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						Union Calendar No. 692


114th Congress }					{ Report
 2d Session    }         HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES       { 114-881
_______________________________________________________________________

                          REPORT ON THE ACTIVITY

                                 OF THE

            HOUSE PERMANENT SELECT COMMITTEE ON INTELLIGENCE

                                FOR THE

                    ONE HUNDRED FOURTEENTH CONGRESS

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]


 December 20, 2016.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed
                         LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

                              ----------                              

                          House of Representatives,
                Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence,
                                 Washington, DC, December 20, 2016.
Hon. Karen Haas,
Clerk, U.S. House of Representatives,
Washington, DC.
    Dear Mrs. Haas: Pursuant to clause 1(d) of rule XI of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives for the 114th Congress, I 
present herewith a report entitled ``Report on the Activity of 
the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, 114th 
Congress.''
            Sincerely,
                                               Devin Nunes,
                                                          Chairman.
                           
                           C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Letter of Transmittal............................................   III
Membership.......................................................     1
Jurisdiction.....................................................     2
Legislative and Oversight Activities.............................     3
Oversight Plan for the 114th Congress and Implementation and 
  Hearings Held Pursuant to Clause 2(n), (o), and (p) of House 
  Rule XI........................................................     8
Appendix I--Part A: Committee Reports; Part B: Public Laws; Part 
  C: Committee Hearings & Briefings..............................    11





                                                 Union Calendar No. 692
114th Congress }                                             { Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session    }                                             { 114-881

======================================================================

 
      REPORT ON THE ACTIVITY OF THE PERMANENT SELECT COMMITTEE ON 
        INTELLIGENCE FOR THE ONE HUNDRED AND FOURTEENTH CONGRESS

                                _______
                                

 December 20, 2016.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and 
                         ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

    Mr. Nunes of California, from the Permanent Select Committee on 
                 Intelligence, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

               PERMANENT SELECT COMMITTEE ON INTELLIGENCE


                          FULL COMMITTEE LIST

ADAM B. SCHIFF, California,          DEVIN NUNES, California,
  Ranking Member                       Chairman
JAMES A. HIMES, Connecticut          JEFF MILLER, Florida
TERRI A. SEWELL, Alabama             K. MICHAEL CONAWAY, Texas
ANDRE CARSON, Indiana                PETER T. KING, New York
JACKIE SPEIER, California            FRANK A. LoBIONDO, New Jersey
MIKE QUIGLEY, Illinois               LYNN A. WESTMORELAND, Georgia
ERIC SWALWELL, California            THOMAS J. ROONEY, Florida
PATRICK E. MURPHY, Florida           JOSEPH J. HECK, Nevada
JOAQUIN CASTRO, Texas                MIKE R. POMPEO, Kansas
                                     ILEANA ROS-LEHTINEN, Florida
                                     MICHAEL R. TURNER, Ohio
                                     BRAD R. WENSTRUP, Ohio
                                     CHRIS STEWART, Utah

   Damon Nelson, Staff Director
  Michael Bahar, Minority Staff 
             Director

                              ----------                              

                           SUBCOMMITTEE LIST
                            CIA Subcommittee

ERIC SWALWELL, California,           FRANK A. LoBIONDO, New Jersey, 
  Ranking Member                     Chairman
JAMES A. HIMES, Connecticut          K. MICHAEL CONAWAY, Texas
ANDRE CARSON, Indiana                PETER T. KING, New York
JOAQUIN CASTRO, Texas                LYNN A. WESTMORELAND, Georgia
                                     THOMAS J. ROONEY, Florida
                                     MIKE R. POMPEO, Kansas

     Department of Defense Intelligence and Overhead Architecture 
                              Subcommittee

TERRI A. SEWELL, Alabama,            JOSEPH J. HECK, Nevada,
  Ranking Member                       Chairman
ERIC SWALWELL, California            JEFF MILLER, Florida
PATRICK E. MURPHY, Florida           ILEANA ROS-LEHTINEN, Florida
JOAQUIN CASTRO, Texas                MICHAEL R. TURNER, Ohio
                                     CHRIS STEWART, Utah
                                     BRAD R. WENSTRUP, Ohio

