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                                                 Union Calendar No. 706
114th Congress      }                               {        Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session         }                               {         114-896

======================================================================



 
 REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE ON ACTIVITIES DURING THE 114TH 
                                CONGRESS

                                _______
                                

 December 27, 2016.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Conaway, from the Committee on Agriculture, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

    In accordance with rule XI, clause 1(d), of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the Committee on Agriculture 
reports herewith on its activities during the 114th Congress.

  I. Summary of Organization, Jurisdiction, and Oversight Plan of the 
                        Committee on Agriculture


                            a. organization

    The House of Representatives established the total 
authorized membership of the Committee on Agriculture for the 
114th Congress at 45, with a party division of 26 Republicans 
and 19 Democrats. Among the committee members were 13 
Representatives who were serving their first terms (Allen, 
Bost, Rouzer, Abraham, Emmer, Moolenaar, Newhouse, Kirkpatrick, 
Aguilar, Plaskett, Adams, Graham, and Ashford).
    The Committee organized on January 22, 2015, into six 
subcommittees. The six subcommittees were constituted as 
follows:

                        SUBCOMMITTEE ASSIGNMENTS

    (Ratio includes ex officio Members.)
    (K. Michael Conaway, Chairman, and Collin C. Peterson, 
Ranking Minority Member, are ex officio members of all 
Subcommittees.)









        Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy, and Credit
                         (Ratio 9-6 (Total 15))

  AUSTIN SCOTT, Georgia, Chairman
DAVID SCOTT, Georgia, Ranking Minority MemberLATTE, Virginia
FILEMON VELA, Texas                  FRANK D. LUCAS, Oklahoma
SEAN PATRICK MALONEY, New York       RANDY NEUGEBAUER, Texas
ANN KIRKPATRICK, Arizona             MIKE ROGERS, Alabama
PETE AGUILAR, California             DOUG LaMALFA, California
                                     RODNEY DAVIS, Illinois
                                     TOM EMMER, MinnesotaB
                                     TRENT KELLY, MississippiC D

    Jurisdiction: Policies, statutes, and markets relating to 
commodity exchanges; agricultural credit; rural development; 
energy; rural electrification.

                                 ------                                

               Subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry
                         (Ratio 9-6 (Total 15))

  GLENN THOMPSON, Pennsylvania, 
             Chairman
MICHELLE LUJAN GRISHAM, New Mexico, Ranking Minority Memberma
ANN M. KUSTER, New Hampshire         STEVE KING, Iowa
RICHARD M. NOLAN, Minnesota          SCOTT DesJARLAIS, Tennessee
SUZAN K. DelBENE, Washington         CHRISTOPHER P. GIBSON, New York
ANN KIRKPATRICK, Arizona             DAN BENISHEK, Michigan
                                     RICK W. ALLEN, Georgia
                                     MIKE BOST, Illinois

    Jurisdiction: Policies and statutes relating to resource 
conservation, forestry, and all forests under the jurisdiction 
of the Committee on Agriculture.

                                 ------                                

                       Subcommittee on Nutrition
                        (Ratio 13-9 (Total 24))

    JACKIE WALORSKI, Indiana, 
            Chairwoman
JAMES P. McGOVERN, Massachusetts,  Ranking Minority Memberas
MARCIA L. FUDGE, Ohio                GLENN THOMPSON, Pennsylvania
ALMA S. ADAMS, North Carolina        BOB GIBBS, Ohio
MICHELLE LUJAN GRISHAM, New Mexico   ERIC A. ``RICK'' CRAWFORD, 
PETE AGUILAR, California             Arkansas
STACEY E. PLASKETT, Virgin Islands   VICKY HARTZLER, Missouri
BRAD ASHFORD, Nebraska               DAN BENISHEK, Michigan
SUZAN K. DelBENE, Washington         RODNEY DAVIS, Illinois
                                     TED S. YOHO, Florida
                                     DAVID ROUZER, North Carolina
                                     RALPH LEE ABRAHAM, Louisiana
                                     JOHN R. MOOLENAAR, Michigan

    Jurisdiction: Policies and statutes relating to nutrition, 
including the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and 
domestic commodity distribution and consumer initiatives.







                                 ------                                

      Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management
                        (Ratio 13-9 (Total 24))

    ERIC A. ``RICK'' CRAWFORD, 
        Arkansas, Chairman
TIMOTHY J. WALZ, Minnesota, Ranking Minority Member, Oklahoma
CHERI BUSTOS, Illinois               RANDY NEUGEBAUER, Texas
GWEN GRAHAM, Florida                 MIKE ROGERS, Alabama
BRAD ASHFORD, Nebraska               BOB GIBBS, Ohio
DAVID SCOTT, Georgia                 AUSTIN SCOTT, Georgia
JIM COSTA, California                JEFF DENHAM, California
SEAN PATRICK MALONEY, New York       DOUG LaMALFA, California
ANN KIRKPATRICK, Arizona             JACKIE WALORSKI, Indiana
                                     RICK W. ALLEN, Georgia
                                     MIKE BOST, Illinois
                                     RALPH LEE ABRAHAM, Louisiana

    Jurisdiction: Policies, statutes, and markets relating to 
commodities including barley, cotton, cottonseed, corn, grain 
sorghum, honey, mohair, oats, other oilseeds, peanuts, pulse 
crops, rice, soybeans, sugar, wheat, and wool; the Commodity 
Credit Corporation; risk management policies and statues, 
including Federal Crop Insurance; producer data and privacy 
issues.

                                 ------                                

       Subcommittee on Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research
                         (Ratio 9-6 (Total 15))

 RODNEY DAVIS, Illinois, Chairman
SUZAN K. DelBENE, Washington, Ranking Minority MemberPennsylvania
MARCIA L. FUDGE, Ohio                AUSTIN SCOTT, Georgia
JAMES P. McGOVERN, Massachusetts     CHRISTOPHER P. GIBSON, New York
ANN M. KUSTER, New Hampshire         JEFF DENHAM, California
GWEN GRAHAM, Florida                 TED S. YOHO, Florida
                                     JOHN R. MOOLENAAR, Michigan
                                     DAN NEWHOUSE, Washington

    Jurisdiction: Policies, statutes, and markets relating to 
horticulture, including fruits, vegetables, nuts, and 
ornamentals; bees; and organic agriculture; policies and 
statutes relating to marketing and promotion orders; pest and 
disease management; bioterrorism; adulteration and quarantine 
matters; research, education, and extension; and biotechnology.

                                 ------                                

           Subcommittee on Livestock and Foreign Agriculture
                         (Ratio 9-6 (Total 15))

  DAVID ROUZER, North Carolina, 
             Chairman
JIM COSTA, California, Ranking Minority MemberATTE, Virginia
STACEY E. PLASKETT, Virgin Islands   STEVE KING, Iowa
FILEMON VELA, Texas                  SCOTT DesJARLAIS, Tennessee
RICHARD M. NOLAN, Minnesota          VICKY HARTZLER, Missouri
CHERI BUSTOS, Illinois               TED S. YOHO, Florida
                                     TOM EMMER, Minnesota
                                     DAN NEWHOUSE, WashingtonB
                                     TRENT KELLY, MississippiC D

    Jurisdiction: Policies, statutes, and markets relating to 
all livestock, poultry, dairy, and seafood, including all 
products thereof; the inspection, marketing, and promotion of 
such commodities and products; aquaculture; animal welfare; 
grazing; foreign agricultural assistance and trade promotion.

                        Section Endnotes

    BMay 19, 2015--Resigned from Committee.
    CJune 10, 2015--Appointed to Committee.
    DJune 16, 2015--Appointed to Subcommittees.








                       b. committee jurisdiction

    Under Rules adopted by the House of Representatives for the 
114th Congress, the Committee on Agriculture's (hereinafter 
also referred to as Committee) jurisdiction (See Rule X, clause 
1 of the Rules of the House of Representatives) extended to--

  (1)  Adulteration of seeds, insect pests, and protection of 
            birds and animals in forest reserves.

  (2)  Agriculture generally.

  (3)  Agricultural and industrial chemistry.

  (4)  Agricultural colleges and experiment stations.

  (5)  Agricultural economics and research.

  (6)  Agricultural education extension services.

  (7)  Agricultural production and marketing and stabilization 
            of prices of agricultural products, and commodities 
            (not including distribution outside of the United 
            States).

  (8)  Animal industry and diseases of animals.

  (9)  Commodity exchanges.

  (10) Crop insurance and soil conservation.

  (11) Dairy industry.

  (12) Entomology and plant quarantine.

  (13) Extension of farm credit and farm security.

  (14) Inspection of livestock, poultry, meat products, and 
            seafood and seafood products.

  (15) Forestry in general, and forest reserves other than 
            those created from the public domain.

  (16) Human nutrition and home economics.

  (17) Plant industry, soils, and agricultural engineering.

  (18) Rural electrification.

  (19) Rural development.

  (20) Water conservation related to activities of the 
            Department of Agriculture.

    The revised edition of the Rules and Manual of the House of 
Representatives for the 114th Congress (House Document No. 113-
181) provides the following concerning the Committee on 
Agriculture:\1\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\References are to the volume and section of Hinds' (volumes I-V, 
e.g., IV, 500) and Cannon's (volumes VI-VIII, e.g., VI, 400) Precedents 
of the House of Representatives, and to the Congressional Record by 
date and page (e.g., January 3, 1953, p. 500).

          ``This Committee was established in 1820 (IV, 4149). 
        In 1880 the subject of forestry was added to its 
        jurisdiction, and the Committee was conferred authority 
        to receive estimates of and to report appropriations 
        (IV, 4149). However, on July 1, 1920, authority to 
        report appropriations for the U.S. Department of 
        Agriculture was transferred to the Committee on 
        Appropriations (VII, 1860).
          The basic form of the present jurisdictional 
        statement was made effective January 2, 1947, as a part 
        of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 (60 Stat. 
        812). Subparagraph (7) was altered by the 93d Congress, 
        effective January 3, 1975, to include jurisdiction over 
        agricultural commodities (including the Commodity 
        Credit Corporation) while transferring jurisdiction 
        over foreign distribution and nondomestic production of 
        commodities to the Committee on International Relations 
        (H. Res. 988, 93d Cong., Oct 8, 1974, p. 34470). 
        Nevertheless, the Committee has retained a limited 
        jurisdiction over measures to release CCC stocks for 
        such foreign distribution (Sept. 14, 1989, p. 20428). 
        Previously unstated jurisdictions over commodities 
        exchanges and rural development were codified effective 
        January 3, 1975.
          The 104th Congress consolidated the Committee's 
        jurisdiction over inspection of livestock and meat 
        products to include inspection of poultry, seafood, and 
        seafood products, and added subparagraph (20) relating 
        to water conservation (sec. 202(a), H. Res. 6, Jan. 4, 
        1995, p.464). Clerical and stylistic changes were 
        effected when the House recodified its rules in the 
        106th Congress (H. Res. 5. Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47).
          The Committee has had jurisdiction of bills for 
        establishing and regulating the Department of 
        Agriculture (IV, 4150), for inspection of livestock and 
        meat products, regulation of animal industry, diseases 
        of animals (IV, 4154; VII, 1862), adulteration of 
        seeds, insect pests, protection of birds and animals in 
        forest reserves (IV, 4157; VII, 1870), the improvement 
        of the breed of horses, even with the cavalry service 
        in view (IV, 4158; VII, 1865), and in addition to the 
        Committee on Energy and Commerce, amending Horse 
        Protection Act to prevent the shipping, transporting, 
        moving, delivering, or receiving of horses to be 
        slaughtered for human consumption (July 13, 2006, p. 
        14304).
          The Committee, having charge of the general subject 
        of forestry, has reported bills relating to timber, and 
        forest reserves other than those created from the 
        public domain (IV, 4160). The Committee on Natural 
        Resources, and not this committee, has jurisdiction 
        over a bill to convey land that is part of a National 
        Forest created from the public domain (March 23, 2004, 
        p. 4926). It has also exercised jurisdiction of bills 
        relating to agricultural colleges and experiment 
        stations (IV, 4152), incorporation of agricultural 
        societies (IV, 4159), and establishment of a highway 
        commission (IV, 4153), to discourage fictitious and 
        gambling transactions in farm products (IV, 4161; VII, 
        1861), to regulate the transportation, sale and 
        handling of dogs and cats intended for use in research 
        and the licensing of animal research facilities (July 
        29, 1965, p. 18691); and to designate an agricultural 
        research center (May 14, 1995, p.11070). The Committee 
        shares with the Committee on the Judiciary jurisdiction 
        over a bill comprehensively amending the Immigration 
        and Nationality Act and including food stamp 
        eligibility requirements for aliens (Sept. 19, 1995, p. 
        25533).
          The House referred the President's message dealing 
        with the refinancing of farm-mortgage indebtedness to 
        the Committee, thus conferring jurisdiction (April 4, 
        1933, p. 1209).
          The Committee has jurisdiction over a bill relating 
        solely to executive level position in the Department of 
        Agriculture (Mar. 2, 1976, p. 4958) and has 
        jurisdiction over bills to develop land and water 
        conservation programs on private and non-Federal lands 
        (June 7, 1976, p. 16768).''

    Some of the specific areas in which the Committee on 
Agriculture exercises its jurisdiction or that have been 
created for the Committee by historical reference include:

  (1)  Public Law 480, Eighty-third Congress, the restoration, 
            expansion, and development of foreign markets for 
            United States agricultural products; and the effect 
            of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (and 
            the North American Free Trade Agreement), bilateral 
            free trade agreements, the European Community, and 
            other regional economic agreements and commodity 
            marketing and pricing systems on United States 
            agriculture.

  (2)  All matters relating to the establishment and 
            development of an effective Foreign Agricultural 
            Service.

  (3)  Matters relating to rural development, including rural 
            telephone companies, farm credit banks, farm rural 
            housing loans, rural water supply, rural flood 
            control and water pollution control programs, and 
            loans for rural firehouses, community facilities, 
            and businesses.

  (4)  Production and use of energy from agricultural and 
            forestry resources.

  (5)  Matters relating to the development, use, and 
            administration of the National Forests, including, 
            but not limited to, development of a sound program 
            for general public use of the National Forests 
            consistent with watershed protection and sustained-
            yield timber management, study of the forest fire 
            prevention and control policies and activities of 
            the Forest Service and their relation to 
            coordinated activities of other Federal, State, and 
            private agencies; Forest Service land exchanges; 
            and wilderness and similar use designations applied 
            to National Forest land.

  (6)  Price spreads of agricultural commodities between 
            producers and consumers.

  (7)  The formulation and development of improved programs for 
            agricultural commodities; matters relating to the 
            inspection, grading, and marketing of such 
            commodities, including seafood; and food safety 
            generally.

  (8)  Matters relating to trading in futures contracts for all 
            commodities and similar instruments, including 
            commodity options and commodity leverage contracts.

  (9)  The administration and operation of agricultural 
            programs through State and county committees and 
            the administrative policies and procedures relating 
            to the selection, election, and operation of such 
            committees.

  (10) The administration and development of small watershed 
            programs under Public Law 566, Eighty-third 
            Congress, as amended, and the development of 
            resource conservation and development programs for 
            rural areas.

  (11) Programs of food assistance or distribution supported in 
            whole or in part by funds of the Department of 
            Agriculture, including but not limited to the 
            Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and the 
            commodity distribution program.

  (12) Aquaculture programs of the Department of Agriculture.

  (13) Sugar legislation, including import control programs 
            that stabilize domestic prices.

  (14) All matters relating to pesticides, the Federal 
            Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, as 
            amended, the Federal Environmental Pesticide 
            Control Act of 1972, the Federal Insecticide, 
            Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Amendments of 1988, 
            and the Food Quality Protection Act of 1996, 
            including, but not limited to, the registration, 
            marketing, and safe use of pesticides, groundwater 
            contamination, and the coordination of the 
            pesticide program under FIFRA with food safety 
            programs.

  (15) Agricultural research programs, including, but not 
            limited to, the authorization of specific research 
            projects and agricultural biotechnology development 
            efforts.

  (16) All matters relating to the Commodity Credit Corporation 
            Charter Act.

  (17) Legislation relating to the control of the entry into 
            the United States of temporary, nonresident aliens 
            for employment in agricultural production.

  (18) Legislation relating to the general operations and the 
            Organic Act of the Department of Agriculture, the 
            Commodity Credit Corporation, Federal Crop 
            Insurance Corporation, Farm Credit Administration, 
            Farm Credit System, Federal Agricultural Mortgage 
            Corporation, and Commodity Futures Trading 
            Commission.

  (19) Producer-funded research, promotion, and consumer and 
            industry information programs for agricultural 
            commodities.

  (20) Legislation regarding reclamation water projects where 
            the pricing of water delivered by such projects is 
            affected by whether the water will be used in the 
            production of a crop for which an acreage reduction 
            program is in effect.

  (21) Legislation regarding reclamation water projects for 
            which the Secretary of Agriculture is required to 
            make a determination regarding commodity 
            availability prior to the determination of the 
            price to be charged for the delivery of such 
            project water.

  (22) Legislation establishing the level of fees charged by 
            the Federal Government for the grazing of livestock 
            on Federal lands.

  (23) Legislation governing the Federal regulation of 
            transactions involving swaps contracts, hybrid 
            financial instruments, and derivative securities 
            and financial products.

  (24) Legislation regarding the Federal Reserve Board with 
            respect to its authority to regulate the 
            establishment of appropriate levels of margin on 
            stock index futures contracts.

    The Committee also reviews and studies, on a continuing 
basis, the current and prospective application, administration, 
execution, and effectiveness of those laws, or parts of laws, 
the subject matter of which is within the jurisdiction of the 
Committee, and the organization and operation of the Federal 
agencies and entities having responsibilities in or for the 
administration and execution thereof. In addition, the 
Committee, along with other standing Committees of the House, 
has the function of reviewing and studying on a continuing 
basis the effect or probable effect of tax and other fiscal and 
monetary policies affecting subjects within their jurisdiction.

                           c. oversight plan

    The Committee on Agriculture met on January 22, 2015 to 
also fulfill the General Oversight Responsibility reporting 
requirements of Rule X 2(d)(1) of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives.
    The following outline was prepared in consultation with the 
Ranking Minority Member and approved by the Full Committee. It 
was then forwarded to the Committee on Oversight and Government 
Reform and the Committee on House Administration on February 6, 
2015:

2014 Farm Bill and Current Agricultural Conditions

   Review the current state of the U.S. farm economy;

   Review the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) 
        implementation of the Agricultural Act of 2014;

   Review programs for waste, fraud, abuse and 
        mismanagement;

   Review the state of credit conditions and 
        availability in rural America;

   Review the effect of weather conditions on crop 
        production;

   Review USDA's implementation of the U.S. Warehouse 
        Act;

   Review of market situation, including effect of crop 
        reports and projections;

   Review USDA's implementation of the U.S. Grain 
        Standards Act;

   Review USDA's implementation of the Fair and 
        Equitable Tobacco Reform Act of 2004;

   Review how Administrative PAYGO is affecting 
        Department actions; and

   Review discretionary actions by USDA that are not 
        directly authorized by legislation.

