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114th Congress  }                                     {   Report
                   HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 
2d Session      }                                     {  114-577
                                                       
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     



            DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2017

                               ----------                              

                              R E P O R T

                                 of the

                      COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [TO ACCOMPANY H.R. 5293]




  May 19, 2016.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed
              
              
              
              
              
              
            DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2017
            
            
            
            
            
            
            
            
114th Congress  }                                             {   Report
                     HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES         
2d Session      }                                             {  114-577
                                                              
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     



            DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2017

                               __________

                              R E P O R T

                                 of the

                      COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [TO ACCOMPANY H.R. 5293]
                        





  May 19, 2016.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed
              
              
                          ____________________
              
                   U.S. GOVERNMENT PUBLISHING OFFICE
                  
 20-161 PDF                 WASHINGTON : 2016       
 
 
                            
              
              
              
              
                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Bill Totals......................................................     1
Committee Budget Review Process..................................     3
Introduction.....................................................     3
Definition of Program, Project, and Activity.....................     4
Funding Increases................................................     4
Committee Recommendations by Major Category......................     4
  Active, Reserve, and National Guard Military Personnel.........     4
  Operation and Maintenance......................................     5
  Procurement....................................................     5
  Research, Development, Test and Evaluation.....................     6
  Defense Health Program.........................................     7
Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism 
  Requirements...................................................     7
Classified Programs..............................................     7
Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism..........     7
Countering Russian Aggression in the Arctic......................     9
Readiness........................................................     9
Cost of Nuclear Modernization....................................    10
Israeli Missile Defense Programs.................................    10
Recognition of Women's Service in the Armed Forces...............    11
Cyberspace Operations............................................    11
TITLE I. MILITARY PERSONNEL......................................    15
  Military Personnel Overview....................................    17
    Summary of End Strength......................................    17
    Overall Active End Strength..................................    17
    Overall Selected Reserve End Strength........................    17
    Full-Time Support Strengths..................................    18
    Reprogramming Guidance for Military Personnel Accounts.......    19
    Military Personnel Special Interest Items....................    19
    Alternative Learning for Military Dependents.................    19
    Maternity Care...............................................    20
    Suicide Prevention...........................................    20
    Minority Outreach and Officer Accessions.....................    20
    Cultural Sensitivity Training................................    20
    Foreign Language Training....................................    21
  Military Personnel, Army.......................................    21
  Military Personnel, Navy.......................................    25
  Military Personnel, Marine Corps...............................    29
  Military Personnel, Air Force..................................    33
  Reserve Personnel, Army........................................    37
  Reserve Personnel, Navy........................................    40
  Reserve Personnel, Marine Corps................................    43
  Reserve Personnel, Air Force...................................    46
  National Guard Personnel, Army.................................    49
  National Guard Personnel, Air Force............................    52
TITLE II. OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE..............................    55
    Reprogramming Guidance for Operation and Maintenance Accounts    57
    Operation and Maintenance Special Interest Items.............    58
    Operation and Maintenance Military Intelligence Program 
      Budget Justification Material..............................    58
    Military Uniforms............................................    59
    Cyberspace Operations........................................    59
    Army, Army National Guard, and Army Reserve Cyberspace 
      Operations.................................................    59
    Information Technology Workforce Certification...............    61
    Cloud Computing..............................................    61
    Quality of Life Programs.....................................    61
    African Americans Buried at the Normandy American Cemetery...    62
  Operation and Maintenance, Army................................    62
    Depot Maintenance--Productivity Enhancement Program..........    68
  Operation and Maintenance, Navy................................    68
    Readiness Cost Assessment Tool...............................    75
    Expeditionary Medical Facilities.............................    75
  Operation and Maintenance, Marine Corps........................    75
    Townsend Bombing Range.......................................    79
  Operation and Maintenance, Air Force...........................    79
    Air Education and Training Command Facilities................    84
    Offutt Air Force Base........................................    84
  Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide........................    84
    Background Investigation Systems.............................    89
    Security Clearance Determinations............................    89
    Base Security and Access Control Systems.....................    89
    Performance-Based Logistics..................................    90
    Meals Ready-To-Eat War Reserve...............................    90
    Defense Logistics Agency and the Federal Prison Industry 
      Mission....................................................    90
    Improving Asset Tracking and In-Transit Visibility...........    90
    Department of Defense Education Activity.....................    91
    Public Schools on Department of Defense Installations........    91
    Pilot Program to Assist Members of the Armed Forces..........    91
    Social Media Analytical Cell.................................    92
    Child Abuse and Neglect......................................    92
  Operation and Maintenance, Army Reserve........................    92
  Operation and Maintenance, Navy Reserve........................    95
  Operation and Maintenance, Marine Corps Reserve................    98
  Operation and Maintenance, Air Force Reserve...................   101
    Air Force Reserve Specialized Missions.......................   104
  Operation and Maintenance, Army National Guard.................   104
  Operation and Maintenance, Air National Guard..................   107
  United States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces............   110
  Environmental Restoration, Army................................   110
  Environmental Restoration, Navy................................   110
    Vieques and Culebra Environmental Restoration................   110
  Environmental Restoration, Air Force...........................   110
  Environmental Restoration, Defense-Wide........................   111
  Environmental Restoration, Formerly Used Defense Sites.........   111
  Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid.................   111
  Cooperative Threat Reduction Account...........................   111
TITLE III. PROCUREMENT...........................................   113
    Reprogramming Guidance for Acquisition Accounts..............   115
    Procurement Special Interest Items...........................   115
    Funding Increases............................................   115
    Classified Annex.............................................   115
  Aircraft Procurement, Army.....................................   115
  Missile Procurement, Army......................................   120
  Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles, Army.......   123
  Procurement of Ammunition, Army................................   127
    Ammunition Production Base Support...........................   130
  Other Procurement, Army........................................   130
    Combat Support Hospital Infrastructure.......................   139
    Tactical Auditory Protection Systems.........................   139
  Aircraft Procurement, Navy.....................................   139
    Navy Reserve Combat Aircraft.................................   146
  Weapons Procurement, Navy......................................   146
  Procurement of Ammunition, Navy and Marine Corps...............   150
    Improved Munitions on Naval Surface Combatants...............   153
  Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy..............................   153
    Cruiser Modernization........................................   156
  Other Procurement, Navy........................................   156
  Procurement, Marine Corps......................................   167
  Aircraft Procurement, Air Force................................   173
    MQ-9 Fleet Size..............................................   179
  Missile Procurement, Air Force.................................   179
  Space Procurement, Air Force...................................   182
  Procurement of Ammunition, Air Force...........................   185
  Other Procurement, Air Force...................................   188
  Procurement, Defense-Wide......................................   193
    SM-3 Block IB and IIA Inventories............................   198
  Defense Production Act.........................................   198
    Domestic Supply of Beryllium.................................   198
TITLE IV. RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION.............   199
    Reprogramming Guidance for Acquisition Accounts..............   201
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Special Interest 
      Items......................................................   201
    Funding Increases............................................   201
    Classified Annex.............................................   201
    Joint Strike Fighter Follow-On Development...................   201
    Joint Strike Fighter Autonomic Logistics Information System..   202
    Joint Strike Fighter Test Aircraft...........................   202
  Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Army...............   203
    Warfighter Lethality.........................................   215
    Technology Advancement and Retention Center..................   215
    Army Net Zero Industrial Base Technology Program.............   215
    Environmental Control Units..................................   215
    Advanced Lightweight Multifunctional Transparent Armor.......   216
    Multi-Role Armament Systems..................................   216
    Access to Contested Areas....................................   216
    Subterranean and Dense Urban Complex Environment.............   216
    Advanced Energetics..........................................   216
    Directed Energy Armament Systems.............................   217
    Improved Turbine Engine Program..............................   217
    Active Response to Underbody Explosions......................   217
    Ballistic Resistant Adaptive Seating System..................   217
    Technologies to Delay Ripening...............................   217
    Materials and Metals Processing Science and Engineering......   218
    Lightweight Combat Vehicle Components........................   218
    Silicon Carbide Power Electronics............................   218
    Protected Satellite Communications Capability................   218
    Advanced Multi-Purpose Vehicle...............................   219
    Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratories..............   219
  Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy...............   219
    Condition-Based Maintenance for Navy Ships...................   235
    Navy Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Development.....................   235
    Marine Corps Performance and Resiliency Program..............   235
    Coastal Environmental Research...............................   235
    Active Protection Systems for Marine Corps Vehicles..........   235
  Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Air Force..........   236
    Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System 
      Recapitalization...........................................   249
    Presidential Aircraft Replacement............................   249
    Improved Global Positioning System Receivers.................   249
    Space Based Infrared System..................................   250
    Satellite Communications.....................................   250
    Weather Satellite Follow-On..................................   250
    Antenna Research.............................................   251
  Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Defense-Wide.......   251
    Manufacturing Innovation Institute for High Temperature 
      Superconductors............................................   263
    United States-Israeli Anti-Tunneling Technology..............   263
    National Security Education Program..........................   263
    Access to Trusted Microelectronics...........................   263
    High Energy Lasers...........................................   264
    STEM Improvement within Historically Black Colleges and 
      Universities and Minority Serving Institutions.............   264
  Operational Test and Evaluation, Defense.......................   264
TITLE V. REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS..........................   267
  Defense Working Capital Funds..................................   267
TITLE VI. OTHER DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PROGRAMS...................   269
  Defense Health Program.........................................   269
    Reprogramming Guidance for the Defense Health Program........   273
    Carryover....................................................   273
    Peer-Reviewed Cancer Research Programs.......................   273
    Peer-Reviewed Breast Cancer Research Program.................   274
    Metastatic Cancer Research...................................   274
    Joint Warfighter Medical Research Program....................   275
    Electronic Health Records....................................   275
    Mental Health of Military Dependents.........................   275
    The Cancer Center at Walter Reed National Military Medical 
      Center.....................................................   276
    Emerging Infectious Diseases.................................   276
    Multi-Disciplinary Brain Research............................   276
    Impact of Gut Microbiome on Chronic Conditions...............   277
    Combat Ocular Trauma.........................................   277
    Expanded Canine Therapy Research.............................   277
    Water Safety on Military Bases...............................   277
    Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy....................................   278
    Applied Biomedical Technology................................   278
    Service Records Loss through Fire............................   278
    Burn Patient Transfer System.................................   279
    Thermal Injury Protection Systems............................   279
    Existing Research Needs......................................   279
    HIV Testing..................................................   279
    Opioid Abuse in the Military.................................   280
    Advanced Orthopedic Surgical Training........................   280
  Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, Defense.............   280
  Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense.........   281
  Joint Urgent Operational Needs Fund............................   281
  Office of the Inspector General................................   281
TITLE VII. RELATED AGENCIES......................................   283
  National and Military Intelligence Programs....................   283
    Classified Annex.............................................   283
  Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and Disability System 
    Fund.........................................................   283
  Intelligence Community Management Account......................   283
    Wildlife Trafficking.........................................   284
TITLE VIII. GENERAL PROVISIONS...................................   284
TITLE IX. OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS/GLOBAL WAR ON TERRORISM   295
  Committee Recommendation.......................................   295
  Reporting Requirements.........................................   295
  Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Fund............   295
  Southeast Asia.................................................   296
  Military Personnel.............................................   297
  Operation and Maintenance......................................   304
    Assistance to Ukraine........................................   318
  Counterterrorism Partnerships Fund.............................   318
    Direct Funding to the Kurdistan Regional Government..........   318
  Afghanistan Security Forces Fund...............................   318
    Women in the Afghan National Security Forces.................   318
  Counter-Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant Train and Equip 
    Fund.........................................................   318
  Procurement....................................................   318
    National Guard and Reserve Equipment.........................   334
    Virtual Training and Simulation..............................   334
  Research, Development, Test and Evaluation.....................   334
    Navy Underwater Test Ranges..................................   339
  Revolving and Management Funds.................................   339
    Defense Working Capital Funds................................   339
  Other Department of Defense Programs...........................   339
    Defense Health Program.......................................   339
    Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense.......   340
    Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Fund................   340
    Office of the Inspector General..............................   340
  General Provisions.............................................   340
TITLE X..........................................................   343
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES REPORTING REQUIREMENTS..................   343
  Statement of General Performance Goals and Objectives..........   343
  Rescissions....................................................   343
  Transfer of Funds..............................................   344
  Earmark Disclosure Statement...................................   346
  Compliance with Rule XIII, CL. 3(e) (Ramseyer Rule)............   346
  Changes in the Application of Existing Law.....................   346
  Appropriations not Authorized by Law...........................   359
  Comparison with the Budget Resolution..........................   360
  Five-Year Outlay Projections...................................   360
  Financial Assistance to State and Local Governments............   360
  Program Duplication............................................   360
  Directed Rule Making...........................................   361
  Full Committee Votes...........................................   361
  Additional Views...............................................   391
  
  
  
  
  
  
114th Congress   }                                           {    Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session      }                                           {   114-577

======================================================================



 
            DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2017

                                _______
                                

  May 19, 2016.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Frelinghuysen, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 5293]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for the Department of Defense, and for other 
purposes, for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2017.

                              BILL TOTALS

    Appropriations for most military functions of the 
Department of Defense are provided for in the accompanying bill 
for fiscal year 2017. This bill does not provide appropriations 
for military construction, military family housing, civil 
defense, and military nuclear warheads, for which requirements 
are considered in connection with other appropriations Acts.
    The President's fiscal year 2017 budget request for 
activities funded in the Department of Defense Appropriations 
Act totals $576,856,382,000 in new budget obligational 
authority.


                    COMMITTEE BUDGET REVIEW PROCESS

    During its review of the fiscal year 2017 budget request 
and execution of appropriations for fiscal year 2016, the 
Subcommittee on Defense held a total of eleven hearings and six 
formal briefings during the period of February 2016 to April 
2016. Testimony received by the Subcommittee totaled 950 pages 
of transcript. Hearings were held in open session, except when 
the security classification of the material to be discussed 
presented no alternative but to conduct those hearings in 
executive or closed session.

                              INTRODUCTION

    The Committee recommendation for the fiscal year 2017 
Department of Defense base budget is $517,130,000,000, which is 
a decrease of $586,831,000 below the budget request. The 
Committee recommendation for overseas contingency operations/
global war on terrorism is $58,626,000,000, which is an 
increase of $449,000 above the budget request.
    To reach the reduced base allocation, the Subcommittee has 
reviewed in detail the budget request and found areas and 
programs where reductions are possible without adversely 
impacting the warfighter or modernization and readiness 
efforts. Examples of such reductions include: programs that 
have been terminated or restructured since the budget was 
submitted, savings from favorable contract pricing adjustments, 
contract or schedule delays resulting in fiscal year 2017 
savings, unjustified cost increases or funding requested ahead 
of need, anticipated or historical underexecution, rescissions 
of unneeded prior year funds, and reductions that are 
authorized in the National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal 
year 2017.
    In spite of recent force reductions, missions and 
operations tempo have increased. Simultaneously, funding cuts 
as a result of sequestration have forced the Services to choose 
between addressing readiness needs and funding other essential 
programs. Consequently, neither is properly funded. At the same 
time, strategic peers and adversaries continue to modernize 
their equipment and technology, eroding the technological and 
strategic advantages that have provided United States troops 
with decisive superiority when they enter battle. This erosion 
directly threatens the global stability which has prevented 
widespread conflicts since World War II.
    To address these concerns, the Committee has moved funds 
from overseas contingency operations/global war on terrorism 
(OCO/GWOT) requirements to invest in readiness and equipment 
modernization, and ensure all servicemembers are properly 
prepared and equipped for battle. The Committee has provided 
funding to fully support OCO/GWOT requirements for warfighters 
until the end of April 2017. Additional OCO/GWOT funding will 
be required in calendar year 2017 to support ongoing 
operations.
    Funding above the President's request to support readiness 
and equipment needs across the Services and the defense 
agencies includes $1,648,895,000 for facilities sustainment, 
restoration, and modernization; $6,383,235,000 for operation 
and maintenance and general readiness requirements; and 
$9,569,556,000 for equipment recapitalization and 
modernization.
    The Committee is also concerned that the cuts to end 
strength in recent years have eroded morale, readiness, and 
strategic superiority. The draw down of end strength that was 
put in motion five years ago did not account for the current 
global uncertainty and instability of adversaries. Simply put, 
the budget request for end strength in fiscal year 2017 does 
not address the evolving threats that exist today. The 
Committee recommendation provides an additional $2,989,012,000 
in the military personnel and operation and maintenance 
accounts to restore end strength to an appropriate level.

              DEFINITION OF PROGRAM, PROJECT, AND ACTIVITY

    For the purposes of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
Deficit Control Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-177), as amended by 
the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Reaffirmation 
Act of 1987 (Public Law 100-119), and by the Budget Enforcement 
Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-508), the terms ``program, project, 
and activity'' for appropriations contained in this Act shall 
be defined as the most specific level of budget items 
identified in the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 
2017, the related classified annexes and Committee reports, and 
P-1 and R-1 budget justification documents as subsequently 
modified by congressional action.
    The following exception to the above definition shall 
apply: the military personnel and the operation and maintenance 
accounts, for which the term ``program, project, and activity'' 
is defined as the appropriations accounts contained in the 
Department of Defense Appropriations Act.
    At the time the President submits the budget request for 
fiscal year 2018, the Secretary of Defense is directed to 
transmit to the congressional defense committees budget 
justification documents to be known as the ``M-1'' and ``O-1'' 
which shall identify, at the budget activity, activity group, 
and sub-activity group level, the amounts requested by the 
President to be appropriated to the Department of Defense for 
military personnel and operation and maintenance in any budget 
request, or amended budget request, for fiscal year 2018.

                           FUNDING INCREASES

    The Committee directs that the funding increases outlined 
in the tables for each appropriation account shall be provided 
only for the specific purposes indicated in the tables.

              COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS BY MAJOR CATEGORY

         ACTIVE, RESERVE, AND NATIONAL GUARD MILITARY PERSONNEL

    In title I of the bill, the Committee recommends a total of 
$128,168,468,000 for active, reserve, and National Guard 
military personnel, a decrease of $733,864,000 below the budget 
request, and a decrease of $1,060,190,000 below the fiscal year 
2016 enacted level. The Committee recommendation provides 
funding to increase basic pay for all military personnel by 2.1 
percent, as authorized by current law, effective January 1, 
2017. The recommendation provides the resources required for an 
additional 28,715 active forces and 25,000 Selected Reserve 
forces above the requested end strength levels in order to meet 
operational needs in fiscal year 2017.

                       OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

    In title II of the bill, the Committee recommends a total 
of $173,680,060,000 for operation and maintenance support to 
the military Services and other Department of Defense entities, 
an increase of $2,361,572,000 above the budget request, and an 
increase of $6,194,890,000 above the fiscal year 2016 enacted 
level. The recommended levels will robustly fund operational 
training programs in fiscal year 2017. Requests for unit and 
depot-level maintenance, facilities sustainment, restoration 
and modernization, and base operations support program funding 
have been fully supported.

                              PROCUREMENT

    In title III of the bill, the Committee recommends a total 
of $104,200,570,000 for procurement. In title IX of the bill, 
the Committee recommends a total of $7,277,843,000 for 
additional base requirements.
    Major initiatives and modifications include:
    $881,124,000 for the remanufacture of 52 AH-64 Apache 
helicopters;
    $374,210,000 for the procurement of ten AH-64 Apache 
helicopters; an increase of $374,210,000 and ten helicopters 
above the President's request;
    $1,195,346,000 for the procurement of 72 UH-60 Blackhawk 
helicopters; an increase of $440,200,000 and 36 helicopters 
above the President's request;
    $688,857,000 for the procurement of 27 CH-47 Chinook 
helicopters;
    $423,201,000 for the procurement of 85 MSE missiles for the 
Patriot missile system;
    $541,598,000 for the procurement of WIN-T Ground Forces 
Tactical Networks;
    $131,000,000 for the procurement of 20 UH-72A Lakota 
helicopters;
    $439,831,000 for the procurement of 123 Stryker vehicle 
upgrades;
    $250,388,000 for the procurement of 12 MQ-1 Gray Eagle 
unmanned aerial vehicles;
    $1,200,000,000 for the procurement of 14 F/A-18E/F Super 
Hornet aircraft, an increase of $1,200,000,000 and 14 aircraft 
above the President's request;
    $1,821,245,000 for the procurement of 11 P-8A Poseidon 
multi-mission aircraft;
    $805,682,000 for the procurement of 26 UH-1Y/AH-1Z 
helicopters, an increase of two aircraft above the President's 
request;
    $8,318,512,000 for the procurement of 74 F-35 Lightning 
aircraft, an increase of $988,200,000 and 11 aircraft above the 
President's request: 18 short take-off and vertical landing 
variants for the Marine Corps, eight carrier variants for the 
Navy, and 48 conventional variants for the Air Force;
    $21,570,824,000 for the procurement of 15 Navy ships, 
including two DDG-51 guided missile destroyers, two fully 
funded SSN-774 attack submarines, three Littoral Combat Ships, 
one moored training ship, one LHA replacement, one amphibious 
ship replacement, and five ship to shore connectors, an 
increase of $3,215,950,000 and five ships above the President's 
request;
    $773,138,000 for the initial procurement of the Ohio 
Replacement Submarine;
    $1,961,471,000 for the procurement of 24 C/HC/MC/KC-130J 
aircraft, an increase of $748,012,000 and ten aircraft above 
the President's request;
    $1,616,929,000 for the procurement of 21 MV/CV-22 aircraft, 
an increase of five aircraft and $352,795,000 above the 
President's request;
    $453,030,000 for the procurement of 24 MQ-9 Reaper unmanned 
aerial vehicles;
    $2,801,891,000 for the procurement of 15 KC-46 tanker 
aircraft;
    $1,028,439,000 for the procurement of three Evolved 
Expendable Launch Vehicles; and
    $332,000,000 for the Israeli Cooperative Programs under the 
Missile Defense Agency, an increase of $290,000,000 above the 
President's request.

               RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION

    In title IV of the bill, the Committee recommends a total 
of $70,292,888,000 for research, development, test and 
evaluation. In title IX of the bill, the Committee recommends a 
total of $162,990,000 for additional base requirements.
    Major initiatives and modifications include:
    $700,811,000 for the continued development of the 
replacement for the Ohio class ballistic missile submarine;
    $311,947,000 for the continued development of the E-2D 
Advanced Hawkeye aircraft;
    $545,822,000 for the continued development of the Next 
Generation Jammer;
    $1,791,268,000 for the continued development of the F-35 
Lightning Joint Strike Fighter aircraft;
    $338,357,000 for the continued development of the 
replacement for the Presidential helicopter program;
    $1,358,309,000 for the continued development of a new 
penetrating bomber;
    $128,019,000 for the development of a Next Generation 
JSTARS aircraft;
    $351,220,000 for the development of a Presidential Aircraft 
Replacement;
    $304,331,000 for the continued development of a new combat 
rescue helicopter;
    $161,966,000 for the continued development of the Space 
Based Infrared Satellite and associated ground support systems;
    $393,268,000 for the continued development of the Global 
Positioning System III operational control segment;
    $141,888,000 for the continued development of the Global 
Positioning System III space segment;
    $296,572,000 for the development of an alternative rocket 
engine for space launch;
    $2,923,036,000 for the Defense Advanced Research Projects 
Agency; and
    $268,735,000 for the Israeli Cooperative Program under the 
Missile Defense Agency, an increase of $164,900,000 above the 
President's request.

                         DEFENSE HEALTH PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends a total of $33,576,563,000 for the 
Defense Health Program to support worldwide medical and dental 
services for active forces and other eligible beneficiaries.
    The Committee recommends funding to augment the request for 
enduring traumatic brain injury, psychological health, and 
wounded, ill and injured requirements. To address these 
challenges of the Defense Health Program, the Committee 
recommends the following:

Traumatic brain injury and psychological health research   $125,000,000;
Peer-reviewed spinal cord research......................    $30,000,000;
Peer-reviewed orthopedic research.......................    $30,000,000.

  OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS/GLOBAL WAR ON TERRORISM REQUIREMENTS

    In title IX of the bill, the Committee recommends a total 
of $42,949,994,000 for overseas contingency operations/global 
war on terrorism requirements. This funding level will fully 
support OCO/GWOT operations through the end of April 2017 and 
includes:
    Military Personnel: The Committee recommends a total of 
$2,199,059,000 for military personnel OCO/GWOT requirements in 
title IX of the bill.
    Operation and Maintenance: The Committee recommends a total 
of $29,960,628,000 for operation and maintenance OCO/GWOT 
requirements in title IX of the bill.
    Procurement: The Committee recommends a total of 
$9,357,564,000 for procurement OCO/GWOT requirements in title 
IX of the bill.
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation: The Committee 
recommends a total of $333,679,000 for research, development, 
test and evaluation OCO/GWOT requirements in title IX of the 
bill.

                          CLASSIFIED PROGRAMS

    As described elsewhere in this report, the Committee's 
budget review of classified programs is published in a 
separate, detailed, and comprehensive classified annex. 
Adjustments to the classified programs are addressed in the 
classified annex accompanying this report.

        OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS/GLOBAL WAR ON TERRORISM

    The United States military and Intelligence Community 
remain engaged in responding to crises, conflicts, and 
instability across the globe. As intelligence and military 
leaders have testified repeatedly before Congress, the list of 
threats against United States interests has rarely, if ever, 
been greater.
    Tragically, Russia seems to have returned to a Cold War 
posture based on the recent actions of Vladimir Putin. 
Aggression for propaganda purposes seems to be the new norm. 
Russian occupation of Crimea and Eastern Ukraine has 
destabilized the region and the support to the Syrian regime of 
Bashar al-Assad has propped up a dictator who has killed over 
300,000 of his own countrymen, including with chemical weapons. 
Further, Russian support gives the Syrian regime greater 
confidence and enables Assad to delay negotiations with 
opposition forces and rebuff attempts at a meaningful and 
lasting ceasefire.
    Iran continues to threaten international stability, even 
though the nuclear agreement with Iran has been negotiated. 
Iran's new-found positive public appearance masks its actions 
to reestablish Persian dominance in the Middle East. It has 
proxy forces on several battlefields and is working in the 
cyber arena to destabilize both military operations and global 
commerce.
    Other nation state actors have been allowed to retrench and 
plan as the international community has focused for the past 15 
years on the Middle East. For over fifty years, North Korea has 
used escalatory tactics and provocation on the Korean peninsula 
to blackmail the world into acquiescing to its demands. With 
the death of Kim Jong Il, there was hope that North Korea could 
join the world as a partner. Unfortunately, the opposite 
appears to be true. The inflammatory actions taken by Kim Jong 
Un leave no room for negotiations and may ultimately lead to an 
escalation of hostilities on the Korean peninsula, which will 
be difficult to defuse or contain.
    Also in the Pacific, the manipulation of shoals and reefs 
in the South and East China Seas by China can no longer be 
ignored. These man-made islands on other nations' sovereign 
territories will hamper the freedom of navigation and commerce. 
These provocative actions may eventually lead to an incident 
that may spiral out of control and involve all Pacific Rim 
nations.
    Finally, international terrorism continues to metastasize. 
Although the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) has 
faced setbacks in Syria and Iraq, it is expanding its reach 
into northern Africa. Its attacks in Europe and inspiration for 
attacks in the United States in calendar year 2016 have claimed 
the lives of dozens in addition to the thousands who have died 
in Iraq and Syria. Al Qaida and its affiliates, while 
diminished, continue to plan attacks on the West while they 
build safe havens in unstable regions. These are but two of the 
terrorist groups which continue to use extortion and terror, 
and prey upon ignorance, to achieve their objectives.
    The Committee recognizes the changing face of warfare and 
does not assume that military engagements in the future will be 
limited to current regions of instability, or that conflicts 
will be predicted well in advance. Appropriate responses to 
these threats require a variety of military and Intelligence 
Community resources that can address the entire spectrum of 
warfare today and in the future. The Committee continues to 
support the warfighter and the Intelligence Community with 
resources that will allow for the preparation and fast-reaction 
to both current contingencies and future unknown crises.
    To address these threats and challenges, the bill includes 
increases in base funding to rebuild troop levels, readiness, 
and equipment while pursuing technological advances and 
strengthening Intelligence Community capabilities. The bill 
also supports the European Reassurance Initiative to help deter 
President Putin from further actions to destabilize Europe, and 
includes additional Intelligence, Surveillance, and 
Reconnaisance funding to ensure warfighters have the 
operational awareness they rely upon to detect and respond to 
threats around the world.
    The bill also specifically supports efforts to degrade and 
reverse the gains of ISIL where it currently exists and 
wherever it may try to gain a new foothold, maintain security 
along Jordan's borders, and stem aggression within the Levant. 
The Committee includes sufficient resources for the Counter-
ISIL Train and Equip Fund to support allies, including by 
providing assistance to military and other security forces of 
the Government of Iraq, such as Kurdish and tribal security 
forces.
    Since the war on terrorism is truly global, the Committee 
includes funding under several authorities and efforts to 
support the United States Africa Command's Theater Campaign 
Concept to combat al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, Boko Haram, 
al-Qaeda East Africa, and al-Shabaab, instability caused by the 
Lord's Resistance Army, and piracy and illicit trafficking. 
These same authorities are expanded using the Counterterrorism 
Partnerships Fund and are available, but not limited to, the 
countries bordering the Gulf of Aden, the Seas of Indonesia, 
the South China Sea, and other global havens for terrorism and 
extremism.