                     Emerging Threats Subcommittee

MIKE QUIGLEY, Illinois,              THOMAS J. ROONEY, Florida,
  Ranking Member                       Chairman
TERRI A. SEWELL, Alabama             FRANK A. LoBIONDO, New Jersey
ANDRE CARSON, Indiana                JOSEPH J. HECK, Nevada
JACKIE SPEIER, California            MICHAEL R. TURNER, Ohio
                                     BRAD R. WENSTRUP, Ohio
                                     CHRIS STEWART, Utah

                   NSA and Cybersecurity Subcommittee

JAMES A. HIMES, Connecticut,         LYNN A. WESTMORELAND, Georgia, 
  Ranking Member                     Chairman
JACKIE SPEIER, California            JEFF MILLER, Florida
MIKE QUIGLEY, Illinois               K. MICHAEL CONAWAY, Texas
PATRICK E. MURPHY, Florida           PETER T. KING, New York
                                     MIKE R. POMPEO, Kansas
                                     ILEANA ROS-LEHTINEN, Florida

              JURISDICTION AND SPECIAL OVERSIGHT FUNCTION

    Clause 11(b)(1) of rule X of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives for the 114th Congress sets forth the 
jurisdiction of the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence--
          (A) The Central Intelligence Agency, the Director of 
        National Intelligence, and the National Intelligence 
        Program as defined in section 3(6) of the National 
        Security Act of 1947.
          (B) Intelligence and intelligence-related activities 
        of all other departments and agencies of the 
        Government, including the tactical intelligence and 
        intelligence-related activities of the Department of 
        Defense.
          (C) The organization or reorganization of a 
        department or agency of the Government to the extent 
        that the organization or reorganization relates to a 
        function or activity involving intelligence or 
        intelligence-related activities.
          (D) Authorizations for appropriations, both direct 
        and indirect, for the following:
                  (i) The Central Intelligence Agency, the 
                Director of National Intelligence, and the 
                National Intelligence Program as defined in 
                section 3(6) of the National Security Act of 
                1947.
                  (ii) Intelligence and intelligence-related 
                activities of all other departments and 
                agencies of the Government, including the 
                tactical intelligence and intelligence-related 
                activities of the Department of Defense.
                  (iii) A department, agency, subdivision, or 
                program that is a successor to an agency or 
                program named or referred to in (i) or (ii).
    Clause 3(m) of rule X of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives for the 114th Congress sets forth the Special 
Oversight Function of the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence as follows--``The Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence shall review and study on a continuing basis laws, 
programs, and activities of the intelligence community and 
shall review and study on an exclusive basis the sources and 
methods of entities described in clause 11(b)(1)(A).''

                  LEGISLATIVE AND OVERSIGHT ACTIVITIES

    During the 114th Congress, 52 bills or resolutions were 
referred to the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence 
(Committee).

Committee Action

    The Committee reported three measures to the House, two of 
which contained provisions that were later enacted into law 
through H.R. 2029, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016. 
Those measures were: H.R. 1560, the Protecting Cyber Networks 
Act, introduced by Chairman Devin Nunes; and H.R. 2596, the 
Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016, introduced 
by Chairman Devin Nunes. The third measure reported by the 
Committee passed the House: H.R. 5077, the Intelligence 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017, introduced by Chairman 
Devin Nunes.
    The Committee discharged five additional measures, two of 
which were enacted into law: H.R. 2048, USA Freedom Act of 
2015, introduced by Mr. James Sensenbrenner; and S. 1632, A 
bill to require a regional strategy to address the threat posed 
by Boko Haram, introduced by Sen. Susan Collins. The three 
other measures discharged by the Committee that passed the 
House were: H. Res. 842, Expressing the sense of the House of 
Representatives regarding the terrorist attacks launched 
against the United States on September 11, 2001, introduced by 
Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy; H. Res. 891, Expressing concern 
over the disappearance of David Sneddon, introduced by Mr. 
Chris Stewart, a member of the Committee; and H.R. 6480, the 
Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017, introduced 
by Chairman Devin Nunes.