Energy

   Assess energy programs authorized by the 
        Agricultural Act of 2014;

   Review administration of the Biomass Crop Assistance 
        Program (BCAP);

   Review activities funded by the Biomass Research and 
        Development Act (BRDA) and input from the external BRDA 
        Advisory Board;

   Review availability of agriculture and forestry 
        feedstocks for renewable energy production;

   Review current status of research on energy crops 
        and feedstocks;

   Review Rural Utility Service (RUS) electric loan 
        program;

   Review electricity reliability in rural America;

   Review current provisions in existing law that 
        support agriculture-based energy production and use;

   Review the implementation of the Renewable Fuel 
        Standard (RFS); and

   Review renewable fuel programs and their effect on 
        agriculture.

Conservation and the Environment

   Review the effect of regulatory activities by the 
        Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and its effect on 
        agriculture productivity;

   Review the effect of regulatory activities carried 
        out pursuant to the Endangered Species Act (ESA), or 
        any proposed legislative changes to such Act, on 
        agricultural producers;

   Review the effect of the Administration's regulatory 
        activity relative to methyl bromide on production of 
        agriculture in the U.S.;

   Review budget and program activities of the Natural 
        Resources Conservation Services (NRCS);

   Review implementation of all of USDA's conservation 
        programs;

   Review USDA's implementation of the conservation 
        compliance provisions in the Agricultural Act of 2014;

   Review EPA's jurisdiction under the Clean Water Act 
        (CWA) and its effect on U.S. agriculture;

   Review of potential effects of EPA's Clean Air Act 
        (CAA) regulatory program on U.S. agriculture;

   Review ongoing discussions and potential 
        consequences for American agriculture under the United 
        Nations Climate Change Conference;

   Review EPA's implementation of the Food Quality 
        Protection Act (FQPA), Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, 
        and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and Pesticide Registration 
        Improvement Renewal Act (PRIA 3);

   Review the effect of litigation and rulemaking 
        concerning FIFRA, ESA, CAA, CWA, the Comprehensive 
        Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act 
        (CERCLA) and the Emergency Planning and Community Right 
        to Know Act (EPCRA) to evaluate these statutes' effects 
        on agricultural operations;

   Review the EPA's regulatory actions in regard to 
        pesticide evaluations;

   Review EPA's regulation of Animal Feeding 
        Operations; and

   Review Total Maximum Daily Load strategies and 
        effects on production agriculture.

Federal Crop Insurance and Risk Management

   Review USDA's implementation of crop insurance 
        provisions of the Agricultural Act of 2014;

   Review the role and effectiveness of Federal Crop 
        Insurance;

   Review USDA's and the Risk Management Agency's (RMA) 
        administration and oversight of Federal Crop Insurance;

   Review the availability of crop insurance as a risk 
        management tool;

   Review the adequacy and availability of risk 
        management tools for the livestock and dairy 
        industries;

   Review USDA's activities established to identify and 
        reduce crop insurance waste, fraud, and abuse;

   Review USDA's crop insurance rating methodology and 
        management of the Standard Reinsurance Agreement (SRA) 
        process;

   Review RMA's yield and revenue protection crop 
        insurance products; and

   Review RMA's progress in approving crop insurance 
        products for under-served commodities.

Implementation of Title VII of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and 
        Consumer Protection Act

   In its review of rulemakings required by Title VII 
        of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer 
        Protection Act (P.L. 111-203) (Dodd-Frank Act), the 
        Committee will continue to ensure:

    (1)  The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) 
            and U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) 
            rulemaking process is transparent and that 
            meaningful comment is accepted and appropriately 
            reviewed;

    (2)  An adequate cost-benefit analysis is performed by the 
            CFTC for each proposed or finalized rule;

    (3)  The CFTC and SEC properly coordinate with both 
            domestic and international financial regulators;

    (4)  Past exemptive relief orders, also referred to as ``no 
            action letters,'' issued by the CFTC and SEC 
            provide the proper relief for market participants; 
            and

    (5)  Any final or proposed regulations have not harmed or 
            adversely effected the U.S. economy or financial 
            markets, including the effect on jobs and 
            competitiveness;

   Examine how Title VII rulemakings have affected U.S. 
        market structure;

   Examine the developing effect of CFTC, SEC, and 
        Prudential Regulator regulations, such as the 
        imposition of new margin and capital requirements, and 
        how they affect the ability of many ``end-users'' to 
        utilize swaps to hedge against legitimate business 
        risks;

   Examine the level of coordination between U.S. and 
        international regulators for potential effects on U.S. 
        financial institutions compared to their foreign 
        counterparts; and

   Examine the feasibility of timetables established by 
        the Dodd-Frank Act in building the data, technology and 
        connectivity necessary to meet regulatory objectives.

The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission and Oversight of the 
        Derivatives Markets

   Review the operations of the Commodity Futures 
        Trading Commission (CFTC);

   Review the growing consolidation and 
        internationalization of futures exchange trading;

   Review market machinations for exchange traded 
        energy and agricultural futures products;

   Review enforcement and oversight capabilities of the 
        CFTC both domestically and internationally;

   Continue to examine how the CFTC and futures 
        industry as a whole has addressed the MF Global and 
        PFGBest bankruptcies from both an enforcement and 
        regulatory reform standpoint to ensure that proper 
        remedial action is taken to prevent future losses to 
        segregated funds of customers;

   In light of the Commodity Exchange Act statutory 
        authorization of the CFTC which expired at the end of 
        FY 2013, the Committee will continue to examine all 
        sectors of the U.S. derivatives and futures markets, 
        including, but not limited to: exchange or swap 
        execution facility trading; the roles of dealers, 
        inter-dealer brokers, data repositories, and 
        clearinghouses; trade and price reporting; and 
        proposals aimed at protecting the segregated funds of 
        futures customers;

   Continue to examine the ongoing investigation and 
        enforcement action by the CFTC and other federal 
        regulators with respect to the manipulation of 
        international financial benchmarks; and

   Review all operations of the CFTC, including, but 
        not limited to: a continued examination of whether the 
        cost-benefit analysis required by section 15a of the 
        CEA is adequate with respect to proposed and finalized 
        rules; the efficiency of internal Commission actions; 
        and the enforcement and oversight capabilities of the 
        CFTC both domestically and internationally.

Agriculture Trade and International Food Aid

   Review domestic subsidies and protection currently 
        applied by agricultural product producing countries 
        around the world;

   Review ongoing multilateral, regional, and bilateral 
        trade negotiations (including World Trade Organization 
        (WTO) accession agreements) to assess their potential 
        effect on U.S. agriculture;

   Review implementation of existing trade agreements 
        and commitments as well as proposed trade agreements 
        and commitments to determine:

    (1)  whether they are consistent with current U.S. law;

    (2)  whether they will promote economic development in 
            rural
              areas of the U.S.;

    (3)  their effect or potential effect on current production 
            of im-
              port sensitive agricultural commodities, and on 
            exports of
              U.S. agricultural products;

    (4)  their effect or potential effect on the overall 
            competitive-
              ness of the U.S. agricultural sector, including 
            the produc-
              tion, processing and distribution of agricultural 
            products;
              and

    (5)  whether the agreements provide adequate, enforceable
              provisions to minimize non-tariff barriers to 
            U.S. exports;

   Monitor existing trade agreements to ensure trading 
        partners are meeting obligations and enforcing trade 
        commitments;

   Review agricultural export programs to determine how 
        well they are promoting the interests of U.S. 
        agriculture and examine proposals to improve, modify or 
        expand such programs;

   Review U.S. food aid programs to determine their 
        effect or potential effect on the reduction of world 
        hunger. In particular, the committee will examine the 
        potential effect of trade negotiations on the 
        effectiveness of U.S. food aid programs;

   Review monitoring and evaluation activities carried 
        out by USDA and USAID; and

   Review sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) barriers and 
        other technical barriers to U.S. agricultural exports 
        and examine USDA efforts to eliminate such barriers.

Agricultural Research and Promotion

   Review implementation of biosecurity protocols at 
        USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) laboratories;

   Review USDA's implementation of research, education 
        and extension programs authorized in the Agricultural 
        Act of 2014;

   Review the administration of the ARS research 
        stations and worksites;

   Review USDA's continuing ability to conduct foreign 
        animal disease research, training and diagnostic 
        programs at the National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility 
        following the transfer of the center to the Department 
        of Homeland Security;

   Assess federal efforts to facilitate research and 
        development of aquacultural enterprises, specifically 
        focusing on the activities of the Joint Subcommittee on 
        Aquaculture;

   Review USDA's regulation of organic standards;

   Review USDA's collection of organic production and 
        market data;

   Review administration of the National Institute of 
        Food and Agriculture (NIFA);

   Review the administration of the Agricultural Food 
        Research Initiative and other competitive research, 
        extension and education grants programs;

   Review efforts to leverage Federal research 
        investment with state, local, and private sources of 
        funding;

   Review coordination between ARS, Economic Research 
        Service (ERS), NIFA and action agencies in USDA--such 
        as NRCS and FSA--in order to prevent duplicative 
        research;

   Review operation of the National Agricultural 
        Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory 
        Board;

   Review USDA's efforts to expand research and 
        development of pathogen reduction technologies;

   Evaluate the current mix of research funding 
        mechanisms to ensure maximum benefits from these 
        investments to producers, processors and consumers;

   Review administration of USDA's agricultural 
        marketing and promotion programs;

   Review coordination between USDA and DOE on energy 
        research programs;

   Review the sufficiency of research funding under 
        ARS, ERS, National Agricultural Statistics Service 
        (NASS) and NIFA;

   Review ARS, ERS, NASS and NIFA national program 
        priorities;

   Conduct oversight of the research grant process, 
        generally, and more specifically to coordinate and 
        prevent overlapping research; and

   Review the potential for research and technology 
        transfer to address the needs of both the biofuels and 
        livestock industries.

Biotechnology

   Review current regulations and research regarding 
        animal and plant biotechnology;

   Review FDA's regulatory activities regarding 
        genetically engineered animals;

   Assess USDA's efforts to develop and promote 
        benefits of biotechnology for increasing agricultural 
        productivity and combating hunger globally;

   Review USDA's management and controls over 
        biotechnology-derived material;

   Review the effect of litigation on USDA's timeliness 
        in resolving petitions to deregulate products of 
        biotechnology; and

   Review effects of state, county and municipal 
        regulation of biotechnology on the free-flow of 
        agricultural products in interstate commerce.

U.S. Forest Service Administration

   Review the U.S. Forest Service's (USFS) strategy for 
        dealing with wildfire, including the effect of 
        hazardous fuels management, forest health efforts and 
        fire preparedness;

   Continue to monitor the effectiveness and efficiency 
        of the USFS fire management program;

   Review the effect of fire expenses on other USFS 
        program delivery;

   Assess the USFS strategy for timber harvesting on 
        federal lands;

   Review effects of environmental regulations on 
        National Forest land management;

   Review economic effects of National Forest land 
        management on rural communities; and

   Review USFS efforts to promote utilization of 
        National Forest timber for renewable energy purposes.

Dairy

   Review USDA's implementation of the dairy risk 
        management provisions in the Agricultural Act of 2014;

   Review options to improve the efficiency and 
        effectiveness of dairy programs; and

   Review efficiency of federal market order system.

Outreach and Civil Rights

   Review the operations of the Office of Advocacy and 
        Outreach;

   Monitor USDA's outreach efforts to beginning, small 
        and minority farmers/ranchers;

   Monitor USDA's outreach efforts to military veterans 
        interested in careers in agriculture;

   Review of the operations of the office of the 
        Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights;

   Review USDA's implementation of the receipt for 
        service provisions in the Agricultural Act of 2014;

   Review USDA's process for settling discrimination 
        claims and evaluating individual claims submitted 
        pursuant to such settlements;

   Review the delivery of USDA services and outreach 
        efforts on Indian reservations and Tribal lands;

   Review the current status of the Agricultural Census 
        and efforts to reach undercounted farmers and ranchers; 
        and

   Review participation of minority farmers in FSA 
        County/Local Committees as well as outreach to increase 
        participation in County Committee elections.

USDA General Administration

   Review confidentiality of information provided to 
        USDA by agricultural producers;

   Review USDA's implementation of field office 
        consolidation for the purpose of effectively and 
        efficiently delivering commodity, conservation, energy 
        and rural development programs;

   Review USDA's efforts to modernize its Information 
        Technology (IT) systems; and

   Review the administrative structure of USDA for 
        effectiveness and efficiency.

Farm Credit, Rural Development, and the Rural Economy

   Review the Farm Credit Administration's (FCA) 
        regulatory program and activities regarding the Farm 
        Credit System (FCS) to assure its safety and soundness;

   Review the activities and programs of the Federal 
        Agricultural Mortgage Corporation (also referred to as 
        Farmer Mac);

   Review FSA's direct and guaranteed loan programs and 
        graduation efforts;

   Review the Rural Electrification Act (REA);

   Review the farm economy and access to credit;

   Review implementation of rural development policies 
        and authorities contained in the Agricultural Act of 
        2014 and the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development 
        Act;

   Conduct oversight of the USDA's Rural Broadband 
        Access Loan and Loan Guarantee Program;

   Review USDA Rural Development's application 
        processes and internal controls related to the farm 
        bill;

   Review the administration of the Rural 
        Microentrepreneur Assistance Program;

   Conduct oversight of the implementation of USDA's 
        Telecommunications Programs;

   Review the status of the Rural Telephone Bank;

   Assess the state of rural water systems and 
        effectiveness of federal funding to build and upgrade 
        those systems;

   Assess the effectiveness of USDA programs targeted 
        toward rural infrastructure and business needs;

   Review agricultural lending practices;

   Review public-private partnerships in lending 
        through guaranteed loans;

   Review the definition of rural under rural 
        development programs; and

   Review rural development loan programs and default 
        rates.

USDA Food and Nutrition Programs

   Review food and nutrition programs including the 
        Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), fruit 
        and vegetable initiatives, the Emergency Food 
        Assistance Program (TEFAP), the Food Distribution on 
        Indian Reservations (FDPIR) program and other commodity 
        distribution programs;

   Review participant eligibility criteria for SNAP;

   Review the interaction between SNAP and other low-
        income assistance programs such as the Temporary 
        Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, the Low-
        Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), and 
        provisions in the Affordable Care Act;

   Review SNAP work pilots and the efficiency and 
        accountability of the SNAP Employment & Training 
        program;

   Review efforts by USDA and the states to combat 
        waste, fraud and abuse within nutrition programs;

   Review efforts by state SNAP administrators to 
        modernize and streamline their programs; and

   Review the Community Food Project Program to ensure 
        cooperative grants are working.

Specialty Crops

   Review implementation of the Specialty Crop 
        Competitiveness Act;

   Review the Specialty Crop Block Grant program to 
        ensure that the grants awarded are enhancing the 
        specialty crop industry;

   Review farmers' market programs;

   Review implementation and effectiveness of 
        cooperative plant health programs, including Plant Pest 
        and Disease Management and Disaster Prevention and the 
        Clean Plant Network; and

   Review the Specialty Crop Research Initiative.

Food Safety

   Review implementation of the FDA Food Safety 
        Modernization Act;

   Review implementation of the FDA Egg Safety Rule;

   Review USDA's administration of meat and poultry 
        inspection laws and the FDA's food inspection 
        activities to ensure the development of scientifically 
        sound systems for food safety assurance;

   Review USDA's implementation of the catfish 
        inspection program;

   Review USDA's efforts to educate consumers regarding 
        safe food handling practices and streamline the 
        assessment and approval of food safety technologies;

   Review implementation of new protocols for meat, 
        poultry, eggs, or seafood safety inspection;

   Review USDA's enforcement of the Humane Methods of 
        Slaughter Act and humane handling regulations; and

   Review the mechanisms to establish scientifically 
        based international food safety standards.

Plant and Animal Health

   Review enforcement of the Animal Welfare Act;

   Assess federal efforts to reduce threats to human, 
        animal, and plant health due to predatory and invasive 
        species;

   Review efforts of the Animal and Plant Health 
        Inspection Service (APHIS) to manage wildlife conflicts 
        in order to protect public health and safety;

   Assess USDA's Animal Disease Traceability Plan; and

   Review implementation of Sec. 10201 (of the 2008 
        Farm Bill) regarding plant pest and disease management 
        and disaster prevention.

Livestock Marketing

   Assess the effectiveness of the Grain Inspection, 
        Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) in 
        determining market manipulation in the livestock 
        industry;

   Review structural changes in agribusiness and the 
        potential cost and benefits for agricultural producers; 
        and

   Review the USDA's mandatory livestock price 
        reporting system.

Homeland and Agricultural Security

   Oversight of USDA's preparedness against terrorist 
        threats to agriculture production;

   Review cooperative efforts between the Department of 
        Homeland Security and USDA to prevent against foreign 
        animal disease; and

   Review agriculture inspection activities under the 
        Department of Homeland Security.

Miscellaneous

   Review the effects of sequestration on USDA 
        operations and programs;

   Review the effect of transportation infrastructure 
        issues on agriculture and forestry; and

   Review USDA's implementation and enforcement of the 
        country of origin labeling rule including, but not 
        limited to, actions taken by USDA to implement measures 
        necessary to comply with the recommendations and 
        rulings of the WTO Dispute Settlement Body on Certain 
        Country of Origin Labeling Requirements.

Consultation With Other Committees To Reduce Duplication

   With Natural Resources on forestry issues, ESA 
        issues and other public land issues;

   With Science, Space, and Technology on research;

   With Ways and Means and Education and the Workforce 
        on nutrition programs;

   With Ways and Means on trade issues;

   With Homeland Security on importation of animal and 
        plant material and on research related to 
        agroterrorism;

   With Judiciary on immigrant agricultural labor;

   With Energy and Commerce on food safety and biomass 
        energy programs both existing and new;

   With Transportation and Infrastructure on certain 
        CWA compliance issues;

   With Financial Services on Dodd-Frank Act issues;

   With Foreign Affairs on food aid and trade issues;

   With Small Business on addressing economic 
        opportunities for rural America; and

           II. Committee Activities During the 114th Congress


                     a. main legislative activities

    The Committee on Agriculture reported or otherwise 
considered a variety of bills in the 114th Congress covering 
many of the diverse areas within its jurisdictional interests.
    Some of the major activities of the Committee during the 
114th Congress included the following:

Agenda for the House Agriculture Committee

   The Committee approached its business in an open, 
        transparent manner and maintained the strong bipartisan 
        tradition of the Committee. One of the main priorities 
        of the Committee during this Congress was to provide 
        oversight to the various federal agencies through the 
        hearing process.

