suitable to support. MSC's expanded roles also require a 
healthy supply of experienced mariners and a robust number of 
U.S. merchant ships to generate these qualified mariners. With 
declining ship numbers in the U.S. merchant fleet, the 
committee is concerned these new requirements may not be fully 
addressed.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees to address the following:
    (1) What challenges does Military Sealift Command face with 
respect to material condition and service life of its fleet and 
what impact, if any, do these have on maintaining needed 
warfighting capabilities;
    (2) What personnel and training challenges have impacted 
the Military Sealift Command, and what effects, if any, do 
these pose to maintaining warfighting readiness;
    (3) How are Military Sealift Command's mission requirements 
evolving? What implications, if any, are there for the 
command's personnel and force structure; and
    (4) Any other related matters as deemed appropriate in 
order to provide a comprehensive examination of Military 
Sealift Command readiness and employment plans.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a preliminary briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than February 1, 2017, with the report to be 
submitted at a date to be determined at the time of the 
briefing.

               Rotary-Wing Aviation Readiness and Safety

    The committee notes with concern the frequency of mishaps 
in rotary-wing aviation over the past 5 years. The committee 
further notes that the commander of the Army's Aviation Center 
of Excellence described home-station training as a significant 
concern due to the inability of the Army to provide sufficient 
flying hours for all pilots to meet established standards. 
Similarly, the committee notes that the Deputy Commandant of 
the Marine Corps for Aviation has described the reduction of 
funding for aviation training and maintenance as a critical 
concern. Further, the committee believes that the proficiency 
of rotary-wing pilots and the readiness of rotary-wing 
platforms provide crucial capabilities to the joint force. 
Therefore, the committee urges the Secretary of the Army and 
the Secretary of the Navy to prioritize rotary-wing aviation 
funding in order to ensure that the United States maintains 
this crucial capability into the future.
    The committee directs the Chief of Staff of the Army, the 
Chief of Naval Operations, and the Commandant of the Marine 
Corps each to provide a report to the Senate Committee on Armed 
Services and the House Committee on Armed Services, not later 
than January 2, 2017, on the impact of reduced funding on 
rotary-wing aviation readiness and safety from fiscal year 2012 
to the present and an estimate of the impact to aviation 
readiness and safety if funding were maintained at levels 
consistent with the Budget Control Act of 2011 (Public Law 112-
25) through fiscal year 2023.

              Soldiers Medically Unavailable for Training

    The committee is concerned about the number of soldiers 
who, while assigned to deployable units, are medically 
unavailable for training or deployment. The committee shares 
the Army's desire to provide these soldiers the medical 
treatment they deserve, while at the same time moving them to 
Warrior Transition Units and/or discharging them as quickly as 
practicable. The committee recognizes the readiness strain that 
permanently non-deployable soldiers place on deployable units, 
and encourages the Army to make this process as streamlined as 
possible.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the Senate Committee on Armed Services 
and the House Committee on Armed Services by November 1, 2016, 
regarding the effects on readiness of medically non-deployable 
soldiers. The briefing should include, at a minimum, the number 
of medically non-deployable soldiers currently in deployable 
units, the average time a medically non-deployable soldier 
waits to be reassigned out of a deployable unit, the process 
the Army uses to discharge medically non-deployable soldiers, 
what the Army is doing to speed up the discharge process, and 
any issues that slow down the discharge process.

             Support Capabilities for Operations in Europe

    Since the end of the Cold War, the size and footprint of 
U.S. forces in Europe have decreased. Recently, however, 
Russian activities in the region have provided cause for 
reassessment. The Secretary of Defense recommended in the 
budget request for fiscal year 2017 to quadruple the allocation 
for the European Reassurance Initiative to $3.40 billion, 
saying that this money will go to pay for increased rotations 
of U.S. forces to Europe, increased prepositioned stocks, and 
increased multinational training, among other things. Moreover, 
a significant part of the Department's future focus will be on 
Eastern Europe, where the United States has not previously had 
a significant military footprint. This increased U.S. effort in 
Europe raises concerns about the adequacy of the logistical and 
other support capabilities needed to sustain future operations.
    In light of these concerns, the committee directs the 
Comptroller General of the United States to evaluate the 
following with regard to the Department's support capabilities 
for increased activities in Europe and provide a preliminary 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services on the 
following factors not later than February 1, 2017, with a 
report to follow at a date to be determined at the briefing:
    (1) To what extent have the U.S. European Command and 
supporting commands identified gaps in logistical and other 
support capabilities relevant to an increased presence under 
the European Reassurance Initiative;
    (2) How have the relevant Department of Defense 
organizations addressed any identified gaps in logistical and 
other support capabilities; and
    (3) To what extent have the relevant Department of Defense 
organizations evaluated requirements for prepositioned stocks 
and other forward-positioned equipment to support future 
operations in Europe and developed a joint strategy and plan to 
implement any needed changes to these items.

         Synthetic Training System and Small Arms Qualification

    The committee notes that in reviewing base security forces' 
response to the September 16, 2013, active-shooter attack at 
the Washington Navy Yard, Department of the Navy officials 
recognized the Navy's small-arms qualification programs are not 
aligned to post-9/11 force protection watch-standing 
requirements and that Navy programs and policies regarding 
hostile intent determination are unclear, under-resourced, and 
lack standardization among small-arms trainers. Also, the 
committee was concerned to learn that training prior to live-
fire qualification lacks requisite frequency or sufficient 
standardization across all commands or weapons types to develop 
satisfactory proficiency; small arms marksmanship instructors 
lack the tools, procedures, and training to teach proper 
shooting techniques and to remediate shooter deficiencies; Navy 
Security Forces and force protection personnel lack adequate 
training to enhance proficiency after initial qualification; 
and the crew-served weapon course of fire does not objectively 
measure accuracy.
    In support of the review's recommendation to address these 
training shortfalls through an improved small-arms training 
program, the committee encourages the Navy to proceed in a 
manner that will utilize synthetic marksmanship training 
systems that have a proven track record. For example, synthetic 
small arms training systems utilized by Navy Expeditionary 
Combat Command, Naval Special Warfare Command, and Naval Health 
Research Center, and the Joint Multi-National Training Center, 
are leveraging data collection and metric analysis to improve 
training efficiency and ensure that training effectiveness 
consistently transfers to live-fire qualifications and skills 
sustainment.
    The committee notes, however, that the limited objective 
experiment conducted on behalf of U.S. Fleet Forces Command to 
determine the most advantageous capabilities of small-arms 
simulators reported on a single basic skills simulation 
training system in their inventory and did not evaluate 
advanced systems used by other commands. As the Navy implements 
small-arms simulator training systems to meet force protection 
requirements and hostile intent determination gaps, the 
committee encourages the Navy to evaluate a broader range of 
systems including those described above and not be limited to 
existing basic firearms training and engagement skills training 
systems and programs of record.
    Toward that end, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Navy to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services, not later than September 30, 2016, regarding the 
Navy's assessment of advanced, innovative non-program-of-record 
small-arms weapons and crew-served training systems, including 
those at the commands mentioned above, and outlining the 
planned program elements and parameters that will be used to 
contract for any small-arms simulation system in fiscal year 
2017 and future fiscal years.

                             Other Matters


           Acquisition of Highly Technical Contract Services

    The committee notes that in June 2012, the Navy issued 
Office of the Chief of Naval Operations Instruction 4200.7 
addressing services contracting management that included 
``tripwires''' triggering higher level review of specific 
contracting issues. Among the specific issues for which 
tripwires were established was the level of proposed contractor 
labor rates in competitive cost-type and time-and-materials 
service contracts and individual task orders.
    According to the Navy instruction, tripwires were not 
intended to preclude execution, but instead to require higher 
level concurrence or notifications before continuing to 
execute. While the committee is generally supportive of efforts 
to oversee the cost and performance of contracts for services, 
the committee is concerned that the manner in which contracting 
organizations are interpreting this instruction may essentially 
be imposing a ceiling on labor rates in certain categories. The 
committee believes this may be occurring due to the 
unwillingness of lower level managers to seek higher level 
review and approval of proposed labor rates above those set by 
the tripwires, even in cases where such a request would be 
appropriate given the nature of the specific work to be 
performed. This approach may be affecting the service 
industry's ability to recruit and retain personnel in labor 
categories where there is significant competition among 
private-sector firms for limited numbers of highly qualified 
personnel, especially cybersecurity specialists.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to review the impact of the implementation and practice of the 
tripwire instruction with respect to labor rates on the ability 
to achieve contract objectives in areas where access to senior, 
highly skilled technical support is essential, and for which 
industry labor rates generally above the levels set by the 
tripwires are applicable and appropriate. The Secretary shall 
provide a briefing on his findings to the House Committee on 
Armed Services by December 1, 2016.

     Adoption of Tactical Explosive Detection Military Working Dogs

    The committee notes the Tactical Explosive Detection Dog 
(TEDD) program was established in January 2011 as a temporary, 
Army-funded program supporting Army Brigade Combat Teams by 
providing maneuver units with canine assets to mitigate 
casualties associated with improvised explosive devices. In 
2013, U.S. Central Command curtailed the requirement for TEDDs, 
and the TEDD program was terminated in February 2014. The 
Department of the Air Force, the executive agent for all 
military working dogs, delegated development of a disposition 
plan for the 229 TEDDs to the Department of the Army, through 
the Office of the Provost Marshall General (OPMG). The 
committee recognizes the challenge OPMG had in the disposition 
of TEDDs due to a limited transition window.
    However, the committee is aware of persistent concerns 
raised by former TEDD handlers regarding their opportunity to 
adopt the TEDDs. The committee notes that the Department of the 
Army has, on multiple occasions, examined this issue in a 
singular fashion, examining a specific handler or TEDD. Despite 
these reviews, the committee believes the Army has not been 
sufficiently responsive in addressing generally known 
challenges in the TEDD adoption process. The committee believes 
that the Army's reluctance to review the adoption application 
process holistically to ensure that military working dog 
handlers were provided the first opportunity to adopt TEDDs 
failed to meet the intent of military working dog adoption 
processes in law, instruction, and regulation.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a report to the Senate Committee on Armed 
Services and the House Committee on Armed Services by August 
31, 2016, that should address the following issues:
    (1) How TEDD handlers were identified and contacted to 
verify intent to adopt TEDD military working dogs, including a 
listing of all TEDD handlers, the method by which they were 
contacted, the handlers' stated intentions regarding TEDD 
adoption, and instances of handlers reporting errors in the 
adoption process;
    (2) What steps the Secretary has taken to ensure that all 
military working dog handlers have visibility into the adoption 
process of all military working dogs, including TEDDs;
    (3) The factors that led to instances in the adoption 
process of TEDDs where handlers did not have the first 
opportunity to adopt the TEDD, and how the Secretary intends to 
prevent future process errors in military working dog 
adoptions;
    (4) Any resource, legislative, or departmental policy 
changes needed to correct deficiencies in the adoption process; 
and
    (5) The process for selection of a handler for military 
working dog adoption when more than one handler requests to 
adopt the military working dog.

                    Army Explosive Ordnance Disposal

    The committee has been closely monitoring proposed changes 
to the Army's Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) force 
structure, force modernization, and branch proponency for 
impacts upon capability and capacity to provide scalable and 
tailorable EOD mission command and EOD forces to conduct 
counter-improvised explosive devices operations, counter-
unexploded ordnance operations, and combating weapons of mass 
destruction elimination operations in support of the Army and 
joint force commanders.
    The Secretary of the Army has recently informed the 
committee that the Training and Doctrine Command has 
established a capability manager for explosive ordnance 
disposal to integrate EOD force modernization activities across 
all of the Army's Centers of Excellence. However, the committee 
remains concerned that the Army has not clearly identified its 
future branch proponency requirements for an EOD Corps 
consisting of a fully integrated explosives ordnance disposal, 
ammunition, and explosives safety basic branch.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by December 1, 2016, on the Army's EOD branch. At a minimum, 
the report shall include:
    (1) EOD officer development and career management program 
depicting key development assignments and key leadership 
positions from lieutenant to that of Logistics Corps general 
officer;
    (2) EOD officer and EOD senior noncommissioned officer 
(NCO) standard of grade authorization requirements to fill the 
necessary positions throughout the institutional Army to ensure 
enduring health and viability of the EOD branch;
    (3) Description of the Army EOD School licensing process of 
EOD soldiers;
    (4) Identification of joint, interagency, intergovernmental 
and multinational EOD commissioned officer and NCO positions; 
and
    (5) A cost-benefit analysis on any proposed realignment or 
relocation of EOD organization, force structure, training, and 
branch proponency.

    Associated Unit Concept for Terminal High Altitude Area Defense 
                         Security Force Manning

    The committee recognizes the important mission of the 
Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) deployment in Guam 
and supports permanent basing as a means of establishing 
persistent deter-and-defeat capabilities in defense of the 
homeland and reassuring allies and partners. The committee 
appreciates the Army's commitment to total force integration 
and is encouraged by its support of opportunities to leverage 
cost savings and enable Active-Duty units to fill unique 
combatant command requirements by incorporating National Guard 
units into the THAAD security-force mission. Accordingly, the 
committee encourages the Department of the Army and the 
National Guard Bureau to continue to work cooperatively to 
ensure there are adequate resources programmed in fiscal year 
2018 to support an Active-Guard associated unit for THAAD 
security force manning on Guam.

                  Collaboration With U.S. Universities

    The committee notes that in February 2015, the Secretary of 
Defense announced his goal to build the ``Force of the Future'' 
to enable the Department of Defense to maintain a competitive 
edge by, among other things, attracting the top talent from 
corporations and universities to serve the nation. One 
initiative from this effort is to improve and enhance 
Department of Defense internship programs in order to increase 
recruitment at colleges and universities.
    The committee encourages the Department to pursue the 
opportunity to work with U.S. universities to shape certain 
curricula and programs with the goal of providing specific 
``whole-of-government'' education for potential future 
Department leaders, emphasizing enterprise thinking, unity of 
effort, and creative, viable solutions to global issues that 
affect national security. The committee believes it is 
important for the Department to leverage this program to 
attract future talent to the civilian workforce. In return, the 
Department benefits from placing military and civilian 
personnel in the Secretary of Defense Corporate Fellows Program 
and selected academic programs provided by universities.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than November 1, 2016, on efforts undertaken to 
encourage universities to offer master's and doctoral level 
programs in National Security and Strategic Studies, especially 
in regions where universities could leverage the density of 
existing joint, inter-organizational, and multinational 
organizations.

                         Combat Footwear Survey

    The committee recognizes the ongoing efforts of the 
military services to ensure that all new recruits are issued 
combat footwear of appropriate size and fit upon entering the 
military. Proper combat footwear fit not only maximizes comfort 
but prevents injury and can improve combat effectiveness. The 
committee report (H. Rept. 114-102) accompanying the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 acknowledged the 
growing number of women in the military and directed the Office 
of the Secretary of Defense to conduct a study to determine 
whether the military services were meeting the needs of female 
service members with regard to proper combat footwear. Upon 
review of the study report, the committee notes, with concern, 
that the Army, the largest service in terms of force structure, 
is the only service not to design combat footwear using lasts 
designed specifically for women. The study report also noted 
that the Army's most recent survey questioning whether service 
members were satisfied with the fit and sizing of combat boots 
was in 1992.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to conduct a survey of no fewer than 2,000 female Active Duty 
and Reserve Component soldiers from a variety of relevant 
military occupational specialties to determine whether or not 
they are satisfied with the fit, size, and performance of 
combat footwear issued to them. In order to establish 
appropriate comparisons, this study should also undertake, but 
not be limited to, a comparison of satisfaction rates among 
male soldiers and among both male and female service members 
from the other military services.
    The committee further directs the Secretary of the Army to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than September 1, 2016, on the results of the study.

                  Disabled Veterans Non-Profit Groups

    The committee remains concerned that the Department of 
Defense is not maximizing the talents and efforts of non-profit 
groups who employ significant numbers of persons with 
disabilities, including veterans, who make products for the 
Department as participants in the AbilityOne Program. The 
committee encourages the Department to continue to explore 
additional opportunities to utilize the expertise, capability, 
and capacity of these non-profit groups and incentivize the 
Department's acquisition workforce to give them increased 
consideration as contracting solutions when doing so achieves 
the Department's acquisition objectives.

            Disposal of Excess Agriculture-Related Equipment

    The committee is aware that the Department of Defense has a 
disposal process for its excess or unused equipment. Many 
individuals, including firefighters, state agencies, law 
enforcement, and private citizens, have access to equipment 
through this disposal process. The committee believes that some 
of this equipment might be appropriate for use in agricultural 
operations, and that veteran-owned farming operations could 
benefit from greater awareness of what is available. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Director of the Defense Logistics 
Agency to provide a briefing, not later than December 1, 2016, 
to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives on all agriculture-related equipment disposals 
for the last five years. The briefing shall include an itemized 
list of each item disposed, a brief description of each item, 
the monetary value of each item, and whether the item was 
transferred to another government entity or a private company 
or citizen.

        End-of-Service Veterinary Care for Military Working Dogs

    The committee recognizes that military working dogs serve 
the nation as extensions of military law enforcement as well as 
through detection and tracking of drugs, explosives, and 
personnel threats. After numerous tours, military working dogs 
are retired from active service and made available for 
adoption. The committee recognizes that the physical 
environments in which these military working dogs operate may 
pose future health challenges for the adopting entity. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of the 
United States to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services not later than November 18, 2016, on the 
following:
    (1) An assessment of the number of living retired military 
working dogs and an estimate of their annual veterinary care 
expenses;
    (2) The extent to which a military working dog's health is 
impacted by the environment in which the dog served and 
subsequent costs;
    (3) Options for military working dog post-retirement care; 
and
    (4) Any other issues the Comptroller General determines 
appropriate with respect to military working dog veterinary 
health following retirement.

               Flame-Resistant Military Uniform Postures

    In the committee report (H. Rept. 113-446) accompanying the 
Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2015, the committee directed the military 
services to provide a report on emerging flame-resistant (FR) 
technologies for military uniforms and evaluate where these 
technologies can provide cost-effective protection to a wider 
range of service members. The committee noted that distribution 
of flame-resistant uniforms is limited to military units that 
are preparing to deploy to contingency operations, are 
currently deployed in contingency operations, and to those 
serving in certain military occupational specialties. Since 
that time, the Army and the Marine Corps conducted an initial 
study and have begun to review additional commercial products 
for use in varying degrees of FR protection. In light of this, 
the committee encourages all military services to consider 
implementing FR uniform protective postures based on an 
assessment of the threat and the operating environment. The 
committee does not intend for the services to alter existing 
protection and reliability requirements for units deployed to 
contingency operations.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army, Secretary 
of the Navy, Secretary of the Air Force, and the Commandant of 
the Marine Corps to provide a joint briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by August 15, 2016, that outlines 
the plan and process, including costs, for providing FR uniform 
protection postures for all military personnel.

  Military Free Fall Course as a Requirement of the U.S. Army Special 
                      Forces Qualification Course

    The committee is aware that in 2012 the U.S. Army Special 
Operations Command approved a concept and implementation plan 
for offering the Military Free Fall (MFF) course to all Special 
Forces upon completion of the Special Forces Qualification 
Course (SFQC), but prior to graduation. The committee would 
like to better understand the addition of the MFF course on 
Special Forces, including the impact on overall recruiting and 
retention if successful completion of MFF becomes a requirement 
for graduating SFQC.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Commander of U.S. 
Special Operations Command to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than October 1, 2016, on 
the MFF course, including impacts on readiness if MFF becomes 
mandatory.

                         Military Glove System

    The committee is aware that the military services currently 
lack a single glove system effective in a wide variety of 
climate environments. Modern organizational clothing and 
individual equipment (OCIE) provide service members with a 
distinct combat advantage. The committee encourages the 
services to pursue commercial-off-the-shelf solutions for 
military handwear and other personal protective equipment (PPE) 
and OCIE items to ensure that service members are provided with 
innovative, readily available solutions. Further, the committee 
supports efforts by the services to support a strong domestic 
industrial base to ensure that innovative and cost-effective 
commercial PPE/OCIE items are available in the future.

                 National Guard Cyber Protection Teams

    The committee is aware that the Army National Guard has 
developed a plan to establish 10 cyber protection teams (CPT) 
to complement the Army's build for its contribution to the 
cyber mission force. The committee also understands that 
decisions relating to the establishment of those teams, and 
where they would be based, were made late in the budget cycle, 
and thus were not properly synchronized in the fiscal year 2017 
budget request. The committee is aware that the Army National 
Guard has established three CPTs, but because of the lack of 
funding in fiscal year 2017, it will not be on track with its 
schedule for establishing teams this year.
    Further, the committee recognizes that these Army National 
Guard CPTs are not integrated into the Army Cyber Command 
structure for cyber mission teams. This is unlike the approach 
the Air Force has taken, which integrates some Air National 
Guard units as part of its cyber mission force structure. The 
committee notes that the National Guard brings important 
capabilities to the Army, including experience and skills from 
industry experts, and the ability to bring greater outreach and 
support to States. The committee believes that the Army needs 
to work more expeditiously to determine and codify the role 
National Guard forces should take in the cyber domain.
    The committee supports the training of the National Guard 
CPTs planned for fiscal year 2017, and urges the Army, as well 
as the National Guard, to ensure that projected funding 
disconnects are resolved in the fiscal year 2018 budget 
request. The committee also urges Army Cyber Command to 
finalize and promulgate clear policy about the role of Reserve 
Component CPTs in the Army's cyber mission build.

   National Guard Unit for the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana 
                                Islands

    In response to section 515 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 (Public Law 113-66), the 
National Guard Bureau (NGB) in August 2015 reported that 
establishing National Guard units in both the Territory of 
American Samoa and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana 
Islands (CNMI) is feasible, but ``major steps are necessary to 
reach that end state.'' Among the issues raised were the 
territories' limited ability to recruit, maintain, and sustain 
units, and that the costing framework to transfer force 
structure from one State or territory to American Samoa or the 
CNMI would have an impact on the donor State's or territory's 
ability to accommodate the NGB's ``Essential Ten'' homeland 
capabilities.
    With these issues in mind, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services, not later than February 1, 2017, 
on how the Department of Defense would establish, maintain, and 
sustain a National Guard unit in the Commonwealth of the 
Northern Mariana Islands. At a minimum, the briefing shall 
include details regarding force structure allocation, 
recruiting, and funding requirements, including military 
construction, that would allow the committee to evaluate the 
cost and overall impact of locating a National Guard unit in 
CNMI.

  Procurement and Inspection of Armored Commercial Passenger-Carrying 
                                Vehicles

    In a report and briefing to Congress on procurement and 
inspection of armored commercial passenger-carrying vehicles to 
transport civilian employees of the Department of Defense, 
dated August 2015, the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics found that Department of 
Defense components procure and inspect armored commercial 
passenger-carrying vehicles in accordance with applicable laws 
and regulations and that Departmental policy provides 
components the necessary flexibility to procure armored 
vehicles to meet mission requirements.
    However, the committee has learned that a ``presumption of 
quality'' on the part of the General Services Administration, 
and in the absence of known and clearly understood 
specifications, calls into question whether the Department's 
acquisition policies and procedures for the armoring of these 
vehicles provide appropriate physical protection for Department 
of Defense civilians. The committee is concerned that the rigor 
applied to the procurement of armored military vehicles is 
absent for the procurement of armored commercial passenger-
carrying vehicles. The committee questions whether appropriate 
standards are in place to ensure safety, quality, qualified 
vendor selection, contract compliance, sustainment, and 
reliability of armored commercial passenger-carrying vehicles.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to assess the following and provide a 
preliminary briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, 
not later than September 30, 2016, with a final report at a 
mutually agreed-upon date:
    (1) The extent to which DOD components complied with 
Department of Defense Instruction (DODI) C-4500.51 in procuring 
armored commercial passenger-carrying vehicles over the past 5 
years, including the requirement or specifications for vetting 
of suppliers, ballistic and blast mitigation protection and 
inspection, automotive safety, and road performance;
    (2) To what extent contracts for armored commercial 
passenger-carrying vehicles have been awarded over the past 5 
years to firms that do not have a valid U.S. security clearance 
and whether such contract awards are compliant with DODI C-
4500.51, including procurements from third-party brokers, both 
domestic and international, and leased vehicles;
    (3) To what extent the Department of Defense has purchased, 
quarantined, and refurbished armored commercial passenger-
carrying vehicles that do not meet contract specifications, and 
at what cost above the original purchase or lease price;
    (4) To what extent the Department of Defense has guidance, 
policy, and procedures in place to track purchase, acceptance, 
deployment, and fleet management of armored commercial 
passenger-carrying vehicles used to transport civilian 
employees; and
    (5) How the protection and security requirements, 
specifications, processes, and policies for acquiring armored 
commercial passenger-carrying vehicles to transport civilian 
employees of the Department of Defense compare with the same 
for uniformed military personnel and compare with those for 
employees of the U.S. Department of State.

      Public-Private Partnerships for Cyber Education and Training

    The committee is aware of the efforts of the Reserve 
Components of the military services, including the National 
Guard, to develop cyber protection teams that can leverage the 
best attributes, authorities, and capabilities of both civilian 
and military cyber practitioners. The committee recognizes that 
Reserve Component cyber personnel often bring a wealth of 
experience from their civilian life, coupled with the 
additional training and discipline instilled by military 
service. The committee is concerned, though, that the current 
training pipeline is a major bottleneck to fully manning and 
training cyber mission teams. This problem is exacerbated by 
the fact that current active units are prioritized in the 
current schoolhouses, which already have limited available 
training billets.
    The committee believes that the Department of Defense 
should look at additional ways to diversify the training 
pipeline available to all cyber personnel to help relieve that 
bottleneck. Elsewhere in this report, the committee encourages 
the Department to use Reserve Officer Training Corps programs, 
as well as senior military academies, to develop and implement 
common curricula that can satisfy the joint training standard. 
Also elsewhere in this report, the committee directs the 
Department of Defense to review its cyber training equivalency 
process to help improve the ability to give cyber personnel 
credit for other experience, certifications, or commercial 
training they may have received that meets the joint training 
standard. The committee also encourages the Department to look 
at additional ways to build public-private partnerships with 
academia, industry, and non-profit institutions as a way to 
develop additional training curricula equivalent to the joint 
standard to diversify that pipeline.

  Retaining Critical Skills and STEM Capabilities During Headquarters 
                               Downsizing

    The committee notes that the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92) directed the 
Secretary of Defense to achieve not less than a 25 percent 
reduction in headquarters, administrative, and support 
activities of the Department of Defense during the period 
beginning with fiscal year 2015 and ending with fiscal year 
2019. The committee remains concerned that these cuts may 
result in the loss of critical capabilities across the 
Department of Defense and military services, particularly in 
the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) 
competencies. As demonstrated by section 1105 of this Act, the 
committee has made clear its intention that the Department of 
Defense and the military services recruit, hire, and retain the 
Nation's top scientific and engineering talent. It would, 
therefore, be imprudent for the military services and the 
Department to achieve headquarters, administrative, and support 
activities reductions by reducing the number of STEM employees 
just because their workplace resides within a headquarters 
function.
    Public Law 114-92 requires the Secretary, as part of the 
annual budget submission for the Department of Defense, to 
include a report describing and assessing the progress of the 
Department in implementing the headquarters reduction plan for 
fiscal years 2017, 2018, and 2019. As part of this reporting 
requirement, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
include a detailed assessment on the downsizing of employees, 
including through attrition, by component or military service 
that are considered STEM employees, and the operational impact 
on the Department of Defense or military service of that loss.
    Further, as the committee has stated in past House reports, 
any reduction in personnel should not be implemented as an 
across-the-board cut, but rather should be strategically 
designed to retain critical functions, capabilities, and 
skillsets--including, but not limited to the depots, the 
arsenals, the ammunition plants and the acquisition workforce--
and to eliminate unnecessary or redundant functions or 
skillsets that do not benefit or support mission requirements.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense and the 
Secretaries of each of the military services to provide a 
report to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives not later than February 15 of 
calendar years 2017, 2018, and 2019, on any depot, arsenal, or 
ammunition plant position that has been reduced as a result of 
headquarters downsizing. The report should include the position 
description, critical skills required for that position, and 
justification for the reduction. The report should also provide 
details on any gaps in compliance with section 2464 of title 
10, United States Code, at the facility from which a position 
was cut or gaps in critical skill sets at an arsenal.

              The Role of the National Security Contractor

    The committee recognizes that government contractors 
provide critical subject-matter and engineering expertise, as 
well as help to ensure program continuity across the spectrum 
of national security and intelligence programs. The committee 
acknowledges that the Department of Defense and the 
Intelligence Community will continue to work with these 
essential partners to ensure national security. At the same 
time, the committee reminds these agencies of their 
responsibility to remain vigilant with taxpayer funding by 
maintaining appropriate levels of contract oversight and 
regular review.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations


              Section 301--Authorization of Appropriations

    This section would authorize appropriations for operation 
and maintenance activities at the levels identified in section 
4301 of division D of this Act.

                   Subtitle B--Energy and Environment


     Section 311--Rule of Construction Regarding Alternative Fuel 
                        Procurement Requirement

    This section would amend section 526 of the Energy 
Independence and Security Act of 2007 (Public Law 110-140) to 
clarify that this section shall not be construed as a 
constraint on any conventional or unconventional fuel 
procurement necessary for military operations.

                 Subtitle C--Logistics and Sustainment


 Section 321--Pilot Program for Inclusion of Certain Industrial Plants 
     in the Armament Retooling and Manufacturing Support Initiative

    This section would authorize a 5-year pilot program to 
allow for government-owned, contractor-operated (GOCO) 
industrial plants to participate in the Armament Retooling and 
Manufacturing Support (ARMS) Initiative (10 U.S.C. 4551-4555).
    The committee notes the ARMS Initiative currently applies 
to GOCO ammunition manufacturing facilities and depots. The 
committee understands the ARMS Initiative was created to allow 
the Army to rent portions of its ammunition plants that are not 
being used in production to commercial companies. The committee 
notes the revenues from the property rental are used to help 
pay for the operation, maintenance, and environmental cleanup 
at the facilities; these savings in overhead cost lower the 
production cost of the goods manufactured, as well as fund the 
environmental cleanup at no cost to the government.
    In the committee report (H. Rept. 113-446) accompanying the 
Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2015, the committee required the Secretary of 
the Army to provide a report on manufacturing infrastructure 
investment for GOCO Joint Systems Manufacturing Center-Lima 
(JSMC-L), in an effort to obtain a comprehensive analysis of 
the operational costs associated with this facility, and to 
encourage the Army to explore more effective and efficient 
operating models at JSMC-L. The report recommended amending the 
ARMS Initiative to include GOCO industrial plants as a means to 
improve operating efficiency. The committee believes that this 
recommendation warrants further consideration, and believes the 
authorized pilot program should provide the opportunity to gain 
a better understanding of ways to improve operating 
efficiencies at JSMC-L. This provision does not authorize GOCO 
industrial plants' use of Army Working Capital Funds.

          Section 322--Private Sector Port Loading Assessment

    This section would require the Secretary of the Navy to 
conduct a quarterly assessment of the private sector port 
loading for Norfolk, Virginia; Mayport, Florida; San Diego, 
California; Puget Sound, Washington; and Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. 
This section would also require the Secretary to brief the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives on the assessments by October 1, 2016, and to 
provide quarterly updates through September 30, 2021.

 Section 323--Limitation on Availability of Funds for Defense Contract 
                           Management Agency

    This section would limit funding for the Defense Contract 
Management Agency (DCMA) until the DCMA Director provides a 
briefing to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives on the agency's plan to foster the 
adoption, implementation, and verification of the Department of 
Defense's revised Item Unique Identification policy across the 
Department and the defense industrial base.

                          Subtitle D--Reports


   Section 331--Modification of Annual Department of Defense Energy 
                           Management Reports

    This section would modify subsection (a) and (b) of section 
2925 of title 10, United States Code, to modify and extend, 
with a sunset date of January 31, 2021, the ``Annual Report 
Related to Installations Energy Management'' report and the 
``Annual Report Related to Operational Energy'' report. This 
amendment would supersede section 1080 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92).

 Section 332--Report on Equipment Purchased from Foreign Entities and 
              Authority to Adjust Army Arsenal Labor Rates

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees 30 days 
after the submission of the President's budget request for 
fiscal year 2018 on weapons, weapons systems, components, 
subcomponents, and end-items purchased from foreign entities 
that could be manufactured domestically in depots or arsenals 
as well as a plan for moving that workload into such arsenals 
or depots. It also would authorize the establishment of a 2-
year pilot program permitting Army arsenals to adjust their 
labor rates charged to customers based upon changes in workload 
and other factors. Finally, this section would also require the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
by May 1, 2019, that assesses certain information related to 
arsenal labor rates.

                       Subtitle E--Other Matters


             Section 341--Explosive Ordnance Disposal Corps

    This section would amend section 3063 of title 10, United 
States Code, to add Explosive Ordnance Disposal Corps to the 
list of Army branches.

            Section 342--Explosive Ordnance Disposal Program

    This section would establish a joint Explosive Ordnance 
Disposal (EOD) program, with the Navy as executive agent for 
the Department of Defense, to coordinate and integrate 
research, development, and procurement for EOD defense 
programs. This section would also require the Secretary of 
Defense to conduct a review of the management structure of the 
program and to brief the results of the review to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives by May 1, 2018.

Section 343--Expansion of Definition of Structures Interfering With Air 
                     Commerce and National Defense

    This section would amend section 44718 of title 49, United 
States Code, to authorize the Secretary of Transportation to 
include the interests of national security, as determined by 
the Secretary of Defense, in the Secretary's aeronautical 
studies and reports required under this this statute.

 Section 344--Development of Personal Protective Equipment for Female 
                          Marines and Soldiers

    This section would require the Army and Marine Corps to 
develop a joint acquisition strategy to provide more effective 
personal protective equipment and organizational clothing and 
equipment to meet the specific and unique requirements for 
female Marines and soldiers.

 Section 345--Study on Space-Available Travel System of the Department 
                               of Defense

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct a study of the space-available travel system and to 
provide the results of such a study to the congressional 
defense committees within 180 days after entering into a 
contract with a federally funded research and development 
center for the purposes of conducting such a study.

   Section 346--Supply of Specialty Motors from Certain Manufacturers

    This section would exempt certain small business 
manufacturers of specialty motors from the requirements of 
section 431.25 of title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, 
regarding energy conservation standards.

Section 347--Limitation on Use of Certain Funds Until Establishment and 
Implementation of Required Process by Which Members of the Armed Forces 
        May Carry Appropriate Firearms on Military Installations

    This section would limit the obligation and expenditure of 
15 percent of the funds authorized to be appropriated for 
Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide, for the Office of the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Policy for fiscal year 2017, 
until the Secretary of Defense establishes and implements a 
process by which members of the Armed Forces may carry an 
appropriate firearm on a military installation, as required by 
section 526 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92).

              TITLE IV--MILITARY PERSONNEL AUTHORIZATIONS

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                       Subtitle A--Active Forces


              Section 401--End Strengths for Active Forces

    This section would authorize the following end strengths 
for Active Duty personnel of the Armed Forces as of September 
30, 2017:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       FY 2017                 Change from
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                    Service                        FY 2016                  Committee
                                                  Authorized    Request       Recom-      FY 2017      FY 2016
                                                                            mendation     Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army...........................................      475,000      460,000      480,000       20,000        5,000
Navy...........................................      329,200      322,900      324,615        1,715       -4,585
USMC...........................................      184,000      182,000      185,000        3,000        1,000
Air Force......................................      320,715      317,000      321,000        4,000          285
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total....................................    1,308,915    1,281,900    1,310,615       28,715        1,700
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Section 402--Revisions in Permanent Active Duty End Strength Minimum 
                                 Levels

    This section would establish new minimum Active Duty end 
strengths for the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force as of 
September 30, 2017. The committee recommends 480,000 as the 
minimum Active Duty end strength for the Army, 322,900 as the 
minimum Active Duty end strength for the Navy, 185,000 as the 
minimum Active Duty end strength for the Marine Corps, and 
321,000 as the minimum Active Duty end strength for the Air 
Force.

                       Subtitle B--Reserve Forces


            Section 411--End Strengths for Selected Reserve

    This section would authorize the following end strengths 
for Selected Reserve personnel, including the end strength for 
Reserves on Active Duty in support of the Reserves, as of 
September 30, 2017:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       FY 2017                 Change from
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                    Service                        FY 2016                  Committee
                                                  Authorized    Request       Recom-      FY 2017      FY 2016
                                                                            mendation     Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard............................      342,000      335,000      350,000       15,000        8,000
Army Reserve...................................      198,000      195,000      205,000       10,000        7,000
Navy Reserve...................................       57,400       58,000       58,000            0          600
Marine Corps Reserve...........................       38,900       38,500       38,500            0         -400
Air National Guard.............................      105,500      105,700      105,700            0          200
Air Force Reserve..............................       69,200       69,000       69,000            0         -200
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total....................................      811,000      801,200      826,200       25,000       15,200
Coast Guard Reserve............................        7,000        7,000        7,000            0            0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Section 412--End Strengths for Reserves on Active Duty in Support of 
                              the Reserves

    This section would authorize the following end strengths 
for Reserves on Active Duty in support of the Reserves as of 
September 30, 2017:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       FY 2017                 Change from
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                    Service                        FY 2016                  Committee
                                                  Authorized    Request       Recom-      FY 2017      FY 2016
                                                                            mendation     Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard............................       30,770       30,155       30,155            0         -615
Army Reserve...................................       16,261       16,261       16,261            0            0
Navy Reserve...................................        9,934        9,955        9,955            0           21
Marine Corps Reserve...........................        2,260        2,261        2,261            0            1
Air National Guard.............................       14,748       14,764       14,764            0           16
Air Force Reserve..............................        3,032        2,955        2,955            0          -77
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total....................................       77,005       76,351       76,351            0         -654
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

   Section 413--End Strengths for Military Technicians (Dual Status)

    This section would authorize the following end strengths 
for military technicians (dual status) as of September 30, 
2017:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       FY 2017                 Change from
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                    Service                        FY 2016                  Committee
                                                  Authorized    Request       Recom-      FY 2017      FY 2016
                                                                            mendation     Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard............................       26,099       25,507       25,507            0         -592
Army Reserve...................................        7,395        7,570        7,570            0          175
Air National Guard.............................       22,104       22,103       22,103            0           -1
Air Force Reserve..............................        9,814       10,061       10,061            0          247
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total....................................       65,412       65,241       65,241            0         -171
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Section 414--Fiscal Year 2017 Limitation on Number of Non-Dual Status 
                              Technicians

    This section would establish the maximum end strengths for 
the Reserve Components of the Army and Air Force for non-dual 
status technicians as of September 30, 2017:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       FY 2017                 Change from
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                    Service                        FY 2016                  Committee
                                                  Authorized    Request       Recom-      FY 2017      FY 2016
                                                                            mendation     Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard............................        1,600        1,600        1,600            0            0
Air National Guard.............................          350          350          350            0            0
Army Reserve...................................          595          420          420            0         -175
Air Force Reserve..............................           90           90           90            0            0
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total....................................        2,635        2,460        2,460            0         -175
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Section 415--Maximum Number of Reserve Personnel Authorized To Be on 
                  Active Duty for Operational Support

    This section would authorize, as required by section 115(b) 
of title 10, United States Code, the maximum number of Reserve 
Component personnel who may be on Active Duty or full-time 
National Guard duty during fiscal year 2017 to provide 
operational support. The personnel authorized here do not count 
against the end strengths authorized by section 401 or section 
412 of this Act unless the duration on Active Duty exceeds the 
limitations in section 115(b)(2) of title 10, United States 
Code.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       FY 2017                 Change from
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                    Service                        FY 2016                  Committee
                                                  Authorized    Request       Recom-      FY 2017      FY 2016
                                                                            mendation     Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard............................       17,000       17,000       17,000            0            0
Army Reserve...................................       13,000       13,000       13,000            0            0
Navy Reserve...................................        6,200        6,200        6,200            0            0
Marine Corps Reserve...........................        3,000        3,000        3,000            0            0
Air National Guard.............................       16,000       16,000       16,000            0            0
Air Force Reserve..............................       14,000       14,000       14,000            0            0
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total....................................       69,200       69,200       69,200            0            0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

   Section 416--Sense of Congress on Full-Time Support for the Army 
                             National Guard

    This section would express a sense of Congress that an 
adequately supported, full-time support force consisting of 
active and reserve personnel and military technicians for the 
Army National Guard is essential to maintaining the readiness 
of the Army National Guard.

              Subtitle C--Authorization of Appropriations


                    Section 421--Military Personnel

    This section would authorize appropriations for military 
personnel at the levels identified in the funding table in 
section 4401 of division D of this Act.

                   TITLE V--MILITARY PERSONNEL POLICY

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


 Army National Guard Preventive Intervention for Suicide and Substance 
                                 Abuse

    The committee commends the Army National Guard for 
implementing a new, proactive approach to assessing the at-risk 
behaviors of members of the National Guard and for making 
suicide and substance abuse prevention a priority. The 
committee recognizes the Army National Guard's focused efforts 
to combat behaviors that may lead to substance abuse and 
suicide among service members, through the implementation of 
the Prevention, Response and Outreach program (PRO). PRO, which 
is an evidenced-based model that proactively identifies at-risk 
behaviors before soldiers are at a point of crisis, employs 
data-driven decisions to initiate commander interventions, 
monitor completion of support programs, and track follow-up to 
ensure ongoing support is available. The committee encourages 
the Army National Guard to continue its efforts by leveraging 
expertise to accelerate implementation of preventive measures 
such as those in the PRO program.