Other Measures Within the Committee's Jurisdiction

    In addition to those measures described above, six measures 
referred to the Committee passed the House. Those measures 
were: H.R. 3654, the Combat Terrorist Use of Social Media Act 
of 2015, introduced by Mr. Ted Poe; H.R. 4127, the Intelligence 
Authorization Act for 2016, introduced by Chairman Devin Nunes; 
H.R. 4239, the Tracking Foreign Fighters in Terrorist Safe 
Havens Act, introduced by Mr. Frank LoBiondo, a member of the 
Committee; H.R. 5607, Enhancing Treasury's Anti-Terror Tools 
Act, introduced by Mr. Robert Pittenger; H.R. 5631, Iran 
Accountability Act of 2016, introduced by Majority Leader Kevin 
McCarthy; and H.R. 6393, the Intelligence Authorization Act for 
2017, introduced by Chairman Devin Nunes.
    At least two other measures containing matters within the 
jurisdiction of the Committee on Intelligence were enacted into 
law: S. 1356, the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2016, introduced by Sen. Ron Johnson; and H.R. 5790, the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation Whistleblower Protection 
Enhancement Act of 2016, introduced by Mr. Jason Chaffetz. 
Additionally, S. 2943, the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2017, introduced by Sen. John McCain, was 
presented to the President on December 14, 2016.
    The following is a summary of the legislative and oversight 
activities of the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of 
the 114th Congress. In addition, this report includes a summary 
of hearings held pursuant to clauses 2(n), (o), and (p) under 
House rule XI.

                         Legislative Activities


                             Full Committee


                            USA FREEDOM ACT

                              (H.R. 2048)

Summary

    H.R. 2048 reformed the authorities of the Federal 
Government to require the production of certain business 
records, conduct electronic surveillance, use pen registers and 
trap and trace devices, and use other forms of information 
gathering for foreign intelligence, counterterrorism, and 
criminal purposes.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2048 was introduced by Mr. James Sensenbrenner on 
April 28, 2015, and was referred to the Permanent Select 
Committee on Intelligence, the Committee on Financial Services, 
and the Committee on the Judiciary.
    On April 30, 2015, the Committee on the Judiciary held a 
business meeting to consider H.R. 2048 and ordered the bill 
reported to the House, as amended, by a recorded vote of 25 
ayes and two noes.
    On May 8, 2015, the Committee on the Judiciary reported 
H.R. 2048 to the House.
    On May 8, 2015, the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence discharged H.R. 2048.
    On May 13, 2015, the House considered H.R. 2048, and passed 
the bill by a recorded vote of 338 ayes and 88 noes.
    On June 2, 2016, the Senate considered H.R. 2048, as 
amended, and passed the bill by a recorded vote of 67 ayes and 
32 noes.
    On June 2, 2015, President signed H.R. 2048, which became 
Public Law 114-23.

                     PROTECTING CYBER NETWORKS ACT

                              (H.R. 1560)

Summary

    The purpose of H.R. 1560 was to improve cybersecurity in 
the United States through enhanced sharing of information about 
cybersecurity threats and amended the Homeland Security Act of 
2002 to enhance multi-directional sharing of information 
related to cybersecurity risks and strengthen privacy and civil 
liberties protections.
    H.R. 1560 contained provisions that were later enacted into 
law as Division N of H.R. 2029, the Consolidated Appropriations 
Act, 2016.

Legislative History

    H.R. 1560 was introduced by Chairman Devin Nunes on March 
24, 2015, and referred to the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence.
    On March 26, 2015, the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence held a business meeting to consider H.R. 1560 and 
ordered the bill reported to the House, as amended, by a voice 
vote.
    On April 13, 2015, the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence reported H.R. 1560, as amended, to the House.
    On April 22, 2015, the House considered H.R. 1560, as 
amended, and passed the bill by a recorded vote of 307 ayes and 
116 noes.

          INTELLIGENCE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2016

                              (H.R. 2596)

Summary

    The purpose of H.R. 2596 was to authorize appropriations 
for fiscal year 2016 for intelligence and intelligence-related 
activities of the United States Government, the Community 
Management Account, and the Central Intelligence Agency 
Retirement and Disability System.
    H.R. 2596 contained provisions that were later enacted into 
law as Division M of H.R. 2029, Consolidated Appropriations 
Act, 2016.
    On December 1, 2016, the House considered related 
legislation, H.R. 4127, under suspension of the rules, and 
passed the bill by a recorded vote of 364 ayes and 58 noes. 
H.R. 4127 contained provisions from H.R. 2596, and also 
reflected extensive negotiations with the Senate.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2596 was introduced by Chairman Devin Nunes on June 1, 
2015, and referred to the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence and the Committee on the Budget.
    On June 4, 2015, the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence held a business meeting to consider H.R. 2596 and 
ordered the bill reported to the House, as amended, by a voice 
vote.
    On June 9, 2015 the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence reported H.R. 2596, as amended, to the House.
    On June 9, 2015, the Committee on the Budget discharged 
H.R. 2596.
    On June 16, 2015, the House considered H.R. 2596, as 
amended, and passed the bill by a recorded vote of 247 ayes and 
178 noes.