   The Committee held 37 full committee hearings and 11 
        business meetings during the 114th Congress. Various 
        subcommittees held 45 hearings during the 114th 
        Congress.

   The Committee heard testimony from 56 Administration 
        officials, specifically from 38 U.S. Department of 
        Agriculture representatives and 6 officials from the 
        Commodity Futures Trading Commission. Additional 
        testimony heard by the Committee was offered by 
        university researchers, nonprofit organizations, SNAP 
        recipients, derivatives end-users, trade groups, and 
        farmers and ranchers from across the United States for 
        a total of 340 witnesses.

   The Committee successfully drafted and passed out of 
        Committee a total of 7 bills that ultimately became 
        law:

     P.L. 114-54, Agriculture Reauthorizations Act 
            of 2015, which included the following: H.R. 2088, 
            United States Grain Standards Act Reauthorization 
            Act of 2015, H.R. 2051, Mandatory Livestock 
            Reporting Act, and H.R. 2394, National Forest 
            Foundation Reauthorization Act of 2015;

     P.L. 114-174, to amend the United States 
            Cotton Futures Act to exclude certain cotton 
            futures contracts from coverage Act;

     P.L. 114-237, Clarification of Treatment of 
            Electronic Sales of Livestock Act of 2016;

     P.L. 114-216, The Safe and Accurate Food 
            Labeling Act of 2015; and

     P.L. 114-113, Consolidated Appropriations Act, 
            which included H.R. 2393, Country of Origin 
            Labeling Amendments of 2015.

   The Committee held four hearings to examine the 
        statutory reauthorization of the CFTC within the 
        Commodity Exchange Act. The hearings focused on the 
        CFTC's role and place in overseeing the futures and 
        swaps markets, current issues facing the Commission, 
        current issues facing end-users and market 
        participants, and recent regulatory proposals that were 
        designed to better protect futures customers from 
        unexpected market events.

   The Committee also held four hearings on the 
        implementation of G20's financial reforms in 
        derivatives, as enacted by Title VIII of Dodd-Frank. 
        The first hearing focused on the broad impact that 
        Title VII has made to derivatives markets, including 
        both improvements and challenges. The three subsequent 
        subcommittee hearings focused on the implementation of 
        the five key reforms called for by the G20, including 
        new rules for reporting, capital, margin, clearing, and 
        execution of certain derivatives transactions.

   The Committee successfully drafted and passed out of 
        Committee bipartisan legislation to reauthorize and 
        improve the operations of the Commodity Futures Trading 
        Commission and reduce unnecessary regulatory burdens on 
        end-users. The legislation sought to better protect 
        futures customers, to provide end-users with market 
        certainty, to make basic reforms to ensure transparency 
        and accountability at the Commission, to help farmers, 
        ranchers, and end-users manage risks, and to help keep 
        consumer costs low. The legislation would also clarify 
        the CFTC's cost-benefit obligations for new 
        rulemakings, as well as address concerns relating to 
        protecting customers from another failure such as MF 
        Global and PFGBest.

   The Committee held 16 educational hearings under the 
        title Past, Present, and Future of SNAP to take a 
        closer look at how SNAP works and examined challenges 
        faced by the recipients. The fifty-three witnesses, 
        including hunger advocates, researchers, USDA 
        officials, and SNAP recipients testified on the 
        significance of employment and training programs; 
        nutrition education; nutrition incentives; and the 
        impact error, fraud, and evidence-based solutions have 
        on program integrity within SNAP.

   H.R. 1314, the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015, 
        included $3 billion in harmful cuts to Federal crop 
        insurance. The proposed changes--which threatened 
        private delivery of Federal crop insurance--were 
        reversed in H.R. 2353, the Highway and Transportation 
        Funding Act of 2015.

   H.R. 2393 repealed country-of-origin labeling 
        requirements for beef, pork, and poultry in response to 
        a World Trade Organization case initiated by Canada and 
        Mexico.

                  b. statistical summary of activities


  (1)  Statistics on bills referred to the Committee on 
            Agriculture

    Number of bills referred:


 
 
 
House bills................................................        211
Senate bills...............................................          1
House joint resolutions....................................          0
House concurrent resolutions...............................          7
Senate joint resolutions...................................          0
Senate concurrent resolutions..............................          0
House resolutions..........................................         10
                                                            ------------
  Total....................................................        229
 


  (2)  Disposition of Bills Containing Items Under the 
            Jurisdiction of the Committee on Agriculture


 
 
 
Bills enacted into law.....................................         11
Bills acted on by the Committee included in other bills              3
 that became law...........................................
Bills vetoed...............................................          0
Bills acted on by both Houses, but not enacted.............          0
Bills acted on by the House but not the Senate.............         12
Concurrent Resolutions approved............................          0
Bills reported to the House but not considered.............          1
Bills ordered reported, but not reported...................          0
Bills defeated in the House................................          1
 


  (3)  Statistics on hearings and markups


 
                                                                     Business
                   Full Committee/Subcommittee                       Meetings        Hearings     Field Hearings
 
Full Committee on Agriculture...................................              11              39
Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management....                               6
Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy, and Credit.........                               7
Subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry.......................                               7
Subcommittee on Nutrition.......................................                               9
Subcommittee on Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research.......                               9
Subcommittee on Livestock and Foreign Agriculture...............                               7
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
  Total.........................................................              11              84
 

 c. digest of bills within the jurisdiction of the committee on which 
                         action has been taken


1. Bills Enacted into Law

            P.L. 114-36 (H.R. 2620)
    Legislation to Amend the United States Cotton Futures Act

    H.R. 2620 was introduced by Representative David Scott on 
June 2, 2015. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Agriculture. On June 17, 2015, the Committee ordered the bill 
to be reported, as amended, by voice vote. The bill passed the 
House under suspension of the rules on June 23, 2015. The 
Senate passed the legislation by Unanimous Consent on July 9, 
2015. The President signed the bill into law on July 20, 2015.
    P.L. 114-36 amended the U.S. Cotton Futures Act to allow 
for a globally sourced and globally delivered cotton futures 
contract to be listed on a U.S. futures exchange. Before the 
amendment, the U.S. Cotton Futures Act prohibited the tendering 
of cotton that was not classed by the USDA to fulfill a 
delivery obligation for a U.S.-listed cotton futures contract. 
The new law allows foreign grown cotton to be classed by USDA 
or any other appropriate classer selected by the exchange.
            P.L.114-54 (H.R. 2051)
    Agriculture Reauthorization Act of 2015

    This public law reauthorizes and amends laws that address 
livestock mandatory price reporting requirements, funding for 
the National Forest Foundation, and procedures for weighing and 
inspecting grain. The President signed the bill into law on 
September 30, 2015.
    The following bills are included in P.L. 114-54:

        H.R. 2051, Mandatory Price Reporting Act of 2015

    H.R. 2051 was introduced by Representative K. Michael 
Conaway on April 28, 2015. The bill was referred to the 
Agriculture Committee. On April 30, 2015, the Committee ordered 
the bill to be reported, as amended, by a voice vote. On June 
9, 2015 the House passed the bill under suspension of the rules 
by a voice vote.
    The Livestock Mandatory Reporting Act of 1999 (Act of 1999) 
expires on September 30, 2015. Stakeholders from the livestock 
and meat industry are generally supportive of livestock 
mandatory reporting (LMR) and have worked cooperatively to 
achieve consensus toward reauthorization of the Act for a five 
year period.
    The Act of 1999, which passed as an amendment to the 
Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946, established a program of 
information regarding the marketing of cattle, swine, lambs, 
and the products of such livestock. The purpose was to provide 
information that could be readily understood by producers, 
improve the price and supply reporting services of USDA, and 
encourage competition in the marketplace for livestock and 
livestock products. The statutory authority for the program 
lapsed on September 30, 2005, not because of controversy over 
whether the program should continue, but because the House and 
Senate passed different versions of reauthorization 
legislation. Ultimately, the Senate passed the House version by 
unanimous consent the following October.
    When authorization lapsed, AMS sent letters to all packers 
required to report under the Act of 1999 requesting that they 
continue to submit information voluntarily. About 90 percent of 
packers cooperated in submitting information during the lapse. 
Finally, in October 2006, Congress passed the Livestock 
Mandatory Reporting Reauthorization Act, re-establishing the 
regulatory authority for the LMR program through September 30, 
2010, and separating the reporting requirements for sows and 
boars from barrows and gilts, among other changes. AMS began 
re-implementing the regulations right away. The final rules 
were not completed until May 2008 because AMS had to account 
for changes to the program.
    The 2008 Farm Bill directed the Secretary of Agriculture 
(Secretary) to conduct a study to determine advantages, 
drawbacks, and potential implementation issues associated with 
adopting mandatory wholesale pork reporting. The study 
concluded that voluntary negotiated wholesale pork price 
reporting was thin and becoming thinner. It also found some 
support for moving to mandatory price reporting at every 
segment of the industry and that the benefits of moving from a 
voluntary to a mandatory reporting program for wholesale pork 
would likely exceed the cost. The 2010 Reauthorization Act 
reauthorized LMR for an additional five years and added a 
provision for mandatory reporting of wholesale pork cuts. It 
directed the Secretary to engage in negotiated rulemaking to 
make required regulatory changes for mandatory wholesale pork 
reporting. AMS completed the negotiated rulemaking process and 
implemented mandatory wholesale pork reporting on January 7, 
2013.
    The LMR program provides the market with information on 
pricing; contracting for purchase; and supply-and-demand 
conditions for livestock, livestock production, and livestock 
products. Consistent with its mission to facilitate marketing, 
AMS publishes this information to ensure open, transparent 
price discovery and provide all market participants--large and 
small--with comparable levels of market information for cattle, 
swine, pork, sheep, beef, and lamb meat. AMS produces 
approximately 62 daily reports and 47 weekly reports.
    During the Fiscal Year 2014 government shutdown, AMS Market 
News, including livestock mandatory reporting data, was not 
available. AMS's inability to deliver the mandatory price 
information for livestock, meat, and certain dairy products 
caused a significant disruption to the orderly marketing of 
these products and generated extensive media coverage. Many 
stakeholders asked AMS to consider LMR an `excepted activity' 
that would continue in the case of another government shutdown.
    In order to remain relevant with current marketing 
practices, AMS regularly meets with industry and trade member 
associations to discuss LMR and marketing trends. One of the 
major concerns in the livestock industry is the shrinking 
negotiated spot market. The number of livestock marketed on a 
negotiated basis has been declining for years as more 
processors, producers, and feedlots have entered into formula 
marketing agreements. Industry members say that some negotiated 
markets are becoming too thin to be an adequate market basis. 
At the recent House Appropriations budget hearing, AMS was 
asked about current reporting methodology for hogs and concerns 
of price manipulation and volatility in the negotiated hog 
market. To address this issue, AMS is developing a 5 day 
rolling average of the daily negotiated hog prices to include 
in reports. This should help normalize the reported information 
and mute the volatility.
    Livestock industry associations have had under 
consideration other potential LMR regulatory changes. Some in 
the industry would like to enhance the reporting requirements 
to more accurately capture weekly basis information and near-
term negotiated formula transactions. The swine industry has 
expressed an interest in amending report time requirements for 
barrows and gilts while some in the lamb industry want to lower 
the reporting threshold requirements, add a definition for 
committed lambs, and include lamb pelts as a reported 
commodity.
    The legislation reflects a consensus among livestock and 
meat industry participants working toward reauthorization of 
the Act. A representative of AMS in attendance at a 
reauthorization hearing held in the Livestock and Foreign 
Agriculture Subcommittee was asked generally about 
reauthorization of the LMR program and the specific requests of 
industry and responded that USDA supports reauthorization of 
the program and saw no issues of concern in the bill ultimately 
presented for Committee consideration. (See also the discussion 
of the April 22, 2015: Hearing to review reauthorization of the 
Livestock Mandatory Reporting Act under ``D. Oversight''.)

 H.R. 2394, National Forest Foundation Reauthorization Act of 
                              2015

    H.R. 2394 was introduced by Representative Glenn Thompson 
on May 18, 2015. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Agriculture. On May 20, 2015, the Committee ordered the bill to 
be reported, as amended, by a voice vote. On June 9, 2015, the 
House passed the bill under suspension of the rules by a voice 
vote.
    The National Forest Foundation was created by Congressional 
Charter in 1993 with a discretionary authorization of $1 
million per year for a period of five years. The Foundation 
uses Federal dollars as a match for private donations to 
restore and enhance our National Forests and Grasslands. Since 
its charter, the Foundation has been essential in helping meet 
the challenges the National Forest System faces.
    The National Forestry Foundation has been consistently 
funded through the appropriations process despite an expired 
authorization. The bill reauthorizes the authority for 
discretionary funding at $3 million per year, which is 
consistent with the funding it has received in recent years.
    Under the authority of the National Forest Foundation Act, 
the Foundation is legally obligated to obtain private 
contributions to match Federal dollars on a one-to-one basis. 
Federal funds have been leveraged by additional resources at an 
overall ratio of 4.3 to 1.
    The Foundation uses private and federal dollars to support 
our nation's great forests in a variety of ways. These include 
planting trees, preserving wildlife habitat, surveying streams, 
restoring and maintaining trails, among other activities.
    This authority will expire at the end of FY 2018 making the 
program consistent with most farm bill forestry programs in the 
Agricultural Act of 2014.
    This bill amends the National Forest Foundation Act to 
reauthorize the Department of Agriculture to provide during FY 
2015-FY 2018 matching funds for certain administrative and 
project expenses incurred by the National Forest Foundation.

 H.R. 2088, United States Grain Standards Act Reauthorization 
                          Act of 2015

    H.R. 2088 was introduced by Representative K. Michael 
Conaway on April 29, 2015. The bill was referred to the 
Agriculture Committee. On April 30, 2015, the Committee ordered 
the bill to be reported by voice vote. On June 9, 2015, the 
House passed by the bill under suspension of the rules by a 
voice vote.
    The United States Grain Standards Act Reauthorization Act 
of 2015, H.R. 2088, reauthorizes provisions of the United 
States Grain Standards Act until September 30, 2020, and 
provides a safeguard mechanism in the event of an interruption 
of official inspection services. In addition, H.R. 2088 revises 
the process for the delegation and designation of authority by 
the Secretary to provide official inspection services and 
allows for the review of current delegations. Finally, the 
legislation amends the United States Grain Standards Act to 
provide a basis for fees based on export tonnage and for the 
adjustment of those fees. (Note: See also the discussion of the 
April 22, 2015: Hearing to review reauthorization of the U.S. 
Grain Standards Act under ``D. Oversight''.
            P.L. 114-94 (H.R. 22)
    Fixing America's Surface Transportation Act (FAST Act)

    H.R. 22 as introduced by Representative Rodney Davis on 
January 6, 2015. The bill was referred to the House Committee 
on Ways and Means. The House passed the bill on November 5, 
2015 and the conference report on December 3, 2015. The 
President signed the bill on December 4, 2015.
    The Act authorizes spending on federal highway and public 
transportation programs and surface transportation safety and 
research activities for five years, through September 30, 2020. 
The Act also authorizes passenger rail programs for five years, 
through FY 2020. The Act's authorization totals about $305 
billion for FY 2016 through FY 2020. This includes $233 billion 
for highways and highway safety, $61 billion for public 
transportation, and more than $10 billion for Amtrak.
    This public law repealed Section 201 in the Bipartisan 
Budget Act of 2015, which forced a renegotiation of the 
Standard Reinsurance Agreement, forced those negotiations to 
happen every 5 years going forward, and capped the targeted 
rate of return on retained premiums for the insurance companies 
at 8.6%.
    The following bill is included in P.L. 114-94:

       H.R. 1847, Swap Data Repository and Clearinghouse 
             Indemnification Correction Act of 2015

    H.R. 1847 was introduced by Representative Eric A. ``Rick'' 
Crawford on April 16, 2015. The bill was referred to the 
Committee on Agriculture and in addition to the Committee on 
Financial Services. On July 14, 2015, the Committee on 
Agriculture discharged the legislation. On July 14, 2015, H.R. 
1847 passed the House by a voice vote.
    H.R. 1847 repeals the indemnification provisions in 
Sections 725, 728, and 763 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform 
and Consumer Protection Act to increase the market 
transparency, facilitate global regulatory cooperation, and 
ensure that U.S. regulators have access to necessary swaps data 
from foreign data repositories, derivatives clearing 
organizations, and regulators.
            P.L. 114-216 (H.R. 1599/S. 764)
    The Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act of 2015

    H.R. 1599 was introduced by Representative Mike Pompeo on 
March 25, 2015. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Energy and Commerce, and in addition to the Committee on 
Agriculture. On July 14, 2015, the Committee on Agriculture 
ordered the bill to be reported, as amended, by voice vote. On 
July 23, 2015, the House passed the bill by a vote of 275 yeas 
to 150 nays.
    On June 23, 2016, the Senate Agriculture Committee proposed 
a bill (S. Amdt. 4937 to S. 764) that would amend the 
Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946 to give the U.S. Department 
of Agriculture (USDA) authority to establish a mandatory 
``national bioengineered food disclosure standard.'' S. 764 
would authorize food manufacturers to adopt either text, a 
symbol, or an electronic/digital link for identifying 
bioengineered foods. Small food manufacturers would be 
permitted to use a website or phone number. Very small food 
manufacturers and restaurants would be exempt from the 
mandatory disclosure requirement. The Senate passed the 
labeling bill on July 7 by a vote of 63 yeas to 30 nays. The 
House approved the Senate bill on July 14, 2016, by a vote of 
306 yeas to 117 nays. The President signed the bill into law on 
July 29, 2016.
    The Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act of 2015 would 
ensure national uniformity regarding labeling of foods derived 
from genetically engineered plants by preventing a patchwork of 
conflicting state or local labeling laws which inherently 
interfere with interstate and foreign commerce. This 
legislation will create a consumer-friendly, science-based, 
uniform food labeling framework for products produced using 
genetically engineered ingredients. By ensuring that food 
labeling is the sole purview of the Federal Government, the 
bill guarantees that state labeling mandates do not mislead and 
misinform consumers. Additionally, the bill will prevent the 
costly price hikes associated with a patchwork of state 
labeling laws. By creating a national non-GE certification 
program that is overseen by the U.S. Department of Agriculture 
(USDA), this bill brings transparency and consistency to an 
area of food labeling where it is urgently needed. This program 
mimics the widely popular National Organic Program and will 
provide those who prefer to buy non-GE foods a reliable means 
of doing so. Similar to organics, non-GE foods also are a small 
percentage of the U.S. food market. The USDA Certified Organic 
program is a successful precedent for labeling the exception 
rather than the rule.
            P.L. 114-245 (H.R. 845)
    National Forest System Trails Stewardship Act