              COUNTERING RUSSIAN AGGRESSION IN THE ARCTIC

    The Committee is concerned with increasing Russian military 
expansion and unprovoked aggression in the Arctic region. Over 
the last few years, Russia has built multiple new bases and 
begun permanently stationing troops in the region. As the area 
becomes more heavily transited, it is imperative that the 
seaways remain free and open for international traffic. 
Russia's revived interest in the Arctic as a military outpost 
threatens the geopolitical stability of the region, including 
the interests of the United States and allies. The Committee 
urges the Secretary of Defense to review Russia's Arctic 
strategy, including the modernization of its Northern Fleet, 
and to make maritime security and countering the Russian 
aggression in the Arctic region a priority.

                               READINESS

    Readiness has reached historically low levels and the 
budget request represents the bare minimum needed to sustain 
the readiness recovery. This is unacceptable. The Committee has 
provided an additional $6,383,235,000 to provide for additional 
flight time, battle training, depot maintenance, equipment 
modernization, and critical infrastructure sustainment so the 
Services may more effectively meet their combat readiness 
requirements. This includes an additional $750,000,000 for the 
Army, Navy, and Air Force each to apply towards its most 
critical readiness gaps that exist due to inadequate budget 
requests.
    For example, the budget request funds the Army, Navy, and 
Air Force flying hour programs between 85 percent and 91 
percent of their requirements. Utilizing the additional 
readiness funds provided for the flying hour programs, the 
Services will meet 100 percent of their requirements. 
Similarly, the Army is currently funding just 78 percent of 
their ground operating tempo (OPTEMPO) training requirement. 
Utilizing the additional readiness funds provided, the Army 
will meet 100 percent of its ground OPTEMPO requirement.
    Furthermore, across the Services, facility sustainment is 
funded at approximately 74 percent of the requirement set forth 
in the Department's Facility Sustainment Model, resulting in 
the deferral of routine maintenance and repair actions and 
increasing the likelihood of accelerated facility degradation 
and subsequent mission degradation due to poor infrastructure 
support. Within the amount provided, the Committee has provided 
an additional $1,648,895,000 above the budget request for 
facilities sustainment, restoration, and modernization (FSRM). 
This increase will enable the Services to fund FSRM at more 
than 80 percent of the requirement set forth in the 
Department's Facility Sustainment Model, in line with 
historical execution levels.
    Finally, on average depot maintenance is funded at just 81 
percent of the requirement across the active duty components. 
Within the amount provided, the Committee has included an 
additional $752,867,000 above the budget request for depot 
maintenance. This funding level will enable the Navy to meet 
100 percent of its aircraft depot maintenance and ship depot 
maintenance requirement, the Marine Corps to meet 100 percent 
of its total depot maintenance requirement, and the Air Force 
to meet 100 percent of its weapons systems sustainment 
requirement.

                     COST OF NUCLEAR MODERNIZATION

    The Committee notes the Secretary of Defense's testimony 
that the total cost of nuclear modernization, estimated by the 
Secretary to be $350,000,000,000 to $450,000,000,000, presents 
an enormous affordability challenge. The Committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees not later than 180 days after the enactment 
of this Act detailing the estimated life-cycle costs associated 
with the Department of Defense's plan for replacing and 
sustaining all legs of the nuclear triad, including the ground-
based strategic deterrent, the B-21 bomber, the long-range 
standoff weapon, the Ohio replacement program, and any 
associated warheads and supporting infrastructure. This report 
may be submitted with a classified annex if necessary.

                    ISRAELI MISSILE DEFENSE PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommendation includes $332,000,000 in 
Procurement, Defense-Wide, an increase of $290,000,000 above 
the request, and $268,735,000 in Research, Development, Test 
and Evaluation, Defense-Wide, an increase of $164,900,000 above 
the request, for the Israeli Missile Defense Cooperative 
programs.
    The Committee directs that of the $150,000,000 appropriated 
for co-production activities associated with the Short Range 
Ballistic Missile Defense program, not more than $90,000,000 
may be obligated or expended until the establishment of a 
United States-Israeli co-production agreement. In addition, of 
the $120,000,000 appropriated for co-production activities 
associated with the Arrow 3 Upper Tier, not more than 
$70,000,000 may be obligated or expended until the 
establishment of a United States-Israeli co-production 
agreement.

           RECOGNITION OF WOMEN'S SERVICE IN THE ARMED FORCES

    The Committee notes with regret the decision by the former 
Secretary of the Army to rescind inurnment rights at Arlington 
National Cemetery for Women Airforce Service Pilots. The 
Committee strongly urges the Secretary of Defense to use his 
authorities to reverse this decision in recognition of the 
selfless and groundbreaking service these pilots contributed 
during World War II.
    In addition, the Committee notes the strong support for 
military service memorials and museums highlighting the role of 
women in the military. The Committee recommendation includes a 
legislative provision making up to $5,000,000 available for 
such facilities upon the submission of a report from the 
Secretary of Defense.

                         CYBERSPACE OPERATIONS

    The Committee recommendation fully funds the fiscal year 
2017 base budget request of $6,734,000,000 for cyberspace 
operations, an increase of $992,000,000 over the fiscal year 
2016 enacted level. While the Department of Homeland Security 
and the Department of Justice are responsible for investigating 
intrusions into private companies and protecting government 
websites, the Department of Defense is responsible for 
defending military networks, systems, and information; 
defending the nation against cyberattacks of significant 
consequence; and providing cyber support to operational and 
contingency plans. A total of $6,734,000,000 is provided to the 
Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and the defense agencies 
to continue to organize, train, and equip Cyber Mission Forces 
to become fully operational by the end of fiscal year 2018; to 
support cyber-focused research and technology projects; to 
develop innovative approaches to cyber training in order to 
respond to an evolving threat environment; and to support both 
defensive and offensive cyberspace operations.
    While the Committee supports the requested increases in 
funding for cyber operations, it remains concerned over the 
lack of detail and clarity regarding how requested funding will 
be spent. While the Service and defense-wide budget 
justification material provides some level of detail, much of 
the funding is encompassed within larger programs and funding 
lines, which limits visibility and insight into requested 
funding for cyber operations specifically. The Department of 
Defense classified cyberspace operations information technology 
investments budget justification materials provide additional 
information regarding the overall requested funding by 
cyberspace investment activity, but include limited 
justification for changes in requested funding. The lack of 
clarity in the justification material limits proper 
congressional oversight.
    The Department of Defense cyberspace operations table 
included in the Committee report shows the amount of funding 
provided to each Service and defense-wide account in fiscal 
years 2016 and 2017. Funding provided in the operation and 
maintenance, procurement, and research, development, test and 
evaluation appropriation accounts for cyberspace operations at 
the provided funding levels is designated a congressional 
special interest item. Funding appropriated may only be used 
for cyberspace operations as justified in the classified 
cyberspace operations information technology investment budget 
request for fiscal year 2017. The Committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense that normal prior approval reprogramming 
procedures must be used to obligate or expend these funds for 
any purpose other than cyberspace operations as justified in 
the cyberspace operations information technology investments 
budget request for fiscal year 2017.
    In addition, the Committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit two reports to the congressional defense committees, 
not later than April 1, 2017 and October 15, 2017, detailing 
the obligations and expenditure of cyberspace operations 
appropriated funds by account, budget activity group, and sub-
activity group for the operation and maintenance appropriations 
accounts and account, program element, and line item for the 
procurement and research, development, test and evaluation 
accounts.
    The Committee directs the Department of Defense Chief 
Information Officer, in coordination with the Service 
Secretaries and the Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller), 
to work with the House and Senate Appropriations Committees to 
provide increased visibility and clarity into the cyberspace 
operations funding requirements and requested changes to 
funding requirements from the enacted levels as part of the 
fiscal year 2018 classified cyberspace operations information 
technology funding justification materials.



                                TITLE I

                           MILITARY PERSONNEL

    The fiscal year 2017 Department of Defense military 
personnel budget request totals $128,902,332,000. The Committee 
recommendation provides $128,168,468,000 for the military 
personnel accounts. The table below summarizes the Committee 
recommendations:


                      MILITARY PERSONNEL OVERVIEW

    The Committee recommendation provides $128,168,468,000 for 
the military personnel accounts, which funds military pay and 
allowances, recruitment and retention initiatives, and overall 
quality of life programs for active duty, National Guard, and 
reserve personnel. The recommendation provides the resources 
required for an additional 27,000 active forces and 25,000 
selected reserve forces above the requested end strength levels 
in order to meet operational needs for fiscal year 2017. The 
recommendation also provides increased basic pay for all 
military personnel by 2.1 percent as authorized by current law, 
effective January 1, 2017. The Committee continues to encourage 
constructive evaluations of recruitment and retention programs, 
bonus and special pay incentives, and personnel benefit 
programs for fiscal year 2017. The Committee remains supportive 
of programs intended to enhance the morale and quality of life 
of military personnel and their families.

                        SUMMARY OF END STRENGTH

    The fiscal year 2017 budget request includes a decrease of 
27,015 in total end strength for the active forces and a 
decrease of 9,800 in total end strength for the Selected 
Reserve as compared to the fiscal year 2016 authorized levels. 
The following tables summarize the Committee recommendations 
for end strength levels, both in the aggregate and for each 
active and Selected Reserve component.

                      OVERALL ACTIVE END STRENGTH

 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 authorized...........................         1,308,915
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................         1,281,900
Fiscal year 2017 recommendation.......................         1,310,615
    Compared with fiscal year 2016....................            +1,700
    Compared with fiscal year 2017 budget request.....           +28,715
 

                 OVERALL SELECTED RESERVE END STRENGTH

 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 authorized...........................           811,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................           801,200
Fiscal year 2017 recommendation.......................           826,200
    Compared with fiscal year 2016....................           +15,200
    Compared with fiscal year 2017 budget request.....           +25,000
 


                                   SUMMARY OF MILITARY PERSONNEL END STRENGTH
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Fiscal year 2017
                                                               -------------------------------------------------
                                                   Fiscal year                                          Change
                                                       2016       Budget      Committee     Change       from
                                                    authorized    request    recommended     from       fiscal
                                                                                            request    year 2016
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Active Forces (End Strength)
Army.............................................      475,000     460,000       480,000      20,000       5,000
Navy.............................................      329,200     322,900       324,615       1,715      -4,585
Marine Corps.....................................      184,000     182,000       185,000       3,000       1,000
Air Force........................................      320,715     317,000       321,000       4,000         285
                                                  --------------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Active Forces.....................    1,308,915   1,281,900     1,310,615      28,715       1,700
                                                  --------------------------------------------------------------
 
Guard and Reserve Forces (End Strength)
Army Reserve.....................................      198,000     195,000       205,000      10,000       7,000
Navy Reserve.....................................       57,400      58,000        58,000       - - -         600
Marine Corps Reserve.............................       38,900      38,500        38,500       - - -        -400
Air Force Reserve................................       69,200      69,000        69,000       - - -        -200
Army National Guard..............................      342,000     335,000       350,000      15,000       8,000
Air National Guard...............................      105,500     105,700       105,700       - - -         200
                                                  --------------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Selected Reserve..................      811,000     801,200       826,200      25,000      15,200
                                                  --------------------------------------------------------------
Total, Military Personnel........................    2,119,915   2,083,100     2,136,815      53,715      16,900
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                      FULL-TIME SUPPORT STRENGTHS

    There are four categories of full-time support in the 
National Guard and reserve components: military technicians 
(dual status), Active Guard and Reserve, non-technician 
civilians, and active component personnel.
    Full-time support personnel organize, recruit, train, 
maintain, and administer the reserve components. Military 
technicians (dual status) directly support units and are 
critical to helping units maintain readiness and meet the 
wartime missions of the Army and Air Force.
    The following table summarizes the National Guard and 
reserve components full-time support end strengths:


                                 SUMMARY OF GUARD AND RESERVE FULL TIME STRENGTH
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Fiscal year 2017
                                                               -------------------------------------------------
                                                   Fiscal year                                          Change
                                                       2016       Budget      Committee     Change       from
                                                    authorized    request    recommended     from       fiscal
                                                                                            request    year 2016
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army Reserve:
AGR..............................................       16,261      16,261        16,261       - - -       - - -
Technicians......................................        7,395       7,570         7,570       - - -         175
Navy Reserve:
AR...............................................        9,934       9,955         9,955       - - -          21
Marine Corps Reserve:
AR...............................................        2,260       2,261         2,261       - - -       - - -
Air Force Reserve:
AGR..............................................        3,032       2,955         2,955       - - -         -77
Technicians......................................        9,814      10,061        10,061       - - -         247
Army National Guard:
AGR..............................................       30,770      30,155        30,155       - - -        -615
Technicians......................................       26,099      25,507        25,507       - - -        -592
Air National Guard:
AGR..............................................       14,748      14,764        14,764       - - -          16
Technicians......................................       22,104      22,103        22,103       - - -          -1
Totals:
AGR/AR...........................................       77,005      76,351        76,351       - - -        -654
Technicians......................................       65,412      65,241        65,241       - - -        -171
                                                  --------------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Full-Time Support.................      142,417     141,592       141,592       - - -        -826
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

         REPROGRAMMING GUIDANCE FOR MILITARY PERSONNEL ACCOUNTS

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit 
the Base for Reprogramming (DD Form 1414) for each of the 
fiscal year 2017 appropriation accounts not later than 60 days 
after the enactment of this Act. The Secretary of Defense is 
prohibited from executing any reprogramming or transfer of 
funds for any purpose other than originally appropriated until 
the aforementioned report is submitted to the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to use the 
normal prior approval reprogramming procedures to transfer 
funds in the Services' military personnel accounts between 
budget activities in excess of $10,000,000.

               MILITARY PERSONNEL SPECIAL INTEREST ITEMS

    Items for which additional funds have been provided or have 
been specifically reduced as shown in the project level tables 
or in paragraphs using the phrase ``only for'' or ``only to'' 
in this report are congressional special interest items for the 
purpose of the Base for Reprogramming (DD Form 1414). Each of 
these items must be carried on the DD Form 1414 at the stated 
amount as specifically addressed in the Committee report. Below 
Threshold Reprogrammings may not be used to either restore or 
reduce funding from congressional special interest items as 
identified on the DD Form 1414.

              ALTERNATIVE LEARNING FOR MILITARY DEPENDENTS

    The Committee recognizes that the educational needs of 
military children are often taxing to both military and 
civilian school systems. In order to address this issue and 
capitalize on emerging technology, the Committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to establish a three year pilot program to 
assess a virtual school option for military dependent children. 
The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
180 days after the enactment of this Act, and quarterly reports 
thereafter, on the progress of the pilot program.

                             MATERNITY CARE

    The Committee commends the Secretary of Defense for making 
maternity care for female servicemembers a priority by adopting 
a Department of Defense-wide twelve week maternity leave 
policy. The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct an analysis of how this policy affects readiness and 
retention across the Services and to submit a report containing 
its findings to the congressional defense committees not later 
than 90 days after the enactment of this Act.

                           SUICIDE PREVENTION

    The Committee remains concerned by the high rate of 
suicides among servicemembers. The Committee recognizes the 
successes of organizations outside of the federal government to 
address and prevent servicemember suicides. These organizations 
understand military culture and work with combat-wounded and 
other at-risk servicemembers to build resiliency, increase 
normal day-to-day performances, and increase health and fitness 
levels, all of which may reduce suicides. The Committee 
encourages the Secretary of Defense to develop policies for 
finding, qualifying, and interacting with suicide prevention 
organizations outside of the federal government to assist in 
reducing suicides.
    The Committee is also concerned that the Department of 
Defense does not have a 24-hour suicide hotline. Therefore, the 
Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report 
to the congressional defense committees not later than 60 days 
after the enactment of this Act on efforts to establish a 24-
hour hotline.

                MINORITY OUTREACH AND OFFICER ACCESSIONS

    Minorities remain underrepresented in the general officer 
ranks across the Services. To build a more diverse military, 
the Committee supports efforts to conduct outreach and 
recruiting programs focused on increasing officer accessions 
from minority communities and encourages the Secretary of 
Defense and the Service Secretaries to support such efforts 
with both personnel and resources.

                     CULTURAL SENSITIVITY TRAINING

    The Committee recognizes that the Department of Defense and 
the Services have multiple cultural sensitivity training 
programs for military personnel. The Committee also believes in 
the importance of protecting servicemembers' rights regarding 
religious exercise and ethnic heritage. As such, the Committee 
supports efforts to identify resource and personnel gaps that 
may exist in the Office of Diversity Management and Equal 
Opportunity of the Department of Defense as well as efforts to 
identify existing gaps in protections for new and prospective 
servicemembers.

                       FOREIGN LANGUAGE TRAINING

    The Committee recognizes the important role of the Defense 
Language Institute (DLI) in providing foreign language training 
and interpretation to the military and Intelligence Community 
and supports efforts to ensure that the DLI can continue to 
effectively conduct its primary mission of training career or 
professional linguists. The Committee urges the Secretary of 
Defense to ensure that any deficiencies in the requirements 
generation process for combatant commands' foreign language 
operational needs is fully addressed by developing a 
comprehensive process for identifying emerging and future 
capability requirements and by fully resourcing the DLI. 
Furthermore, the Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense 
to make valuable language skill training available to more 
servicemembers, including non-commissioned officers, from all 
Services.

                        MILITARY PERSONNEL, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................   $41,045,562,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................    40,028,182,000
Committee recommendation..............................    39,986,962,000
Change from budget request............................       -41,220,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$39,986,962,000 for Military Personnel, Army which will provide 
the following program in fiscal year 2017:


                        MILITARY PERSONNEL, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................   $27,835,183,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................    27,951,605,000
Committee recommendation..............................    27,774,605,000
Change from budget request............................      -177,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$27,774,605,000 for Military Personnel, Navy which will provide 
the following program in fiscal year 2017:


                    MILITARY PERSONNEL, MARINE CORPS


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................   $12,859,152,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................    12,813,412,000
Committee recommendation..............................    12,701,412,000
Change from budget request............................      -112,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$12,701,412,000 for Military Personnel, Marine Corps which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2017:


                     MILITARY PERSONNEL, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................   $27,679,066,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................    27,944,615,000
Committee recommendation..............................    27,794,615,000
Change from budget request............................      -150,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$27,794,615,000 for Military Personnel, Air Force which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2017:


                        RESERVE PERSONNEL, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $4,463,164,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     4,561,703,000
Committee recommendation..............................     4,458,963,000
Change from budget request............................      -102,740,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $4,458,963,000 
for Reserve Personnel, Army which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2017:


                        RESERVE PERSONNEL, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $1,866,891,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     1,924,155,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,898,825,000
Change from budget request............................       -25,330,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,898,825,000 
for Reserve Personnel, Navy which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2017:


                    RESERVE PERSONNEL, MARINE CORPS


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................      $702,481,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................       744,995,000
Committee recommendation..............................       736,305,000
Change from budget request............................        -8,690,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $736,305,000 
for Reserve Personnel, Marine Corps which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2017:


                      RESERVE PERSONNEL, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $1,682,942,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     1,742,906,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,718,126,000
Change from budget request............................       -24,780,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,718,126,000 
for Reserve Personnel, Air Force which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2017:


                     NATIONAL GUARD PERSONNEL, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $7,892,327,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     7,910,694,000
Committee recommendation..............................     7,827,440,000
Change from budget request............................       -83,254,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $7,827,440,000 
for National Guard Personnel, Army which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2017:


                  NATIONAL GUARD PERSONNEL, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $3,201,890,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     3,280,065,000
Committee recommendation..............................     3,271,215,000
Change from budget request............................        -8,850,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $3,271,215,000 
for National Guard Personnel, Air Force which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2017:



                                TITLE II

                       OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

    The fiscal year 2017 Department of Defense operation and 
maintenance budget request totals $171,318,488,000. The 
Committee recommendation provides $173,680,060,000 for the 
operation and maintenance accounts. The table below summarizes 
the Committee recommendations:


     REPROGRAMMING GUIDANCE FOR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE ACCOUNTS

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit 
the Base for Reprogramming (DD Form 1414) for each of the 
fiscal year 2017 appropriation accounts not later than 60 days 
after the enactment of this Act. The Secretary of Defense is 
prohibited from executing any reprogramming or transfer of 
funds for any purpose other than originally appropriated until 
the aforementioned report is submitted to the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to use the 
normal prior approval reprogramming procedures to transfer 
funds in the Services' operation and maintenance accounts 
between O-1 budget activities in excess of $15,000,000. In 
addition, the Secretary of Defense should follow prior approval 
reprogramming procedures for transfers in excess of $15,000,000 
out of the following budget sub-activities:
    Army:
    Maneuver units
    Modular support brigades
    Land forces operations support
    Force readiness operations support
    Land forces depot maintenance
    Base operations support
    Facilities sustainment, restoration, and modernization
    Navy:
    Aircraft depot maintenance
    Ship depot maintenance
    Facilities sustainment, restoration, and modernization
    Marine Corps:
    Depot maintenance
    Facilities sustainment, restoration, and modernization
    Air Force:
    Primary combat forces
    Combat enhancement forces
    Combat communications
    Facilities sustainment, restoration, and modernization
    Air Force Reserve:
    Depot maintenance
    Air National Guard:
    Depot maintenance
    Additionally, the Secretary of Defense should follow prior 
approval reprogramming procedures for transfers in excess of 
$15,000,000 into the following budget sub-activity:
    Operation and Maintenance, Army National Guard:
    Other personnel support/recruiting and advertising
    With respect to Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide, 
proposed transfers of funds to or from the levels specified for 
defense agencies in excess of $15,000,000 shall be subject to 
prior approval reprogramming procedures.
    During fiscal year 2017, the Committee directs the Service 
Secretaries to submit written notification and justification to 
the congressional defense committees not later than 15 days 
prior to implementing transfers in excess of $15,000,000 out of 
the following budget sub-activities:
    Navy:
    Mission and other flight operations
    Mission and other ship operations
    Air Force:
    Operating forces depot maintenance
    Mobilization depot maintenance
    Training and recruiting depot maintenance
    Administration and service-wide depot maintenance
    These transfers may be implemented 15 days after a 
congressional notification unless an objection is received from 
one of the congressional defense committees.

            OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE SPECIAL INTEREST ITEMS

    Items for which additional funds have been provided or have 
been specifically reduced as shown in the project level tables 
or in paragraphs using the phrase ``only for'' or ``only to'' 
in this report are congressional special interest items for the 
purpose of the Base for Reprogramming (DD Form 1414). Each of 
these items must be carried on the DD Form 1414 at the stated 
amount as specifically addressed in the Committee report. Below 
Threshold Reprogrammings may not be used to either restore or 
reduce funding from congressional special interest items as 
identified on the DD Form 1414.

    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE MILITARY INTELLIGENCE PROGRAM BUDGET 
                         JUSTIFICATION MATERIAL

    The explanatory statement accompanying the Department of 
Defense Appropriations Act, 2016 noted that previous budget 
justification material submitted for the operation and 
maintenance portion of the Military Intelligence Program (MIP) 
and the exhibits for the Security Programs sub-activity groups 
(SAGs) in the Operation and Maintenance Army, Navy, Marine 
Corps, and Air Force accounts did not provide full visibility 
into requested funding, which limited congressional oversight. 
Accordingly, the explanatory statement directed the Secretary 
of Defense to provide classified OP-5 and OP-32 budget exhibits 
with the budget submission for each of the Security Program 
SAGs, which would provide the non-National Intelligence Program 
funding amount requested in the SAG and a summary and 
justification for changes in the level of resources required 
for each SAG. For fiscal year 2017, the Services and defense 
agencies were directed to work with the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees to provide this information during 
the budget review process. The new tables and budget exhibits 
are to be included as a part of the budget submission for 
fiscal year 2018, as the current budget justification material 
for the operation and maintenance portion of the MIP and the 
exhibits for the Security Programs SAGs in the Operation and 
Maintenance Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force accounts do 
not provide full visibility into requested funding.
    In addition, beginning in fiscal year 2018, the Secretary 
of Defense is directed to break out requested funding for 
operation and maintenance accounts at the line item level of 
funding in the MIP congressional budget justification material. 
Further, requested changes from the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level in operation and maintenance funding should break out the 
change by price and program as defined by the Department of 
Defense Financial Management Regulation.

                           MILITARY UNIFORMS

    The Committee recognizes that there is an increasing 
movement towards prohibiting halogenated flame retardants in 
commercial products due to health and safety concerns. The 
Committee believes that servicemembers should be provided the 
same protection against potential toxic exposure. As such, the 
Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to explore the 
potential of utilizing non-halogenated flame retardants in 
military uniforms.

                         CYBERSPACE OPERATIONS

    The Committee is extremely concerned by the risk that 
cyberattacks and cyber threats present not only to national 
security but also to economic security, and therefore supports 
an increase of $992,000,000 in fiscal year 2017 above the 
fiscal year 2016 enacted level to bolster Department of Defense 
cyber defensive and offensive operations and capabilities. The 
Committee is also concerned by the risk posed by unauthorized 
or malicious access to data assets and encourages the Secretary 
of Defense to keep the congressional defense committees 
informed when such intrusions are detected.
    In addition, the Committee recognizes the importance of 
recruiting and retaining a trained and qualified cyber 
workforce. Many cyber workforce positions require security 
clearances, which can present a hurdle to hiring recent college 
graduates. The Committee encourages the exploration of methods 
of recruiting students prior to graduation in order to expedite 
the security clearance and hiring processes. The Committee also 
encourages initiatives to specifically reach out to minority-
serving public institutions to build a pipeline for scientists 
and engineers from minority communities to enter the cyber 
workforce upon graduation. In addition, the Committee supports 
efforts to include newly qualified applicants, such as interns 
and college graduates, in cybersecurity related contract labor 
categories. The Committee recognizes that the adoption of next 
generation end user computing could result in cost savings 
while also improving desktop security, and it encourages the 
Secretary of Defense to continue to explore the use of next 
generation end user computing.