 Briefing on Credentialing Programs for Service Members in Combat Arms 
                              Specialties

    The committee is supportive of efforts made by the services 
to encourage service members to earn civilian credentials in 
comparable fields to their military occupations while on duty. 
These programs have the potential to remove an obstacle to 
employment faced by members of the military after they conclude 
their service. However, the committee is concerned that the 
opportunity to earn these credentials is limited for service 
members in combat arms fields. While this is largely due to the 
lack of an equivalent profession outside of uniform, the 
Department of Defense identified in a 2013 report to Congress 
that these service members possess soft skills such as 
``leadership, problem-solving, and team-building [which] can be 
related to the skills and credentials required for civilian 
careers.'' The committee agrees with this assessment that the 
skills, character, and training that our service members 
possess make them outstanding potential employees. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretaries of the military services 
to brief the House Committee on Armed Service no later than 120 
days from the date of the enactment of this Act on the 
availability of credentials provided by accredited bodies which 
are aligned with the skills possessed by service members in 
combat arms specialties as well as how service members in these 
types of specialties are informed of those opportunities.

                 Briefing on Stars and Stripes Funding

    Before the Secretary of Defense or the Defense Media 
Activity makes a determination or takes action to remove or 
reduce the appropriated funding for the Stars and Stripes, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense or his designee to 
brief the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives on the justification or determination for the 
reduction or removal of Stars and Stripes from appropriated 
funding.

             Community and Military Education Partnerships

    The committee is aware that partnerships exist between the 
military and civilian communities to enhance education support 
of all children by understanding the needs and perspective of 
military children. Therefore, the committee directs Secretary 
of Defense to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services not later than March 1, 2017, on the policies 
governing ongoing partnership efforts between the Department 
and communities with unusually high concentrations of military 
dependents enrolled in public schools. The briefing should 
address the following elements: an evaluation of partnership 
efforts in areas considered overseas assignments with unusually 
high concentrations of military dependents enrolled; 
organizations and resources currently dedicated to enhancement 
of these community partnerships; policies and guidelines 
governing the funding of community partnerships; and any other 
matters the Secretary deems relevant.

Comptroller General Review of the Military Entrance Processing Stations 
                          Medical Examinations

    The committee understands that it is often difficult for 
the military services to have full visibility of the medical 
history of potential recruits. The committee is concerned that 
incomplete medical information and inadequate medical screening 
may result in attrition before the Active Duty enlistees' 
initial commitments are fulfilled. Further, the committee is 
concerned that the lack of availability of the Department of 
Defense electronic health record within the Military Entrance 
Processing Station (MEPS) exacerbates the lack of visibility of 
pre-service medical conditions by the services throughout the 
individual's career. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Comptroller General of the United States to conduct a review of 
the MEPS medical screening and submit a report on results of 
the review to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate 
and the House of Representatives not later than March 1, 2017. 
The review shall address, at a minimum, the following:
    (1) An evaluation of the extent to which attrition prior to 
completion of initial commitment is related to medical reasons;
    (2) An assessment of the processes in place for recruiters 
and at MEPS for identifying, screening, and tracking medical 
qualifications of applicants; and
    (3) An assessment of whether the current structure of the 
MEPS supports optimal medical screening and permanent 
documentation of medical conditions identified prior to initial 
entry.

            Cyber Science Education at the Service Academies

    The committee recognizes the growing threat to United 
States national, economic, and infrastructure security, among 
others, from destructive and disruptive cyberattacks by 
malicious government, criminal, and individual actors. The 
Department has formally recognized cyberspace as a domain of 
warfare that has become as critical to military operations as 
land, sea, air, and space, and as such, the military must be 
able to defend and operate within it. The committee believes 
that this practice should begin at the earliest levels of 
education within the U.S. military. The committee therefore 
encourages the Department to recognize the importance of cyber 
education within each of the U.S. military service academies 
and actively promote cyber sciences education and training 
within the service's respective curriculum.

               Database Tracking System for Valor Awards

    The committee commends the Department of Defense for its 
commitment to improving the awards and decoration process in 
order to recognize service members for their actions in a 
timely and efficient manner. The Department's recent Military 
Decorations and Awards Review, in conjunction with the 
Department's report on the Medal of Honor Process that was 
directed in the committee report (H. Rept. 113-446) 
accompanying the Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015, highlighted numerous 
ways to improve the timeliness of processing Medal of Honor 
recommendations and mitigate the mishandling or loss of a 
nomination. The committee encourages the Department to develop 
and implement a Department-wide electronic awards system, much 
like the Marine Corps Improved Awards Processing System, in 
order to streamline and facilitate online processing from 
initiation through approval, and provide better visibility of 
high-level valor awards, as well as to serve as the official 
system of record for preserving the award documents for later 
verification.

         Dual Military Shared Parental Leave Feasibility Study

    The committee notes that dual military couples are faced 
with unique challenges after the birth of a child. Women 
account for 15.6 % (201,318) of the active duty force and the 
number of annual births for active duty women is typically 
between 15,000 and 16,000 or about 7-8% of the women on active 
duty every year. Currently, a service member who gives birth is 
afforded 12 weeks leave and a service member whose spouse gives 
birth is eligible for 10 days of parental leave. There are 
approximately 84,000 dual military marriages that have to 
balance the challenges of two of the most solemn commitments 
they can make: a commitment to serve their country and a 
commitment to start and support a family.
    The committee recognizes that paid maternity and parental 
leave can encourage recruitment and retention and help support 
the well-being of military families, especially those dual 
serving military families. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to study the feasibility of allowing dual 
military couples to allocate shared parental leave based on the 
needs of their family. Specifically, the Secretary should 
address the impact on military recruitment, retention, and 
readiness, as well as the medical impact on the service members 
and the ability of both service members to bond with their 
child. The committee further directs the Secretary of Defense 
to brief the House Committee on Armed Services on his findings 
by December 1, 2016.

 Enhanced Access and Consideration before Discharge Review Boards and 
                 Correction of Military Records Boards

    The committee recognizes the efforts made by the Department 
of Defense and the military departments to ensure applicants 
before Discharge Review Boards and Boards for the Correction of 
Military Records receive full and fair consideration of their 
applications for discharge upgrades. However, the committee 
encourages the Department to look for additional opportunities 
to enhance the review process, and allow applicants every 
opportunity to present the facts associated with their 
application. Therefore, the committee encourages the Department 
to extend the ``liberal consideration'' standard established 
for those applicants who allege a nexus between their 
misconduct and a diagnosis of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder or 
related conditions to all discharge upgrade cases considered by 
Discharge Review Boards, in addition to Boards for the 
Correction of Military Records.
    In addition, the committee notes that advances in 
technology have made remote communication through video 
teleconferencing, telephone and similar technology more 
efficient and cost-effective than ever before. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in coordination 
with the Secretaries of the military departments, to examine 
the feasibility of incorporating commercial, off-the-shelf 
video and video teleconferencing technologies to allow 
applicants to the Discharge Review Board or, when appropriate, 
the Boards for the Correction of Military Records, to appear 
before the boards remotely. The committee further directs the 
Secretary to provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed 
Services of the House of Representatives not later than 
February 1, 2017, on the results of the examination.

  Implementation by the Services of the Recommendations Listed in the 
 ``Program to Assist Veterans to Acquire Commercial Driver's Licenses 
                          Report to Congress''

    The committee notes that the Moving Ahead for Progress in 
the 21st Century Act (P.L. 112-141) mandated the creation of a 
report from the Secretary of Transportation, in consultation 
with the Secretary of Defense, and in cooperation with the 
States, to study the regulatory, economic, and administrative 
challenges in obtaining Commercial Drivers Licenses by members 
and former members of the Armed Forces who received training 
and operated military Commercial Motor Vehicles safely during 
their service. The result was the Federal Motor Carrier Safety 
Administration's (FMCSA) report ``Program to Assist Veterans to 
Acquire Commercial Driver's Licenses Report to Congress''. The 
committee is aware that while some of the recommendations have 
been partially implemented by particular Services, some of the 
Services have yet to take action on the proposed 
recommendations. Easing the transition to civilian employment 
for our service men and women should be a priority of the 
Department of Defense, especially when the skills and training 
gained while in the service are applicable to the civilian 
market. Accordingly, the committee directs the service 
secretaries to provide a briefing to the congressional defense 
committees, no later than February 1, 2017, regarding where the 
services currently are in their efforts to implement these 
recommendations and what their plans are to implement those 
that have not been completed fully.

 Improved Oversight of Hazing Prevention Programs and Reporting in the 
                           Military Services

    The committee recognizes the efforts made by the Department 
of Defense and the military services to improve hazing 
prevention programs and increase oversight in an attempt to 
eliminate hazing in the military. Although the military 
services have created prevention training programs and have 
established reporting mechanisms, the committee remains 
concerned with the wide disparity in the programs across the 
services, to include the variation in reporting and tracking 
requirements of incidents of hazing. The committee notes the 
Department of Defense issued an updated policy, dated December 
23, 2015, that defines hazing and bullying, directs 
requirements for training and education with respect to hazing 
and bullying, and standardizes reporting of hazing and 
bullying. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed 
Services of the House of Representatives not later than 
December 1, 2016, on the implementation of the changes outlined 
in the December 23, 2015, policy memorandum. This briefing 
shall include an overview of the results of the 180-day report 
on allegations directed by the memorandum.

 Information Regarding On-the-Job Training and Apprenticeship Programs

    The committee is concerned about the lack of information 
provided on Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits for on-the-job training 
and apprenticeship programs during the Transition Assistance 
Program (TAP). In a November 2015 report, the Government 
Accountability Office found that the Transition Assistance 
Program did not adequately inform service members transitioning 
from Active Duty service of their options with respect to the 
availability of apprenticeship programs, in addition to Post-9/
11 educational benefits. For example, 81 percent of surveyed 
TAP participants reported that they did not think TAP 
adequately informs veterans about on-the-job training and 
apprenticeship options. Nearly 50 percent of veterans who have 
used their Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits for a non-college degree, 
such as a trade school program, had the same response. The 
committee encourages the Secretary of Defense in collaboration 
with the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to ensure on-the-job 
training and apprenticeship programs are adequately addressed 
in TAP.

     Informing Service Members About the United Services Military 
                         Apprenticeship Program

    The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to ensure 
that all enlisted sailors and Marines receive a briefing during 
their military occupational specialty training that provides an 
overview of the United Services Military Apprenticeship Program 
(USMAP), including how to register and navigate USMAP and the 
value of USMAP in obtaining civilian employment following 
military service. The Secretary of the Navy is also encouraged 
to ensure that USMAP coordinators are assigned to appropriate 
commands. The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
April 1, 2017, on the updated policy implementation plan for 
USMAP.

    Integration of Women Into Previously Closed Military Occupations

    The committee recognizes the extensive research and 
planning undertaken by the Department of Defense and the 
military services to fully integrate women into the Armed 
Forces. The committee understands that the services have begun 
to execute the implementation of their approved plans to open 
all previously closed military occupational specialties, career 
fields, and branches for accession by women. The service 
implementation plans address the Secretary of Defense's seven 
specified concerns: transparent standards, population size, 
physical demands and physiological differences, conduct and 
culture, talent management, operating abroad, and assessment 
and adjustment. The committee notes the services' commitment to 
maintaining gender neutral standards and the intent to assign 
women to previously closed occupational specialties based on 
merit rather than quotas. The committee believes assigning 
personnel, regardless of gender, should be based on established 
standards and merit and will monitor these critical factors to 
ensure the military services are complying with their plans.

                   Military Reemployment Initiatives

    The committee applauds the efforts of the military services 
to partner with local communities to assist service members 
with post-military employment in the community. The committee 
is aware of an initiative between Tyndall Air Force Base, Eglin 
Air Force Base, Hurlbert Field, and the Florida Department of 
Economic Opportunity to provide the skill sets of transitioning 
service members in the area to the local community to assist 
with providing jobs as well as expanding economic development 
for the community. The committee believes these efforts are 
beneficial to service members and veterans. Therefore, the 
committee encourages the Department of Defense and the military 
services, where appropriate, to continue to work with local 
communities to assist service members with post-service 
employment by expanding this program to other service branches 
and to ensure that the transfer of information is as efficient 
as possible.

               National Guard Bureau Briefing Requirement

    The committee notes a perceived imbalance regarding manning 
and resource allocation on a State by State and territory by 
territory basis, therefore the National Guard Bureau is 
directed to provide a report to the Committee on Armed Services 
of the House of Representatives on the distribution of full-
time manning and controlled grade positions as they relate to 
all 54 states and territories no later than February 1, 2017, 
that includes the following elements:
    (1) A description of the National Guard Bureau formula and 
allocation of full-time manning and how that number relates to 
resource end strength; why states are currently equally funded 
at the headquarters, staff and senior controlled grade level.
    (2) Analysis and recommendations of a manning and end 
strength formula based upon an equitable formula as opposed to 
equally divided among states and territories, to include why 
states are not resourced at the paid end strength levels with 
full-time manning when requested to increase end strength by 
National Guard Bureau.

  Non-Appropriated Fund Instrumentality Compliance With Department of 
                             Defense Policy

    The committee is concerned about the protection of severely 
disabled employees of Non-Appropriated Fund Instrumentality 
(NAFI) facilities from losing their jobs and directs the United 
States Air Force to adhere to Department of Defense Instruction 
4105.67 and section 2492 of title 10, United States Code, which 
states that Non-Appropriated Fund Instrumentalities will not 
enter into contracts or agreements that will result in the loss 
of jobs pursuant to the Javits-Wagner-O'Day Act (AbilityOne 
Program). Currently, the Air Force Transformation Initiative 
(AFTI) is phasing out employees with severe disabilities who 
are employed through the AbilityOne program and replacing them 
with non-disabled individuals employed by the commercial prime-
vendor for AFTI.
    Therefore, the committee further directs the Secretary of 
the Air Force to submit a report to the House Committee on 
Armed Services not later than October 1, 2016, on the Air 
Force's compliance with the Randolph-Sheppard Act, section 107 
of title 20, United States Code.

       Report on Department of Defense Efforts To Provide Timely 
 Review of Separation Characterization of Former Members of the Armed 
       Forces Who Were Separated by Reason of Sexual Orientation

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit to 
the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives, not later than 60 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, a report on the efforts by the 
Department of Defense to ensure that former members of the 
Armed Forces whose separation was characterized, pursuant to 
section 654 of title 10, United States Code, as in effect 
before such section was repealed pursuant to the Don't Ask, 
Don't Tell Repeal Act of 2010 (Public Law 111-321), as less 
than honorable by reason of their sexual orientation, are 
granted a timely process to correct the separation 
characterization to honorable. The report shall include the 
following:
    (1) The number of such former members of the Armed Forces 
whose separation has been upgraded to honorable.
    (2) The number of such former members whose request for an 
upgrade has been denied and, in the case of such members, the 
general trends for such a denial being overturned.
    (3) The feasibility of providing automatic upgrades for 
such former members whose separation was less than honorable 
solely by reason of their sexual orientation and whose record 
does not disclose any type of misconduct.

Report on the Purpose and Utility of a Registration System for Military 
                           Selective Service

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit to 
the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives by July 1, 2017, a report on the current and 
future need for a centralized registration system for military 
selective service. The report under subsection shall include 
the following:
    (1) A detailed analysis of the current benefits derived, 
both directly and indirectly, from the Military Selective 
Service System, including:
          (A) The extent to which mandatory registration 
        benefits military recruiting;
                  (B) The extent to which a national 
                registration capability serves as a deterrent 
                to other nations.
          (2) An analysis of the functions currently performed 
        by the Selective Service System that would be assumed 
        by the Department in the absence of a national 
        registration capability;
          (3) An analysis of the systems, manpower, and 
        facilities that would be needed by the Department to 
        physically mobilize inductees in the absence of the 
        Selective Service System;
          (4) A detailed analysis of the Department's manpower 
        needs in the event of an emergency requiring mass 
        mobilization, including:
                  (A) A detailed timeline, along with the 
                factors considered in arriving at this 
                timeline, of when the Department of Defense 
                would require:
                          (i) The first inductees to report for 
                        service;
                          (ii) The first 100,000 inductees to 
                        report for service;
                          (iii) The first medical personnel to 
                        report for service.
                  (B) An analysis of any additional critical 
                skills that would be needed in the event of a 
                national emergency, and a timeline for when the 
                Department would require the first inductees to 
                report for service.
          (5) A list of the assumptions used by the Department 
        when conducting their analysis.

                   Review and Report on Port Chicago

    The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to carry 
out a thorough review of the circumstances which may have 
influenced the mutiny charges against, and convictions of the 
individuals convicted in courts-martial arising from the 
explosion at the Port Chicago (California) Naval Magazine on 
July 17, 1944. The purpose of the review shall be to assess the 
extent to which racial prejudice or other factors may have 
impacted the African American sailors who were stationed at 
Port Chicago and Mare Island throughout the duration of their 
service. Specifically, the committee directs the Secretary to 
review findings of racial bias including those acknowledged in 
the Navy's 1994 report entitled ``Port Chicago Courts-Martial 
Review.'' If the Secretary determines that the filing of a 
charge of mutiny against any of the African American sailors in 
any such case was connected to, or impacted by, racial 
prejudice, or if the Secretary determines that the presence of 
prejudicial practices created a pattern of discriminatory 
treatment affecting African American sailors at Port Chicago, 
then, notwithstanding any other provision of law, the committee 
directs the Secretary to submit to the President and Congress 
such recommendations as the Secretary considers appropriate 
regarding corrective actions that should be considered.

                    Review of Qualified Joint Tours

    The committee commends the Department of Defense for its 
ongoing commitment to ensuring the interoperability of the 
joint force. The committee notes that operations conducted by 
the Department and the uniformed services at all levels of 
command are increasingly characterized by their joint nature. 
Accordingly, in light of the review of the Goldwater-Nichols 
Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1986 (Public Law 
99-433), the committee urges the Department to continue these 
efforts and directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives not later than December 1, 2016, on the 
composition of the Joint Duty Assignment List (JDAL) and 
recommendations for congressional action required to bring the 
current JDAL in line with the joint nature of the current 
force.

                           Suicide Prevention

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense 
Inspector General report entitled ``Assessment of DOD Suicide 
Prevention Process,'' dated September 30, 2015, made a series 
of recommendations to improve the Department's efforts to 
reduce the incidence of suicide in the U.S. military. The 
committee applauds the efforts by the Department of Defense and 
the military services to reduce suicide and improve prevention 
programs, but the committee believes that the Department can 
and should improve its efforts, based on the Inspector 
General's recommendations. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than September 1, 2016, 
on the implementation of the recommendations made in the 
Department of Defense Inspector General's report.

                     Troops to Teachers Partnership

    The committee notes that veterans and their family members 
have proven to be exceptional teachers, as demonstrated through 
the national Troops to Teachers program where almost 20,000 
veterans have distinguished themselves in America's classrooms. 
The committee believes that the Troops to Teachers program 
provides an organizational plan for a national effort to 
overcome two critical issues facing our nation: the continuous 
improvement of our schools and the transition of service 
members and their families into civilian roles after they have 
served our nation. Therefore, the committee encourages the 
Secretary of Defense to investigate the establishment of a 
public-private partnership with a 501c organization capable of 
leveraging private donations and relationships to improve and 
expand upon the current Troops to Teachers model.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                  Subtitle A--Officer Personnel Policy


          Section 501--Number of Marine Corps General Officers

    This section would amend sections 525, 526 and 5045 of 
title 10, United States Code, to authorize an increase in the 
number of general officers in the grade above major general 
from 15 to 17, decrease the number of general officers in the 
grade of major general from 23 to 22 and increase the number of 
deputy commandants within the Marine Corps from 6 to 7.

 Section 502--Equal Consideration of Officers for Early Retirement or 
                               Discharge

    This section would amend section 638a of title 10, United 
States Code, to provide the Secretaries of the military 
departments authority to consider officers for involuntary 
separation below the grade of lieutenant colonel or commander 
as a single, consolidated year group without distinctions based 
on retirement eligibility. Such a change allows the military 
departments to conduct separation boards in a manner consistent 
with promotion selection board practices.

      Section 503--Modification of Authority to Drop from Rolls a 
                          Commissioned Officer

    This section would modify section 1161 of title 10, United 
States Code, to allow the Secretary of Defense (or in the case 
of a commissioned officer of the Coast Guard, the Secretary of 
the department in which the Coast Guard is operating when it is 
not operating in the Navy), in addition to the President, to 
drop from the rolls certain commissioned officers.

                Subtitle B--Reserve Component Management


 Section 511--Extension of Removal of Restrictions on the Transfer of 
        Officers Between the Active and Inactive National Guard

    This section would amend section 512 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 (Public Law 113-
66) to extend the authorization to allow officers to 
participate in the Inactive National Guard for 3 years, from 
December 31, 2016 until December 31, 2019. The extension would 
give the National Guard more flexibility to access departing 
Active Component members during the drawdown and provide a 5-
year period to evaluate the benefits of Inactive National Guard 
transferability.

Section 512--Extension of Temporary Authority to Use Air Force Reserve 
Component Personnel to Provide Training and Instruction Regarding Pilot 
                                Training

    This section would amend section 514(a)(1) of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92) to extend, for 1 year, the current temporary authority for 
the Air Force to allow no more than 50 Active Guard and Reserve 
personnel and dual status military technicians to instruct and 
train Active Duty and members of foreign military forces in the 
United States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, or possessions 
of the United States as a primary duty.

 Section 513--Limitations on Ordering Selected Reserve to Active Duty 
      for Preplanned Missions in Support of the Combatant Commands

    This section would amend section 12304(b) of title 10, 
United States Code, to authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
order forces to Active Duty during the year of execution if the 
Secretary identifies manpower and associated costs for the year 
of execution and provides a 30-day notice to the congressional 
defense committees.

   Section 514--Exemption of Military Technicians (Dual Status) from 
                      Civilian Employee Furloughs

    This section would amend section 10216(b)(3) of title 10, 
United States Code, to exempt military dual-status technicians 
from civilian employee furloughs.

                Subtitle C--General Service Authorities


Section 521--Technical Correction to Annual Authorization for Personnel 
                               Strengths

    This section would amend section 115 of title 10, United 
States Code, to update the references to section 502(f) of 
title 32, United States Code, as amended by the John Warner 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2007 (Public 
Law 109-364). Section 502(f) provides for the conditions under 
which the Secretary of the Army or the Secretary of the Air 
Force may order a member of the National Guard to perform 
training or other duty in addition to required drills and field 
exercises.

  Section 522--Entitlement to Leave for Adoption or Birth of Child by 
                         Dual Military Couples

    This section would amend section 701(i) of title 10, United 
States Code, to provide one service member up to 21 days of 
leave under this subsection and the other service member up to 
14 days of leave for the adoption of a child for dual-military 
couples of the Armed Forces.

   Section 523--Revision of Deployability Rating System and Planning 
                                 Reform

    This section would amend chapter 1003 of title 10, United 
States Code, to revise the Department of the Army's 
deployability rating system and manner in which the Army is 
required to track prioritization of deployable units. To the 
extent it would apply across all Army components, this section 
would facilitate implementation of the Army ``Total Force'' 
Policy by requiring systems to identify the priority of 
deployment and track readiness for all Army units, not just for 
the Reserve Components. Currently, the Army is operating under 
the construct set forth in the Army National Guard Combat 
Readiness Reform Act of 1992 (title XI of Public Law 102-484; 
10 U.S.C. 10105 note), which was enacted after the experience 
of Operation Desert Storm when several Army National Guard 
combat brigades were mobilized for, but not deployed to, 
combat.

    Section 524--Expansion of Authority to Execute Certain Military 
                              Instruments

    This section would amend section 1044d(c) of title 10, 
United States Code, to enable notaries to execute military 
testamentary instruments. This section would also modify 
section 1044a of title 10, United States Code, to extend 
Federal notary powers to those civilian paralegals working 
within military legal assistance offices.

   Section 525--Technical Correction to Voluntary Separation Pay and 
                                Benefits

    This section would amend section 1175a of title 10, United 
States Code, by updating the references to section 502(f) of 
title 32, United States Code, and the list of involuntary 
mobilization authorities.

  Section 526--Annual Notice to Members of the Armed Forces Regarding 
Child Custody Protections Guaranteed by the Servicemembers Civil Relief 
                                  Act

    This section would require the Secretaries of the military 
departments to notify service members with dependents annually, 
and prior to deployment, of the child custody protections 
guaranteed under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act.

       Section 527--Pilot Program on Consolidated Army Recruiting

    This section would direct the Secretary of the Army to 
establish a 3-year pilot program in which recruiters from all 
three components (Regular, Reserve, and National Guard) are 
authorized to recruit individuals into any of the components, 
and receive credit toward periodic enlistment goals for each 
enlistment regardless of component. Not later than 1 year after 
implementation of the pilot program, the Secretary of the Army 
shall submit to the Committees on Armed Services of the House 
of Representatives and the Senate a detailed report on the 
design of the program. The Secretary would also be required to 
submit a final report at the conclusion of the pilot period.

Section 528--Application of Military Selective Service Registration and 
   Conscription Requirements to Female Citizens and Residents of the 
              United States Between the Ages of 18 and 26

    This section would amend section 3802(a) of title 50, 
United States Code, to require both male and female United 
States citizens, and every other male or female citizen 
residing in the United States, between the ages of 18 and 26, 
to register with the Selective Service.

      Section 529--Parental Leave for Members of the Armed Forces

    This section would amend chapter 40 of title 10, United 
States Code, by adding a new section 701a which would authorize 
14 days of leave to a member of the Armed Forces who becomes a 
parent when that member's spouse gives birth. This section 
would also amend section 701 of title 10, United States Code, 
to authorize 36 days of leave, to be shared between two members 
of the armed forces who are married to each other and adopt a 
child.

  Subtitle D--Military Justice, Including Sexual Assault and Domestic 
                    Violence Prevention and Response


 Section 541--Expedited Reporting of Child Abuse and Neglect to State 
                       Child Protective Services

    This section would amend section 1787 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require military and civilian personnel of the 
Department of Defense working on military installations, who 
are otherwise required by law to report suspected instances of 
child abuse and neglect to their Department of Defense chain of 
command, to also promptly notify State Child Protective 
Services. This section would focus on reporting requirements 
between the Department of Defense and State Child Protective 
Services, but is in no way intended to require or encourage 
unnecessary duplicative efforts on the part of federal and 
state agencies regarding investigations or other proceedings.

 Section 542--Extension of the Requirement for Annual Report Regarding 
Sexual Assaults and Coordination with Release of Family Advocacy Report

    This section would extend the requirement for the Sexual 
Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO) report through 
January 31, 2021. In addition, it would require the release of 
the SAPRO report to be timed to coincide with the release of 
the Family Advocacy Program Report, as required elsewhere in 
this Act. This amendment would supersede section 1080 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92).

  Section 543--Requirement for Annual Family Advocacy Program Report 
              Regarding Child Abuse and Domestic Violence

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
provide the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the 
House of Representatives an annual report, beginning not later 
than January 31, 2017, through January 31, 2021, on the child 
abuse and domestic abuse incident data contained in the 
Department of Defense Family Advocacy Program central registry 
for the previous year, and an analysis of the effectiveness of 
the Family Advocacy Program.

Section 544--Improved Department of Defense Prevention of and Response 
                     to Hazing in the Armed Forces

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
establish a comprehensive data-collection system for reports 
related to hazing in the Armed Forces, and require the 
Secretary of each military department to improve training to 
better recognize, prevent, and respond to hazing.

Section 545--Burdens of Proof Applicable to Investigations and Reviews 
Related to Protected Communications of Members of the Armed Forces and 
                     Prohibited Retaliatory Actions

    This section would amend section 1034 of title 10, United 
States Code, to establish the burden of proof under this 
section for military retaliation investigations to be the same 
as the burden of proof applicable to retaliation investigation 
under section 1221(e) of title 5, United States Code.

  Section 546--Improved Investigation of Allegations of Professional 
                              Retaliation

    This section would amend section 1034(c)(4) of title 10, 
United States Code, to require the Secretary concerned to 
ensure that any individual investigating an allegation of 
retaliation be trained in the definition and characteristics of 
retaliation, and where applicable, trained in the 
characteristics of sex-related offenses.

         Subtitle E--Member Education, Training, and Transition


 Section 561--Revision to Quality Assurance of Certification Programs 
                             and Standards

    This section would amend section 2015 of title 10, United 
States Code, relating to a program to enable members of the 
Armed Forces to obtain, while serving in the Armed Forces, 
professional credentials related to military training and 
skills that translate into civilian occupations. Specifically, 
this section would amend the requirements of any credentialing 
program used in connection with the skills program.

Section 562--Establishment of ROTC Cyber Institutes at Senior Military 
                                Colleges

    This section would amend chapter 103 of title 10, United 
States Code, to authorize the Secretary of Defense to carry out 
a program to establish ROTC Cyber Institutes at the six Senior 
Military Colleges for purposes of accelerating the development 
of foundational expertise in critical cyber operational skills 
for future military and civilian leaders of the Armed Forces 
and Department of Defense, to include such leaders of the 
Reserve Components.

              Section 563--Military-to-Mariner Transition

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense and the 
Secretary of the department in which the Coast Guard is 
operating to jointly report on the steps the Departments of 
Defense and Homeland Security have taken to maximize the extent 
to which Armed Forces service, training, and qualifications are 
creditable towards United States merchant mariner licenses and 
certifications and to promote awareness among Armed Forces 
personnel who serve in vessel operating positions of the 
requirements for post-service use of training, education, and 
practical experience from service in the Armed Forces in 
satisfying requirements for merchant mariner licenses and 
certifications.

   Section 564--Employment Authority for Civilian Faculty at Certain 
                      Military Department Schools

    This section would amend section 4021 of title 10, United 
States Code, to allow the Secretary concerned to hire staff for 
professional military education courses regardless of course 
length.

  Section 565--Revision of Name on Military Service Record to Reflect 
  Change in Name of a Member of the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Marine 
             Corps, after Separation from the Armed Forces

    This section would amend section 1551 of title 10, United 
States Code, to allow any person who legally changes their name 
to reflect their gender identity after separation from the 
Armed Forces to receive a new certificate of discharge or 
acceptance of resignation order under that new name.

    Section 566--Direct Employment Pilot Program for Members of the 
                       National Guard and Reserve

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
carry out a pilot program to enhance efforts of the Department 
of Defense to provide job placement assistance and related 
employment services directly to members of the National Guard 
and Reserves. This section would also require the Secretary to 
submit a report on the program to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives by 
January 31, 2021.

 Section 567--Prohibition on Establishment, Maintenance, or Support of 
     Senior Reserve Officers' Training Corps Units at Educational 
           Institutions That Display Confederate Battle Flag

    This section would amend section 2102 of title 10, United 
States Code, to prohibit the Secretary concerned from 
establishing, maintaining, or supporting a Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps unit at an educational institution that displays 
the Confederate battle flag except where the board of visitors 
has voted to take down the flag described.

Subtitle F--Defense Dependents' Education and Military Family Readiness 
                                Matters


  Section 571--Continuation of Authority to Assist Local Educational 
  Agencies That Benefit Dependents of Members of the Armed Forces and 
                Department of Defense Civilian Employees

    This section would authorize $30.0 million for the 
continuation of the Department of Defense assistance in fiscal 
year 2017 to local educational agencies that are impacted by 
the enrollment of dependent children of military members and 
Department of Defense civilian employees.

    Section 572--Support for Programs Providing Camp Experience for 
                     Children of Military Families

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
provide support to nonprofit organizations that carry out camp 
or camp-like programs for children of military families who 
have experienced the death of a family member or a family 
member with substance abuse disorder or post-traumatic stress 
disorder.

                   Subtitle G--Decorations and Awards


Section 581--Review Regarding Award of Medal of Honor to Certain Asian 
       American and Native American Pacific Islander War Veterans

    This section would require the Secretaries of the military 
departments to review the service records of Asian American and 
Native American Pacific Islander veterans from the Korean war 
and Vietnam war to determine if the award of the Medal of Honor 
is appropriate. The Secretary concerned would be obligated to 
review the records of veterans who were previously awarded the 
Distinguished Service Cross, the Navy Cross, and the Air Force 
Cross, and veterans submitted to the Secretary concerned during 
the 1-year period beginning with the date of the enactment of 
this Act. In those cases where the Secretary concerned 
determines that service records support the award of the Medal 
of Honor, this section would also waive the statutory time 
limitations for award.

    Section 582--Authorization for Award of Medals for Acts of Valor

    This section would waive the statutory time limitation 
specified in sections 3744, 6248, and 8744 of title 10, United 
States Code, to allow the President to award the Medal of Honor 
to those individuals identified by the ``Current Conflict 
Service Cross and Silver Star Awards Review'' directed by the 
Secretary of Defense on January 7, 2016.

 Section 583--Authorization for Award of the Medal of Honor to Gary M. 
             Rose for Acts of Valor During the Vietnam War

    This section would waive the statutory time limitation 
under section 3744 of title 10, United States Code, to allow 
the President to award the Medal of Honor to Gary M. Rose, who 
served in the United States Army during the Vietnam War. The 
committee takes this action based on the written confirmation 
by the Secretary of Defense that the actions of Gary M. Rose 
merit the consideration of award of the Medal of Honor by the 
President.

 Section 584--Authorization for Award of the Medal of Honor to Charles 
          S. Kettles for Acts of Valor During the Vietnam War

    This section would waive the statutory time limitation 
under section 3744 of title 10, United States Code, to allow 
the President to award the Medal of Honor to Charles S. 
Kettles, who served in the United States Army during the 
Vietnam War. The committee takes this action based on the 
written confirmation by the Secretary of Defense that the 
actions of Charles S. Kettles merit the consideration of award 
of the Medal of Honor by the President.

          Subtitle H--Miscellaneous Reports and Other Matters


Section 591--Burial of Cremated Remains in Arlington National Cemetery 
    of Certain Persons Whose Service Is Deemed To Be Active Service

    This section would amend section 2410 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require the Secretary of the Army to ensure 
that the cremated remains of an individual, whose service has 
been determined to be Active Duty service, are eligible for 
inurnment with military honors in Arlington National Cemetery. 
Further, this section would require the Secretary, not later 
than 180 days after enactment of this Act, to submit a report 
to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House 
of Representatives and the Committees on Veterans' Affairs of 
the Senate and the House of Representatives on the interment 
and inurnment capacity of Arlington National Cemetery.

Section 592--Representation from Members of the Armed Forces on Boards, 
 Councils, and Committees Making Recommendations Relating to Military 
                            Personnel Issues

    This section would require that enlisted or retired 
enlisted members of the Armed Forces be represented on all 
boards, panels, commissions, or task forces established under 
chapter 7 of title 10, United States Code, to render a 
recommendation on any aspect of personnel policy directly 
affecting enlisted personnel.

                   Section 593--Body Mass Index Test

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
review the current body mass index test procedure.

 Section 594--Preseparation Counseling Regarding Options for Donating 
               Brain Tissue at Time of Death for Research

    This section would require that information be provided 
during transition separation counseling concerning options for 
donating brain tissue at the time of the member's death for 
chronic traumatic encephalopathy research.

    Section 595--Recognition of the Expanded Service Opportunities 
Available to Female Members of the Armed Forces and the Long Service of 
                       Women in the Armed Forces

    This section would express Congress' recognition of women 
who have served and are currently serving in the Armed Forces.

  Section 596--Sense of Congress Regarding Plight of Male Victims of 
                         Military Sexual Trauma

    This section would express the sense of Congress that the 
Secretary of Defense should enhance access to intensive medical 
and mental health treatment of male victims of sexual assault; 
look for opportunities to use them as presenters at prevention 
training; and ensure medical and mental health providers are 
trained to meet the needs of male victims.

   Section 597--Sense of Congress Regarding Section 504 of Title 10, 
United States Code, on Existing Authority of the Department of Defense 
  to Enlist Individuals, Not Otherwise Eligible for Enlistment, Whose 
              Enlistment Is Vital to the National Interest

    This section would restate the existing authority under 
section 504 of title 10, United States Code, regarding the 
enlistment of certain individuals.

Section 598--Protection of Second Amendment Rights of Military Families

    This section would amend section 921(b) of title 18, United 
States Code, to state that, for the purposes of chapter 44 of 
title 18, a member of the Armed Forces on active duty and the 
spouse of such a member are residents of the State in which the 
permanent duty station of the member is located, and that the 
spouse may satisfy the identification document requirements of 
the chapter by presenting specified documents.

  Section 599--Pilot Program on Advanced Technology for Alcohol Abuse 
                               Prevention

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
establish a pilot program to demonstrate the feasibility of 
using breathalyzers to monitor the progress of alcohol abuse 
prevention programs.

          TITLE VI--COMPENSATION AND OTHER PERSONNEL BENEFITS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


      Feasibility Study to Expanding Veterans Access to Commissary

    The committee seeks to better serve disabled veterans that 
live near military installations and would like to increase 
their access to commissary and exchange facilities. The 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to report on the 
feasibility of allowing disabled veterans with a thirty percent 
disability rating or higher; or that have been awarded a Purple 
Heart the use of the commissary and exchange stores on the same 
basis as a member of the armed forces entitled to retired or 
retainer pay. The determination should include an evaluation of 
the potential costs to the Department and the impacts to the 
disabled veteran community. The committee further directs the 
Secretary to submit the results of the report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2017.

Inspector General Review of the Fresh Fruits and Vegetable Contract for 
                              the Pacific

    The committee is concerned about the performance of the 
current Pacific Fresh Fruits and Vegetables (FFV) delivery 
contract, the past FFV contract and the FFV local purchase 
authority across the Defense Commissary Agency enterprise 
outside the continental United States. The committee therefore 
directs the Department of Defense Inspector General to evaluate 
and report to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 
2017, on the effectiveness of the new FFV purchase process vice 
the previous second destination transportation funded process, 
and to do an assessment of the similar local purchase process 
currently ongoing in Europe.
    The evaluation shall address the following issues so as to 
facilitate comparison between the establishment and progression 
of the local sourcing model in Europe and in the Pacific:
    (1) A timeline showing the percentage of locally sourced 
produce made available to commissaries in Europe as compared to 
the Pacific, in 6 month increments, beginning from a point in 
time not less than 6 months prior to the expiration of 
precursor contracts in each theater. The review should include 
any information related to produce market maturity in both 
theaters and any documented issues related to the locally 
sourced produce in both.
    (2) The amount of produce sold and appropriated funds paid 
by the Department of Defense for second destination 
transportation (surface, air and in-theater) in the last full 
year prior to award of the first contract for the locally 
sourced fresh fruits and vegetables for commissaries in Europe 
and the Pacific theater.
    In addition, the Inspector General shall compare the 
Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA) contract for produce in effect 
through the end of October 2015, and the new contract's 
performance which began in November 2015, to include:
    (1) Comparison of the amount of produce lost due to 
spoilage or importation delays/requirements between the 
previous Pacific contract to the current contracts.
    (2) Comparison of the benefits/impacts of the current and 
previous DeCA models for the provision of fresh fruits and 
vegetables to Pacific commissaries relative to:
    (a) Department of Defense;
    (b) Commissary patrons; and
    (c) The Cost of Living Allowance.
    (3) Documentation of the percentage of increase or decrease 
in local market prices on produce as compared to Pacific 
commissary prices on produce.
    The Inspector General may call upon the Defense Contract 
Audit Agency for assistance in performing an audit of the 
recently replaced fresh fruits and vegetable contract DeCA 
administered for its overseas commissaries in the Pacific 
theater between April 2008, and October 2015, to ensure that 
the produce prices offered to commissary patrons were 
reasonable.

              Service Members Group Life Insurance Report

    The committee notes that Active Duty service members are 
required to participate in pre-deployment readiness briefings, 
in which Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance (SGLI) is a 
covered topic. The committee is concerned about the process by 
which service members subsequently select life insurance 
coverage during their pre-deployment readiness processing. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the Committee on Armed Services of the House 
of Representatives by December 1, 2016, evaluating the 
information provided to each service member on their SGLI 
benefits as he or she prepares for deployment. The evaluation 
shall include but is not limited to:
    (1) The number of service members who have opted for less 
than $400,000 of SGLI coverage and died in combat during their 
deployment for the last 10 years;
    (2) The current briefing materials provided to service 
members informing them of prerequisites necessary for 
deployment, the number of administrative decisions required for 
pre-deployment, the number of pre-deployment briefings given, 
and the amount of time period in which the pre-deployment 
briefings occur;
    (3) The ratio of briefers-to-service members that 
communicate SGLI benefits in service members' preparation for 
deployment and the opportunity for service members to seek one-
on-one counseling for guidance on pre-deployment paperwork;
    (4) The financial and familial effects of an automatic 
increase to maximum SGLI benefit levels when a service member 
prepares to deploy, of which a service member must opt out in 
order to not receive the highest coverage, then an automatic 
resumption of the service members' previous SGLI levels upon 
their return from deployment.
    (5) Any proposed changes to the pre-deployment process 
which lessens the administrative burden for a service member 
while maximizing benefits for next of kin in the event of SGLI 
benefit use.