    H.R. 845 was introduced by Representative Cynthia Lummis on 
February 10, 2015. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Agriculture, and in addition to the Committee on Natural 
Resources. On September 14, 2016, the Committee ordered the 
bill to be reported, as amended, by a voice vote. On September 
26, 2016, the bill was considered under suspension of the rules 
and passed by a voice vote. The President signed the bill on 
November 28, 2016.
    The United States Forest Service (USFS or Forest Service) 
is facing a $500 million backlog in trail maintenance costs of 
the National Forest Service trail system. In 2013, the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) released a report that 
recognized the importance of volunteers for trail maintenance 
and recommended taking steps to improve management of 
volunteers.
    This legislation improves the state of Forest Service 
resources by using volunteers to improve Forest Service trail 
maintenance.
    The bill requires the USFS to produce a national strategy 
to maximize use of volunteers and partners and eliminates 
challenges that have prevented increased use of volunteers, 
such as liability concerns raised by the Forest Service.
    The Committee believes that refocusing on volunteers and 
partners to help the USFS is a commonsense way of making 
progress on the backlog and opening up these trails to public 
access. Using volunteers across the nation in the remediation 
of our deteriorating National Forest Service trails is a cost 
effective solution.
            P.L. 114-275 (S. 3395)
    Prescribed Burn Approval Act of 2016

    S. 3395 was introduced by Senator John Thune on September 
27, 2016. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Agriculture, and in addition to the Committee on Natural 
Resources. The bill passed the Senate without amendment by 
Unanimous Consent on November 18, 2016. On December 5, 2016, 
the bill was considered under suspension of the rules and 
passed by a voice vote. The President signed the bill on 
December 14, 2016.
    This bill prohibits the Department of Agriculture, acting 
through the Forest Service, from authorizing a prescribed burn 
(i.e., a planned fire intentionally ignited) on Forest Service 
land if, for the county or contiguous count in which such land 
is located, the national fire danger rating system is 
indicating an extreme fire danger level. Nonetheless, the USDA 
may authorize a prescribed burn under such a condition if it 
coordinates with the applicable state government and local fire 
officials.
            P.L. 114-279 (H.R. 875)
    Cross Border Trade Enhancement)

    H.R. 875 was introduced by Representative Henry Cuellar on 
February 11, 2015. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Ways and Means, Transportation and Infrastructure, Judiciary, 
Homeland Security and Agriculture. On December 6, 2016, the 
bill was considered under suspension of the rules and passed by 
a voice vote. The Senate passed the bill by Unanimous Consent 
on December 10, 2016. The President signed the bill on December 
16, 2016.
    H.R. 875 authorizes the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and 
Border Protection to enter into agreement with certain persons 
for the CBP to provide customs, agricultural processing, border 
security, or inspection related immigration services at a land 
border port of entry, subject to payment of a fee to reimburse 
the CBP for providing such services.
            P.L. 114-289 (H.R. 4680)
    National Park Service Centennial Act

    H.R. 4680 was introduced by Representative Rob Bishop on 
March 3, 2016. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Natural Resources, and in addition to the Committees on 
Agriculture, and Education and the Workforce. On May 19, 2016, 
the Committee on Agriculture discharged the legislation. The 
Senate passed the bill by Unanimous Consent on December 10, 
2016. The President signed the bill on December 16, 2016.
    It is the purpose of this Act to establish a fund in the 
Treasury to finance signature projects and programs to enhance 
the National Park System as it approaches its centennial in 
2016 and to prepare the parks for another century of 
conservation, preservation, and enjoyment.
            P.L. 114-322 (S. 612)
    Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act

    S. 612 was introduced by Senator John Corny on February 27, 
2015. It was referred to the Senate Environment and Public 
Works and House Transportation and Infrastructure Committees. 
It passed the Senate by Unanimous Consent on May 21, 2015. The 
bill passed the House on December 8, 2016 by a vote 360 yeas to 
61 nays. The Senate agreed the House amendment by a vote of 78 
yeas to 21 nays on December 10, 2016. The President signed the 
bill on December 16, 2016.
    The following bills are included in P.L. 114-322:

H.R. 2898, Western Water and American Food Security Act of 2015

    H.R. 2898 was introduced by Representative David Valadao on 
June 25, 2015. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Natural Resources, and in addition to the Committee on 
Agriculture. On July 13, 2015, the Committee on Agriculture 
discharged the legislation. On July 16, 2015, H.R. 2898 passed 
the House by a vote of 245 yeas to 176 nays.

H.R. 2898, the Western Water and American Food Security Act of 
2015, represents a comprehensive approach aimed at alleviating 
   drought impacts through short-term and long-term measures.

    Title I of the bill ensures that changes to operational 
pumping levels are based on the best and most up-to-date 
science, while also requiring agencies to use the most accurate 
survey methods to help determine how these water projects may 
be maximized without causing significant impacts to the Delta 
smelt. Only three years of data were used to calculate the 
incidental take limit (ITL) of Delta smelt in the most recent 
biological opinion, and the data is up to a decade old (2006-
2008). Section 102 of the bill requires Federal agencies to 
modify the methodology used to calculate the ITLs for the Delta 
smelt using the best scientific and commercial data available 
to allow for a more accurate and robust ITL. Section 103 
requires the agencies to use real-time data to make informed 
decisions about operational changes to the pumps and to 
maximize project operations pumping at a specified level 
provided there is no harm to Delta smelt. Although the text is 
not identical, Title I, and Titles II and III, reflect parts of 
the framework negotiated with the Senate last year.
    Title II aims to ease water project pumping restrictions by 
identifying management actions other than reductions in pumping 
that can be utilized to better contribute to salmon recovery. 
Section 202 requires the Federal agencies to evaluate and 
quantify the benefit to salmon species from reductions in 
pumping. In addition, the Secretary of Commerce is required to 
consider alternative measures including barriers to fish 
entrainment, habitat enhancements and predation control 
programs. The evaluation of these alternative measures will 
allow the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to 
demonstrate the effectiveness of existing reasonable and 
prudent alternatives (RPAs) and identify potential additional 
actions to protect species while reducing adverse water impacts 
to CVP and SWP contractors. Section 203 authorizes a non-
federally financed predator fish removal program on the 
Stanislaus River. This program is designed to remove nonnative 
striped bass, smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, black bass, and 
other nonnative predator fish species that prey on protected 
salmonid species.
    Title III works within current law to provide Federal 
agencies the operational flexibility to maximize Delta pumping 
levels while still satisfying the needs of ESA listed species. 
It also directs the federal agencies to maximize the amount of 
water pumped south of the Delta during drought and for two 
subsequent normal water years. Section 302 requires the 
Secretaries of Agriculture, Commerce and the Interior to 
expeditiously issue all necessary permits for water transfers 
and the use of temporary barriers or operable gates to improve 
the quantity and quality of water available to CVP and SWP 
water users. This section also creates a streamlined project 
elevation and decision-making process to ensure that decisions 
related to projects that provide additional water supplies or 
address emergency drought conditions are made expeditiously. 
Additional provisions require the Cross Channel gates in the 
Delta remain open for longer periods of time to prevent water 
from being lost to the Pacific Ocean. Section 306 requires 
Federal agencies to increase regular project operations pumping 
at specific levels if there is no harm to protected species, 
and Section 307 authorizes pumping at specific levels to 
capture water during the first few storms of the year. Section 
313 replaces and satisfies the requirements of the San Joaquin 
River Restoration Settlement with a much less expensive warm 
water fishery.
    Title IV requires Reclamation to complete five feasibility 
studies for storage projects in California by certain 
timelines. These studies have been ongoing for over 12 years, 
prompting many to ask when they will be completed to bring 
about new long-term water supplies. Title V, as amended, 
includes provisions designed to preserve water rights seniority 
and to protect the joint operation of the CVP and SWP. Title VI 
allows artificially-spawned Delta smelt and Chinook salmon to 
be counted when counting fish populations and requires the 
Federal Government to develop and implement a plan to replace 
the 800,000 acre-feet of CVP water, as required by the CVPIA, 
within 180 days of enactment.

         H.R. 3382, Lake Tahoe Restoration Act of 2015

    H.R. 3382 was introduced by Representative Tom McClintock 
on July 29, 2015. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Natural Resources, and in addition to the Committees on 
Agriculture, and Transportation and Infrastructure. On February 
1, 2015 the Committee on Agriculture discharged the 
legislation.
    The Lake Tahoe Basin is an administrative unit managed by 
the U.S. Forest Service. Since its creation in 2000, the forest 
surrounding the Lake has become overgrown and in an 
increasingly fire-prone state. The decade between 2000-2010 
showed a large increase in forest acres burned compared to 
previous decades. For example, the 2007 Angora Fire burned 254 
residences and 75 commercial buildings and 3,100 acres, an 
alarming example of the danger that lurks in the forests 
surrounding Lake Tahoe.
    Ash and debris from wildfires ultimately end up in the 
water, damaging watershed health and aquatic wildlife. This 
legislation addresses the need for significant active 
management to reduce the risk of wildfire in this world class 
setting. The bill addresses many forest health issues by 
expediting urgently needed forest management through the use of 
a 3,000 acre categorical exclusion under the National 
Environmental Policy Act.
    The bill seeks to enhance visitor experiences by 
authorizing Lake Tahoe Basin managers to focus on improving 
recreation opportunities when evaluating management decisions. 
The bill also seeks to help land managers more efficiently 
manage the land by authorizing land exchanges to remove a 
patchwork of ownership that exists. The bill also promotes more 
coordination with local governments by requiring the Forest 
Service to consult with localities when evaluating the possible 
acquisition of new land.
    Finally, H.R. 3382 authorizes $8.7 million in annual 
supplemental funding from both appropriated dollars and 
receipts generated within the Basin to augment the existing 
forest budget. These supplemental funds would be used for 
active forest management to reduce the risk of catastrophic 
wildfire, provide for recreation improvements and increase 
staffing.

Other Laws; Legislative Matters

    Appropriations
            P.L. 114-113 (H.R. 2029)
    Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016

    H.R. 2029 was introduced by Representative Charles Dent on 
April 24, 2015. The bill passed the House on April 30, 2015 by 
a vote of 255 yeas to 163 nays. The bill, as amended, 
subsequently passed the Senate by a vote of 93 yeas to 0 nays. 
The legislation was sent back to the House. The House amended 
the bill and passed it by a vote 316 yeas to 113 nays on 
December 18, 2015. The Senate agreed to the House amendments to 
the Senate amendment by a vote of 65 yeas and 33 nays. The 
President signed the bill on December 18, 2015.
    The following bill was included in P.L. 114-113:

    H.R. 2393, Country of Origin Labeling Amendments of 2015

    H.R. 2392 was introduced by Representative K. Michael 
Conaway on May 18, 2015. The bill was referred to the Committee 
on Agriculture. On May 20, 2015 the Committee ordered the bill 
to be reported, as amended, by a vote of 38 yeas to 6 nays. On 
June 10, 2015, the House considered the bill under a Rule and 
it was passed by 300 yeas to 131 nays.
    The Country of Origin Labeling Amendments Act of 2015, H.R. 
2393, amends the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946 to repeal 
country-of-origin labeling requirements for beef, pork, and 
chicken.
    In 2002, Congress enacted mandatory country-of-origin 
labeling (COOL) provisions requiring retailers of certain meat 
products to inform consumers of a product's country-of-origin. 
Controversial aspects of COOL prompted Congress to revisit the 
law in the 2008 Farm Bill, which included several amendments to 
the 2002 statute.
    Less than five months after the COOL implementing rule was 
published in 2008, Canada and Mexico challenged the rule at the 
WTO, arguing that it had a trade-distorting impact by reducing 
the value and number of cattle and hogs shipped to the U.S. 
market.
    The process has since progressed through the dispute 
settlement panel phase (report issued November 2011), and a 
U.S. appeal to the WTO's Appellate Body (report issued June 
2012). In both instances, the WTO found that the way U.S. COOL 
regulations were implemented violated U.S. WTO obligations by 
discriminating against imported livestock.
    The United States was given until May 2013 to bring its 
COOL regulations into compliance with the findings of the 
dispute settlement panel, as modified by the Appellate Body. In 
response, USDA issued a revised COOL rule in May 2013 which 
required that production steps--born, raised, and slaughtered, 
by origin country--be included on meat labels. The revised rule 
also prohibited the commingling of meat from imported and 
domestic livestock. Canada and Mexico claimed the revised rule 
did not bring the United States into compliance, and 
furthermore they said the revised rule, especially the 
prohibition on commingling, was more onerous than the original 
rule. A key criterion of current COOL implementation is that it 
requires `segregation' of animals by country-of-origin, which 
raises the cost of utilizing imported livestock.
    At the request of Canada and Mexico, the WTO established a 
compliance panel to determine if the revised rule brought the 
United States into compliance with previous rulings. The 
compliance panel report, released October 20, 2014, upheld the 
earlier findings of discrimination.
    The United States filed to appeal the compliance panel 
report on November 28, 2014. On May 18, 2015, the WTO rejected 
the United States' appeal and found for the fourth and final 
time that the U.S. COOL requirements for beef and pork are 
unavoidably discriminatory. The final ruling kick-starts the 
WTO process to determine the level of retaliatory tariffs 
Canada and Mexico can now impose of the U.S., which has widely 
been predicted to have effects in the billions of dollars.
    On Wednesday, March 25, the House Agriculture Committee's 
Livestock and Foreign Agriculture Subcommittee held a public 
hearing to examine the implications of potential retaliation 
against the U.S. Witnesses at the hearing testified as follows:

          Canada and Mexico are by far the United States' 
        largest export markets, and purchased a record $485 
        billion in manufactured goods in 2014. Those exports 
        support millions of U.S. jobs. WTO-authorized 
        retaliation by two of the largest U.S. trading partners 
        could result in billions in tariffs affecting multiple 
        sectors of the U.S. economy, threatening the 
        livelihoods of American families.

    (See also the discussion of the March 25, 2015: Hearing to 
examine the implications of potential retaliatory measures 
taken against the United States in response to meat labeling 
requirements under ``D. Oversight''.)

2. Bills Acted on by the House But Not the Senate

            H.R. 1317, To amend the Commodity Exchange Act and the 
                    Securities Exchange Act of 1934 to specify how 
                    clearing requirements apply to certain affiliate 
                    transactions, and for other purposes.
    H.R. 1317 was introduced by Representative Gwen Moore on 
March 4, 2015. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Financial Services, and in addition to the Committee on 
Agriculture. On September 30, 2015, the Committee on 
Agriculture ordered the bill to be reported, as amended, by a 
voice vote. On November 16, 2015, the House passed the bill by 
a voice vote.
    H.R. 1317 would amend the Commodity Exchange Act (CEA) to 
provide an exemption for certain swaps from the clearing 
requirements of the Dodd-Frank Act so long as the swap 
transaction hedges or mitigates the commercial risk of an 
entity that is not a financial entity.
            H.R. 2289, Commodity End-User Relief Act
    H.R. 2289 was introduced by Representative K. Michael 
Conaway on May 13, 2015. The bill was referred to the 
Agriculture Committee. On May 29, 2015, the Committee ordered 
the bill to be reported, as amended, by a voice vote. On June 
9, 2015, the bill was considered in the House under a rule and 
passed with 246 yeas to 171 nays.
    This legislation reauthorizes the Commodity Futures Trading 
Commission, to better protect futures customers, to provide 
end-users with market certainty, to make basic reforms to 
ensure transparency and accountability at the Commission, to 
help farmers, ranchers, and end-users manage risks, to help 
keep consumer costs low, and for other purposes, having 
considered the same, report favorably thereon with an amendment 
and recommend that the bill as amended do pass and makes 
numerous changes to the CEA to better protect end-users and to 
reduce regulatory burdens on end-users.
            H.R. 2647, Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2015
    H.R. 2647 was introduced by Representative Bruce Westerman 
on June 4, 2015. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Agriculture, and in addition to the Committee on Natural 
Resources. On June 11, 2015, the Committee on Natural Resources 
ordered the bill to be reported, as amended, by a vote of 22 
yeas to 15 nays. On June 17, 2015, the Committee on Agriculture 
ordered the bill to be reported, as amended, by a voice vote. 
On July 9, the bill was considered in the House under a rule 
and passed the House by a vote of 262 yeas to 167 nays.
    This legislation attempts to address the core issues facing 
the Forest Service: lengthy and costly planning processes to 
complete needed hazardous fuel reduction projects and the 
threat of litigation forcing the Forest Service and BLM to take 
an overly cautious approach to forest management. H.R. 2647 
addresses these challenges by including categorical exclusions 
for processes that are routine and have known effects, allowing 
the agencies to perform forest management activities earlier to 
save time and taxpayer money. It rewards collaboration, giving 
all interest groups a seat at the table, and minimizes the 
threat of litigation of these collaborative projects. H.R. 2647 
imposes no new requirements or burdens on the Forest Service or 
BLM. It expands upon the successes of the 2014 Farm Bill and 
the Healthy Forest Restoration Act. H.R. 2647 retains many 
environmental safeguards to ensure the respective land 
management agencies use these authorities in a reasonable and 
environmentally safe manner.

3. House Resolutions Considered in the House

    None.

4. Bills Reported by the Committee on Agriculture But Not Considered

            H.R. 470, Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest Land 
                    Adjustment Act of 2015
    H.R. 470 was introduced by Representative Doug Collins on 
January 22, 2015. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Agriculture. On September 14, 2016, the Committee ordered the 
bill to be reported by a voice vote.
    Currently, the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) owns numerous 
tracts of land in Georgia that exist as small isolated parcels, 
disconnected from the core lands of the Chattahoochee-Oconee 
National Forest. Intervening growth and development hinders 
efforts to bridge gaps between the core National Forest and 
outlying lands and, thus, is the primary reason that many of 
these tracts no longer warrant Federal ownership. The Committee 
believes managing these tracts for public benefit and use is a 
waste of taxpayer money.
    At the same time, the USFS has identified critical 
inholdings, edge-holdings, and connections that if added to 
National Forest lands, would streamline land management, better 
protect flora and fauna, and add value to the National Forest 
as a recreational asset.
    H.R. 470, the Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest Land 
Adjustment Act of 2015, will allow the sale of these isolated 
parcels (30 in total; 3,841 acres; as identified as desired 
disposal by the USFS). The proceeds from the sale of these 
parcels will go into a Federal account that the USFS may use 
only to buy critical inholdings from willing sellers. The funds 
could only be spent inside the existing USFS proclamation 
boundary in Georgia.
    Georgia's lone National Forest is a huge economic 
generator. Opportunities for hunting, fishing and hiking will 
improve with the consolidation of Federal lands. H.R. 470 is a 
pragmatic way to make the Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest 
a better place to recreate.