   ARMY, ARMY NATIONAL GUARD, AND ARMY RESERVE CYBERSPACE OPERATIONS

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,330,000,000 across 
appropriation accounts to the Department of the Army, including 
the Army National Guard and the Army Reserve, for cyberspace 
operations in fiscal year 2017, an increase of $384,000,000 
over the fiscal year 2016 enacted level. The Army's 
contribution to the joint Cyber Mission Forces (CMF) is 41 
teams made up of active duty personnel. In addition to the 41 
active duty CMF teams, the Department of the Army has chosen to 
grow 21 Cyber Protection Teams (CPTs) in the reserve component. 
While the Committee strongly supports the Army CMF efforts to 
reach full operating capability by fiscal year 2018, the 
Committee is concerned that because the Army Reserve and the 
Army National Guard are not formally part of the CMF, they are 
not resourced through the United States Cyber Command training 
pipeline, which hinders access to training. As a result, the 
Army National Guard has chosen to establish a separate training 
course at its Professional Education Center. While the 
Committee supports the intent of this course, it is concerned 
that this is not the most efficient use of Army National Guard 
resources in the current constrained budget environment. The 
Committee is aware that the Army Cyber Center of Excellence at 
Fort Gordon is growing capabilities and capacity and will 
provide training to the reserve component beginning in the 
summer of 2016. The Committee is also aware that the reserve 
component has not fully identified its training throughput 
requirements to support development of the 21 reserve component 
CPTs, which has made it difficult to ensure that reserve cyber 
warriors receive the training they need.
    The Committee directs the Commander, United States Cyber 
Command, the Secretary of the Army, the Chief of the Army 
Reserve, and the Director of the Army National Guard to 
cooperate to ensure that the Army National Guard and Army 
Reserve have adequate access to the Army training pipeline to 
ensure the reserve component CPTs will meet full operating 
capability within their current fielding plans and to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
120 days after the enactment of this Act detailing the 
implementation of this plan. The Committee also encourages the 
Director of the National Security Agency (NSA), to collaborate 
with the Secretary of the Army to ensure that training courses 
that require NSA certification are reviewed in a timely manner.
    The Committee recognizes the threat that attempted attacks 
to critical infrastructure and associated control systems by 
cyber hackers presents both domestically and internationally. 
The Committee supports collaborative efforts by the Department 
of Defense, Department of Homeland Security, the Department of 
Energy national laboratories, universities, and private 
industry in order to spur innovation and create cost 
efficiencies while addressing these threats across multiple 
sectors. In addition, the Committee recognizes that the Army 
National Guard, through its CPTs, offers a flexible and ready 
force that can provide specialized experience. The Committee 
supports efforts by the Army National Guard, as part of its 
title 32 duties, to partner with these entities to provide 
training focused on protecting industrial control systems 
associated with critical infrastructure.
    The Committee further supports Army Reserve efforts to 
engage with universities and the private sector to develop 
formal cyber public-private partnerships to further cyber 
training and employment for Army Reserve cyber warriors. The 
Committee understands that the Army Reserve has experienced 
challenges in certifying the cyber public-private partnership 
program due to the classified nature of the cyber common 
technical core course. The Committee encourages the Director of 
the NSA and the Commander, United States Cyber Command to work 
with the Chief of the Army Reserve to provide a pathway for 
certification of this program.

             INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY WORKFORCE CERTIFICATION

    The Committee notes that information technology users 
remain one of the most significant vulnerabilities in 
preventing cybersecurity breaches and is aware that to combat 
this, the Department of Defense conducts a certification 
process to train personnel with information assurance 
responsibilities and access to Department of Defense networks. 
The Committee supports the efforts of the Chief Information 
Officer (CIO) of the Department of Defense to update and expand 
established policies and assigned responsibilities for managing 
the Department's cyberspace workforce through the 
implementation of Department of Defense Directive 8140. The 
Committee encourages the CIO to consider expanding the existing 
certification requirement, which could enhance the Department's 
information technology infrastructure security posture and 
position servicemembers to easily transition into the civilian 
information technology workforce once their military service 
has ended.

                            CLOUD COMPUTING

    The Committee is concerned with the findings of the 
Department of Defense Inspector General Audit Report 2016-038 
which stated that the Department did not establish a standard, 
Department-wide cloud computing definition or an integrated 
repository to provide detailed information on cloud computing 
contracts. These findings inhibited the Inspector General's 
ability to determine actual cost savings from using cloud 
computing services.
    The Committee directs the Chief Information Officer of the 
Department of Defense to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees not later than 90 days after the enactment 
of this Act on the implementation of the recommendations of the 
Department of Defense Inspector General Audit Report 2016-038. 
The report should include what costing models are used, such as 
the utility-based model, for purchasing commercial cloud 
services; cost savings garnered in fiscal year 2016 by the use 
of commercial cloud services; and the status of implementation 
of existing commercial cloud security initiatives and their 
costs, to include transitioning Federal Information Security 
Modernization Act systems and data to cloud computing.

                        QUALITY OF LIFE PROGRAMS

    The Committee supports the continued investment in quality 
of life programs for servicemembers and their families. 
Programs such as Operation Live Well and the Healthy Base 
Initiative are Committee priorities, as are initiatives that 
provide for safe living conditions and healthy water supplies 
for bases and surrounding communities. In addition, the 
Committee recommendation includes $1,648,895,000 above the 
budget request for facilities sustainment, restoration, and 
modernization to ensure appropriate levels of maintenance and 
upkeep at military installations and that servicemembers and 
their families are receiving medical treatment in modern, well-
maintained facilities. The Committee will continue to monitor 
the Department's efforts to ensure a high quality of life on 
military bases and encourages the Secretary of Defense to 
continue to promote these programs across all military 
installations.

       AFRICAN AMERICANS BURIED AT THE NORMANDY AMERICAN CEMETERY

    The Committee recognizes the critical role that African 
Americans, including servicemembers, support staff, and women 
played during World War II. The Committee requests that the 
Army Chief of Military History, in coordination with the 
Secretary of the American Battle Monuments Commission, submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
90 days after the enactment of this Act that lists the names 
and positions of the African American servicemembers, support 
staff, and women buried at the Normandy American Cemetery in 
Normandy, France. The report should also estimate the number of 
African Americans buried at the Normandy American Cemetery 
absent identification.

                    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................   $32,399,440,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................    33,809,040,000
Committee recommendation..............................    34,436,295,000
Change from budget request............................      +627,255,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$34,436,295,000 for Operation and Maintenance, Army which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2017:


          DEPOT MAINTENANCE--PRODUCTIVITY ENHANCEMENT PROGRAM

    The Committee recognizes that organic depot maintenance 
capacity provides the Department of Defense with a valuable 
resource that contributes to overall military readiness. It is 
imperative that depot equipment is maintained and modernized to 
continue to provide the highest possible capability. The 
Committee encourages the Secretary of the Army to modernize the 
electronic test and measurement equipment of organic depots.

                    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................   $39,600,172,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................    39,483,581,000
Committee recommendation..............................    40,213,485,000
Change from budget request............................      +729,904,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$40,213,485,000 for Operation and Maintenance, Navy which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2017:


                     READINESS COST ASSESSMENT TOOL

    The Committee continues to support the Navy's Readiness 
Cost Assessment Tool (RCAT) proficiency initiative. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to submit a report 
to the congressional defense committees not later than 60 days 
after the enactment of this Act that describes the current 
funding profile of the RCAT initiative and the potential to 
accelerate or streamline the current program strategy.

                    EXPEDITIONARY MEDICAL FACILITIES

    The Committee understands the importance of the Department 
of the Navy efforts to correct performance and safety issues in 
legacy Expeditionary Medical Facilities systems and encourages 
the Secretary of the Navy to prioritize such improvements in 
purchases for Expeditionary Health Services Systems.

                OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, MARINE CORPS


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $5,718,074,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     5,954,258,000
Committee recommendation..............................     6,246,366,000
Change from budget request............................      +292,108,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $6,246,366,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Marine Corps which will provide 
the following program in fiscal year 2017:


                         TOWNSEND BOMBING RANGE

    The Committee is aware of the Marine Corps' intention to 
seek designation by the Federal Aviation Administration to 
become the using agency for the coastal military operations 
areas associated with the Townsend Bombing Range. The Committee 
directs the Secretary of the Navy to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 180 days after 
the enactment of this Act that includes the plans for such a 
transition and any potential for related changes in air traffic 
control that could impede existing commercial and general 
aviation traffic in the coastal Georgia area or impose 
restrictions on military training at Fort Stewart and Hunter 
Army Airfield.

                  OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................   $35,727,457,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................    37,518,056,000
Committee recommendation..............................    38,209,602,000
Change from budget request............................      +691,546,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$38,209,602,000 for Operation and Maintenance, Air Force which 
will provide the following program in fiscal year 2017:


             AIR EDUCATION AND TRAINING COMMAND FACILITIES

    The report accompanying the House-passed Department of 
Defense Appropriations Act, 2016 recognized the adverse impact 
that flooding and other infrastructure challenges have had on 
Air Education and Training Command facilities, equipment, 
operations, and training. The Committee recognizes that steps 
have been taken to begin the mitigation of some of these 
effects through multi-year projects. The Committee supports 
these efforts and urges completion of projects that are 
underway, along with the utilization of a similar approach to 
address additional deficiencies.

                         OFFUTT AIR FORCE BASE

    The Committee understands the Air Force is replacing the 
runway at Offutt Air Force Base. The Committee urges the 
Secretary of the Air Force to continually inform the House and 
Senate Appropriations Committees on its progress.

                OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, DEFENSE-WIDE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................   $32,105,040,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................    32,571,590,000
Committee recommendation..............................    32,263,224,000
Change from budget request............................      -308,366,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$32,263,224,000, for Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide 
which will provide the following program in fiscal year 2017:


                    BACKGROUND INVESTIGATION SYSTEMS

    In response to increasing cybersecurity threats, including 
the recent compromise of information stored at the Office of 
Personnel Management (OPM), the Administration has proposed the 
creation of the National Background Investigations Bureau 
(NBIB). As a result of this effort, and as part of a series of 
changes to strengthen how the federal government safeguards 
background investigations of its employees and contractors, the 
Interagency Deputies Committee and the Office of Management and 
Budget (OMB) have determined that the responsibility for the 
development and sustainment of a new federal government 
background information technology system should transfer from 
OPM to the Department of Defense. The Defense Information 
Systems Agency (DISA) would be responsible for the development, 
implementation, and sustainment of this new background 
investigation system. The Committee requires more information 
about the Administration's proposal to create the NBIB, which 
would replace OPM's Federal Investigative Services Division. 
The Committee directs the Director of DISA, in coordination 
with the Director of OPM, to submit a progress report to the 
House and Senate Appropriations Committees not later than 90 
days after the enactment of this Act, and quarterly thereafter, 
that includes the NBIB implementation plan, timeline with 
milestones, costs for each phase of implementation, anticipated 
outyear costs, governance structure, resource management 
structure, personnel structure, accountability policies between 
OPM and the Department of Defense, and any other significant 
issues related to the establishment of the NBIB.

                   SECURITY CLEARANCE DETERMINATIONS

    The Committee is interested in understanding trends related 
to security clearance determinations, both initial or periodic 
reinvestigations, and denials due to Foreign Preference or 
Foreign Influence. The Committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense, in coordination with the Director of National 
Intelligence, to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than 180 days after the enactment of this 
Act that includes the number of denials or revocations of 
security clearance requests for fiscal year 2016 and fiscal 
year 2017 and a list of countries and the number of times each 
was cited per Guideline B (Foreign Influence) or Guideline C 
(Foreign Preference) as the disqualifying security concern 
cause for denial, revocation, or adjudicative delay exceeding 
one year.

                BASE SECURITY AND ACCESS CONTROL SYSTEMS

    The Department of Defense and the Services continue to 
develop and deploy various credentialing and physical access 
control systems, which often result in different approaches to 
vetting and screening individuals that require access to 
military installations. The Committee encourages the Secretary 
of Defense to work with the Service Secretaries to update 
Department-wide policy and guidance concerning internally 
developed credentialing and physical access control systems to 
ensure that these systems are being utilized effectively. The 
Committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller), 
in conjunction with the Under Secretary of Defense (Policy), to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than 180 days after the enactment of this Act that 
identifies and describes all Department credentialing and 
physical access control systems currently deployed, including 
commercially contracted services, any systems that are 
presently in development or in pilot demonstration, all costs 
associated with these systems, and any military installations 
that are not currently scanning credentials at base access 
points.

                      PERFORMANCE-BASED LOGISTICS

    The Committee recognizes that the Department of Defense 
values the use of performance-based logistics (PBL) contracts 
for maintenance and repair. The Services routinely use PBL to 
improve support for components such as aircraft engines and 
tires. Similarly, the Defense Logistics Agency is combining 
multiple contracts for similar items into a single PBL 
arrangement that supports all the Services. The Committee 
encourages the Secretary of Defense and the Service Secretaries 
to continue expanding their use of PBL contracts.

                     MEALS READY-TO-EAT WAR RESERVE

    The Committee recommendation fully supports the fiscal year 
2017 request for the Defense Logistics Agency to maintain 
2,500,000 cases of meals ready-to-eat and reaffirms support for 
the War Reserve stock objective of 5,000,000 cases.

    DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY AND THE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRY MISSION

    While the Committee supports the Federal Prison Industry 
(FPI) mission to reduce crime by preparing inmates for 
successful reentry into society through job training, the 
Committee is increasingly concerned that the Defense Logistics 
Agency's (DLA) reliance on FPI is coming at the expense of the 
private sector, particularly small and disadvantaged 
businesses. This is especially troubling since the FPI 
organizing statute requires it be operated so that it ``reduces 
to a minimum competition with private industry or free labor.'' 
Therefore, the Committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense 
(Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics), in coordination with 
the Director of DLA, to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees not later than 90 days after the enactment 
of this Act that lists the contracts for which FPI is 
responsible for more than five percent of the production of any 
individual item. In addition, for each contract on the list, 
the report should identify whether any small businesses 
competed for, but did not win, the contract.

           IMPROVING ASSET TRACKING AND IN-TRANSIT VISIBILITY

    The Committee remains interested in the Department of 
Defense's strategy for improving asset tracking and in-transit 
visibility. The Committee supports the goal of enhancing asset 
visibility through item-unique identification (IUID) and 
automatic identification technology/automatic identification 
and data capture processes, but remains concerned with the 
Department's compliance with its own IUID policy that was 
issued in September 2015. The Committee directs the Director of 
the Defense Contract Management Agency (DCMA) to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
60 days after the enactment of this Act that describes the 
DCMA's plan to foster the adoption, implementation, and 
verification of the revised IUID policy across the Department 
and the defense industrial base.

                DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE EDUCATION ACTIVITY

    The Committee recognizes the importance of continually 
evolving and improving the curriculum of high school students 
to remain current with emerging technology and to inspire and 
educate young students to be independent thinkers, designers, 
and inventors. The Committee directs the Director of the 
Department of Defense Education Activity (DODEA) to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
120 days after the enactment of this Act that describes how a 
new program could be initiated to integrate digital education, 
design thinking, and additive manufacturing into the curriculum 
for DODEA high school students.

         PUBLIC SCHOOLS ON DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE INSTALLATIONS

    In fiscal year 2011, the Office of Economic Adjustment was 
provided authority to evaluate the condition and capacity of 
public schools located on Department of Defense installations. 
These schools, although on base, are run by local public school 
districts but serve a significant number of military dependent 
children. A priority list was approved in 2011 to disburse 
funds to the most disadvantaged schools. Since 2011, many 
schools have experienced changes due to military activity that 
directly impact capacity and conditions. The Committee 
encourages the Secretary of Defense to conduct an updated 
assessment and to create a priority list to address the 
condition and capacity of public schools on military 
installations that may have been included in the priority list 
from July 2011 but have not yet received funding.

          PILOT PROGRAM TO ASSIST MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES

    The Committee remains concerned with the ability of 
servicemembers to attain employment after they leave the 
military and understands that a pilot program to address this 
issue was authorized in the National Defense Authorization Act 
for fiscal year 2015. The Committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of Veterans 
Affairs, to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than January 15, 2017, that details the 
feasibility of establishing a pilot program to assist members 
of the armed forces in obtaining post-service employment, the 
program requirements set forth in the National Defense 
Authorization Act for fiscal year 2015, and the annual funding 
required by the Department of Defense and the Department of 
Veterans Affairs to implement and sustain such a program.

                      SOCIAL MEDIA ANALYTICAL CELL

    The Committee is concerned with the widespread use of 
social media to foster unrest and to encourage recruitment to 
terrorist organizations. The creation of a social media 
analytical cell that is capable of analyzing transnational 
threats and social media recruitment and providing counter-
messages would be an asset to the Department of Defense. The 
Committee urges the Secretary of Defense to consider starting a 
pilot program for a social media analytical cell in the United 
States European Command area of responsibility.

                        CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT

    The Committee is concerned about the impact that child 
abuse and neglect among military families have on military 
family health and overall military readiness. It has been 
reported that the number of confirmed cases of abuse and 
neglect of military children is at its highest level in ten 
years. Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to conduct a study that examines the reasons for the 
increase in confirmed cases of abuse and neglect and the 
actions taken to understand the causes for this increase. The 
Secretary of Defense shall submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees not later than 180 days after the enactment 
of this Act with the results of the study, plans to partner 
with experts in child abuse clinical care, research, and 
education, and provide recommendations on research needs to 
prevent instances of child abuse and neglect among military 
families.

                OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, ARMY RESERVE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $2,646,911,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     2,712,331,000
Committee recommendation..............................     2,767,471,000
Change from budget request............................       +55,140,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,767,471,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Army Reserve which will provide 
the following program in fiscal year 2017:


                OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, NAVY RESERVE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................      $998,481,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................       927,656,000
Committee recommendation..............................       975,724,000
Change from budget request............................       +48,068,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $975,724,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Navy Reserve which will provide 
the following program in fiscal year 2017:


            OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, MARINE CORPS RESERVE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................      $274,526,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................       270,633,000
Committee recommendation..............................       320,066,000
Change from budget request............................       +49,433,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $320,066,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Marine Corps Reserve which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2017:


              OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, AIR FORCE RESERVE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $2,980,768,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     3,067,929,000
Committee recommendation..............................     3,106,066,000
Change from budget request............................       +38,137,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $3,106,066,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Air Force Reserve which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2017:


                 AIR FORCE RESERVE SPECIALIZED MISSIONS

    The Committee understands that the Air Force Reserve 
includes units that have a designated specialized mission as 
well as a traditional tactical mission. The Committee is aware 
of concerns that these specialized units may lack sufficient 
training hours to fulfill both their tactical and specialized 
missions. The Committee encourages the Chief of the Air Force 
Reserve to review requirements to ensure that specialized units 
are allocated sufficient training hours to successfully perform 
both their specialized and tactical missions and are allocated 
equipment upgrades necessary to address safety concerns 
associated with these missions. When deciding which specialized 
missions to target for equipment upgrades, the Committee urges 
that strong consideration be given to those missions utilizing 
the oldest equipment. The Committee also supports efforts to 
build partnerships between units performing specialized 
missions and other government agencies when practical.

             OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, ARMY NATIONAL GUARD


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $6,595,483,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     6,825,370,000
Committee recommendation..............................     6,923,595,000
Change from budget request............................       +98,225,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $6,923,595,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Army National Guard which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2017:


             OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, AIR NATIONAL GUARD


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $6,820,569,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     6,703,578,000
Committee recommendation..............................     6,708,200,000
Change from budget request............................        +4,622,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $6,708,200,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Air National Guard which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2017:


          UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE ARMED FORCES


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................       $14,078,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................        14,194,000
Committee recommendation..............................        14,194,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $14,194,000 
for the United States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces.

                    ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................      $234,829,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................       170,167,000
Committee recommendation..............................       170,167,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $170,167,000 
for Environmental Restoration, Army.

                    ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................      $300,000,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................       281,762,000
Committee recommendation..............................       289,262,000
Change from budget request............................        +7,500,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $289,262,000 
for Environmental Restoration, Navy.

             VIEQUES AND CULEBRA ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION

    The Committee remains interested in the pace and scope of 
environmental restoration on the island municipalities of 
Culebra and Vieques in Puerto Rico, and commends the Department 
of Defense for demonstrating progress in a recent report 
provided to the Committee. However, public safety hazards still 
exist on each island and decontamination of these islands 
should be a priority for environmental restoration programs 
within the Department. The Committee directs the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense (Energy, Installations, and Environment) 
to brief the House and Senate Appropriations Committees not 
later than 90 days after the enactment of this Act on the 
progress of the current implementation strategy, the status of 
the installation restoration program sites and the military 
munitions response program sites, and the remediation 
investigations timeline for Culebra and Vieques. The brief 
should include potential links between the identified ordnance 
to be removed and any possible threats to public health.

                  ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................      $368,131,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................       371,521,000
Committee recommendation..............................       371,521,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $371,521,000 
for Environmental Restoration, Air Force.

                ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, DEFENSE-WIDE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................        $8,232,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................         9,009,000
Committee recommendation..............................         9,009,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $9,009,000 for 
Environmental Restoration, Defense-Wide.

         ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, FORMERLY USED DEFENSE SITES


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................      $231,217,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................       197,084,000
Committee recommendation..............................       222,084,000
Change from budget request............................       +25,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $222,084,000 
for Environmental Restoration, Formerly Used Defense Sites.

             OVERSEAS HUMANITARIAN, DISASTER, AND CIVIC AID


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................      $103,266,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................       105,125,000
Committee recommendation..............................       108,125,000
Change from budget request............................        +3,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $108,125,000 
for Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid.

                  COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION ACCOUNT


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................      $358,496,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................       325,604,000
Committee recommendation..............................       325,604,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $325,604,000 
for the Cooperative Threat Reduction Account which will provide 
the following program in fiscal year 2017:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee         Change from
                                                          Budget  Request      Recommended          Request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION
    Strategic Offensive Arms Elimination...............             11,791             11,791              - - -
    Chemical Weapons Destruction.......................              2,942              2,942              - - -
    Global Nuclear Security............................             16,899             16,899              - - -
    Cooperative Biological Engagement..................            213,984            213,984              - - -
    Proliferation Prevention...........................             50,709             50,709              - - -
    Threat Reduction Engagement........................              2,000              2,000              - - -
    Other Assessments/Admin Costs......................             27,279             27,279              - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    TOTAL, COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION................            325,604            325,604              - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                               TITLE III

                              PROCUREMENT

    The fiscal year 2017 Department of Defense procurement 
budget request totals $101,916,357,000. The Committee 
recommendation provides $104,200,570,000 for the procurement 
accounts. The table below summarizes the Committee 
recommendations:


            REPROGRAMMING GUIDANCE FOR ACQUISITION ACCOUNTS

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to continue 
to follow the reprogramming guidance as specified in the report 
accompanying the House version of the Department of Defense 
Appropriations bill, 2008 (House Report 110-279). Specifically, 
the dollar threshold for reprogramming funds will remain at 
$20,000,000 for procurement and $10,000,000 for research, 
development, test and evaluation.
    Also, the Committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense 
(Comptroller) to continue to provide the congressional defense 
committees quarterly, spreadsheet-based DD Form 1416 reports 
for Service and defense-wide accounts in titles III and IV of 
this Act. Reports for titles III and IV shall comply with the 
guidance specified in the explanatory statement accompanying 
the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2006. The 
Department shall continue to follow the limitation that prior 
approval reprogrammings are set at either the specified dollar 
threshold or 20 percent of the procurement or research, 
development, test and evaluation line, whichever is less. These 
thresholds are cumulative from the Base for Reprogramming value 
as modified by any adjustments. Therefore, if the combined 
value of transfers into or out of a procurement (P-1) or 
research, development, test and evaluation (R-1) line exceeds 
the identified threshold, the Secretary of Defense must submit 
a prior approval reprogramming to the congressional defense 
committees. In addition, guidelines on the application of prior 
approval reprogramming procedures for congressional special 
interest items are established elsewhere in this report.

                   PROCUREMENT SPECIAL INTEREST ITEMS

    Items for which additional funds have been provided as 
shown in the project level tables or in paragraphs using the 
phrase ``only for'' or ``only to'' in this report are 
congressional special interest items for the purpose of the 
Base for Reprogramming (DD Form 1414). Each of these items must 
be carried on the DD Form 1414 at the stated amount 
specifically addressed in the Committee report. These items 
remain special interest items whether or not they are repeated 
in a subsequent conference report.

                           FUNDING INCREASES

    The Committee directs that the funding increases outlined 
in these tables shall be provided only for the specific 
purposes indicated in the tables.

                            CLASSIFIED ANNEX

    Adjustments to the classified programs are addressed in a 
classified annex accompanying this report.

                       AIRCRAFT PROCUREMENT, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $5,866,367,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     3,614,787,000
Committee recommendation..............................     4,628,697,000
Change from budget request............................    +1,013,910,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $4,628,697,000 
for Aircraft Procurement, Army which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2017:


                       MISSILE PROCUREMENT, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $1,600,957,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     1,519,966,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,502,377,000
Change from budget request............................       -17,589,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,502,377,000 
for Missile Procurement, Army which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2017:


        PROCUREMENT OF WEAPONS AND TRACKED COMBAT VEHICLES, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $1,951,646,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     2,265,177,000
Committee recommendation..............................     2,244,547,000
Change from budget request............................       -20,630,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,244,547,000 
for Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles, Army 
which will provide the following program in fiscal year 2017:


                    PROCUREMENT OF AMMUNITION, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $1,245,426,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     1,513,157,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,513,157,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,513,157,000 
for Procurement of Ammunition, Army which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2017:


                   AMMUNITION PRODUCTION BASE SUPPORT

    The Army has reported that approximately $200,000,000 per 
year is required to properly modernize and sustain the eight 
government-owned, contractor-operated Army Ammunition Plants 
(AAPs), many of which were built during World War II. The 
Committee notes that the fiscal year 2017 budget request 
actually exceeds this baseline investment, committing 
$268,000,000 per year during the fiscal year 2017-2021 period. 
Despite this commitment, significant safety, environmental, and 
operational discrepancies exist among the four largest AAPs 
that will require investments far above what is programmed 
under the Army's modernization plan. The mismatch between 
documented need and allotted investment calls into question the 
adequacy of the Army's investment strategy and the analysis 
used to determine required funding. The Committee therefore 
directs the Secretary of the Army to reevaluate the AAP funding 
investment model and the underlying recapitalization 
assumptions in order to determine a more accurate steady-state 
funding baseline for the fiscal year 2018 budget request.

                        OTHER PROCUREMENT, ARMY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $5,718,811,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     5,873,949,000
Committee recommendation..............................     6,081,856,000
Change from budget request............................      +207,907,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $6,081,856,000 
for Other Procurement, Army which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2017:


                 COMBAT SUPPORT HOSPITAL INFRASTRUCTURE

    The Committee supports the continued deployment and 
modernization of the Army's combat support hospital and 
recognizes the important goal of transitioning dated legacy 
systems to rapidly erectable hospital infrastructure. Improving 
and correcting safety and performance issues in the combat 
support hospital legacy systems should take a high priority in 
the equipment purchases of the Army Medical Department. The 
Committee urges the Secretary of the Army to make modernization 
and upgrade of combat support hospital deployable 
infrastructure a priority, with continued focus on improving 
the safety of legacy systems while upgrading their performance.

                  TACTICAL AUDITORY PROTECTION SYSTEMS

    The Committee recognizes the importance of providing 
soldiers with equipment that concurrently protects their 
hearing and improves their auditory situational awareness, 
making them more effective in combat while reducing the 
incidence of noise-induced hearing loss. In light of the high 
level of funding spent annually for veterans' hearing aids and 
hearing disability compensation, the Committee views this 
investment as prudent, and encourages the Secretary of the Army 
to continue funding tactical auditory protection systems at 
previously projected rates.

                       AIRCRAFT PROCUREMENT, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................   $17,521,209,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................    14,109,148,000
Committee recommendation..............................    15,900,093,000
Change from budget request............................    +1,790,945,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$15,900,093,000 for Aircraft Procurement, Navy which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2017:


                      NAVY RESERVE COMBAT AIRCRAFT

    The Committee remains concerned that the aging aircraft of 
the Navy Reserve Combat air fleet will further hamper the 
mission of these vital tactical aviation squadrons. The Navy 
Reserve squadrons provide critical adversary support and strike 
fighter weapons training to active duty forces, and must 
maintain a high mobilization readiness level for immediate 
deployment in the event of war or national emergency.
    The Committee has become aware that the Navy Reserve will 
not be able to transition to F/A-18-E/F Super Hornets until 
2034. However, the legacy F/A-18A-D aircraft they will rely 
upon until then are rapidly nearing the end of their service 
lives. The Secretary of the Navy has reported to the Committee 
that the number of aircraft considered as out-of-reporting 
status will increase from 53 percent in fiscal year 2015 to 67 
percent by July 2016, as depots have been unable to achieve 
production requirements. This puts a strain on both the reserve 
squadrons and the active component squadrons that must augment 
the fleet adversary support mission of the reserves. The 
recommendation includes more than $1,350,000,000 for the 
procurement of 16 F/A-18E/Fs and increases funding for Navy 
aircraft depot maintenance to help alleviate these concerns.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of the Navy, in 
coordination with the Chief of the Navy Reserve, to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
90 days after the enactment of this Act that includes a three 
year recapitalization and funding plan for the Navy Reserve F/
A-18 squadrons. The report should include the cost and schedule 
for accelerating the fielding of new F/A-18E/F Super Hornets to 
the Navy Reserve Combat air fleet and the benefits such a 
replacement would provide. Additionally, the Committee believes 
that the Secretary of the Navy should provide a sufficient 
number of operational ready for tasking aircraft to the Navy 
Reserve Combat air fleet to allow it to continue its mission.