          INTELLIGENCE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2017

                              (H.R. 5077)

Summary

    The purpose of H.R. 5077 was to authorize appropriations 
for fiscal year 2017 for intelligence and intelligence-related 
activities of the United States Government, the Community 
Management Account, and the Central Intelligence Agency 
Retirement and Disability System.
    On November 30, 2016, the House considered related 
legislation, H.R. 6393, under suspension of the rules, and 
passed the bill by a recorded vote of 390 ayes and 30 noes. 
H.R. 6393 contained provisions from H.R. 5077, and also 
reflected extensive negotiations with the Senate.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5077 was introduced by Chairman Devin Nunes on April 
27, 2016, and referred to the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence.
    April 29, 2016, the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence held a business meeting to consider H.R. 5077 and 
ordered the bill reported to the House by a voice vote.
    On May 18, 2016, the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence reported H.R. 5077 to the House.
    On May 24, 2016, the House considered H.R. 5077, as 
amended, under suspension of the rules, and passed the bill by 
a recorded vote of 371 ayes and 35 noes.

  EXPRESSING THE SENSE OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES REGARDING THE 
 TERRORIST ATTACKS LAUNCHED AGAINST THE UNITED STATES ON SEPTEMBER 11, 
               2001, ON THE 15TH ANNIVERSARY OF THAT DATE

                             (H. RES. 842)

Summary

    H. Res. 842 expresses the sense of the House of 
Representatives regarding the terrorist attacks launched 
against the United States on September 11, 2001, on the 15th 
anniversary of that date.

Legislative History

    H. Res. 842 was introduced by Majority Leader Kevin 
McCarthy on September 6, 2016, and was referred to the 
Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, Committee on 
Oversight and Government Reform, Committee on Foreign Affairs, 
Committee on Armed Services, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure, Committee on the Judiciary, and the Committee 
on Homeland Security.
    On September 9, 2016, the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, 
Committee on Foreign Affairs, Committee on Armed Services, 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, Committee on 
the Judiciary, and the Committee on Homeland Security 
discharged H. Res. 842.
    On September 9, 2016, the House considered H. Res. 842 by 
unanimous consent and passed the resolution without objection.

  EXPRESSING CONCERN OVER THE DISAPPEARANCE OF DAVID SNEDDON, AND FOR 
                             OTHER PURPOSES

                             (H. RES. 891)

Summary

    H. Res. 891 expresses concern over the disappearance of 
David Sneddon.

Legislative History

    H. Res. 891 was introduced by Mr. Chris Stewart on 
September 26, 2016, and was referred to the Permanent Select 
Committee on Intelligence and the Committee on Foreign Affairs.
    On September 28, 2016, the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence and Committee on Foreign Affairs discharged H. 
Res. 842.
    On September 28, 2016, the House considered H. Res. 891 by 
unanimous consent and passed the resolution without objection.

 A BILL TO REQUIRE A REGIONAL STRATEGY TO ADDRESS THE THREAT POSED BY 
                               BOKO HARAM

                               (S. 1632)

Summary

    The purpose of S. 1632 was to require a regional strategy 
to address the threat posed by Boko Haram.

Legislative History

    S. 1632 was introduced by Ms. Susan Collins on June 18, 
2015.
    On July 28, 2015, the Committee on Foreign Relations of the 
Senate reported S. 1632 with an amendment in the nature of a 
substitute.
    On September 22, 2015, the Senate considered S. 1632 by 
unanimous consent and passed the bill without objection.
    On September 24, 2015, S. 1632 was referred to the 
Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and Committee on 
Foreign Affairs.
    On December 7, 2016, the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence and the Committee on Foreign Affairs discharged S. 
1632.
    On December 7, 2016, the House considered S. 1632 by 
unanimous consent and passed the bill without objection.
    On December 14, 2016, President signed S. 1632, which 
became Public Law 114-266.