5. Bills Reported by Other Committees Within the Committee on 
        Agriculture's Jurisdiction But Not Considered

            H.R. 37, Promoting Job Creation and Reducing Small Business 
                    Burdens Act
    H.R. 37 was introduced by Representative Michael 
Fitzpatrick on January 6, 2015. The bill was referred the 
Committee on Financial Services, and in addition to the 
Committee on Agriculture. On January 14, 2015 the legislation 
passed the House by a vote of 271 yeas to 154 nays.
    H.R. 37 includes several derivatives provisions. Section 
201 of H.R. 37 would exempt swaps traded between an affiliate 
of a nonfinancial firm and another company from the clearing 
and exchange-trading requirements. Separately, Title V of H.R. 
37, the Swap Data Repository and Clearinghouse Indemnification 
Corrections, would remove a requirement, added in the Dodd-
Frank Act, that foreign regulators indemnify a U.S.-based swap 
data repository for any expenses arising from litigation 
related to a request for market data.
            H.R. 373, Good Samaritan Search and Recovery Act
    H.R. 373 was introduced by Representative Joseph Heck on 
January 14, 2015. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Natural Resources, and in addition to the Committee on 
Agriculture. On April 15, 2015, the Committee on Agriculture 
discharged the legislation. On April 28, 2015, H.R. 373 passed 
the House by a vote of 413 yeas to 0 nays.
    This legislation directs the Department of the Interior and 
the Department of Agriculture (USDA) to implement a process to 
provide eligible organizations and individuals expedited access 
to Federal land to conduct Good Samaritan search-and-recovery 
missions, which are searches for one or more missing 
individuals believed to be deceased at the time that the search 
is initiated.
            H.R. 399, Secure Our Border First Act of 2015
    H.R. 399 was introduced by Representative Michael McCaul on 
January 16, 2015. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security, and in addition to the Committees on Armed 
Services, Natural Resources, and Agriculture. On January 27, 
2015, the Committee on Agriculture discharged the legislation.
    The purpose of H.R. 399 is to require the Secretary of 
Homeland Security to gain and maintain operational control of 
the international borders of the United States.
            H.R. 894, To extend the authorization of the Highlands 
                    Conservation Act
    H.R. 894 was introduced by Representative Rodney 
Frelinghuysen on February 11, 2015. The bill was referred to 
the Committee on Natural Resources, and in addition to the 
Committee on Agriculture. On April 21, 2015, the Committee on 
Agriculture discharged the legislation.
    The Northeastern Highlands is a geographic region that 
encompasses over two million acres stretching from western 
Connecticut across the Lower Hudson River Valley and northern 
New Jersey into east central Pennsylvania. About 1.4 million 
people live in the Highlands Region, which is adjacent to one 
of the most populous metropolitan regions of the nation, and is 
the source of the region's drinking water.
    The purpose of the Highlands Conservation Act (Public Law 
108-421) is to promote conservation of natural resources and 
conservation lands as identified in the U.S. Forest Service's 
update of the NY-NJ Highlands Regional Study and state open 
space plans. The bill reauthorizes $11 million annually for 
land conservation partnership projects and for technical 
assistance to private landowners and local communities under 
this law. The program funds land acquisition by the affected 
states--not the Federal Government.
            H.R. 1214, National Forest Small Tracts Act Amendments Act 
                    of 2015
    H.R. 1214 was introduced by Representative Mark Amodei on 
March 3, 2015. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Natural Resources, and in addition to the Committee on 
Agriculture. On June 8, 2015, the Committee on Agriculture 
discharged the legislation. On September 16, 2015, H.R. 1214 
passed the House by a vote of 403 yeas to 0 nays.
    H.R. 1214 would amend the Small Tracts Act (Public Law 97-
465) to allow for the sale of small isolated parcels as well as 
parcels encumbered with certain special uses such as 
cemeteries. Proceeds from the sale of National Forest System 
lands would be deposited in a Sisk Act account and may be used 
for acquisition of lands for administrative sites or 
recreational access, to address deferred maintenance for 
administrative sites or recreational access or to reimburse the 
agency for administrative costs for preparing the sales.
    H.R. 1214 would allow the Forest Service to more 
efficiently resolve land ownership challenges that exist in 
virtually every Ranger District. The benefits of expanded small 
parcel conveyance authority include the ability to: (1) sell 
parcels under 40 acres that are isolated, inaccessible, and are 
difficult to administer; (2) convey small parcels currently 
authorized under special use permits of a long-term nature with 
accompanying potential liability issues, like cemeteries, 
landfills, and sewage treatment facilities; (3) reduce efforts 
spent addressing individual legislative proposals needed to 
address these issues; (4) resolve certain encroachments of 
permanent, habitable structures which cannot readily be 
resolved under existing authorities; and (5) retain sale 
proceeds which can be used for deferred maintenance for 
recreational access and administrative sites, to acquire lands 
for recreational access or administrative sites, or to 
reimburse for administrative costs of preparing competitive 
sales (acquisitions would be proponent funded for non-
competitive sales).
            H.R. 1991, Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act 
                    Extension Act of 2015
    H.R. 1991 was introduced by Rob Bishop on April 23, 2015. 
The bill was referred to the Committee on Natural Resources, 
and in addition to the Committee on Agriculture. On June 12, 
2015, the Committee on Agriculture discharged the legislation.
    H.R. 1991 extends the authority of the Secretary of the 
Interior and the Secretary of Agriculture to carry out the 
Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act. The Federal Lands 
Recreation Act (FLREA), 16 U.S.C. 6809, provides an authority 
for Federal land management agencies to manage recreation sites 
with fees received from visitors. Specifically, it allows for 
the collection of fees for certain types of developed 
recreation sites and requires that the collected funds be used 
for operation, maintenance and improvement of those sites. The 
proposed legislation would allow Federal agencies to continue 
to implement FLREA for one additional year while a bill to 
further extend existing authority or provide for permanent 
authority can be developed.
            H.R. 2358, Electricity Reliability and Forest Production 
                    Action
    H.R. 2358 was introduced by Representative Ryan Zinke on 
May 15, 2015. The bill was referred to the Committee on Natural 
Resources, and in addition to the Committee on Agriculture. On 
October 6, 2015, the Committee on Agriculture discharged the 
legislation.
    The purpose of H.R. 2358 is to amend the Federal Land 
Policy and Management Act of 1976 to enhance the reliability of 
the electricity grid and reduce the threat of wildfires to and 
from electric transmission and distribution facilities on 
Federal lands by facilitating vegetation management on such 
lands.
    H.R. 2406, Sportsmen's Heritage and Recreational 
Enhancement Act (SHARE Act)
    H.R. 2406 was introduced by Representative Robert J. 
Wittman on May 19, 2015. The bill was referred to the Committee 
on Natural Resources, and in addition to the Committees on 
Agriculture, Energy and Commerce, Transportation and 
Infrastructure, and the Judiciary. On December 10, 2015, the 
Committee on Agriculture discharged the legislation. On 
February 26, 2016, the House passed the bill by a vote of 242 
yeas to 151 nays.
    H.R. 2406, the Sportsmen's Heritage and Recreational 
Enhancement Act of 2015 (SHARE Act), as amended, aims to 
protect Second Amendment rights and ensure that future 
generations of Americans will have ample access to Federal 
lands to hunt, fish, and recreationally shoot. Reliable access 
is necessary to sustain our nation's rich outdoor sporting 
tradition heritage and benefits the men and women that make up 
the industries that support it. Outdoor sporting activities, 
including hunting, fishing and recreational shooting, are 
deeply engrained in the fabric of America's culture and 
heritage. Much of this activity occurs on America's Federal 
lands. Federal agencies often prevent or impede access to 
federal lands for hunting, fishing, and recreational shooting 
that should otherwise be available for those activities. Since 
lack of access is one of the key reasons why sportsmen and 
women may stop participating in traditional outdoor sporting 
activities, ensuring that the public has reliable access to our 
nation's Federal lands must remain a priority.
    The SHARE Act includes many provisions to accomplish these 
goals. First, it implements an `open until closed' management 
policy on Federal lands to facilitate sustained access for 
hunting, fishing, and recreational shooting and protects 
sportsmen and women from arbitrary efforts by the Federal 
Government to close lands to those activities. However, it does 
not prioritize hunting and fishing over other multiple uses of 
Federal lands. The bill also requires Federal agencies to 
consider the use of volunteers from the hunting community to 
cull excess animals on Federal lands; prevents the Departments 
of the Interior and Commerce from restricting recreational or 
commercial fishing access on marine waters without coordination 
with and approval of the applicable state or territory; 
prevents U.S. Forest Service restrictions on hunting, fishing, 
and shooting in certain National Forests in Arkansas, 
Louisiana, and Mississippi; creates a new cost structure for 
small film crews operating on Federal lands; adjusts funding 
limitations to make more funds available to states to establish 
and maintain recreational shooting ranges; authorizes bows and 
crossbows to be lawfully transported on National Park System 
lands with certain restrictions; and allows the National Park 
Service to establish hunter access corridors through National 
Park System units that are used to access adjacent Federal land 
that is open to hunting. The bill also reauthorizes and amends 
the Federal Land Transaction Facilitation Act by emphasizing 
the acquisition of parcels that provide recreational access and 
providing Federal agencies with the option to use funds 
generated by land sales for deferred maintenance activities, in 
addition to the purchase of land.
    The bill also protects Second Amendment rights and the use 
of traditional ammunition and fishing tackle. It protects 
individuals' Constitutional right to bear arms on lands owned 
by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Congress passed 
legislation allowing citizens to exercise this right on 
National Parks and other Federal lands, but did not address 
lands owned by the Corps. The bill also protects the use of 
traditional ammunition and fishing tackle by reiterating and 
clarifying existing law that clearly limits the Environmental 
Protection Agency's authority to regulate those components 
under the Toxic Substances Control Act. It also prevents 
certain Federal agencies from regulating the use of ammunition 
and fishing tackle based on lead content, but retains the 
existing prohibition of lead used in waterfowl hunting.
    Finally, the bill prevents the regulation of lawfully 
possessed ivory products and eliminates red tape associated 
with the importation of hunting trophies. The bill prevents the 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service from implementing onerous rules 
banning the domestic sale and trade of lawfully possessed ivory 
products, including musical instruments, firearms, and antiques 
that include ivory, and ensures that sport-hunted elephant 
trophies can be legally imported from countries with 
sustainable elephant populations. It also allows for the 
importation of certain already legally-taken polar bear hunting 
trophies that, through no fault of sportsmen or women, have 
become trapped in bureaucratic red tape. However, the bill does 
not open the door to future imports.
            H.R. 4894, To repeal title II of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street 
                    Reform and Consumer Protection Act
    H.R. 4894 was introduced by Representative Lynn 
Westmoreland on April 11, 2016. The bill was referred to the 
Committee on Financial Services, and in addition to the 
Committees on Agriculture, the Judiciary, and Ways and Means. 
On May 19, 2016, the Committee on Agriculture discharged the 
legislation.
    H.R. 4894 repeals Title II of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street 
Reform and Consumer Protection Act to ensure that taxpayers 
will not pay the costs of bailing out large financial 
institutions or their creditors. Title II establishes an 
Orderly Liquidation Authority (OLA) that grants the Federal 
Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) the authority to resolve 
certain non-bank financial institutions in the event of their 
failure and the authority to borrow from the Treasury to 
capitalize an `orderly liquidation fund' that it is authorized 
to be used to pay off the creditors of a failed firm.
            H.R. 5346, Securing our Agriculture and Food Act
    H.R. 5346 was introduced by Representative David Young on 
May 26, 2016. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security, and in addition to the Committees on Energy 
and Commerce, and Agriculture. On September 19, 2016, the 
Committee on Agriculture was discharged from consideration of 
the legislation. On September 26, 2016, the bill passed under 
suspension of the rules by a voice vote.
    The purpose of H.R. 5346 is to amend the Homeland Security 
Act of 2002 to make the Assistant Secretary of Homeland 
Security for Health Affairs responsible for coordinating the 
efforts of the Department of Homeland Security related to food, 
agriculture, and veterinary defense against terrorism, and for 
other purposes.

6. Bills Ordered Reported by the Committee on Agriculture

    See the bills listed under ``1. Bills Enacted into Law'' 
and ``2. Bills Acted on by the House But Not the Senate.''

7. Bills Ordered Reported but Not Reported by Other Committees Within 
        the Committee on Agriculture's Jurisdiction

            P.L. 114-216 (H.R. 1599), Safe and Accurate Food Labeling 
                    Act of 2015
    See the discussion of H.R. 1599 under the ``1. Bills 
Enacted into Law.''

8. Bills Defeated

            H.R. 897, Reducing Regulatory Burden Act of 2015
    See the discussion of H.R. 897 under the ``2. Bills Acted 
on by the House But Not the Senate.''

9. Bills Acted on by the Committee Included in Other Laws Enacted

            H.R. 2394, National Forest Foundation Reauthorization Act 
                    of 2015
    See the discussion of P.L. 114-54 under the ``1. Bills 
Enacted into Law.''
            H.R. 2088, United States Grain Standards Act 
                    Reauthorization Act of 2015
    See the discussion of P.L. 114-54 under the ``1. Bills 
Enacted into Law.''
            H.R. 2393, Country of Origin Labeling Amendments of 2015
    See the discussion of P.L. 114-113 under the ``1. Bills 
Enacted into Law.''

10. Bills Vetoed

    None.

11. Bills Acted on by Both Houses But Not Enacted

    None.

12. Concurrent Resolutions Approved

    None.
    Other Bills of Interest: Several bills acted on by other 
committees, but not acted on by the Committee on Agriculture 
contain provisions relating to matters within the Committee's 
jurisdiction. The following are abbreviated summaries of these 
bills.
            P.L. 114-74 (H.R. 1314)
    Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015

    H.R. 1315 was introduced by Representative Patrick Meehan 
on March 3, 2015, and was referred to the Committee on Ways and 
Means. The Committee on Ways and Means ordered the bill 
reported on March 25, 2015. On April 15, 2015, the bill passed 
the House by a voice vote. On May 14, 2015, H.R. 1315 
subsequently passed the Senate by a vote of 65 yeas to 33 nays. 
The President signed the bill into law on November 2, 2015.
    H.R. 1314, reported by the Committee on Ways and Means, 
requires the Treasury Secretary to establish procedures under 
which an organization claiming exemption from tax under section 
501(c), or certain other provisions, of the Internal Revenue 
Code (the `Code') but receiving an adverse determination as to 
either initial classification or a continuing classification 
may request an administrative appeal to the Internal Revenue 
Service (`IRS') Office of Appeals. The bill would be effective 
for appeals of determinations made after May 19, 2014.
    Section 201 in the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 forced a 
renegotiation of the Standard Reinsurance Agreement, forced 
those negotiations to happen every 5 years going forward, and 
capped the targeted rate of return on retained premiums for the 
insurance companies at 8.6%.
            P.L. 114-195 (H.R. 1567)
    Global Food Security Act of 2015