                       WEAPONS PROCUREMENT, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $3,049,542,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     3,209,262,000
Committee recommendation..............................     3,102,544,000
Change from budget request............................      -106,718,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $3,102,544,000 
for Weapons Procurement, Navy which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2017:


            PROCUREMENT OF AMMUNITION, NAVY AND MARINE CORPS


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................      $651,920,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................       664,368,000
Committee recommendation..............................       601,563,000
Change from budget request............................       -62,805,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $601,563,000 
for Procurement of Ammunition, Navy and Marine Corps which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2017:


             IMPROVED MUNITIONS ON NAVAL SURFACE COMBATANTS

    The Committee is aware of the potential for improved 
munitions for 5" guns on naval surface combatants. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to submit a report 
to the congressional defense committees not later than 90 days 
after the enactment of this Act that examines the types of 
munitions that could be considered to improve the effectiveness 
of the 5" guns. The report should include an analysis of the 
effectiveness and utilization of current munitions and an 
analysis of available munitions that may provide improvement in 
distance and precision.

                   SHIPBUILDING AND CONVERSION, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................   $18,704,539,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................    18,354,874,000
Committee recommendation..............................    18,484,524,000
Change from budget request............................      +129,650,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$18,484,524,000 for Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy which 
will provide the following program in fiscal year 2017:


                         CRUISER MODERNIZATION

    The Committee is disappointed that the Navy's fiscal year 
2017 budget request is once again attempting to renegotiate the 
terms for the modernization of the 22 remaining Ticonderoga-
class cruisers. The position of this Committee, as well as the 
entire Congress, is very clear and has been stated repeatedly 
over the last four years. The Committee remains adamant that 
the Navy will not lay up half of the remaining cruisers for an 
extended period of time. The Navy's own stated requirement for 
guided missile cruisers in the 30 year shipbuilding plan 
remains steady at 22. The requirement is not for eleven 
cruisers in an extended lay-up status while eleven others 
continue to operate. The Secretary of the Navy has repeatedly 
stated his desire to increase the size of the fleet, yet 
placing half of the Navy's cruisers, the centerpiece of area 
air defense for the Navy's carrier battlegroups, would seem to 
contradict any desire to build up the fleet. Therefore, the 
bill once again contains a provision that provides the 
Secretary of the Navy explicit direction for how to conduct the 
cruiser modernization program--no more than two cruisers may 
enter a modernization period each year, the modernization 
period for each cruiser may last no longer than four years, and 
there can only be a maximum of six ships in a modernization 
period at any one time. The Committee understands that the Navy 
has sufficient funding remaining in the Ship Modernization, 
Operations, and Sustainment Fund to further these efforts in 
fiscal year 2017. Further, the Committee directs the Secretary 
of the Navy to brief the congressional defense committees 
quarterly on the status of each of the 22 Ticonderoga class 
cruisers to ensure that these ships are being operated 
appropriately and as a way for the committees to ensure that 
the Navy is not attempting to sidestep the intent of the 
committees by keeping the ships in extended alongside 
availabilities.
    Additionally, the Committee expects the Secretary of the 
Navy to comply with these statutorily directed rules for 
cruiser modernization in future budget submissions.

                        OTHER PROCUREMENT, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $6,484,257,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     6,338,861,000
Committee recommendation..............................     6,099,326,000
Change from budget request............................      -239,535,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $6,099,326,000 
for Other Procurement, Navy which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2017:


                       PROCUREMENT, MARINE CORPS


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $1,186,812,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     1,362,769,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,213,872,000
Change from budget request............................      -148,897,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,213,872,000 
for Procurement, Marine Corps which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2017:


                    AIRCRAFT PROCUREMENT, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................   $15,756,853,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................    13,922,917,000
Committee recommendation..............................    14,325,117,000
Change from budget request............................      +402,200,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$14,325,117,000 for Aircraft Procurement, Air Force which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2017:


                            MQ-9 FLEET SIZE

    The Committee notes the objective procurement quantity of 
MQ-9 Reapers has declined from over 400 as recently as fiscal 
year 2014 to 347 in the fiscal year 2017 budget request, and 
the current plan does not include procurement of any further 
MQ-9 aircraft after fiscal year 2017, despite an increasing 
demand for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance from 
the combatant commanders and the attrition of at least 22 
aircraft since 2009. The Committee understands that the Air 
Force is currently conducting a new analysis of the objective 
MQ-9 fleet, including an updated attrition model, and directs 
the Secretary of the Air Force to report the results of this 
study to the congressional defense committees not later than 30 
days after its completion.

                     MISSILE PROCUREMENT, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $2,912,131,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     2,426,621,000
Committee recommendation..............................     2,288,772,000
Change from budget request............................      -137,849,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,288,772,000 
for Missile Procurement, Air Force which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2017:


                      SPACE PROCUREMENT, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $2,812,159,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     3,055,743,000
Committee recommendation..............................     2,538,152,000
Change from budget request............................      -517,591,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,538,152,000 
for Space Procurement, Air Force which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2017:


                  PROCUREMENT OF AMMUNITION, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $1,744,993,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     1,677,719,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,609,719,000
Change from budget request............................       -68,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,609,719,000 
for Procurement of Ammunition, Air Force which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2017:


                      OTHER PROCUREMENT, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................   $18,311,882,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................    17,438,056,000
Committee recommendation..............................    17,342,313,000
Change from budget request............................       -95,743,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$17,342,313,000 for Other Procurement, Air Force which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2017:


                       PROCUREMENT, DEFENSE-WIDE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $5,245,443,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     4,524,918,000
Committee recommendation..............................     4,649,876,000
Change from budget request............................      +124,958,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $4,649,876,000 
for Procurement, Defense-Wide which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2017:


                   SM-3 BLOCK IB AND IIA INVENTORIES

    The Committee is concerned by the continual erosion in 
quantities programmed across the future years defense program 
for SM-3 Block IB and SM-3 Block IIA production. After the 
fiscal year 2015 and 2016 budgets substantially reduced the 
quantity of SM-3 Block IB interceptors requested, Congress 
added more than $340,000,000 to add back 31 interceptors to the 
production line to maintain an economically efficient 
production rate. The lack of an inventory objective for this 
critical missile defense system makes it particularly 
challenging for the congressional defense committees to assess 
annual progress towards meeting warfighter requirements. The 
Committee directs the Director of the Missile Defense Agency, 
in coordination with the Secretary of the Navy, to establish 
and report the inventory objective required to satisfy 
warfighter requirements for the SM-3 Block IB and Block IIA 
missile as part of the fiscal year 2018 and subsequent budget 
requests.

                         DEFENSE PRODUCTION ACT


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................       $76,680,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................        44,065,000
Committee recommendation..............................        74,065,000
Change from budget request............................       +30,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $74,065,000 
for the Defense Production Act which will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2017:

                EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Change from
                                     Budget      Committee      Request
                                    Request     Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
DEFENSE PRODUCTION ACT PURCHASES       44,065        74,065       30,000
    Program increase............                     30,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------
        TOTAL, DEFENSE                 44,065        74,065       30,000
         PRODUCTION ACT
         PURCHASES..............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      DOMESTIC SUPPLY OF BERYLLIUM

    The Committee recognizes the importance of the strategic 
and critical material beryllium to national security. The 
Committee is pleased that the Department of Defense began to 
invest in a domestic beryllium manufacturing facility in 2004 
to maintain the security of supply and the affordability of 
beryllium for defense systems. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary of Defense to continue to take affirmative steps to 
maintain a secure, domestic source of beryllium and to consider 
investing in improvements to make the production of domestic 
beryllium more efficient and affordable.

                                TITLE IV

               RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION

    The fiscal year 2017 Department of Defense research, 
development, test and evaluation budget request totals 
$71,391,771,000. The Committee recommendation provides 
$70,292,888,000 for the research, development, test and 
evaluation accounts. The table below summarizes the Committee 
recommendations:


            REPROGRAMMING GUIDANCE FOR ACQUISITION ACCOUNTS

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to continue 
to follow the reprogramming guidance as specified in the report 
accompanying the House version of the Department of Defense 
Appropriations bill, 2008 (House Report 110-279). Specifically, 
the dollar threshold for reprogramming funds will remain at 
$20,000,000 for procurement and $10,000,000 for research, 
development, test and evaluation.
    Also, the Committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense 
(Comptroller) to continue to provide the congressional defense 
committees quarterly, spreadsheet-based DD Form 1416 reports 
for Service and defense-wide accounts in titles III and IV of 
this Act. Reports for titles III and IV shall comply with the 
guidance specified in the explanatory statement accompanying 
the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2006. The 
Department shall continue to follow the limitation that prior 
approval reprogrammings are set at either the specified dollar 
threshold or 20 percent of the procurement or research, 
development, test and evaluation line, whichever is less. These 
thresholds are cumulative from the Base for Reprogramming value 
as modified by any adjustments. Therefore, if the combined 
value of transfers into or out of a procurement (P-1) or 
research, development, test and evaluation (R-1) line exceeds 
the identified threshold, the Secretary of Defense must submit 
a prior approval reprogramming to the congressional defense 
committees. In addition, guidelines on the application of prior 
approval reprogramming procedures for congressional special 
interest items are established elsewhere in this report.

   RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION SPECIAL INTEREST ITEMS

    Items for which additional funds have been provided as 
shown in the project level tables or in paragraphs using the 
phrase ``only for'' or ``only to'' in this report are 
congressional special interest items for the purpose of the 
Base for Reprogramming (DD Form 1414). Each of these items must 
be carried on the DD Form 1414 at the stated amount 
specifically addressed in the Committee report. These items 
remain special interest items whether or not they are repeated 
in a subsequent conference report.

                           FUNDING INCREASES

    The Committee directs that the funding increases outlined 
in these tables shall be provided only for the specific 
purposes indicated in the tables.

                            CLASSIFIED ANNEX

    Adjustments to the classified programs are addressed in a 
classified annex accompanying this report.

               JOINT STRIKE FIGHTER FOLLOW-ON DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee notes that a recent report by the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) found that the cost and character 
of follow-on development for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter 
(JSF), also known as Block 4, would require designation as a 
Major Defense Acquisition Program (MDAP) if it were constituted 
as a separate program rather than being managed within the 
baseline of the overall JSF program. The GAO found that the 
current management of follow-on development exposed this effort 
to greater cost and schedule risk and potentially could 
confound congressional oversight. The GAO recommended that the 
Department of Defense manage follow-on development as a 
separate and distinct MDAP. The Department did not concur with 
this recommendation on the grounds that existing oversight 
mechanisms and potential actions, such as an independent cost 
estimate, would provide sufficient transparency and 
accountability. The Committee believes that the quality of 
information provided to the Congress is more important than the 
formal designation of follow-on development as an MDAP or the 
bureaucratic foundation that would be required to support its 
management as such, as long as the Department is able and 
willing to provide the information needed for congressional 
oversight. Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to submit, not later than 30 days after the submission 
of the fiscal year 2018 budget request, a report to the 
congressional defense committees on JSF follow-on development 
containing information similar to that provided in a 
comprehensive annual selected acquisition report, with 
additional information as necessary to clarify the content, 
scope, and phasing of the capabilities to be acquired for all 
variants of the JSF. This report may be submitted with a 
classified annex if necessary.

      JOINT STRIKE FIGHTER AUTONOMIC LOGISTICS INFORMATION SYSTEM

    The Committee remains concerned with the development of the 
Autonomic Logistics Information System (ALIS) for the F-35 
Joint Strike Fighter (JSF). ALIS has repeatedly been identified 
by Department of Defense officials, congressional defense 
committees, and the Government Accountability Office as a major 
source of both developmental and operational risk for the JSF 
program. The Committee understands that the F-35 Joint Program 
Office is in the process of developing a ``Technical Roadmap'' 
for ALIS to inform the fiscal year 2018 budget request. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report 
to the congressional defense committees on the ``Technical 
Roadmap'' not later than 30 days following its approval along 
with the most recent cost estimates for ALIS.

                   JOINT STRIKE FIGHTER TEST AIRCRAFT

    The Committee recommendation for Joint Strike Fighter 
development includes $251,700,000, the same as the request, to 
modify operational test aircraft to the Block 3F configuration 
in support of initial operational test and evaluation (IOT&E;). 
The Committee expects that the Secretary of Defense will 
allocate aircraft to support both developmental and operational 
testing consistent with the approved Test and Evaluation Master 
Plan. The Committee further urges the Secretary of Defense to 
ensure that necessary modifications to operational test 
aircraft will be given appropriate priority in the depot flow 
plan to meet the IOT&E; timeline.

            RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION, ARMY

 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $7,565,327,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     7,515,399,000
Committee recommendation..............................     7,864,517,000
Change from budget request............................      +349,118,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $7,864,517,000 
for Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Army which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2017:


                          WARFIGHTER LETHALITY

    The Committee is adamant that in a hostile environment 
warfighters must enter a conflict with a decisive technical and 
capability advantage. Due to world events including state 
aggression, terrorism, and global weapons proliferation, in the 
report accompanying the House-passed Department of Defense 
Appropriations Act, 2015, the Committee directed the Secretary 
of the Army to conduct a study focused on the status of lethal 
mechanisms such as armament systems, munitions, and missiles. 
The study identified numerous areas of concern including, but 
not limited to, the loss of weapons range overmatch, reductions 
in the use of area weapons, the proliferation of low-cost 
commercially available unmanned aerial systems, urban scenarios 
and associated humanitarian concerns, and sub-optimization of 
weapon acquisition planning. The Committee commends the 
Secretary of the Army's attention and action on the report's 
findings and has provided resources for select mitigation 
activities that can be conducted in the near-term. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of the Army to establish and 
advance armament systems integration capability through 
existing capacity and mechanisms to advance and coordinate 
armament systems development and effectiveness.

              TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENT AND RETENTION CENTER

    The Committee believes that automating and optimizing 
ammunition propellant production processes such as those for 
solvent-less and spherical propellants and integrating new 
materials such as consumable structural materials will benefit 
the Army's manufacture of conventional ammunition. Further, the 
Committee believes that these processes and materials could 
play a crucial role in reducing cost, increasing ammunition 
performance, and enhancing soldier safety. The Committee 
encourages the Secretary of the Army to equip the national 
technical industrial base with these manufacturing processes 
and materials.

            ARMY NET ZERO INDUSTRIAL BASE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    The Committee supports the research, development, and 
demonstration of advanced technologies to increase the Army's 
ability to address its Net Zero Energy, Water, and Solid Waste 
Policy and enhance the sustainable operation of its industrial 
munitions base.

                      ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL UNITS

    The Committee recognizes that a significant amount of fuel 
used at forward operating bases is consumed by environmental 
control units that keep servicemembers and major electronic 
systems cool in austere environments. The Committee encourages 
the Secretary of the Army to consider determining the potential 
efficiency that could be created through the use of enclosure-
sized environmental control units and systems. An evaluation 
between distributed cooling and legacy approaches to compare 
the size, weight, power, purchase, and overall operational 
costs would provide the Army with information that could yield 
fuel and operational cost savings, as well as more efficient 
ways to cool servicemembers and electronics.

         ADVANCED LIGHTWEIGHT MULTIFUNCTIONAL TRANSPARENT ARMOR

    The Committee encourages the Secretary of the Army to 
consider the development of advanced lightweight 
multifunctional transparent armor material for facial shields, 
goggles, spectacles, and other solider protection gear.

                      MULTI-ROLE ARMAMENT SYSTEMS

    The Committee notes that the Army's combat vehicle 
modernization strategy has identified requirements for greater 
lethality for existing combat vehicles, in developing new 
platforms, and in maintaining technical superiority. The Army's 
modification of combat vehicles over the years has resulted in 
additional protection at the expense of mobility, and lagging 
increases in lethality. The Committee urges the Secretary of 
the Army to develop new armament systems for both current and 
future combat vehicles that will provide lethality overmatch as 
well as the ability to defeat multiple target sets, active 
protection systems, and lethal and non-lethal capability within 
the same weapon system.

                       ACCESS TO CONTESTED AREAS

    The Committee notes that many potential adversaries have 
established anti-access and area denial measures. To facilitate 
access to contested areas, the Committee encourages the 
Secretary of the Army to focus on developing capabilities that 
can be airdropped into contested areas, operated in GPS-denied 
environments, and that can survive an initial fight until 
heavier reinforcements become available. The Committee 
encourages the Secretary of the Army to consider the 
development of lighter platforms that have the lethality of the 
Abrams tank but can be airdropped, as well as armed robotic 
platforms that are deployable with manned platforms.

            SUBTERRANEAN AND DENSE URBAN COMPLEX ENVIRONMENT

    The Army Research Development Engineering Center (ARDEC) is 
the lead for dense urban warfare materiel solutions and has the 
responsibility to coordinate and demonstrate materiel solutions 
that are responsive to warfighting challenges that impede 
operations. The Committee understands that numerous challenges 
exist that impede operations and encourages the Director of the 
ARDEC to adapt existing technologies to subterranean hard 
target defeat needs, to support experimentation of technologies 
to disable and neutralize underground facilities and their 
associated components, and to demonstrate new emerging 
technologies to enable delivery of effects in dense urban 
environments.

                          ADVANCED ENERGETICS

    The Committee urges the Secretary of the Army to 
demonstrate, through application of novel manufacturing pilot 
processes, next generation insensitive energetic materials 
enabling increased gun-launched munition performance to achieve 
longer ranges and increased terminal effects against a spectrum 
of threats.

                    DIRECTED ENERGY ARMAMENT SYSTEMS

    The Committee understands that the Air Force and the Navy 
are currently investing in high energy laser directed energy 
programs. Accordingly, the Army should also consider investing 
in directed energy capabilities for both combat vehicles and 
dismounted soldiers. Existing Army work in this area is 
targeted at high power systems on large ground platforms that 
lack mobility and may not be available as an organic asset to 
companies and below, to include dismounted soldiers. The 
Committee encourages the Secretary of the Army to invest in 
reducing the size, weight, power, and cost for these directed 
energy systems and to focus on integrating them into existing 
or future combat and tactical vehicles, as well as individual 
soldier weapon systems.

                    IMPROVED TURBINE ENGINE PROGRAM

    The Committee commends the Army for moving forward with the 
research and development phase of the Improved Turbine Engine 
program and encourages the Secretary of the Army to examine 
options to accelerate the development and fielding of this 
critical aviation modernization program.

                ACTIVE RESPONSE TO UNDERBODY EXPLOSIONS

    The Committee is aware of the development of technology to 
detect and autonomously respond to vehicle underbody explosive 
incidents with an active real-time response to counter vehicle 
flight, and to reduce the physical effects on vehicle occupants 
through a cooperative research and development agreement 
between industry and the Army. The Committee directs the 
Secretary of the Army to continue testing this technology, 
including with the use of explosive testing, through available 
funds, and to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than March 31, 2017 on the progress and 
results of these tests.

              BALLISTIC RESISTANT ADAPTIVE SEATING SYSTEM

    The Committee understands that helicopter pilots and 
aircrew members have reported back pain and increased fatigue 
while flying, which reduces their effectiveness and affects 
safety. Additionally, with more military specialties open to 
females, a number of pilots are flying in seats that do not fit 
their physical geometry. Therefore, the Committee 
recommendation provides $7,000,000 above the request for the 
Ballistic Resistant Adaptive Seating System program in order to 
accelerate prototype fabrication and destructive testing of 
adaptive seats.

                     TECHNOLOGIES TO DELAY RIPENING

    The Committee is aware of the development of entirely 
natural food applications that can be kept at room temperature, 
thereby negating the need for refrigeration. This technology 
can help extend the ripening process and shelf-life of combat 
rations for servicemembers, thereby controlling cost and 
improving quality. The Committee encourages the Secretary of 
the Army to continue to invest in this technology.

        MATERIALS AND METALS PROCESSING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

    The Committee supports continued expansion of the Army 
Research Laboratory's (ARL) efforts in research, education, and 
technology development in materials and metals processing 
science and engineering. These investments have the potential 
to accelerate transformation of the affordability, performance, 
and environmental sustainability of strategic materials vital 
to national security. The Committee values ARL's recent 
expansion of its open campus concept to materials and 
manufacturing science laboratories and encourages such 
collaborations with the academic community and industry.

                 LIGHTWEIGHT COMBAT VEHICLE COMPONENTS

    The Committee acknowledges that incorporating alternative 
materials into combat vehicle components may offer an 
opportunity to significantly reduce the weight of the vehicle, 
thereby extending the service life of the vehicle. The 
Committee encourages the Commanding General of the United 
States Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and 
Engineering Center to continue to test, develop, and field 
components that can reduce vehicle weight, reduce fuel 
consumption, increase payload capacity, and extend service 
life.

                   SILICON CARBIDE POWER ELECTRONICS

    The Committee supports the Army's investment to advance 
power and energy technology to meet requirements for higher 
electric power loads at forward operating bases through 
efficient generators, to extend silent watch capabilities for 
ground vehicles, and to improve vehicle performance. Silicon 
carbide power modules may be an enabling technology that meets 
Army requirements for power distribution and management for 
generator and battery systems. The Committee urges the 
Secretary of the Army to support demonstration and deployment 
of silicon carbide power electronics.

             PROTECTED SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS CAPABILITY

    The Committee understands that the Army is pursuing a 
protected satellite communications (SATCOM) capability and that 
an interim software-only solution could be implemented with 
wideband global SATCOM system certification within two years. 
The Committee is concerned the fiscal year 2017 budget request 
may not be sufficient to maintain the current program execution 
plan over the future years defense program. Lack of sufficient 
funding could derail required hardware and software efforts and 
hinder near-term progress on an anti-jam solution. Therefore, 
the Committee directs the Secretary of the Army to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
60 days after the enactment of this Act on the technical and 
budgetary feasibility for continuing this effort, including an 
assessment of the capability in enterprise and tactical 
communications networks. Furthermore, the Secretary is urged to 
consider prioritizing funding for these capabilities in future 
budgets.

                     ADVANCED MULTI-PURPOSE VEHICLE

    The Committee recognizes the priority that the Army is 
placing on the Advanced Multi-Purpose Vehicle (AMPV) program 
and fully supports the fiscal year 2017 budget request of 
$184,200,000 to move forward with prototype testing. Given the 
importance of the AMPV program, the total estimated program 
cost of $10,200,000,000, and the Army's troubled acquisition 
record in new start modernization programs, the Committee 
directs the Secretary of the Army to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 90 days after 
the enactment of this Act, and quarterly thereafter, with 
updates on cost and schedule metrics and the vehicle's 
performance in meeting established performance requirements.

            SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY REINVENTION LABORATORIES

    The Committee acknowledges the unique, valuable 
contributions of the Department of Defense Science and 
Technology Reinvention Laboratories (STRL) to the national 
technology base. As such, the Committee believes that each STRL 
must be able to accept and execute funding from other STRLs, 
Department of Defense organizations, government agencies, 
industry, and academia.

            RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION, NAVY


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................   $18,117,677,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................    17,276,301,000
Committee recommendation..............................    16,831,290,000
Change from budget request............................      -445,011,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$16,831,290,000 for Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, 
Navy which will provide the following program in fiscal year 
2017:


               CONDITION-BASED MAINTENANCE FOR NAVY SHIPS

    The Committee is encouraged that the Navy continues to 
develop and implement condition-based maintenance solutions 
that will likely provide demonstrable improvements in fleet 
readiness. The Committee encourages the Secretary of the Navy 
to learn from and adapt the successes of the Littoral Combat 
Ship condition-based maintenance efforts to other classes of 
ships with aging weapons systems, such as the Aegis class 
cruisers and destroyers.

                NAVY UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee understands that the Navy is continuing to 
restructure and refine its requirements for unmanned aerial 
vehicles that can be launched and recovered aboard aircraft 
carriers and are mission survivable in anti-access, area-denied 
environments. The Committee encourages the Secretary of the 
Navy to examine and invest in already proven technologies that 
can host a variety of payloads, including communications, 
electronic attack, and strike capability.

            MARINE CORPS PERFORMANCE AND RESILIENCY PROGRAM

    The Committee is aware of the Marine Corps Performance and 
Resiliency program and encourages the Secretary of the Navy to 
continue to invest in integrated research in injury 
rehabilitation, nutrition, and neurocognition to improve 
recovery outcomes. The Committee believes that particular 
attention should be given to the readiness of combat support 
Marines and that there should be a plan to transition lessons 
learned from the Performance and Resiliency program to the 
Director of the Defense Health Agency for Department-wide 
application of prevention management, performance, and 
rehabilitation strategies.

                     COASTAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH

    The Committee understands the importance of the littoral 
region to Navy operations worldwide. The Committee believes 
that additional research of the magnetic and electric field 
characteristics in coastal ocean regions and the development of 
predictive techniques to distinguish ships and submarines from 
naturally occurring background features would be beneficial for 
littoral operations. The Committee encourages the Secretary of 
the Navy to conduct additional research in this critical area.

          ACTIVE PROTECTION SYSTEMS FOR MARINE CORPS VEHICLES

    The Committee is concerned with the growing threat to the 
warfighter from inexpensive shoulder-launched munitions such as 
rocket-propelled grenades and commends the Secretary of the 
Army for initiating the acquisition and testing of active 
protection systems that provide a higher level of survivability 
against these threats for Army ground vehicles. The Committee 
recommendation includes an additional $10,000,000 in overseas 
contingency operations/global war on terrorism funding to 
advance the development and testing of active protection 
systems. In addition, the Committee notes that the Marine Corps 
is currently leveraging Army investments on the Abrams tanks, 
and directs the Secretary of the Navy to consider conducting 
similar demonstrations on other Marine Corps ground vehicles.

         RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION, AIR FORCE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................   $25,217,148,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................    28,112,251,000
Committee recommendation..............................    27,106,851,000
Change from budget request............................    -1,005,400,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$27,106,851,000 for Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, 
Air Force which will provide the following program in fiscal 
year 2017:


     JOINT SURVEILLANCE TARGET ATTACK RADAR SYSTEM RECAPITALIZATION

    The Committee is concerned by further delays in the 
acquisition schedule for the recapitalization of the E-8 Joint 
Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (JSTARS) fleet. The 
Committee is also concerned by direction from the Office of the 
Secretary of Defense that would appear to contemplate further 
delays to entering the engineering and manufacturing 
development phase of the program based on progress in radar 
risk reduction.
    The Committee urges the Secretary of Defense and the 
Secretary of the Air Force to avoid any further slips to the 
present schedule. The Committee recommends that the Secretary 
of the Air Force adopt a clear size, weight, power, and cooling 
requirement based on data and analysis that takes into account 
both prior experience on past acquisition programs and the 
present state of technology. The Committee also recommends that 
the Secretary of the Air Force consider an increase in the 
number of developmental aircraft and utilize a contracting 
method that will incentivize the prime contractor to accelerate 
delivery of JSTARS recap aircraft and expedite the achievement 
of initial operating capability, which is currently projected 
to occur in fiscal year 2024. In order to preclude further 
delays to the program, the Committee recommendation includes a 
provision that prohibits the obligation or expenditure of 
JSTARS recapitalization program funds for pre-milestone B 
activities, including radar technology maturation and risk 
reduction, beyond December 31, 2017.
    Finally, in order to preserve JSTARS capability for the 
combatant commanders during the transition to a recapitalized 
fleet, the Committee also recommends an increase of $19,700,000 
above the budget request to complete modifications to the 
primary mission equipment of the existing operational E-8 
JSTARS fleet. A recent report from the Air Force noted that two 
aircraft have not received these modifications solely due to 
budget restraints and that these modifications are essential to 
ensuring continued JSTARS mission relevance in the near term.

                   PRESIDENTIAL AIRCRAFT REPLACEMENT

    The Committee includes $351,220,000, the same as the budget 
request, for the continued development of the Presidential 
Aircraft Replacement (PAR). The Committee directs the Secretary 
of the Air Force to provide a quarterly briefing on the PAR 
program to the congressional defense committees. The first such 
brief shall be provided not later than 30 days following the 
end of the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2016.