         Student Loan Interest for Eligible Military Borrowers

    The committee notes that service members are exempt from 
paying interest on their federal student loans for the length 
of time served in an area of hostilities. Unfortunately, since 
2008, eligible service members have avoidably overpaid $100 
million dollars in federal student loan interest payments due 
to a lack of communication between the Department of Education, 
Department of Defense, Department of Veterans Affairs, and 
student loan servicers.
    The committee also notes that the Higher Education 
Opportunity Act (Public Law 110-315) requires the Secretary of 
Education, in coordination with the Secretary of Defense and 
the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, to create a publicly 
available, searchable website that discloses information 
concerning those who qualify as an eligible military borrower 
in order to receive loan interest accrual exemptions based on 
their service in an area of hostilities. Moreover, the 
Secretary of Education, in coordination with the Secretary of 
Defense and the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, is tasked with 
making such information widely known to members of the Armed 
Forces (including members of the National Guard and Reserves), 
veterans and eligible dependents of veterans, States, 
institutions of higher education and the general public.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in coordination with the Secretary of Education and the 
Secretary of Veterans Affairs, to establish a plan of action to 
ensure the required information regarding eligible military 
borrowers is shared in a timely manner so service members can 
receive the benefits due under the law. The committee further 
directs the Secretary of Defense to brief the House Committee 
on Armed Services on the plan of action by December 1, 2016.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                     Subtitle A--Pay and Allowances


          Section 601--Annual Adjustment of Monthly Basic Pay

    This section would direct that the rates of basic pay under 
section 203(a) of title 37, United States Code, be increased in 
accordance with section 1009 of title 37, United States Code, 
notwithstanding a determination made by the President under 
subsection (e) of such section 1009.

 Section 602--Extension of Authority to Provide Temporary Increase in 
    Rates of Basic Allowance for Housing Under Certain Circumstances

    This section would extend for 1 year the authority of the 
Secretary of Defense to temporarily increase the rates of basic 
allowance for housing in areas impacted by natural disasters or 
experiencing a sudden influx of personnel.

Section 603--Prohibition on Per Diem Allowance Reductions Based on the 
        Duration of Temporary Duty Assignment or Civilian Travel

    This section would amend section 474(d)(3) of title 37, 
United States Code, and section 5702(a)(2) of title 5, United 
States Code, to prohibit the Secretary concerned from altering 
the per diem allowance for the duration of a temporary duty 
assignment of a member of the Armed Forces or an employee of 
the Department of Defense.

           Subtitle B--Bonuses and Special and Incentive Pays


   Section 611--One-Year Extension of Certain Bonus and Special Pay 
                     Authorities for Reserve Forces

    This section would extend the authority, through December 
31, 2017, for the Selected Reserve reenlistment bonus, the 
Selected Reserve affiliation or enlistment bonus, special pay 
for enlisted members assigned to certain high-priority units, 
the Ready Reserve enlistment bonus for persons without prior 
service, the Ready Reserve enlistment and reenlistment bonus 
for persons with prior service, the Selected Reserve enlistment 
and reenlistment bonus for persons with prior service, the 
authority to reimburse travel expenses for inactive duty 
training outside of normal commuting distance, and income 
replacement payments for Reserve Component members experiencing 
extended and frequent mobilization for Active Duty service.

   Section 612--One-Year Extension of Certain Bonus and Special Pay 
               Authorities for Health Care Professionals

    This section would extend the authority for the nurse 
officer candidate accession program, repayment of educational 
loans for certain health professionals who serve in the 
Selected Reserve, the accession and retention bonuses for 
psychologists, the accession bonus for registered nurses, the 
incentive special pay for nurse anesthetists, the special pay 
for Selected Reserve health care professionals in critically 
short wartime specialties, the accession bonus for dental 
officers, the accession bonus for pharmacy officers, the 
accession bonus for medical officers in critically short 
wartime specialties, and the accession bonus for dental 
specialist officers in critically short wartime specialties, 
until December 31, 2017.

 Section 613--One-Year Extension of Special Pay and Bonus Authorities 
                          for Nuclear Officers

    This section would extend the authority for the special pay 
for nuclear-qualified officers extending a period of active 
service, the nuclear career accession bonus, and the nuclear 
career annual incentive bonus until December 31, 2017.

  Section 614--One-Year Extension of Authorities Relating to Title 37 
     Consolidated Special Pay, Incentive Pay, and Bonus Authorities

    This section would extend the general bonus authority for 
enlisted members, the general bonus authority for officers, the 
special bonus and incentive pay authority for nuclear officers, 
special aviation incentive pay and bonus authorities, the 
special health professions incentive pay and bonus authorities, 
contracting bonus for Senior Reserve Officers' Training Corps 
cadets and midshipmen, hazardous duty pay, assignment pay or 
special duty pay, skill incentive pay or proficiency bonus, and 
the retention bonus for members with critical military skills 
or assigned to high-priority units, until December 31, 2017.

 Section 615--One-Year Extension of Authorities Relating to Payment of 
                Other Title 37 Bonuses and Special Pays

    This section would extend the authority for the aviation 
officer retention bonus, assignment incentive pay, the 
reenlistment bonus for active members, the enlistment bonus for 
active members, the incentive pay for members of 
precommissioning programs pursuing foreign language 
proficiency, the accession bonus for new officers in critical 
skills, the incentive bonus for conversion to military 
occupational specialty to ease personnel shortage, the 
incentive bonus for transfer between Armed Forces, and the 
accession bonus for officer candidates, until December 31, 
2017.

 Section 616--Increase in Maximum Amount of Aviation Special Pays for 
                              Flying Duty

    This section would amend section 334(c)(1) of title 37, 
United States Code, to increase the statutory limits for the 
aviation incentive pay and retention bonus and allow the 
Secretary concerned the flexibility to increase the aviation 
incentive pay limit set forth in regulations issued by the 
Secretary of Defense under section 374 of title 37, United 
States Code.

  Section 617--Conforming Amendment to Consolidation of Special Pay, 
                  Incentive Pay, and Bonus Authorities

    This section would amend section 332(c) of title 37, United 
States Code, to conform the consolidated bonus amount to the 
current amount authorized under section 308j of title 37, 
United States Code. The National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2013 (Public Law 112-239) increased the bonus 
authority to $20,000 under section 308j, but will sunset on 
September 30, 2017, when the new consolidated bonus authorities 
take effect pursuant to the National Defense Authorization Act 
for 2008 (Public Law 110-181).

    Section 618--Technical and Clerical Amendments Relating to 2008 
            Consolidation of Certain Special Pay Authorities

    This section would make technical and clerical corrections 
to titles 10, 20, 24, 36, 37, and 42, United States Code, as 
well as section 586 of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2008 (Public Law 110-181), section 362 of the 
John Warner National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2007 (Public Law 109-364), and section 112(c)(5)(B) of the 
Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as part of the Department of 
Defense's transition to the consolidated authorities in section 
661 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2008 (Public Law 110-181), which provided eight consolidated 
statutory special and incentive pay authorities for future use 
to replace those currently in use. This section is consistent 
with technical corrections included each year in the annual 
National Defense Authorization Act.

Section 619--Combat-Related Special Compensation Coordinating Amendment

    This section would amend section 1413a(b)(3) of title 10, 
United States Code, to correct the computation of Combat-
Related Special Compensation (CRSC) to match the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 enacted military 
retirement system reduction in the retirement base pay 
multiplier from 2.5 percent to 2.0 percent for the years of 
service formula to calculate retired pay to be restored by 
CRSC.

       Subtitle C--Disability, Retired Pay, and Survivor Benefits


  Section 621--Separation Determinations for Members Participating in 
                          Thrift Savings Plan

    This section would repeal section 632(c)(2) of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92) that added an additional definition of separation from 
government service which addresses cases of separation and/or 
resumption of service but applies only to military members. The 
Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board, which oversees and 
administers the Thrift Savings Plan, has identified conflicts 
between section 632(c)(2) and section 211(c) of title 37, 
United States Code, which applies to the entire Federal 
Government workforce.

Section 622--Continuation Pay for Full Thrift Savings Plan Members Who 
                Have Completed 8 to 12 Years of Service

    This section would amend section 356 of title 37, United 
States Code, to authorize the Department of Defense the 
flexibility to pay continuation pay at any point between the 
time the member completes 8 years of service and before the 
member reaches 12 years of service, in exchange for an 
agreement to continue serving for a period of not less than 3 
additional years.

           Section 623--Special Survivor Indemnity Allowance

    This section would amend section 1450(m) of title 10, 
United States Code, to extend the Special Survivor Indemnity 
Allowance at $310 per month through fiscal year 2018.

 Section 624--Equal Benefits Under Survivor Benefit Plan for Survivors 
    of Reserve Component Members who Die in the Line of Duty during 
                         Inactive-Duty Training

    This section would amend section 1451(c)(1)(A) of title 10, 
United States Code, to eliminate the different treatment under 
the Survivor Benefit Plan accorded members of the Reserve 
Component who die from an injury or illness incurred or 
aggravated in the line of duty during Inactive-Duty training, 
as compared to the treatment of members of the Armed Forces who 
die in the line of duty while on Active Duty.

 Section 625--Use of Member's Current Pay Grade and Years of Service, 
   Rather Than Final Retirement Pay Grade and Years of Service, in a 
         Division of Property Involving Disposable Retired Pay

    This section would amend section 1408(a)(4) of title 10, 
United States Code, to change the calculation concerning a 
service member's retired pay in a division of property.

    Subtitle D--Commissary and Nonappropriated Fund Instrumentality 
                        Benefits and Operations


  Section 631--Protection and Enhancement of Access to and Savings at 
                       Commissaries and Exchanges

    This section would amend sections 2481(a) and (c), 2483(c), 
2484, 2485, and 2487 of title 10, United States Code, to 
authorize the Secretary of Defense to develop and implement a 
comprehensive strategy to optimize practices across the defense 
commissary and exchange system that reduce the reliance of the 
system on appropriated funds without reducing the benefits to 
the patrons of the system or the revenue generated by non-
appropriated fund entities or instrumentalities of the 
Department of Defense for the morale, welfare, and recreation 
of members of the Armed Forces.

   Subtitle E--Travel and Transportation Allowances and Other Matters


   Section 641--Maximum Reimbursement Amount for Travel Expenses of 
  Members of the Reserves Attending Inactive Duty Training Outside of 
                       Normal Commuting Distances

    This section would amend section 478a(c) of title 37, 
United States Code, to authorize the Secretary concerned, on a 
case-by-case basis, to reimburse travel expenses at a higher 
amount for Reserve Component members traveling to training from 
rural areas.

 Section 642--Statute of Limitations on Department of Defense Recovery 
   of Amounts Owed to the United States by Members of the Uniformed 
             Services, Including Retired and Former Members

    This section would amend section 1007(c)(3) of title 37, 
United States Code, to establish a 10-year limitation on the 
collection of an overpayment of salaries and benefits or unpaid 
bills of service members. This section would establish a 
statute of limitations that goes into effect 10 years after it 
is signed into law and would direct the Defense Finance and 
Accounting Service to quantify the lost revenue for the 
Congressional Budget Office.

                   TITLE VII--HEALTH CARE PROVISIONS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


     Briefing on TRICARE Coverage for Emerging Health Care Services

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to brief the 
Committee on Armed Services of the House of Representatives, 
not later than June 30, 2017, on implementation of section 704 
of the Carl Levin and Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-
291). The briefing shall include: the activities that have been 
undertaken to implement provisional TRICARE coverage for 
emerging health care services and supplies; any activities to 
implement such authority that are planned but have not yet 
occurred and the rationale for the delay; the services and 
supplies that have been granted such provisional TRICARE 
coverage; the rationale, if any, for implementation of 
demonstration projects for TRICARE coverage of such services 
and supplies in lieu of implementation of the provisional 
TRICARE coverage; and the impact that implementation of the 
provisional TRICARE coverage has had on access to and provider 
reimbursement for such services and supplies as compared to 
non-coverage.

   Department of Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs Health Care 
                              Partnerships

    The committee is aware that the Department of Defense and 
the Department of Veterans Affairs have established 
partnerships to provide health care to beneficiaries of both 
departments. The committee understands that these partnerships 
expand access to care to veterans and Department of Defense 
beneficiaries, particularly in medically underserved areas. In 
addition, these partnerships provide Department of Defense 
providers additional patients with complex medical conditions 
that enhance medical provider readiness. However, the committee 
is aware that the Department of Defense-Department of Veterans 
Affairs joint facility, the Captain James A. Lovell Health Care 
Center at Naval Station Great Lakes, Illinois, established by 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 
(Public Law 111-84), continues to suffer from management and 
leadership challenges, as reported by several Government 
Accountability Office evaluations. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services not later than October 1, 
2016, on any plans for establishing new Department of Defense-
Department of Veterans Affairs partnerships to provide health 
care.

 Designation of TRICARE Providers with Military Awareness and Cultural 
                                Training

    The committee is aware that military beneficiaries prefer 
to seek assistance from mental health providers who have some 
knowledge and experience serving military populations. Section 
717 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2016 (Public Law 114-92), directed the Secretary of Defense to 
develop a system by which non-Department of Defense mental 
health care providers receive a readiness designation if they 
meet certain criteria relating to knowledge with respect to the 
culture of members of the Armed Forces and family members. The 
committee believes this paradigm is similar for beneficiaries 
seeking health care from providers in the TRICARE network. The 
committee is aware that there are training programs available 
for businesses and organizations that employ or work with 
former military members. Therefore, the committee encourages 
the Department of Defense to include TRICARE providers in the 
same system developed for mental health care providers and to 
look for opportunities to use existing training programs.

                      Diabetes Prevention Programs

    The committee notes that the occurrence of diabetes within 
the currently serving military population and their families is 
relatively small compared to the incidence of diabetes in the 
general United States population. It is estimated that there 
are 30 million Americans with diabetes but only approximately 
50,000 military members or their family members with the 
disease. The committee is aware that the number of military 
beneficiaries with diabetes increases to more than 200,000 for 
retirees and their family members who are under the age of 65 
and doubles to over 400,000 for those beneficiaries in the 
TRICARE for Life, Medicare-eligible population. The committee 
is also aware that the Department of Health and Human Services 
recently expanded a pilot program for Medicare beneficiaries to 
prevent diabetes that showed estimated savings of $2,650 for 
each enrollee in the program. Therefore, the committee 
encourages the Department of Defense to examine the feasibility 
of using a similar program for TRICARE beneficiaries to prevent 
diabetes, improve health, and reduce health care costs.

                  Expedited Treatment for Fetal Repair

    The committee is aware that advances in fetal medicine 
present military personnel and their dependents with 
opportunities to correct fetal anomalies in-utero, or before 
birth. The committee understands that complex birth defects 
have varying times for fetal intervention but in all instances 
of fetal anomalies, the earliest referral for in-utero 
procedures is best to ensure optimal outcomes for mother and 
fetus. The committee is concerned that in some cases, military 
beneficiary referrals have taken several weeks or longer. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than January 14, 2017, on the process for referring 
beneficiaries for fetal repair procedures. The Secretary shall 
include in the briefing information on referrals during 
calendar year 2016 that required an intervention, the amount of 
time between diagnosis, referral, treatment and the outcomes of 
such treatments.

  Full Spectrum Ultraviolet Technologies for Routine Disinfection and 
                          Outbreak Mitigation

    The committee is aware that both hospital-acquired 
infections and surgical site infections continue to be a major, 
yet preventable threat to patient and health care worker safety 
in both civilian and military treatment facilities, including 
the deployed environment. Full spectrum ultraviolet (UV) 
technologies have been shown to reduce infection rates in the 
health care environment in multiple published, peer-reviewed 
studies. In addition to routine disinfection in military 
treatment facilities, there are UV technologies that can be 
deployed as a biodefense mitigation strategy in the event of an 
outbreak including natural and man-made events. The committee 
encourages the Department of Defense to investigate full 
spectrum UV technologies to support patient and staff safety 
through routine disinfection, and as a mitigation strategy in 
response to a biological outbreak.

                     Gluten-Free Meals Ready to Eat

    The committee is aware of the impact that celiac disease 
and gluten sensitivity have on the health and medical readiness 
of members of the Armed Forces. The committee notes that the 
Army has expanded its field combat Meals Ready to Eat (MRE) by 
providing vegetarian meals and meals that accommodate religious 
requirements. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
the Army to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than February 1, 2017, on the feasibility 
and any existing effort to provide a gluten-free MRE option.

             Improving Beneficiary Experience and Outcomes

    The committee notes the Department of Defense continues to 
seek ways to improve the health care service experience for 
military beneficiaries and personnel health and readiness, and 
lower the total cost of care. The committee is aware that 
certain large private sector employers are offering each 
covered family an on-demand health care navigator who is a 
trusted individual to assist families with understanding and 
utilizing their health benefits, support them in accessing and 
navigating the healthcare delivery system, and provide them 
with information so they can make informed decisions in 
collaboration with their care providers.
    This approach has the potential to produce enhanced 
clinical outcomes, improved beneficiary experiences in 
navigating the health care system, and reduced utilization 
which may lower health care costs. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to determine the feasibility 
of incorporating the use of healthcare navigators into the 
Military Health System to improve beneficiary experience and 
outcomes. The Secretary shall submit the results to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives by April 1, 2017.

             Improving Pediatric Health Care Under TRICARE

    The committee is aware that the Department of Defense has 
made strides to improve the delivery of health care services to 
pediatric patients, especially those patients with severe 
disabilities. However, the committee remains concerned that the 
Department has not completed addressing the deficiencies noted 
in the report required by section 735 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (Public Law 112-239). 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than September 1, 2016, on the actions taken and the plan 
to correct the remaining deficiencies identified in the 
pediatric health care report.

 Infertility Treatment and Services for Wounded Ill or Injured Members 
                          of the Armed Forces

    The committee notes the robust infertility services and 
supplies available to seriously wounded, ill or injured service 
members. Services include infertility testing and treatment, 
correction of the physical or physiological cause of the 
infertility as well as assisted reproductive services that will 
now include a demonstration of cryopreservation for Active Duty 
prior to deployment. The committee is concerned that some 
seriously wounded, ill or injured service members may not be 
aware of the services available to them after they depart the 
military. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense, in coordination with the Secretaries of the military 
departments, to implement a plan by December 1, 2016, to 
actively reach out to former members of the military who were 
seriously wounded, ill or injured and inform them of the 
infertility services available to them.

                  Joint Medical Research Test Centers

    The committee recognizes the need to develop joint 
capabilities for military health research projects to optimize 
opportunities to identify impactful research opportunities that 
support the Department of Defense's medical readiness. The 
Pacific Joint Information Technology Center (P-JITC) is the 
only joint research test center for the Military Health Service 
(MHS), and has produced successful research efforts, such as 
the Unified Theater Server Platform and Radio-Frequency 
Identification Bar Code Project. The committee also recognizes 
the need for joint requirements in four overarching focus 
areas: military health care services, theater/operational 
medicine, information technology infrastructure and data 
management, and medical resourcing. The committee encourages 
continued development of these capabilities at a joint research 
test center. The committee notes that the Defense Health 
Technology Review established a Review Panel to identify 
opportunities for efficiencies and savings through 
standardization and consolidation. As a result of the review, 
the P-JITC was recommended to be consolidated into existing MHS 
architecture. Therefore, the committee directs the Director of 
the Defense Health Agency to brief the House Committee on Armed 
Services by March 1, 2017, on a comprehensive plan to conduct 
joint research across the MHS.

                       Military Medical Photonics

    The committee is aware that military medical photonics 
research has been shown to improve battlefield patient care 
using photomedicine technologies. Recent breakthroughs in this 
research include major technology advances in burn and wound 
management, tissue imaging and bonding for vascular and 
reconstructive surgery, diagnosis and treatment of major eye 
diseases and trauma, critical care sensors and monitors, early 
assessment of inhalation airway injury, rapid imaging of 
coronary artery disease, and normalization of severe scarring 
from traumatic wounds. The committee encourages the Department 
of Defense to continue the work to develop important, 
innovative technologies for battlefield medicine.

                           Network of Support

    The committee commends the Department of Defense's efforts 
to inform military families of the aspects and stressors of 
daily military life experienced by members of the armed forces, 
as well as the services available to assist service members 
with those stressors. However, the committee believes that the 
military services can improve upon current efforts by providing 
information over the duration of the military service and 
during the transition to civilian life, when appropriate, 
coordinating across all branches the information that is 
provided, and how it is disseminated, and providing service 
members the opportunity to submit their ``network of support'' 
to receive this important information. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to assess the options for new 
recruits of the armed forces to identify a small number of 
people that encompass their network of support and to identify 
the best ways to integrate these contacts into existing 
outreach efforts, including the estimated cost associated with 
this effort. In addition, the Secretary shall brief the 
Committee on Armed Services of the House of Representatives not 
later than February 1, 2017, on the results of the assessment.

                             Osteoarthritis

    The committee is aware that the physical demands of 
military training and deployment may increase the risk of 
osteoarthritis in service members. The committee is concerned 
that post-traumatic osteoarthritis may affect the readiness of 
our military, yet there is limited information on the scope and 
impact of osteoarthritis on the military. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives not later than June 30, 2017, on the overall 
discharge rate of military service members as a result of 
osteoarthritis, the impact to the overall medical readiness 
from post-traumatic osteoarthritis, and recommendations on 
prevention and treatment to reduce the number of service 
members suffering from osteoarthritis.

           Prescription Opioid Abuse and Effects on Readiness

    The committee is aware of increased misuse of prescription 
opioid drugs on the national level. The committee understands 
that the Department of Defense employs several methods to 
prevent, educate and identify abuse of opioid drugs by military 
service members. However, the committee is concerned that new 
strategies may be necessary to combat opioid drug abuse to 
improve service member individual readiness, health and quality 
of life. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to submit a report to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by October 1, 2017, on the Department's efforts to 
prevent, educate and treat prescription opioid drugs abuse by 
military service members. The report shall include: research on 
more comprehensive treatments for opioid addiction; integration 
of drug treatment into healthcare settings and addressing 
behavioral interventions; research on next generation 
analgesics in order to identify new pain relievers with reduced 
abuse, tolerance, and dependence risk; devising alternative 
delivery systems and formulations for existing drugs that 
minimize diversion; a focus on developing more effective means 
for preventing overdose deaths; and focused strategies on 
public communication and education.

      Private-Public Partnership in Military Treatment Facilities

    The committee is aware that there are significant 
challenges regarding access to health care on military bases 
particularly at smaller and mid-sized bases. The committee is 
committed to improving access to care at military treatment 
facilities (MTF) for military beneficiaries and to ensure the 
readiness of military medical providers. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to assess the 
feasibility of including private-public partnerships using 
contracted services to provide health care within MTFs. In 
conducting the assessment, the Secretary shall consider the 
benefit of providing additional services, not previously 
available at clinics, through the partnerships, hybrid models 
of privately contracted care with direct military oversight 
providing services within the MTFs, potential costs savings by 
operating an MTF through the partnership, increased patient 
satisfaction, improved access to care measured by appointment 
availability and wait time, and overall improvement to service 
member medical readiness. Not later than December 1, 2016, the 
Secretary shall brief the Committee on Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives on the results of the assessment.

         Storage of DNA Samples of Members of the Armed Forces

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense uses the 
Armed Forces Repository of Specimens for the purpose of 
identifying human remains. The repository of DNA samples is 
critical to the identification of service members if they 
become casualties or Missing in Action and the remains are 
recovered. The committee is concerned that the storage of the 
original and duplicate DNA samples for members of the Armed 
Forces is in one location and could jeopardize future 
identification if the facility becomes inoperable. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to review the 
feasibility of storing duplicate DNA samples in an alternate 
facility and provide the results of the review to the Committee 
on Armed Services of the House of Representatives by December 
1, 2016.

             TRICARE Coverage of Medically Necessary Foods

    The committee is aware that medically necessary foods are 
prescribed for the safe and effective management of multiple 
disorders which affect digestion, absorption, and metabolism of 
nutrients. The committee is also aware of current TRICARE 
Program policy directing coverage of nutritional therapy when 
it is used as the primary source of calories or as the primary 
source of a required macronutrient. The committee is concerned 
that healthcare providers may have difficulty obtaining 
approval of medically necessary foods and formulas for the 
management of their patients' diseases and conditions, such as 
for the management of inflammatory bowel disease, eosinophilic 
esophagitis, and major milk sensitivity in pediatric 
populations. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to review the adequacy of current TRICARE coverage 
policy for nutritional therapy and provide a briefing of its 
findings to the Armed Services Committee of the House of 
Representatives by July 1, 2017. The briefing shall address the 
following elements; rates of appeal for denial of coverage, 
average length of appeal, rates of denial of nutritional 
therapy coverage in pediatric and adult populations, and any 
other matters that the Secretary may deem appropriate.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


        Subtitle A--Reform of TRICARE and Military Health System


        Section 701--TRICARE Preferred and Other TRICARE Reform

    This section would establish TRICARE Preferred as the self-
managed, preferred provider option that would replace TRICARE 
Standard and Extra. This section would also establish annual 
enrollment fees and fixed dollar copayments for Active Duty 
family members and retirees who join the armed services on or 
after January 1, 2018, and enroll in TRICARE Preferred or in 
TRICARE Prime, the managed care option. In addition, this 
section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to establish 
an annual enrollment fee for TRICARE Preferred for 
beneficiaries who were in the Active Duty or retired categories 
prior to January 1, 2018. However, the Secretary may not 
establish this annual enrollment fee until 90 days after the 
Comptroller General of the United States submits a report, not 
later than February 1, 2020, to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives on 
access to care, network adequacy, and beneficiary satisfaction 
under TRICARE Preferred compared to the baseline review. This 
section would require the Comptroller General, not later than 
September 1, 2017, to submit to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives a 
report on the baseline assessment of network adequacy and 
beneficiaries' access to care under the TRICARE health care 
provider network. Further, this section would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit an implementation plan, not 
later than June 1, 2017, to the Committees on Armed Services of 
the Senate and the House of Representatives to improve access 
for TRICARE beneficiaries. The Comptroller General would be 
required to submit, not later than December 1, 2017, to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives a review of the implementation plan submitted 
by the Secretary.

Section 702--Reform of Administration of the Defense Health Agency and 
                 Military Medical Treatment Facilities

    This section would require the Defense Health Agency to 
become responsible for management of military treatment 
facilities throughout the Department of Defense, while 
preserving the responsibilities of the commanders of such 
facilities for ensuring the readiness of the members of the 
armed forces and civilian employees at such facilities and for 
furnishing the health care and medical treatment provided at 
such facilities. The Defense Health Agency would establish an 
executive-level management office consisting of professional 
health care administrators to manage health care operations, 
finance and budget, information technology, and medical affairs 
across all military treatment facilities. In addition, this 
section would direct the Secretary of Defense to submit an 
interim report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than March 1, 2017, on the preliminary plan to implement 
these changes, and a final report not later than March 1, 2018. 
This section would also require the Comptroller General of the 
United States to review each of the plans submitted by the 
Secretary and to submit the Comptroller's assessment to the 
congressional defense committees by September 1, 2017, and 
September 1, 2018, respectively.

           Section 703--Military Medical Treatment Facilities

    This section would modify chapter 55 of title 10, United 
States Code, by inserting a new section 1073d which would 
establish the requirements for military medical treatment 
facilities in order to support medical readiness of the Armed 
Forces and the readiness of medical personnel. This section 
would further require the Secretary of Defense, in 
collaboration with the Secretaries of the military departments, 
to submit an updated Military Health System Modernization Study 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
270 days after the date of the enactment of this Act. This 
section would also require the Secretary to submit to the 
congressional defense committees, not later than 2 years after 
the date of the enactment of this Act, an implementation plan 
to restructure or realign the military medical treatment 
facilities in accordance with section 1073d of title 10, United 
States Code.

        Section 704--Access to Urgent Care Under TRICARE Program

    This section would modify chapter 55 of title 10, United 
States Code, by inserting a new section 1077a to require the 
Secretary of Defense, not later than 1 year after enactment of 
this Act, to ensure urgent care is available through 11:00 p.m. 
at military treatment facilities the Secretary determines to be 
appropriate. Further, this section would require that if urgent 
care is unavailable at the military treatment facilities, 
access to urgent care through the TRICARE network providers 
would be available through 11:00 p.m. This section would also 
eliminate the preauthorization requirement for urgent care.

    Section 705--Access to Primary Care Clinics at Military Medical 
                          Treatment Facilities

    This section would further modify section 1077a of title 
10, United States Code, as added elsewhere in this Act, to 
require the Secretary of Defense to expand the primary care 
clinic hours at military treatment facilities during the week 
and on weekends beyond the standard business hours of the 
installation.

  Section 706--Incentives for Value-Based Health Under TRICARE Program

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
develop and implement value-based incentive programs as part of 
the TRICARE contracts to encourage health care providers under 
the TRICARE program to improve the quality of care and the 
experience of the covered beneficiaries. Not later than 1 year 
after implementation of a value-based incentive program and 
annually thereafter through 2022, the Secretary of Defense 
would be required to brief the Committees on Armed Services of 
the Senate and the House of Representatives, and any other 
appropriate congressional committee, on the quality performance 
metrics and expenditures related to the incentive program.

Section 707--Improvements to Military-Civilian Partnerships to Increase 
                  Access to Health Care and Readiness

    This section would amend section 1096 of title 10, United 
States Code, to improve military-civilian partnerships to 
deliver health care to beneficiaries in a more effective, 
efficient, or economical manner and to provide members of the 
Armed Forces with additional training opportunities to maintain 
readiness requirements for military health care providers.

                    Section 708--Joint Trauma System

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit to the Committees on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives and the Senate an implementation plan to 
establish a Joint Trauma System as an enduring organization 
within the Defense Health Agency. The Joint Trauma System would 
serve as a reference body for all trauma care provided within 
the military health system; establish standards of care for 
trauma services; coordinate the translation of research from 
the Defense Centers of Excellence into standards of care; and 
coordinate the lessons learned from joint trauma partnerships 
into clinical practice. This section would also require the 
Comptroller General of the United States to review the 
implementation plan not later than 120 days after the Secretary 
submits the implementation plan.

      Section 709--Joint Trauma Education and Training Directorate

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
assess the number of traumatologists needed to meet the 
requirements of the combatant commanders and to establish a 
Joint Trauma Education and Training Directorate to create 
enduring partnerships with civilian trauma centers. These 
military trauma surgeons and physicians, along with the 
clinical support teams, would be embedded within civilian 
trauma centers to maintain professional readiness to treat 
critically injured patients. This section would also require 
the Secretary to submit an implementation plan to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the House of Representatives 
and the Senate not later than July 1, 2017.

Section 710--Improvements to Access to Health Care in Military Medical 
                          Treatment Facilities

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
ensure that military medical treatment facilities implement and 
consistently practice the following requirements: first call 
resolution, standardized appointment scheduling, increased 
provider productivity, and managed appointment utilization 
through maximizing use of telehealth and secure messaging. This 
section would require the Secretary to implement the 
requirements by February 1, 2017, and provide a briefing to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the House of Representatives 
and the Senate on the implementation not later than March 1, 
2017.

       Section 711--Adoption of Core Quality Performance Metrics

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
adopt the core quality performance measures agreed upon by a 
collaborative group of Federal agencies, health plans, national 
physician organizations, employers, and consumers. The core 
quality measures would be used to evaluate performance of the 
Military Health System and the TRICARE network.

Section 712--Study on Improving Continuity of Health Care Coverage for 
                           Reserve Components

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
study the options for providing health care coverage to certain 
current and former members of the Selected Reserve. The section 
would require the Secretary to submit a report of the findings 
and recommendations to the congressional defense committees not 
later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act.

                 Subtitle B--Other Health Care Benefits


Section 721--Provision of Hearing Aids to Dependents of Retired Members

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
sell hearing aids to dependents of retired members of the 
uniformed services.

 Section 722--Extended TRICARE Program Coverage for Certain Members of 
the National Guard and Dependents During Certain Disaster Response Duty

    This section would require that members of the National 
Guard be treated as if they were on Active Duty for purposes of 
coverage under TRICARE while performing disaster response duty, 
if the period immediately follows a period of full-time 
National Guard duty, unless a Governor determines that it is 
not in the best interest of the member or State.

                 Subtitle C--Health Care Administration


Section 731--Prospective Payment of Funds Necessary to Provide Medical 
                        Care for the Coast Guard

    This section would amend chapter 13 of title 14, United 
States Code, to require the Secretary of Homeland Security to 
make a prospective payment to the Secretary of Defense of an 
amount that represents the actuarial valuation of treatment or 
care provided to members of the Coast Guard, former members of 
the Coast Guard, and their dependents at facilities under the 
jurisdiction of the Department of Defense except for any period 
during which the Coast Guard operates as a service in the Navy.

                 Subtitle D--Reports and Other Matters


   Section 741--Mental Health Resources for Members of the Military 
                    Services at High Risk of Suicide

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
develop a methodology that identifies which members of the 
military services are at high risk of suicide based on 
association with units that have a high rate of suicide and 
provide additional mental health resources to members who have 
deployed with such units.

       Section 742--Research of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    This section would authorize not more than $25.0 million to 
be used to award grants for research of Chronic Traumatic 
Encephalopathy.

      Section 743--Active Oscillating Negative Pressure Treatment

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
consider using active oscillating negative pressure treatment 
for members of the Armed Forces who incur blast-related 
injuries.

  Section 744--Long-Term Study on Health of Helicopter and Tiltrotor 
                                 Pilots

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
carry out a long-term study of helicopter and tiltrotor pilots 
to assess the acute and chronic medical conditions of such 
pilots. This section would also require the Secretary to brief 
the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives by June 6, 2017, on the results of such study.

   Section 745--Pilot Program for Prescription Drug Acquisition Cost 
            Parity in the TRICARE Pharmacy Benefits Program

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct a pilot program to evaluate whether extending 
additional discounts for prescription drugs filled at retail 
pharmacies will maintain or reduce cost for the Department of 
Defense.

  Section 746--Study on Display of Wait Times at Urgent Care Clinics, 
     Pharmacies, and Emergency Rooms of Military Medical Treatment 
                               Facilities

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
study the feasibility of displaying average wait times at 
urgent care clinics, pharmacies, and emergency rooms of 
military medical treatment facilities. Not later than March 1, 
2017, the Secretary would be required to submit a report to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the House of Representatives 
and the Senate, which includes the estimated costs for 
displaying wait times.

    Section 747--Report on Feasibility of Including Acupuncture and 
        Chiropractic Services for Retirees Under TRICARE Program

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit to the congressional defense committees a report on the 
feasibility of furnishing acupuncture and chiropractic services 
to retirees under TRICARE.

  Section 748--Clarification on Submission of Reports on Longitudinal 
                    Study on Traumatic Brain Injury

    This section would, notwithstanding section 1080 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92), require the Secretary of Defense to submit to 
Congress the reports required by section 721 of the John Warner 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2007 (Public 
Law 109-364).

  TITLE VIII--ACQUISITION POLICY, ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT, AND RELATED 
                                MATTERS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                    Acquisition Auditing and Agility

    The committee continues to believe that more could be done 
to improve the efficiency of defense contract audits. According 
to its annual report, the Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA) 
had an inventory of more than 18,000 incurred cost submissions 
at the end of fiscal year 2014, and the average time to 
complete these cost audits was about 1,000 days. Meanwhile, the 
Department of Defense recently withdrew a proposal that would 
have enabled additional external auditors to assist DCAA in 
conducting agency audits of contractor business systems. The 
inability of DCAA to carry out its audit responsibilities in a 
timely manner has cost and schedule consequences for both 
defense acquisition programs and the Department's industrial 
base.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to conduct a comprehensive review of DCAA's 
current backlog of incurred cost submissions and contractor 
business system audits. The review shall assess issues such as:
    (1) How DCAA defines and measures its backlog for audits;
    (2) The nature, extent, and dollar value of the audits that 
comprise the backlog;
    (3) The factors contributing to why audits have remained 
open;
    (4) DCAA's criteria and approach for conducting audits and 
reducing the backlog;
    (5) The time and resources used by DCAA to conduct backlog 
audits;
    (6) The cost avoidance, cost savings, or other benefits 
realized from completing backlog audits;
    (7) Whether any additional measures are needed to improve 
DCAA's ability to complete audits within a reasonable period of 
time; and
    (8) Recommendations on ways to reduce DCAA's backlog and to 
prevent a backlog from reoccurring.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
March 1, 2017, on the interim results of the review, and to 
provide a final report to the congressional defense committees 
by August 1, 2017.

                    Acquisition Manager Career Paths

    For many years, acquisition experts have emphasized that 
military and civilian acquisition managers need more knowledge 
and experience to be able to effectively develop, manage, and 
oversee complex weapon system programs in the Department of 
Defense. The committee recognizes that the Department has 
recently made progress in improving the capacity of the 
acquisition workforce by providing acquisition managers with 
additional training, industry exchange opportunities, and 
leadership development. However, the committee continues to be 
concerned that these efforts focus on managing the ``process'' 
of the Department's acquisition system rather than on 
developing technical and business expertise, knowledge of 
industry operations, and the skills needed to achieve desired 
acquisition outcomes. The committee also is concerned that 
efforts to develop more skilled acquisition managers are 
hampered by the lack of clear and comprehensive acquisition 
manager career paths and incentives. Many acquisition studies 
have identified conflicts between what military officers need 
to do to be promoted and their tenure as program managers, as 
well as the limited incentives available to retain highly 
experienced managers.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to conduct a comprehensive study of the 
career paths, development, and incentives for military and 
civilian acquisition managers in the Department of Defense. The 
review shall assess issues such as: (1) how acquisition career 
paths for civilian and military acquisition managers are 
structured and implemented in the military services; (2) the 
extent to which career development and training provide the 
requisite skills and experience needed to work effectively with 
industry; (3) the extent to which career path opportunities 
support program acquisition tenure requirements; (4) whether 
career path opportunities and other existing financial 
mechanisms are effective in retaining high performing managers; 
and (5) whether changes are needed in authorities, regulations, 
or procedures to provide for more effective career paths and 
development opportunities for acquisition managers. The 
committee further directs that the Comptroller General brief 
the House Committee on Armed Services on the interim results of 
the review by March 1, 2017, and provide a final report to the 
congressional defense committees by September 1, 2017.

                        Advanced Small Business

    Section 1613 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2013 (Public Law 112-239) required the Secretary of 
Defense to submit to the congressional defense committees by 
January 1, 2014, a report on an independent assessment of the 
procurement performance of the Department of Defense related to 
small business concerns. The committee is concerned that it has 
not yet received the results of the independent assessment. The 
committee understands that some of the required items have been 
completed and some continue to be assessed. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide the 
results of the independent assessment as soon as possible. The 
committee further directs the Secretary to brief the House 
Committee on Armed Services and the Committee on Small Business 
of the House of Representatives not later than February 1, 
2017, on the elements of the assessment that have been 
completed. In particular, the committee seeks information on 
the transition challenges faced by businesses that graduate 
from small business programs or grow to exceed the size 
standards for participation in such programs, along with 
specific recommendations on steps that should be taken to help 
ensure the continued health and growth of such businesses (item 
7 of the independent assessment).

    Appropriate Use of Lowest Price, Technically Acceptable Source 
                   Selection Processes and Contracts

    The committee notes that in a memorandum on ``Appropriate 
Use of Lowest Priced, Technically Acceptable Source Selection 
Process and Associated Contract Type'' dated March 4, 2015, the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and 
Logistics stated that ``Lowest Priced Technically Acceptable 
(LPTA) has a clear, but limited place in the source selection 
`best value' continuum. Used in appropriate circumstances and 
combined with effective competition and proper contract type, 
LPTA can drive down costs and provide the best value solution. 
LPTA offers a streamlined and simplified source selection 
approach to rapidly procure commercial and non-complex services 
and supplies we need to support the warfighter. If not applied 
appropriately, however, the Department can miss an opportunity 
to secure an innovative, cost-effective solution to meet 
warfighter needs to help maintain our technological edge.''
    The committee agrees with this assessment of the limited 
and appropriate use of LPTA source selection processes and 
contracts, and the risks of their inappropriate use. However, 
the committee is concerned that LPTA processes and contracts 
are being used in many circumstances far beyond the depiction 
of appropriate in the Under Secretary's memorandum, resulting 
in the negative consequences described in the memorandum. For 
example, LPTA contracts have been inappropriately used to 
procure sensitive electronic test equipment that are very 
technical in nature and require calibration, repair, and 
software updates during their life cycle. Such long-term costs 
are not considered under LPTA processes, even though they may 
increase taxpayer costs by millions over the life of the 
equipment. Another example is procurement of personal 
protective equipment, which the committee strongly believes 
demands consideration of additional performance above a minimum 
threshold. The committee is also concerned that LPTA processes 
may prevent the Department of Defense from hiring auditing 
firms with the necessary experience to conduct audits for 
large, complex, multinational organizations.
    The committee also is concerned that these anecdotal 
examples suggest a more widespread over-use of LPTA processes 
and contracts that may be having substantial unintended 
consequences. Therefore, the committee directs the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics 
to:
    (1) Conduct a review of the Department's formal and 
informal policy guidance regarding the use of LPTA source 
selection processes and contracts;
    (2) Conduct a survey of contracting officers regarding 
their understanding of such policy guidance; and
    (3) Compile data on the frequency and type of goods or 
services for which LPTA source selection processes and 
contracts were used during fiscal years 2015 and 2016.
    The committee further directs the Under Secretary to 
provide a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives not later than March 1, 
2017, on the findings of the review, survey, and data 
compilation related to LPTA processes and contracts.

 Contracting Delays for the Small Business Innovative Research Program

    The committee is aware that in the past, continuing 
resolutions for the budget have caused delays in getting funds 
for Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program out to 
program offices. Additionally, these continuing resolutions 
also cause contracting backlogs with other contracts in the 
Department of Defense. The committee is concerned that SBIR 
contracting may become even further delayed by being put at the 
end of any contract officer's work queue. The committee 
applauds the Department for looking for innovative solutions to 
this problem, including the establishment of contracting 
centers of excellence to deal with the logjam. The committee 
encourages the Department to continue refining such ideas, and 
look at other ways to streamline and improve the SBIR 
contracting process.