    H.R. 1567 was introduced by Representative Christopher 
Smith on March 24, 2015. The bill was referred the Committee on 
Foreign Affairs. On April 12, 2016, the House passed the bill 
under suspension of the rules by a vote of 370 yeas to 33 nays. 
On April 20, 2016, the Senate passed the legislation, as 
amended, by a voice vote. On July 20, 2016, the President 
signed the bill into law.
    This bill requires the President to coordinate the 
development and implementation of a comprehensive strategy to 
accomplish the objectives of promoting global food security, 
resilience, and nutrition consistent with national food 
security investment plans.
    The President must coordinate the efforts of relevant 
departments and agencies in implementing the Global Food 
Security Strategy by establishing monitoring and evaluation 
systems, coherence, and coordination across relevant 
departments and agencies; and platforms for regular 
consultation and collaboration with key stakeholders.
    By October 1, 2016, the President must submit the strategy 
to Congress, including a detailed description of how the United 
States intends to advance the objectives and agency-specific 
implementation plans.
    The bill authorizes the President to provide foreign 
assistance to implement the strategy and prevent or address 
food shortages. The President must ensure that assistance to 
implement the strategy is provided under established parameters 
for a system to monitor and evaluate the progress and impact of 
the strategy, including by providing specified reports to 
Congress and the public.
            H.R. 3049, Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug 
                    Administration, and Related Agencies Appropriations 
                    Act, 2016
    H.R. 3049 was introduced by Representative Robert Aderholt 
on July 14, 2015 and the Committee on Appropriations 
subsequently filed H. Rept. 114-205.
    The Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug 
Administration, and Related Agencies Subcommittee has 
jurisdiction over the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), 
except for the Forest Service, the Food and Drug Administration 
(FDA), the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), and the 
Farm Credit Administration (FCA). The Subcommittee's 
responsibility covers a vast and diverse group of agencies 
responsible for such things as promoting the production of a 
plentiful food supply; assisting farmers and ranchers across 
the country with sound production practices; improving the 
quality-of-life and vitality of communities in rural America; 
assisting indigent populations in the U.S. and abroad with 
basic nutritional needs; research and development in 
agriculture to improve productivity and stability; overseeing 
commodity markets that provide confidence for businesses, 
traders, investors, and the public; supporting a safe food 
supply; and safe and effective drugs and devices. The 
activities of these agencies impact every American every day of 
the year.
    The Fiscal Year 2016 discretionary spending in this bill 
totals $20,650,000,000, which is $175,000,000 below the Fiscal 
Year 2015 enacted level and $1,135,697,000 below the 
President's budget request for Fiscal Year 2016.
    The funding levels provided in this appropriations bill 
continue to demonstrate how seriously this Committee takes its 
responsibility to fund the highest priority programs and 
activities while helping to address the nation's debt, deficit, 
and economic challenges.
    The Committee does not include funding to begin new 
programs, terminates eight outdated programs, and, except where 
specifically noted, does not provide additional funding for pay 
increases. The Committee identified savings of almost $1 
billion at USDA, saves on leasing costs at the CFTC, and reins 
in regulatory overreach at the FDA.
    H.R. 3049 included a provision to allow producers to use 
commodity certificated in exchange for marketing loan gains and 
Loan Deficiency Payments which were subjected to the combined 
$125,000 payment limit in the Agricultural Act of 2014.
            H.R. 1735, National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal 
                    Year 2016
    H.R. 1735 was introduced by Representative Mac Thornberry 
on April 13, 2015. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Armed Services. This legislation contained provisions within 
the Committee on Agriculture's jurisdiction. The Committee on 
Agriculture was discharged from consideration of the 
legislation. On May 15, 2015, the House passed the bill by a 
vote of 268 yeas to 151 nays. On June 18, 2015, the Senate 
passed the bill by a vote of 71 yeas to 25 nays. The Conference 
Report passed the House on October 1, 2015 and subsequently 
passed the Senate on October 7, 2015. The bill was vetoed by 
the President on October 22, 2015.
    The bill would: (1) Authorize appropriations for Fiscal 
Year 2016 for procurement and for research, development, test, 
and evaluation (RDT&E;); (2) Authorize appropriations for Fiscal 
Year 2016 for operation and maintenance (O&M;) and for working 
capital funds; (3) Authorize for Fiscal Year 2016: (a) the 
personnel strength for each Active Duty component of the 
military departments; and (b) the personnel strength for the 
Selected Reserve for each Reserve Component of the Armed 
Forces; (4) Modify various elements of compensation for 
military personnel and impose certain requirements and 
limitations on personnel actions in the defense establishment; 
(5) Authorize appropriations for Fiscal Year 2016 for military 
construction and family housing; (6) Authorize appropriations 
for Overseas Contingency Operations; (7) Authorize 
appropriations for Fiscal Year 2016 for the Department of 
Energy national security programs; and (8) Authorize 
appropriations for Fiscal Year 2016 for the Maritime 
Administration.
    The legislation ended the military's nutritional assistance 
program for stateside service members. Those households will 
then exclusively apply for SNAP. Service members stationed 
abroad would retain their Family Supplemental Subsistence 
Allowance.
            H.R. 5054, Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug 
                    Administration, and Related Appropriations Act, 
                    2017
    H.R. 5054 was introduced by Representative Robert Aderholt 
on April 26, 2016. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Appropriations. The Committee on Appropriations subsequently 
filed H. Rept. 114-531.
    The Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug 
Administration, and Related Agencies Subcommittee has 
jurisdiction over the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), 
except for the Forest Service, the Food and Drug Administration 
(FDA), the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), and the 
Farm Credit Administration (FCA). The Subcommittee's 
responsibility covers a vast and diverse group of agencies 
responsible for such things as promoting the production of a 
plentiful food supply; assisting farmers and ranchers across 
the country with sound production practices; improving the 
quality-of-life and vitality of communities in rural America; 
assisting indigent populations in the U.S. and abroad with 
basic nutritional needs; research and development in 
agriculture to improve productivity and stability; overseeing 
commodity markets that provide confidence for businesses, 
traders, investors, and the public; supporting a safe food 
supply; and safe and effective drugs and medical devices. The 
activities of these agencies impact every American every day of 
the year.
    The Fiscal Year 2017 discretionary spending in this bill 
totals $21,299,000,000, which is $451,000,000 below the Fiscal 
Year 2016 enacted level and $281,000,000 below the President's 
budget request for Fiscal Year 2017.
    The funding levels provided in this appropriations bill 
continue to demonstrate how seriously this Committee takes its 
responsibility to fund the highest priority programs and 
activities while helping to address the nation's debt, deficit, 
and economic challenges.
    The Committee does not include funding to begin new 
programs and, except where specifically noted, does not provide 
additional funding for pay increases. The Committee identifies 
savings of almost $1,000,000,000 at USDA, provides relief for 
excessive leasing costs at the CFTC, and reins in regulatory 
overreach at the FDA, USDA, and CFTC.

                              d. oversight

    The Committee on Agriculture and its subcommittees were 
active in their oversight functions, holding a number of 
oversight hearings and activities during the 114th Congress. 
The hearings related to the application, administration, and 
effectiveness of laws that lie within the Committee's 
jurisdiction as well as the organization and operation of the 
Department of Agriculture and other federal agencies having 
responsibility for the administration of such laws. The 
hearings often result in recommendations for improvements in 
the administration of the laws, regulations and policies in 
effect in the Executive Branch as they relate to the 
Committee's jurisdiction. Information gathered at these 
hearings was useful in preparing legislation for consideration 
in the House of Representatives.
    As part of its hearings, the Committee and its 
subcommittees reviewed the way the particular federal agency or 
department (usually the Department of Agriculture) administered 
existing laws related to the subject matter of the legislation 
before, or to be considered by, the Committee. In some cases, 
legislation favorably reported to the House carries a 
termination date (a ``sunset'') to ensure that in the future 
Congress will again review the effectiveness and the methods 
with which the Executive Branch of Government has carried out 
the letter and the spirit of that statute.
    In keeping with the objective of the Oversight Plan, as 
submitted to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform 
and House Administration, and Rule XI, clause 2 of the House of 
Representatives, the Committee and its subcommittees conducted 
the following chronological oversight hearings during the 114th 
Congress (Note: To see a copy of the Oversight Plan as 
submitted, see ``I. Summary of Organization, Jurisdiction, and 
Oversight Plan of the Committee on Agriculture.''):