              IMPROVED GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM RECEIVERS

    The fiscal year 2017 budget request includes funds to 
integrate improved military global positioning system (GPS) 
receivers with various Air Force weapon systems and munitions. 
The Committee acknowledges the need for this improvement but is 
concerned about the coherence of these multiple efforts and the 
Air Force's ability to properly execute the funding that has 
been requested. Therefore, the Committee recommends a reduction 
in funding for these efforts pending further information. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to review the 
execution plan for improved military GPS receivers and brief 
the House and Senate Appropriations Committees on the results 
of this review not later than September 15, 2016.

                      SPACE BASED INFRARED SYSTEM

    The Committee continues to be concerned that the Space 
Based Infrared System (SBIRS) program of record continues to 
develop new payload technology without an approved future 
systems architecture. Further, the Committee is troubled that 
the SBIRS analysis of alternatives for a future system does not 
benefit from clearly defined roles and responsibilities within 
the Overhead Persistent Infrared family of systems to determine 
what requirements any new system should meet. The analysis of 
alternatives also lacks a full review of resiliency 
requirements and the risks associated with transitioning to any 
new architecture. Therefore, the Committee directs the 
Secretary of the Air Force to brief the congressional defense 
and intelligence committees on the findings from the post 
analysis of alternatives actions and reduces funding for 
Evolved SBIRS by $20,000,000.

                        SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS

    The Committee is troubled that the Department of Defense 
does not have a unified satellite communications (SATCOM) 
architecture, to include the purchase of commercial services, 
with one organization responsible for lead planning and 
budgeting. Further, the Services and various components of the 
Office of the Secretary of Defense appear at odds with one 
another when planning for future space, ground, and user 
equipment systems. Though the Committee is encouraged by the 
progress made by the Principal Department of Defense Space 
Advisor, it appears that the Department continues to 
independently plan each major piece of the architecture, 
thereby sub-optimizing capability, performance, and 
affordability. The Committee encourages the Secretary of 
Defense to consolidate SATCOM planning and budget authority 
into one entity and reduces funding for Evolved Advanced 
Extremely High Frequency by $30,000,000.

                      WEATHER SATELLITE FOLLOW-ON

    The Committee is concerned that the Department of Defense 
lacks sufficient focus and planning capability to efficiently 
and affordably meet weather data collection requirements. Five 
near-term capability gaps exist, two of which the Air Force has 
no approved plan for remediation. Remediation of the remaining 
three gaps relies upon building and launching a demonstration 
satellite to determine if sufficient technological maturation 
exists to meet collection requirements. If successful, the Air 
Force plans to launch a free flying interim satellite at 
significant cost until a long-term plan is designed. 
Unfortunately, there is no formal effort underway to design a 
baseline system, including utilizing applicable federal and 
international partnerships, that is capable of meeting all 
weather data collection requirements. Therefore, the Committee 
reduces the fiscal year 2017 budget request by $30,000,000.

                            ANTENNA RESEARCH

    The Committee is aware that the Air Force has funded 
research in deployable and reconfigurable multifunctional 
antennas. The Committee encourages the Director of the Air 
Force Office of Scientific Research to partner with academic 
institutions capable of advancing technologies with a 
potentially transformational impact on important applications 
for military use, such as expandable antennas for satellite 
communications and collapsible antennas that can benefit ground 
personnel by reducing the weight and footprint of antennas.

        RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION, DEFENSE-WIDE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................   $18,695,955,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................    18,308,826,000
Committee recommendation..............................    18,311,236,000
Change from budget request............................        +2,410,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$18,311,236,000 for Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, 
Defense-Wide which will provide the following program in fiscal 
year 2017:


MANUFACTURING INNOVATION INSTITUTE FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS

    The Committee notes that high temperature superconductors 
offer the potential to reduce the magnetic signature of Navy 
warships, to accelerate the use of motors and generators for 
all-electric ships and aircraft, to develop minesweeping 
magnets, and to create magnetic energy storage systems and rail 
guns. The Committee urges the Secretary of Defense to consider 
establishing a Manufacturing Innovation Institute that focuses 
on high temperature superconductors.

            UNITED STATES-ISRAELI ANTI-TUNNELING TECHNOLOGY

    In fiscal year 2016 the United States and Israel jointly 
initiated the development of a system to detect tunnels built 
by its enemies, in an effort to prevent future terrorist 
incursions on the Israeli border. This new system may also have 
an application in curbing illegal migration on United States 
borders.
    Of the funding provided in fiscal year 2016, Israel 
promised to match contributions with a combination of actual 
funding and in-kind contributions of up to the appropriated 
level of $40,000,000. For fiscal year 2017, the Israeli 
government has requested and the Committee recommendation 
provides an additional $42,700,000 to continue this effort.
    The Committee understands that when practical, every effort 
will be made to complete portions of this research that are 
better accomplished in the United States by United States 
vendors and military research and development centers.

                  NATIONAL SECURITY EDUCATION PROGRAM

    The Committee supports the Department of Defense and 
Intelligence Community's partnerships with institutions of 
higher education to ensure an adequate level of servicemembers 
maintain proficiency in critical languages. The Committee 
believes that these efforts should include minority serving 
institutions, such as Historically Black Colleges and 
Universities and Hispanic Serving Institutions, to ensure 
diversity within the Intelligence Community and to increase the 
number of analysts with proficiency in critical languages and 
cultural studies, including Russian, Chinese, Farsi, Arabic, 
and Turkish.

                   ACCESS TO TRUSTED MICROELECTRONICS

    The Committee is concerned by the risk that reliance on 
foreign suppliers of critical information technology components 
and suppliers with connections to foreign governments poses. 
However, the Committee is aware of efforts the Department of 
Defense has initiated to address concerns with access to 
microelectronics from trusted sources. The fiscal year 2017 
budget request includes funding for a multi-faceted approach 
designed to protect microelectronics designs and intellectual 
property, while at the same time enabling access to advanced 
technology from the commercial sector. The Committee is 
encouraged by the Department's engagement with industry, 
academia, national laboratories, and other government agencies 
to both implement near-term actions and develop a long-term 
science and technology based approach that reduces risk of 
reliance on sole source foundry operations.
    The Committee believes that the Department has 
appropriately scoped and adequately funded this effort. The 
consolidation of the Department of Defense Trusted Foundry 
contract management efforts at the Defense Microelectronics 
Activity effectively preserves the organization's role, while 
at the same time initiates development of a new trust approach 
to shift away from the traditional trust model. This provides a 
sensible and affordable investment strategy that will enable 
United States intelligence and weapons systems to remain secure 
and technologically advanced. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary of Defense to inform the congressional defense 
committees of issues with foreign suppliers of critical 
information technology components and progress on the 
implementation of the new trust approach.

                           HIGH ENERGY LASERS

    The Committee is aware of efforts within the High Energy 
Laser Joint Technology Office to develop advanced, directed-
energy, high energy laser weapons that have the potential to 
perform a wide variety of military missions. The Committee 
encourages the Secretary of Defense to explore further 
development and evaluation of this important technology.

 STEM IMPROVEMENT WITHIN HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES 
                   AND MINORITY SERVING INSTITUTIONS

    The Committee remains concerned about the long-term 
development of the Science, Technology, Engineering and 
Mathematics (STEM) workforce pipeline for underrepresented 
minorities. The Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense 
to emphasize STEM education improvement within the Historically 
Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Serving 
Institutions, Tribal and Native American Colleges, and Hispanic 
Colleges and Universities, and to focus on increasing the 
participation of minority students through engaged mentoring, 
enriched research experiences, and opportunities to publish, 
present, and network. The Committee encourages the Secretary of 
Defense to consider these factors when awarding competitive 
funding under this program to expand STEM opportunities for 
underrepresented minorities.

                OPERATIONAL TEST AND EVALUATION, DEFENSE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................      $188,558,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................       178,994,000
Committee recommendation..............................       178,994,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $178,994,000 
for Operational Test and Evaluation, Defense which will provide 
the following program in fiscal year 2017:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee         Change from
                                                          Budget  Request      Recommended          Request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1 OPERATIONAL TEST AND EVALUATION......................             78,047             78,047              - - -
2 LIVE FIRE TESTING....................................             48,316             48,316              - - -
3 OPERATIONAL TEST ACTIVITIES AND ANALYSIS.............             52,631             52,631              - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    TOTAL, OPERATIONAL TEST & EVALUATION, DEFENSE......            178,994            178,994              - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                TITLE V

                     REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS

                     DEFENSE WORKING CAPITAL FUNDS

 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $1,738,768,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................     1,371,613,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,371,613,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,371,613,000 
for the Defense Working Capital Funds accounts which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2017:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee         Change from
                                                          Budget  Request      Recommended          Request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
WORKING CAPITAL FUND, ARMY.............................             56,469             56,469              - - -
WORKING CAPITAL FUND, AIR FORCE........................             63,967             63,967              - - -
WORKING CAPITAL FUND, DEFENSE WIDE.....................             37,132             37,132              - - -
DEFENSE WORKING CAPITAL FUND, DECA.....................          1,214,045          1,214,045              - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    TOTAL, DEFENSE WORKING CAPITAL FUNDS...............          1,371,613          1,371,613              - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                TITLE VI

                  OTHER DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PROGRAMS

                         DEFENSE HEALTH PROGRAM

 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................   $32,329,490,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................    33,467,516,000
Committee recommendation..............................    33,576,563,000
Change from budget request............................      +109,047,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$33,576,563,000 for the Defense Health Program which will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2017:


         REPROGRAMMING GUIDANCE FOR THE DEFENSE HEALTH PROGRAM

    The Committee remains concerned regarding the transfer of 
funds from the In-House Care budget sub-activity to pay for 
contractor-provided medical care. To limit such transfers and 
improve oversight within the Defense Health Program operation 
and maintenance account, the Committee includes a provision 
which caps the funds available for Private Sector Care under 
the TRICARE program subject to prior approval reprogramming 
procedures. The provision and accompanying report language 
should not be interpreted as limiting the amount of funds that 
may be transferred to the In-House Care budget sub-activity 
from other budget sub-activities within the Defense Health 
Program. In addition, funding for the In-House Care budget sub-
activity continues to be designated as a congressional special 
interest item. Any transfer of funds from the In-House Care 
budget sub-activity into the Private Sector Care budget sub-
activity or any other budget sub-activity requires the 
Secretary of Defense to follow prior approval reprogramming 
procedures for operation and maintenance funds.
    The Committee remains concerned that transfers of funds 
from the Private Sector Care budget sub-activity often occur 
without the submission of written notification as required by 
prior year Department of Defense Appropriations Acts. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide written 
notification to the congressional defense committees of 
cumulative transfers in excess of $10,000,000 out of the 
Private Sector Care budget sub-activity not later than fifteen 
days after such a transfer. Furthermore, the Committee directs 
the Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 30 days after 
the enactment of this Act that delineates transfers of funds, 
and the dates any transfers occurred, from the Private Sector 
Care budget sub-activity to any other budget sub-activity for 
fiscal year 2016.
    The Committee further directs the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense (Health Affairs) to provide quarterly reports to the 
congressional defense committees on budget execution data for 
all of the Defense Health Program budget activities and to 
adequately reflect changes to the budget activities requested 
by the Services in future budget submissions.

                               CARRYOVER

    For fiscal year 2017, the Committee recommends one percent 
carryover authority for the operation and maintenance account 
of the Defense Health Program. The Committee directs the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to submit a 
detailed spending plan for any fiscal year 2016 designated 
carryover funds to the congressional defense committees not 
less than 30 days prior to executing the carryover funds.

                 PEER-REVIEWED CANCER RESEARCH PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $120,000,000 for the peer-reviewed 
breast cancer research program, $90,000,000 for the peer-
reviewed prostate cancer research program, $20,000,000 for the 
peer-reviewed ovarian cancer research program, $10,000,000 for 
the peer-reviewed kidney cancer research program, $12,000,000 
for the peer-reviewed lung cancer research program, and 
$30,000,000 for the peer-reviewed cancer research program that 
would research cancers not addressed in the aforementioned 
programs currently executed by the Department of Defense.
    The funds provided in the peer-reviewed cancer research 
program are directed to be used to conduct research in the 
following areas: bladder cancer, brain cancer, colorectal 
cancer, listeria vaccine for cancer, liver cancer, lymphoma, 
melanoma and other skin cancers, mesothelioma, pancreatic 
cancer, stomach cancer, and cancer in children, adolescents, 
and young adults.
    The funds provided under the peer-reviewed cancer research 
program shall be used only for the purposes listed above. The 
Committee directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health 
Affairs) to provide a report not later than 180 days after the 
enactment of this Act to the congressional defense committees 
on the status of the peer-reviewed cancer research program. For 
each research area, the report should include the funding 
amount awarded, the progress of the research, and the relevance 
of the research to servicemembers and their families.
    The Committee commends the Department of Defense for 
ensuring that projects funded through the various peer-reviewed 
cancer research programs maintain a focus on issues of 
significance to military populations and the warfighter. This 
includes promoting collaborative research proposals between 
Department of Defense researchers and non-military research 
institutions. These collaborations leverage the knowledge, 
infrastructure, and access to clinical populations that the 
partners bring to the research effort. Additionally, promoting 
these collaborations provides a valuable recruitment and 
retention incentive for military medical and research 
personnel. The Committee encourages the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense (Health Affairs) to continue to emphasize the 
importance of these collaborations between military and non-
military researchers throughout the peer review process.

              PEER-REVIEWED BREAST CANCER RESEARCH PROGRAM

    The Committee is encouraged by ongoing efforts within the 
Defense Health Program to research breast cancer. Recent 
medical journals have described the promise of immunotherapy in 
combating several forms of metastatic cancer and as such, the 
Committee encourages the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health 
Affairs) to investigate immunotherapeutic vaccines for the 
treatment of metastatic breast cancer, prioritizing efforts 
that have already shown success.

                       METASTATIC CANCER RESEARCH

    The Committee continues to support the establishment of a 
task force to research metastasized cancer with a focus on 
clinical and translational research aimed at extending the 
lives of advanced state and recurrent patients. The Committee 
directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to 
submit an updated report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than 60 days after the enactment of this 
Act on the status of the establishment of a task force under 
the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program to focus 
on research for metastatic cancer of all types.

               JOINT WARFIGHTER MEDICAL RESEARCH PROGRAM

    The Committee recommendation includes $30,000,000 for the 
continuation of the joint warfighter medical research program. 
The funding shall be used to augment and accelerate high 
priority Department of Defense and Service medical requirements 
and to continue prior year initiatives that are close to 
achieving their objectives and yielding a benefit to military 
medicine. The funding shall not be used for new projects nor 
for basic research, and it shall be awarded at the discretion 
of the Secretary of Defense following a review of medical 
research and development gaps as well as unfinanced medical 
requirements of the Services. Further, the Committee directs 
the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to submit a 
report not later than 180 days after the enactment of this Act 
to the congressional defense committees that lists the projects 
that receive funding. The report should include the funding 
amount awarded to each project, a thorough description of each 
project's research, and the benefit the research will provide 
to the Department of Defense.

                       ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORDS

    The Committee continues to be concerned about the pace at 
which the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs have 
developed and procured an interoperable electronic health 
records solution. The Committee reiterates that the two systems 
must be completely and meaningfully interoperable and 
encourages the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, 
Technology, and Logistics) to focus on the overall goal of 
seamless compatibility between the two Departments' electronic 
health record systems. Furthermore, the Committee directs the 
Director of the Interagency Program Office (IPO) to continue to 
provide quarterly reports on the progress of interoperability 
between the two Departments to the House and Senate Defense 
Appropriations Subcommittees and the House and Senate Military 
Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies 
Appropriations Subcommittees. Additionally, the Program 
Executive Officer (PEO) for Defense Healthcare Management 
Systems (DHMS), in conjunction with the Director of the IPO, is 
directed to provide quarterly reports to the congressional 
defense committees on the cost and schedule of the program, to 
include milestones, knowledge points, and acquisition 
timelines, as well as quarterly obligation reports. The 
Committee directs the PEO DHMS to continue briefing the House 
and Senate Defense Appropriations Subcommittees on a quarterly 
basis, coinciding with the report submission.

                  MENTAL HEALTH OF MILITARY DEPENDENTS

    The Secretary of Defense has indicated that military 
dependents are at a higher risk of depression and pediatric 
behavioral issues compared to the general population, and that 
further research to improve military dependent psychological 
health issues is needed to continue the adaptation and 
development of appropriate evidence-based interventions and 
targeted therapies. In fiscal year 2016, the Committee directed 
the Secretary of Defense to fully fund a program to address 
this issue starting in fiscal year 2017. While the fiscal year 
2017 budget request includes robust funding for mental health 
care, the budget request fails to identify funding that 
satisfies the fiscal year 2016 requirement. It is imperative 
that the Department develop efficient means to identify 
children at risk of deployment-related mental health issues and 
to provide tools, education, and guidance to the professionals 
and families caring for these children. Therefore, the 
Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to develop a program 
to address this issue and to brief the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees not later than 90 days after the 
enactment of this Act on the steps that will be taken in fiscal 
year 2017 to address the fiscal year 2016 requirement.

   THE CANCER CENTER AT WALTER REED NATIONAL MILITARY MEDICAL CENTER

    The Committee recognizes the close cooperation between The 
John P. Murtha Cancer Center at Walter Reed National Military 
Medical Center and the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health 
Affairs) that has enabled the expedited completion of a 
partnership agreement between the Murtha Cancer Center and the 
Oncology Research Information Exchange Network. This new 
relationship between these two programs will further advance 
research at the Murtha Cancer Center through the enhanced use 
of patient data derived from large patient studies that include 
long-term health records, bio specimen repositories, and 
research collaborations involving major academic cancer 
centers. The Committee commends the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense (Health Affairs) for assisting the Murtha Cancer Center 
in completing this agreement and strongly encourages increased 
support to allow for rapid enrollment of patients and 
collaboration on research initiatives toward the goal of 
enhanced cancer treatment for all servicemembers and their 
families.

                      EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES

    The Committee understands that the impact of infectious 
diseases on servicemembers can be significant, including lost 
service time, reduction in operational readiness, and an 
increased logistical burden to provide replacement troops. The 
Department of Defense's critical role in the swift response to 
viral outbreaks of Ebola and Zika demonstrates the value of 
continued investment in military infectious disease research 
and development capabilities. The Committee encourages the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to pursue 
partnerships with colleges and universities that have strong 
research programs in emerging infectious diseases and to 
support research efforts that incorporate genomic technologies, 
bioinformatics, and computational biology.

                   MULTI-DISCIPLINARY BRAIN RESEARCH

    The Committee recognizes recent efforts by the Department 
of Defense to leverage partnerships with academia and the 
private sector to understand and improve prevention and 
treatment of traumatic brain injuries to servicemembers. The 
Committee encourages the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health 
Affairs) to continue to leverage partnerships with academia and 
the private sector and to support further studies of traumatic 
brain injuries to gain a deeper understanding of concussive 
injuries including how they impact the brain, how and to what 
extent the brain recovers, and how prevention and treatment 
methods may be improved.

             IMPACT OF GUT MICROBIOME ON CHRONIC CONDITIONS

    Recent research suggests that levels of microbiota can 
affect a patient's overall health. The Committee is aware that 
the Defense Health Agency plans to investigate the impact of 
gut microbiome on warfighter readiness and performance in 
fiscal year 2017. The Committee encourages the Director of the 
Defense Health Agency to also investigate the impact of gut 
microbiome on long-term chronic conditions such as heart 
disease, kidney disease, and hypertension.

                          COMBAT OCULAR TRAUMA

    The Committee is concerned about incidents of combat ocular 
trauma, which is an injury to the eye or neuro-ophthalmological 
pathways. These injuries often result in severe vision loss and 
visual dysfunction. Therefore, the Committee encourages the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to evaluate the 
effectiveness and safety of treatments such as transcorneal 
electrical stimulation to improve visual function after ocular 
trauma.

                    EXPANDED CANINE THERAPY RESEARCH

    The Committee is aware that canine therapy for treatment of 
post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain 
injury (TBI) symptoms is a promising alternative or adjunct to 
pharmaceutical treatment, which can have harmful side-effects. 
While still experimental, canine therapy has shown 
effectiveness in treating PTSD and other psychological 
disorders, from hospitalized psychiatric patients to children 
with developmental disorders, patients with substance abuse 
problems, and victims of trauma. The Committee notes that 
canine therapy is a promising area for further research as a 
complementary or alternative treatment for the signature wounds 
sustained in ongoing conflicts. Therefore, the Committee 
continues to encourage the Service Surgeons General to initiate 
or expand their research into canine therapy to validate its 
therapeutic effectiveness in the treatment of PTSD and TBI.

                     WATER SAFETY ON MILITARY BASES

    The Committee is concerned about actual and potential 
incidents of contaminated drinking water on and around military 
bases. The Committee understands that in more than one 
instance, the Services' use of firefighting foam during 
training exercises caused perfluorinated chemicals to enter the 
ground and drinking water supply. It is the responsibility of 
the Department of Defense to ensure that its activities do not 
adversely affect supplies of drinking water at military 
installations and in surrounding communities. Additionally, 
appropriate policies and procedures must be in place to address 
any future contaminations, including the availability of clean 
drinking water in the event of an incident.
    Therefore, the Committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense (Health Affairs) to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 90 days after 
the enactment of this Act that identifies the current water 
quality status of each of the military bases worldwide. The 
report should outline the current procedures that are in place 
to provide clean drinking water if the current water supply is 
deemed unhealthy. Additionally, the Committee directs the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to conduct a 
study to determine if the Department's current policies and 
procedures for monitoring drinking water are sufficient and to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than 120 days after the enactment of this Act with the 
results of the study and recommendations for improving the 
quality of water testing.

                       HYPERBARIC OXYGEN THERAPY

    In December 2015, the Government Accountability Office 
(GAO) published a report that identified research on the use of 
hyberbaric oxygen therapy to treat traumatic brain injury (TBI) 
and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Patients suffering 
from these conditions are often prescribed various psychotropic 
drugs to ease their symptoms. These drugs often have negative 
side effects and carry the risk of leading to dependency. The 
GAO report indicated that there is no conclusive evidence at 
this point to determine whether or not hyperbaric oxygen 
therapy is effective. The Committee urges the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to continue to study the 
effects of hyperbaric therapy on servicemembers with TBI and/or 
PTSD and to continually inform the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees on its progress.

                     APPLIED BIOMEDICAL TECHNOLOGY

    The Committee is encouraged by scientific advances which 
may enhance the ability to diagnose and treat chronic 
conditions caused by neurotrauma, including post-traumatic 
stress disorder and traumatic brain injury. The Committee is 
eager to review findings from the Defense Health Agency's 
applied biomedical technology research to enhance military 
readiness and encourages the Assistant Secretary of Defense 
(Health Affairs) to explore the development of a diagnostic 
tool which uses advanced imaging analysis to assess 
demyelination in various patient populations.

                   SERVICE RECORDS LOSS THROUGH FIRE

    The 1973 fire at the National Personnel Records Center in 
Overland, Missouri destroyed millions of military service 
records. This loss has created numerous challenges for some 
veterans and has prevented access to benefits and decorations 
earned through their service. While the Department of Defense 
and the Department of Veterans Affairs have an established 
process for veterans affected by this fire, the coordination 
between the two Departments could be improved. The Committee 
urges the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of Veterans 
Affairs to create a clear, coordinated plan to improve the 
process to address the issue of proving military service when a 
veteran's official service record has been lost or destroyed 
while in possession of the federal government.

                      BURN PATIENT TRANSFER SYSTEM

    The Committee understands the necessity of developing 
strategies and technologies to improve the logistics of burn 
patient triage and transfer in and between military and 
civilian treatment facilities in the event of a mass casualty 
event. The Committee recognizes that, following such an event, 
military treatment facilities would experience a significant 
increase in burn patient volume. The ability to maximize 
efficiency and effectiveness of triage and subsequent care 
would be critical to the management of an overwhelming surge in 
burn patient volume and intensity. The Committee encourages the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to research the 
development of a burn patient transfer system that would 
provide a platform for reporting immediate and surge burn bed 
availability and electronically match patient acuity with open 
beds at clinical burn facilities within the system.

                   THERMAL INJURY PROTECTION SYSTEMS

    The Committee is aware of ongoing efforts to protect 
servicemembers from burn injuries related to engine, fuel tank, 
crew compartment, and external fires that are triggered by 
hostile actions. It is imperative that safe and effective 
combat prevention and protection technologies, including 
passive fire suppression systems, are available on military 
vehicles in theater. The Committee encourages the use of 
technologies that continue to support protection from potential 
burn injuries.

                        EXISTING RESEARCH NEEDS

    The Committee encourages the Service Surgeons General and 
the Director of the Defense Health Agency to continue to focus 
on the medical research needs of servicemembers and their 
families and to make recommendations on where research gaps 
exist and how to address these shortfalls. The research 
programs supported by Congress and the Department of Defense 
are valuable tools for addressing gaps in medical research and 
should be focused on efforts that make the greatest impact on 
servicemembers and their families with input from all of the 
Services.

                              HIV TESTING

    The Committee believes that all health delivery services 
within the Military Health System, including HIV testing, 
should be of the highest quality and should be administered in 
the most cost effective and efficient manner possible. The 
Committee remains concerned with the decisions by the 
Department of the Navy and the Department of the Army to 
transition HIV testing from a contracted service to an in-house 
capability. The Committee directs the Department of Defense 
Inspector General to examine the business case analyses 
undertaken by the Army and the Navy, including data on cost, 
performance, flexibility, and subject matter expertise, and to 
provide a report on its findings to the congressional defense 
committees not later than 90 days after the enactment of this 
Act.

                      OPIOID ABUSE IN THE MILITARY

    The Committee is concerned by the high rate of opioid abuse 
among servicemembers. Despite low levels of illicit drug use, 
abuse of prescription drugs by servicemembers is higher than in 
the general population. The Committee understands that 
servicemembers face unique wartime stresses--multiple 
deployments and combat exposure can lead to conditions such as 
post-traumatic stress disorder, which can further exacerbate 
the need for pain medications. The Committee notes the strong 
commitment of the Department of Defense and the Department of 
Veterans Affairs to research improved pain management 
protocols, including the formation of a Pain Management Task 
Force. A National Advisory Council on Complementary and 
Integrative Health working group recommended that the 
Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs 
undertake one or more large-scale studies to answer important 
policy and patient care questions about the use of integrative 
approaches in pain management. The Committee encourages the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to examine the 
feasibility of completing the large-scale studies. 
Additionally, the Centers for Disease Control recently 
published guidelines for prescribing opioids for chronic pain. 
The Committee encourages the Assistant Secretary of Defense 
(Health Affairs) to ensure its prescribers are familiar with 
the guidelines and also to prioritize abuse-deterrent 
formulations of prescription opioids through TRICARE 
formularies.

                 ADVANCED ORTHOPEDIC SURGICAL TRAINING

    The Committee understands that servicemembers and their 
families regularly undergo orthopedic procedures and that these 
types of musculoskeletal injuries account for a significant 
amount of medical separations or retirements from military 
service. Delivery of direct training based on best practices 
related to orthopedic procedures for injuries to the knee, 
shoulder, and other extremities has become an increasingly 
important readiness issue. The Committee encourages the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to ensure that 
military orthopedic health professionals are provided with 
advanced surgical training in arthroscopic techniques and to do 
so in partnership with medical professional societies that 
maintain best practices related to arthroscopic surgery and 
techniques.