          INTELLIGENCE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2017

                              (H.R. 6480)

Summary

    The purpose of H.R. 6480 was to authorize appropriations 
for fiscal year 2017 for intelligence and intelligence-related 
activities of the United States Government, the Intelligence 
Community Management Account, and the Central Intelligence 
Agency Retirement and Disability System.
    H.R. 6480 contained provisions from H.R. 5077 and H.R. 
6393, and also reflected extensive negotiations with the 
Senate.

Legislative History

    H.R. 6480 was introduced by Chairman Devin Nunes on 
December 8, 2016, and referred to the Permanent Select 
Committee on Intelligence.
    On December 8, 2016, the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence discharged H.R. 6480.
    On December 8, 2016, the House considered H.R. 6480 by 
unanimous consent and passed the bill without objection.

                 OVERSIGHT PLAN FOR THE 114TH CONGRESS

    Clause 1(d)(2)(E) of rule XI also requires that each 
committee provide a delineation of any hearings held pursuant 
to clauses 2(n), (o), or (p) of rule XI. Those clauses require 
the Committee, or a subcommittee thereof, to hold at least one 
hearing on egregious instances of agency waste, fraud, abuse, 
and mismanagement, at least one hearing on agency financial 
statements, and one hearing on programs that, according to 
reports issued by the Comptroller General of the United States, 
are at high risk for waste, fraud, and mismanagement. As part 
of the Committee's oversight and authorization of the 
Intelligence Community budget, the Committee conducts numerous 
classified hearings and briefings that focus on issues of 
potential waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement in federal 
agencies. These Committee efforts result in the annual 
intelligence authorization bill. That bill is accompanied by a 
detailed classified annex on all Intelligence Community 
programs and budgets. A review of potential waste, fraud, 
abuse, and mismanagement within these programs is an 
inextricable part of the development of the classified annex.
    In addition to the classified annex, the Committee also 
conducted a number of unclassified oversight activities during 
the 114th Congress.

Intelligence Community Information Technology Environment

    Since the Director of National Intelligence (DNI) first 
announced his intention to pursue an Intelligence Community 
Information Technology Environment (IC ITE) in 2011, the 
Committee has expended considerable effort overseeing all 
aspects of the project's planning and implementation. On 
February 4, 2016, the Committee adopted--and provided the 
Intelligence Community with--a report entitled ``IC ITE 
Security Posture'' and the final report. The report concluded 
that IC ITE will increase the security of the IC information 
environment from both internal and external threats but 
highlighted the complexity of the endeavor and provided five 
recommendations to the IC. The report was the result of a year-
long study that included interviews with IC ITE leadership and 
technical directors, document reviews, and numerous staff 
briefings and meetings.

Abbottabad Documents

    On May 20, 2015, in response to Section 313 of the 
Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014, the 
Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) declassified and posted on 
its website 103 documents recovered during the May 2, 2011, 
raid that killed Usama bin Laden. On March 1, 2016, the CIA 
declassified and posted 113 additional documents. On November 
15, 2016, CIA declassified what the DNI described as the 
``final tranche'' of the documents but had not, as of December 
1, 2016, posted them or notified the Committee of the number of 
documents in that tranche.
    The Abbottabad documents came from over 100 thumb drives, 
hard drives, cell phones, paper files and other documents and 
materials collected during the raid and could fill a ``small 
college library.'' The Committee directed the declassification 
review so the material could to serve the public interest and 
help demystify bin Laden and al-Qa'ida without compromising 
national security. Moreover, the public release provides 
insights into al-Qa'ida's operations, tradecraft and its 
relationships with regional nation states, organizations and 
people. The 216 documents released to date represent a small 
percentage of the documents deemed to have intelligence value 
and the Committee continues to push for an expeditious 
declassification review of the remaining documents.