            Defense Acquisition University Course Curriculum

    The committee is concerned that, following the issuance of 
Executive Order 13502, there have been very few project labor 
agreements (PLAs) used for Department of Defense construction. 
In 2010, the Annual Report of the White House Task Force on the 
Middle Class found that agency contracting offices had limited 
utilization of PLAs. The committee is concerned that such low 
utilization may result from limited curriculum on the use of 
PLAs at the Defense Acquisition University (DAU). For example, 
the committee notes that PLAs are not a main focus area of 
DAU's course on construction contracting (CON244). The 
committee directs the Undersecretary of Defense for 
Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics to provide a briefing to 
the House Committee on Armed Services not later than October 1, 
2016, on the extent to which DAU instructs students on the use 
of PLAs. The briefing should include recommendations on how to 
elevate the importance of PLAs in DAU's curriculum.

                          Development Planning

    Development planning has long been recognized as an 
effective tool for the Department of Defense, and the Air Force 
in particular, to understand future warfighting needs and 
reconcile those with available and potential capabilities, 
concepts, and emerging technologies, and to provide a technical 
foundation for acquisition programs. A 2014 study by the 
National Research Council of the National Academies called 
development planning ``a key process to support the Secretary 
of the Air Force and the Chief of Staff of the Air Force in 
strategic decisions that guide the Air Force toward mission 
success today and in the future.'' The committee is encouraged 
by the commitment of the Department and the Air Force to 
development planning, including experimentation and 
prototyping, as a tool to support emerging capabilities that 
will lead to more effective and lower cost weapon systems.

             Developmental and Operational Testing Agility

    The committee recognizes that developmental and operational 
test and evaluation activities are an integral part of the 
acquisition of weapon systems, as they provide knowledge of a 
system's capabilities and limitations as it matures and is 
eventually deployed for use by the warfighter. However, the 
committee is concerned that test and evaluation processes in 
the Department of Defense may not be sufficiently aligned to 
support recent efforts to increase the rapid acquisition, 
prototyping, and fielding of advanced warfighter capabilities. 
In an environment where threats and technologies are changing 
at a rapid pace, it is critical that the Department have an 
agile acquisition system that provides the warfighter with the 
best capabilities possible.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Director of 
Operational Test and Evaluation, in coordination with the 
Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Developmental Test 
and Evaluation, to conduct a review focused on ways to improve 
the agility and effectiveness of developmental and operational 
testing within the Department, especially for incremental 
upgrades to weapon systems and the rapid prototyping and 
fielding of advanced warfighter capabilities. The review should 
assess the Department's current use of modeling, simulation, 
automated testing, risk-based testing, and other testing 
approaches used in government or industry that could be used to 
support rapid prototyping and fielding activities. The review 
should also address whether operational and developmental test 
organizations are sufficiently positioned and resourced to 
effectively conduct their missions. The committee further 
directs the Director of Operational Test and Evaluation to 
provide a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than February 1, 2017, on the findings of the review, 
along with recommendations for any improvements in test and 
evaluation processes and procedures.

 Discussions Between Government and Industry After Receipt of Proposals

    The committee notes that the Defense Federal Acquisition 
Regulation Supplement (DFARS) pertaining to exchanges with 
offerors after receipt of proposals is not consistent with the 
Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) on the same subject. 
Currently, FAR 15.306 makes clear that contracting officers 
must conduct discussions with each offeror within the 
competitive range, yet DFARS 215.306 states contracting 
officers should conduct such discussions above a certain 
monetary threshold, thereby introducing a possible discrepancy 
regarding if such discussions are mandatory or optional.
    The committee is concerned that such inconsistency could 
have an adverse effect on exchanges between government and 
industry. Accordingly, the committee reminds the Department of 
Defense that the FAR makes discussions with offerors within the 
competitive range mandatory and expects Department contracting 
officers to follow the FAR. The committee has been supportive 
of improving discussions overall between government and 
industry. For example, section 887 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92) 
required the FAR Council to prescribe a regulation making clear 
that acquisition personnel are permitted and encouraged to 
engage in responsible and constructive exchanges with industry. 
The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by October 1, 
2016, on how the Department implements FAR 15.306 and DFARS 
215.306, as well as any revisions or additions to the FAR based 
on the requirements of section 887 of Public Law 114-92.

                Domestic Source of Traveling Wave Tubes

    The committee is concerned with the use of foreign made 
components in the most sensitive national security programs. 
Specifically, the committee is aware that traveling wave tubes 
(TWTs) of non-U.S. manufacturers are being used in critical 
satellite and guided missile programs. Additionally, the 
committee notes the failure of a TWT constitutes a grave risk 
of single point failure in many of these national security 
programs. The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
March 1, 2017, on the risks of non-U.S. TWTs in national 
security programs. The briefing should include recommendations 
for ensuring all TWTs used as components in national security-
related procurements are American in origin and manufacture.

                          Innovation Clusters

    The committee recognizes the critical role that industry, 
non-profit research institutes, and academia play in the 
innovation ecosystem that supports national security. In 
particular, the committee believes that small businesses and 
non-traditional contractors have an especially important role 
to play, though their size and lack of familiarity with 
Department of Defense processes can often be an impediment to 
effective cooperation. The increasing need for these entities 
to be involved in classified research poses additional 
problems, and makes it even more difficult for the Department 
to leverage these entities for the full range of national 
security work.
    The committee believes the Department should find methods 
to bring together these disparate organizations in new and 
novel ways to help build communities that can work together on 
vital national security problems. The committee encourages the 
Department to support these sorts of regional innovation 
clusters or consortia, especially where they can help leverage 
limited or high-demand resources, like classified meeting or 
processing spaces, which would be difficult for individual 
small businesses to invest in by themselves.

                         Large Lot Procurement

    The committee notes that the significant procurement 
reductions proposed in the fiscal year 2017 budget request make 
clear the imperative of changing acquisition policies to 
generate greater efficiencies and to procure more weapon 
systems within constrained budgets. The committee is aware that 
Department of Defense acquisition officials have evaluated a 
concept known as Large Lot Procurement (LLP), which could 
generate substantial acquisition savings and more efficient 
utilization of the defense industrial base. The committee 
understands LLP to involve using a multiyear contract to 
purchase units from a portfolio of stable acquisition programs 
produced in common facilities. Purchases would be sequenced to 
realize economic order quantities, resulting in substantial 
savings across acquisition programs. Therefore, the committee 
encourages Department of Defense officials to continue to 
explore the LLP concept. The committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than September 1, 2016, on the potential 
utility of LLP, barriers to pursuing LLP, and potential policy 
and legislative changes necessary to enable LLP. The briefing 
should also include a list of current multiyear contracts that 
could be included in an LLP and a description of a notional LLP 
containing such multiyear contracts.

                    Operation and Support Cost Data

    The committee notes that operation and support (O&S;) costs 
comprise the majority of the life-cycle costs of a weapon 
system, yet O&S; costs are difficult to accurately estimate 
during the acquisition process because historical data on 
actual O&S; costs for weapon systems are limited. Section 832 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 
(Public Law 112-81) directed the Secretary of Defense to 
establish standard requirements for the collection of O&S; cost 
data, the military departments to revise their data systems to 
ensure complete and accurate collection of such data, and the 
Director of Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation (CAPE) to 
develop and maintain a database on O&S; cost estimates, 
supporting documentation, and actual O&S; costs. The committee 
is aware that some progress has been made in improving data 
collection and analysis; however, significant deficiencies 
still exist. For example, while existing systems collect data 
on the amount of funds executed for operation and maintenance 
of weapon systems, they fail to capture detailed information on 
how and for what purposes such funds are used, which are 
critical details for developing reliable O&S; cost estimates for 
new acquisition programs. In addition, the committee is 
concerned that there is insufficient coordination across the 
military services regarding the collection of O&S; cost data, 
making it difficult to integrate and use data across systems.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Director of CAPE, in 
coordination with the service secretaries and the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and 
Logistics, to conduct a comprehensive review of the military 
services' O&S; cost data collection efforts and systems and 
provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives by February 1, 2017, on the results of 
the review. The review should include a case study of the O&S; 
cost data available for at least one current major defense 
acquisition program from each of the military departments, 
based on data that is currently available to CAPE. It should 
identify any shortfalls in O&S; cost data that reduce the 
accuracy of O&S; cost estimates and potential sources of 
additional data that could improve O&S; cost modeling, such as 
information on how and for what purposes O&S; funds are used and 
relevant information on operation and sustainment activities. 
The briefing should include recommendations for achieving an 
enterprise data repository that could retrieve and consolidate 
data from the military departments' various databases that 
contain information related to the operation and sustainment of 
weapon systems.

 Public-Private Competitions Conducted Under Office of Management and 
                          Budget Circular A-76

    The committee is aware that a moratorium on the conduct of 
public-private competitions governed by Office of Management 
and Budget Circular A-76 has existed within the Department of 
Defense since fiscal year 2008. The committee is also aware 
that in the Department's report to the congressional defense 
committees on the Department's conduct of public-private 
competitions, required by section 325 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (Public Law 111-84), the 
Department recommended Congress lift the suspension on A-76 
competitions. The committee further notes that historically the 
Department has relied on conducting A-76 public-private 
competitions in an effort to achieve greater efficiency and 
productivity. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense, acting through the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Personnel and Readiness, in consultation with the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics 
and the Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller), to review the 
Department's report to congressional defense committees 
submitted pursuant to section 325 of Public Law 111-84 and 
brief the House Committee on Armed Services by March 31, 2017, 
on updated views and recommendations concerning the 
Department's ability to implement public-private competitions 
under Circular A-76. The briefing shall include what actions 
the Department has taken to correct the problems identified 
with Circular A-76 by the Department of Defense Inspector 
General in report D-2009-034 and by the Government 
Accountability Office in report GA0-11-923R.

                              Rare Earths

    In the committee report (H. Rept. 113-446) accompanying the 
Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2015, the committee tasked the Director of the 
Defense Contract Management Agency (DCMA) to conduct a supply 
chain review of rare earths in acquisition category (ACAT) I 
programs. DCMA concluded that virtually all ACAT I programs 
contain rare earths that are necessary for program 
functionality. DCMA also concluded that ACAT I programs 
containing rare earths are dependent on foreign sources at 
several points in the rare earth supply chain. However, the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) reported in 2016 that 
the Department of Defense does not have a comprehensive 
approach to identifying rare earths that are critical to 
national defense. GAO further concluded that, without a 
comprehensive assessment, the ability of the Department to 
assess supply chain risks and mitigating actions is limited. 
The committee notes that the Department concurred with GAO 
recommendations to improve management of rare earths. However, 
the committee remains concerned about rare earth supply chain 
risks. The committee looks forward to reviewing the results of 
the Department's efforts to improve management of rare earths 
and will continue to work with the Department to mitigate risks 
related to rare earths.

           Requirement for Non-U.S. Contracts in Afghanistan

    The committee understands that U.S. military personnel and 
civilians currently serving in Afghanistan receive contractor 
support, which allows them to focus on achieving mission 
objectives. This support is paid for with U.S. taxpayer funding 
and is executed in accordance with the Federal Acquisition 
Regulations (FAR), subject to oversight of the Defense Contract 
Management Agency (DCMA), and allows for the appropriate 
congressional committees to fulfill their constitutional 
obligations to oversee funding for and performance of these 
contracts.
    The committee is concerned that transferring control of 
these activities to a non-U.S. contracting authority could 
result in reduced quality of services and overall decline in 
contract performance, as well as diminishing Federal and 
congressional oversight to protect U.S. taxpayer funds against 
waste, fraud, and abuse.
    Therefore, to maintain the quality of services being 
provided to U.S. personnel serving in Afghanistan, as well as 
safeguarding Congress' ability to conduct proper oversight, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by December 
1, 2016, on the plans and rationale for transferring any 
logistics or support contracts in Afghanistan currently awarded 
and administered by the U.S. Department of Defense, via the 
Army and the other services and defense agencies, to any other 
non-U.S. contracting authority. The briefing should include, at 
a minimum:
    (1) How many U.S.-funded contracts have been transferred to 
a non-U.S. contracting authority;
    (2) How many more transfers are planned; and
    (3) How does DCMA monitor compliance with the FAR and 
ensure taxpayer funds are protected against fraud, waste, and 
abuse.

             Service Contracts Inventory and Accountability

    The committee remains concerned about the ability of the 
Department of Defense to properly account for its contracts for 
services. The committee encourages the Department's recent 
efforts to improve its services contracting inventory and 
accountability methods in order to inform sourcing decisions 
and workforce planning. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the Senate 
Committee on Armed Services and the House Committee on Armed 
Services by November 1, 2016, regarding the steps the 
Department has taken to improve its services contracts 
inventory and accountability procedures. Elsewhere in this Act, 
the committee includes a provision that would revise the 
current requirement related to the inventory of contracts for 
services found in section 2330a of title 10, United States 
Code.

        Small Business Participation Across Industry Categories

    The committee continues to support the appropriate use of 
small business set asides to strengthen the defense industrial 
base. Section 1631 of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2013 (Public Law 112-239) required the head of 
each agency to ``develop a plan for achieving [the agency's 
small business goals] at both the prime contract and 
subcontract level'' that addresses the participation of these 
small businesses by industry category. Section 868 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92) required that when the Small Business 
Administration evaluates an agency's use of small businesses, 
it must assess the industrial distribution of those small 
business prime contracts and subcontracts. As neither of these 
requirements have been fully implemented, the committee directs 
the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by January 1, 2017, to outline 
Department of Defense efforts to ensure that awards to small 
businesses, including awards accomplished using set aside or 
sole source procedures, are appropriately distributed across 
industry categories.

                       Veterans in Piping Program

    The committee is aware that the Veterans in Piping program 
offers high-quality skills training and jobs in the pipe trades 
to Active Duty military personnel preparing to leave service. 
The program is intended to address the growing shortage in the 
construction industry of skilled workers and the unemployment 
rate among veterans.
    The committee supports this and similar transition 
programs, but notes that participating employers that provide 
training, certification, and guaranteed placement to Active 
Duty personnel often bear the full costs of such programs. The 
committee is concerned that, without more Department of Defense 
support, such transition assistance programs will not reach 
their full potential. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the Committee on 
Armed Services of the House of Representatives not later than 
February 1, 2017, on possible options within current law for 
supporting contractors working with service member transition 
organizations like the Veterans in Piping program. The briefing 
should also include potential legislative options on this issue 
for future consideration by the committee.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS

Subtitle A--Amendments to General Contracting Authorities, Procedures, 
                            and Limitations


Section 801--Revision to Authorities Relating to Department of Defense 
                    Test Resource Management Center

    This section would amend section 196 of title 10, United 
States Code, by limiting application of the existing law to the 
Major Range and Test Facility Base and those test and 
evaluation facilities that are used to support the acquisition 
programs of the Department of Defense. The amendment would 
align the statute to the original enactment in the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2003 (Public Law 107-
314) and would prevent reporting requirements from being 
broadened to small laboratory and educational test and 
evaluation facilities. The section would also define the term 
``significant change'' in test and evaluation facilities.

 Section 802--Amendments to Restrictions on Undefinitized Contractual 
                                Actions

    This section would amend section 2326 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require the Department of Defense to consider 
the cost risk to the contractor as of the date that a 
qualifying proposal to definitize a contract was submitted if 
the contract was not then definitized within the statutory 180-
day period. The section would also apply the 180-day 
definitization period to foreign military sales contracts and 
would amend the definition of a qualifying proposal to a 
proposal that contains sufficient information to enable a 
meaningful audit of the definitization proposal.

Section 803--Revision to Requirements Relating to Inventory Method for 
              Department of Defense Contracts for Services

    This section would amend section 2330a of title 10, United 
States Code, to revise the current requirement related to how 
the Department of Defense accounts for and reports contracts 
for services.

       Section 804--Procurement of Personal Protective Equipment

    This section would amend section 884 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92) to clarify source selection criteria to be used in the 
procurement of personal protective equipment or critical safety 
items. The criteria are that best value, rather than reverse 
auction or lowest price technically acceptable, contracting 
methods should be used in source selections to the maximum 
extent practicable.

 Section 805--Revision to Effective Date of Senior Executive Benchmark 
              Compensation for Allowable Cost Limitations

    This section would remove the retroactive application 
requirement of section 803 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 (Public Law 112-81), 
which implemented a cap on the allowable compensation of 
contractor employees. As a result of this revision, section 803 
would apply to compensation costs incurred after January 1, 
2012, under contracts entered into on or after December 31, 
2011.

     Section 806--Amendments Related to Detection and Avoidance of 
                      Counterfeit Electronic Parts

    This section would modify section 818 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 (Public Law 112-
81) by replacing the term ``trusted suppliers''' with the term 
``suppliers that meet anticounterfeiting requirements''', as 
well as related conforming amendments.
    The committee is aware that the term ``trusted'' in this 
context has created some confusion, since ``trusted 
suppliers''' refers to a specific category of microelectronics 
suppliers that have been accredited by the Defense 
Microelectronics Activity. Counterfeit parts refer to a much 
broader set of circumstances and require a broader definition 
of the supplier base needed to address counterfeiting concerns.

   Section 807--Amendments to Special Emergency Procurement Authority

    This section would amend section 1903 of title 41, United 
States Code, to expand the permissible uses of special 
emergency procurement authorities to include support of 
international disaster assistance and support of a national 
emergency or natural disaster relief efforts in the United 
States as defined by the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and 
Emergency Assistance Act.

Section 808--Compliance with Domestic Source Requirements for Footwear 
Furnished to Enlisted Members of the Armed Forces Upon Their Entry into 
                            the Armed Forces

    This section would amend section 418 of title 37, United 
States Code, to require the Department of Defense to adhere to 
the requirements of section 2533a of title 10, United States 
Code, and issue 100 percent American-made athletic shoes to new 
recruits upon entrance to basic training. This section would 
also allow waivers to be granted in cases of medical necessity.

    Section 809--Requirement for Policies and Standard Checklist in 
                        Procurement of Services

    This section would establish a procurement policy checklist 
to ensure accountability in the acquisition of services.

    Section 810--Extension of Limitation on Aggregate Annual Amount 
                    Available for Contract Services

    This section would extend the cap on the total spending for 
services contracts by 1 year.

 Subtitle B--Provisions Relating to Major Defense Acquisition Programs


   Section 811--Change in Date of Submission to Congress of Selected 
                          Acquisition Reports

    This section would amend section 2342(f) of title 10, 
United States Code, by changing, from 45 to 10, the number of 
days after the President's budget request transmittal that 
comprehensive annual Selected Acquisition Reports are due to 
Congress.

  Section 812--Amendments Relating to Independent Cost Estimation and 
                             Cost Analysis

    This section would amend sections 2334 and 2434 of title 
10, United States Code, to make clear that the Office of Cost 
Assessment and Program Evaluation (CAPE) conducts or approves 
independent cost estimates (ICEs) for all major defense 
acquisition programs and major automated information systems. 
In recognition of improvements made by military department 
costing functions, the section would authorize CAPE to approve 
ICEs conducted by the military departments rather than 
conducting all ICEs itself. The section would require 
assessments of risk and potential consequences in independent 
cost estimates, rather than the current reporting of confidence 
intervals. The section would also standardize and increase the 
scope of cost data collected by CAPE to create an enterprise 
cost data repository for use by all Department of Defense 
costing and acquisition functions. It is the committee's intent 
that the establishment of an enterprise data repository should 
not add additional layers of oversight to acquisition programs 
that are currently managed by the military departments.

          Section 813--Revisions to Milestone B Determinations

    This section would amend section 2366b of title 10, United 
States Code, to remove the requirement for the milestone 
decision authority, prior to milestone B approval, to determine 
affordability and funding levels for a major defense 
acquisition program relative to the Future Years Defense 
Program submitted during the year in which the determination is 
made. Since the Future Years Defense Program is not developed 
until the end of the year, the current requirement is typically 
waived. The section would maintain the requirement to determine 
affordability based on unit cost and total life-cycle cost, as 
well as determine the expected funding for product development 
and production.

     Section 814--Review and Report on Sustainment Planning in the 
                          Acquisition Process

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
enter into a contract with an independent entity with 
appropriate expertise to conduct an assessment of the extent to 
which sustainment matters are considered in decisions related 
to requirements, acquisition, cost estimating, and programming 
and budgeting for major defense acquisition programs (MDAPs). 
The study would include an evaluation of the availability and 
quality of information on sustainment of MDAPs and major weapon 
systems, including operation and support (O&S;) cost data; an 
assessment of product support strategies for major weapon 
systems; an evaluation of how effectively the military 
departments consider sustainment matters at key decision points 
for acquisition and life-cycle management; and recommendations 
for improving access to information and the consideration of 
sustainment matters. This section would require the Secretary 
to provide a briefing to the Committees on Armed Services of 
the Senate and the House of Representatives not later than 
March 1, 2017, on the preliminary findings of the independent 
entity. This section would also require the Secretary to submit 
to the congressional defense committees by August 1, 2017, the 
final report of the independent entity, his comments on the 
final report, and proposed revisions to laws or regulations.
    The committee received testimony that the Department has 
limited ability to estimate the O&S; costs of weapon systems, 
but such estimates are critical for accurately projecting 
complete life-cycle costs. Additionally, the committee 
continues to observe that operation and sustainment matters 
could receive more careful consideration early in the 
acquisition process during the planning and design of MDAPs. 
The committee expects the study to provide useful insights into 
the use of data in decision making, the effectiveness of 
sustainment planning in life-cycle management of major weapon 
systems, and how the decisions made early in the acquisition 
process affect the long-term operation and sustainment of major 
weapon systems.

 Section 815--Revision to Distribution of Annual Report on Operational 
                          Test and Evaluation

    This section would amend section 139 of title 10, United 
States Code, by including the Secretaries of the military 
departments in the list of people who receive and who may 
comment on the annual report of the Director of Operational 
Test and Evaluation. The section would also extend the annual 
report through January 31, 2021. This amendment would supersede 
section 1080 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92).

          Subtitle C--Provisions Relating to Commercial Items


         Section 821--Revision to Definition of Commercial Item

    This section would amend section 103 of title 41, United 
States Code, to expand the types of nondevelopmental items that 
may be considered commercial items to include items that the 
procuring agency determines were developed at private expense 
and sold in substantial quantities on a competitive basis to 
foreign governments. Currently, nondevelopmental items are 
limited to items sold to multiple State and local governments. 
This section would eliminate the requirement that a 
nondevelopmental item be sold to multiple governments to be 
considered a commercial item. This section also would prescribe 
that nothing in this section shall affect the meaning of the 
term ``commercial item'' under section 2464 of title 10, United 
States Code, regarding core logistics capabilities.

Section 822--Market Research for Determination of Price Reasonableness 
                   in Acquisition of Commercial Items

    This section would amend section 2377 of title 10, United 
States Code, relating to the preference for acquisition of 
commercial items by adding a new subsection that would require 
procurement officials of the Department of Defense to conduct 
or obtain market research when determining price reasonableness 
for commercial items.

      Section 823--Value Analysis for the Determination of Price 
                             Reasonableness

    This section would amend section 2379(d) of title 10, 
United States Code, by adding a new paragraph that would allow 
contractors to submit information or analysis pertaining to the 
value of a commercial item when responding to solicitations. 
This section would also allow contracting officers to consider 
value analysis, in addition to historic pricing data, when 
determining price reasonableness for commercial items.

Section 824--Clarification of Requirements Relating to Commercial Item 
                             Determinations

    This section would amend section 2380 of title 10, United 
States Code, to expand Department of Defense centralized 
records relating to commercial item determinations to include 
market research and price reasonableness analysis. This section 
would also eliminate the requirement that such records be 
publicly accessible.

    Section 825--Pilot Program for Authority to Acquire Innovative 
   Commercial Items Using General Solicitation Competitive Procedures

    This section would allow the Secretary of Defense to carry 
out a pilot program under which innovative commercial items may 
be acquired through a competitive selection of proposals, 
resulting from a general solicitation and the peer review of 
such proposals.

                       Subtitle D--Other Matters


       Section 831--Review and Report on the Bid Protest Process

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
enter into a contract with an independent entity with 
appropriate expertise to conduct a review of the bid protest 
process related to major defense acquisition programs. The 
review would include an assessment of the incidence and 
duration of bid protests, whether bid protests have delayed 
procurement actions, and whether bid protests are frequent by, 
or provide financial benefits to, incumbent contractors. The 
section would require the Secretary to brief the Senate and 
House Committees on Armed Services on the interim findings of 
the independent entity by March 1, 2017, and submit the final 
report on the findings of the independent entity to the 
congressional defense committees by July 1, 2017.
    The committee recognizes that the bid protest process 
serves a valuable role in helping ensure the overall integrity 
of the Federal procurement system. In recent years, however, 
there have been conflicting reports about the role of bid 
protests in the Department of Defense and whether the number of 
protests has increased and contributed to avoidable cost and 
schedule effects on acquisition programs.
    This review is likely to offer government-wide acquisition 
insights. Consequently, the committee intends to coordinate 
briefings and lessons learned with the Senate Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs and House Oversight and Government 
Reform Committees.

    Section 832--Review and Report on Indefinite Delivery Contracts

    This section would require the Comptroller General of the 
United States to review the use of indefinite delivery type 
contracts by the Department of Defense during fiscal years 
2015, 2016, and 2017. The Comptroller General would be required 
to report the findings of the review to Congress by March 31, 
2018.

   Section 833--Review and Report on Contractual Flow-Down Provisions

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
enter into a contract with an independent entity with 
appropriate expertise to conduct a review of contractual flow-
down provisions related to major defense acquisition programs. 
The review would include an assessment of the number of 
contractual flow-down provisions; provisions that are critical 
for national security; the applicability of provisions for 
commodities acquired for multiple programs; and costs, burdens, 
and participation rate effects, if any, of contractual flow-
down provisions on defense contractors. The section would 
require the Secretary to submit to the Senate and House 
Committees on Armed Services a briefing of interim findings of 
the independent entity by March 1, 2017, and a final report to 
the congressional defense committees on the findings of the 
independent entity by August 1, 2017.
    The committee is concerned that prime contracts awarded by 
the Department of Defense can have adverse effects on 
subcontractors due to the myriad flow-down provisions 
established in the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) and the 
Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement to the FAR. 
The committee is aware that the number of flow-down provisions 
has increased substantially and that some provisions may impose 
unnecessary burdens for the Department and its suppliers. The 
committee also is concerned that some provisions may be flowed 
down to subcontractors or suppliers to which they do not apply 
or without appropriate tailoring.
    This review is likely to offer government-wide acquisition 
insights. Consequently, the committee intends to coordinate 
briefings and lessons learned with the Senate Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs and House Oversight and Government 
Reform Committees.

 Section 834--Review of Anti-Competitive Specifications in Information 
                        Technology Acquisitions

    This section would require the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics to review the 
policy, guidance, regulations, and training related to 
specifications included in information technology (IT) 
acquisitions within 180 days after the date of the enactment of 
this Act. The purpose of this review would be to ensure that 
current policies eliminate the use of potentially anti-
competitive specifications, such as the use of brand name 
procurements, or references to proprietary specification or 
standards in IT acquisitions. This section would also require 
the Under Secretary to provide a briefing to the Senate 
Committee on Armed Services and the House Committee on Armed 
Services on the review. Lastly, this section would require the 
Under Secretary to revise current policies, guidance, and 
training to incorporate any recommended changes from this 
review, should changes be warranted.

          Section 835--Coast Guard Major Acquisition Programs

    This section would amend section 56(c) of title 14, United 
States Code, to direct the Chief Acquisitions Officer of the 
Coast Guard to inform the Commandant of developments in major 
acquisition programs that have new or revisited trade-offs 
between costs, scheduling, feasibility, and performance. This 
section also would amend chapter 15 of title 14, United States 
Code, to clarify the role of the Acquisition Directorate in 
ensuring that the needs of customers in major acquisition 
programs are met in the most cost-effective manner practicable. 
The Vice Commandant of the Coast Guard would be responsible for 
representing the operating field units and would serve an 
advisory role to the Commandant for major acquisition programs. 
The customer of a major acquisition program would be specified 
as the operating field unit that would field the acquired 
system and ``major acquisition program'' would be defined as a 
program with a life-cycle cost estimate of $300.0 million or 
more.
    This section also would prohibit the Commandant of the 
Coast Guard from awarding a contract for the design of an 
unmanned aerial system (UAS) for use by the Coast Guard, and 
would require the Commandant to use and operate only UASs that 
have already been acquired by either the Department of Defense 
or the Department of Homeland Security.
    This section also would allow the Coast Guard to extend 
major acquisition program contracts if the Comptroller General 
of the United States finds that extending a current contract 
would be more cost effective than awarding a new contract. The 
Comptroller General would determine the costs for acquiring 
additional vessels under an existing contract, as well as the 
incurred costs due to schedule delays and asset design changes 
that would result from awarding a new contract.
    This section also would require the Commandant to review 
all authorities provided under chapter 15 of title 14, United 
States Code, and other relevant statutes and deliver a report 
to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of 
the Senate and the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure of the House of Representatives on how the 
Commandant can play a more appropriate role in the acquisitions 
process with regard to policies, requirements, and implementing 
a more customer-oriented acquisition system.
    This section also would require the Secretary for the 
department in which the Coast Guard is operating to submit a 
report to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation of the Senate and the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure of the House of 
Representatives on an analysis of multiyear procurement 
authorities for the procurement of at least five Fast Response 
Cutters (beginning with hull 43) and Offshore Patrol Cutters 
(beginning with hull 5). The report would include an assessment 
of costs and benefits, impact on delivery times, and whether 
acquisitions would meet the four-part test under section 2306b 
of title 10, United States Code.

 Section 836--Waiver of Congressional Notification for Acquisition of 
 Tactical Missiles and Munitions Greater Than Quantity Specified in Law

    This section would waive the requirement for the Secretary 
of Defense to notify the congressional defense committees of a 
decision, not later than 30 days after the date of the 
decision, to acquire a higher quantity of an end item (for 
tactical missiles and munitions annual procurements only) than 
is specified in law.
    The committee believes this could be a considerable process 
improvement for the military service acquisition staffs by 
eliminating a significant staffing burden in working 
congressional notifications for nominal increases in missile 
and munition quantities over the budgeted levels that are based 
on unit cost savings.

     Section 837--Closeout of Old Department of the Navy Contracts

    This section would authorize the administrative closeout of 
a number of older Navy contracts and assist in obtaining a 
clean financial audit. The Department of Defense has estimated 
that this proposal would result in a one-time cost avoidance of 
at least $1.6 million and a one-time payment to the U.S. 
Treasury of approximately $0.58 million.

 Section 838--Requirement That Certain Ship Components Be Manufactured 
             in the National Technology and Industrial Base

    This section would amend section 2534 of title 10, United 
States Code, and would require certain auxiliary ship 
components to be procured from a manufacturer in the national 
technology and industrial base.

 Section 839--Department of Defense Acquisition Workforce Development 
                     Fund Determination Adjustment

    This section would amend section 1705 of title 10, United 
States Code, to allow the Secretary of Defense to reduce the 
threshold amount that must be credited to the Defense 
Acquisition Workforce Development Fund during fiscal year 2017 
from $400.0 million to $0. This section addresses an 
overfunding of the fund that has resulted from carryovers from 
prior years.

  Section 840--Amendment To Prohibition on Performance of Non-Defense 
 Audits by Defense Contract Audit Agency To Exempt Audits for National 
                    Nuclear Security Administration

    This section would amend section 893 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92) to exempt audits for the National Nuclear Security 
Administration from the prohibition on performance of non-
defense audits by the Defense Contract Audit Agency.

 Section 841--Selection of Service Providers for Auditing Services and 
                        Audit Readiness Services

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
select providers for audit and audit readiness services based 
on the best value to the Department, rather than based on the 
lowest price technically acceptable service provider.

 Section 842--Modifications to the Justification and Approval Process 
     for Certain Sole-Source Contracts for Small Business Concerns

    This section would repeal section 811 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (Public Law 111-
84) and establish a standard justification and approval process 
for sole-source contracts valued at $20.0 million or greater.

      TITLE IX--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT

                                OVERVIEW

    The Goldwater-Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization 
Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-433) instituted a series of sweeping 
organizational reforms to the Department of Defense to include: 
(1) improving military advice to the President and the 
Secretary of Defense; (2) improving joint officer management; 
(3) placing clear responsibility on the commanders of the 
combatant commands; and (4) increasing attention to the 
formulation of strategy and to contingency planning.
    These reforms were the result of 4 years of congressional 
oversight and deliberations. They led to a clear delineation of 
roles and responsibilities across the Department. The Chairman 
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff was designated as the principal 
military adviser to the President and the Secretary of Defense, 
and was to focus on planning and coordination across the joint 
force. The unified commands were assigned responsibility for 
conducting operations at the direction and control of the 
President through the Secretary of Defense, and all combat 
forces were to be assigned to the unified commanders. The role 
of the military departments was also clarified regarding 
organize, train, and equip functions. Lastly, to strengthen 
civilian authority, Public Law 99-433 codified the powers and 
duties of the Secretary of Defense. By all accounts, these 
reforms were a success and remain a model for bipartisan 
congressional oversight and reform of national security 
structures.
    Three decades after Public Law 99-433 was enacted, the 
committee believes that the legislation should be reviewed and 
reevaluated. The committee recognizes that security challenges 
have become more transregional, multi-domain, and multi-
functional; that U.S. superiority in key warfighting areas is 
at risk with other nations' technological advances; and that 
the Department of Defense lacks the agility and adaptability 
necessary to support timely decisionmaking and the rapid 
fielding of new capabilities.
    This subtitle represents the committee's first step towards 
Goldwater-Nichols reform. The committee believes that reform 
efforts must start with a clear set of guiding principles and 
objectives, and it recognizes that further oversight hearings 
and deliberations are necessary to inform additional reforms. 
The proposals contained in this subtitle are focused on 
increasing accountability and oversight, enhancing global 
synchronization and joint operations, and strengthening 
strategic thinking and planning, while preserving civilian 
control of the military and the role of the Chairman of the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff as the principal, independent military 
advisor to the President and Secretary of Defense.
    This subtitle contains a sense of Congress that outlines a 
set of guiding principles for reform. Regarding joint matters, 
it contains a provision that would reinforce the advisory role 
of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) to provide 
independent advice on ongoing operations and on the allocation 
and transfer of forces across regions to bridge service and 
combatant command stovepipes. It contains a provision that 
would extend the CJCS term from 2 to 4 years in a manner that 
bridges administrations to increase independence and to provide 
greater continuity of leadership, and it would require a 
revamped independent National Military Strategy to support U.S. 
national security objectives and to synchronize individual 
combatant command plans. It also includes a provision that 
would expand the definition of jobs that qualify for joint duty 
credit and decreases minimum joint tour lengths from 3 years to 
2 years to enhance operational currency across joint operations 
and the joint staff.
    Regarding unified commands, this subtitle includes a 
provision that elevates U.S. Cyber Command (CYBERCOM) to a 
unified command and directs the Comptroller General of the 
United States to study the dual-hat responsibility of the 
CYBERCOM Commander as the Director of the National Security 
Agency. Additionally, this subtitle contains a provision that 
would further de-layer and reduce top-heavy combatant command 
headquarters by reducing the rank of service and functional 
component commanders under a combatant command from four-star 
to three-star general and flag officers.
    Regarding reform within the military departments, the 
committee has largely focused its efforts on acquisition reform 
and the role of the military services in acquisition through 
legislation contained in the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92) and elsewhere in this 
Act.
    Lastly, this subtitle contains provisions that would 
streamline strategic planning within the Department. The 
subtitle includes provisions that would eliminate the 
ineffective Quadrennial Defense Review and replace it with a 
new framework for Secretary-led strategic guidance. The 
Secretary would be required to issue top-down Defense Strategic 
Guidance every four years that sets force structure and 
resource priorities. This guidance would be implemented through 
classified annual program and budget guidance and biennial 
contingency planning guidance that Congress would receive to 
support its oversight. Finally, this subtitle contains a 
proposal that would establish an independent Defense Strategy 
Commission to make recommendations for the nation's defense 
strategy.

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                        Conference Travel Policy

    The committee has been concerned about the detrimental 
impact that restrictions on the ability of defense laboratory 
personnel to travel to technical conferences and symposia have 
had on recruitment and retention of personnel in the defense 
research enterprise. The committee notes that such conferences 
provide value by enabling Department of Defense engineers, 
scientists, and other technical personnel to share research, 
learn about cutting-edge innovations, and interact with their 
peers from across the country and the world. In some cases, 
participation in such conferences is a necessary step in 
attaining or maintaining technical professional society 
memberships or certifications. Participation in technical 
conferences is also a signal of technological leadership to the 
international community, and recent restrictions have created a 
vacuum in some cases that have led other nations' researchers 
and engineers to fill the void. The ability of the Department 
to maintain technical leadership means U.S. scientists and 
engineers have to be present and active in this community.
    The committee is aware that the Office of the Deputy 
Secretary of Defense updated the Department's Conference Policy 
guidance in September of 2015. These changes have allowed 
personnel within the military departments and several other 
Department of Defense agencies greater flexibility for 
participation in technical conferences and symposia. While some 
military departments and Department of Defense agencies have 
implemented this new guidance, the committee is concerned about 
the uneven implementation of this new, more decentralized 
decision making. The committee encourages the Secretary of 
Defense to ensure the new policy is broadly, and correctly, 
understood to ensure that it is fully implemented as soon as 
possible.

                Defense Logistics Agency Overhead Costs

    The Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) sources and provides 
nearly every consumable item used by U.S. military forces 
worldwide. The Department of Defense uses the Defense-Wide 
Working Capital Fund to cover the Department's costs for 
providing services and purchasing commodities under three DLA 
activity groups: Supply Chain Management, Energy Management, 
and Document Services. The Defense-Wide Working Capital Fund is 
reimbursed through DLA's sale of commodities and services to 
the military services and other customers, such as other 
Federal agencies and foreign military sales. DLA incorporates 
overhead costs into the reimbursement rates it charges its 
customers, which DLA uses to offset facilities sustainment, 
restoration, and modernization; transportation; storage; and 
other costs.
    The committee is interested in the potential for improving 
DLA's overhead cost estimates, which could, in turn, contribute 
to more accurate budget estimates and potential savings. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of the 
United States to evaluate the following:
    (1) The nature and size of DLA activities financed by 
overhead costs reimbursed through the Defense-Wide Working 
Capital Fund;
    (2) How DLA calculates overhead costs for the commodities 
and services it manages through the Defense-Wide Working 
Capital Fund;
    (3) How DLA's estimated overhead costs have compared to 
actual costs since fiscal year 2009, and factors that have 
contributed to any differences;
    (4) The options, if any, DLA has considered in adjusting 
its approach to determining overhead costs in light of any 
differences between estimated and actual overhead costs; and
    (5) Any best practices that DLA has previously used or is 
using to identify and manage overhead costs.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
March 30, 2017, on preliminary findings of the Comptroller 
General's evaluation and to submit a final report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services on a date agreed to at the time of 
the briefing.

             Human Capital Plan for Business Transformation

    The committee believes that business transformation will be 
increasingly important to the Department of Defense, especially 
as shrinking budgets and workforce reductions continue. 
Additional demands, like the growing implementation of 
enterprise resource planning systems for financial and 
personnel management, as well as the deadlines to reach full 
financial auditability, further highlight the need to focus on 
business transformation, and to have a workforce with the right 
skill sets and experience to ensure that business 
transformation is successful. As the lead within the Department 
of Defense for these activities, these workforce needs are 
especially acute for the Deputy Chief Management Officer 
(DCMO).
    The Government Accountability Office (GAO) has pointed out 
that the human capital needs for the Office of the DCMO are not 
completely defined, and that there appear to be gaps in the 
skill sets needed for that office to be effective. An earlier 
call to complete a gap analysis of the human capital needs to 
better understand what types of personnel are needed to manage 
and oversee business transformation efforts has not been 
completed. While there is expertise in business systems and 
process improvement, GAO found the Office of the DCMO lacking 
in people with strategic planning or performance management 
expertise. Continuing workforce reductions will not only impact 
the ability to conduct this sort of assessment, but also 
underline the needs to take a more focused look at the 
workforce in order to make strategic decisions about the 
limited number of people that office will be able to hire and 
retain.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Department of Defense 
Deputy Chief Management Officer to complete a gap analysis of 
the human capital needs of the Office of the DCMO, taking into 
account the merger of the positions of Chief Information 
Officer and DCMO as directed by section 901 of the Carl Levin 
and Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291), and to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 
2017, on the results of the analysis.