           CHEMICAL AGENTS AND MUNITIONS DESTRUCTION, DEFENSE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................      $699,821,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................       551,023,000
Committee recommendation..............................       551,023,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $551,023,000 
for Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, Defense which 
will provide the following program in fiscal year 2017:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee         Change from
                                                           Budget Request      Recommended          Request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE..............................            147,282            147,282              - - -
PROCUREMENT............................................             15,132             15,132              - - -
RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION.............            388,609            388,609              - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    TOTAL, CHEMICAL AGENTS AND MUNITIONS DESTRUCTION,              551,023            551,023              - - -
     DEFENSE...........................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

         DRUG INTERDICTION AND COUNTER-DRUG ACTIVITIES, DEFENSE


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................    $1,050,598,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................       844,800,000
Committee recommendation..............................       908,800,000
Change from budget request............................       +64,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $908,800,000 
for Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense 
which will provide the following program in fiscal year 2017:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee         Change from
                                                           Budget Request      Recommended          Request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
COUNTER NARCOTICS SUPPORT..............................            730,087            631,087            -99,000
    Transfer to National Guard counter-drug program....                               -99,000
DRUG DEMAND REDUCTION PROGRAM..........................            114,713            118,713              4,000
    Program increase--Young Marines....................                                 4,000
NATIONAL GUARD COUNTER-DRUG PROGRAM....................              - - -            159,000            159,000
    Transfer from counter-narcotics support............                                99,000
    Program increase...................................                                60,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        TOTAL, DRUG INTERDICTION AND COUNTER-DRUG                  844,800            908,800             64,000
         ACTIVITIES, DEFENSE...........................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                  JOINT URGENT OPERATIONAL NEEDS FUND


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................             - - -
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................       $99,300,000
Committee recommendation..............................             - - -
Change from budget request............................       -99,300,000
 

    The Committee recommends no funding for the Joint Urgent 
Operational Needs Fund.

                    OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL


 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................      $312,559,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................       322,035,000
Committee recommendation..............................       322,035,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $322,035,000 
for the Office of the Inspector General which will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2017:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee         Change from
                                                           Budget Request      Recommended          Request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE..............................            318,935            318,882              - - -
RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION.............              3,100              3,153              - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    TOTAL, OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL.............            322,035            322,035              - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                               TITLE VII

                            RELATED AGENCIES

              NATIONAL AND MILITARY INTELLIGENCE PROGRAMS

    The National Intelligence Program and the Military 
Intelligence Program budgets funded in the Department of 
Defense Appropriations Act consist primarily of resources for 
the Director of National Intelligence including the 
Intelligence Community Management Staff, the Central 
Intelligence Agency (CIA), the Defense Intelligence Agency, the 
National Reconnaissance Office, the National Security Agency, 
the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, the intelligence 
services of the Departments of the Army, Navy, Air Force, and 
the CIA Retirement and Disability fund.

                            CLASSIFIED ANNEX

    The Committee's budget review of classified programs is 
published in a separate, detailed, and comprehensive classified 
annex. The intelligence community, Department of Defense, and 
other organizations are expected to fully comply with the 
recommendations and directions in the classified annex 
accompanying the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 
2017.

   CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM FUND

 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................      $514,000,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................       514,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................       514,000,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -
 

    This appropriation provides payments of benefits to 
qualified beneficiaries in accordance with the Central 
Intelligence Agency Retirement Act of 1964 for Certain 
Employees (P.L. 88-643), as amended by Public Law 94-522. This 
statute authorized the establishment of the CIA Retirement and 
Disability System for certain employees and authorized the 
establishment and maintenance of a fund from which benefits 
would be paid to those beneficiaries.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $514,000,000 
for the Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and Disability 
System Fund. This is a mandatory account.

               INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT ACCOUNT

 
 
 
Fiscal year 2016 appropriation........................      $505,206,000
Fiscal year 2017 budget request.......................       533,596,000
Committee recommendation..............................       483,596,000
Change from budget request............................       -21,610,000
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $483,596,000 
for the Intelligence Community Management Account.

                          WILDLIFE TRAFFICKING

    The Committee is concerned that wildlife poaching and 
trafficking, particularly of African elephant ivory, can be 
used as a source of funding by terrorist organizations, 
extremist militias, and transnational organized crime 
syndicates in Central and Eastern Africa. The Committee 
encourages the Director of National Intelligence to work with 
American and international law enforcement and partner 
countries to share information and analysis on transnational 
criminal organizations, terrorist entities, corrupt officials, 
and others that facilitate illegal wildlife trafficking.

                               TITLE VIII

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    The accompanying bill includes 135 general provisions. A 
description of each provision follows:
    Section 8001 provides that no funds made available in this 
Act may be used for publicity or propaganda purposes not 
authorized by Congress.
    Section 8002 provides for conditions and limitations on the 
payment of compensation to, or employment of, foreign 
nationals.
    Section 8003 provides that no funds made available in this 
Act may be obligated beyond the end of the fiscal year unless 
expressly provided for a greater period of availability 
elsewhere in the Act.
    Section 8004 limits the obligation of certain funds 
provided in this Act during the last two months of the fiscal 
year.
    Section 8005 has been amended and provides for the general 
transfer authority of working capital funds to other military 
functions.
    Section 8006 provides that the tables titled ``Explanation 
of Project Level Adjustments'' in the Committee report and 
classified annex shall be carried out in the manner provided by 
the tables to the same extent as if the tables were included in 
the text of this Act.
    Section 8007 has been amended and provides for the 
establishment of a baseline for application of reprogramming 
and transfer authorities for the current fiscal year.
    Section 8008 provides for limitations on the use of 
transfer authority of working capital fund cash balances.
    Section 8009 provides that none of the funds appropriated 
in this Act may be used to initiate a special access program 
without prior notification to the congressional defense 
committees.
    Section 8010 provides limitations and conditions on the use 
of funds made available in this Act to initiate multi-year 
contracts.
    Section 8011 provides for the use and obligation of funds 
for humanitarian and civic assistance costs.
    Section 8012 has been amended and provides that civilian 
personnel of the Department of Defense may not be managed on 
the basis of end strength or be subject to end strength 
limitations.
    Section 8013 prohibits funding from being used to influence 
congressional action on any matters pending before the 
Congress.
    Section 8014 prohibits compensation from being paid to any 
member of the Army who is participating as a full-time student 
and who receives benefits from the Education Benefits Fund when 
time spent as a full-time student is counted toward that 
member's service commitment.
    Section 8015 provides for the transfer of funds 
appropriated in title III of this Act for the Department of 
Defense Pilot Mentor-Protege Program.
    Section 8016 provides for the Department of Defense to 
purchase anchor and mooring chains manufactured only in the 
United States.
    Section 8017 prohibits funds made available to the 
Department of Defense from being used to demilitarize or 
dispose of certain surplus firearms and small arms ammunition 
or ammunition components.
    Section 8018 provides a limitation on funds for the 
relocation of any Department of Defense entity into or within 
the National Capital Region.
    Section 8019 provides for incentive payments authorized by 
section 504 of the Indian Financing Act of 1974 (25 U.S.C. 
1544).
    Section 8020 provides that no funding for the Defense Media 
Activity may be used for national or international political or 
psychological activities.
    Section 8021 provides for the obligation of funds for 
purposes specified in section 2350j(c) of title 10, United 
States Code, in anticipation of receipt of contributions from 
the Government of Kuwait.
    Section 8022 has been amended and provides funding for the 
Civil Air Patrol Corporation.
    Section 8023 has been amended and prohibits funding from 
being used to establish new Department of Defense Federally 
Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDC), with certain 
limitations and reduces funding provided for FFRDCs.
    Section 8024 provides for the Department of Defense to 
procure carbon, alloy, or armor steel plate melted and rolled 
only in the United States and Canada.
    Section 8025 defines the congressional defense committees 
as being the Armed Services Committees of the House and Senate 
and the Subcommittees on Defense of the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House and Senate.
    Section 8026 provides for competitions between private 
firms and Department of Defense Depot Maintenance Activities.
    Section 8027 provides for the revocation of blanket waivers 
of the Buy American Act.
    Section 8028 provides for the availability of funds 
contained in the Department of Defense Overseas Military 
Facility Investment Recovery Account.
    Section 8029 provides for the conveyance, without 
consideration, of relocatable housing units that are excess to 
the needs of the Air Force.
    Section 8030 provides authority to use operation and 
maintenance appropriations to purchase items having an 
investment item unit cost of not more than $250,000.
    Section 8031 prohibits the use of funds to disestablish, 
close, downgrade from host to extension center, or place on 
probation a Senior Reserve Officers' Training Corps.
    Section 8032 prohibits the sale of tobacco products in 
military resale outlets below the most competitive price in the 
local community.
    Section 8033 has been amended and prohibits the use of 
Working Capital Funds to purchase specified investment items.
    Section 8034 has been amended and provides that none of the 
funds appropriated for the Central Intelligence Agency shall 
remain available for obligation beyond the current fiscal year 
except for funds appropriated for the Reserve for 
Contingencies, the Working Capital Fund, or other programs as 
specified.
    Section 8035 provides that funds available for the Defense 
Intelligence Agency may be used for the design, development, 
and deployment of General Defense Intelligence Program 
intelligence communications and intelligence information 
systems.
    Section 8036 provides for the availability of funds for the 
mitigation of environmental impacts on Indian lands resulting 
from Department of Defense activities.
    Section 8037 requires the Department of Defense to comply 
with the Buy American Act, chapter 83 of title 41, United 
States Code.
    Section 8038 provides conditions under which contracts for 
studies, analyses, or consulting services may be entered into 
without competition on the basis of an unsolicited proposal.
    Section 8039 places certain limitations on the use of funds 
made available in this Act to establish Field Operating 
Agencies.
    Section 8040 places restrictions on converting to 
contractor performance an activity or function of the 
Department of Defense unless it meets certain guidelines 
provided.
    Section 8041 has been amended and provides for the 
rescission of $1,283,416,000 from the following programs:

 
 
 
2015 Appropriations:
    Aircraft Procurement, Army:
        Network and mission plan......................       $15,000,000
    Other Procurement, Army:
        Installation of information infrastructure....        30,000,000
    Aircraft Procurement, Navy:
        EA-18G........................................       150,000,000
    Weapons Procurement, Navy:
        Fleet satellite comm follow-on................        16,698,000
    Procurement of Ammunition, Navy and Marine Corps
        LRLAP 6 inch long range attack projectile.....        43,600,000
    Aircraft Procurement, Air Force:
        HC-130J.......................................        18,000,000
        MC-130J.......................................        12,000,000
        MQ-1 Mods.....................................         2,000,000
        MQ-9 depot activation.........................        25,000,000
        Target drones.................................         8,800,000
2016 Appropriations:
    Procurement of Ammunition, Army:
        Demolition munitions..........................         8,000,000
        Simulators....................................         5,000,000
    Other Procurement, Army:
        Information systems...........................        40,000,000
        Modification of in-service equipment..........        18,000,000
    Aircraft Procurement, Navy, 2016/2018
        F-35 CV.......................................         6,755,000
    Weapons Procurement, Navy:
        Sidewinder....................................         5,307,000
        Standard missile..............................        10,106,000
    Procurement of Ammunition, Navy and Marine Corps:
        81mm all types................................         1,000,000
    Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy:
        DDG-51........................................       262,000,000
        LPD-17........................................        14,906,000
    Other Procurement, Navy:
        Remote minehunting system.....................        53,077,000
        Surface combatant HM&E........................;         1,317,000
    Aircraft Procurement, Air Force:
        HC-130J.......................................        12,500,000
        KC-135 block 40/45 installs...................         9,000,000
        KC-135 post production support................         1,500,000
        KC-46.........................................       148,800,000
        MC-130J.......................................         4,500,000
        MQ-1 mods.....................................         2,000,000
    Other Procurement, Air Force:
        Night vision goggles..........................         5,950,000
        Classified adjustment.........................        17,300,000
    Procurement, Defense-Wide:
        Classified adjustment.........................         2,600,000
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Army:
        Communications security equipment.............         6,000,000
        Concepts experimentation......................         6,000,000
        Information technology development............        21,000,000
        Manpower, personnel, training advanced                 5,000,000
         technology...................................
        Missile defense system integration............         7,000,000
        Missile and rocket advanced technology........        10,000,000
        Tactical command and control HW & SW..........        18,000,000
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy:
        Future unmanned carrier-based strike system...        75,000,000
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Air
     Force:
        KC-46 EMD.....................................       181,400,000
        Classified adjustment.........................           300,000
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation,
     Defense-Wide:
        Classified adjustment.........................         3,000,000
 

    Section 8042 prohibits funds made available in this Act 
from being used to reduce authorized positions for military 
technicians (dual status) of the Army National Guard, Air 
National Guard, Army Reserve, and Air Force Reserve unless such 
reductions are a direct result of a reduction in military force 
structure.
    Section 8043 prohibits funding from being obligated or 
expended for assistance to the Democratic People's Republic of 
Korea unless specifically appropriated for that purpose.
    Section 8044 provides for reimbursement to the National 
Guard and reserve components when members of the National Guard 
and reserve components provide intelligence or 
counterintelligence support to the combatant commands, Defense 
agencies, and Joint Intelligence Activities.
    Section 8045 prohibits the transfer of Department of 
Defense and Central Intelligence Agencies drug interdiction and 
counter-drug activity funds to other agencies except as 
specifically provided in an appropriations law.
    Section 8046 prohibits funding from being used for the 
procurement of ball and roller bearings other than those 
produced by a domestic source and of domestic origin.
    Section 8047 has been amended and provides that 
competitively procured launch services must open for award to 
all certified providers of Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle-
class systems.
    Section 8048 provides funding for Red Cross and United 
Service Organization grants.
    Section 8049 prohibits funding from being used to purchase 
supercomputers which are not manufactured in the United States.
    Section 8050 provides funds for the Small Business 
Innovation Research program and the Small Business Technology 
Transfer program.
    Section 8051 prohibits funding from being used for 
contractor bonuses being paid due to business restructuring.
    Section 8052 provides for prior congressional notification 
of article or service transfers to international peacekeeping 
organizations.
    Section 8053 provides for the Department of Defense to 
dispose of negative unliquidated or unexpended balances for 
expired or closed accounts.
    Section 8054 provides conditions for the use of equipment 
of the National Guard Distance Learning Project on a space-
available, reimbursable basis.
    Section 8055 prohibits the use of funds to modify command 
and control relationships to give Fleet Forces Command 
operational and administrative control of United States Navy 
forces assigned to the Pacific fleet.
    Section 8056 provides funding for Sexual Assault Prevention 
and Response Programs.
    Section 8057 provides for the limitation on the use of 
funds appropriated in title IV to procure end-items for 
delivery to military forces for operational training, 
operational use or inventory requirements.
    Section 8058 provides for a waiver of ``Buy America'' 
provisions for certain cooperative programs.
    Section 8059 prohibits funding in this Act from being used 
for repairs or maintenance to military family housing units.
    Section 8060 provides obligation authority for new starts 
for advanced concept technology demonstration projects only 
after notification to the congressional defense committees.
    Section 8061 provides that the Secretary of Defense shall 
provide a classified quarterly report on certain matters as 
directed in the classified annex accompanying this Act.
    Section 8062 provides for the use of National Guard 
personnel to support ground-based elements of the National 
Ballistic Missile Defense System.
    Section 8063 prohibits the use of funds made available in 
this Act to transfer to any nongovernmental entity ammunition 
held by the Department of Defense that has a center--fire 
cartridge and is designated as ``armor piercing'' except for 
demilitarization purposes.
    Section 8064 provides for a waiver by the Chief of the 
National Guard Bureau or his designee for all or part of 
consideration in cases of personal property leases of less than 
one year.
    Section 8065 has been amended and provides for the transfer 
of funds made available in this Act under Operation and 
Maintenance, Army to other activities of the Federal Government 
for classified purposes.
    Section 8066 prohibits funding to separate, or to 
consolidate from within, the National Intelligence Program 
budget from the Department of Defense budget.
    Section 8067 provides grant authority for the construction 
and furnishing of additional Fisher Houses to meet the needs of 
military family members when confronted with the illness or 
hospitalization of an eligible military beneficiary.
    Section 8068 has been amended and provides funding and 
transfer authority for the Israeli Cooperative Programs.
    Section 8069 has been amended and provides for the funding 
of prior year shipbuilding cost increases.
    Section 8070 has been amended and provides that funds made 
available in this Act for intelligence activities are deemed to 
be specifically authorized by Congress for purposes of section 
504 of the National Security Act of 1947 until the enactment of 
the Intelligence Authorization Act for the current fiscal year.
    Section 8071 prohibits funding from being used to initiate 
a new start program without prior written notification.
    Section 8072 provides that the budget of the President for 
the subsequent fiscal year shall include separate budget 
justification documents for costs of the United States Armed 
Forces' participation in contingency operations for the 
military personnel, operation and maintenance, and procurement 
accounts.
    Section 8073 prohibits funding from being used for the 
research, development, test, evaluation, procurement, or 
deployment of nuclear armed interceptors of a missile defense 
system.
    Section 8074 has been amended and reduces appropriations to 
reflect savings due to favorable exchange rates.
    Section 8075 prohibits funding from being used to reduce or 
disestablish the operation of the 53rd Weather Reconnaissance 
Squadron of the Air Force Reserve.
    Section 8076 prohibits funding from being used for the 
integration of foreign intelligence information unless the 
information has been lawfully collected and processed during 
conduct of authorized foreign intelligence activities.
    Section 8077 prohibits funding from being used to transfer 
program authority relating to current tactical unmanned aerial 
vehicles from the Army and requires the Army to retain 
responsibility for and operational control of the MQ-1C 
Unmanned Aerial Vehicle.
    Section 8078 provides funding under certain conditions for 
the Asia Pacific Regional Initiative Program for the purpose of 
enabling the Pacific Command to execute certain Theater 
Security Cooperation activities.
    Section 8079 has been amended and limits the availability 
of funding provided for the Office of the Director of National 
Intelligence beyond the current fiscal year, except for funds 
appropriated for research and technology, which shall remain 
available for the current and the following fiscal years.
    Section 8080 provides for the adjustment of obligations 
within the Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy appropriation.
    Section 8081 has been amended and provides for the 
establishment of a baseline for application of reprogramming 
and transfer authorities for the Office of the Director of 
National Intelligence for the current fiscal year.
    Section 8082 prohibits the use of funds to modify Army 
Contracting Command--New Jersey without prior congressional 
notification.
    Section 8083 prohibits funding from being used to violate 
the Child Soldiers Prevention Act of 2008.
    Section 8084 has been amended provides for the transfer of 
funds by the Director of National Intelligence to other 
departments and agencies for the purposes of Government-wide 
information sharing activities.
    Section 8085 provides for limitations on funding provided 
for the National Intelligence Program to be available for 
obligation or expenditure through a reprogramming or transfer 
of funds in accordance with section 102A(d) of the National 
Security Act of 1947 (50 U.S.C. 403-1(d)).
    Section 8086 directs the Director of National Intelligence 
to submit a future-years intelligence program reflecting 
estimated expenditures and proposed appropriations.
    Section 8087 defines the congressional intelligence 
committees as being the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence of the House, the Select Committee on Intelligence 
of the Senate, and the Subcommittees on Defense of the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate.
    Section 8088 directs the Department of Defense to continue 
to report incremental contingency operations costs for 
Operation Inherent Resolve, Operation Enduring Freedom, or any 
other named successor operations on a monthly basis in the Cost 
of War Execution Report as required by Department of Defense 
Financial Management Regulation.
    Section 8089 provides the authority to transfer funding 
from operation and maintenance accounts for the Army, Navy, and 
Air Force to the central fund for Fisher Houses and Suites.
    Section 8090 provides that funds appropriated in this Act 
may be available for the purpose of making remittances and 
transfers to the Defense Acquisition Workforce Development 
Fund.
    Section 8091 provides that any agency receiving funds made 
available in this Act shall post on a public website any report 
required to be submitted by Congress with certain exceptions.
    Section 8092 prohibits the use of funds for federal 
contracts in excess of $1,000,000 unless the contractor agrees 
not to require, as a condition of employment, that employees or 
independent contractors agree to resolve through arbitration 
any claim or tort related to, or arising out of, sexual assault 
or harassment, including assault and battery, intentional 
infliction of emotional distress, false imprisonment, or 
negligent hiring, supervision, or retention, and to certify 
that each covered subcontractor agrees to do the same.
    Section 8093 has been amended and provides funds for 
transfer to the Joint Department of Defense--Department of 
Veterans Affairs Medical Facility Demonstration Fund.
    Section 8094 provides for the purchase of heavy and light 
armed vehicles for the physical security of personnel or for 
force protection purposes up to a limit of $450,000 per 
vehicle.
    Section 8095 has been amended and prohibits the use of 
funds providing certain missile defense information to certain 
entities.
    Section 8096 has been amended and provides the Director of 
National Intelligence with general transfer authority with 
certain limitations.
    Section 8097 prohibits funding to transfer or release any 
individual detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba into the United 
States, its territories, or possessions. This language is 
identical to language enacted in Public Law 112-74.
    Section 8098 prohibits funding to modify any United States 
facility (other than the facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba) to 
house any individual detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. This 
language is identical to language enacted in Public Law 112-74.
    Section 8099 has been amended and prohibits funding to 
transfer any individual detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba to a 
country of origin or other foreign country or entity unless the 
Secretary of Defense makes certain certifications. This 
language is similar to language enacted in Public Law 112-239.
    Section 8100 prohibits funding from being used to violate 
the War Powers Resolution Act.
    Section 8101 prohibits funds from being used to purchase or 
lease new light duty vehicles except in accordance with the 
Presidential Memorandum-Federal Fleet Performance.
    Section 8102 prohibits funds from being used to enter into 
a contract, memorandum of understanding, or cooperative 
agreement with, make a grant to, or provide a loan or loan 
guarantee to Rosoboronexport, except under certain conditions.
    Section 8103 prohibits the use of funds for the purchase or 
manufacture of a United States flag unless such flags are 
treated as covered items under section 2533a(b) of title 10, 
United States Code.
    Section 8104 provides that funds may be used to provide ex 
gratia payments to local military commanders for damage, 
personal injury, or death that is incident to combat operations 
in a foreign country.
    Section 8105 prohibits the use of funds to reduce or 
prepare to reduce the number of deployed and non-deployed 
strategic delivery vehicles and launchers.
    Section 8106 directs the Secretary of Defense to post grant 
awards on a public website in a searchable format.
    Section 8107 prohibits the use of funds for flight 
demonstration teams outside of the United States.
    Section 8108 prohibits the use of funds by the National 
Security Agency targeting United States persons under 
authorities granted in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance 
Act.
    Section 8109 prohibits the use of funds to implement the 
Arms Trade Treaty until ratified by the Senate.
    Section 8110 prohibits the transfer of administrative or 
budgetary resources to the jurisdiction of another Federal 
agency not financed by this Act without the express 
authorization of Congress.
    Section 8111 prohibits the use of funds to provide 
counterterrorism support to foreign partners unless the 
congressional defense committees are notified accordingly.
    Section 8112 prohibits the use of funds to contravene the 
War Powers Resolution with respect to Iraq.
    Section 8113 prohibits the use of funds to retire the A-10 
aircraft.
    Section 8114 provides funds to support Department of 
Defense activities related to the Digital Accountability and 
Transparency Act.
    Section 8115 has been amended and prohibits the use of 
funds to award a new T-AO(X) program contract for the 
acquisition of certain components unless those components are 
manufactured in the Unites States.
    Section 8116 has been amended and reduces Working Capital 
Funds to reflect excess cash balances.
    Section 8117 has been amended and reduces the total amount 
appropriated to reflect lower than anticipated fuel prices.
    Section 8118 prohibits the use of funds to retire the KC-10 
fleet.
    Section 8119 prohibits the use of funds to retire of the 
EC-130H aircraft.
    Section 8120 prohibits the use of funds for gaming or 
entertainment that involves nude entertainers.
    Section 8121 prohibits the use of funds for Base 
Realignment and Closure.
    Section 8122 is new and provides for multiyear procurement 
of AH-64E and UH-60M.
    Section 8123 is new and provides transfer authority to the 
Ready Reserve Force, Maritime Administration for the National 
Defense Reserve Fleet.
    Section 8124 is new and makes funds available to transfer 
from Ship Modernization, Operations and Sustainment Fund for 
equipping and modernizing Ticonderoga-class guided missile 
cruisers and Whidbey Island-class dock landing ships.
    Section 8125 is new and provides funds to sustain security 
and suitability background investigations for the Office of 
Personnel Management.
    Section 8126 is new and places restrictions on the 
obligation of funds for the Joint Surveillance Target Attack 
Radar System recapitalization program.
    Section 8127 is new and provides for the availability of 
funds to implement cost-effective agreements for required 
heating facility modernization in the Kaiserslautern Military 
Community, Landstuhl Army Regional Medical Center, and Ramstein 
Air Base, Germany.
    Section 8128 is new and provides funds for the 
transportation of fresh fruits and vegetables to commissaries 
in Asia and the Pacific.
    Section 8129 is new and places restrictions on fresh fruits 
and vegetables accepted by commissaries in Asia and the 
Pacific.
    Section 8130 is new and prohibits the use of funds to close 
facilities at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay.
    Section 8131 is new and provides for the transfer of funds 
for pay for military personnel for purposes of fully funding 
the authorized military pay raise.
    Section 8132 is new and prohibits the use of funds to 
enforce section 526 of the Energy Independence and Security Act 
of 2007.
    Section 8133 is new and provides for the use of funds to 
research and respond to the Zika virus.
    Section 8134 is new and provides for the availability of 
funds for military service memorials and museums that highlight 
the role of women in the military.
    Section 8135 is new and prohibits funding for any computer 
network that does not block pornography, with certain 
exceptions.
    Section 8136 is new and prohibits funding for certain 
travel regulations.

                                TITLE IX

        OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS/GLOBAL WAR ON TERRORISM

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    In title IX, the Committee recommends total new 
appropriations of $58,626,000,000. A detailed review of the 
Committee recommendation for programs funded in this title is 
provided in the following pages.

                         REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to continue 
to report incremental contingency operations costs for all 
current and new named operations that may have commenced in the 
Central Command Area of Responsibility on a monthly basis in 
the Cost of War Execution report as required by Department of 
Defense Financial Management Regulation, Chapter 23, Volume 12. 
The Committee further directs the Secretary of Defense to 
continue providing Cost of War reports to the congressional 
defense committees that include the following information by 
appropriation account: funding appropriated, funding allocated, 
monthly obligations, monthly disbursements, cumulative fiscal 
year obligations, and cumulative fiscal year disbursements.
    The Committee expects that in order to meet unanticipated 
requirements, the Secretary of Defense may need to transfer 
within these appropriations accounts for purposes other than 
those specified in this report. The Committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to follow normal prior approval 
reprogramming procedures should it be necessary to transfer 
funding between different appropriations accounts in this title 
using authority provided in Section 9002 of this Act.

          INTELLIGENCE, SURVEILLANCE, AND RECONNAISSANCE FUND

    The Committee recommendation includes $500,000,000 to 
continue support for the Intelligence, Surveillance, and 
Reconnaissance (ISR) Fund, the same as the fiscal year 2016 
enacted level. The Committee has repeatedly heard from 
combatant commanders of their need for greater capacity and 
capability in ISR, and commends the Secretary of Defense and 
the Service leaders for aggressively working to address this 
need. The Committee notes that the Air Force, which provides 
the majority of pilots for ISR assets and missions, has 
broadened the pool of potential operators by including enlisted 
servicemembers as pilots and has increased incentives to 
improve recruitment and retention. The Committee directs the 
Secretary of the Air Force to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than March 15, 2017 
on the implementation progress of the ``get well plan'' for 
remotely piloted aircraft announced in January 2015, the 
current and projected shortfalls of pilots and sensor 
operators, and the proposed measures to increase supply of 
those critical skills.
    Additionally, the Committee is concerned about the 
capability of current bandwidth capacity to meet the rapidly 
growing demand for increased communications and ISR 
information. The Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense 
and the Service Secretaries to identify opportunities for 
demand reduction, spectral efficiency, and new technological 
investments to ensure that warfighters have the timely and 
accurate information they rely upon.