Joint Intelligence Analysis Complex

    In July 2015, the Committee began an independent assessment 
of the Department of Defense (DOD) analysis of the optimal 
location for the Joint Intelligence Analysis Complex (JIAC), an 
intelligence center designed to support the U.S. European 
Command, U.S. Africa Command, the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization, and various other intelligence customers.
    On July 20, 2015, the Committee published an independent 
cost estimate of the JIAC location, which stated that the DOD 
did not consider alternatives that could result in over $1.1 
billion of savings. After publishing the report, the Committee 
received information from multiple whistleblowers that 
indicated that the DOD had also provided the Committee with 
incorrect and misleading information. Based upon these 
findings, the Committee, in coordination with the Committee on 
Armed Services and the Committee on Appropriations, 
Subcommittee on Defense, requested that DOD reassess its basing 
decision for the JIAC. The three Committees also jointly 
requested that the Government Accountability Office conduct an 
independent review of the DOD analysis.
    The three committees also requested, in coordination with 
the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform (OGR) and the 
Committee on Veterans' Affairs, that the DOD Inspector General 
investigate the possible intentional provision of 
misinformation to Congress related to the JIAC. The Committee 
initiated its own investigation into the provision of false 
information to Congress, in coordination with OGR. To date, the 
Committee has conducted sixteen transcribed interviews and 
reviewed over 1,000 pages of documents provided by the DOD as 
part of this investigation. The Committee has also requested an 
additional 15 interviews and various documents, which the DOD 
has not yet provided to the Committee. The JIAC investigation 
has been a topic of significant discussion in at least four 
Committee hearings, including the Committee's hearings on 
November 15 and November 17, 2016.

9/11 Joint Inquiry ``28 Pages''

    On July 15, 2016, the Committee approved publication of a 
newly declassified section of the 2002 Joint Congressional 
Inquiry into Intelligence Community Activities Before and After 
the Terrorist Attacks of September 11, 2001. Following a 
declassification review, the Obama Administration decided to 
declassify the Joint Inquiry's only wholly classified section, 
commonly referred to as the ``28 pages.'' The Administration 
then sent this document--with redactions to protect sources and 
methods--to congressional leadership, and the Committee 
subsequently posted the unclassified version of the 28 pages on 
its website.

U.S. Central Command Joint Task Force

    On December 11, 2015, along with the Committee on Armed 
Services and the Committee on Appropriations, Subcommittee on 
Defense, the Chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee 
on Intelligence, the Committee established a Joint Task Force 
(JTF) to investigate the allegations of a whistleblower related 
to intelligence produced by U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) 
intelligence directorate. The whistleblower alleged that 
CENTCOM had manipulated intelligence to present an unduly 
positive outlook on CENTCOM efforts to train the Iraqi Security 
Forces (ISF) and combat the self-proclaimed Islamic State of 
Iraq and the Levant (ISIL).
    Although investigations into the whistleblower's claims 
continue, the JTF issued an initial report on August 11, 2016. 
Among other findings, the JTF report determined that 
intelligence products approved by senior CENTCOM leaders 
typically provided a more positive depiction of U.S. anti-
terrorism efforts than was warranted by facts on the ground and 
were consistently more positive than analysis produced by other 
elements of the Intelligence Community. It further determined 
that numerous process changes implemented at CENTCOM as well as 
leadership deficiencies resulted in widespread dissatisfaction 
among CENTCOM analysts who felt their superiors were distorting 
their products.
    Though not formally part of the JTF, minority members of 
the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence also conducted 
an inquiry into the whistleblower's claims. On August 11, 2016, 
the minority released preliminary, unclassified findings. Among 
other things, the minority found that CENTCOM's process for 
producing intelligence assessments deviated from best practices 
and insufficiently accommodated analysts' dissenting views, 
which at times led to more optimistic tactical assessments of 
the ISF relative to ISIL. The minority found no evidence, 
however, that intelligence production had been politicized.
    At the time of its report, the JTF had conducted nearly 25 
hours of classified transcribed interviews; travelled twice to 
CENTCOM headquarters for briefings, observations, and further 
discussions; received briefings in Washington; reviewed 
analytic products provided by the DOD; and evaluated survey 
results and related material submitted in connection with the 
President's Fiscal Year 2017 budget request.