           Oversight and Management of Defense-Wide Training

    The committee notes that Department of Defense Directive 
1322.18 pertaining to military training was last updated in 
January 2009. Since then, significant organizational changes 
within the Department have occurred, including the 
disestablishment of U.S. Joint Forces Command and the 
establishment of an Assistant Secretary of Defense for 
Readiness, directly affecting the oversight and management of 
defense-wide training policies, programs, and resources.
    The committee notes that section 4(d) of the Directive 
states that ``The Department of Defense shall maintain a 
comprehensive and effective Service, Defense Agency, and joint 
training management capability to develop, execute, and assess 
military training throughout the Department.'' The committee is 
aware, however, that, since the disestablishment of U.S. Joint 
Forces Command, defense-wide training and training-related 
activities and programs have been dispersed throughout the 
Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Joint Staff, the 
military services, the combatant commands, and other defense 
organizations. The committee is concerned that such dispersal, 
combined with outdated policy guidance, has led to the 
ineffective oversight and management of defense-wide training 
and inefficient allocation of training-related resources. The 
committee believes that the Department should take a more 
holistic approach to managing the defense training enterprise 
to enhance the capability and readiness of the joint force, to 
include aligning the services' training investments to joint 
and common training needs, identifying opportunities for 
greater training integration and interoperability, and 
advancing innovative training methods and capabilities.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in consultation with the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, 
to update Department of Defense Directive 1322.18. The 
committee further directs the Secretary and the Chairman to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than December 1, 2016, on the status of the Department's 
efforts to update such Directive. The briefing should also 
address the following elements:
    (1) The scope of training programs, facilities, activities, 
and resources covered by the updated Directive;
    (2) The delineation of training roles and responsibilities 
among the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Joint Staff, 
the military services, the combatant commands, and other 
relevant defense organizations;
    (3) An assessment of joint and common training requirements 
and the adequacy of current, planned, and programmed training 
capabilities, resources, and personnel to meet those 
requirements;
    (4) Any recommendations for improving the oversight and 
management of military training and related resources, 
including any recommendations for changes in authorities, 
budgeting structures, or organizational structures, including 
any recommendations for de-layering and consolidating defense-
wide training organizations; and
    (5) Any other matters the Secretary determines to be 
appropriate.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                  Subtitle A--Goldwater-Nichols Reform


       Section 901--Sense of Congress on Goldwater-Nichols Reform

    This section would express the sense of Congress that 
certain principles should be adhered to in any reform of the 
Goldwater-Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 
1986 (Public Law 99-433). These principles shape the 
legislative recommendations contained in this subtitle and will 
inform the committee's consideration of future reform 
proposals.

             Section 902--Repeal of Defense Strategy Review

    This section would repeal section 118 of title 10, United 
States Code, which requires the Secretary of Defense to conduct 
a comprehensive examination of the national defense strategy.
    Elsewhere in this Act, the committee includes provisions 
that would recommend comprehensive reform of the defense and 
military strategies of the Department of Defense.

  Section 903--Commission on National Defense Strategy for the United 
                                 States

    This section would establish a commission to be known as 
the ``Commission on National Defense Strategy for the United 
States'' to examine and make recommendations with respect to 
national defense strategy for the United States. This section 
would further set the composition and duties of the commission, 
and require the commission to submit a final report to the 
President, Secretary of Defense, and the specified 
congressional committees on its findings, conclusions, and 
recommendations, and to provide an interim briefing to the 
specified congressional committees.
    The committee notes that the strategic environment has 
evolved since the current defense strategy, as outlined in both 
the 2012 Defense Strategic Guidance and 2014 Quadrennial 
Defense Review, was formulated. For example, the strategy does 
not reflect a resurgent Russian Federation, the rise of the 
Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, or the fragile security 
environment in the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. The 
committee believes that the strategy and the assumptions 
underpinning it should be reviewed and revised, as appropriate.
    The committee further notes that the Congressional 
Commission on the Strategic Posture of the United States, in 
its 2009 final report, achieved a largely bipartisan consensus 
on its recommended strategic posture and nuclear weapons policy 
for the United States. The committee encourages the Commission 
on National Defense Strategy for the United States to strive 
for a similar bipartisan consensus. The committee believes that 
the Nation will benefit from such a bipartisan consensus on 
national security and that a new administration can leverage 
the work of the commission in its own defense strategy and 
posture development.

      Section 904--Reform of Defense Strategic and Policy Guidance

    This section would amend section 113(g) of title 10, United 
States Code, regarding Secretary of Defense policy guidance. 
Specifically, this section would require the Secretary of 
Defense to provide:
    (1) Written strategic guidance every 4 years to components 
of the Department of Defense that expresses the national 
defense strategy of the United States;
    (2) Written policy guidance annually to components of the 
Department that provides program and budget guidance for the 
development of the force;
    (3) Written policy guidance every 2 years or more 
frequently, as needed, to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff that provides contingency planning guidance; and
    (4) A copy of all written guidance described above to the 
congressional defense committees not later than February 15th 
in any calendar year in which any of the guidance is required.
    This section on reform of defense strategy and policy 
guidance from the Secretary of Defense is complemented 
elsewhere in this Act by reform of military strategy from the 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The committee aims to 
simplify the strategy and policy guidance required of the 
Secretary of Defense and to establish a hierarchy for 
Department of Defense strategy and policy guidance documents. 
The committee encourages the Secretary to efficiently implement 
the requirements of this section and to avoid standing 
bureaucracies dedicated to the assembly of such documents.
    The committee has previously expressed disappointment that 
the Department's seminal strategy document, the quadrennial 
defense review, was insufficient in providing a means to set 
Department priorities, shape the force, guide capabilities and 
resources, and to understand the relationships between 
missions, risks, and resources.
    Further, the committee understands the importance of the 
Department publicly communicating its defense strategy to the 
American people, Congress, other U.S. Government agencies, and 
international partners and allies. However, the committee also 
recognizes that the classified assumptions and analysis 
underpinning the strategy, as well as the subsequent 
programming, budgeting, and contingency planning guidance that 
implement the strategy, are also important oversight tools for 
the committee and help to frame the annual budget request. 
Therefore, this section would require the congressional defense 
committees to receive such information and documents.

         Section 905--Reform of the National Military Strategy

    This section would strike section 153(b)(1) of title 10, 
United States Code, on the National Military Strategy (NMS) and 
replace it with a requirement for the Chairman of the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff to prepare a new National Military Strategy or 
to update a previous one in conjunction with the other members 
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the commanders of the unified 
and specified combatant commands. The section would also 
require that the NMS support the objectives of national 
security and defense strategic guidance issued by the President 
and the Secretary of Defense, and focus the NMS on, at a 
minimum:
    (1) Developing military ends, ways, and means to support 
national security objectives;
    (2) Assessing strategic and military risks, and developing 
risk mitigation options;
    (3) Establishing a strategic framework for the development 
of operational and contingency plans;
    (4) Prioritizing joint force capabilities, capacities, and 
resources; and
    (5) Establishing military guidance for the development of 
the joint force.
    This section on reform of the military strategy from the 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff is complemented elsewhere 
in this Act with reform of defense strategy and policy guidance 
from the Secretary of Defense. The committee aims to simplify 
the National Military Strategy and to link it to a hierarchy of 
Department of Defense strategy and policy guidance documents. 
The committee believes that the NMS should be re-focused to 
provide a strategic framework for the development of 
operational and contingency plans by the combatant commands, 
and to provide joint force and joint capability development 
guidance to guide resource investments by the military 
services. To provide such guidance, the committee also believes 
that the NMS should be a classified document.

  Section 906--Modification to Independent Study of National Security 
                      Strategy Formulation Process

    This section would amend section 1064 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92), which requires an independent study of the national 
security strategy formulation process, by adding a requirement 
for the study to address the workforce responsible for 
conducting strategic planning and to examine how Congress fits 
into the strategy formulation process.

  Section 907--Term of Office for the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
                                 Staff

    This section would amend section 152(a) of title 10, United 
States Code, to extend the term of office of the Chairman of 
the Joint Chiefs of Staff from 2 years to 4 years. This section 
would also limit the reappointment of the Chairman to 
additional terms only in a time of war, and limit the combined 
period of service of an officer serving as Chairman or Vice 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to 8 years.
    The committee believes that a longer term of office for the 
Chairman provides greater stability and continuity of military 
leadership at the Department of Defense. Furthermore, by 
staggering the Chairman's term of office such that it is not 
aligned with the 4 year presidential election cycle, the 
committee believes that the Chairman's role in providing 
independent military advice to the President and Secretary of 
Defense is reinforced.

 Section 908--Responsibilities of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
                      Staff relating to Operations

    This section would amend section 153(a) of title 10, United 
States Code, which sets forth the functions of the Chairman of 
the Joint Chiefs of Staff, by codifying the Chairman's 
responsibility to provide advice to the President and the 
Secretary of Defense on ongoing military operations and to 
provide advice to the Secretary on the allocation and transfer 
of forces among combatant commands.
    While the Goldwater-Nichols Department of Defense 
Reorganization Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-433) established the 
combatant commands to conduct operations at the direction of 
the President, through the Secretary of Defense, the committee 
recognizes that these commands individually develop and execute 
operational plans for specific regions and functional areas. 
The committee also recognizes that security challenges will 
become increasingly transregional, multi-domain, and multi-
functional, which will require an entity to transcend 
individual combatant commands and to support timely decision-
making by the President and the Secretary. Therefore, the 
committee recommends vesting the Chairman with an advisory 
responsibility on operations and on the allocation and transfer 
of forces among combatant commands.
    The committee also believes such a transcendent, global 
perspective should be brought to the Department's strategy 
development, contingency planning, requirements identification, 
resource allocation, and budgeting process. The committee 
understands that the Chairman, in an advisory capacity, has 
these authorities and encourages the Chairman to exercise them.
    Lastly, the committee would note that the intent of Public 
Law 99-433 in revising the Chairman's functions was to focus 
the Chairman on strategy and planning. While the committee 
would grant the Chairman a greater role in advising on 
operations, it also believes that the Chairman should remain 
focused on strategic direction, strategic planning, and 
contingency planning, for the Chairman is the only senior 
military leader that, independently and holistically, looks 
across the military services and the combatant commands.

   Section 909--Assigned Forces within the Continental United States

    This section would amend section 162(a) of title 10, United 
States Code, to allow U.S. military forces within the 
continental United States to be assigned to a military 
department as directed by the Secretary of Defense.
    Section 162(a) of title 10, United States Code, requires 
the Secretaries of the military departments to assign all 
forces under their jurisdiction to unified and specific 
commands, with certain exceptions. For example, military forces 
returning to the continental United States from deployments to 
the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and the Republic of Iraq, 
and who are conducting reset and reconstitution activities, are 
required to be assigned to a unified or specified command to 
support the missions of that command. This legislative 
recommendation would allow those forces, at the direction of 
the Secretary of Defense, to be assigned to a military 
department during such reset and reconstitution period rather 
than a unified or specified command.

 Section 910--Reduction in General Officer and Flag Officer Grades and 
                               Positions

    This section would amend section 164(e) of title 10, United 
States Code, on subordinate commanders of combatant commands to 
specify that the grade of an officer serving as the commander 
of a service or functional component command shall be no higher 
than lieutenant general or vice admiral. This section would 
further require that the total number of officers in the grade 
of general or admiral on active duty be reduced by five 
positions. Lastly, this section would require the Secretary of 
Defense to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees on the Department's plan for implementing such 
reductions.
    The committee remains concerned that a top-heavy chain of 
command within the combatant commands adds unnecessary 
headquarters staff, adds distance and layers between commanders 
and warfighters, and slows decision-making and agility of 
command. The committee's focus on the number of senior military 
leaders within the combatant commands complements its previous 
efforts to streamline Department of Defense headquarters 
organizations, including reducing the size of staffs and 
eliminating tiers of management. The committee understands that 
the Secretary of Defense shares this concern and welcomes the 
Secretary's effort to review four-star general and admiral 
positions within the Department to simplify and improve command 
and control.

   Section 911--Establishment of Unified Combatant Command for Cyber 
                               Operations

    This section would establish a unified combatant command 
for cyber operations with the primary function to prepare cyber 
operations forces to carry out assigned missions.

Section 912--Revision of Requirements Relating to Length of Joint Duty 
                              Assignments

    This section would amend section 664 of title 10, United 
States Code, to reduce the joint duty assignment tour length to 
a minimum of 2 years for officers of all ranks, and remove the 
statutory requirement for services to maintain a tour length 
average.

 Section 913--Revision of Definitions Used for Joint Officer Management

    This section would amend section 668 of title 10, United 
States Code, to revise the statutory definition of ``joint 
matters'' to more accurately reflect and properly clarify the 
types of joint duty positions for which an officer may receive 
joint duty credit to better capture the breadth of duties and 
positions that comprise joint matters experience.

   Section 914--Independent Assessment of Combatant Command Structure

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, not 
later than 30 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, 
to enter into a contract with an independent entity to conduct 
an assessment on combatant command structure, and to provide 
recommendations for improving the overall effectiveness of 
combatant command structures. Additionally, this section would 
require that, not later than March 1, 2017, the Secretary of 
Defense submit a report on the findings and recommendations of 
the independent entity to the congressional defense committees.

                       Subtitle B--Other Matters


             Section 921--Modifications to Corrosion Report

    This section would amend section 2228(e) of title 10, 
United States Code, to make revisions to the annual report from 
the Office of Corrosion Policy and Oversight. This amendment 
would also supersede the effect of section 1080 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92) on the report amended described in this section.

  Section 922--Authority To Employ Civilian Faculty Members at Joint 
                     Special Operations University

    This section would amend section 1595(c) of title 10, 
United States Code, to provide the Joint Special Operations 
University (JSOU) the flexibility to hire selected talent. The 
committee notes that hiring authority under title 10, versus 
the traditional title 5 authority, would ensure JSOU's faculty 
remain relevant in their area of expertise by enabling JSOU to 
hire faculty with relevant expertise in an expeditious manner 
and, if necessary, replace faculty that do not maintain 
currency in their area of expertise.

   Section 923--Guidelines for Conversion of Functions Performed by 
 Civilian or Contractor Personnel to Performance by Military Personnel

    This section would amend section 129a of title 10, United 
States Code, to clarify when military personnel could be used 
for functions currently being performed by civilian personnel 
or contractors.

    Section 924--Public Release by Inspectors General of Reports of 
                               Misconduct

    This section would require the Department of Defense 
Inspector General to publicly release reports of administrative 
investigations that confirm misconduct of members of the Senior 
Executive Service, schedule C employees, or commissioned 
officers in the Armed Forces in pay grades O-6 promotable and 
above. Information otherwise protected from release would not 
be disclosed.

 Section 925--Modifications to Requirements for Accounting for Members 
of the Armed Forces and Department of Defense Civilian Employees Listed 
                               as Missing

    This section would remove responsibility for recovering 
personnel who are missing during current operations or 
activities from the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.

          Subtitle C--Department of the Navy and Marine Corps


    Section 931--Redesignation of the Department of the Navy as the 
                Department of the Navy and Marine Corps

    This section would redesignate the Department of the Navy 
as the Department of the Navy and Marine Corps. It would also 
redesignate the Secretary of the Navy as the Secretary of the 
Navy and Marine Corps and redesignate other statutory offices.

   Section 932--Conforming Amendments to Title 10, United States Code

    This section would make several conforming amendments to 
title 10, United States Code, consistent with the redesignation 
of the Department of the Navy as the Department of the Navy and 
Marine Corps elsewhere in this Act.

       Section 933--Other Provisions of Law and Other References

    This section would amend other provisions of law and other 
references consistent with the redesignation of the Department 
of the Navy as the Department of the Navy and Marine Corps and 
the redesignation of the Secretary of the Navy as the Secretary 
of the Navy and Marine Corps elsewhere in this Act.

                      Section 934--Effective Date

    This section would state that this subtitle and the 
amendments made by this subtitle shall take effect on the first 
day of the first month beginning more than 60 days after the 
date of the enactment of this Act.

                      TITLE X--GENERAL PROVISIONS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                        Counter-Drug Activities


                         Colombia Peace Process

    The committee commends the Republic of Colombia on its 
progress over the past 4 years to achieve a peace accord with 
the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia. The committee notes 
that the United States has provided assistance over the past 15 
years to help the Government of Colombia stabilize the nation. 
In those 15 years, Colombia has transformed from a near-failed 
state rife with violence, criminality, corruption, and 
paralyzing instability, to a state of economic prosperity, 
political stability, and security. The committee credits the 
people of Colombia and the leadership of the Colombian 
Government for this transformation.
    The committee supports the peace process in Colombia and is 
hopeful that it concludes successfully. However, the committee 
also recognizes that challenges remain, including addressing 
potential renewed violence and illicit trafficking, an increase 
in coca production, charges of human rights violations, 
contamination by landmines and unexploded munitions, and a lack 
of state presence in many regions. To address these challenges, 
the committee believes that the assistance efforts of the 
Department of Defense and other U.S. Government organizations 
must be sustained.

           United States Southern Command Operational Support

    The committee commends the Department of Defense and the 
U.S. Southern Command for their continued efforts to address 
regional instability in Central and South America.
    The committee notes several security challenges that 
persist in the area of responsibility of U.S. Southern Command. 
These challenges include continued violence and instability in 
Central America; pervasive drug cartels, corruption, and lack 
of economic opportunity; continued drug and illicit 
trafficking, particularly in the Caribbean where those nations 
serve as transit points; and continued smuggling of 
unaccompanied alien children into the United States from 
Central America. They also include rising coca production and 
increased violence in the Republic of Colombia, as the 
Government of Colombia continues its efforts to achieve a peace 
accord with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC).
    The committee notes the important work of the U.S. 
Government in the Western Hemisphere, and particularly the 
Department of Defense, in providing valuable training, 
equipment, and assistance to U.S. regional neighbors and 
partners to address these challenges. Therefore, elsewhere in 
this Act, the committee recommends an increase of $30.0 million 
for Department of Defense United States Southern Command 
Operational Support within the Drug Interdiction and 
Counterdrug Activities Appropriation.

                             Other Matters


  Accessibility of Translated Foreign Military and Technical Writings

    The committee notes that Department of Defense policy, 
strategy, and programmatic decision-making are informed by an 
understanding of foreign military and technical writings. The 
committee also notes that the Department and the U.S. 
Intelligence Community have organizations and resources 
dedicated to translating foreign military and technical 
writings. However, the committee is concerned that these 
translated writings are not widely disseminated or easily 
accessible within either the Department or the broader 
community of analysts supporting and informing U.S. defense 
strategy and policy.
    The committee encourages the Department to make translated 
foreign military and technical writings more accessible within 
the Department and the Intelligence Community. The committee 
further believes that unclassified translated writings should 
be made publicly available so that civilian academics and 
researchers can leverage them to enhance their analytical work, 
including work conducted for the Department.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than July 15, 2016, on the policies governing the 
access and dissemination of translated foreign military and 
technical writings. The briefing should also address the 
following elements:
    (1) Policies and guidelines governing the access and 
dissemination of translated writings;
    (2) Policies and guidelines governing the releasability of 
translated writings, including release authorities;
    (3) Organizations and resources currently dedicated to the 
translation and dissemination of such writings;
    (4) Options to make translated writings more accessible 
within the Department and to the public, including 
identification of policy changes and resources required for 
each option; and
    (5) Any other matters that the Secretary may deem relevant.

           Air Force Combat Search and Rescue Associate Units

    The committee supports the National Commission on the 
Structure of the Air Force recommendation to expand the use of 
associate units, where appropriate. The committee notes, 
however, that none of the three Air National Guard combat 
search and rescue units in Alaska, California, and New York are 
associate units. Therefore, the committee encourages the Air 
Force to consider options for making these units active 
associate units under an appropriate organizational structure 
based on their local mission and operational demands. In 
addition, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force 
to provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives not later than March 1, 2017, on the 
potential options for transforming these units into associate 
units, including the potential cost, benefits, and challenges 
involved in each case.

           Airlift Safety and Readiness for Certain Aircraft

    As noted elsewhere in this report, the committee is 
concerned about the recent rise in Class A mishaps across the 
services. The committee has also observed the decrease in the 
readiness and availability of C-40, C-37, C-32, C-21, C-20, C-
12, and C-9 aircraft, which has led to the cancellation or 
delay of a number of high-priority missions. These 
cancellations and delays, coupled with data on other recent 
mishaps, may suggest that the unique way the military services 
operate these aircraft may be leading to unforeseen maintenance 
issues, which could present a safety risk. The committee also 
continues to be concerned with the inconsistent way these 
aircraft are scheduled, tasked, operated, and managed among the 
military services.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to conduct an assessment of the safety, 
readiness, and utilization of C-40, C-32, C-37, C-21, C-20, C-
12, and C-9 aircraft across the military services and to 
provide a report on the findings of such assessment to the 
congressional defense committees by March 1, 2017. The 
committee expects the Secretary of Defense to provide the 
Comptroller General any information and background materials 
necessary for completion of the assessment. At a minimum, the 
report should include:
    (1) A summary of ground and flying safety mishap incidents 
by military service, aircraft type, model, and series over the 
past 10 years;
    (2) A summary of both requested and actual funding for 
maintenance and spare parts by military service, aircraft type, 
model, and series over the past 10 years;
    (3) Current policies and directives governing the operation 
and use of these aircraft;
    (4) The overall requirement for C-40, C-37, C-32, C-21, C-
20, C-12, and C-9 aircraft compared to the current inventory;
    (5) A comprehensive review of scheduling, operational 
tasking, and operating procedures, including tactical control, 
across all of the military services, including integration and 
interoperability among the military services, and potential 
ways to standardize these practices;
    (6) Utilization rates across all of the military services 
and a comparison with commercial practices and standards, 
including maintenance intervals;
    (7) Maintenance plans, processes, and procedures for 
sustainment of the C-40, C-37, C-32, C-21, C-20, C-12, and C-9 
aircraft and the impact of maintenance deferrals on operational 
availability; and
    (8) Any other items the Comptroller General deems relevant 
to the assessment.

  Army and Joint Force Integration of Former Unmanned Aircraft System 
                 Center of Excellence Responsibilities

    The committee notes that under the former Joint Forces 
Combatant Command (JFCOM), a Joint Center of Excellence for 
Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) was established in 2005 by the 
Department of Defense at Creech Air Force Base, Nevada. A 
separate Unmanned Aircraft Systems Center of Excellence (COE) 
was established in 2008 by the Army at Fort Rucker, Alabama. 
The purpose of the UAS COEs was to establish organizations that 
could collaborate and create an environment among the military 
services that would foster unity of effort focused on all 
aspects of UAS requirements, system development, acquisition, 
testing, fielding, training, airspace integration, employment 
concepts, sustainment, interoperability, data dissemination, 
capability gaps, and shortfalls. Consequently, in 2010 when 
JFCOM was disestablished by the Secretary of Defense, both the 
Joint COE and the Army COE were subsequently disestablished.
    The committee understood at the time that all the 
responsibilities of the Joint COE would be divided between the 
Joint Staff J-8 Directorate for Force Structure, Resources, and 
Assessment, and the Department of Defense UAS Task Force. The 
committee further understood that all the responsibilities of 
the Army COE would be absorbed within the Capabilities 
Development and Integration Directorate of the Army's Aviation 
COE at the Army's Training and Doctrine Command.
    Although the committee has been assured by the Department 
that all aspects of the UAS COEs that were disestablished were 
reabsorbed into the aforementioned organizations, the committee 
seeks to gain a further understanding regarding particular 
aspects of UAS issues.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, 
not later than October 1, 2016, that explains:
    (1) How the Army plans to grow resources and facilities to 
support the expansion of UAS orbits through 2030;
    (2) How increased Army UAS operations will fit into joint 
and executive branch interagency operations; and,
    (3) How the Army plans to mitigate frequency encroachment 
on test and training ranges.
    The committee also directs the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs 
of Staff to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services, not later than October 1, 2016, that explains how the 
role, mission, and responsibilities of the former Joint UAS COE 
were absorbed into the governance architecture of the J-8 
Directorate of the Joint Staff, and provide an assessment to 
the committee regarding the benefits and challenges of those 
responsibilities being executed within the J-8 Directorate.

                    Carrier Air Wing Force Structure

    The budget request would deactivate the Navy's 10th carrier 
air wing and its associated squadrons. The committee notes that 
the Navy wishes to pursue deactivating the 10th carrier air 
wing currently assigned to Naval Air Station Lemoore, which is 
in contravention to the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2012 (Public Law 112-81) to maintain 10 carrier air 
wings and associated headquarters. The committee does not 
believe the Navy has sufficient analysis to support the risk 
associated with a reduction from ten to nine carrier air wings.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $134.0 million, an 
increase of $2.3 million, in PE87732N, and an increase of 
$131.7 million in Operations and Maintenance, Military 
Personnel Navy, Reserve Personnel Navy, and Medicare Eligible 
Retiree Health Fund Contribution Reserve Navy, in order to 
retain the 10th carrier air wing.

                    Comprehensive Detention Strategy

    The committee believes that the Department of Defense's 
policy for the disposition of individuals captured on the 
battlefield is insufficient.
    The committee notes that the Department of Defense intends 
to increase the pace of operations in the Republic of Iraq and 
the Syrian Arab Republic that are either intended to capture 
individuals, or may result in the capture of individuals. In 
testimony before the committee on December 1, 2015, the 
Secretary of Defense described the creation of an 
``expeditionary targeting force'' to assist Iraqi and Kurdish 
Peshmerga forces and to put pressure on the Islamic State of 
Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). The Secretary stated that, ``These 
special operators will, over time, be able to conduct raids, 
free hostages, gather intelligence and capture ISIL leaders. 
This force will also be in a position to conduct unilateral 
operations in Syria. That creates a . . . virtuous cycle of 
better intelligence, which generates more targets, more raids, 
more momentum.'' The Secretary went on to say, ``One of the 
reasons for the expeditionary targeting for us is precisely to 
gain intelligence. And one of the ways you do that is by 
capturing people.'' According to the Secretary's public 
statements, as well as documents delivered to the committee, 
future captures would be considered on a ``case-by-case 
basis.''
    The committee agrees that battlefield captures can yield 
significant intelligence. Given the anticipated increase in 
operational tempo, the committee believes that a more 
comprehensive detention strategy needs to be established to 
improve the intelligence gained from captured individuals and 
to ensure lawful dispositions of captured individuals.

   Comptroller General Assessment of Deployable Identity Management 
                          Forensics Capability

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense has used 
biometrics and forensics to successfully identify, target, and 
disrupt terrorists and enemy combatants in the Republic of Iraq 
and the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. Expeditionary forensic 
laboratories have deployed in theater to quickly exploit 
evidence collected from the battlefield, resulting in the 
capture and prosecution of enemy combatants. Many of the 
Department's expeditionary biometrics and forensics 
capabilities were resourced through the Department's Overseas 
Contingency Operations funding. The committee notes that the 
Department has taken steps to establish expeditionary 
biometrics and forensics as enduring capabilities in the base 
budget; however, these funding levels may not be adequate to 
sustain current and future validated mission requirements.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to assess the Department's process for 
determining and validating its future expeditionary biometrics 
and forensics requirements, as well as actions the Department 
has taken to ensure that its expeditionary biometrics and 
forensics capabilities, including materiel solutions, trained 
personnel, and funding, are available to meet current and 
future requirements. The committee further directs the 
Comptroller General to provide a briefing to the House Armed 
Services Committee by March 1, 2017, on the Comptroller 
General's preliminary findings with a report to follow on a 
date agreed to at the time of the briefing.

                      Countering Violent Extremism

    The committee remains concerned about the ongoing threat of 
violent extremism across the globe. The committee is aware of 
coordinated interagency efforts to address the threat of 
terrorism and to counter violent extremism. The committee 
encourages and supports continued efforts to ensure the urgent 
challenges of violent extremism, including root causes such as 
lack of effective governance, are addressed in a comprehensive, 
interagency approach.

  Department of Defense Briefing on United States Ratification of the 
            United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea

    The committee has heard testimony from a multitude of U.S. 
military leaders who are supportive of the U.S. becoming a 
formal signatory of the United Nations Convention on the Law of 
the Sea (UNCLOS). The committee is aware that these military 
leaders testified that ratifying UNCLOS is in our national 
interest, specifically regarding developing territorial 
challenges in the South China Sea and the Arctic.
    The committee therefore directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than September 30, 2016, regarding United States 
ratification of UNCLOS. The briefing should contain, at a 
minimum, the strategic implications and surmised impacts--both 
benefits and disadvantages--to national security, current 
foreign military relations, and ongoing military operations 
should the United States ratify UNCLOS or maintain the status 
quo. The brief should also identify those areas in which the 
lack of ratification has impacted the interests of the United 
States and our allies.

  Department of Defense Strategy for Countering Unconventional Warfare

    Section 1097 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92) directed the Department of 
Defense to develop a strategy to counter unconventional warfare 
threats posed by adversarial state and non-state actors. 
Section 1097 further directed the Secretary of Defense and the 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to coordinate this 
strategy with the heads of other appropriate departments and 
agencies of the U.S. Government. The Secretary is required to 
submit this strategy to the congressional defense committees 
not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of 
Public Law 114-92.
    The committee remains concerned about the growing 
unconventional warfare capabilities and threats being posed 
most notably and recently by the Russian Federation and the 
Islamic Republic of Iran. The committee notes that 
unconventional warfare is defined most accurately as those 
activities conducted to enable a resistance movement or 
insurgency to coerce, disrupt, or overthrow a government or 
occupying power by operating through or with an underground, 
auxiliary, or guerrilla force in a denied area. The committee 
also notes that most state-sponsors of unconventional warfare, 
such as Russia and Iran, have doctrinally linked conventional 
warfare, economic warfare, cyber warfare, information 
operations, intelligence operations, and other activities 
seamlessly in an effort to undermine U.S. national security 
objectives and the objectives of U.S. allies alike.
    The committee also notes that the Department of Defense may 
require additional time to fully and properly coordinate the 
strategy, as directed by section 1097, with the heads of other 
appropriate departments and agencies of the U.S. Government. 
Given the importance of this coordination and the interagency 
aspects of an effective strategy for countering unconventional 
warfare threats, the committee expects frequent and periodic 
progress updates by the Department should an extension be 
required for interagency coordination and the development and 
delivery of this strategy. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to provide an update to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
by May 23, 2016, on the completion of the strategy for 
countering unconventional warfare threats required by section 
1097 of Public Law 114-92.

    Enterprise Resource Planning Financial Management Implementation

    The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 
(Public Law 111-84) mandated that the Chief Management Officer 
of the Department of Defense develop and maintain a Financial 
Improvement and Audit Readiness (FIAR) Plan that describes the 
specific actions to be taken by the Department to be ready for 
audit by September 30, 2017. Implementation of Enterprise 
Resource Planning (ERP) systems is a critical element in the 
military departments' audit readiness plans. The Army General 
Fund Enterprise Business System (GFEBS) supports standardized 
financial management and accounting practices for the Army's 
general fund, the Navy Enterprise Resource Planning (Navy ERP) 
system standardizes Navy financial management, and the Air 
Force Defense Enterprise Accounting and Management System 
(DEAMS) provides a range of financial management capabilities.
    The committee notes that the successful implementation, 
operation, and full utilization of GFEBS, Navy ERP, and DEAMS 
are critical to the military departments' ability to produce 
auditable statements and pass financial audits. The committee 
therefore encourages the Army, Navy, and Air Force to ensure 
that full implementation, operation, and utilization of their 
respective ERP systems remain on schedule. The Department's 
Functional Management Office (FMO) is responsible for ensuring 
these ERP systems allow the end user to produce auditable, 
timely, and accurate reporting of all financial data. To 
fulfill the FMO's requirements and to ensure that GFEBS, Navy 
ERP, and DEAMS meet auditing standards, the committee believes 
that the Department should leverage greater certified public 
accountant expertise and Federal financial management 
experience. In that regard, the committee believes that this 
expertise and experience should be included in any follow-on 
award of a contract for implementation of, or enhancement to, 
GFEBS, Navy ERP, and DEAMS, to better ensure ERP system 
success, compliance with all laws and regulations, and to meet 
the functional needs of the financial user community.

 Financial Management Systems for Army Non-Appropriated Fund Activities

    The committee is aware of the priority placed on financial 
management and auditability for the Department of Defense and 
the various military services. The committee continues to 
emphasize the need to ensure greater visibility and control 
over financial resources, in both appropriated and non-
appropriated funds. For the Army, the committee recognizes that 
the General Fund Enterprise Business System (GFEBS) is the 
principal enterprise resource planning system for appropriated 
funds. While non-appropriated funds are not processed by that 
system, the committee is aware that the non-appropriated fund 
community is looking at financial management tools to support 
their mission. Because of the similarity in requirements, as 
well as the efficiencies that could be gained in common 
training and enterprise license purchases, the committee 
encourages the Army to look at GFEBS as a possible solution to 
financial management for non-appropriated fund activities.

                  Foreign Currency Fluctuation Account

    In the committee report (H. Rept. 113-446) accompanying the 
Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2015, the committee recommended that the 
Department of Defense take into consideration the current 
balance within the Foreign Currency Fluctuation, Defense 
(FCF,D) account when determining foreign currency levels in 
future budget submissions. The committee observes that there 
has been no such change to how foreign currency rates are 
calculated since it identified the issue 2 years ago.
    The General Accounting Office (now the Government 
Accountability Office, or GAO) noted in a 1986 report (NSIAD-
86-173) that the purpose of the FCF,D account is to provide a 
mechanism for stabilizing the portion of Operation and 
Maintenance (O&M;) and Military Personnel funding used for 
purchasing foreign goods and services. The FCF,D provides funds 
to O&M; when foreign exchange rates are unfavorable (when losses 
occur) and receives funds from O&M; when the rates are favorable 
(when gains occur). This ensures, as GAO stated, that ``any 
given O&M; appropriation for the purchase of foreign goods and 
services will purchase the budgeted amount of goods and 
services, regardless of the gains and losses of the dollar 
caused by currency fluctuations.'' Based on the rationale for 
the genesis of the FCF,D account, the committee believes that 
when the Department determines foreign currency rates for 
budget programming, the current balance of funds in the FCF,D 
account should be considered.
    When the FCF,D account has a balance close to or at the cap 
of $970.0 million, the committee believes the budgeted rates 
should be adjusted to generate losses within the account, 
thereby drawing down the FCF,D account balance. This would 
reduce the O&M; budget requirement for foreign goods and 
services, allowing excess funds to be allocated to other 
readiness programs without changing the budget topline. 
However, as the FCF,D account realizes a net gain, these gains 
remain in O&M; and are used for purposes not originally 
requested in the annual budget submission to Congress. Without 
visibility of these transactions through a reprogramming 
request, the committee cannot determine whether funds remaining 
in the FCF,D account are being used to reduce current readiness 
shortfalls.
    The committee notes that GAO estimates the Department will 
again realize a net gain in fiscal year 2017 when comparing the 
rates used to develop fiscal year 2017 budgetary needs to cover 
foreign currency fluctuations with the projected needs based on 
current exchange rates. Due to the projected net gain and the 
lack of the use of current balances to structure foreign 
currency rates, the committee recommends both a reduction in 
the O&M; budget for fiscal year 2017 as shown in section 4301 of 
this Act and a reduction in the Military Personnel budget for 
fiscal year 2017 as shown in section 4401 of this Act, and 
realigns those funds to support higher priority defense 
requirements throughout the Department.

    Maintaining Compliance with the Financial Improvement and Audit 
                             Readiness Plan

    The committee continues to monitor progress on the 
Department of Defense's Financial Improvement and Audit 
Readiness (FIAR) plan, and expects the Department to continue 
to work towards achieving the goal of validating financial 
statements as ready for audit by September 30, 2017, as 
required by section 1003 of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (Public Law 111-84). Full audit 
readiness will provide the Department and Congress with 
auditable information that can be used to verify Department 
balance sheets and track Department spending, which will aid in 
the appropriate oversight of the Department's various budgetary 
activities and appropriations accounts, as well as assist in 
the identification of waste, fraud, and abuse. The committee 
encourages the Secretary of Defense to address the findings and 
recommendations identified in the Department's latest FIAR Plan 
Status Report, dated November 2015, and to continue improving 
the Department's audit infrastructure and annual audit regimen.

                      Minerva Research Initiative

    The committee is aware of the ongoing efforts of the 
Department of Defense to increase sociocultural understanding 
at tactical, operational, and strategic levels through programs 
like the Minerva Initiative. The Minerva Initiative is a 
university-based, social science research initiative focusing 
on areas of strategic importance to U.S. national security 
policy. The committee continues to support the Minerva 
Initiative's efforts to utilize the capabilities within 
universities, research institutions, and of individual scholars 
to execute interdisciplinary and cross-institutional projects 
addressing specific topic areas determined by the Secretary of 
Defense. The committee believes that strategic research 
efforts, such as those that are part of the Minerva 
Initiative's research program, are critical to better 
understand and manage the social, cultural, and political 
forces that allow threats, such as the emergence of radical 
Islamic groups, to emerge. The committee encourages the 
Department of Defense to continue to improve their social 
science research, foreign area, and interdisciplinary studies 
to improve the Department's capacity to understand and predict 
these emerging threats.

     Preventing Unfair Trade Practices in Military Equipment Sales

    The committee notes that offsets are generally prohibited 
under most U.S. trade agreements and generally considered a 
violation of the principles of the European Union treaty, with 
the exception of certain specific, limited, and agreed-upon 
defense procurements. The committee believes that any free 
trade agreement negotiations between the United States and the 
European Union should include a prohibition on offset 
agreements with respect to the sale of defense equipment by 
U.S. companies to European Union member states that would, for 
example, require U.S. companies to reinvest a percentage of the 
value of any resulting contract in the importing country.

  Recommendations of the National Commission on the Future of the Army

    The committee notes that Congress established the National 
Commission of the Future of the Army (NCFA) in the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-
291). The primary purpose of the NCFA was to address two major 
concerns:
    (1) How the Army should best organize and employ the Total 
Force in time of declining resources; and
    (2) Whether the Army should proceed with the transfer of 
AH-64 Apache aircraft from the Reserve Components to the 
Regular Army as directed by the Army's aviation restructure 
initiative.
    In its final report, the NCFA made 63 recommendations that 
were directed to the President, Congress, Department of 
Defense, Joint Staff, combatant commands, and the Army. In 
considering these recommendations, based on the underlying law 
that established the NCFA, the commission was instructed to 
take into account ``anticipated mission requirements for the 
Army at acceptable levels of national risk and in a manner 
consistent with available resources and anticipated future 
resources.'' Consequently, the commission presumed a budget 
request level for fiscal year 2016, and its recommendations 
assumed that a total Army force of 450,000 in the Regular Army, 
335,000 in the Army National Guard, and 195,000 in the Army 
Reserve could not be increased. Furthermore, all 
recommendations with funding implications assumed that the Army 
would have to take risk and make internal trades to resource 
the recommendations, as well as assumed that Congress would not 
provide additional resources across the Future Years Defense 
Program.
    The committee commends the efforts of the commissioners and 
their staff for the on-time completion of the NCFA report and 
associated recommendations. In general, the committee is 
supportive of many of the commission's recommendations; 
however, the committee requires additional information from the 
Department of Defense and the Army, as well as more time for 
sufficient review in order to make informed decisions regarding 
most of the recommendations made by the NCFA. Of these 
recommendations, the committee supports the recommendation to 
retain 4 Apache attack helicopter battalions in the National 
Guard and an 11th combat aviation brigade in the Regular Army. 
The committee expects the Army to plan and program accordingly 
based on available resources across the Future Years Defense 
Program. The committee is also supportive of a permanent combat 
aviation brigade in the Republic of Korea, a permanent armored 
brigade combat team presence in Europe, and increasing armored 
brigade combat team capacity in the Army. The committee is also 
supportive of the recommendations for developing one Army under 
the total force policy. The committee is also supportive of the 
recommendation to consolidate Army marketing functions under 
the authority of the Army Marketing Research Group to eliminate 
redundancy and gain unity of effort. The committee is not 
supportive, however, of any recommendation that would reduce 
the Army's current force structure or use reductions in combat 
force structure as offsets to resource any recommendation. 
Elsewhere in this Act, the committee includes a provision that 
would address the commission's recommendations focusing on Army 
modernization capability and capacity shortfalls, as well as 
alternative Army force designs and modeling.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Chief of 
Staff of the Army, to provide a written assessment of all of 
the NCFA recommendations that are within such official's 
respective jurisdiction to the congressional defense committees 
by December 1, 2016. The committee expects the Army's written 
assessment to be separate, and include comments from the Chief 
of the National Guard Bureau. The respective assessments should 
include, but not be limited to, the following:
    (1) Whether the recommendation is agreeable;
    (2) Potential implementation plans for those 
recommendations, to include resource options and timelines;
    (3) Costs anticipated in execution of those implementation 
plans; and
    (4) Any legislative assistance required.

             Repeal of Report on Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    In the committee report (H. Rept. 106-652) accompanying the 
Duncan Hunter National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2009, the committee directed the Secretary of Defense to 
submit an annual report on the Department's progress in 
addressing the challenges facing unmanned aircraft systems. The 
Department has provided the requested report for 7 years, 
including the most recent report on March 23, 2016. Based on 
the committee's ability to obtain the information in these 
reports through other means, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to no longer provide this report to the 
congressional defense committees, the Senate Select Committee 
on Intelligence, and House Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence.

              Special Operations Forces Education Briefing

    The committee remains concerned that high operational tempo 
and dwell times may not afford U.S. Special Operations Forces 
(SOF) appropriate time for enrollment in Department of Defense 
education programs such as the Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) 
and the Post 9-11 GI Bill. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Commander, U.S. Special Operations Command, to brief the 
Committee on Armed Services of the House of Representatives not 
later than September 16, 2016, on the following:
    (1) The number of U.S. Special Operations Forces active and 
reserve personnel currently enrolled in TAP and the Post 9-11 
GI Bill;
    (2) The number of SOF active and reserve enrolled in these 
programs over the past five years;
    (3) Percentage of SOF personnel active and reserve enrolled 
in these programs as compared to general purpose forces; and
    (4) Any additional elements the Commander deems relevant.