                             SOUTHEAST ASIA

    The Committee is concerned about the growth of violent 
Islamic extremism throughout Southeast Asia. Militant followers 
of Abu Sayyaf are using kidnapping and demands for ransom to 
raise funds for their extremist cause. As recently as April 
2016, the group held true to their threats for ransom and 
beheaded a retired Canadian businessman in the tropical jungles 
of the Southern Philippines. Although the Philippine government 
insists that these acts are merely the works of bandits and 
opportunists, and that the Islamic State has no presence in the 
nation's south, evidence shows that the followers of Abu Sayyaf 
are aligning themselves with the Islamic State of Iraq and the 
Levant. This group had previously attempted to align itself 
with al-Qaida to gain stature and notoriety.
    It is strongly believed that militants from Malaysia, 
Indonesia, and the Middle East have a shaped and unified effort 
on Basilan Island, a province of the Philippines within the 
unconstitutional, yet self-claimed Autonomous Region in Muslim 
Mindanao and in and around the Sulu Sea, and have struck a new 
alliance under the Islamic State flag to help recruit 
Filipinos.
    The 600 person United States Joint Special Operations Task 
Force-Philippines (JSOTF-P), tasked to help the Philippine 
military fight Islamic militants, came to a close in May 2015, 
ending 13 years of an advise and assist mission in coordination 
with Philippine commandos fighting Islamic separatists in the 
southern Philippine islands. All that remains is a foreign 
liaison element that provides operational counterterrorism 
assistance to higher levels of command within the Philippine 
Security Forces.
    The Committee applauds the successful effort of the task 
force during its 13 year presence, but following the task 
force's reduction and shift in effort, the Committee is 
seriously concerned about the recent resurgence of violent 
Islamic separatist activity in the area. The Committee directs 
the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 90 days after 
the enactment of this Act on the Department of Defense's 
counterterrorism efforts in Southeast Asia and the appropriate 
funding level required for fiscal year 2018, should forces be 
reinstated to a 600 person level.
    Additionally, the Committee is concerned about the state of 
military-to-military relations in Thailand. While the Committee 
recognizes that the events of 2014 have weakened political 
relations between the countries, it is imperative that the 
security relationship remains strong. Since the 2014 coup, the 
Committee notes that the Thai leadership has been expanding its 
alliances with Russia and China. The Committee strongly 
encourages the Secretary of Defense to ensure that United 
States military leaders, including senior uniformed leaders, 
are able to travel to Thailand to build and strengthen this 
important strategic relationship.

                           MILITARY PERSONNEL

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$4,400,203,000 for Military Personnel. The Committee 
recommendation for each military personnel account is as 
follows:


                       OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$35,544,657,000 for Operation and Maintenance. The Committee 
recommendation for each operation and maintenance account is as 
follows:


                         ASSISTANCE TO UKRAINE

    The Committee recommends an additional $150,000,000 to 
provide assistance to the national security forces of Ukraine. 
Section 9014 of this Act provides guidance for the use of this 
funding and directs the purchase of items such as training, 
equipment, lethal weapons of a defensive nature, and logistics 
support. This assistance is provided for the purpose of helping 
Ukraine secure its sovereign territory and protect its citizens 
against foreign aggressors.

                   COUNTERTERRORISM PARTNERSHIPS FUND

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$750,000,000 for the Counterterrorism Partnerships Fund.

          DIRECT FUNDING TO THE KURDISTAN REGIONAL GOVERNMENT

    The Peshmerga forces of the Kurdistan Regional Government 
(KRG) have been a leading force against the Islamic State of 
Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). However, lethal and non-lethal 
support for these allies is managed and distributed at the 
discretion of the Iraqi government. This process is cumbersome 
and leaves the distribution at the whim of Baghdad and local 
politics. To date, the Government of Iraq has not fulfilled the 
$12,000,000,000 promised support and back tax revenue to the 
Kurdish people, resulting in a humanitarian and economic crisis 
in the Kurdish region.
    There are many authorities at the disposal of the 
Department of Defense to build partnership capacity around the 
world.
    The Committee strongly encourages the Secretary of Defense 
to consider the use of all available authorities and funding to 
build the capacity of the KRG, a partner in the fight against 
ISIL.

                    AFGHANISTAN SECURITY FORCES FUND

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$3,448,715,000 for the Afghanistan Security Forces Fund.

              WOMEN IN THE AFGHAN NATIONAL SECURITY FORCES

    The Committee recommendation contains funding and a 
legislative provision regarding the recruitment, integration, 
retention, training, and treatment of women, and infrastructure 
required to address the needs of women in the Afghan National 
Security Forces.

   COUNTER-ISLAMIC STATE OF IRAQ AND THE LEVANT TRAIN AND EQUIP FUND

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$880,000,000 for the Counter-Islamic State of Iraq and the 
Levant Train and Equip Fund.

                              PROCUREMENT

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$16,635,407,000 for Procurement. The Committee recommendation 
for each procurement account is as follows:


                  NATIONAL GUARD AND RESERVE EQUIPMENT

    The Committee recommendation provides $1,000,000,000 for 
National Guard and Reserve Equipment. Of that amount, 
$330,000,000 is for the Army National Guard; $330,000,000 is 
for the Air National Guard; $140,000,000 is for the Army 
Reserve; $50,000,000 is for the Navy Reserve; $10,000,000 is 
for the Marine Corps Reserve; and $140,000,000 is for the Air 
Force Reserve to meet urgent equipment needs that may arise in 
fiscal year 2017.
    This funding will allow the National Guard and reserve 
components to procure high priority equipment that may be used 
by these units for both their combat missions and their 
missions in support of state governors. The funding within this 
account is not to be used to procure equipment that has been 
designated as high density critical equipment item, major 
weapon systems, aircraft, and other items of equipment central 
to a unit's ability to perform its doctrinal mission. The 
funding within this account is not to be used to procure 
equipment that should be purchased by the senior Service, to 
expand or accelerate current Service procurement plans 
increasing program risk borne by the reserve components, to 
purchase expendable items, or to purchase facilities or 
equipment for any requirement that can be satisfied elsewhere.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to ensure 
that the National Guard and Reserve Equipment account shall be 
executed by the Chiefs of the National Guard and reserve 
components with priority consideration given to the following 
items: acoustic hailing devices, airborne sense and avoid 
systems, common access card for remote access virtual private 
network with pre-tunnel authentication, crashworthy 
ballistically tolerant auxiliary fuel systems, integrated 
facial protection components for standard issue helmets, large 
aircraft infrared countermeasures, advanced targeting pods, 
electromagnetic in-flight propeller balance system, handheld 
and manpack and mid-tier networking vehicular radios, handheld 
explosives and chemical weapons detection capabilities, HMMWV 
rollover mitigation, modular small arms and self-contained 
ranges, joint threat emitter, Marine Corps tactical radio 
digital communications, the mobile user objective system, all-
digital radar warning receivers, unstabilized gunnery crew 
trainer and small arms simulation trainers, and wireless mobile 
mesh self-healing network systems.

                    VIRTUAL TRAINING AND SIMULATION

    Virtual training using simulation allows soldiers to 
prepare in virtual environments prior to live fire range 
qualifications. Better preparation leads to significantly 
higher first time qualification rates and therefore, requires 
less ammunition, on range time, remediation, and has less of an 
environmental impact. Therefore, the Committee urges the Chiefs 
of the reserve components to strongly consider the use of 
virtual training systems.

               RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$496,669,000 for Research, Development, Test and Evaluation. 
The Committee recommendation for each research, development, 
test and evaluation account is as follows:


                      NAVY UNDERWATER TEST RANGES

    The Committee is concerned about the state of readiness and 
modernization of tactical test ranges that support critical 
undersea warfare missions. Such concerns are particularly acute 
given the state of evolving, global threats in the undersea 
domain and the advanced age of some of the Navy's tactical 
underwater ranges. In particular, the Barking Sands Tactical 
Underwater Range (BARSTUR) is well beyond its service life and 
requires extensive redevelopment. The Committee understands 
that substantial resources are required to fully fund the 
repair, redevelopment, and modernization of BARSTUR. Therefore, 
the Committee includes $9,000,000 above the request to 
accelerate the initial analysis and environmental impact 
studies related to repairing and modernizing BARSTUR. 
Furthermore, the Committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than 45 days after the enactment of this Act on the 
future of BARSTUR. The report should include the requirement 
for its redevelopment and modernization, the capability that a 
fully functioning underwater range at BARSTUR would provide, 
the total amount of required funding delineated by activity and 
fiscal year, what is currently budgeted for in the Future Years 
Defense Program, and the detailed schedule of the 
redevelopment.

                     REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS


                     DEFENSE WORKING CAPITAL FUNDS

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$140,633,000 for the Defense Working Capital Funds accounts.

                  OTHER DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PROGRAMS


                         DEFENSE HEALTH PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$781,764,000 for the Defense Health Program. The Committee 
recommendation is as follows:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee         Change from
                                                          Budget  request      recommended          request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OCO/GWOT
IN-HOUSE CARE..........................................             95,366             95,366              - - -
PRIVATE SECTOR CARE....................................            233,073            233,073              - - -
CONSOLIDATED HEALTH SUPPORT............................              3,325              3,325              - - -
        SUBTOTAL, OCO/GWOT.............................            331,764            331,764              - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OCO/GWOT FOR BASE REQUIREMENTS
BASE OPERATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS.....................              - - -            450,000            450,000
    Program increase--Army FSRM........................                               150,000
    Program increase--Navy FSRM........................                               150,000
    Program increase--Air Force FSRM...................                               150,000
        SUBTOTAL, OCO/GWOT FOR BASE REQUIREMENTS.......              - - -            450,000            450,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    TOTAL, OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE...................            331,764            781,764            450,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

         DRUG INTERDICTION AND COUNTER-DRUG ACTIVITIES, DEFENSE

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$215,333,000 for Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities 
Defense. The Committee recommendation is as follows:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee         Change from
                                                          Budget  Request      Recommended          Request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 COUNTER-NARCOTICS SUPPORT.............................            215,333            215,333              - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    TOTAL, DRUG INTERDICTION AND COUNTER-DRUG                      215,333            215,333              - - -
     ACTIVITIES, DEFENSE...............................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

             JOINT IMPROVISED EXPLOSIVE DEVICE DEFEAT FUND

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$408,272,000 for the Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat 
Fund. The Committee recommendation is as follows:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee         Change from
                                                          Budget  Request      Recommended          Request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
RAPID ACQUISITION AND THREAT RESPONSE..................            345,472            345,472              - - -
MISSION ENABLERS.......................................             62,800             62,800              - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    TOTAL, JOINT IMPROVISED EXPLOSIVE DEVICE DEFEAT                408,272            408,272              - - -
     FUND..............................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$22,062,000 for the Office of the Inspector General.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Title IX contains several general provisions, many of which 
extend or modify war-related authorities included in previous 
Acts. A brief description of the recommended provisions 
follows:
    Section 9001 has been amended and provides that funds made 
available in this title are in addition to funds appropriated 
or otherwise made available for the Department of Defense for 
the current fiscal year.
    Section 9002 provides for general transfer authority within 
title IX.
    Section 9003 provides that supervision and administration 
costs associated with a construction project funded with 
appropriations available for operation and maintenance, 
Afghanistan Infrastructure Fund, or the Afghanistan Security 
Forces Fund may be obligated at the time a construction 
contract is awarded.
    Section 9004 provides for the procurement of passenger 
motor vehicles and heavy and light armored vehicles for use by 
military and civilian employees of the Department of Defense in 
the United States Central Command area of responsibility.
    Section 9005 provides funding for the Commanders' Emergency 
Response Program, within certain limitations.
    Section 9006 provides lift and sustainment to coalition 
forces supporting military and stability operations in Iraq and 
Afghanistan.
    Section 9007 prohibits the establishment of permanent bases 
in Iraq or Afghanistan or United States control over Iraq oil 
resources.
    Section 9008 prohibits the use of funding in contravention 
of the United Nations Convention Against Torture and Other 
Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment.
    Section 9009 limits the obligation of funding for the 
Afghanistan Security Forces Fund until certain conditions have 
been met.
    Section 9010 provides for the purchase of items of a 
particular investment unit cost from funding made available for 
operation and maintenance.
    Section 9011 has been amended and provides funding for the 
operations and activities of the Office of Security Cooperation 
in Iraq and security assistance teams.
    Section 9012 has been amended and provides security 
assistance to the Government of Jordan.
    Section 9013 has been amended and prohibits the use of 
funds to procure or transfer man-portable air defense systems.
    Section 9014 has been modified and provides assistance and 
sustainment to the military and national security forces of 
Ukraine.
    Section 9015 provides replacement funds for items provided 
to the Government of Ukraine from the inventory of the United 
States.
    Section 9016 prohibits the use of funds to procure or 
transfer man-portable air defense systems to Ukraine.
    Section 9017 restricts funds provided under the heading 
Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide for payments under 
Coalition Support Funds for reimbursement to the Government of 
Pakistan until certain conditions are met.
    Section 9018 has been amended and provides funds to the 
Department of Defense to improve intelligence, surveillance, 
and reconnaissance capabilities.
    Section 9019 prohibits the use of funds with respect to 
Syria in contravention of the War Powers Resolution.
    Section 9020 has been amended and provides for the 
rescission of $669,000,000 from the following programs:

 
 
 
2016 Appropriations:
    Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide:
        DSCA Coalition Support Fund...................      $300,000,000
    Counterterrorism Partnerships Fund:
        Counterterrorism Partnerships Fund............       200,000,000
    Other Procurement, Air Force:
        Classified adjustment.........................       169,000,000
 

    Section 9021 has been amended and requires the President to 
designate Overseas Contingency Operation/Global War on 
Terrorism funds.

                                TITLE X

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Title X contains the following general provisions:
    Section 10001 is new and expresses the sense of Congress 
regarding the use of military force against the Islamic State 
of Iraq and the Levant.
    Section 10002 is new and provides that the amount by which 
the applicable allocation of new budget authority under section 
302(b) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 exceeds the 
amount of proposed new budget authority is $0.

            HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

    The following items are included in accordance with various 
requirements of the Rules of the House of Representatives:

         STATEMENT OF GENERAL PERFORMANCE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is a statement of 
general performance goals and objectives for which this measure 
authorizes funding:
    The Committee on Appropriations considers program 
performance, including a program's success in developing and 
attaining outcome-related goals and objectives, in developing 
funding recommendations.

                              RESCISSIONS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House or Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the rescissions recommended in the accompanying 
bill:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Aircraft Procurement, Army, 2015/2017..........              $15,000,000
Other Procurement, Army, 2015/2017.............               30,000,000
Aircraft Procurement, Navy, 2015/2017..........              150,000,000
Weapons Procurement, Navy, 2015/2017...........               16,698,000
Procurement of Ammunition, Navy and Marine                    43,600,000
 Corps, 2015/2017..............................
Aircraft Procurement, Air Force, 2015/2017.....               65,800,000
Procurement of Ammunition, Army, 2016/2018.....               13,000,000
Other Procurement, Army, 2016/2018.............               58,000,000
Aircraft Procurement, Navy, 2016/2018..........                6,755,000
Weapons Procurement, Navy, 2016/2018...........               15,413,000
Procurement of Ammunition, Navy and Marine                     1,000,000
 Corps, 2016/2018..............................
Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy, 2016/2020...              276,906,000
Other Procurement, Navy, 2016/2018.............               54,394,000
Aircraft Procurement, Air Force, 2016/2018.....              178,300,000
Other Procurement, Air Force, 2016/2018........               23,250,000
Procurement, Defense-Wide, 2016/2018...........                2,600,000
Research, Development, Test and Evaluation,                   73,000,000
 Army, 2016/2017...............................
Research, Development, Test and Evaluation,                   75,000,000
 Navy, 2016/2017...............................
Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Air              181,700,000
 Force, 2016/2017..............................
Research, Development, Test and Evaluation,                    3,000,000
 Defense-Wide, 2016/2017.......................
Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on
 Terrorism:
    Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide,                $300,000,000
     2016/2017.................................
    Counterterrorism Partnerships Fund, 2016/                200,000,000
     2017......................................
    Other Procurement, Air Force, 2016/2018....              169,000,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                           TRANSFER OF FUNDS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is submitted describing 
the transfer of funds provided in the accompanying bill.
    Language has been included under ``Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-Wide'' which provides for the transfer of 
funds for certain classified activities.
    Language has been included under ``Environmental 
Restoration, Army'' which provides for the transfer of funds 
for environmental restoration, reduction and recycling of 
hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings and debris, or for 
similar purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Environmental 
Restoration, Navy'' which provides for the transfer of funds 
for environmental restoration, reduction and recycling of 
hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings and debris, or for 
similar purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Environmental 
Restoration, Air Force'' which provides for the transfer of 
funds for environmental restoration, reduction and recycling of 
hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings and debris, or for 
similar purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Environmental 
Restoration, Defense-Wide'' which provides for the transfer of 
funds for environmental restoration, reduction and recycling of 
hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings and debris, or for 
similar purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Environmental 
Restoration, Formerly Used Defense Sites''' which provides for 
the transfer of funds for environmental restoration, reduction 
and recycling of hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings 
and debris, or for similar purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Research, Development, 
Test and Evaluation, Defense-Wide'' which provides for the 
transfer of funds for the Defense Rapid Innovation Program to 
appropriations for research, development, test and evaluation 
for specific purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Drug Interdiction and 
Counter-Drug Activities, Defense'' which provides for the 
transfer of funds to appropriations available to the Department 
of Defense for military personnel of the reserve components; 
for operation and maintenance; for procurement; and for 
research, development, test and evaluation for drug 
interdiction and counter-drug activities of the Department of 
Defense.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8005'' which provides for the transfer of working capital funds 
to other appropriations accounts of the Department of Defense 
for military functions.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8008'' which provides for the transfer of funds between working 
capital funds and the ``Foreign Currency Fluctuations, 
Defense'' appropriation and the ``Operation and Maintenance'' 
appropriation accounts.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8015'' which provides for the transfer of funds from the 
Department of Defense Pilot Mentor-Protege Program to any other 
appropriation for the purposes of implementing a Mentor-Protege 
Program development assistance agreement.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8052'' which provides for the transfer of funds from 
``Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide'' to appropriations 
available for the pay of military personnel in connection with 
support and services of eligible organizations and activities 
outside the Department of Defense.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8056'' which provides for the transfer of funds from the 
Department of Defense to the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air 
Force, including Reserve and National Guard, to support high 
priority Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program 
requirements and activities.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8065'' which provides for the transfer of funds from 
``Operation and Maintenance, Army'' to other activities of the 
federal government.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8068'' which provides for the transfer of funds from 
``Procurement, Defense-Wide'' and ``Research, Development, Test 
and Evaluation, Defense-Wide'' for the Israeli Cooperative 
Programs.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8069'' which provides for the transfer of funds under the 
heading ``Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy'' to fund prior 
year shipbuilding cost increases.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8084'' which provides for the transfer of funds appropriated in 
the Intelligence Community Management Account for the Program 
Manager for the Information Sharing Environment to other 
departments and agencies for the purposes of Government-wide 
information sharing activities.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8089'' which provides for the transfer of funds from 
``Operation and Maintenance, Army'', ``Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy'', and ``Operation and Maintenance, Air 
Force'' to the central fund established for Fisher Houses and 
Suites.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8090'' which provides that funds appropriated by this Act may 
be made available for the purpose of making remittances to the 
Defense Acquisition Workforce Development Fund.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8093'' which provides for the transfer of funds appropriated 
for operation and maintenance for the Defense Health Program to 
the Joint Department of Defense--Department of Veterans Affairs 
Medical Facility Demonstration Fund.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8096'' which provides for the transfer of funds for the 
National Intelligence Program.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8124'' which provides for the transfer of funds from ``Ship 
Modernization, Operations and Sustainment Fund'' to support 
specific Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruisers.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8131'' which provides for the transfer of funds for pay for 
military personnel for purposes of fully funding the authorized 
military pay raise.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8133'' which provides for the transfer of funds to support 
activities related to the Zika virus.
    Language has been included under title IX ``Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy'' for the transfer of funds to the ``Coast 
Guard Operating Expenses''' account.
    Language has been included under title IX 
``Counterterrorism Partnerships Fund'' for the transfer of 
funds to other appropriations provided for in this Act.
    Language has been included under title IX ``Joint 
Improvised Explosive Devise Defeat Fund'' which provides for 
the transfer of funds to appropriations available to the 
Department of Defense for military personnel; for operation and 
maintenance; for procurement; for research, development, test 
and evaluation; and for defense working capital funds for 
purposes related to assisting United States forces in the 
defeat of improvised explosive devices.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
9002'' which provides for the authority to transfer funds 
between the appropriations or funds made available to the 
Department of Defense in title IX, subject to certain 
conditions.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
9018'' which provides for the transfer of funds to the 
operation and maintenance, military personnel, and procurement 
accounts, to improve the intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance capabilities of the Department of Defense.

                      EARMARK DISCLOSURE STATEMENT

    Neither the bill nor the report contains any congressional 
earmarks, limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as 
defined in Clause 9 of rule XXI.

          COMPLIANCE WITH RULE XIII, CL. 3(E) (RAMSEYER RULE)

    In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the Committee notes that the 
accompanying bill does not propose to repeal or amend a statute 
or part thereof.