Review of the Unauthorized Disclosures of Former National Security 
        Agency Contractor Edward Snowden

    On September 15, 2016, the Committee issued an unclassified 
summary of its bipartisan investigative report on Edward 
Snowden, the former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor 
who fled to China and then Russia after stealing 1.5 million 
classified documents. The result of a two-year inquiry, the 
report describes Snowden's background, likely motivations, and 
methods of theft, as well as the damage done to U.S. national 
security as a result of his actions.
    During its investigation, the Committee held one open 
hearing, eight additional closed hearings and briefings, 
followed by numerous staff-level briefings on Snowden's 
disclosures. In those oversight events, the Committee and its 
staff investigated how this breach occurred, what the U.S. 
Government has learned about Snowden, and whether the security 
shortfalls the breach highlighted had been remedied.
    The Committee's review was careful not to disturb any 
criminal investigation or future prosecution of Snowden, who 
has remained in Russia since he fled there on June 23, 2013. 
Concurrent with the approval of the report, the Committee sent 
the full 36-page review to the executive branch, for a 
classification review. The Committee filed a declassified 
version of the report with the House in December 2016.

Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act

    The Committee regularly receives extensive information on--
and engages with the Executive branch regarding--the Foreign 
Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA). Throughout 2016, 
Committee Members met with non-Committee Members to discuss the 
value of reauthorizing FISA Section 702 and made available to 
such Members extensive information about the implementation 
thereof.

Other Oversight Activities

    In addition to Committee investigations and Committee's 
oversight and authorization of the Intelligence Community 
budget and waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement issues, the 
Committee receives information on significant intelligence 
activities and conducts numerous classified hearings and 
briefings. Those events focused on the range of national 
security and intelligence related issues including: Russia, 
Iran, China, North Korea, Afghanistan, Syria, Iraq, weapons of 
mass destruction, cyber threats and attacks, the status of 
released Guantanamo Bay detainees, refugee screening, terrorist 
threats to the Homeland, and terrorist attacks in Orlando, San 
Bernardino, Paris, and Brussels. While details of the vast 
majority of the Committee's oversight activities must 
necessarily remain classified, a complete list of hearings and 
briefings is provided in Part C of Appendix I.

                               APPENDIX I


                       PART A--COMMITTEE REPORTS

    Reports filed with the House by the Permanent Select 
Committee on Intelligence:
    114-63: To Accompany H.R. 1560, the Protecting Cyber 
Networks Act.
    114-144: To Accompany H.R. 2596, the Intelligence 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016.
    114-573: To Accompany H.R. 5077, the Intelligence 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017.
    Additionally, in December 2016, the Committee filed with 
the House a declassified version of its September 2016 report, 
``Review of the Unauthorized Disclosures of Former National 
Security Agency Contractor Edward Snowden.''

                          PART B--PUBLIC LAWS

    Four bills that contained matters within the jurisdiction 
of the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence were enacted 
into law during the 114th Congress.
    H.R. 2048, the USA Freedom Act of 2015, became Public Law 
114-23 on June 2, 2015.
    S. 1356, the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2016, became Public Law 114-92 on November 25, 2015.
    H.R. 2029, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016, 
became Public Law 114-113 on December 18, 2015.
    S. 1632, a bill to require a regional strategy to address 
the threat posed by Boko Haram, became Public Law 114-266, on 
December 14, 2016.
    H.R. 5790, the Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act of 2016, was signed by 
the President on December 16, 2016.
    Additionally, bills that contained matters within the 
jurisdiction of the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence 
were presented to the President for his signature during the 
114th Congress.
    S. 2943, the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2017, was presented to the President on December 14, 2016.