       Wassenaar Arrangement Impacts to the Department of Defense

    The committee understands the Wassernaar Arrangement on 
Export Controls for Conventional Arms and Dual-Use Goods and 
Technologies prevents destabilizing accumulations of covered 
goods and technologies, and seeks to prevent acquisition of 
such items by terrorists. Covered technologies and goods 
subject to the Wassernaar Arrangement impact items which have 
both military and civilian applications. For example, controls 
for software, hardware, and technology that operate, deliver, 
or communicate with intrusion software added to the list of 
dual-use technologies in 2013 include a number of products 
regularly used for cyber security research and defense. The 
committee believes restricting export of these technologies may 
negatively impact use of such products for national security 
purposes. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by March 1, 2017, on the impact of the Wassernaar 
Agreement to Department of Defense applications, including 
efforts to support alliance partners or otherwise build partner 
capacity with friendly nations.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                     Subtitle A--Financial Matters


                Section 1001--General Transfer Authority

    This section would allow the Secretary of Defense, with 
certain limitations, to make transfers between amounts 
authorized for fiscal year 2017 in division A of this Act. This 
section would limit the total amount transferred under this 
authority to $5.00 billion. This section would also require 
prompt notification to Congress of each transfer made.

Section 1002--Requirement To Transfer Funds From Department of Defense 
         Acquisition Workforce Development Fund to the Treasury

    This section would reduce the unobligated balance of the 
Defense Acquisition Workforce Development Fund by $475.0 
million due to excess funds.

                  Subtitle B--Counter-Drug Activities


Section 1011--Extension of Authority To Provide Additional Support for 
             Counter-Drug Activities of Foreign Governments

    This section would amend section 1033 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1998 (Public Law 105-
85), as most recently amended by section 1012 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92), by extending the authority to provide additional support 
for counter-drug activities of foreign governments to September 
30, 2019.

  Section 1012--Secretary of Defense Review of Curricula and Program 
            Structures of National Guard Counterdrug Schools

    This section would amend section 901 of the Office of 
National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization Act of 2006 
(Public Law 109-469) to authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
review and approve the curriculum and program structure of each 
of the National Guard counterdrug schools.
    The committee notes the importance of the National Guard 
counterdrug schools in the development, training, and 
maintenance of skills for Federal, State, local, and foreign 
government officials to combat illicit trafficking. The 
committee supports increased oversight by the Secretary of 
these schools to improve the alignment of curriculum to defense 
priorities and the allocation of limited resources.

Section 1013--Extension of Authority To Support Unified Counterdrug and 
                 Counterterrorism Campaign in Colombia

    This section would extend, by 1 year, the authority to 
support the unified counterdrug and counterterrorism campaign 
in the Republic of Colombia originally authorized by section 
1021 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2005 (Public Law 108-375), and most recently 
amended by section 1011 of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92).

                Subtitle C--Naval Vessels and Shipyards


 Section 1021--Definition of Short-Term Work With Respect to Overhaul, 
                Repair, or Maintenance of Naval Vessels

    This section would amend section 7299a of title 10, United 
States Code, and expand the homeport limitation of an overhaul, 
repair, or maintenance ship availability from 6 months to 10 
months.

     Section 1022--Warranty Requirements for Shipbuilding Contracts

    This section would require shipbuilding contracts to 
include warranty of work for a period of at least 1 year. A 
contracting officer may waive this requirement if a limited 
liability of warranted work is in the best interest of the 
government.
    The committee is concerned about incentives that reward 
shipbuilders for delivering a ship that needs additional work. 
The committee notes that the Government Accountability Office 
completed an assessment entitled ``Navy Should Reconsider 
Approach to Warranties for Correcting Construction Defects'' 
dated March 6, 2016. The report indicated that in most 
instances, the Navy paid the shipbuilder to build the ship as 
part of the construction contract, and then paid the same 
shipbuilder again, including profit, to repair the ship when 
defects were discovered after delivery.

            Section 1023--National Sea-Based Deterrence Fund

    This section would expand the transfer authority provided 
by section 1022(b)(1) of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291) to include fiscal 
year 2018. Also, this section would amend section 2218a of 
title 10, United States Code, relating to the national sea-
based deterrence fund to include authority for multi-year 
procurement of critical components to support continuous 
production. Finally, this section would clarify the definition 
of a national sea-based deterrence vessel.

 Section 1024--Availability of Funds for Retirement or Inactivation of 
            Ticonderoga-Class Cruisers or Dock Landing Ships

    This section would prohibit the Secretary of the Navy from 
using funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act to retire 
a cruiser or dock landing ship or to place in a modernization 
status more than six cruisers and one dock landing ship. 
Furthermore, the Secretary of Defense would be prohibited from 
obligating more than 75 percent of the funds made available for 
the Office of the Secretary of Defense until the Secretary of 
the Navy enters into a contract for the modernization of four 
cruisers and one dock landing ship and enters into a contract 
for the procurement of combat systems upgrades associated with 
six such cruisers.

  Section 1025--Restrictions on the Overhaul and Repair of Vessels in 
                           Foreign Shipyards

    This section amends section 7310(b)(1) of title 10, United 
States Code, to prohibit the Department of the Navy from 
performing any overhaul, repair, or maintenance work that takes 
longer than 6 months in foreign shipyards.

                      Subtitle D--Counterterrorism


    Section 1031--Frequency of Counterterrorism Operations Briefings

    This section would amend section 485 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require the Secretary of Defense to provide 
monthly counterterrorism operations briefings to the 
congressional defense committees.

 Section 1032--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Transfer or Release of 
 Individuals Detained at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, 
                       Cuba to the United States

    This section would prohibit the use of any amounts 
authorized to be appropriated or otherwise made available for 
the Department of Defense to be used during the period 
beginning on the date of the enactment of this Act and ending 
on December 31, 2017, to transfer or release detainees at U.S. 
Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to or within the United 
States, its territories, or possessions.

   Section 1033--Prohibition on Use of Funds to Construct or Modify 
  Facilities in the United States To House Detainees Transferred from 
           United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

    This section would prohibit the use of any amounts 
authorized to be appropriated or otherwise made available for 
the Department of Defense to be used during the period 
beginning on the date of the enactment of this Act and ending 
on December 31, 2017, to construct or modify any facility in 
the United States, its territories, or possessions to house any 
detainee transferred from United States Naval Station, 
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for the purposes of detention or 
imprisonment in the custody or under the effective control of 
the Department of Defense.

 Section 1034--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Transfer or Release to 
   Certain Countries of Individuals Detained at United States Naval 
                     Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

    This section would prohibit the use of any amounts 
authorized to be appropriated or otherwise made available for 
the Department of Defense to be used during the period 
beginning on the date of the enactment of this Act and ending 
on December 31, 2017, to transfer, release, or assist in the 
transfer or release of any individual detained at U.S. Naval 
Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to Libya, the Federal Republic 
of Somalia, the Syrian Arab Republic, or the Republic of Yemen.

Section 1035--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Realignment of Forces at 
    or Closure of United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

    This section would prohibit the use of any amounts 
authorized to be appropriated or otherwise made available to 
the Department of Defense for fiscal year 2017 for the closure 
or abandonment of United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, 
Cuba, the relinquishment of control of Guantanamo Bay to the 
Republic of Cuba, or the implementation of a material 
modification to the Treaty Between the United States of America 
and Cuba signed in the District of Columbia on May 29, 1934, 
that constructively closes United States Naval Station, 
Guantanamo Bay.

 Section 1036--Modification of Congressional Notification of Sensitive 
                          Military Operations

    This section would modify section 130f of title 10, United 
States Code, to provide additional oversight of sensitive 
military operations.

     Section 1037--Comprehensive Strategy for Detention of Certain 
                              Individuals

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Attorney General and the Director of 
National Intelligence, to submit a report to the appropriate 
congressional committees by July 19, 2017, setting forth the 
details of a comprehensive strategy for the detention of 
individuals captured and held pursuant to the Authorization for 
Use of Military Force (Public Law 107-40) pending the end of 
hostilities. Additionally, this section would require that the 
strategy contain certain specific elements. This section would 
also define ``appropriate congressional committees''' as the 
congressional defense committees, the Permanent Select 
Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives, the 
Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate, the Committee 
on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives, and the 
Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate.

         Subtitle E--Miscellaneous Authorities and Limitations


 Section 1041--Expanded Authority for Transportation by the Department 
      of Defense of Non-Department of Defense Personnel and Cargo

    This section would amend section 2649 of title 10, United 
States Code, to reinstate the authority of the Secretary of 
Defense to provide transportation to allied military personnel 
and civilians in contingencies or disaster responses on a non-
interference basis, without charge, and expand such authority 
to include allied and civilian cargo, as well as passengers. In 
addition, a new subsection would authorize the Secretary of 
Defense to enter into a contract or other arrangement with one 
or more commercial providers to provide commercial insurance 
products to non-Department of Defense shippers using the 
Defense Transportation System.

       Section 1042--Limitation on Retirement, Deactivation, or 
             Decommissioning of Mine Countermeasures Ships

    This section would modify section 1090 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 111-
92) to prohibit funds authorized to be appropriated in fiscal 
year 2017 to be used to deactivate, decommission, or place in 
reduced operating status any mine countermeasures ships. The 
limitation in this section may be waived if the Secretary of 
the Navy certifies that the operational test and evaluation for 
replacement mine countermeasures capabilities are available in 
sufficient quantity and capacity to meet combatant commander 
requirements. This section would also modify the reporting 
requirement of such section 1090 of Public Law 111-92.

Section 1043--Extension of Authority of Secretary of Transportation To 
                  Issue Non-Premium Aviation Insurance

    This section would amend Section 44310(b) of title 49, 
United States Code, to extend the authority of the Secretary of 
Transportation to provide aviation insurance and reinsurance 
upon the request of another U.S. Government agency.

Section 1044--Evaluation of Navy Alternate Combination Cover and Unisex 
                           Combination Cover

    This section would require the Secretary of the Navy to 
change the mandatory possession or wear date of the alternate 
combination cover or the unisex combination cover from October 
31, 2016, to October 31, 2020. This change would provide female 
service members a 5-year transition window consistent with 
standard uniform policy transition windows for non-operational 
and non-tactical uniforms.
    Additionally, this section would prohibit the Secretary of 
the Navy from implementing or enforcing any change to Navy 
female service dress uniforms until the Secretary submits to 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives a report on the evaluation of Navy female 
service dress uniforms. The committee is concerned that recent 
changes to Navy female service dress uniforms, uniform covers, 
and other non-operational uniform components were not 
consistent with the Navy's standard processes for evaluating 
uniform items, including user test groups that represented a 
broad spectrum of service-member locales and operational 
specialties, out-of-pocket expenses to service members, 
including members of both the Active Forces and Reserves, and 
the inability for the Navy to identify an operational necessity 
driving this uniform change during a time of fiscal constraint.

  Section 1045--Department of Defense Protection of National Security 
                                Spectrum

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense and the 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to jointly evaluate and 
to provide to the congressional defense committees not later 
than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act their 
views on the following:
    (1) The statutory and regulatory options available to them 
to protect critical test and training capability in the event 
of a spectrum auction that affects frequency used by the 
Department of Defense; and
    (2) The utility, effect, and limitation, if any, of section 
1062 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2000 (Public Law 106-65).

Section 1046--Transportation on Military Aircraft on a Space-Available 
     Basis for Members and Former Members of the Armed Forces with 
                      Disabilities Rated as Total

    This section would amend section 2641b of title 10, United 
States Code, to authorize space-available travel for disabled 
veterans with a service-connected, permanent disability rated 
as total by the Department of Defense. The committee notes that 
this section would clarify eligibility within an existing 
category of space-available travel already afforded to disabled 
veterans.

         Section 1047--National Guard Flyovers of Public Events

    This section would provide a statement of policy for 
National Guard flyovers of public events.

                    Subtitle F--Studies and Reports


 Section 1061--Temporary Continuation of Certain Department of Defense 
                         Reporting Requirements

    This section would exclude certain reports from the effect 
of section 1080 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92). The committee notes that 
section 1080 of Public Law 114-92 would repeal 254 standing 
requirements for reports to Congress. The committee believes 
that some of these reports should be retained as they provide 
valuable oversight information and therefore the committee 
recommends retaining 84 reporting requirements, only four of 
which would not sunset on January 31, 2021.
    Over the past 2 years, the committee has significantly 
reduced the number of reporting requirements it levies upon the 
Department of Defense. The committee expects the Department to 
deliver the remaining reports on time.

    Section 1062--Matters for Inclusion in Report on Designation of 
  Countries for which Rewards May Be Paid under Department of Defense 
                            Rewards Program

    This section would modify the reporting requirements in 
section 127b(h) of title 10, United States Code, for the 
Department of Defense Rewards Program to clarify the 
requirement to report on the designation of countries for which 
rewards or payment-in-kind may be paid.

Section 1063--Congressional Notification of Biological Select Agent and 
   Toxin Theft, Loss, or Release Involving the Department of Defense

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
provide notification to the congressional defense committees 
within 15 days of notifying the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention and/or the Animal and Plant Health Inspection 
Service of any theft, loss, or release of biological select 
agents or toxins.

   Section 1064--Report on Service-Provided Support to United States 
                       Special Operations Forces

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees within 
180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act on support 
contributed from each of the military services towards special 
operations forces for each of the fiscal years 2018-20.

   Section 1065--Report on Citizen Security Responsibilities in the 
                  Northern Triangle of Central America

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense and the 
Secretary of State to jointly submit a report to the Committees 
on Armed Services of the House of Representatives and the 
Senate, the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of 
Representatives, and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the 
Senate, not later than 180 days after the enactment of this 
Act, on the military units that have been assigned to policing 
or citizen security responsibilities in the Republic of 
Guatemala, the Republic of Honduras, and the Republic of El 
Salvador.

  Section 1066--Report on Counterproliferation Activities and Programs

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
provide the congressional defense committees with a biennial 
report, with a sunset date of January 31, 2021, on the 
Department of Defense's counterproliferation activities and 
programs. This report would be a simplified replacement for the 
Counterproliferation Program Review Committee report from 
section 1603 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 1994 (Public Law 103-160) that has recently 
expired. The content of this report is aimed to reduce the 
reporting burden on the Department, while still providing the 
congressional defense committees with program analysis critical 
for robust program oversight.

  Section 1067--Inclusion of Ballistic Missile Defense Information in 
          Annual Report on Requirements of Combatant Commands

    This section would amend the statutory requirement of 
section 153c of title 10, United States Code, that the Chairman 
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff submits to the congressional 
defense committees the annual Integrated Priorities List of the 
combatant commands to add a requirement that he also submit the 
Integrated Priorities List submitted to the Missile Defense 
Agency and U.S. Strategic Command and the Prioritized 
Capabilities List produced by them. This section would also 
sunset the reporting requirement on January 31, 2021.

  Section 1068--Reviews by Department of Defense Concerning National 
                        Security Use of Spectrum

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense and the 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to conduct a 
comprehensive review of all uses by the Department of Defense 
of spectrum. Such review would include the use of spectrum in 
military plans, training, test, and in military capabilities 
that are in development or have been fielded for any known or 
potential impacts of sharing or repurposing of spectrum used or 
allocated to be used by the Department of Defense that may be 
reallocated or shared pursuant to a spectrum auction, sharing 
arrangement, or other arrangement, or that is otherwise 
identified as part of the 10-year plan developed by the 
National Telecommunications and Information Administration 
(NTIA). The review would further include whether there are 
known or possible mitigations in the event of reallocation or 
sharing that the Secretary and Chairman recommend would protect 
Department of Defense use of spectrum, including the costs to 
do so and whether such costs would be borne out of the 
Department's total obligation authority.
    This section would also require the Secretary and Chairman 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than one year after the date of the enactment of this 
Act, and every two years thereafter until January 21, 2021, on 
the results of such review.
    This section would further require the Secretary and 
Chairman to certify at the time of submission of such report 
and provide such certification to the congressional defense 
committees that they understand any potential impacts to 
Department of Defense use of spectrum that could result from a 
spectrum auction, reallocation, or sharing arrangement as of 
that date.
    Furthermore, this section would require the Secretary to 
notify the congressional defense committees as to whether the 
Secretary has not concurred with or otherwise objected to the 
most recent version of the 10-year plan developed by the NTIA 
not later than 30 days after the date of such non-concurrence 
or objection.
    Lastly, this section would prevent the Secretary and 
Chairman from obligating more than 95 percent of the funding 
authorized to be appropriated to the Department for fiscal year 
2017 for operation and maintenance for headquarters operations 
until 30 days after the date on which the report and 
certification are submitted to the congressional defense 
committees.

   Section 1069--Annual Report on Personnel, Training, and Equipment 
Requirements for the Non-Federalized National Guard To Support Civilian 
      Authorities in Prevention and Response to Domestic Disasters

    This section would modify the reporting requirement of 
section 10504 of title 10, United States Code, to include a 
report on non-federalized National Guard personnel, training, 
and equipment requirements.

                       Subtitle G--Other Matters


            Section 1081--Technical and Clerical Amendments

    This section would make a number of technical and clerical 
amendments of a non-substantive nature to existing law.

 Section 1082--Modification to Support for Non-Federal Development and 
             Testing of Material for Chemical Agent Defense

    This section would modify subsection (d) and subsection (e) 
of section 1034 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2008 (Public Law 110-181), to modify and extend, 
with a sunset date of January 31, 2021, the ``Support for Non-
Federal Development and Testing of Material for Chemical Agent 
Defense'' report to include reporting on any instance where the 
Department provides biological select agents or toxins to a 
non-Federal entity for development of biological defenses. This 
amendment would supersede section 1080 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92).
    The committee notes the importance of developing and 
procuring effective biological countermeasures. However, the 
committee is concerned by the inadvertent shipments of live 
Bacillus Anthracis from Dugway Proving Ground. The committee 
encourages the Department to minimize the instances where it 
provides biological select agents and toxins to a non-Federal 
entity for development of biological defenses as much as 
possible.

   Section 1083--Increase in Maximum Amount Available for Equipment, 
  Services, and Supplies Provided for Humanitarian Demining Assistance

    This section would raise the monetary cap in section 407 of 
title 10, United States Code, for the cost of equipment, 
services, and supplies for humanitarian demining assistance and 
stockpiled conventional munitions assistance provided by the 
Department of Defense, from $10.0 million to $15.0 million in 
any fiscal year.
    The committee supports the Department of Defense's efforts 
to provide training, assistance, and equipping of global 
partners to support demining efforts. The goal of the 
Department's Humanitarian Mine Action (HMA) program is to 
reduce the adverse effects of land mines and other explosive 
remnants of war on noncombatants while supporting U.S. 
geographic combatant commander theater campaign plans and 
national security objectives. The committee notes the increased 
efforts of the Republic of Colombia, the United States, and the 
newly commissioned Global Demining Initiative, which consists 
of approximately 20 international partners, to address the 
demining assistance that Colombia is expected to need following 
the anticipated achievement of a peace accord between Colombia 
and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia.

  Section 1084--Liquidation of Unpaid Credits Accrued as a Result of 
             Transactions Under a Cross-Servicing Agreement

    This section would amend section 2345 of title 10, United 
States Code, to provide the Secretary of Defense with the 
discretionary authority to liquidate unpaid debts owed to the 
United States by a foreign government or international 
organization as a result of the Department of Defense providing 
logistic support, supplies, or services to that foreign 
government or international organization. Liquidation would 
occur by offsetting the debt against any amounts owed by the 
Department to that foreign government or international 
organization for logistic support, supplies, or services 
obtained by the Department pursuant to a transaction or 
transactions concluded under the authority of subchapter I of 
chapter 138, title 10, United States Code.

  Section 1085--Clarification of Contracts Covered by Airlift Service 
                               Provision

    This section would amend section 9516 of title 10, United 
States Code, to ensure both contracts and subcontracts for 
airlift service are covered by this section. The committee is 
concerned that significant volumes of cargo for the Department 
of Defense are moved outside ``contracts for airlift 
services,'' and this amendment would ensure any cargo movements 
paid for by the Department of Defense, even those in service 
contracts such as Logistics Civil Augmentation Program or 
Defense Logistics Agency Prime Vendor, will be compliant with 
section 9516 and the intent of the National Airlift Policy of 
1987. The committee notes that the maintenance of a viable 
Civil Reserve Air Fleet (CRAF) is a national security priority 
and encourages the Department to update its regulations quickly 
to ensure that contractors are including a CRAF requirement in 
all of their subcontracts. The proposed amendment is not to be 
construed as limiting the operational flexibility of Air 
Mobility Command or U.S. Transportation Command.

               Section 1086--National Biodefense Strategy

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, the 
Secretary of Health and Human Services, the Secretary of 
Homeland Security, and the Secretary of Agriculture to jointly 
develop and submit to the appropriate congressional committees, 
within 275 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, a 
national biodefense strategy and implementation plan. This 
section would also require the Secretary of Defense, the 
Secretary of Health and Human Services, the Secretary of 
Homeland Security, and the Secretary of Agriculture to provide 
a joint briefing to the appropriate congressional committees 
annually, starting March 1, 2017, and ending March 1, 2019, on 
the strategy and status of its implementation. This section 
would also require the Comptroller General of the United States 
to submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees, 
within 180 days of submission of the national biodefense 
strategy, on a gap analysis of the national biodefense strategy 
and its implementation plan.

            Section 1087--Global Cultural Knowledge Network

    This section would require the Secretary of the Army to 
carry out a program to support the socio-cultural understanding 
needs of the Department of the Army, to be known as the Global 
Cultural Knowledge Network. The program would increase the 
organic socio-cultural expertise of the Army, and support 
future Army missions and regionally aligned forces that would 
need access to such expertise. Further, this section would 
require the Secretary of the Army to issue a directive related 
to the employment of such activities, including oversight 
mechanisms and procedures for requesting support. This section 
would also prohibit any social scientists from being deployed 
outside of the United States unless the Secretary of the Army 
provides a waiver.
    The committee is aware of past efforts with the Human 
Terrain System (HTS) to bring socio-cultural understanding to 
units deployed in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation 
Enduring Freedom. The committee believes that many valuable 
lessons have been learned from HTS, including the need to 
institutionalize such organizations so they can retain the 
level of oversight and auditability needed to prevent abuse or 
misuse of valuable military resources. The committee believes 
that specifically authorizing such activities is an important 
step in ensuring the Army maintains some level of organic 
socio-cultural expertise that can adapt to the future security 
environment, while also maintaining robust oversight and 
notification safeguards to ensure allegations that affected HTS 
in the past are not further perpetuated.

 Section 1088--Modification of Requirements Relating to Management of 
                          Military Technicians

    This section would delay the implementation date of section 
1053 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2016 (Public Law 114-92) from January 1, 2017, to October 1, 
2017, and align the date of conversion for military technicians 
(non-dual status) with military technicians (dual status). This 
section would also clarify that the positions to be converted 
will be reviewed and determined by leadership from the Army 
Reserve, the Air Force Reserve, the National Guard Bureau, and 
the State Adjutants General for purposes of implementation.
    This section would also require the Secretary of Defense, 
in consultation with the Chief of the National Guard Bureau, to 
submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives by March 1, 2017, on 
the feasibility and advisability of converting any remaining 
military technicians (dual status) to personnel performing 
Active Guard and Reserve Duty under section 328 of title 32, 
United States Code, or other applicable provisions of law.

   Section 1089--Sense of Congress Regarding Connecticut's Submarine 
                                Century

    This provision would express the sense of Congress 
commending the dedication and contribution of the people of 
Connecticut to the Navy and the submarine force.

        Section 1090--LNG Permitting Certainty and Transparency

    This section would require the Department of Energy to 
issue a final decision on any application for the authorization 
to export natural gas not later than 30 days after completing 
an environmental review or the date of enactment of this Act. 
Such a decision applies only to proposals that must also obtain 
authorization from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission or 
the United States Maritime Administration.

 Section 1091--Sense of Congress Regarding the Reporting of the MV-22 
              Mishap in Marana, Arizona, on April 8, 2000

    This section would express the sense of Congress regarding 
the reporting of the MV-22 mishap in Marana, Arizona, on April 
8, 2000.

   Section 1092--Transfer of Surplus Firearms to Corporation for the 
            Promotion of Rifle Practice and Firearms Safety

    This section would require the Army to transfer excess .45 
caliber M1911A1 pistols to the Civilian Marksmanship Program.

  Section 1093--Sense of Congress Regarding the Importance of Panama 
      City, Florida, to the History and Future of the Armed Forces

    This section would express the sense of Congress regarding 
the importance of Panama City, Florida, to the history and 
future of the Armed Forces.

  Section 1094--Protections Relating to Civil Rights and Disabilities

    This section would require that religious organizations 
that are recipients of or offerors for a Federal Government 
contract be provided the protections and exemptions for 
religious organizations under the Civil Rights Act.

Section 1095--Nonapplicability of Certain Executive Order to Department 
        of Defense and National Nuclear Security Administration

    This section would exempt the Department of Defense and the 
National Nuclear Security Administration from implementation of 
Executive Order 13673.

  Section 1096--Determination and Disclosure of Transportation Costs 
 Incurred by Secretary of Defense for Congressional Trips Outside the 
                             United States

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
determine and disclose the transportation costs incurred by the 
Department of Defense for certain congressional trips outside 
the United States.

   Section 1097--Waiver of Certain Polygraph Examination Requirements

    This section would allow the Commissioner of U.S. Customs 
and Border Protection to waive certain polygraph examination 
requirements for qualifying veterans.

                  TITLE XI--CIVILIAN PERSONNEL MATTERS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


             Defense Intelligence Agency Housing Allowances

    The committee is concerned about the cost of housing 
allowances, including the Living Quarters Allowance (LQA) 
incentive program for Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) 
civilian employees serving overseas. The committee is also 
concerned about potential disparity between DIA civilian and 
military personnel housing allowances and overseas incentives. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Personnel and Readiness to provide a report to the 
Committee on Armed Services of the House of Representatives by 
December 1, 2016, on DIA civilian personnel housing allowances, 
the relocation incentive program, and the potential disparity 
between military and civilian allowances. The report will 
include, at a minimum:
    (1) How the Department of Defense determines cost of living 
allowance for DIA civilian employees;
    (2) How the amount of LQA is determined and the 
Department's policy and guidance to military services and 
defense agencies for authorizing the payment;
    (3) The total cost of DIA cost of living allowances and LQA 
paid at overseas locations, by locations; and
    (4) The differences between housing allowances for DIA 
civilians and their military counterparts, including enlisted 
personnel.

      Five-Year Limitation on Civilian Personnel Working Overseas

    The committee recognizes the challenges that the Department 
of the Navy faces in hiring and maintaining a professional 
civilian workforce for overseas assignments, particularly ship 
repair specialists. The current ``5-year rule'' limiting 
civilian personnel to a maximum of 5 consecutive years serving 
overseas in the same location may have the unintended 
consequence of forcing the departure of highly qualified and 
difficult-to-replace ship maintenance professionals. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy or his designee 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by September 1, 2016, on the impact on ship maintenance due to 
the 5-year rule. At a minimum, the briefing shall include the 
annual rate of civilian attrition because of the rule, what 
skills or functions are affected most, how frequently waivers 
are requested and granted, what steps the Navy is taking to 
address the issue, and the timeline for implementation.

                      Joint Base Wage Grade Parity

    The committee is concerned about the ongoing wage grade 
pay-parity issue at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst (JB MDL). 
The 2005 Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission 
brought together three bases with two different wage grade 
locality pay rates. In 2009, all salaried employees at JB MDL 
were placed on the New York City locality pay area. However, 
Federal wage grade system workers were never brought onto the 
same wage scale, with 82 percent being paid at the Philadelphia 
rate and 18 percent at the New York City rate. The committee 
understands the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) has had 
the authority to fix this discrepancy since 2009 but has yet to 
act.
    The committee notes this pay disparity has created 
management challenges for leaders at JB MDL. In some cases, two 
sets of employees are performing the same function on the same 
base for the same boss yet are paid at different rates. This 
disparity has affected the base's mission by limiting 
management's flexibility to move employees from one side of the 
base to the other as needed to meet mission requirements and 
has negated efficiencies that otherwise would have been 
realized under the joint basing model.
    On October 15, 2015, the Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory 
Committee (FPRAC) approved ``Proposal to Move a Portion of 
Joint-Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst from the Philadelphia Wage 
Area to the New York, NY, Wage Area, 599-ACT1.'' The proposal 
recommended that OPM correct the wage grade pay-parity issue at 
JB-MDL, bringing wage grade employees onto a single locality 
pay. The committee urges OPM to address FPRAC's recommendation 
and develop a plan to resolve the pay disparity in a timely 
manner.

                          Security Clearances

    The committee has received information from multiple 
Department of Defense sources about the length of time it takes 
to grant prospective civilian employees security clearances. 
The committee is concerned that the process is so lengthy that 
many highly qualified civilians find other work rather than 
wait for the process to end.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by December 1, 2016, on the Department's efforts to reduce the 
length of time it takes to grant security clearances for 
civilians. At a minimum, the briefing should include:
    (1) The average length of time it takes to grant a civilian 
employee or prospective employee a security clearance;
    (2) The factors that exist that prevent the Department from 
reducing the amount of time it takes to grant security 
clearances; and
    (3) The steps the Department is taking to reduce the amount 
of time it takes to grant a security clearance.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


  Section 1101--Temporary Direct Hire Authority for Domestic Defense 
Industrial Base Facilities and the Major Range and Test Facilities Base

    This section would provide direct-hire authority for 
Department of Defense industrial base facilities located in the 
United States, as well as the Major Range and Test Facilities 
Base, for 2 years.

 Section 1102--Temporary Personnel Flexibilities for Domestic Defense 
  Industrial Base Facilities and Major Range and Test Facilities Base 
                           Civilian Personnel

    This section would allow Department of Defense industrial 
base facilities located in the United States and Major Range 
and Test Facilities Base centers to hire temporary employees 
into permanent positions outside of the requirements of the 
competitive service.

   Section 1103--One-Year Extension of Temporary Authority to Grant 
Allowances, Benefits, and Gratuities to Civilian Personnel on Official 
                         Duty in a Combat Zone

    This section would grant a 1-year extension of temporary 
authority to grant allowances, benefits, and gratuities to 
civilian personnel on official duty in a combat zone.

  Section 1104--Advance Payments for Employees Relocating within the 
                   United States and Its Territories

    This section would modify section 5524a of title 5, United 
States Code, to authorize advance payment of basic pay for 
current civilian employees who relocate within the United 
States and its territories to a location outside the employee's 
current commuting area.

Section 1105--Permanent Authority for Alternative Personnel Program for 
                   Scientific and Technical Personnel

    This section would remove the sunset date and annual 
reporting requirement for section 1101 of the Strom Thurmond 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999 (Public 
Law 105--261), and codify the authority in chapter 81 of title 
10, United States Code.
    The committee notes that the Defense Advanced Research 
Projects Agency has used this alternative personnel hiring 
authority to great effect since its inception. Furthermore, the 
committee believes that given the limited scope of this 
authority, the fact that there have been no reports of misuse 
or abuse in 15 years, and the fact that it does not authorize 
any new civilian billets for the Department of Defense, the 
authority should be made permanent. The committee believes that 
such unique hiring authorities will be important tools for the 
technical community in the Department to recruit, hire, and 
retain the Nation's top scientific and engineering talent.

Section 1106--Modification to Information Technology Personnel Exchange 
                                Program

    This section would modify the Information Technology 
Exchange Program established by section 1110 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (Public Law 111-
84), as amended by section 1106 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014. Among the changes, this 
section would rename the program the ``Cyber and Information 
Technology Exchange Program,'' and would increase the number of 
personnel that could be exchanged from 10 to 50.

 Section 1107--Treatment of Certain Localities for Calculation of Per 
                            Diem Allowances

    This section would consolidate per diem localities in the 
Dayton, Ohio, area.

Section 1108--Eligibility of Employees in a Time-Limited Appointment to 
       Compete for a Permanent Appointment at Any Federal Agency

    This section would modify section 9602 of title 5, United 
States Code, to clarify the eligibility of employees of a land 
management agency in a time-limited appointment to compete for 
a permanent appointment at any Federal agency.

            Section 1109--Limitation on Administrative Leave

    This section would provide that a Federal employee may not 
be placed on administrative leave, or other paid non-duty 
status without charging leave, for more than 14 total days for 
reasons relating to misconduct or performance.

Section 1110--Record of Investigation of Personnel Action in Separated 
                   Employee's Official Personnel File

    This section would require the head of an agency to make a 
permanent notation in an individual's personnel file if the 
individual resigns from government employment while the subject 
of a personnel investigation and an adverse finding against the 
individual is made as a result of the investigation.

   Section 1111--Review of Official Personnel File of Former Federal 
                       Employees before Rehiring

    This section would require an appointing authority to 
review and consider the information relating to a prospective 
employee's former government service in the candidate's 
official personnel record file prior to making any 
determination with respect to the appointment or reinstatement 
of the employee to such position.

             TITLE XII--MATTERS RELATING TO FOREIGN NATIONS

                                OVERVIEW

    Framing the committee's oversight of national security 
matters relating to foreign nations is the observation that the 
United States faces a wider range of serious threats than at 
any time in recent history. As the Director of the Defense 
Intelligence Agency testified to the committee in March 2016, 
``The world is far more complicated; it is far more 
destabilized; it is far more complex than at any time I have 
seen it.''
    The committee believes that America's global military 
capabilities and commitments have undergirded peace, security, 
and economic prosperity, and underwritten an international 
world order aligned with American interests. However, the 
committee also recognizes that others seek to threaten such 
security and prosperity. The provisions contained in this title 
reinforce the committee's belief that America's military 
strength and its global posture and presence, will continue to 
be necessary to deter aggression, to reassure U.S. allies and 
partners, and to exercise global influence.
    The committee continues to focus on U.S. military 
operations in the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. It 
recognizes the fragile security situation in Afghanistan and 
the risks associated with reducing U.S. forces to 5,500 by 
January 1, 2017. Therefore, this Act includes the resources to 
sustain at least 9,800 U.S. troops in Afghanistan through April 
2017, to preserve options and provide time for a new President 
to assess the security environment and U.S. military missions 
in Afghanistan. The Act would also extend key authorities and 
express the committee's view that the President should provide 
additional resources to strike the Islamic State of Iraq and 
the Levant (ISIL) in Afghanistan; authorize unilateral strikes 
against the Taliban and the Haqqani Network, the most lethal 
group on the battlefield; and provide support for 352,000 
Afghan National Defense and Security Forces.
    The committee has also focused oversight on the efforts of 
the Department of Defense to counter ISIL in the Republic of 
Iraq and the Syrian Arab Republic, as part of Operation 
Inherent Resolve (OIR), and to address the growing instability 
and terrorism threats across the Middle East and Africa. The 
Act would extend the Syria train and equip authority, and 
maintain strong congressional oversight of the program through 
a continued reprogramming requirement. It would also extend the 
Iraq train and equip authority, but fence 25 percent of the 
funds until a comprehensive plan is submitted to Congress. 
Lastly, it would provide an additional $50.0 million in 
stipends and sustainment, exempt from the above fence, for 
Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga and Sunni tribal security forces that 
are directly engaged in the campaign for Mosul.
    The committee remains concerned about the Islamic Republic 
of Iran's malign military activities, and H.R. 4909 would 
express the committee's view that the United States should 
counter Iran's malign activities and ensure that the U.S. 
military maintains a robust, enduring posture in the Arabian 
Gulf to deter and respond to Iranian aggression.
    The committee has also focused on the Department's efforts 
to deter aggression by the Russian Federation against Ukraine 
and other allies and partners in Europe. The committee supports 
a significant increase in European Reassurance Initiative 
funding above the fiscal year 2016 request, including funding 
for heel-to-toe rotations of U.S. forces and the pre-
positioning of an Armored Brigade Combat Team's equipment in 
Europe. The bill would also provide $150.0 million for the 
Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative to enhance the defense 
of Ukraine and to deter further Russian aggression.
    In the Asia-Pacific region, H.R. 4909 would express a sense 
of Congress on trilateral security cooperation between Japan, 
the Republic of Korea, and the United States, and on security 
cooperation between the Republic of Singapore and the United 
States.
    Lastly, the committee notes that the Department has placed 
greater emphasis on security cooperation. To aid in its 
oversight, the committee would require an independent 
assessment of Department of Defense security cooperation 
programs; consolidate existing security cooperation authorities 
into a new chapter in title 10, United States Code; and 
consolidate multiple reporting requirements into a single 
document. Additionally, to address concerns that the foreign 
military sales (FMS) process is slow, cumbersome, and 
complicated, the committee would require the Comptroller 
General the United States to undertake a review of the 
Department of Defense's performance in the FMS process.

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


            Assistance to Iraqi Forces for Mosul Operations

    The committee believes that the operation to retake the 
city of Mosul, in the Republic of Iraq, from the Islamic State 
of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) is an important step to achieving 
the military objectives of Operation Inherent Resolve (OIR) and 
to supporting the United States vital national security 
interests.
    The committee notes that the operation to retake Mosul will 
be complex and will require sustained operations by security 
forces in Iraq, including the Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga, Sunni 
tribal security forces, and local security forces with a 
national security mission. The committee believes that an 
operation to retake Mosul should include sufficient U.S. 
military and logistical assistance and support.
    To that end, elsewhere in this Act, the committee includes 
a provision that would extend the authority of the Secretary of 
Defense to provide assistance to the military and other 
security forces of, or associated with, the Government of Iraq, 
including the Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga, Sunni tribal security 
forces, and local security forces with a national security 
mission, to counter ISIL. This authority, specifically as it 
pertains to sustainment activities for forces that have direct 
involvement in combat operations to retake Mosul, includes 
payment of salaries and provision of life support, including 
sustenance.
    The committee is also concerned that the U.S. military 
support for an operation to retake Mosul would be challenged by 
current force management levels; restrictions on U.S. Armed 
Forces ground combat activities with the Iraqi Security Forces 
(ISF), the Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga, and the Sunni tribal 
security forces; and constraints on U.S. airstrikes. Therefore, 
the committee believes that such U.S. policy limitations should 
be revisited in the lead-up to an operation to retake Mosul. 
Further, the committee believes that U.S. assistance and 
support should be sustained for all phases of any such 
operation.

     Assistance to the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces

    The stability and security of the Islamic Republic of 
Afghanistan remains a vital national security interest of the 
United States. The Afghan National Defense and Security Forces 
(ANDSF) are a critical component to the immediate and long-term 
security of Afghanistan, which also reinforces stability in the 
region.
    The committee notes the deteriorating security situation in 
Afghanistan due to a resurgence of the Afghan Taliban, as well 
as the growth of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant in 
Afghanistan. As such, the committee remains focused on the 
sufficiency of United States assistance to the ANDSF, including 
weapons and equipment.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to provide a briefing to the House Committee 
on Armed Services, not later than February 15, 2017, that 
includes a review of the major weapon systems and equipment 
provided to the ANDSF. The briefing should include, but is not 
limited to, the following:
    (1) Outline all major weapon systems and equipment procured 
for the ANDSF, consistent with the program of record;
    (2) Summarize how such weapon systems and equipment support 
the overall strategy for the ANSDF;
    (3) Describe the current capability and capacity of the 
ANSDF to operate and sustain such weapon systems and equipment;
    (4) Identify any gaps in ANDSF capability given the 
evolving security situation and overall strategy; and
    (5) Address any other matters that the Comptroller General 
determines appropriate.

          Chinese Participation in Rim of the Pacific Exercise

    The committee is concerned by certain unilateral actions 
taken by the People's Republic of China in the South China Sea 
and by the implications that those actions may have on regional 
stability. Rather than abiding by internationally accepted 
norms and contributing to a peaceful and equitable resolution 
to the many disputed claims in the South China Sea, China has 
engaged in controversial land reclamation projects and resorted 
to aggressive tactics, short of open conflict, to further its 
foreign policy goals.
    The committee notes that the United States has maintained 
its invitation to China to participate, to a limited extent, in 
the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise for 2016, despite 
China's concerning actions in the South China Sea. The 
committee acknowledges the benefits of inviting China to 
participate in international exercises, which aim to reinforce 
the merits of cooperative security. However, the committee 
believes that these invitations should be continuously 
evaluated in light of China's conduct. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services, which may include a 
classified portion, not later than July 1, 2016, on the merits 
of continued Chinese participation in forthcoming RIMPAC 
exercises.

Comptroller General of the United States Assessment of Foreign Military 
                                 Sales

    The committee believes that an efficient, thorough, and 
effective Foreign Military Sales (FMS) process is vital to U.S. 
foreign policy and national security, and contributes to the 
health of the U.S. defense industrial base. The committee is 
aware of concerns raised by U.S. military leaders, the defense 
industry, and foreign partners that the FMS process is slow, 
cumbersome, and complicated. The committee is also aware of 
provisions in the committee report (H. Rept. 114-154) 
accompanying the State, Foreign Operations, and Related 
Programs Appropriations Bill, 2016, and in the Explanatory 
Statement accompanying H.R. 2029, the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2016 (Public Law 114-113), directing the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) to submit a report to 
Congress on the interagency processes for implementing the 
Foreign Military Financing (FMF) and FMS programs. The 
committee supports the GAO review of the FMF and FMS processes, 
and contends that continued study of the performance of the 
Department of Defense in the FMS process is warranted to 
determine if additional efficiencies can be found to improve 
the process.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees, the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the 
House of Representatives, and the Committee on Foreign 
Relations of the Senate, by June 30, 2017, that further 
evaluates the performance of the Department of Defense in the 
FMS process. Such a report should include the following:
    (1) Roles, responsibilities, and lines of authority for 
implementing Department of Defense processes in FMS;
    (2) An assessment of performance measures established by 
the Department of Defense in the FMS process;
    (3) An assessment of the extent to which the Department of 
Defense meets established performance measures;
    (4) Where performance measures are not met, an assessment 
of the causes;
    (5) An assessment of the extent to which previous reforms 
have improved the efficiency of the FMS process, including but 
not limited to training and workforce challenges, challenges 
defining partner country requirements, and obtaining 
acquisition and delivery status information;
    (6) An assessment of FMS compared to practices followed in 
other procurement processes such as the procurement of similar 
items and services for the U.S. military, excess defense 
articles sales to foreign nations, direct commercial sales to 
foreign nations, or procurement of items and services under 
Department of Defense authorities for building partner 
capacity;
    (7) An assessment of the impacts of Firm Fixed Price and 
Fixed Price Incentive Fee contracting types on the defense 
industrial base and the FMS process;
    (8) Further examination of the Defense Security Cooperation 
Agency and the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition, Technology and Logistics to ensure the Department 
of Defense acquisition work force is properly sized and aligned 
to meet the performance measures in (2);
    (9) An evaluation of the size and use of the Foreign 
Military Sales Trust Fund; and
    (10) Any other matters the Comptroller General considers 
appropriate.
    Additionally, the committee directs the Comptroller General 
to provide a briefing to the Committees on Armed Services and 
Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives not later than 
October 31, 2016, on any preliminary findings and 
recommendations from its evaluation.