               CHANGES IN THE APPLICATION OF EXISTING LAW

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1)(A) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the following statements are 
submitted describing the effect of provisions in the 
accompanying bill which directly or indirectly change the 
application of existing law.
    Language is included in various parts of the bill to 
continue ongoing activities which require annual authorization 
or additional legislation, which to date has not been enacted.
    The bill includes a number of provisions which place 
limitations on the use of funds in the bill or change existing 
limitations and which might, under some circumstances, be 
construed as changing the application of law.
    The bill includes a number of provisions which provide for 
the transfer of funds and which might, under some 
circumstances, be construed as changing the application of law.
    The bill includes a number of provisions, which have been 
virtually unchanged for many years that are technically 
considered legislation.
    The bill provides that appropriations shall remain 
available for more than one year for some programs for which 
the basic authorizing legislation does not presently authorize 
each extended availability.
    In various places in the bill, the Committee has allocated 
funds within appropriation accounts in order to fund specific 
programs.
    Language is included in various accounts placing a 
limitation on funds for emergencies and extraordinary expenses.
    Language is included that provides not more than 
$15,000,000 for the Combatant Commander Initiative Fund.
    Language is included that provides not less than 
$35,045,000 for the Procurement Technical Assistance 
Cooperative Agreement Program, of which not less than 
$3,600,000 shall be available for centers.
    Language is included that prohibits the consolidation of 
certain legislative affairs or liaison offices.
    Language is included that makes available $8,023,000 for 
certain classified activities, allows such funds to be 
transferred between certain accounts, and exempts such funds 
from the investment item unit cost ceiling.
    Language is included that limits the use of funds for 
official representation purposes under the heading ``United 
States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces''.
    Language is included that provides for specific 
construction, acquisition, or conversion of vessels under the 
heading ``Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy''.
    Language is included that provides for the incurring of 
additional obligations for certain activities under the heading 
``Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy''.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds 
provided under the heading ``Shipbuilding and Conversion, 
Navy'' for the construction of any naval vessel, or the 
construction of major components for the construction or 
conversion of any naval vessel, in foreign facilities or 
shipyards.
    Language is included under the heading ``Research, 
Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy'' that provides funds 
for certain activities related to the V-22.
    Language is included under the heading ``Research, 
Development, Test and Evaluation, Defense-Wide'' that provides 
$250,000,000 for the Defense Rapid Innovation Program and 
provides for the transfer of funds subject to certain 
requirements.
    Language is included that specifies the use of certain 
funds provided under the heading ``Defense Health Program''.
    Language is included that provides that not less than 
$8,000,000 of funds provided under the heading ``Defense Health 
Program'' shall be available for HIV/AIDS prevention 
educational activities.
    Language is included that provides for the carry-over of no 
more than one percent of operation and maintenance funds 
provided under the heading ``Defense Health Program''.
    Language is included under the heading ``Defense Health 
Program'' that provides that not less than $619,100,000 shall 
be made available to the U.S. Army Medical Research and 
Materiel Command to carry out congressionally directed medical 
research programs.
    Language is included that specifies the use of certain 
funds provided under the heading ``Chemical Agents and 
Munitions Destruction, Defense''.
    Language is included that provides that no funds made 
available in this Act may be used for publicity or propaganda 
purposes not authorized by Congress.
    Language is included that provides for conditions and 
limitations on the payment of compensation to, or employment 
of, foreign nationals.
    Language is included that provides that no funds made 
available in this Act may be obligated beyond the end of the 
fiscal year unless expressly provided for in this Act.
    Language is included that limits the obligation of certain 
funds during the last two months of the fiscal year to no more 
than 20 percent with certain exceptions.
    Language is included that provides for incorporation of 
project level adjustments specified in tables included in this 
report.
    Language is included that provides for the establishment of 
a baseline for application of reprogramming and transfer 
authorities for fiscal year 2017 and prohibits reprogramming 
and transfers, with certain exceptions, until after submission 
of a report.
    Language is included that provides for limitations on the 
use and transfer of working capital fund cash balances.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds 
appropriated by this Act to initiate a special access program 
without prior notification to the congressional defense 
committees.
    Language is included that provides limitations and 
conditions on the use of funds provided in this Act to initiate 
multi-year contracts.
    Language is included that provides for the use and 
obligation of funds for humanitarian and civic assistance costs 
under chapter 20 of title 10, United States Code.
    Language is included that provides that civilian personnel 
of the Department of Defense may not be managed on the basis of 
end strength or be subject to end strength limitations, sets 
forth certain requirements related to end strength for the 
budget submission, and requires that Department of Army Science 
and Technology Reinvention Laboratories be managed based on the 
available budget.
    Language is included that prohibits funds made available in 
this Act from being used to influence congressional action on 
matters pending before the Congress.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to pay 
compensation to any member of the Army participating as a full-
time student and receiving benefits from the Education Benefits 
Fund when time spent as a full-time student is counted toward 
that member's service commitment, with certain exceptions.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
funds appropriated in title III of this Act for the Department 
of Defense Pilot Mentor-Protege Program.
    Language is included that provides for the Department of 
Defense to purchase anchor and mooring chains manufactured only 
in the United States.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available to the Department of Defense to demilitarize or 
destroy surplus firearms or small arms ammunition except under 
certain circumstances.
    Language is included that provides a limitation on the use 
of funds for the relocation of any Department of Defense entity 
into or within the National Capital Region.
    Language is included that provides for incentive payments 
authorized by section 504 of the Indian Financing Act of 1974 
(25 U.S.C. 1544).
    Language is included that provides that no funds made 
available by this Act for the Defense Media Activity may be 
used for national or international political or psychological 
activities.
    Language is included that provides for the obligation of 
funds for purposes specified in section 2350j(c) of title 10, 
United States Code.
    Language is included that provides funding for the Civil 
Air Patrol Corporation.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds 
appropriated in this Act to establish a new federally funded 
research and development center (FFRDC), pay compensation to 
certain individuals associated with an FFRDC, construct certain 
new buildings not located on military installations, or 
increase the number of staff years for defense FFRDCs beyond a 
specified amount.
    Language is included that provides for the Department of 
Defense to procure carbon, alloy, or armor steel plate melted 
and rolled only in the United States or Canada.
    Language is included that defines congressional defense 
committees for the purposes of this Act.
    Language is included that provides for competitions between 
private firms and Department of Defense Depot Maintenance 
Activities for modification, depot maintenance, and repair of 
aircraft, vehicles, and vessels, as well as the production of 
components and other Defense-related articles.
    Language is included that provides for revocation of 
blanket waivers of the Buy America Act upon a finding that a 
country has violated a reciprocal trade agreement by 
discriminating against products produced in the United States 
that are covered by the agreement.
    Language is included that provides for the availability of 
funds for the Department of Defense Overseas Military Facility 
Investment Recovery Account established by section 2921(c)(1) 
of the 1991 National Defense Authorization Act.
    Language is included that provides for the conveyance, 
without consideration, of excess relocatable housing units 
located at Grand Forks, Malmstrom, Mountain Home, Ellsworth, 
and Minot Air Force Bases to Indian tribes.
    Language is included that provides for the availability of 
operation and maintenance appropriations to purchase items 
having an investment item unit cost of not more than $250,000.
    Language is included that prohibits funds from being used 
to disestablish, close, downgrade, or place on probation a 
Senior Reserve Officers' Training Corps program.
    Language is included that provides for the issuance of 
regulations placing certain limitations on the sale of tobacco 
products in military resale outlets.
    Language is included that limits the purchase of specified 
investment items with Working Capital Funds.
    Language is included that provides that none of the funds 
appropriated for the Central Intelligence Agency shall remain 
available for obligation beyond the current fiscal year except 
for funds appropriated for the Reserve for Contingencies, the 
Central Services Working Capital Fund, or other certain 
programs authorized under section 503 of the National Security 
Act of 1947.
    Language is included that provides that funds made 
available for the Defense Intelligence Agency may be used for 
intelligence communications and intelligence information 
systems for the Services, the Unified and Specified Commands, 
and the component commands.
    Language is included that provides that not less than 
$12,000,000 appropriated under the heading ``Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-Wide'' shall be for mitigation of 
environmental impacts on Indian lands resulting from Department 
of Defense activities.
    Language is included that provides for the Department of 
Defense to comply with the Buy American Act (chapter 83 of 
title 41, United States Code).
    Language is included that provides conditions under which 
contracts for studies, analysis, or consulting services may be 
entered into without competition on the basis of an unsolicited 
proposal.
    Language is included that limits the use of funds made 
available in this Act to establish or support field operating 
agencies.
    Language is included that limits the use of funds 
appropriated by this Act for the conversion of an activity or 
function of the Department of Defense to contractor 
performance.
    Language is included in title VIII and title IX that 
provides for the rescission of previously appropriated funds.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act from being used to reduce authorized 
positions for military technicians (dual status) of the Army 
National Guard, Air National Guard, Army Reserve, and Air Force 
Reserve unless such reductions are a direct result of a 
reduction in military force structure.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act for assistance to the Democratic People's 
Republic of Korea unless specifically appropriated for that 
purpose.
    Language is included that provides for the use of operation 
and maintenance funds appropriated in this Act for 
reimbursement to the National Guard and reserve when members of 
the National Guard and reserve provide intelligence or 
counterintelligence support to the Combatant Commands, Defense 
Agencies, and Joint Intelligence Activities.
    Language is included that provides that funds made 
available to the Department of Defense and Central Intelligence 
Agency for drug interdiction and counter-drug activities may 
not be transferred to other agencies except as specifically 
provided in an appropriations law.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds 
appropriated by this Act for the procurement of ball and roller 
bearings other than those produced by a domestic source and of 
domestic origin.
    Language is included that places conditions on the use of 
funds made available by this Act for Evolved Expendable Launch 
Vehicle service competitive procurements.
    Language is included to provide funding to make grants to 
specified entities upon determination by the Secretary of 
Defense that such grants serve the national interest.
    Language is included that provides for the Department of 
Defense to purchase supercomputers manufactured only in the 
United States with an exception for certain circumstances.
    Language is included to allow for Small Business Innovation 
Research program and Small Business Technology Transfer program 
set-asides.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act to pay contractor bonuses arising from a 
business restructuring.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
funds to be used in support of personnel supporting approved 
organizations and activities outside the Department of Defense.
    Language is included that provides for the Department of 
Defense to dispose of negative unliquidated or unexpended 
balances for expired or closed accounts.
    Language is included that provides conditions for the use 
of equipment of the National Guard Distance Learning Project on 
a space-available, reimbursable basis.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
modify command and control relationships affecting Navy forces 
assigned to the Pacific Fleet.
    Language is included that provides for the use of funds 
made available under the heading ``Operation and Maintenance, 
Defense-Wide'' for high priority Sexual Assault Prevention and 
Response program requirements, including the transfer of funds.
    Language is included that provides a limitation on the use 
of funds appropriated in title IV to procure end-items for 
delivery to military forces for operational training, 
operational use, or inventory requirements.
    Language is included that provides for a waiver by the 
Secretary of Defense of ``Buy America'' provisions for certain 
cooperative programs.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act for repairs or maintenance to military 
family housing units, for which funds are provided in other 
appropriations acts.
    Language is included that provides that funds for new 
starts for advanced concept technology demonstration projects 
may be obligated or expended only after notification to the 
congressional defense committees.
    Language is included that provides that the Secretary of 
Defense shall continue to provide a classified quarterly report 
on certain matters as directed in the classified annex 
accompanying this Act.
    Language is included that provides for the use of National 
Guard personnel to support ground-based elements of the 
National Ballistic Missile Defense System.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds 
provided in this Act to transfer to any nongovernmental entity 
ammunition held by the Department of Defense that has a 
center--fire cartridge and is designated as ``armor piercing'' 
except for demilitarization purposes.
    Language is included that provides for a waiver by the 
Chief of the National Guard Bureau or his designee for all or 
part of consideration in cases of personal property leases of 
one year or less to certain organizations specified by section 
508(d) of title 32, United States Code.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
funds made available in this Act under the heading ``Operation 
and Maintenance, Army'' to other activities of the Federal 
Government for certain purposes.
    Language is included that prohibits the modification of the 
appropriations account structure or presentation of the budget 
request for the National Intelligence Program, or modification 
of the process by which National Intelligence Program 
appropriations are apportioned, allotted, obligated, and 
disbursed.
    Language is included that provides grant authority for the 
construction and furnishing of additional Fisher Houses to meet 
the needs of military family members when confronted with the 
illness or hospitalization of an eligible military beneficiary.
    Language is included that provides funding and transfer 
authority for the Israeli Cooperative missile defense programs.
    Language is included that provides for the availability and 
transfer of funds to properly complete prior year shipbuilding 
programs.
    Language is included that provides that funds made 
available by this Act are deemed to be specifically authorized 
by Congress for purposes of section 504 of the National 
Security Act of 1947 until enactment of the Intelligence 
Authorization Act.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds 
provided in this Act to initiate a new start program without 
prior written notification.
    Language is included that provides that the budget of the 
President for fiscal year 2018 shall include separate budget 
justification documents for costs of the United States Armed 
Forces' participation in contingency operations that contain 
certain budget exhibits as defined in the Department of Defense 
Financial Management Regulation.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act for the research, development, test, 
evaluation, procurement, or deployment of nuclear armed 
interceptors of a missile defense system.
    Language is included that reduces the total amount of 
funding in this Act to reflect savings due to favorable foreign 
exchange rates.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act to reduce or disestablish the operation 
of the 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron of the Air Force 
Reserve.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act for the integration of foreign 
intelligence information unless the information has been 
lawfully collected and processed during conduct of authorized 
foreign intelligence activities.
    Language is included that prohibits the transfer of program 
authorities related to tactical unmanned aerial vehicles from 
the Army.
    Language is included that provides funding and authority 
for the Asia Pacific Regional Initiative program.
    Language is included that limits the obligation authority 
of funds provided for the Office of the Director of National 
Intelligence to the current fiscal year except for research and 
technology which shall remain available for the current and the 
following fiscal years.
    Language is included that provides for the adjustment of 
obligations within the ``Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy'' 
appropriation.
    Language is included that prohibits the reprogramming or 
transfer of funds provided in this Act for the National 
Intelligence Program until the Director of National 
Intelligence submits a baseline for application of 
reprogramming and transfer authorities.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available by this Act to eliminate, restructure, realign, or 
reduce certain Army Contracting Command sites without prior 
notification to the congressional defense committees.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available by this Act for excess defense articles, assistance, 
or peacekeeping operations for countries designated to be in 
violation of the standards of the Child Soldiers Prevention Act 
of 2008.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
funds appropriated to the Intelligence Community Management 
Account for the Program Manager for Information Sharing 
Environment to other departments and agencies for certain 
purposes.
    Language is included that sets forth reprogramming and 
transfer procedures for the National Intelligence Program.
    Language is included that provides that the Director of 
National Intelligence shall submit budget exhibits identifying 
the future-years intelligence program.
    Language is included that defines the congressional 
intelligence committees for the purposes of this Act.
    Language is included that requires the Department of 
Defense to report incremental contingency operations costs on a 
monthly basis.
    Language is included that provides that funds from certain 
operation and maintenance accounts may be transferred to a 
central fund established for Fisher Houses and Suites pursuant 
to section 2493(d) of title 10, United States Code.
    Language is included that provides that funds appropriated 
by this Act may be used for making remittances and transfers to 
the Defense Acquisition Workforce Development Fund.
    Language is included that provides that agencies post 
congressionally directed reports on a public website.
    Language is included that provides limitations on the award 
of contracts to contractors that require mandatory arbitration 
for certain claims as a condition of employment or a 
contractual relationship. The Secretary of Defense is 
authorized to waive the applicability of these limitations for 
national security interests.
    Language is included that provides for the availability and 
transfer of funds for the Joint Department of Defense-
Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Facility Demonstration 
Fund.
    Language is included that provides for the purchase of 
heavy and light armored vehicles for physical security or force 
protection purposes.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds in 
contravention of section 130h of title 10, United States Code.
    Language is included that provides transfer authority for 
the Director of National Intelligence for the National 
Intelligence Program subject to certain limitations.
    Language is included that prohibits funds to transfer or 
release certain individuals detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba 
into the United States, its territories, or possessions.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
construct, acquire, or modify any facility in the United 
States, its territories, or possessions to house individuals 
detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
transfer any individual detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba to the 
custody or control of the individual's country of origin, any 
other foreign country, or any other foreign entity except in 
accordance with sections 1034 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 and 1034 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds in 
contravention of the War Powers Resolution (50 U.S.C. 1541).
    Language is included that prohibits the lease or purchase 
of new light duty vehicles except in accordance with 
Presidential Memorandum-Federal Fleet Performance, dated May 
24, 2011.
    Language is included that prohibits the Department of 
Defense from entering into certain agreements with 
Rosoboronexport with certain waiver authorities.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds for 
the purchase or manufacture of a United States flag unless such 
flag is treated as a covered item under section 2533a(b) of 
title 10, United States Code.
    Language is included that provides for the availability of 
funds for ex gratia payments in certain circumstances subject 
to certain conditions.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
reduce or prepare to reduce the number of deployed and non-
deployed strategic delivery vehicles and launchers below 
certain authorized levels.
    Language is included that requires grant awards to be 
posted on a public website in a searchable format.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds for 
the performance of a flight demonstration team at a location 
outside the United States if a performance at a location within 
the United States was canceled during the current fiscal year 
due to insufficient funding.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds by the 
National Security Agency for certain activities.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
implement the Arms Trade Treaty until the Senate approves a 
resolution of ratification.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this or any other Act to pay the salary of any 
officer or employee who approves or implements the transfer of 
certain administrative responsibilities or budgetary resources 
unless expressly provided for in Defense Appropriations Acts.
    Language is included that requires certain notification on 
the use of funds for activities authorized under section 1208 
of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005, 
with a waiver for exigent circumstances.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds with 
respect to Iraq in contravention of the War Powers Resolution 
(50 U.S.C. 1541).
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
divest, retire, transfer or place in storage or on backup 
status any A-10 aircraft, or to disestablish any A-10 units.
    Language is included that provides for the use of funds 
from ``Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Defense-
Wide'' to support Department of Defense activities related to 
the implementation of the Digital Accountability and 
Transparency Act.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
award a new contract for the T-AO(X) program except under 
certain circumstances.
    Language is included that reduces the amount of funds 
appropriated in title II of this Act due to excess cash 
balances in the Department of Defense Working Capital Funds.
    Language is included that reduces the amount of funds 
appropriated in title II of this Act due to lower than 
anticipated fuel costs.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available by this Act to divest or retire KC-10 aircraft.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available by this Act to divest, retire, transfer, or place in 
storage or on backup inventory status any EC-130H aircraft.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available by this Act to pay Government Travel Charge Card 
expenses for gaming or certain entertainment activities.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available by this Act to propose, plan for, or execute a new 
base realignment and closure round.
    Language is included that makes funds appropriated in title 
III of this Act available for multiyear procurement contracts 
for AH-64E Apache and UH-60M Blackhawk helicopters.
    Language is included that makes available funds provided 
under the heading ``Operation and Maintenance, Navy'' for 
purposes related to the National Defense Reserve Fleet.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
funds previously appropriated under the heading ``Ship 
Modernization, Operations, and Sustainment Fund'' for the 
purposes of sustaining, equipping, and modernizing specified 
vessels.
    Language is included that provides that the Secretary of 
Defense may use funds appropriated in titles II, III, and IV of 
this Act and Defense Working Capital Funds to develop, replace, 
and sustain Federal Government security and suitability 
background investigation information technology systems.
    Language is included that provides for a limitation on the 
use of funds made available by this Act for the Joint 
Surveillance Target Attack Radar System recapitalization 
program.
    Language is included that provides for the Secretary of the 
Air Force to implement cost-effective agreements for required 
heating facility modernization in the Kaiserslautern Military 
Community subject to certain conditions.
    Language is included that provides that not less than 
$48,000,000 of funds provided under the heading ``Defense 
Working Capital Funds'' in this Act shall be used to support 
transportation of fresh fruits and vegetables to commissaries 
in Asia and the Pacific.
    Language is included that provides for limitations on the 
acceptance of fresh fruits and vegetables at commissaries in 
Asia and the Pacific.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this or any other Act to partially or wholly 
close, or partially or wholly transfer from the jurisdiction of 
the Department of Defense of the United States, Naval Station 
Guantanamo Bay.
    Language is included providing for the availability and 
transfer of additional amounts for military personnel pay.
    Language is included prohibiting the use of funds made 
available by this Act to enforce section 526 of the Energy 
Independence and Security Act of 2007.
    Language is included providing for the availability and 
transfer of additional readiness funds made available to the 
Services in title II of this Act for activities related to the 
Zika virus.
    Language is included that makes available funds for 
financial support to military memorials and museums for the 
purpose of highlighting the role of women in the military, 
subject to certain limitations.
    Language is included that prohibits funding for computer 
networks that do not block pornography, subject to certain law 
enforcement and national defense exceptions.
    Language is included that prohibits funding for certain 
travel regulations.
    Language is included under the heading ``Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-Wide'' in title IX that provides for the 
use of funds for certain purposes subject to certain 
limitations.
    Language is included under the heading ``Counterterrorism 
Partnerships Fund'' that provides for the transfer and use of 
funds for certain purposes.
    Language is included under the heading ``Afghanistan 
Security Forces Fund'' that provides for the use of funds for 
certain purposes and the management of contributions and 
returned items.
    Language is included under the heading ``Counter-Islamic 
State of Iraq and the Levant Train and Equip Fund'' that 
provides for the use of funds for certain purposes, compliance 
with vetting standards, management of contributions, and the 
submission of certain reports.
    Language is included under the heading ``National Guard and 
Reserve Equipment Account'' providing for the procurement of 
certain items and the submission of modernization priority 
assessments.
    Language is included under the heading ``Joint Improvised-
Threat Defeat Fund'' that makes funds available for certain 
purposes notwithstanding any other provision of law and 
provides for transfers to other accounts.
    Language is included that provides that amounts designed in 
this Act as Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on 
Terrorism shall be available only if the President subsequently 
so designates all such amounts and transmits such designations 
to the Congress.
    Language is included that provides that funds made 
available in title IX are in addition to amounts appropriated 
or otherwise made available for the Department of Defense for 
the current fiscal year.
    Language is included that provides for supervision and 
administration costs for construction projects associated with 
overseas contingency operations.
    Language is included that provides for the availability of 
funds to purchase passenger, heavy, and light armored vehicles 
notwithstanding price or other limitations on the purchase of 
passenger carrying vehicles for use in the U.S. Central Command 
area of responsibility.
    Language is included that provides funds and authority for 
the Commanders' Emergency Response Program and establishes 
certain reporting requirements.
    Language is included that authorizes the use of funds to 
provide certain assistance to coalition forces supporting 
military and stability operations in Afghanistan and to counter 
the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, and establishes 
certain reporting requirements.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds to 
establish permanent bases in Iraq or Afghanistan.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds in 
contravention of certain laws or regulations promulgated to 
implement the United Nations Convention Against Torture and 
Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment.
    Language is included that places limitations on the use of 
Afghanistan Security Forces Funds and requires certain 
certifications.
    Language is included that provides for the availability of 
funds appropriated in title IX of this Act for the purchase of 
items having an investment unit cost of up to $250,000, subject 
to certain conditions.
    Language is included that authorizes up to $60,000,000 
under the heading ``Operation and Maintenance, Air Force'' for 
the Office of Security Cooperation in Iraq and security 
assistance teams, and operations and activities authorized in 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016, 
subject to written notice requirements.
    Language is included that provides for up to $500,000,000 
of funds appropriated by this Act for the Counterterrorism 
Partnerships Fund to be used for assistance to the Government 
of Jordan for certain purposes.
    Language is included prohibiting the use of funds made 
available by this Act under the heading ``Counter-Islamic State 
of Iraq and the Levant Train and Equip Fund'' to procure or 
transfer man-portable air defense systems.
    Language is included that provides for $150,000,000 for 
assistance to the military and national security forces of 
Ukraine for certain purposes and under certain conditions.
    Language is included providing for the availability of 
funds appropriated in title IX for replacement of items 
provided to the Government of Ukraine from the inventory of the 
United States to the extent provided for in this Act.
    Language is included prohibiting the use of funds made 
available by this Act for assistance to Ukraine to procure or 
transfer man-portable air defense systems.
    Language is included that places limitations on the use of 
Coalition Support Funds for the Government of Pakistan.
    Language is included that provides for additional funds and 
transfer authority to improve the intelligence, surveillance, 
and reconnaissance capabilities of the Department of Defense, 
subject to a reporting requirement.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds with 
respect to Syria in contravention of the War Powers Resolution 
(50 U.S.C. 1541).
    Language is included that expresses the sense of Congress 
regarding the use of military force against the Islamic State 
of Iraq and the Levant.
    Language is included that sets the amount by which 
subcommittee allocation exceeds the amount of proposed new 
budget authority at $0.


                 COMPARISON WITH THE BUDGET RESOLUTION

    Clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires an explanation of compliance with 
section 308(a)(1)(A) of the Congressional Budget and 
Impoundment Control Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, which requires that the report accompanying a bill 
providing new budget authority contain a statement detailing 
how that authority compares with the reports submitted under 
section 302 of the Act for the most recently agreed to 
concurrent resolution on the budget for the fiscal year from 
the Committee's section 302(a) allocation. This information 
follows:

                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              302(b) Allocation               This Bill
                                                       ---------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Budget                       Budget
                                                           Authority      Outlays       Authority      Outlays
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discretionary:
    General Purpose...................................         517,130      527,191         517,130   \1\527,191
    Global War on Terrorism\2\........................          58,626       33,786          58,626       33,786
Mandatory.............................................             514          514             514         514
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\2\Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism.

                      FIVE-YEAR OUTLAY PROJECTIONS

    In compliance with section 308(a)(1)(B) of the 
Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 
(Public Law 93-344), as amended, the following table contains 
five-year projections associated with the budget authority 
provided in the accompanying bill.

                        [In millions of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                             Non-GWOT          GWOT
------------------------------------------------------------------------
2017....................................         324,322          33,786
2018....................................         115,765          11,873
2019....................................          40,800           6,439
2020....................................          18,953           3,457
2021 and future years...................          14,948          2,511
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
Note: GWOT is Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism.

          FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS

    In accordance with section 308(a)(1)(C) of the 
Congressional Budget and Impoundment Act of 1974 (Public Law 
93-344), as amended, no new budget or outlays are provided by 
the accompanying bill for financial assistance to State and 
local governments.

                          PROGRAM DUPLICATION

    No provision of this bill establishes or reauthorizes a 
program of the Federal Government known to be duplicative of 
another Federal program, a program that was included in any 
report from the Government Accountability Office to Congress 
pursuant to section 21 of Public Law 111-139, or a program 
related to a program identified in the most recent Catalog of 
Federal Domestic Assistance.

                          DIRECTED RULE MAKING

    This bill does not contain any provision that specifically 
directs the promulgation or completion of a rule.

                          FULL COMMITTEE VOTES

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(b) of rule XIII of 
the House of Representatives, the results of each roll call on 
an amendment or on the motion to report, together with the 
names of those voting for and those voting against, are printed 
below:
    No record votes were ordered during consideration of the 
bill in Committee.



ADDITIONAL VIEWS--FISCAL YEAR 2017 DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS 
                                  BILL

    With this bill, the Committee has carried out its 
Constitutional responsibility to recommend the appropriations 
necessary to provide for the common defense of our Nation. The 
Committee did this in a collegial and bipartisan fashion 
consistent with its long-standing traditions.
    The base portion of this bill provides $517,130,000 in new 
budget authority covering all Department of Defense (DoD) and 
Intelligence Community functions except for Military 
Construction and Family Housing. This is $586,381,000 below the 
President's budget request, and $2,982,000 above last year's 
enacted level. The Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War 
on Terrorism (OCO/GWOT) portion provides a total of 
$58,626,000,000, an increase of $449,000 above the President's 
budget request. Within the funding provided for OCO/GWOT, 
$42,949,994,000 is for OCO/GWOT requirements and 
$15,676,000,000 is for base requirements.
    These additional views discuss the circumstances and 
conditions leading to the proposal to use nearly 27 percent of 
the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) accounts to fund base 
Department of Defense programs, which gives us pause as 
Appropriators.
    As Appropriators, we disagreed with the arbitrary spending 
caps that addressed one-third of the federal budget under the 
Budget Control Act of 2011 (BCA). In each session of Congress 
we should be making discrete decisions on how we annually 
invest our discretionary dollars. Setting inflexible spending 
targets for 10 years is nonsensical. More investment is needed 
in our roads, ports, water pipes, universities, and our 
defense. Congress might disagree on the ways to generate more 
resources, and the need to have a serious discussion of our 
entitlement programs, but our assumption is that there are very 
few people on the Committee or serving in Congress who believe 
the federal government is currently making enough of an 
investment in the long-term interests of our nation.
    And as Appropriators we voted for the Bipartisan Budget Act 
of 2015 (BBA), which mitigated the BCA caps on base 
discretionary funding and capped OCO spending for Fiscal Years 
(FY) 2016 and 2017. A complete repeal of the BCA was 
preferable, but nonetheless, we supported the BBA because it 
provided clarity to the Appropriations process for the balance 
of the 114th Congress. As such, we were able to complete the FY 
2016 process and, with a spending level for FY 2017, we were 
guardedly optimistic the House would return to regular order.
    The Defense Subcommittee was far along in its FY 2017 
process when the OCO to Base strategy--conceived to placate 
some on other House Committees--was settled upon by the House 
Majority. While this bill technically does not violate the caps 
established by the BBA for base defense programs and OCO, it is 
hard to argue that this bill comports with the spirit of that 
law. There is no doubt that the Chairman and Subcommittee staff 
made smart investment decisions in executing the $15.7 billion 
in OCO to Base funding strategy, but we are troubled by the 
circumstances that compelled the subcommittee's action.
    First and foremost, the fiscal year begins on October 1, 
2016, not May 1, 2017, and it is the responsibility of those of 
us holding office in the 2nd session of the 114th Congress to 
execute the FY 2017 appropriations process. In order to make 
OCO funding available for base programs, our bill only provides 
enough funding to fully support the warfighter until the end of 
April 2017, which is five months before the end of the fiscal 
year. This construct is intended to force the next 
administration and the next Congress to pass supplemental 
appropriations in calendar year 2017 to support ongoing combat 
operations. It forces the new President, as one of her or his 
first actions in office to request emergency supplemental 
funding. The difference here is about more than bookkeeping. 
Sending our military men and women into some of the most 
dangerous places on earth--Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria--
without ensuring that we provide mission support or pay their 
salaries for a full year is irresponsible.
    It is not the responsibility of the 115th Congress to 
finish a predetermined fraction of our work, and we should not 
be dismissive of the difficulties we face. To assume there will 
be smooth sailing for a supplemental appropriations bill in the 
spring is Pollyannaish. It is unknown who will be in the White 
House, who will be the civilian leadership at DoD, or even the 
composition of the next Congress. As evidenced from the current 
Zika virus debate, and past debate on Hurricane Sandy, 
supplemental appropriations bills are not without controversy.
    Additionally, in making $15.7 billion in cuts to the OCO 
budget request, the Subcommittee made assumptions on the pace 
of combat operations between now and May 2017. While the 
Chairman exercised caution, there is not much wiggle room in 
the interim. If the OCO spend rate were to increase for any 
reason, Congress and a new Administration would have to act 
quickly to pass a supplemental early in 2017. If that 
supplemental were not timely, the Department would likely be 
forced to reprogram or transfer base dollars to OCO, which 
would shortchange other priorities, negate the committee's 
funding levels, and still require a supplemental to backfill 
both base and OCO. And, possibly, this supplemental would be 
funded by offsets from resources within the other 11 bills 
within the full committee's jurisdiction, a wholly unacceptable 
scenario.
    Adding to the uncertainty, the House Majority is going it 
alone with this strategy. To date, it has been soundly rejected 
by the Administration, the Senate Appropriations Committee, and 
the Senate authorizers. While those three are not infallible, 
if the House Majority insists upon heading down this path, we 
fear the process for conference will be impossible.
    Putting concerns about uncertainty aside, as Appropriators, 
we further believe the OCO to Base strategy abdicates our 
Committee's discretion to the Department of Defense in 
executing the remaining OCO funding. In order to free up $15.7 
billion, certain appropriations in OCO were subject to 
reductions. These reductions were done at the account level, 
not at the program level. For example, Navy O&M; in the OCO 
Title was reduced by $2.9 billion, from its requested level of 
$6.8 billion. The Department will now have discretion to apply 
a $2.9 billion reduction across the tens of programs under that 
account.
    A final concern, and one expressed in prior years' markups, 
is the continued reliance on OCO funding. We should eliminate 
the reliance on OCO funding and shift these activities to the 
base budget. It is increasingly difficult after fifteen years 
of war to argue that this operational tempo for our military is 
a contingency and not the new normal in defending our nation 
and our interests. This Subcommittee had begun to limit what is 
an eligible expense in OCO, but we have clearly taken a step 
back under the BBA, and this latest proposal would take us back 
even farther. For example, this bill proposes to increase end 
strength by 52,000 above planned reductions for the Army, 
Marine Corps, and Air Force. We agree that we need more 
personnel to meet increasing operational demands; however, this 
additional force structure costs $3 billion in FY 2017, and we 
are concerned it would be paid for with OCO to Base dollars. 
Using OCO funding can provide a path of least resistance to 
increasing defense spending and allows for the postponement of 
some very difficult decisions. However, we cannot keep 
deferring tough decisions. This is particularly true when BCA 
caps are scheduled to lower defense spending by $2 billion in 
FY 2018. An increase in end strength creates a tail of spending 
in future years. The Department of Defense estimates the troop 
levels funded in the bill would increase spending by $30 
billion over five years. If this Bill is enacted there will be 
a $30 billion unbudgeted requirement our Committee will be 
expected to fund.
    Despite the concerns just expressed, Chairman Frelinghuysen 
and the Subcommittee did an exceptional job with a number of 
important priorities.
     The bill funds activities to counter Russian 
aggression, in part by providing an additional $150 million for 
Ukraine and funding for the European Reassurance Initiative 
(ERI) to increase the U.S. presence in NATO and eastern 
European nations.
     The bill includes ``Buy America'' general 
provisions to ensure American goods are used for production of 
military equipment, helping to maintain the Defense Industrial 
Base.
     The bill provides $6.7 billion for cyber security, 
nearly $1 billion more than FY 2016. Funding would be used to 
help cyber mission forces to become fully operational by the 
end of 2018, advance cyber training across the department, and 
support both defense and offensive operations.
     The bill again provides $250 million, which was 
not in the President's request, for the Rapid Innovation Fund 
to incorporate small business developments into DoD programs. 
This fund allows small businesses with big ideas for national 
security problems to participate, providing a path into the 
defense acquisition community.
     The bill provides a robust investment in several 
important National Guard modernization programs and $1 billion 
for the National Guard and Reserve Equipment Account, which 
allows these components to procure high priority equipment for 
their dual missions.
     The bill provides a pay raise of 2.1 percent, 0.5 
percent above the President's Request.
     The bill provides robust funding for medical 
research, to include an additional $282 million for cancer 
research, $125 million for peer-reviewed psychological health 
and traumatic brain injury research program, and a greater 
focus on hearing and vision restoration.
     The bill continues to support efforts on sexual 
assault prevention and response, providing $25 million above 
the request for Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program 
requirements.
     The bill supports Operation Observant Compass and 
the Humanitarian Mine Action program. These are just two of the 
many smaller programs and operations undertaken by the 
Department that work closely with host nations, while 
addressing a humanitarian need.
    In closing, these views have expressed concerns with the 
circumstances that have resulted in the crafting of less than 
three percent of the total bill. However, it must be noted that 
these circumstances and the uncertainty introduced are an 
unnecessary complication and increase the existing burden on 
the Chair, the Committee, and the staff. It is a mark of their 
talent, their commitment to our troops and our nation's 
defense, and their seriousness of purpose, that they have done 
so much good to ameliorate the problems caused by this 
approach. We look forward to working with the Chairman and the 
members of the Committee to advance the process and complete 
the task before us.

                                   Nita M. Lowey.
                                   Peter J. Visclosky.