                PART C--COMMITTEE HEARINGS AND BRIEFINGS

    On January 21, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On January 28, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
business meeting.
    On February 2, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On February 5, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On February 10, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On February 12, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
business meeting.
    On February 13, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On February 24, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On February 25, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
hearing.
    On February 26, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On March 2, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed hearing.
    On March 3, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On March 16, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On March 17, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
hearing.
    On March 19, 2015, the Full Committee held an open hearing 
on ``The Growing Cyber Threat and its Impact on American 
Business.''
    On March 23, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On March 24, 2015, the Department of Defense Intelligence 
and Overhead Architecture Subcommittee held a closed hearing.
    On March 25, 2015, the National Security Agency and 
Cybersecurity (NSA/Cyber) Subcommittee held a closed hearing.
    On March 26, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
business meeting.
    On April 14, 2015, the Department of Defense Intelligence 
and Overhead Architecture Subcommittee held a closed briefing.
    On April 14, 2015, the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) 
Subcommittee held a closed hearing.
    On April 15, 2015, the NSA/Cyber Subcommittee held a closed 
hearing.
    On April 16, 2015, the Department of Defense Intelligence 
and Overhead Architecture Subcommittee held a closed hearing.
    On April 21, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On April 22, 2015, the Department of Defense Intelligence 
and Overhead Architecture Subcommittee held a closed hearing.
    On April 23, 2015, the Emerging Threats (ET) Subcommittee 
held a closed hearing.
    On April 30, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On May 1, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
roundtable.
    On May 12, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed briefing.
    On May 18, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed briefing.
    On May 20, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed briefing.
    On June 1, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed briefing.
    On June 3, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed briefing.
    On June 4, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed business 
meeting.
    On June 9, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed briefing.
    On June 12, 2015, the ET Subcommittee held a closed 
briefing.
    On June 15, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On June 18, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On June 23, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On July 7, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
roundtable.
    On July 9, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed briefing.
    On July 16, 2015, the CIA Subcommittee held a closed 
briefing.
    On July 21, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On July 23, 2015, the Department of Defense Intelligence 
and Overhead Architecture Subcommittee held a closed hearing.
    On July 27, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
roundtable.
    On July 28, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On July 28, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On September 8, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On September 10, 2015, the Full Committee held an open 
hearing on ``Worldwide Cyber Threats.''
    On September 16, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On September 18, 2015, the Department of Defense 
Intelligence and Overhead Architecture Subcommittee held a 
closed hearing.
    On September 28, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
roundtable.
    On October 1, 2015, the CIA Subcommittee held a closed 
briefing.
    On October 6, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On October 9, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
roundtable.
    On October 20, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On October 26, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
roundtable.
    On November 2, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On November 3, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
roundtable.
    On November 5, 2015, the NSA and Cybersecurity Subcommittee 
held a closed briefing.
    On November 16, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On November 19, 2015, the Emerging Threats Subcommittee 
held a closed briefing.
    On November 30, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
roundtable.
    On December 3, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
roundtable.
    On December 9, 2015, the Full Committee held a closed 
roundtable.
    On January 5, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On January 6, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On January 7, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
business meeting and a closed briefing.
    On January 11, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On January 13, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
roundtable.
    On February 1, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
business meeting and a closed briefing.
    On February 4, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
business meeting and a closed briefing.
    On February 9, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On February 11, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On February 23, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On February 25, 2016, the Full Committee held an open 
hearing on ``World Wide Threats.''
    On February 29, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On March 3, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed hearing.
    On March 14, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On March 16, 2016, the ET Subcommittee held a closed 
hearing.
    On March 17, 2016, the NSA/Cyber Subcommittee held a closed 
hearing.
    On March 21, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On March 22, 2016, the Department of Defense Intelligence 
and Overhead Architecture Subcommittee held a closed hearing.
    On April 12, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On April 13, 2016, the Department of Defense Intelligence 
and Overhead Architecture Subcommittee held a closed hearing.
    On April 14, 2016, the CIA Subcommittee held a closed 
hearing.
    On April 18, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On April 21, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On April 26, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On April 29, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
business meeting.
    On May 10, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed briefing.
    On May 12, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed business 
meeting and a closed briefing.
    On May 16, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed briefing.
    On May 19, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed briefing.
    On May 23, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed briefing.
    On May 26, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed briefing.
    On June 7, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed briefing.
    On June 9, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed briefing.
    On June 13, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On June 15, 2016, the Department of Defense Intelligence 
and Overhead Architecture Subcommittee held a closed briefing.
    On June 16, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On June 21, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On June 22, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed hearing.
    On June 23, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On June 23, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
roundtable.
    On July 5, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed briefing.
    On July 6, 2016, the Department of Defense Intelligence and 
Overhead Architecture Subcommittee held a closed hearing.
    On July 7, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed briefing.
    On July 11, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On July 12, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
roundtable.
    On July 14, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On July 15, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed business 
meeting.
    On September 6, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On September 9, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On September 12, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On September 14, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On September 15, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
business meeting.
    On September 20, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On September 21, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
roundtable.
    On September 26, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On September 28, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
roundtable.
    On November 14, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On November 15, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
hearing.
    On November 17, 2016, the Full Committee held an open 
hearing on ``Intelligence Community Support to the Department 
of Defense.''
    On November 29, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On December 1, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
business meeting.
    On December 5, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
briefing.
    On December 6, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
roundtable.
    On December 8, 2016, the Full Committee held a closed 
roundtable.

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