                    Countering Adversarial Messaging

    The committee remains concerned about the success of the 
Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) messaging and 
propaganda, and their ability to persuade, inspire, and recruit 
from across the globe. ISIL's continued success on the 
battlefield depends on this messaging, and the group's 
propaganda attracts recruits and other support that enables it 
to persist. Consequently, the committee believes that the 
campaign to degrade and defeat ISIL on the battlefield must be 
linked with a comparable effort to degrade and defeat ISIL's 
message in the minds of potential supporters. The committee 
recognizes that other extremist groups have taken note of 
ISIL's success and are expanding their messaging operations, 
particularly in social media.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by March 17, 2017, on the Department of Defense's long-term 
strategy to counter adversarial messaging and recruiting 
utilizing digital technologies, including social media. The 
briefing should address the following questions:
    (1) What are the Department's roles, responsibilities, and 
rules of engagement when it comes to countering adversarial 
messaging?
    (2) What is the Department's integrated strategy to counter 
online radicalization and recruitment?
    (3) What measures of effectiveness exist to inform 
outcomes?
    (4) What analytical data points have already been collected 
to compare our capabilities to those of our adversaries?
    (5) What policies, regulations, or other guidance need to 
be updated or modified to improve the Department's ability to 
execute an integrated strategy?

 Counterterrorism and Security Cooperation Efforts in Somalia and the 
                             Horn of Africa

    The committee recognizes the contributions made by the 
Department of Defense through bilateral security cooperation 
and counterterrorism efforts to improve the security situation 
in the Federal Republic of Somalia and the Horn of Africa. 
These efforts are important to address terrorist threats to the 
United States emanating from Al Shabaab. The committee 
acknowledges that security and stability improvements in 
Somalia require a whole-of-government approach and cooperation 
with the international community, including the African Union. 
The committee also acknowledges the importance of collaboration 
with the Department of State to work with the international 
community to prevent Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant 
recruitment within the region. The committee urges the 
Department of Defense to continue coordination of efforts with 
the Department of State and international community, 
recognizing the important role Somalia plays in the Horn of 
Africa.

        Department of Defense Briefing on Foreign Military Sales

    The committee is aware of concerns raised by U.S. military 
leaders, the defense industry, and foreign partners that the 
Foreign Military Sales (FMS) process is slow, cumbersome, and 
complicated. Although FMS is an interagency process, the 
Department of Defense plays a key role in implementation. The 
committee is aware that the Department has taken certain steps 
to improve the FMS process, such as the establishment by the 
Deputy Secretary of Defense of the Defense Senior Steering 
Group on Arms Transfers and Technology Review, to improve the 
Department's decision making on arms transfers and release of 
sensitive technology. The committee remains concerned, however, 
that inefficiencies may exist in internal Department of Defense 
processes that cause suboptimal outcomes such as delays. The 
committee therefore directs the Deputy Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than September 30, 2016, on the results of the 
Department's initiatives to streamline procedures and on other 
Department efforts to improve the FMS process.

   Enduring Basing Requirements in the U.S. Central Command Area of 
                             Responsibility

    The committee notes the criticality of U.S. strategic 
basing in the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) area of 
responsibility (AOR). Such basing supports myriad operations 
conducted by the Department of Defense, including Operation 
Inherent Resolve to counter the Islamic State of Iraq and the 
Levant in the Syrian Arab Republic and the Republic of Iraq, 
the Resolute Support Mission in the Islamic Republic of 
Afghanistan, and the defense of the Arabian Gulf. Further, such 
basing reassures U.S. allies and partners in the region, 
supports their military efforts in the region, and enables a 
forward-based U.S. posture to deter the Islamic Republic of 
Iran.
    The committee believes that some of these bases within the 
CENTCOM AOR are enduring in nature. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives not later than June 15, 2016, on regional 
basing in the CENTCOM AOR, including:
    (1) The bases that are determined to be enduring within the 
AOR;
    (2) The enduring missions that such bases will support;
    (3) The current funding for such bases;
    (4) The plan for sustaining funding for such bases;
    (5) The impact to U.S. interests and regional objectives if 
such bases are not sustained; and
    (6) Any other matters that the Secretary determines to be 
appropriate.

                Enduring High-Resolution Geospatial Data

    The committee is aware that the Department of Defense has 
been utilizing sophisticated three-dimensional high-resolution 
light detection and ranging systems to provide geospatial data 
for tactical users in theaters of hostilities. Such data has 
proven to be useful for these tactical users in providing 
capabilities for accurate foundation mapping that supports 
special operations and other forces with situational awareness, 
mission planning, targeting, as well as the ability to share 
with coalition partners and aid in the development of partner 
capacity. While national capabilities are useful in a strategic 
context, the committee believes that these tactical systems are 
vital to supporting urgent, in-theater operational forces in 
the successful execution of their missions. However, the 
committee is concerned that the reliance on overseas 
contingency operations (OCO) funds have prevented Special 
Operations Command and the Army from properly ensuring that 
such capabilities are included in the base budget request. 
Funding these capabilities in the base budget ensures these 
capabilities are available to support existing and emerging 
requirements, while enabling broader application of the 
capability in regions outside of traditional OCO-funded 
geographies. Therefore, the committee directs the Commander of 
Special Operations Command, in coordination with the Secretary 
of the Army and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, to 
conduct a review of these activities and the capabilities 
supporting them and provide a briefing to the House Committee 
on Armed Services by November 1, 2016. This review should 
examine the current requirements, especially those outside of 
areas of active hostilities, and how those requirements will be 
satisfied across the future years' defense program.

                          Instability in Libya

    The committee notes with concern the continued 
deterioration of the security situation in Libya as the Libyans 
work to establish a unity government. Instability continues to 
grow in the country, providing sanctuary for terrorist groups 
to organize, train, and potentially to launch attacks against 
U.S. citizens, interests, and allies and partners around the 
world.
    The committee remains concerned about the expansion of 
terrorist elements in Libya, especially, although not 
exclusively, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). 
According to Department of Defense officials, there are over 
5,000 ISIL fighters in Libya. In public remarks on February 4, 
2016, the Secretary of Defense stated, ``[T]he concern there is 
that Libya not get on a glide slope to the kind of situation 
that we find elsewhere, where ISIL in a politically disturbed 
environment seizes a foothold, gathers a piece of territory 
from which it's able to tyrannize people and plot operations 
elsewhere.'' ISIL has taken credit for attacks in North Africa, 
and there is increasing concern that ISIL fighters from Libya 
will conduct attacks in Europe or the United States.
    In addition, the lack of security and governance throughout 
southern Libya allows terrorist organizations such as Al Qaeda 
in the Islamic Maghreb to operate freely and threaten 
instability across the entire region.
    The committee recognizes that instability in Libya affects 
the entire region. Countries bordering Libya, such as the 
Tunisian Republic, have been especially impacted. The committee 
therefore will continue to consider ways in which the 
Department of Defense can support Tunisia's ability to maintain 
border security and stability.
    The committee encourages the Department of Defense to 
conduct prudent planning necessary to advance regional 
stability. The committee also urges the administration to work 
with U.S. allies and partners in Europe and North Africa to 
address the foreign fighter threat in a cooperative and 
coordinated manner.

           Interpretation of Gross Violation of Human Rights

    The committee is aware of the ongoing assessment by the 
Department of Defense Inspector General to address allegations 
of sexual abuse of children by members of the Afghan National 
Defense and Security Forces. The committee remains concerned 
about allegations of abuses perpetrated against children, and 
therefore encourages the Secretary of State to interpret ``a 
gross violation of human rights,'' as referred to in section 
620M of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2378d), 
to include the sexual abuse of a child.

            Military Assistance to the Government of Ukraine

    The committee continues to urge the Department of Defense 
to provide timely support to the Government of Ukraine to 
enable it to defend itself against aggressive actions by the 
Russian Federation and Russian-backed separatists that threaten 
its sovereignty and territorial integrity. The committee 
acknowledges the progress achieved to date by U.S. efforts to 
train and equip Ukrainian security forces, but notes that such 
efforts may need to be expanded or expedited in the event that 
Ukraine's security situation further deteriorates. In such a 
scenario, timely access to a sufficient inventory of military 
equipment could become critical.
    The committee, therefore, directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the Committees on Armed Services of 
the Senate and the House of Representatives, not later than 
October 1, 2016, on how efforts, inherent to the Department of 
Defense's European Reassurance Initiative and the Ukraine 
Security Assistance Initiative, including any plans to 
preposition military weapons, munitions, and equipment in 
Europe, may facilitate the Department of Defense's capacity to 
respond to the potential need for additional military 
assistance to the Government of Ukraine.

    North Atlantic Treaty Organization Defense Spending Commitments

    The committee acknowledges the importance of allies in the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) meeting the defense 
expenditure commitments listed in Declaration 14 of the Wales 
Summit Declaration, dated September 5, 2014. The declaration 
states that allies currently meeting the NATO guideline to 
spend a minimum of 2 percent of their gross domestic product 
(GDP) on defense will aim to continue to do so, and that allies 
whose current proportion of GDP spent on defense is below this 
level will aim to move towards the 2 percent guideline.
    The committee believes that meeting these commitments is 
essential to the security and fiscal interests of the United 
States and fellow allied states. Allies that fail to meet this 
commitment render NATO less capable of addressing the threats 
posed by adversaries. The committee commends the United Kingdom 
of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the Republic of Poland, 
the Hellenic Republic, and the Republic of Estonia for annual 
defense expenditures at 2 percent or more of their GDPs since 
the Wales Summit Declaration, and it urges other allied states 
to make similar efforts. The committee also urges NATO to 
prioritize discussions on allied resourcing and equipping 
methodologies at the NATO Warsaw Summit in July 2016.

   Report on U.S. Military Enabler Support Within Operation Inherent 
                                Resolve

    The committee remains concerned about the overall 
effectiveness of indigenous forces on the battlefield in the 
Syrian Arab Republic and the Republic of Iraq, including the 
Iraqi Security Forces (ISF) and the appropriately vetted 
elements of the Syrian opposition. This effectiveness is 
hindered by the lack of U.S. military enabler support, such as 
attack aviation and counter-improvised explosive device 
capabilities for the ISF. Additionally, the committee is 
concerned that other actors on the battlefield, such as Shia 
militias backed by the Islamic Republic of Iran or Iranian 
military forces, may benefit from U.S. military enabler 
support.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to provide a report to the House Committee on 
Armed Services not later than March 1, 2017, that evaluates 
U.S. military enabler support to the ISF and such elements of 
the Syrian opposition, including:
    (1) How U.S. military enablers support coalition 
airstrikes;
    (2) How enabler resource allocation decisions are made 
within Operation Inherent Resolve;
    (3) How the United States determines the types of enabler 
support to provide;
    (4) How the United States ensures that groups, such as 
Iranian-back Shia militias or Iranian military forces, do not 
benefit from U.S. military enabler support; and
    (5) Any other matters that the Comptroller General 
determines appropriate.
    Additionally, the committee directs the Comptroller General 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than January 16, 2017, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings.

 Reporting Requirements of Authority for Support of Special Operations 
                          to Combat Terrorism

    The committee notes the importance of the Authority for 
Support of Special Operations to Combat Terrorism, as provided 
in section 1208 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (Public Law 108-375), as 
most recently amended by section 1274 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92). The 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to notify the 
congressional defense committees of funding changes to programs 
executed under this authority when such a proposed increase 
exceeds 20 percent of the currently approved total for that 
particular program, or $1.0 million; whichever amount is less.

         Review of Taiwan Midshipman Cruise Training Port Call

    The Midshipman Cruising and Training Squadron is the only 
annual, long-distance, high-sea training for Taiwanese 
officers, sailors, and first-class midshipmen. The committee is 
aware that prior to 1979 the Squadron, which made resupplying 
port calls at foreign ports and harbors throughout the Pacific 
during the training exercise, would routinely stop at U.S. 
ports, including those on Guam and Hawaii. The committee notes 
that the United States and Taiwan routinely conduct bi-lateral 
and multi-lateral training exercises and recognizes the 
potential theater security cooperation benefits associated with 
increased engagement through Taiwanese port visits.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy, 
in consultation with appropriate Department of State 
authorities, to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services by February 1, 2017 on the feasibility of 
permitting U.S. port calls in the Pacific for Taiwanese sailors 
during the annual training exercise.

Social Media Analytics and Publically Available Information Supporting 
                         Battlespace Awareness

    The committee remains concerned with the Department of 
Defense's ability to effectively monitor and utilize social 
media analytic tools to support awareness of the operating 
environment for force protection, operational security, and 
other missions. The committee believes that the lack of clearly 
defined policies is hampering the ability to use such Publicly 
Available Information (PAI) to understand adversarial sentiment 
and narrative messaging in theaters of active hostilities, as 
well as monitoring for non- and semi-permissive environments, 
and areas of potential future activity. While there are some 
technology capabilities that currently exist that could support 
these activities, including many that can be leveraged from the 
commercial sector, the committee believes that the Department 
of Defense is not effectively leveraging these tools because of 
a fundamental lack of policy, doctrine, and procedures that 
delineate how such tools might be used. In the lack of such 
guidance, the committee believes that the Department is 
abdicating this space to adversaries that have no compunction 
to limit their actions, and in fact actively exploit it to 
achieve their strategic goals of recruitment, fundraising, and 
strategic messaging.
    The committee notes that PAI use and exploitation is having 
a revolutionary impact on both operations and intelligence 
within the Department. Further, the committee recognizes that 
while intelligence activities have important uses for PAI, the 
Department also has unique operational uses and requirements 
for PAI that support force protection, targeting, battlespace 
awareness, and other traditional military activities. As a 
result, the demand signal for the operational use of PAI has 
increased across the force.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to conduct an assessment of the current policy directives on 
how defense entities use such social media tools, and to 
provide a briefing on this assessment to the House Committee on 
Armed Services by February 15, 2017. This assessment should 
examine the demand for such capabilities from the combatant 
commanders to identify any gaps or areas needing clarification 
in policy, doctrine, training, and technology capabilities. In 
conducting this assessment, the Secretary should consider 
operational missions for social media analytics, such as 
battlespace awareness, operational security, and sentiment 
analysis for counter-messaging adversarial narratives and the 
operational use of PAI. The assessment should also include a 
discussion of legal and policy issues associated with the use 
of PAI, as well as resource limitations, approval processes, 
training requirements, and steps being taken to improve 
coordination of effort and leverage best practices and 
capabilities across the Department. Finally, the Secretary 
should report on how to continue and enhance capabilities to 
ensure U.S. persons' PAI is not inadvertently viewed, as well 
as methods for addressing inadvertent viewing while in enemy 
battlespace.

            State Partnership Program Activities in Ukraine

    The committee supports the role of the State Partnership 
Program (SPP) in Department of Defense security cooperation 
efforts, including in activities to assist Ukraine. The 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92) authorized the National Guard to conduct SPP 
activities with security forces and governmental organizations 
of a foreign country whose primary functions include disaster 
response or emergency response, if the Secretary of Defense, 
with the concurrence of the Secretary of State, determines and 
notifies Congress that the activity is in the national security 
interest of the United States. The committee is aware of delays 
in making determinations that would permit the National Guard 
to carry out SPP activities with Ukrainian security forces or 
with governmental organizations whose primary functions include 
disaster response or emergency response. The committee 
encourages the Secretary of Defense and Secretary of State to 
facilitate timely execution of such determinations, as 
appropriate.

          Strategy for Regional Counter-Narrative Capabilities

    The committee remains concerned with the success of Islamic 
State of Iraq and the Levant's (ISIL) messaging and propaganda, 
and ISIL's ability to persuade, inspire, and recruit from 
across the globe. ISIL's continued success on the battlefield 
depends on this messaging, and the group's propaganda attracts 
recruits and other support that enables the organization to 
persist. Consequently, the committee believes that the campaign 
to degrade and defeat ISIL on the battlefield must be mated 
with a comparable effort to degrade and defeat ISIL's message 
in the minds of potential supporters.
    The committee is also aware that Russian actors have been 
highly effective in shaping the information environment against 
Ukrainian forces, as well as against other actors in the region 
seeking to counter Russian influence. The ambiguity that these 
information operations create has been critical in the hybrid 
and unconventional warfare strategy of Russian forces, and have 
effectively masked, created confusion, or otherwise undermined 
timely reactions from Western and allied forces.
    Not only does the Department need to consider how 
adversaries use such information strategies to support their 
operations and undermine our own, but the committee believes 
that the Department should be developing an integrated strategy 
that can leverage, and when necessary combine with, allied and 
partner capabilities to maximize our messaging and its broader 
effects. The committee also believes that there are useful 
technologies, training, and strategies that U.S. forces could 
use to support allied, and international, partner information 
operations capabilities to mitigate and marginalize 
adversaries' ability to influence and inspire.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to develop and submit a strategy for regionally building 
partnership capacity to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by June 1, 2017. This strategy should look at means for 
monitoring, data collection of narratives, and development of 
networks for countering narratives to support the missions of 
the combatant commands. Additionally, this strategy should 
outline how to leverage existing partnership funds to support 
regional cooperation, as well as prioritize the types of 
capacity building that could take place, and the regional 
partners that are most mature to conduct this kind of capacity 
building.

                           Syria No Fly Zone

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, no later 
than October 31, 2016, that gives a detailed description of the 
financial costs of establishing and maintaining a no fly zone 
over a significant portion or all of Syria, as well as the 
tactical, operational and strategic impacts it would have on 
the fight against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, Al 
Qaeda, and other affiliated groups.

  The Military Campaign To Counter the Islamic State of Iraq and the 
                                 Levant

    The committee is concerned that the end-state objectives 
for the military campaign against the Islamic State of Iraq and 
the Levant (ISIL), as part of Operation Inherent Resolve (OIR), 
are unclear and that the resourcing of that campaign may prove 
insufficient. While the committee is mindful that a balance 
must be struck to minimize the risk of collateral damage, the 
committee also remains concerned that limitations on force 
management levels, restrictions on the authority for U.S. 
military commanders to conduct airstrikes, and the lack of 
clarity in overall U.S. policy for the Syrian Arab Republic and 
the Republic of Iraq, may hinder the ability of the U.S. Armed 
Forces' to plan, execute, and achieve the objectives of the 
military campaign against ISIL.
    Elsewhere in this Act, the committee would authorize the 
Secretary of Defense to train and equip the Iraqi Security 
Forces (ISF), including the Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga and Sunni 
tribal forces, and the vetted elements of the Syrian moderate 
opposition. The committee believes that these efforts are 
necessary to counter ISIL; however, these efforts will not 
achieve their intended effect without a coherent, comprehensive 
plan and a detailed analysis of the full scope of resources 
required.
    The committee believes that the United States should 
support appropriately vetted, effective indigenous groups in 
Syria and Iraq, including vulnerable ethnic and minority groups 
such as Iraqi Christian militias, with a national security 
mission. The committee further believes that, in preparation 
for the operation to retake Mosul, Iraq, the United States 
should take steps to assist the Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga, 
including medical evacuations, force protection, logistics, and 
radio communications.
    The committee believes that the U.S. commander of OIR 
should have all authorities necessary to counter ISIL. The 
committee also believes that the United States must support its 
friends and allies in the region who are participating in the 
counter ISIL military campaign, including the Gulf Cooperation 
Council countries.

            Transparency in Security Cooperation Activities

    The committee notes that section 1202 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92) required the Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the 
Secretary of State, to develop and issue a strategic framework 
for the Department of Defense to guide prioritization of 
security cooperation resources and activities. Elsewhere in 
this Act, the committee includes a provision that would require 
the Secretary of Defense to enter into an agreement with a 
federally funded research and development center, or another 
appropriate independent entity, with expertise in security 
cooperation to conduct an assessment of the Strategic Framework 
for Department of Defense Security Cooperation. Further, in the 
committee report (H. Rept. 114-102) accompanying the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016, the committee 
directed the Comptroller General of the United States to submit 
a report on an inventory of Department of Defense security 
cooperation programs intended to build partner security 
capabilities. The committee also notes the continued 
development of the Global Theater Security Cooperation 
Management Information System (G-TSCMIS), which is intended to 
provide a comprehensive picture of whole-of-government security 
cooperation activities and contribute to planning more 
effective cooperative security activities to align or meet 
desired outcomes in support of security cooperation end states.
    The committee supports such efforts that contribute to 
improved security cooperation planning and intends to continue 
to review additional measures that may be taken to improve the 
transparency of the Department of Defense's security 
cooperation program budgeting, planning, implementation, and 
outcomes. The committee also intends to continue to review the 
Department's development and implementation of effective 
assessment, monitoring, and evaluation of security cooperation 
programs.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                  Subtitle A--Assistance and Training


 Section 1201--One-Year Extension of Logistical Support for Coalition 
      Forces Supporting Certain United States Military Operations

    This section would amend section 1234 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008 (Public Law 110-
181), as most recently amended by section 1201 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92), by authorizing the Secretary of Defense to provide 
supplies, services, transportation, and other logistical 
support to coalition forces supporting U.S. operations in the 
Republic of Iraq and the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan during 
fiscal year 2017.

 Section 1202--Extension of Authority for Training of General Purpose 
   Forces of the United States Armed Forces with Military and Other 
             Security Forces of Friendly Foreign Countries

    This section would extend the authority in section 1203 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 
(Public Law 113-66) for training of general purpose forces of 
the United States Armed Forces with military and other security 
forces of friendly foreign countries to December 31, 2019.

   Section 1203--Modification and Extension of Authority to Conduct 
Activities to Enhance the Capability of Foreign Countries to Respond to 
            Incidents Involving Weapons of Mass Destruction

    This section would modify section 1204 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 (Public Law 113-
66) to include a 48-hour congressional notification when 
assistance expected to exceed $4.0 million is provided to 
certain foreign countries, to cap the funds available at $20.0 
million, and extend the authority 1 year, through September 30, 
2020.

Section 1204--Extension of Authority for Support of Special Operations 
                          to Combat Terrorism

    This section would modify and extend section 1208(h) of the 
Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2005 (Public Law 108-375), as most recently amended by 
section 1208(b) of the Carl Levin and Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public 
Law 113-291), for 3 years, through fiscal year 2020.

 Section 1205--Modification and Codification of Reporting Requirements 
              Relating to Security Cooperation Authorities

    This section would modify and codify certain reports to 
Congress for programs carried out by the Department of Defense 
to provide training, equipment, or other assistance or 
reimbursement relating to security cooperation authorities. 
This section would modify the Biennial Report on Programs 
Carried Out by the Department of Defense to Provide Training, 
Equipment, or Other Assistance or Reimbursement to Foreign 
Security Forces, as required by section 1211 of the Carl Levin 
and Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291), as follows:
    (1) Revise it from a biennial to an annual report;
    (2) Extend the expiration date to January 31, 2021;
    (3) Include the Committee on Foreign Relations of the 
Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of 
Representatives to receive the report;
    (4) Strike section 2011 of title 10, United States Code, 
relating to authority to reimburse foreign troops for 
participation in Joint Combined Exercise Training, from the 
specified authorities covered by the report; and
    (5) Include additional elements required in the report.
    In addition, this section would add the following 
provisions to the specified authorities covered by the report:
    (1) Section 401 of title 10, United States Code, relating 
to authority to provide humanitarian assistance;
    (2) Section 1206 of Public Law 113-291, relating to 
authority to conduct human rights training of security forces 
and associated security ministries of foreign countries;
    (3) Section 1534 of Public Law 113-291, relating to the 
Counterterrorism Partnerships Fund; and
    (4) Section 1203 of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2014 (Public Law 113-66), relating to training 
of general purpose forces of the United States Armed Forces 
with military and other security forces of friendly foreign 
countries.
    The amendments of this section would supersede section 1080 
of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 
(Public Law 114-92).
    Modifying, consolidating, and standardizing reports to 
Congress on certain programs to train, equip, assist, or 
reimburse foreign security forces is intended to create a 
single product that will aid transparency, congressional 
oversight, and assist the Department of Defense in the 
development of effective assessment, monitoring, and evaluation 
of security cooperation programs.

Section 1206--Independent Assessment of Department of Defense Security 
                          Cooperation Programs

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
enter into an agreement with a federally funded research and 
development center, or another appropriate independent entity, 
with expertise in security cooperation to conduct an assessment 
of the Strategic Framework for Department of Defense Security 
Cooperation. This section would also require the Secretary of 
Defense to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees, the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, 
and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of 
Representatives not later than November 1, 2017, containing the 
assessment.
    Additionally, the committee expects the Secretary of 
Defense, acting through the federally funded research and 
development center, to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than March 1, 2017, on 
the initial findings of the assessment required by this 
section.

        Subtitle B--Matters Relating to Afghanistan and Pakistan


   Section 1211--Extension and Modification of Commanders' Emergency 
                            Response Program

    This section would amend section 1201 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 (Public Law 112-
81), as most recently amended by section 1211 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92), by authorizing the Commanders' Emergency Response Program 
in the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan during the period 
beginning on October 1, 2016, and ending on December 31, 2017. 
This section would also authorize ex gratia payments for 
damage, personal injury, or death that is incident to combat 
operations of the U.S. Armed Forces in the Republic of Iraq.

Section 1212--Extension and Modification of Authority for Reimbursement 
  of Certain Coalition Nations for Support Provided to United States 
                          Military Operations

    This section would amend section 1233 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008 (Public Law 110-
181), as most recently amended by section 1212 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92), by extending the authority for reimbursement of coalition 
nations for support provided to the United States for military 
operations in the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan through 
December 31, 2017.
    Additionally, this section would limit the overall amount 
available for reimbursement to $1.10 billion, of which $900.0 
million would be available for reimbursement to the Government 
of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan. The committee will 
continue to review the reimbursements made to Pakistan and how 
it comports with the future of U.S. policy, including key 
counterterrorism and security objectives, in the region.
    This section would also extend, through December 31, 2017, 
the requirement for the Secretary of Defense to notify the 
congressional defense committees prior to making any 
reimbursement to the Government of Pakistan for any logistical, 
military, or other support that Pakistan provides to the United 
States.
    Further, this section would extend the requirement for the 
Secretary of Defense to certify, prior to making any 
reimbursement to Pakistan, that Pakistan is maintaining 
security along the Ground Lines of Communications through 
Pakistan, taking demonstrable steps to support counterterrorism 
operations, disrupting cross-border attacks, and countering the 
threat of improvised explosive devices.
    Finally, this section would specify that, of the total 
amount of reimbursement and support authorized for Pakistan 
during the period beginning on October 1, 2016, and ending on 
December 31, 2017, $450.0 million would not be eligible for a 
national security waiver unless the Secretary of Defense 
certifies that Pakistan continues to conduct military 
operations against the Haqqani Network in North Waziristan, is 
demonstrating commitment to preventing the Haqqani Network from 
using North Waziristan as a safe haven, and is actively 
coordinating with the Government of Afghanistan to restrict the 
movement of militants, including the Haqqani Network, along the 
Pakistan-Afghanistan border.

 Section 1213--Extension of Authority To Acquire Products and Services 
   Produced in Countries Along a Major Route of Supply to Afghanistan

    This section would extend section 801(f) of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (Public Law 111-
84), as most recently amended by section 1214 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92), through December 31, 2017.

 Section 1214--Extension of Authority To Transfer Defense Articles and 
    Provide Defense Services to the Military and Security Forces of 
                              Afghanistan

    This section would extend section 1222 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (Public Law 112-
239), as most recently amended by section 1215 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92), through December 31, 2017.

Section 1215--Sense of Congress on United States Policy and Strategy in 
                              Afghanistan

    This section would express certain findings and the sense 
of Congress on U.S. policy and strategy in the Islamic Republic 
of Afghanistan, including that the President should authorize 
at least 9,800 U.S. troops to continue to conduct the train, 
advise, and assist (TAA) and counterterrorism missions in 
Afghanistan after 2016; the President should provide the U.S. 
commander in Afghanistan with the authority to unilaterally 
strike the Taliban and the Haqqani Network and to conduct TAA 
below the corps-level of the Afghan National Defense and 
Security Forces; the President should provide additional 
resources to strike the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant in 
Afghanistan; and U.S. military personnel who are tasked with 
the mission of providing combat search and rescue, casualty 
evacuation, and medical support should not be counted as part 
of any force management level limitation in Afghanistan.

       Section 1216--Special Immigrant Status for Certain Afghans

    This section would modify section 602 of the Afghan Allies 
Protection Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-8) by extending the 
Afghan Special Immigrant Visa program through December 31, 
2017.
    Further, this section would modify the eligibility 
requirements for applicants to such program by requiring that 
any alien, that is submitting an application for Chief of 
Mission approval after May 31, 2016, and has been employed by, 
or on behalf of, the United States Government, must have served 
as an interpreter or translator for United States military 
personnel in Islamic Republic of Afghanistan while traveling 
off-base with such personnel or performing sensitive and 
trusted activities for United States military personnel 
stationed in Afghanistan.
    Finally, this section would amend the report in section 
602(b)(14) of Public Law 111-8 by requiring that the Secretary 
of State and the Secretary of Homeland Security, in 
consultation with the Secretary of Defense, provide such report 
to the Committees on Judiciary of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives not later than December 31, 2016, and annually 
thereafter through January 31, 2021.

             Subtitle C--Matters Relating to Syria and Iraq

    This section would amend section 1209 of the Carl Levin and 
Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291), as amended by 
section 1225 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92), by extending the ``Syria 
train and equip'' program through December 31, 2017. This 
section would also extend the reprogramming requirement through 
December 31, 2017.
    Further, this section would require the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a certification, with each reprogramming 
request, that the required number and type of U.S. Armed Forces 
have been deployed to support:
    (1) The strategy for the Syrian Arab Republic required by 
section 1225(b) of Public Law 114-92;
    (2) A plan to re-take and hold Raqqa, Syria; and
    (3) The elements of the Syrian opposition and other Syrian 
groups and individuals trained and equipped so that such 
elements are able to defend themselves from attacks by the 
Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant and the Government of 
Syria forces.
    Elsewhere in this Act, the committee would authorize $250.0 
million to be appropriated in title XV for fiscal year 2017 in 
the Syria Train and Equip Fund for assistance to the vetted 
Syrian opposition.
    The committee notes that recipients of U.S. assistance 
under this section should reflect the ethnic make-up of Syria, 
including the vetted Sunni elements of the opposition, as 
appropriate.

   Section 1222--Modification and Extension of Authority To Provide 
     Assistance To Counter the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant

    This section would express the sense of Congress that U.S. 
policy should support the Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga, the Iraqi 
Security Forces, and Sunni tribal forces in the fight against 
the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) and that there 
should be efforts to ensure transparency and oversight 
mechanisms for U.S. assistance. Additionally, the sense of 
Congress would recognize the important role of the Iraqi 
Kurdish Peshmerga and express that the United States should 
provide arms, training, and appropriate equipment directly to 
the Kurdish Regional Government.
    This section would also authorize the Secretary of Defense, 
in coordination with the Secretary of State, to provide $680.0 
million in assistance in fiscal year 2017 to the military and 
other security forces of, or associated with, the Government of 
the Republic of Iraq, including Kurdish and Sunni tribal 
security forces or other local security forces with a national 
security mission, through December 31, 2017.
    This section would restrict the obligation or expenditure 
of 25 percent of the funds authorized to be appropriated for 
the ``Iraqi Train and Equip Fund'' (ITEF) until 15 days after 
the Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of 
State, submits to the congressional defense committees, the 
Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, and the Committee 
on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives a plan to 
retake and hold Mosul, Iraq. However, of the funds authorized 
to be appropriated for ITEF, $50.0 million is not subject to 
such restriction and is available for stipends and sustainment 
to the Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga, the Sunni tribal security 
forces, or other local security forces with a national security 
mission. Further, of the $50.0 million for stipends and 
sustainment, not less than 33 percent of such funds must be 
available for the Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga.
    This section would require the Secretary of Defense and the 
Secretary of State to provide the congressional defense 
committees, the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, 
and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of 
Representatives, a briefing not later than 120 days after the 
date of the enactment of this Act that includes an assessment 
on the extent to which the Government of Iraq is meeting 
certain conditions relating to political inclusion of ethnic 
and sectarian minorities within the security forces of Iraq. 
This section also would require a briefing that contains an 
update of the assessment not later than 180 days after the 
first such assessment.
    Finally, this section would prohibit U.S. assistance 
authorized under this section from being provided to the 
Government of Iraq 90 days after the date of the enactment of 
this Act unless the Secretary of Defense certifies that the 
Government of Iraq has taken actions to safeguard against U.S. 
assistance being transferred or acquired by violent extremist 
organizations, as designated by the Secretary of State under 
section 219 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 
1189) or that are known to be under the command and control, or 
associated with, the Government of the Islamic Republic of 
Iran.

   Section 1223--Extension and Modification of Authority To Support 
Operations and Activities of the Office of Security Cooperation in Iraq

    This section would amend section 1215 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 (Public Law 112-
81), as most recently amended by section 1221 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92), by extending the authority for the Office of Security 
Cooperation in Iraq (OSC-I) for 1 year through fiscal year 
2017. This section would also allow the Secretary of Defense, 
with the concurrence of the Secretary of State, to authorize 
OSC-I to conduct training activities in support of the Iraqi 
Border Police.

Section 1224--Report on Prevention of Future Terrorist Organizations in 
                             Iraq and Syria

    The section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a report to the congressional defense committees, not 
later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act, that describes the political, economic, and security 
conditions in the Republic of Iraq and the Syrian Arab Republic 
that would be necessary to prevent the formation of future 
terrorist organizations therein.

    Section 1225--Semiannual Report on Integration of Political and 
                    Military Strategies Against ISIL

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense and the 
Secretary of State to jointly submit to the congressional 
defense committees, the Committee on Foreign Relations of the 
Senate, and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of 
Representatives a semiannual report on the political and 
military strategies to defeat the Islamic State of Iraq and the 
Levant (ISIL).
    Additionally, this section would require the Comptroller 
General of the United States to submit, not later than 180 days 
after the date of the enactment of this Act, a report that: (1) 
reviews the accountability measures taken by the Government of 
Iraq for assistance provided under the Iraq Train and Equip 
Fund, and (2) the financial management capacity and 
accountability of U.S. assistance with respect to recipients 
under such fund.
    The two reports required under this section would expire 3 
years after the date of the enactment of this Act.

         Subtitle D--Matters Relating to the Russian Federation


Section 1231--Limitation on Use of Funds To Approve or Otherwise Permit 
  Approval of Certain Requests by Russian Federation Under Open Skies 
                                 Treaty

    This section would limit the use of funds authorized by 
this Act, or any other Act, for fiscal year 2017 or any 
subsequent fiscal year for the approval of an initial or 
exhibition overflight, or a certification event, by the United 
States for the Russian Federation until a certification and 
report are provided to the specified congressional committees.
    The certification that would be required by this section 
would be a joint certification by the Secretary of Defense, the 
Secretary of State, the Secretary of Homeland Security, the 
Secretary of Energy, the Director of the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, the Director of National Intelligence (DNI), the 
Commander of U.S. Strategic Command, and, in the case of an 
overflight of the United States, the Commander of U.S. Northern 
Command, and, in the case of an overflight of another state 
party to the treaty, the Commander of U.S. European Command. 
The certification that would be required would be that the 
Russian Federation is taking no action inconsistent with the 
terms of the Open Skies Treaty (OST); is not exceeding the 
imagery limits set forth by that treaty; is allowing 
overflights of certain territories, including Kaliningrad; and 
that covered states party to the treaty have been notified and 
briefed on concerns of the Intelligence Community regarding 
upgraded sensors used under the Open Skies Treaty.
    The report that would be required by this section would 
include the mitigation costs of complying with the treaty; a 
plan to replace the Open Skies Treaty with a more robust 
sharing of commercial imagery; and an evaluation by the DNI on 
how the Russian Federation uses Open Skies flights in its 
intelligence collection posture.
    This section would require that, not later than 14 days 
after the completion of an observation flight over the United 
States, the Secretary of Defense, jointly with the Secretary of 
Energy, the Secretary of Homeland Security, the Director of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the Director of National 
Intelligence, shall notify the specified congressional 
committees, of the flight path of such Open Skies flight; an 
analysis of any U.S. critical infrastructure imaged during the 
flight; mitigation costs of the Department of Defense as a 
result of the flight; and an assessment of how the information 
collected during the flight fits into Russia's collection 
against the United States.
    This section would further limit funds authorized to be 
appropriated or otherwise made available by this Act or any 
other Act for fiscal year 2017 to carry out any activities to 
implement the Open Skies Treaty until a joint report is 
submitted to the specified congressional committees by the DNI 
and the Director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency 
(NGA) on providing enhanced access to U.S. commercial imagery 
and other information, and a report by the Secretary of State, 
in consultation with the Director of NGA and the Secretary of 
Defense on the costs of the Open Skies Treaty.

Section 1232--Military Response Options to Russian Federation Violation 
                             of INF Treaty

    This section would withhold $10.0 million from Department 
of Defense support functions to the Executive Office of the 
President until the Secretary of Defense submits to the 
appropriate congressional committees the plan required by 
section 1243(d)(1) of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92) for the development of 
military capabilities to respond to the violation of the Treaty 
on Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces by the Russian Federation 
and until the Secretary carries out the development of 
capabilities pursuant to such plan and requirement of the same 
section of Public Law 114-92.

  Section 1233--Limitation on Military Cooperation Between the United 
                   States and the Russian Federation

    This section would limit the use of fiscal year 2017 funds 
for bilateral military-to-military cooperation between the 
Governments of the United States and the Russian Federation 
until the Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the 
Secretary of State, provides a certification relating to 
certain actions by Russia to the appropriate congressional 
committees. This section would also allow the Secretary of 
Defense to waive the limitation under certain conditions.
    In effect, this section would extend, by 1 year, section 
1246 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2016 (Public Law 114-92). The committee notes that Russia 
continues to illegally occupy Crimea, to foster instability in 
Ukraine, and to maintain an aggressive posture towards its 
regional neighbors. Bilateral military-to-military cooperation 
is unwarranted so long as Russia continues its aggressive and 
intimidating behavior towards U.S. partners and allies in 
Europe.

Section 1234--Statement of Policy on United States Efforts in Europe To 
Reassure United States Partners and Allies and Deter Aggression by the 
                  Government of the Russian Federation

    This section would express a series of findings, including 
a citation that the Russian Federation presents the greatest 
threat to U.S. national security; recommendations from recent 
studies calling for increasing U.S. defense presence in Europe; 
and a summary of the funding for fiscal years 2015, 2016, and 
2017, for the European Reassurance Initiative. This section 
would also express a statement that it is the policy of the 
United States to reassure U.S. partners and allies in Europe 
and to deter aggression by the Government of the Russian 
Federation in order to enhance regional and global security and 
stability.

  Section 1235--Modification of Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative

    This section would amend section 1250 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92) to make conforming changes of a non-substantive nature.
    Elsewhere in this Act, the committee includes a provision 
that would authorize $150.0 million to carry out this authority 
in fiscal year 2017. The committee continues to be concerned 
that certain types of assistance are not being provided to the 
Ukrainian military and national security forces because they 
are considered dual-use in nature. For example, the committee 
is aware that the Government of Ukraine's request for sniper 
training was denied by the United States because it is 
considered offensive training. The committee believes that such 
a distinction is irrelevant for training focused on building 
basic soldier skills, and urges the U.S. Government to revisit 
this issue.
    The committee commends the men and women of the U.S. Armed 
Forces who have assisted in the training and equipping of the 
Ukrainian military and national security forces. The committee 
notes the persistent aggression of the Russian Federation in 
Ukraine to gain political influence and stature while 
attempting to weaken governmental institutions and leadership. 
The committee commends the citizens of Ukraine who continue to 
face threats from Russian-backed separatists in the Donbass 
region. The committee notes the continued need of the Ukrainian 
military and national security forces for training, equipment, 
and assistance to counter Russian-backed separatists.

    Section 1236--Prohibition on Availability of Funds Relating to 
           Sovereignty of the Russian Federation Over Crimea

    This section would prohibit the use of fiscal year 2017 
funds to implement any activity that recognizes the sovereignty 
of the Russian Federation over Crimea. The section would also 
allow the Secretary of Defense, in concurrence with the 
Secretary of State, to waive the prohibition if the Secretary 
certifies that doing so would be in the national security 
interest of the United States and submits a notification to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives, the Committee on Foreign Relations of the 
Senate, and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of 
Representatives.
    In effect, this section would extend, by 1 year, section 
1245 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2016 (Public Law 114-92).