1. Oversight Hearings

    February 11, 2015: Hearing To Review the State of the Rural 
Economy. Full Committee. Serial No. 114-1.
    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the state of the 
rural economy. The sole witness, Secretary of Agriculture Tom 
Vilsack, discussed implementation of each of the 12 titles of 
the farm bill. Members of the Committee asked Secretary Vilsack 
questions regarding the President's FY 2016 USDA Budget 
Request, mandatory country-of-origin labeling, the West Coast 
ports labor dispute, the waters of the U.S. proposed rule, and 
forest management, among other issues.
    February 12, 2015: Hearing To Review the 2015 Agenda for 
the Commodity Futures Trading Commission. Full Committee. 
Serial No. 114-2.
    The purpose of this hearing was to review the 2015 agenda 
for the Commodity Futures Trading Commission. The sole witness, 
Chairman Timothy G. Massad, discussed and answered questions 
regarding the reauthorization of the CFTC.
    February 25, 2015: Past, Present, and Future of the 
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. Full Committee. 
Serial No. 114-3, Part 1.
    The purpose of the hearing was to launch the top-to-bottom 
review of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) 
by examining the past, present, and future of the program. This 
hearing begins the full-scale review of the SNAP program, so 
that as the Committee approaches reauthorization, the review 
will help prepare the Committee to make meaningful improvements 
to the program. This hearing provided Members of the Committee 
a brief history of the program, the current state of the 
program, and a potential vision for the future.
    February 26, 2015: SNAP Recipient Characteristics and 
Dynamics. Subcommittee on Nutrition. Serial No. 114-3, Part 1.
    The purpose of this hearing was to better understand the 
SNAP population through published research on the 
characteristics and dynamics of participants of the 
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). The hearing 
gave Members an opportunity to gain a better understanding of 
the SNAP population and various subpopulations. Members 
discussed with the witnesses various aspects of SNAP enrollment 
and re-certification, studies on duration of participation in 
the program, and circumstances in which a household would cycle 
on and off the program, known as ``churn.''
    March 17, 2015: Hearing To Review the Definition of Waters 
of the United States Proposed Rule and Its Impact on Rural 
America. Subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry. Serial No. 
114-4.
    The purpose of this hearing was to examine how the proposed 
waters of the United States rule will impact rural America. 
Members of the Subcommittee heard testimony from nine witnesses 
over two panels. The witnesses were a variety of stakeholders 
representing rural American interests. Subcommittee Members 
called for the proposed rule to be pulled and re-proposed after 
working with states and stakeholders; or, the rule should be 
reissued, with the changes the Administration has promised, for 
another round of public comment before finalizing the rule.
    March 18, 2015: The Importance of Trade to U.S. 
Agriculture. Full Committee. Serial No. 114-5.
    In light of ongoing Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and (T-
TTIP) negotiations, the purpose of this hearing was to gather 
input from industry representatives regarding the general 
benefits of trade to their individual sectors, as well as their 
views on the importance of Trade Promotion Authority (TPA). 
Throughout the hearing, Members and witnesses emphasized the 
importance of the U.S. working to expand market access while 
eliminating international barriers to trade--especially 
considering that 95 percent of the world's population resides 
outside of the United States. The witnesses made it clear that 
passing TPA is key to such an effort.
    March 24, 2015: Examination of the Costs and Impacts of 
Mandatory Biotechnology Labeling Laws. Full Committee. Serial 
No. 114-6.
    Members heard from witnesses regarding several current 
efforts to require labeling of foods containing products 
derived from biotechnology. These efforts are not driven by 
evidence that biotechnology is actually dangerous. Indeed, the 
science is quite clear: crop improvement by the modern 
molecular techniques of biotechnology is safe. Rather, these 
initiatives are driven by a variety of factors, ranging from 
the persistent perception that such foods are somehow 
``unnatural'' and potentially dangerous to the desire to gain 
competitive advantage by legislating attachment of a label 
meant to alarm. Another misconception used as a rationale for 
labeling is that biotech crops are untested. It is the long-
standing policy of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that 
special labeling of a food is required if the absence of the 
information provided poses a special health or environmental 
risk. The FDA does not require labeling of a food based on the 
specific genetic modification procedure used in the development 
of its input crops. Legally mandating such a label can only 
serve to mislead and falsely alarm consumers. Witnesses 
testified on the need for federal legislation to provide a 
consistent, uniform standard for labeling of non-bioengineered 
products and to codify the existing FDA policy concerning 
mandated labeling.
    March 24, 2015: Reauthorizing the CFTC: End-User Views. 
Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy, and Credit. Serial 
No. 114-7.
    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the impact of 
the Commodity Futures Trading Commission's (CFTC) actions on 
end-users--those businesses that provide our daily goods and 
services, and which rely on derivatives contracts to manage the 
risks of their operations. The panel of witnesses expressed 
concern with CFTC rulemakings that directly impact end-users by 
adding new regulatory burdens or reducing regulatory certainty; 
structural changes to the markets that do not reflect how end-
users traditionally interact with the markets; and regulatory 
burdens on financial intermediaries, who are the counterparties 
to end-users, or the financial agents of end-users.
    March 25, 2015: Reauthorizing the CFTC: Market Participant 
Views. Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy, and Credit. 
Serial No. 114-7.
    In advance of writing legislation to reauthorize the 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), the Subcommittee 
heard from a variety of market participants including 
representatives of the National Futures Association, the two 
largest derivatives exchanges, a futures commission merchant, 
and a swap execution facility. The witnesses described how end-
users rely on the providers of market infrastructure--
exchanges, the Self-Regulatory Organization (SROs), Futures 
Commission Merchants (FCMs), and Swap Execution Facilities 
(SEFs)--to provide organized, safe, and affordable markets to 
manage their risks in. Furthermore, they testified as to how, 
over the past several years, the CFTC and other regulators have 
implemented a complex web of new rulemakings that place 
additional regulations and burdens on financial intermediaries 
and exchanges that are ultimately making hedging more expensive 
for end-users.
    March 26, 2015: Implementing the Agricultural Act of 2014: 
Commodity Policy and Crop Insurance. Subcommittee on General 
Farm Commodities and Risk Management. Serial No. 114-9.
    The purpose of this hearing was to examine implementation 
of Titles I and XI of the Agricultural Act of 2014, which was 
signed into law February 7, 2014. With implementation nearing 
completion, much of Act has been implemented satisfactorily by 
USDA's Farm Service Agency (FSA) and Risk Management Agency 
(RMA). However, a small number of technical items have the 
potential to produce many unintended consequences if they are 
not implemented as Congress intended. Subcommittee Members 
heard implementation updates from the two witnesses--the RMA 
Administrator and the FSA Administrator. Subcommittee Members 
inquired about different outstanding implementation issues, 
including assignment of yields on generic base acres; use of 
cover crops on generic base acres; administrative FSA counties; 
and among other issues.
    April 14, 2015: A Presentation by National 4-H Conference 
Participants Concerning the Future of Agriculture in the United 
States. Subcommittee on Biotechnology, Horticulture, and 
Research. Serial No. 114-10.
    This hearing was the first in a series of hearings that 
will highlight programs and activities which support the 
potential growth of a rural/urban coalition. While the 
Committee has always sought to promote policies that ensure 
access to safe and affordable food, there has been a steady 
escalation in the number of organizations and individuals 
questioning the continuing need for these policies. Through 
these hearings, the Committee intends to continue in its 
historical role as an advocate for production agriculture 
interests while likewise improving transparency relating to 
these productions systems so as to understand and effectively 
address concerns stemming from urban and suburban communities. 
Members heard from 17 participants in the National 4-H 
Conference about the importance of a rural/urban coalition in 
agriculture, the challenges of food and fiber production as it 
relates to the future of agriculture, and how to best enhance 
global food security.
    April 14, 2015: Reauthorizing the CFTC: Commissioners' 
Perspectives. Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy and 
Credit. Serial No. 114-7.
    The purpose of this hearing was to give subcommittee 
Members the opportunity to see what has improved at the 
Commission with the arrival of Chairman Massad and what 
processes continue to be cause for concern. The hearing also 
gave the three Commissioners at the CFTC an opportunity to 
share their views regarding current rulemakings; issues they 
believe warrant the Committee's attention; and most 
importantly, what subcommittee Members should prioritize as 
they work to reauthorize the CFTC.
    April 15, 2015: Past, Present and Future of SNAP: The World 
of Nutrition and the Role of the Charitable Sector. Full 
Committee. Serial No. 114-3, Part 1.
    This hearing is a continuation of the full-scale review, of 
the SNAP program the Agriculture Committee is conducting titled 
The Past, Present, and Future of SNAP. This hearing provided 
Members of the Committee a big picture view of the world of 
nutrition to understand that the government is not alone in 
providing nutrition assistance. Many charitable organizations 
and non-governmental entities play a critical role in helping 
families overcome poverty. Our witnesses from the charitable 
sector discussed the collaboration that must exist between the 
private-sector and the government to best fight hunger and 
poverty.
    April 29, 2015: Hearing To Review the National Forest 
System and Active Forest Management. Subcommittee on 
Conservation and Forestry. Hearing Serial No. 114-13.
    The purpose of this hearing was to review the management of 
the National Forest System and conduct oversight over 
implementation of the forestry provisions in the Agricultural 
Act of 2014. Members heard testimony from U.S. Forest Service 
Chief Thomas L. Tidwell, as well as stakeholders representing 
forestry, sportsmen and conservation industries. Several topics 
were discussed during questioning, including wildfire 
prevention and suppression funding; timelines for implementing 
the final farm bill provisions; the Endangered Species Act 
recent listings and the impacts on forests; challenges for the 
U.S. Forest Service; and others.
    May 13, 2015: Hearing To Review the Federal Coordination 
and Response Regarding Pollinator Health. Subcommittee on 
Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research. Hearing Serial No. 
114-14.
    On June 20, 2014, the White House issued a Presidential 
Memorandum (PM) directing federal agencies to coordinate in 
developing a national strategy with the Secretary of 
Agriculture and Administrator of the Environmental Protection 
Agency appointed as co-chairmen. Their report was due December 
20, 2014. Unfortunately, while the PM directed coordination 
between and among agencies, EPA and other agencies of the 
Department of Interior began moving forward with a political 
agenda regarding neonicotinoid pesticides without either 
coordination with USDA or scientific justification for their 
actions. This hearing focused on activities of EPA and USDA in 
regards to coordination on the regulation of pesticides and 
other components of the overall strategy for promoting 
pollinator health. Subsequent to the hearing, the national 
strategy document was released for public review. The 
Subcommittee will engage stakeholders during this review with 
the goal of ensuring the strategy represents a workable 
framework for promotion of pollinator health.
    May 20, 2015: Past, Present and Future of SNAP: The World 
of Nutrition, Government Duplication and Unmet Needs. 
Subcommittee on Nutrition. Serial No. 114-3, Part 1.
    This hearing provided Members of the Committee a big 
picture view of the world of government nutrition. It is 
important for Members to understand that SNAP, while it is the 
largest, is not the only government program providing nutrition 
assistance and fighting poverty. There are at least 17 other 
federally funded nutrition programs helping families overcome 
poverty, which together account for more than $100 billion 
every year in domestic food assistance. Members heard from 
witnesses suggestions on how to improve coordination among 
various agencies and programs to reduce duplication and better 
target unmet needs.
    June 2, 2015: Update on the Financial Health of Farm 
Country. Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk 
Management. Serial No. 114-15.
    The purpose of this hearing was to receive an update on the 
financial health of farm country. Members heard testimony from 
a representative of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City 
presenting a macro view of the status of the farm economy, as 
well as producers from across the country who presented micro 
views of the financial conditions they were facing. Several 
witnesses noted the importance of farm bill programs to their 
farming operations, as well as the impact that international 
trade has on U.S. production agriculture. Members were 
specifically interested in how the current situation compares 
with the farm crisis of the 1980s; how different regions of the 
country have responded to the drop in commodity prices; the 
role that crop insurance plays in the producers' operations; 
and how international trade impacts agriculture.
    June 3, 2015: Review of Agricultural Subsidies in Foreign 
Countries. Full Committee. Hearing Serial No. 114-16.
    The purpose of this hearing was to review agricultural 
subsidies in foreign countries. Members heard testimony from 
Darren Hudson, Ph.D., a professor at Texas Tech University who 
compiles and maintains a database of 21 countries' domestic 
agricultural subsidies, as well as Craig A. Thorn, a consultant 
whose firm recently authored a report entitled, Agricultural 
Subsidies in Key Developing Countries. Both witnesses described 
how developing countries' agricultural subsidies and support 
have increased dramatically in recent years and how subsidies 
can be market- and production-distorting regardless of a 
county's developed or developing status. There was discussion 
on how this fits into the Doha Round of World Trade 
Organization (WTO) negotiations; problems with WTO 
notifications including: discrepancies, misleading Aggregate 
Measure of Support (AMS) calculations, and delinquent 
notifications; and different paths forward to bring countries 
with market- and production-distorting subsidies into 
compliance.
    June 10, 2015: Past, Present and Future of SNAP: The Means 
to Climbing the Economic Ladder. Full Committee. Serial No. 
114-3, Part 1.
    This hearing continued upon the Agriculture Committee's 
review of the Past, Present and Future of SNAP. The focus of 
this hearing was for Members to better understand the ways 
individuals move out of poverty and into employment and higher 
earning jobs. For most individuals, getting an entry-level job 
is easier than maintaining that job, or improving toward higher 
paying jobs that can actually support their families. We heard 
from witnesses who work directly with low-income or unemployed 
clients about the innovative methods they utilize for helping 
their clients move out of poverty and up the economic ladder. 
One witness described his organization's three week attitudinal 
job prep class for clients with limited work experience. 
Another witness described conducting comprehensive assessments 
of clients with medical or mental health barriers to determine 
what capabilities they do have so they could be match with 
appropriate work. The panel was consistent that these shorter-
term efforts must be accompanied by long-term case management 
in order for individuals to achieve overall success.
    June 11, 2015: Implementing the Agricultural Act of 2014: 
Conservation Programs. Subcommittee on Conservation and 
Forestry. Serial No. 114-17.
    The purpose of this hearing was to review the 
implementation of the conservation programs in the Agricultural 
Act of 2014. Members heard testimony from Natural Resources 
Conservation Service Chief Jason Weller and Farm Service Agency 
Administrator Val Dolcini. The second panel comprised 
stakeholders representing conservation districts, commodity 
organizations, farmland trusts, and sportsmen groups. Members 
were especially concerned with the implementation of the 
linkage of conservation to crop insurance premium subsidies, 
and the requirement of an AD-1026 form to be filed by June 1, 
2015. Other topics of discussion were implementation of new 
Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) provisions and the new 
Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP).
    June 24, 2015: Hearing To Review U.S. International Food 
Aid Programs. Full Committee. Serial No. 114-18.
    The purpose of this hearing was to begin a review of 
current international food aid programs implemented by the U.S. 
Agency for International Development (USAID) and USDA. The 
hearing was the first in a series of hearings that the 
Committee will hold over the coming years in preparation for 
food aid discussions that will occur as part of the next farm 
bill. The witnesses gave an overview of current programs and 
discussed the advantages and disadvantages of the manner in 
which they are currently operated. Members made clear their 
concerns that food aid reforms being developed by USAID--
principally a continued shift to less in-kind donations in 
exchange for additional cash-based assistance--are not being 
considered in an open and transparent manner, and as result, 
the agricultural industry--one of the central partners in the 
60 year history of U.S. international food aid--is being 
excluded from the discussion. Members also made clear that the 
effects of the reforms made in the 2014 Farm Bill should be 
closely monitored before making additional reforms, and that 
the next farm bill is the appropriate legislative vehicle for 
future reforms.
    June 25, 2015: Past, Present and Future of SNAP: How Our 
Welfare System Can Discourage Work. Joint hearing of the 
Subcommittee on Nutrition and the Subcommittee on Human 
Resources of the Committee on Ways and Means. Serial No. 114-3, 
Part 2.
    This hearing is a continuation of the full-scale review, of 
the SNAP program the Agriculture Committee is conducting known 
as the Past, Present, and Future of SNAP. As we have heard 
through our review, sometimes higher earnings do not 
necessarily translate to higher total income. Low-income 
families often receive many types of welfare and tax benefits, 
such as assistance with food, housing, and day care costs; help 
with medical costs; or tax refunds to supplement earnings from 
work. While the goal of these programs is often to support and 
encourage employment, benefit ``phase-out rules''--especially 
when combined across multiple programs--mean that they may do 
just the opposite. This hearing provided information on how 
these program interactions discourage work and possible 
solutions to address the problem to ensure that work always 
pays.
    June 25, 2015: Hearing To Review USDA Marketing Programs. 
Subcommittee on Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research. 
Serial No. 114-19.
    The purpose of this subcommittee hearing was to review the 
programs of AMS to gain insight into how a national standard 
for genetic engineering marketing claims might work. The 
Quality Assessment Division's (QAD) Audit Services Branch (ASB) 
within the Agricultural Marketing Service, Livestock, Poultry, 
and Seed Program, provides a family of user-fee-funded, audit 
based third-party verification programs and services to the 
agricultural industry under its Quality Systems Verification 
Programs (QSVP). The QSVP are designed to provide suppliers the 
opportunity to assure customers of their ability to provide 
consistent quality products or services. Under a QSVP, a 
supplier's documented quality management system is verified 
through independent third-party audits conducted by qualified 
QAD staff. During an audit, a client's documented quality 
management system is verified to assure customer requirements 
and marketing points are being adhered to. In order to ensure 
consistent auditing practices and promote international 
recognition of audit results, ASB auditors utilize the 
International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 19011:2011 
guidelines for quality management systems auditing. Within the 
umbrella of QSVP, there are three primary audit programs: 
Process Verified Program, Quality System Assessment Program, 
and the Accreditation Program.
    July 8, 2015: Energy and the Rural Economy: The Economic 
Impact of Exporting Crude Oil. Full Committee. Serial No. 114-
20.
    The purpose of this hearing was to explore the economic 
impacts of lifting the export restrictions on crude oil on the 
rural economy. Members of the Committee heard testimony from 
several witnesses, including industry professionals, a state 
regulator, and a director with the Government Accountability 
Office (GAO). Members were specifically interested in how 
lifting the export restrictions would impact rural communities 
and their constituents. Witnesses responded that relaxing the 
restrictions would likely be beneficial to rural areas--
creating jobs and lowering the price of fuel for consumers.
    July 9, 2015: U.S. International Food Aid Programs: 
Oversight and Accountability. Subcommittee on Livestock and 
Foreign Agriculture. Serial No. 114-21.
    This hearing was the second in a series to review current 
international food aid programs implemented by USAID and USDA. 
Witnesses from the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) 
and the USDA and USAID Offices of the Inspector General 
testified about their work to monitor the implementation of 
various food aid projects. The Members and witnesses made clear 
that efforts have only just begun to evaluate the issues that 
come with shifting to cash-based assistance, and much more 
attention to the matter is needed in order to strike the proper 
balance of in-kind and cash-based assistance made available 
through the next farm bill.
    July 15, 2015: Recognizing the Continuing Contributions of 
the 1890s Land-Grant Universities on the 125th Anniversary of 
the Passage of the Second Morrill Act. Full Committee. Serial 
No. 114-22.
    The purpose of the hearing was to recognize the continuing 
contributions of the 1890 land-grant universities on the 125th 
Anniversary of the passage of the Second Morrill Act. The 
purpose of the land-grant colleges was: `without excluding 
other scientific and classical studies and including military 
tactic, to teach such branches of learning as are related to 
agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such manner as the 
legislatures of the states may respectively prescribe, in order 
to promote the liberal and practical education of the 
industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions in 
life.' As a network of historically black colleges and 
universities dedicated to providing educational opportunity for 
all through innovative scientific research and community-minded 
extension programs, the 1890 land-grant universities are 
providing relevant and distinctive teaching programs for a 
broad spectrum of students, but particularly for first 
generation college students and those who have limited 
opportunities; addressing health disparities and obesity 
prevention; enhancing capacity, marketability, profitability, 
sustainability and diversity in agricultural enterprises for 
small and limited resource operations; engaging young people 
through leadership development and 4-H and in programs and 
activities that enhance their understanding and interest in 
STEM education and careers; developing and expanding national 
and international access to sufficient, safe and nutritious 
food; enhancing the resilience of families, individuals and 
communities for upward social and economic mobility; engaging 
individuals and communities in environmental stewardship; and 
conducting cutting-edge research to generate new knowledge and 
solutions to global challenges.
    July 15, 2015: Past, Present and Future of SNAP: Developing 
and Using Evidence-Based Solutions. Subcommittee on Nutrition. 
Serial No. 114-3, Part 3.
    This hearing is a continuation of the full-scale review, of 
the SNAP program the Agriculture Committee is conducting known 
as the Past, Present, and Future of SNAP. Evidence-based 
solutions are determined through program evaluation. It is a 
robust approach to collecting, analyzing, interpreting, and 
communicating information about the effectiveness of social 
programs or intervention, which are the variations or 
additional services within the program, for the purpose of 
improving social conditions. Social science research methods 
have improved greatly reducing the cost, and increasing the 
timeliness and usability of more sophisticated results that can 
specifically isolate the positive and negative impacts of 
interventions. Yet, these advancements have yet to catch on in 
SNAP. By knowing what works and what doesn't, limited program 
resources can be better targeted to those interventions that 
have the greatest impact to ultimately improve the program.
    July 22, 2015: Oversight of the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture. Full Committee. Serial No. 114-23.
    The purpose of this hearing was to conduct oversight over 
operations at USDA. The sole witness was Secretary of 
Agriculture Thomas ``Tom'' J. Vilsack, and he responded to 
questions from Members of the Committee on a variety of 
subjects, including the slow-moving Modernize and Innovate the 
Delivery of Agricultural Systems (MIDAS) program; questionable 
practices in the StrikeForce Pilot Program; problems with the 
Acreage and Crop Reporting Streamlining Initiative (ACRSI); 
program integrity within the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance 
Program (SNAP); and others.
    July 29, 2015: Dodd-Frank Turns Five: Assessing the 
Progress of Global Derivatives Reforms. Full Committee. Serial 
No. 114-24.
    The purpose of this hearing was to assess how the Dodd-
Frank Act has and has not helped to achieve the goals developed 
at the G20 summit in response to the 2008 financial crisis to 
make derivatives markets safer. Members and witnesses voiced 
concern that a lack of global coordination and harmonization is 
jeopardizing the implementation of the promised and widely 
supported reforms in areas of clearing, margining, electronic 
execution, data reporting, and capital standards.
    July 30, 2015: Examination of Federal and State Response to 
Avian Influenza. Subcommittee on Livestock and Foreign 
Agriculture. Serial No. 114-25.
    The purpose of this hearing was to discuss lessons learned 
from USDA and the states' response to the recent outbreak of 
highly pathogenic avian influenza and how those lessons will be 
applied if and when there is another outbreak this fall when 
temperatures begin to drop. Members and witnesses discussed the 
process of depopulating infected flocks, issues with disposal 
of the resulting waste, the indemnification process, 
biosecurity challenges, progress on the development of a 
vaccine, and trade implications.
    September 15, 2015: Hearing To Review USDA Organization and 
Program Administration--Part 1. Full Committee. Serial No. 114-
26.
    This was the first of two educational hearings to provide 
Members of the Committee with more information about USDA. The 
three USDA mission areas focused on during this hearing were: 
Farm and Foreign Agricultural Services (FFAS); Natural 
Resources and Environment (NRE); and Research, Education, and 
Economics (REE). Each mission area's Under Secretary and agency 
Administrators gave testimony and answered questions from 
Members.
    September 16, 2015: Hearing To Review USDA Organization and 
Program Administration--Part 2. Full Committee. Serial No. 114-
26.
    This was the second of two educational hearings to provide 
Members of the Committee with more information about the USDA. 
The three USDA mission areas focused on during this hearing 
were: Rural Development (RD); Marketing and Regulatory Programs 
(MRP); Food Safety (FS); and Food, Nutrition and Consumer 
Services (FNCS). Each mission area's Under Secretary and agency 
Administrators gave testimony and answered questions from 
Members.
    September 29, 2015: Hearing To Highlight Research 
Innovations Achieved by Our Nation's Agricultural Colleges and 
Universities. Subcommittee on Biotechnology, Horticulture, and 
Research. Serial No. 114-27.
    Members heard about innovative agricultural research being 
done at our nation's agricultural colleges and universities, in 
which many projects are funded through federal research 
programs. Witnesses discussed the policy challenges facing the 
research community, such as extension and outreach, mechanisms 
to leverage federal resources, cooperation between the various 
institutions, and other issues of importance to the community.
    September 30, 2015: U.S. International Food Aid Programs: 
Stakeholder Perspectives. Full Committee. Serial No. 114-28.
    The purpose of this hearing was to continue the Committee's 
review of U.S. international food aid programs by giving 
private voluntary organizations, commodity groups, and 
agricultural suppliers an opportunity to share their 
experiences regarding the strengths and potential weaknesses of 