    Section 1237--Modification and Extension of Report on Military 
                         Assistance to Ukraine

    This section would express a series of findings and the 
sense of Congress on Ukraine. This section would also modify 
section 1275 of the Carl Levin and Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public 
Law 113-291) to add a reporting element on a description of the 
Department of Defense assistance provided to Ukraine for the 
protection and monitoring of Ukraine's borders, to add the 
Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee 
on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives as report 
recipients, and to extend the report to December 31, 2019.

   Section 1238--Additional Matters in Annual Report on Military and 
         Security Developments Involving the Russian Federation

    This section would amend section 1245 of the Carl Levin and 
Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291), as most recently 
amended by section 1248(a) of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92), to 
require additional reporting elements examining the Russian 
Federation's foreign military deployments.

                       Subtitle E--Other Matters


Section 1241--Sense of Congress on Malign Activities of the Government 
                                of Iran

    This section would express certain findings and the sense 
of Congress on the malign activities of the Government of the 
Islamic Republic of Iran. The sense of Congress would include 
that the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) does not 
address the totality of the malign activities of the Government 
of Iran. Additionally, the section would state that the United 
States should increase its efforts to counter the continued 
expansion of Iran's malign activities in the Middle East; 
should ensure that it has robust, enduring military posture and 
capabilities forward deployed to deter Iranian aggression; and 
should strengthen ballistic missile defense capabilities and 
increase security assistance to partners and allies in the 
region.

 Section 1242--Modification of Annual Report on Military and Security 
         Developments Involving the People's Republic of China

    This section would amend section 1202 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2000 (Public Law 106-
65), which requires the Secretary of Defense to provide to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives, the Committee on Foreign Relations of the 
Senate, and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of 
Representatives an annual report on the military and security 
developments involving the People's Republic of China. The 
Secretary of Defense would be required to provide such report 
by January 31 of each year through January 31, 2021. 
Additionally, this section would require a summary of the order 
of battle of the People's Liberation Army as part of such 
report. This amendment would supersede section 1080 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92).

   Section 1243--Sense of Congress on Trilateral Cooperation Between 
               Japan, South Korea, and the United States

    This section would set forth certain findings and express 
the sense of Congress on trilateral defense cooperation between 
Japan, the Republic of Korea, and the United States. The sense 
of Congress would express that the United States should 
continue to support trilateral cooperation with Japan and South 
Korea. Additionally, the sense of Congress expresses support 
for defense cooperation between Japan and South Korea on the 
full range of issues related to the Democratic People's 
Republic of Korea, as well as non-proliferation, cyber 
security, maritime security, security technology and capability 
development, and other areas of security mutual benefit.

 Section 1244--Sense of Congress on Cooperation Between Singapore and 
                           the United States

    This section would express certain findings and the sense 
of Congress regarding cooperation between the United States and 
the Republic of Singapore, including the United States welcomes 
the enhanced Defense Cooperation Agreement with Singapore and 
should expand bilateral defense cooperation and support; the 
United States should continue efforts with Singapore to address 
transnational issues and strengthen regional and multilateral 
institutions; and the United States should improve joint 
interoperability and security collaboration with Singapore.

   Section 1245--Monitoring and Evaluation of Overseas Humanitarian, 
     Disaster, and Civic Aid Programs of the Department of Defense

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
use up to 5 percent of the amounts authorized to be 
appropriated by this Act for Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, 
and Civic Aid (OHDACA) for fiscal year 2017, to conduct 
monitoring and evaluation of the OHDACA programs of the 
Department of Defense. This section would also require the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the specified 
committees not later than 90 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act on mechanisms to evaluate OHDACA 
programs. This section is consistent with section 1205 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92).

  Section 1246--Enhancement of Interagency Support During Contingency 
                   Operations and Transition Periods

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense and 
the Secretary of State to enter into an agreement under which 
each Secretary may provide support, supplies, and services on a 
reimbursement basis, or by exchange of support, supplies, and 
services, to the other Secretary during a contingency operation 
and related transition period.
    The committee asserts that such an authority could decrease 
the current bureaucratic delays and inefficiencies associated 
with negotiating dozens of individual agreements to acquire or 
transfer such items as fuel, communications, biometrics data, 
blood supplies, and mortuary services, which has affected the 
timeliness of providing support to U.S. service members and 
diplomats serving in the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and 
the Republic of Iraq. The committee also notes that the 
Secretary of Defense, after consultation with the Secretary of 
State, is authorized to enter into an agreement with certain 
foreign countries and international organizations for the 
reciprocal exchange of support, supplies, and services, yet is 
limited in such reciprocal exchanges with the Secretary of 
State in contingency operations.
    This section would set a sunset date of December 31, 2018, 
to allow the committee to revisit the use and benefits of the 
authority. This section would also require a notification to 
specified committees, upon use of the authority, containing a 
copy of any written agreements entered into under this section 
and a description of the acquisitions and transfers of support, 
supplies, and services to enable congressional oversight.

 Section 1247--Two-Year Extension and Modification of Authorization of 
            Non-Conventional Assisted Recovery Capabilities

    This section would modify section 943 of the Duncan Hunter 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009 (Public 
Law 110-417), as most recently amended by section 1271 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92), to permit the recovery of individuals identified 
by the Secretary of Defense when a non-conventional assisted 
recovery capability is already in place. This section would 
also extend the authority through 2020.
    The committee reminds the Department that this authority 
constitutes a traditional military activity for personnel 
recovery and should not be interpreted as an intelligence 
activity. The committee notes that failure to use and report 
this authority accordingly will jeopardize future re-
authorizations.

 Section 1248--Authority To Destroy Certain Specified World War II-Era 
  United States-Origin Chemical Munitions Located on San Jose Island, 
                           Republic of Panama

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
destroy the eight U.S.-origin chemical munitions on San Jose 
Island, Republic of Panama. These munitions are remnants from 
research, development, and testing conducted jointly by an 
American, British, and Canadian effort during, and shortly 
after, World War II. By a letter dated May 8, 2013, the 
Republic of Panama formally requested U.S. assistance and 
limited its request to disposing of only these eight U.S.-
origin chemical munitions. This section also includes certain 
related conditions and a sunset date for the authorization.

  Section 1249--Strategy for United States Defense Interests in Africa

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report not later than 1 year after the date of the 
enactment of this Act to the congressional defense committees 
that contains a strategy for United States defense interests in 
Africa.
    The committee is concerned about the broad range of current 
and potential security challenges across the continent, 
including the deteriorating security situation in Libya and 
violence from terrorist organizations and their affiliates such 
as the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant in North Africa, 
Boko Haram in the Lake Chad region, Al Qaeda in the Islamic 
Maghreb in the western Sahel, and Al Shabaab in the Horn of 
Africa. Additionally, the committee is concerned that 
insufficient coordination between geographic combatant commands 
may hinder the unity of effort necessary to counter threats 
that cross combatant command boundaries. The committee believes 
that a comprehensive strategy for achieving the Department of 
Defense's objectives on the continent will better enable the 
Department to address and plan for these challenges.

     Section 1250--United States-Israel Directed Energy Cooperation

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
carry out research, development, test, and evaluation 
activities, on a joint basis with Israel, to establish directed 
energy capabilities to detect and defeat ballistic missiles, 
cruise missiles, and other threats to the United States, 
deployed U.S. forces, or Israel.
    The section would require a memorandum of agreement (MOA) 
between the U.S. and Israel regarding the sharing of research 
and development costs for directed energy capability to counter 
the aforementioned threats and that such MOA be provided to the 
specified congressional committees.
    This section would limit the authorization for such 
activities to not more than $25.0 million.
    The authority to carry out this section would expire on 
December 31, 2018.

  Section 1251--Sense of Congress on Support for Estonia, Latvia, and 
                               Lithuania

    This section would express the sense of Congress on U.S. 
support for the Republic of Estonia, the Republic of Latvia, 
and the Republic of Lithuania, including support for their 
sovereignty, concern over aggressive military actions of the 
Russian Federation against these nations, and encouragement for 
further defense cooperation between the United States and these 
nations.

         Section 1252--Sense of Congress on Support for Georgia

    This section would express the sense of Congress on U.S. 
support for Georgia's sovereignty and territorial integrity as 
well as support for continued cooperation between the United 
States and Georgia.

 Section 1253--Modification of Annual Report on Military Power of Iran

    This section would amend section 1245 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (Public Law 111-
84), by adding two reporting requirements to the Annual Report 
on the Military Power of Iran on: (1) Iran's cyber 
capabilities, and (2) Iranian military and security 
organizations responsible for detaining U.S. Armed Forces or 
interfering in U.S. military operations.

 Section 1254--Sense of Congress on Senior Military Exchanges Between 
                      the United States and Taiwan

    This section would express the sense of Congress that the 
Secretary of Defense should conduct a program of senior 
military exchanges between the United States and Taiwan.

   Section 1255--Quarterly Report on Freedom of Navigation Operations

    This section would amend chapter 3 of title 10, United 
States Code, by adding the requirement for the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a report on U.S. freedom of navigation 
operations to the congressional defense committees not later 
than 30 days after the end of each fiscal quarter. This 
reporting requirement would terminate on September 30, 2018.

  Subtitle F--Codification and Consolidation of Department of Defense 
                    Security Cooperation Authorities


   Section 1261--Enactment of New Chapter for Department of Defense 
Security Cooperation Authorities and Transfer of Certain Authorities to 
                              New Chapter

    This section would create a new chapter in title 10, United 
States Code, entitled ``Security Cooperation,'' and would 
transfer and codify, as appropriate, the following existing 
security cooperation-related provisions to this new chapter:
    (1) Section 1207 of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2010 (Public Law 111-84);
    (2) Section 1051b of title 10, United States Code;
    (3) Section 2010 of title 10, United States Code;
    (4) Section 127d of title 10, United States Code;
    (5) Section 2282 of title 10, United States Code;
    (6) Subsections (a) through (d) of section 1081 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 (Public 
Law 112-81);
    (7) Section 184 of title 10, United States Code;
    (8) Section 941(b) of the Duncan Hunter National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009 (Public Law 110-417);
    (9) Section 1065 of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 1997 (Public Law 104-201);
    (10) Section 1306 of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 1995 (Public Law 103-337);
    (11) Section 8073 of the Department of Defense 
Appropriations Act, 2003 (Public Law 107-248; 10 U.S.C. prec. 
2161 note);
    (12) Section 2166 of title 10, United States Code;
    (13) Section 2350m of title 10, United States Code;
    (14) Section 2249d of title 10, United States Code;
    (15) Chapter 905 of title 10, United States Code;
    (16) Section 9415 of title 10, United States Code;
    (17) Section 1268 of the Carl Levin and Howard P. ``Buck'' 
McKeon National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 
(Public Law 113-291);
    (18) Section 2249a of title 10, United States Code; and
    (19) Section 2249e of title 10, United States Code.
    Additionally, this section would extend the authority in 
section 273 of chapter 11, title 10, United States Code, as 
added by this section, to December 31, 2019.
    This section would also make conforming stylistic 
amendments, cross-reference amendments, and conforming repeals, 
as appropriate.

                TITLE XIII--COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION

                                OVERVIEW

    The budget request for the Department of Defense 
Cooperative Threat Reduction (CTR) program contained $325.6 
million for fiscal year 2017.
    The committee continues to support the goals of the CTR 
program, which are important for national security. The 
committee notes that the CTR Cooperative Biological Engagement 
Program now encompasses the majority of the CTR budget request, 
and is concerned that CTR is no longer focused on reducing 
nuclear threats.
    For this reason, the committee recommends certain 
reallocations of the budget request for CTR to emerging 
proliferation threats, such as Additive Manufacture (``3-D 
Printing''), elsewhere in this Act. The committee reaffirms its 
view that the CTR program as a whole should ``maintain a strong 
focus''' on the full range of threat reduction challenges.
    Lastly, the committee welcomes efforts by the Department of 
Defense to actively consult with the committee and to keep it 
fully informed of efforts and developments in these areas, 
though it notes there is room for improvement and recommends 
certain measures elsewhere in this Act to provide the committee 
with additional opportunity for oversight.
    The committee recommends $325.6 million, the amount of the 
budget request, for the CTR program.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


   Section 1301--Specification of Cooperative Threat Reduction Funds

    This section would define Cooperative Threat Reduction 
(CTR) programs and funds as those authorized to be appropriated 
in section 301 of this Act and made available by section 4301 
of this Act, and would specify that CTR funds shall remain 
available for obligation for 3 fiscal years.

                   Section 1302--Funding Allocations

    This section would allocate specific amounts for each 
program under the Department of Defense Cooperative Threat 
Reduction (CTR) Program from within the overall $325.6 million 
that the committee would authorize for the CTR Program. The 
allocation under this section reflects the amount of the budget 
request for fiscal year 2017.
    This section would also extend certain notification 
requirements, which would allow the committee to enhance its 
oversight of proposed CTR projects. Further, it would require a 
new determination as to whether other authorities are also 
available to the Secretary of Defense, and other Secretaries as 
applicable, and if they exist, an explanation for why the 
Secretaries were not able to use them for a specific proposed 
project.

   Section 1303--Limitation on Availability of Funds for Cooperative 
             Threat Reduction in People's Republic of China

    This section would require that the Secretary of Defense 
obligate and expend funds on Cooperative Threat Reduction (CTR) 
activities in the People's Republic of China on a quarterly 
basis.
    This section would further require that the Secretary of 
Defense not obligate or expend funds for CTR activities in 
China unless he has submitted to the specific congressional 
committees a certification regarding certain nonproliferation 
benchmarks (including the arrest of Li Fangwei, also known as 
``Karl Lee'') with respect to China.

                    TITLE XIV--OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                         Beryllium Metal Supply

    The committee notes the continuing importance of the 
strategic and critical material, beryllium, to national 
security. The committee understands that, starting in 2004, the 
Department of Defense took affirmative steps to invest in a 
domestic beryllium manufacturing facility in order to maintain 
security of supply, as well as the affordability of beryllium 
for defense systems. The committee encourages the Department to 
continue to take affirmative steps to maintain a secure 
domestic source of beryllium. The committee notes that several 
improvements currently available make the production of 
domestic beryllium more efficient and affordable, through the 
Defense Production Act and other means, which the Department 
should consider as part of this ongoing strategy.

      Clarification of Product Improvement Pilot Program Authority

    The committee notes that section 330 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008 (Public Law 110-
181) provided the Department of the Army, and subsequently 
section 323 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92) provided the Department of 
the Air Force and the Department of the Navy the authority to 
use working capital funds for procuring and installing 
components or subsystems that would improve the reliability and 
maintainability, extend the useful life, enhance safety, lower 
maintenance costs, or provide performance enhancement of weapon 
system platforms or major end items. The committee has learned, 
however, that some military departments are interpreting the 
language in paragraph (a) of section 330 of Public Law 110-181 
to mean ``except as stated in section 2208 of title 10, United 
States Code.'' The committee notes that the intent of the 
statute, as clearly indicated in the phrase ``Notwithstanding 
section 2208 of title 10, United States Code. . .'', is to 
waive the requirements of section 2208 to enable the execution 
of the pilot program established for certain product 
improvements. In light of this clarification, the committee 
directs the Secretary of each military department to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, not later 
than December 1, 2016, on which weapon system components or 
subsystems could be considered as candidates for the product 
improvement pilot programs authorized in section 330 of Public 
Law 110-181 and section 323 of Public Law 114-92.

        Defense Production Act Implications for Propeller Shafts

    The committee recognizes that of the Defense Production Act 
(DPA) Title III program provides the Department of Defense with 
a powerful tool to ensure the timely creation and availability 
of domestic production capabilities for technologies that have 
the potential for wide-ranging impact on the operational 
capabilities and technological superiority of U.S. defense 
systems. DPA Title III is unique in that it is the sole 
Department of Defense program focused on creating, maintaining, 
protecting, expanding, or restoring domestic production 
capacity to strengthen domestic industry and to establish the 
industrial base capacity for essential national defense 
capabilities. The committee supports the DPA Title III program 
and recognizes its importance to preserving key capabilities 
throughout the defense industrial base.
    The committee notes the importance of the segments of the 
defense industrial base where limited numbers of suppliers 
provide materiel that is critical to readiness of the force. 
The committee has been made aware that the industrial segment 
responsible for the manufacture and refurbishment of propeller 
shafts for the Navy's surface and submarine fleet faces 
considerable strain from high demand from Naval Supply Systems 
Command and Naval Sea Systems Command. The committee encourages 
the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and 
Logistics, as manager for the DPA Title III program, to ensure 
that this and other areas of the defense industrial base are 
maintained and enhanced.

               Destruction of Chemical Weapons Stockpile

    The committee is aware that recently the Program Executive 
Office (PEO) for Assembled Chemical Weapons Alternatives (ACWA) 
at the Pueblo Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant (PCAPP) 
successfully completed elimination of problematic chemical 
munitions deemed unsuitable for processing in the main plant. 
The committee is also aware that the PCAPP main plant 
operations are scheduled to begin this fiscal year at the U.S. 
Army Pueblo Chemical Depot, and systemization is underway at 
the Blue Grass Army Depot. The committee believes it is 
important to ensure that all chemical weapons stockpile 
destruction is completed by December 31, 2023, which is the 
congressionally mandated deadline. The committee encourages the 
PEO-ACWA to continue to evaluate options to accelerate the 
destruction schedules without sacrificing worker and public 
safety and security.

 Locality Pay at Department of Defense Working Capital Fund Facilities

    The committee is concerned that the implementation of the 
Department of Defense's policy on locality pay at Defense 
working capital fund facilities is having a negative impact on 
the rates charged at these facilities. The committee believes 
that by allowing working capital fund enterprises to spread the 
costs of locality pay increases over a number of years, a 
sufficient working capital fund accumulated operating result 
would be sustained, and thereby allow these institutions to 
provide valuable services at competitive rates. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to conduct a review 
of departmental policy and to provide a briefing on the 
findings of the review to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by October 31, 2016.

   Rare Earth Stockpile Acquisitions by the Defense Logistics Agency

    The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 
(Public Law 113-66) granted authority to the National Defense 
Stockpile Manager to acquire six materials for the National 
Defense Stockpile: ferroniobium, dysprosium metal, yttrium 
oxide, cadmium zinc tellurium substrate materials, lithium ion 
precursors, and triamino-trinitrobenzene, and insensitive high 
explosive molding powders. The committee is concerned about the 
manner in which this acquisition authority has been used for 
the procurement of yttrium oxide and dysprosium metal. 
Specifically, the awardee of the yttrium oxide acquisition has 
closed its mine in the United States. For dysprosium metal, no 
solicitation has been issued, even though the Administrator of 
Defense Logistics Agency--Strategic Materials (DLASM) issued 
requests for information for dysprosium metal and yttrium oxide 
less than a month apart.
    To better understand how DLASM intends to use this 
acquisition authority, the committee directs the Administrator 
of Defense Logistics Agency--Strategic Materials to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, not later 
than September 30, 2016, that addresses the following questions 
with respect to the yttrium oxide acquisition:
    (1) Where will this material be physically mined and 
refined?
    (2) If either of these process steps will occur outside of 
the United States or other allied nations, what is the DLASM's 
assessment of the risk associated with that acquisition?
    The briefing should also address the following questions 
with respect to the dysprosium metal acquisition:
    (1) Why has the dysprosium metal acquisition been delayed?
    (2) What additional information does DLASM require to issue 
a solicitation prior to the expiration of the acquisition 
authority for dysprosium in fiscal year 2019, to include the 
ability to store or rotate dysprosium metal stocks?
    (3) Has DLASM investigated storage mitigation options, such 
as a vendor-managed inventory or buffer stock?

   Successful Changes to Working Capital Fund Cash Management Policy

    The committee is encouraged by the work performed by the 
Department of Defense to develop a well-defined metric to 
identify lower and upper operational requirements for working 
capital fund cash balances rather than resorting to the 
arbitrary, outdated goal of maintaining 7 to 10 days of cash to 
sustain business operations. The previous metric could not 
respond to changes related to external pressures, such as 
fluctuations in commodity markets that are outside of the 
Department's control.
    The committee has directed the Department for several years 
to develop a metric that was not arbitrary, but more in line 
with true operational requirements. In the committee report (H. 
Rept. 111-166) accompanying the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2010, the committee directed the Secretary 
of Defense to provide a report examining a range of alternative 
cash-balance parameters by which the revolving funds could be 
managed to sustain a single rate or price to the customer 
throughout the fiscal year. Having found this report to be 
insufficient, the committee mandated a study in section 1402 of 
the Ike Skelton National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2011 (Public Law 111-383) requiring an independent review 
of each working capital fund within the Department to ascertain 
the appropriate cash corpus required to maintain good financial 
management of each fund. In the committee report (H. Rept. 112-
479) accompanying the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2013, the committee responded by recommending that 
the Department modify its Financial Management Regulations to 
adjust the range of the cash corpus required for fuel-related 
working capital funds to mitigate the continued fluctuation of 
rates charged to the customer during the fiscal year.
    The committee commended the Department in the committee 
report (H. Rept. 113-446) accompanying the Howard P. ``Buck'' 
McKeon National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 
for initiating processes to determine the correct cash corpus 
thresholds for each working capital fund, looking forward to 
future budget submissions with prices and rates set to maintain 
an adequate cash balance to absorb external pressures, thereby 
maintaining a steady, dependable rate for the customer 
throughout the fiscal year.
    In the fiscal year 2017 budget request, the new methodology 
developed by the Department consists of four elemental 
components: rate of disbursement, range of operation, risk 
mitigation, and reserves for future requirements. Through these 
four components, the committee believes the Department has 
developed a metric that can adjust to accommodate seasonality, 
known changes in the business environment, and unplanned events 
within the activities. Absorbing these fluctuations in market 
forces stabilizes prices for customers, most notably those 
funded through constrained operation and maintenance funds. 
Therefore, the committee commends the development of this new 
cash-management policy.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                     Subtitle A--Military Programs


                  Section 1401--Working Capital Funds

    This section would authorize appropriations for Defense 
Working Capital Funds at the levels identified in section 4501 
of division D of this Act.

              Section 1402--National Defense Sealift Fund

    This section would authorize appropriations for the 
National Defense Sealift Fund at the levels identified in 
section 4501 of this Act.

    Section 1403--Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, Defense

    This section would authorize appropriations for Chemical 
Agents and Munitions Destruction, Defense at the levels 
identified in section 4501 of division D of this Act.

 Section 1404--Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense-
                                  Wide

    This section would authorize appropriations for Drug 
Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense-Wide at the 
levels identified in section 4501 of division D of this Act.

                Section 1405--Defense Inspector General

    This section would authorize appropriations for the Office 
of the Inspector General at the levels identified in section 
4501 of division D of this Act.

                  Section 1406--Defense Health Program

    This section would authorize appropriations for the Defense 
Health Program at the levels identified in section 4501 of 
division D of this Act.

            Section 1407--National Sea-Based Deterrence Fund

    This section would authorize appropriations for the 
National Sea-Based Deterrence Fund at the levels identified in 
section 4501 of this Act.

                 Subtitle B--National Defense Stockpile


  Section 1411--Authority to Dispose of Certain Materials from and to 
    Acquire Additional Materials for the National Defense Stockpile

    This section would authorize certain disposals of materials 
from, and acquisition of materials for, the National Defense 
Stockpile under the Strategic and Critical Materials Stock 
Piling Act (50 U.S.C. 98d(b)).

 Section 1412--Revisions to the Strategic and Critical Materials Stock 
                               Piling Act

    This section would amend sections 4 and 15 of the Strategic 
and Critical Materials Stock Piling Act (50 U.S.C. 98c and 15 
U.S.C. 98h-6, respectively) to make certain clarifying 
amendments and to allow the Department of Defense to contract 
with facilities to recycle strategic and critical materials.

                       Subtitle C--Other Matters


 Section 1421--Authority for Transfer of Funds to Joint Department of 
 Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Facility Demonstration 
     Fund for Captain James A. Lovell Health Care Center, Illinois

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
transfer funds from the Defense Health Program to the Joint 
Department of Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs Medical 
Facility Demonstration Fund created by section 1704 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (Public 
Law 111-84).

    Section 1422--Authorization of Appropriations for Armed Forces 
                            Retirement Home

    This section would authorize $64.3 million to be 
appropriated for the operation of the Armed Forces Retirement 
Home during fiscal year 2017.

   TITLE XV--AUTHORIZATION OF ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR OVERSEAS 
                         CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


            Execution of Counterterrorism Partnerships Fund

    The Department of Defense provided a briefing to the 
committee that the Counterterrorism Partnerships Fund (CTPF) 
strategy contemplates extensive, long-term future efforts to 
build the capacity of partner nations in certain regions. The 
committee supports such efforts, but expects the Department to 
address the specific concerns outlined below in future CTPF 
reprogramming requests and other Building Partnership Capacity 
(BPC) authority notifications, as appropriate. Further, as part 
of future BPC proposals or briefings, the committee expects the 
Department to differentiate those projects intended solely to 
address short-term tactical needs (for example, training a unit 
to deploy on a peacekeeping operation) from those that are 
long-term (for example, assisting the Federal Republic of 
Somalia with the development of a national army).
    The committee is concerned that some of the nations 
described in past CTPF reprogramming requests lack the capacity 
to absorb and sustain some of the assistance contemplated. The 
Department should be prepared to provide assessments of the 
capacity of nations to absorb and sustain assistance as part of 
future CTPF reprogramming requests or BPC authority 
notifications. The committee is concerned about the ability of 
Somalia to absorb and employ the assistance provided by the 
United States effectively, as well as the ability of the 
Department, given the security environment in that region, to 
oversee how such assistance is maintained and used in the 
future. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than June 30, 2016, to update the committee 
on efforts to address these concerns. The committee further 
directs the Secretary to provide a second briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than December 31, 2016, 
on the same subject.
    Further, the committee expects that future CTPF 
reprogramming requests will include specific programs for 
defense institution building for nations that the United States 
intends to be part of any long-term effort. The committee also 
expects the Department to include as part of any such requests 
the specific activities being undertaken by other U.S. 
Government agencies, allied countries, and international 
organizations that are contributing to the capacity-building 
efforts of partner nations, especially in areas that relate to 
civilian control of security forces and the rule of law.
    The committee continues to expect that the Department will 
evaluate carefully the commitments of partner countries that 
receive assistance to principles of rule of law and human 
rights, especially as part of any long-term effort, and will be 
prepared to discuss these commitments as part of any future 
reprogramming request or notification of assistance.
    Finally, the committee notes that there are efforts within 
the Department to evaluate the estimated sustainment costs for 
proposed BPC assistance, as well as the sustainment costs for 
assistance already provided. The committee expects that such 
estimated costs will be provided as they are identified. This 
information is vital to evaluating any future changes to policy 
or authorities.
    Elsewhere in this Act, the committee would decrease funding 
for the CTPF.

         National Guard and Reserve Component Equipment Account

    The budget request for Overseas Contingency Operations 
contained no funding for a National Guard and Reserve Component 
equipment account. Elsewhere in this Act, the committee notes 
that the base budget request contained $3.0 billion for 
procurement of National Guard and Reserve Component equipment.
    Given the uncertainty of the current and projected fiscal 
environment, the availability of equipment needed to sustain 
and modernize the National Guard and Reserve Components as an 
operational reserve and for their domestic support missions 
remains a concern. The committee recognizes the National Guard 
and Reserve Components continue to report significant equipment 
shortages in modernized equipment and challenges associated 
with efficiently fulfilling combat readiness training 
requirements. For example, the committee notes there are 
significant modernization, capability, and training challenges 
associated with the current Air National Guard aircraft 
assigned to the Aerospace Control Alert mission, and those 
aircraft crews maintaining proficiency and readiness in other 
mission areas critical to full-spectrum combat readiness. The 
committee also notes the Army National Guard continues to 
experience modernization shortfalls in utility rotorcraft and 
heavy lift rotorcraft.
    The committee believes additional funds would help 
eliminate identified shortfalls in the areas of critical dual-
use equipment. The committee expects these funds to be used for 
the purposes of, but not limited to, the procurement of 
rotorcraft, avionic and radar upgrades for legacy strike 
fighter aircraft, wheeled and tracked combat vehicles, tactical 
wheeled vehicles, ammunition, small arms, tactical radios to 
include single channel ground and airborne radio systems, non-
system training devices, logistics automation systems, sense 
and avoid system upgrades for unmanned aerial systems, civil 
support communication systems, hail and warning escalation of 
force systems, out of band infrared pointer and illumination 
systems, near infrared aiming and illumination systems, 
crashworthy, ballistically tolerant auxiliary fuel systems, 
Engagement Skills Trainer II systems, F-16 distributed-
operations mission training centers, mobile ad hoc network 
emergency communications equipment, and other critical dual-
use, unfunded procurement items for the National Guard and 
Reserve Components.
    The committee recommends additional funding for a National 
Guard and Reserve Component equipment account within the 
Overseas Contingency Operations budget request. The committee 
also recommends $3.0 billion, the full amount of the base 
budget request, for National Guard and Reserve equipment.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations


   Section 1501--Purpose and Treatment of Certain Authorizations of 
                             Appropriations

    This section would establish the purpose of this title and 
make authorization of appropriations available upon enactment 
of this Act for the Department of Defense, in addition to 
amounts otherwise authorized in this Act, to provide for 
additional costs due to Overseas Contingency Operations and 
other additional funding requirements.

                       Section 1502--Procurement

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
Procurement at the levels identified in section 4102 and 
section 4103 of division D of this Act.

       Section 1503--Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation at the levels 
identified in section 4202 and section 4203 of division D of 
this Act.

                Section 1504--Operation and Maintenance

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
operation and maintenance programs at the levels identified in 
section 4302 and section 4303 of division D of this Act. 
Appropriations for operation and maintenance identified in 
section 4302 would be available for obligation until April 30, 
2017.

                    Section 1505--Military Personnel

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
military personnel at the levels identified in section 4402 and 
section 4403 of division D of this Act. Appropriations for 
military personnel identified in section 4402 would be 
available for obligation until April 30, 2017.

                  Section 1506--Working Capital Funds

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
Defense Working Capital Funds at the levels identified in 
section 4502 of division D of this Act. These appropriations 
for the Defense Working Capital Funds would be available for 
obligation until April 30, 2017.

 Section 1507--Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense-
                                  Wide

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
Drug Interdiction and Counterdrug Activities, Defense-Wide at 
the levels identified in section 4502 and section 4503 of 
division D of this Act.

                Section 1508--Defense Inspector General

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
the Office of the Inspector General at the levels identified in 
section 4502 of division D of this Act.

                  Section 1509--Defense Health Program

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
the Defense Health Program at the levels identified in section 
4502 of division D of this Act. These appropriations for the 
Defense Health Program would be available for obligation until 
April 30, 2017.

            Section 1510--Counterterrorism Partnerships Fund

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
the Counterterrorism Partnerships Fund (CTPF) at the level 
identified in division D of this Act.
    The budget request contained $1.00 billion in Overseas 
Contingency Operations for CTPF. The committee notes that the 
Carl Levin and Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291) 
authorized $1.30 billion for CTPF, and the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92) 
authorized an additional $750.0 million for this fund. The 
committee is encouraged by improvements in the Department of 
Defense's execution of CTPF, but remains concerned about the 
capacity of some partner nations to absorb the resources 
provided through the fund in a short period of time. Therefore, 
the committee recommends $750.0 million, a decrease of $250.0 
million, for CTPF.
    The committee is also concerned that the Department is 
developing, but does not yet have in place, an effective 
process to assess, monitor, and evaluate the outcomes of 
security cooperation activities, including assistance to 
partner countries. The committee intends to conduct close and 
thorough oversight of CTPF authorizations to ensure that the 
Department executes the funding effectively. Thus, elsewhere in 
this Act, the committee provides additional direction to the 
Department for the execution of CTPF.

                     Subtitle B--Financial Matters


          Section 1521--Treatment as Additional Authorizations

    This section would state that amounts authorized to be 
appropriated by this title are in addition to amounts otherwise 
authorized to be appropriated by this Act.

                Section 1522--Special Transfer Authority

    This section would authorize the transfer of up to $4.50 
billion of additional war-related funding authorizations in 
this title among the accounts in this title.

          Subtitle C--Limitations, Reports, and Other Matters


             Section 1531--Afghanistan Security Forces Fund

    This section would continue the existing limitation on the 
use of funds in the Afghanistan Security Forces Fund (ASFF), 
subject to certain conditions of section 1513 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008 (Public Law 110-
181), as amended by section 1531(b) of the Ike Skelton National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2011 (Public Law 111-
383), through December 31, 2017.
    Additionally, this section would require that, of the funds 
available in ASFF for fiscal year 2017, a $25.0 million goal 
would be set to support the recruitment, integration, 
retention, training, and treatment of women serving in the 
Afghan National Defense and Security Forces, as well as the 
recruitment, training, and contracting of female security 
personnel for future elections in the Islamic Republic of 
Afghanistan. The Department's efforts to meet this goal should 
emphasize programs and activities that promote the integration 
of Afghan women into the Afghan National Defense and Security 
Forces' (ANDSF) organizational culture, professional 
development, and opportunities for advancement. The committee 
notes that in recent years there has significant investment 
into infrastructure for Afghan women serving in the ANDSF.
    Finally, this section would modify the requirement for the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a quarterly report to the 
congressional defense committees that summarizes the details of 
any obligation or transfer of ASFF funds, changes the frequency 
of such reporting requirement to a semi-annual basis, extends 
such report through January 31, 2021, and makes other 
conforming changes. Such report should also address the steps 
taken to increase fraud prevention, transparency, and 
accountability.

      Section 1532--Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Fund

    This section would modify subsection 1532(a) of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92) by extending the use and transfer authority for the 
Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Fund to fiscal year 
2017. This section would also modify section 1532(c) of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (Public 
Law 112-239) by expanding the foreign governments to whom 
assistance may be provided in order to counter the flow of 
improvised explosive device precursor chemicals. Finally, this 
section would extend the authority for interdiction of 
improvised explosive device precursor chemicals to December 31, 
2017.

Section 1533--Extension of Authority to Use Joint Improvised Explosive 
 Device Defeat Fund for Training of Foreign Security Forces to Defeat 
                      Improvised Explosive Devices

    This section would modify section 1533(e) of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92) by extending the Authority to Use the Joint Improvised 
Explosive Device Defeat Fund for Training of Foreign Security 
Forces to Defeat Improvised Explosive Devices and precursor 
chemicals from September 30, 2018, to September 30, 2020.

     TITLE XVI--STRATEGIC PROGRAMS, CYBER, AND INTELLIGENCE MATTERS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


             Accrediting Models for Missile Defense Testing

    The committee notes that the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) 
sometimes uses element models, developed both by MDA and the 
military services, during ground tests that have not been fully 
accredited; full accreditation could improve the reliability of 
test results.
    The committee notes that the majority of element models 
used during ground tests to support delivery of phase 2 of the 
European Phased Adaptive Approach were not accredited, and the 
models for Aegis Ashore and the ship-based Aegis ballistic 
missile defense weapon systems were not accredited, but have 
proven to be successful missile defense capabilities.
    The committee is aware that MDA, the services, and the 
Office of Operational Test and Evaluation have been working 
together to accredit the models used in ground tests to support 
operational testing. The committee supports these efforts, and 
directs the Director of the Missile Defense Agency, in 
coordination with the military services and the Director of the 
Office of Operational Test and Evaluation, to provide a 
briefing to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives not later than December 1, 2016, 
on the status of these efforts and the expected timeline for 
accrediting these models to enhance missile defense operational 
testing and reliability, the cost, and any technical 
limitations or operational considerations that may be 
encountered.

                    Air Force Global Strike Command

    Following the establishment of Air Force Global Strike 
Command (AFGSC) in 2009, the Air Force has taken limited steps 
to consolidate and focus attention on the Air Force's nuclear 
mission through this major command. Last year's installation of 
a four-star general officer as commander has undoubtedly led to 
increased stature within the organizational structure of the 
Air Force, but the committee believes further consolidation of 
functions is required. Elsewhere in this title, the committee 
includes a provision that would consolidate certain nuclear 
command and control and missile warning capabilities within 
AFGSC.
    As part of this consolidation and focus, the committee also 
believes AFGSC must be provided the appropriate resources and 
manpower required to effectively plan and execute its mission. 
Balancing priorities across the service, the committee expects 
the Air Force to program funding and personnel commensurate 
with the command's mission and needs.

 Analytic Line Review of U.S. Central Command Intelligence Assessments

    The committee notes that on October 21, 2015, the House 
Committee on Armed Services, the House Permanent Select 
Committee on Intelligence, and the House Appropriations 
Subcommittee on Defense requested that the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Intelligence, the Director of the Defense 
Intelligence Agency, and the Commander of U.S. Central Command 
conduct an analytic line review of U.S. Central Command 
intelligence assessments. The Department has not yet undertaken 
that request. In response, the aforementioned committees 
subsequently requested again on January 7, 2016, and April 11, 
2016, that an analytic line review be undertaken.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Intelligence, in coordination with the Director of 
the Defense Intelligence Agency and the Commander of U.S. 
Central Command, to conduct the analytic line review as 
described in the classified annex to this report, and to 
provide a written report on the review to the congressional 
defense committees and the congressional intelligence 
committees not later than July 1, 2016.

              Army Small Satellite Technology Development

    The committee supports the activities of the U.S. Army 
Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command 
(USASMDC/ARSTRAT) to develop experimental capabilities which 
would assist the ground warfighter's exploitation of space 
capabilities. USASMDC/ARSTRAT is working to demonstrate 
capabilities and identify key technology maturation 
requirements to meet the Army's demands for enhanced 
intelligence, reconnaissance, surveillance, communications, 
target acquisition, position/navigation, missile warning, 
ground-to-space surveillance, and command and control 
capabilities. The committee recognizes the innovation and 
progress regarding small satellite technologies and 
capabilities. Therefore, in order to leverage this advancing 
technology and address the rapidly emerging threat, the 
committee encourages the Secretary of the Army to prioritize 
and accelerate the technology development and on-orbit testing 
of militarily relevant small tactical satellites in support of 
warfighter requirements.

   Assessment of Department of Defense Efforts To Secure Internet of 
                                 Things

    The proliferation of embedded computing systems within the 
Department of Defense has provided significant capabilities 
that have enabled battlefield superiority, created realistic 
training environments, facilitated the tracking of supplies and 
equipment, improved health care provided to wounded soldiers, 
and provided common operating pictures to support command and 
control decisions. However, as these and future capabilities 
become more connected to the Internet, the success, security, 
and resilience of the Department's missions, personnel, and 
capabilities could become jeopardized. For example, the same 
systems that allow commanders to provide command and control or 
have situational awareness of troop movement from remote 
locations could be used by enemies or other bad actors to 
identify, track, and even misdirect U.S. and allied forces. 
Further, while the Department tries to mitigate Internet-based 
threats that could emanate from or use Department of Defense 
networks, the Department may remain vulnerable based on the 
reliance on non-defense networks, such as those from defense 
industrial base partners or allies. Those systems may collect 
and store critical information the Department is reliant on, 
and thus weaknesses in the security of those systems may have 
inadvertent impacts on Department of Defense data and networks.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to assess the Department of Defense's 
planning and management for the security impact and challenges 
that the Internet of Things will present to the Department. The 
committee directs the Comptroller General to provide a report 
on the findings to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives. The Comptroller 
General should provide a briefing on preliminary results to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2017, with the 
report to follow on a date agreed to at the time of the 
briefing. The assessment should address the following:
    (1) To what extent does the Department have situational 
awareness of the extent to which its current capabilities are 
exposed to Internet-based threats and the vulnerabilities that 
could result; and what actions, if any, is the Department 
taking to mitigate these threats?
    (2) To what extent does the Department have policies and 
plans in place to monitor, track, report, and manage incidents 
where the Department's Internet-based capabilities are accessed 
or manipulated?
    (3) To what extent has the Department taken action to 
manage the security of Internet-based capabilities being 
procured by Department of Defense components?
    (4) Any other matters the Comptroller General determines 
are relevant.

          Assessment of Hardening Technologies for Microgrids

    The committee is aware of the increasing development and 
use of microgrids on Department of Defense installations in an 
effort to provide better isolation capabilities from failures 
to the public electrical grid, but also to integrate other 
sources of energy to make bases more secure in the event of 
long-term power outages. The committee is also aware that the 
Department recently completed a Joint Concept Technology 
Demonstration (JCTD), called ``Smart Power Infrastructure 
Demonstration for Energy Reliability and Security (SPIDERS), to 
demonstrate how to integrate cybersecurity, energy efficiency, 
and energy storage technologies into a common architecture for 
military installations. However, the committee does not believe 
that this demonstration looked at how to integrate technologies 
to harden against electromagnetic pulse (EMP) from high-
altitude nuclear burst or space weather. The committee remains 
concerned that EMP effects could have potentially catastrophic 
effects against an electrical grid, and the effects against 
such new technology as microgrids is not currently quantified.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by January 
20, 2017, assessing the capabilities and needs for EMP 
hardening Department of Defense microgrids. This briefing 
should include an overview of the results of the SPIDERS JCTD, 
including any technologies that that demonstration considered 
that would improve EMP hardening. The briefing should also 
assess the three locations used in the demonstration to 
identify what kinds of hardening technologies might be 
incorporated into their architectures, as well as an estimate 
of the projected costs in hardening those sites.

           Asset Tracking for Information Technology Security

    The committee recognizes that the Department of Defense 
needs a comprehensive asset management system with continuous 
remediation across all layers of the open systems 
interconnection model in order to achieve and maintain security 
over the Department's information technology systems. Section 
935 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2014 (Public Law 113-66) directed the Department to provide a