the current slate of programs administered by USDA and USAID. 
The hearing helped Members develop a better understanding of 
the implementing partners' respective roles in the overall 
scheme of international food aid, and the witness' input will 
serve as a valuable guide for future farm bill negotiations 
through which the Committee will strive to strike the 
appropriate balance between in-kind and cash-based assistance.
    October 7, 2015: Hearing To Review the development of the 
2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Full Committee. Serial 
No. 114-29.
    This hearing allowed Members to register their concerns 
about the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans process with 
both Secretary Vilsack and Secretary Burwell as the two 
Departments prepare to release the Guidelines in December 2015. 
The Committee has no intention to legislate specific 
recommendations or guidelines, however Committee Members were 
clear in their demand that the Guidelines be based on sound, 
consistent, and irrefutable science, as inaccurate and 
conflicting dietary guidance messages are detrimental to 
consumer understanding of nutrition and their ability to 
implement healthy diets. Both Secretary Vilsack and Secretary 
Burwell indicated that the Dietary Guidelines Advisory 
Committee was advisory in nature and expected the final 2015 
Guidelines to be similar to 2010. The Secretaries also 
committed to not venturing into areas of sustainability and tax 
policy when writing the final Guidelines.
    October 8, 2015: Hearing To Review the 2015 Fire Season and 
Long-Term Trends. Committee on Conservation and Forestry. 
Serial No. 114-30.
    The purpose of this hearing was to review the 2015 fire 
season and the long-term trends of forest fires in our nation, 
especially in our National Forests. The 2015 fire season was 
catastrophic over much of the West, and there are several 
reasons why--including lack of active forest management, a 
strained Forest Service budget, burdensome environmental 
processes, and drought, to name a few. Members heard testimony 
from Forest Service Chief Tidwell on the first panel, and 
stakeholders affected by wildfire comprised the second panel. 
Their testimonies included different solutions to alleviate 
this growing problem. The solutions included: increasing the 
market for wood products; fixing the fire funding problem; 
incentivizing collaborations with stakeholders; reducing 
frivolous litigation; and leveraging resources, among others.
    October 21, 2015: Foreign Subsidies: Jeopardizing Free 
Trade and Harming American Farmers. Full Committee. Serial No. 
114-31.
    This hearing provided additional information on how foreign 
governments are unfairly using subsidies, tariffs, and 
nontariff barriers to spur domestic production. At a previous 
House Agriculture Committee hearing, witnesses noted that as 
the U.S. further reformed domestic support programs, other 
countries were introducing and otherwise increasing subsidy 
regimes, which in most cases violated their WTO commitments. 
This has resulted in drastic over-production that is depressing 
world prices and U.S. farm income. The witnesses for this 
hearing consisted of representatives from different commodity 
organizations as well as a university professor. They 
highlighted the injury being done to U.S. farmers and ranchers 
and reaffirmed the need for sound U.S. farm policy.
    October 27, 2015: Past, Present and Future of SNAP: 
Breaking the Cycle. Subcommittee on Nutrition. Serial No. 114-
3, Part 3.
    This hearing explored the impact that poverty has on 
children and what factors can help to improve the likelihood of 
success as an adult. Parents want their children to have a 
better chance at succeeding than they did--it's the definition 
of economic mobility and the American Dream. This can be a 
tough goal to attain if the child grows up in a stressful and 
unstable environment. Like prior hearings, the importance of a 
holistic approach to addressing poverty is required in order to 
help children to break the cycle. Testimony was presented by 
policy experts and an individual who has first-hand experience 
breaking the cycle of poverty.
    October 28, 2015: Big Data and Agriculture: Innovation and 
Implications. Serial No. 114-32.
    This hearing was the first in the series examining Big Data 
and Agriculture. This hearing introduced Members to the concept 
of big data and its interaction in agriculture. The witness 
panel was a variety of stakeholders including farmers, 
equipment manufacturers, and a university professor. Members 
heard about opportunities that big data presents to the 
agricultural community as well as the challenges and work being 
done to address them. Members were specifically interested in 
data ownership and security, and ways in which Congress could 
be helpful and not hinder progress being made in the big data 
realm.
    November 4, 2015: American Agriculture and Our National 
Security. Full Committee. Serial No. 114-33.
    The Committee recognizes the challenges faced by American 
agriculture and the need to build a stronger coalition among 
rural and urban interests that not only support agriculture 
policy, but also understand the role U.S. agriculture plays in 
maintaining a strong U.S. economy and stability around the 
world. With fewer and fewer Americans connected to production 
agriculture, many in Congress fail to recognize the importance 
of sound farm policy to our national security. Members spoke 
with witnesses about the importance of maintaining a secure 
food supply for both domestic and global security and 
stability.
    November 17, 2015: U.S. International Food Aid Programs: 
Transportation Perspectives. Joint hearing of the Subcommittee 
on Livestock and Foreign Agriculture of the Committee on 
Agriculture and the Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime 
Transportation of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure. Serial No. 114-34.
    The purpose of this hearing was to continue the Agriculture 
Committee's review of U.S. international food aid programs. The 
hearing provided an opportunity to hear from the maritime 
industry about its longtime role in the transportation of food 
aid and how proposed changes to existing food aid programs and 
cargo preference rules would affect that historic partnership. 
While the agriculture and maritime communities have worked 
hand-in-hand to deliver food to hungry people around the world 
for the past 60 years, the vast majority of government-impelled 
cargo is military hardware. Now with the volume of military 
cargo declining, the availability of other government-impelled 
cargoes has assumed greater significance in sustaining a viable 
U.S. merchant marine. The hearing explored the intersection 
between food aid shipping and sealift capacity, particularly 
that provided by the Maritime Security Program (MSP).
    November 18, 2015: Past, Present and Future of SNAP: The 
National Commission on Hunger. Serial No. 114-3, Part 3.
    This hearing featured the Co-Chairs of the National 
Commission on Hunger who shared their efforts over the last 
year traveling the country to see and listen to those closest 
to the issue to better understand the challenges, as well as 
learn about the successes. The Commission's final report had 
been expected prior to the hearing, but instead will be 
released sometime before the end of 2015. The hearing and 
testimony focused on their year-long process, general themes, 
and a limited number of recommendations, including addressing 
the veteran population, utilizing evidence-based strategies, 
and collaboration across the public and private sector.
    December 2, 2015: Hearing To Review the Farm Credit System. 
Full Committee. Serial No. 114-35.
    The primary purpose of this hearing was to highlight the 
Farm Credit System (FCS) and its century-long mission of 
providing credit to agriculture and rural America, as well as 
the role of the Farm Credit Administration (FCA) in ensuring 
the soundness of the Farm Credit System and its lending 
practices. This hearing was especially timely as producers 
across the nation face dwindling crop prices and land values. 
In particular, the hearing provided a platform for Members to 
explore how the FCA is working to ensure that the System banks 
are staying within the bounds of their statutory mandate, 
especially as it pertains to telecommunications loans and 
``similar entity lending''.
    December 9, 2015: Commodity in Focus: Stress in Cotton 
Country. Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk 
Management. Serial No. 114-36.
    This hearing examined the current state of the cotton 
industry. With cotton prices hovering below the average cost of 
production, cotton producers and communities that depend on 
cotton to drive the local economy face very hard times ahead. 
The U.S. cotton industry is at an important crossroads. 
Although U.S. cotton producers are willing and able to 
efficiently produce a quality cotton crop, the markets in which 
they operate are being severely distorted by unfair subsidies 
and other policies of foreign governments. Witnesses included 
cotton producers as well as an agricultural lender. Members 
were especially interested in the National Cotton Council's 
(NCC) proposal encouraging Secretary Vilsack to use his 
authority included in the 2014 Farm Bill to list cottonseed as 
an ``other oilseed'' and thus be eligible for ARC and PLC.
    December 9, 2015: Oversight of USDA's Use of Census of 
Agriculture Authority To Acquire Farmers' Personal Financial 
Information. Subcommittee on Biotechnology, Horticulture, and 
Research. Serial No. 114-37.
    In January 2015, the Committee, both Majority and Minority, 
were contacted by farmers and ranchers concerned that the 
USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) 
improperly used the Census of Agriculture authority to conduct 
a survey entitled Tenure, Ownership, and Transition of 
Agricultural Land (TOTAL). By invoking the Census authority, 
NASS rendered the TOTAL survey compulsory. The Committee began 
oversight in February 2015 by requesting briefings by NASS 
officials and has since reviewed approximately 49,000 documents 
sent by USDA. Over the course of the Committee's oversight of 
the TOTAL survey, it became clear that certain anomalies 
occurred during the planning and approval phase of the survey. 
Members heard from the Administrator of NASS and raised 
concerns and questions about the political motivations for the 
compulsory nature of the TOTAL survey.
    January 12, 2016: Past, Present and Future of SNAP: 
Addressing Special Populations. Subcommittee on Nutrition. 
Serial No. 114-3, Part 4.
    This hearing explored the challenges and barriers faced by 
low-income seniors, veterans, and active-duty military. These 
demographics are more vulnerable to disabilities, metabolic 
illnesses, and mental impairments that impede their ability to 
be fully independent. As said in prior hearings, the importance 
of a holistic approach to addressing poverty is required in 
order to best serve the needs of these special populations. 
Testimony was presented by advocacy organizations, policy 
experts, and an individual who has first-hand experience 
dealing with hunger in a low-income military family.
    February 2, 2016: Opportunities and Challenges in Direct 
Marketing--A View from the Field. Subcommittee on 
Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research Hearing. Serial No. 
114-38.
    This hearing discussed the challenges and opportunities 
farmers and ranchers face in direct marketing ventures 
including farmers' markets, Community Supported Agriculture 
(CSA), restaurants and more. While much of the hearing focused 
on the economic factors that drive participation in direct 
marketing ventures, the subcommittee also looked at how 
marketing agricultural products directly to consumers can 
bridge the disconnect between the farmers and consumers.
    February 3, 2016: Hearing To Review Incentive Programs 
Aimed At Increasing Low-Income Families' Purchasing Power for 
Fruits and Vegetables. Subcommittee on Nutrition. Serial No. 
114-39.
    This hearing provided Members of the Committee a greater 
understanding of healthy food incentive programs. The 2014 Farm 
Bill authorized $100 million for the Food Insecurity Nutrition 
Incentive (FINI) Grant Program, which supports projects to 
increase the purchase of fruits and vegetables among low-income 
consumers participating in SNAP by providing incentives at the 
point of purchase. Members learned how incentives are 
increasing the consumption of healthier foods; explored the 
challenges and opportunities in incentives moving forward; and 
learned about opportunities for the local agriculture 
economies. Testimony was presented by recipient organizations 
of the FINI grant, a healthcare professional, and a SNAP 
recipient.
    February 10, 2016: Hearing To Review the 2016 Agenda for 
the Commodity Futures Trading Commission. Full Committee. 
Serial No. 114-40.
    The purpose of this hearing was to hear from Chairman 
Massad regarding the Commission's priorities for the coming 
year. Much of the discussion centered around Members' concerns 
regarding the CFTC's failure to properly account for multi-year 
leases in agency financial statements, potentially in violation 
of the Antideficieny Act. Chairman Massad also responded to 
questions regarding a variety of issues and rulemakings 
including the CFTC's underutilized office space, the 
implication of Regulation Automated Trading, position limits, 
utilization of swap data, and the recent announcement of a path 
forward with the EU on clearinghouse equivalence.
    February 11, 2016: Hearing To Consider the Impacts of the 
Environmental Protection Agency's Actions on the Rural Economy. 
Full Committee. Serial No. 114-41.
    This hearing examined how actions by the Environmental 
Protection Agency (EPA) impact rural America. The sole witness 
for this hearing was EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy. A major 
topic of concern for Members of the Committee was the final 
rule that redefined waters of the U.S. (WOTUS) under the Clean 
Water Act. Many questions pertained to a Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) report, which found that EPA 
violated federal law by engaging in covert propaganda and 
grassroots lobbying in the Agency's promotion of the WOTUS 
rule. Another interest of Committee Members was the different 
actions EPA have taken on pesticide registrations, including 
asking a court to vacate a registration. Other topics of 
interest included: the Clean Power Plan; Renewable Fuel 
Standard; Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) 
regulation; Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure 
(SPCC) regulation; pollinators; and others.
    February 11, 2016: Foot-and-Mouth Disease: Are We Prepared? 
Subcommittee on Livestock and Foreign Agriculture. Serial No. 
114-42.
    The purpose of this hearing was to develop a better 
understanding of the United States' ability to respond to a 
potential outbreak of Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) and the 
impact that such an outbreak would have on the livestock 
industry and the economy as a whole. Representatives of the 
livestock and animal pharmaceutical industries discussed 
vaccine availability, vaccine stockpiling procedures, and 
emergency preparedness plans. A major topic of discussion was 
the potential for a public-private partnership to fund vaccine 
stockpiling efforts.
    February 24, 2016: Hearing To Review the State of the Rural 
Economy. Full Committee. Serial No. 114-43.
    This hearing examined the current state of the rural 
economy. The sole witness was Secretary of Agriculture, Tom 
Vilsack. Net farm income for 2016 is projected to be down 56 
percent from three years ago, which is the largest three year 
percentage drop since the Great Depression. Farmers are 
challenged with high and rising foreign subsidies, tariffs and 
non-tariff barriers to trade, coupled with a stronger dollar, 
which makes U.S. exports less attractive. A major topic of 
concern among Members of the Committee was the growing crisis 
in the cotton industry, and USDA's assertion that the 
Department lacks authority to designate cottonseed as an 
``other oilseed'' for purposes of ARC and PLC. Other topics 
were mainly topics of interest to Members' home districts, and 
these included wildfire and the budget for wildfire 
suppression; the Dairy Margin Protection Program; Highly 
Pathogenic Avian Influenza; biotech labeling; renewable fuels; 
and conservation programs.
    February 25, 2016: Hearing To Review the G20 Swap Data 
Reporting Goals. Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy, 
and Credit. Serial No. 114-44.
    The broad purpose of this hearing was to examine the 
efforts of the CFTC to achieve transparency in the swaps 
markets following the financial crisis. Members expressed 
concern with the CFTC's failure to create an effective swap 
data reporting regime and questioned the CFTC's ability to 
fully surveil its markets as mandated by Dodd-Frank. There was 
also a general concern that a lack of reporting harmonization 
and the potential for regulators to demand more information 
than needed could pose needless costs on market participants, 
especially end-users.
    March 1, 2016: Voluntary Conservation: Utilizing Innovation 
and Technology. Subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry. 
Serial No. 114-45.
    This hearing highlighted the unique and innovative 
conservation practices farmers and ranchers are voluntarily 
utilizing to conserve and protect natural resources, while also 
maintaining profitable production on their land. Members of the 
subcommittee heard from Natural Resources Conservation Service 
(NRCS) Chief Jason Weller on the first panel, while 
stakeholders composed the second panel. Chief Weller discussed 
the next level in science, tools and partnerships to increase 
conservation benefits. The producers and stakeholders on the 
second panel spoke to the varying natural resource concerns 
they are facing and the different voluntary, incentive-based 
programs, as well as new technology and methods, they are 
utilizing to protect and restore water quantity and quality, 
air quality, and wildlife habitat.
    March 2, 2016: Past, Present and Future of SNAP: Examining 
State Options. Subcommittee on Nutrition. Serial No. 114-3, 
Part 4.
    This hearing specifically looked into the various 
flexibilities states have when implementing SNAP. Understanding 
what options states have within this program allow for a more 
holistic understanding of the program and how to best leverage 
the relationship between states and local communities to better 
serve recipients and utilize taxpayer dollars. The hearing and 
testimony highlighted how states are using Federal funds to 
implement SNAP including Broad Based Categorical Eligibility, 
work requirements, and program integrity measures. Testimony 
was presented by a state representative and researchers 
focusing on state implementation.
    March 15, 2016: Defending American Agriculture Against 
Foreign Pests and Diseases. Joint Hearing of the Subcommittee 
on Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research and the 
Subcommittee on Livestock and Foreign Agriculture. Serial No. 
114-46.
    This hearing continued the Agriculture Committee's national 
security series, highlighting the importance of agriculture and 
sound agricultural policies in preserving our nation. This 
hearing examined the considerable work and collaborative 
efforts of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 
Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and the 
Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) Customs and Border 
Protection (CBP) Agriculture Program in protecting U.S. 
agriculture and safeguarding animal and plant health. Members 
and witnesses focused on plant and animal health risks and how 
they are mitigated by our current biosecurity systems.
    March 17, 2016: Hearing To Examine USDA Organization and 
Program Administration--Part 1. Full Committee. Serial No. 114-
47.
    This was the first of two educational hearings to provide 
Members of the Committee with more information about USDA and 
the agencies comprising the Department. The three USDA mission 
areas focused on during this hearing were: Food, Nutrition and 
Consumer Sciences (FNCS); Food Safety (FS); and Rural 
Development (RD). Each mission area's Under Secretary and 
agency Administrators gave testimony and answered questions 
from Members.
    March 18, 2016: Hearing To Examine USDA Organization and 
Program Administration--Part 2. Full Committee. Serial No. 114-
47.
    This was the second of two educational hearings to provide 
Members of the Committee with more information about USDA and 
the agencies comprising the Department. The four USDA mission 
areas focused on during this hearing were: Natural Resources 
and Environment (NRE); Farm and Foreign Agricultural Services 
(FFAS); Research, Education, and Economics (REE); and Marketing 
and Regulatory Programs (MRP). Each mission area's Under 
Secretary and agency Administrators gave testimony and answered 
questions from Members
    April 13, 2016: Energy and the Rural Economy: The Impacts 
of Oil and Gas Production. Full Committee. Serial No. 114-48.
    This hearing examined the oil and gas industry's impact on 
rural America, specifically upstream oil and gas production and 
the associated economic effects. The oil and gas industry 
employs thousands of Americans in good-paying jobs at every 
skill and education level. Additionally, oil and gas 
development provides significant tax revenues, which enable 
rural communities to fund needed investments in schools, roads, 
hospitals, and other public services. Members heard from a 
panel of three witnesses who testified about how their rural 
communities and livelihoods are directly impacted by oil and 
gas production.
    April 14, 2016: Focus on the Farm Economy: Growing Farm 
Financial Pressure. Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities 
and Risk Management. Serial No. 114-49.
    This was the first hearing in the Focus on the Farm Economy 
series to examine growing pressures in rural America from the 
perspective of each subcommittee. Over the past three years, 
net farm income has fallen by 56 percent, the largest three 
year percentage decline in net farm income since the Great 
Depression. This is due largely to sinking commodity prices, 
with most analyses predicting no relief in sight. Witnesses 
spoke broadly about the factors that are driving current market 
conditions, the bleak outlook going forward, and the impact 
that both are having and could continue to have on our nation's 
farmers and ranchers, going forward. They also spoke to the 
vital role that farm policy and crop insurance are playing in 
helping absorb some of the shock, and they stressed the 
devastating impact that further reductions to these vital tools 
could have.
    April 19, 2016: Focus on the Farm Economy: Tightening 
Credit Conditions. Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy, 
and Credit. Serial No. 114-49.
    This is the second hearing in the Focus on the Farm Economy 
series to examine growing pressures in rural America from the 
perspective of each subcommittee. Members heard from a series 
of witnesses who explained the impact the collapse in net farm 
income is having on the availability of credit, financial 
stress on both producers and credit providers, and the value of 
key producer assets such as land.
    April 27, 2016: Focus on the Farm Economy: Factors 
Impacting Cost of Production. Subcommittee on Biotechnology, 
Horticulture, and Research. Serial No. 114-49.
    As part of the Focus on the Farm Economy series, this 
hearing examined the cause and effect of the collapse in net 
farm income and sinking commodity prices. Low prices are also 
leading to a significant reduction in equipment purchases, 
changes in food prices for consumers, serious impacts on 
creditors and their ability to finance producers, pressure to 
reduce voluntary conservation efforts to save money, reductions 
in the use of cutting edge technology, growing impacts of 
regulatory overreach on farm profitability, and increased 
damage from disproportionately large foreign agricultural 
subsidies. The hearing also highlighted programs and policies 
impacting farm efficiency, productivity and profitability.
    April 28, 2016: Hearing To Review the Impact of Capital and 
Margin Requirements on End-Users. Subcommittee on Commodity 
Exchanges, Energy, and Credit. Serial No. 114-50.
    Through this hearing, the Committee sought to understand 
the impacts of the new rules for capital and margin on 
derivatives markets and market participants, especially end-
users. Although most of the new capital rules apply to 
prudentially regulated banks, they impact bank derivatives 
activity, and consequently will have an impact on the health of 
markets regulated by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission 
(``CFTC''). Closely related to the capital rules are the new 
rules governing margin for swaps that are not cleared at a 
clearinghouse (i.e., uncleared). The CFTC and the Prudential 
Regulators recently finalized their uncleared margin rules. In 
a separate, supplemental rulemaking, the CFTC has proposed new 
rules for how to apply those requirements across international 
borders. Although Congress has exempted end-users from 
requirements to post margin to their counterparties, margin 
rules could impact end-users in unintended ways, including 
through increased transaction costs and fewer counterparties.
    April 28, 2016: Focus on the Farm Economy: Food Prices and 
the Consumer. Subcommittee on Nutrition. Serial No. 114-49.
    This was the fourth hearing in a series titled Focus on the 
Farm Economy where each of the six subcommittees examined 
growing pressure in rural America from the perspective of the 
subcommittee. The purpose of this hearing was to connect the 
farm economy with the consumer's grocery basket. The hearing 
looked at how U.S. farm policy contributes to not only an 
abundant food supply, but also the relative stability of food 
prices for Americans. Witnesses also discussed what goes into 
the dollars that are spent on food, the share that goes to each 
segment of the food supply chain, and the potential impacts of 
shifts in food prices on consumers.
    May 12, 2016: Past, Present and Future of SNAP: The 
Retailer Perspective. Full Committee. Serial No. 114-3, Part 4.
    In this hearing Members heard from retailers about the 
various opportunities and challenges they experience as they 
execute SNAP. Some of the topics included: how retailers become 
authorized to accept SNAP benefits, initiatives taking place 
within stores to promote healthy eating, food deserts, the 
various challenges facing rural communities, and the 
opportunities with technology to improve program integrity. 
Testimony was presented by representatives of various types of 
store formats including convenience stores, truck stops, a 
single store operators, and a large grocery store chain.
    May 17, 2016: Focus on the Farm Economy: Impacts of 
Environmental Regulations and Voluntary Conservation Solutions. 
Subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry. Serial No. 114-49.
    This is the fifth hearing in a series titled Focus on the 
Farm Economy where each of the six subcommittees examine 
growing pressure in rural America from the perspective of the 
subcommittee. With farmers facing a sharp decline in commodity 
prices, this hearing examined the regulatory challenges imposed 
on farmers and ranchers by the Federal Government. Witnesses 
provided testimony about how regulations such as the EPA's 
Waters of the U.S. (WOTUS) rule, Endangered Species Act (ESA), 
and Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) impact their 
ability to run their business and manage their resources. 
Acknowledging the challenges to our natural resources, the 
second panel focused on voluntary, locally-led conservation 
programs that provide a more flexible alternative to achieve 
environmental goals. Testimony included proven results from 
locally-led initiatives that utilized cutting-edge technology.
    May 18, 2016: Service in the Field: Veteran Contributions 
to National Food Security. Full Committee. Serial No. 114-51.
    This hearing examined the effectiveness of provisions 
authorized in the farm bill that provide incentives for 
veterans to take up farming. Veterans-turned-farmers testified 
about their transition into farming as well as instances of 
food insecurity they witnessed during their service. Members of 
the Committee discussed the challenges faced by veterans 
wishing to return to the farm, and how farm bill provisions can 
better serve their needs. Provisions discussed include the 
AgrAbility program, EQIP, CRP, and beginning farmer and rancher 
training programs.
    May 24, 2016: Focus on the Farm Economy: A View from the 
Barnyard. Subcommittee on Livestock and Foreign Agriculture. 
Serial No. 114-49.
    This hearing was the final hearing in a series titled Focus 
on the Farm Economy. The hearing focused primarily on the 
market outlook for the livestock, dairy and poultry sectors. 
This year, farmers have faced a steep decline in commodity 
prices not seen since the Great Depression. Farmers have dealt 
with razor tight margins, making them even more vulnerable to 
any additional economic burden. Witnesses raised concerns with 
pressures associated with recent and proposed regulations, as 
well as pest and disease incursions.
    May 25, 2016: Food Waste from Field to Table. Full 
Committee. Serial No. 114-52.
    In this hearing Members were introduced to the issue of 
food waste and how food waste occurs at every part of the food 
system. The topics included what programs have already been put 
in place by public- and private-sector organizations to 
mitigate food waste, how food is able to be diverted from the 
landfill through donations, composting, and anaerobic 
digestion, and what can continue to be done to reduce the 
amount of food wasted. Testimony was presented by 
Representative Chellie Pingree from Maine, representatives of 
various organizations representing producers, nonprofits, 
manufacturers, as well as researchers who were able to speak 
holistically on the issue.
    June 14, 2016: Hearing To Review the Impact of G20 Clearing 
and Trade Execution Requirements. Subcommittee on Commodity 
Exchanges, Energy, and Credit. Serial No. 114-53.
    Through this hearing, the Committee sought to review the 
clearing ecosystem, learn about the new systemic challenges 
associated with the significant expansion of cleared 
transactions, and better understand the impacts of mandatory 
execution rules.
    June 22, 2016: Past, Present and Future of SNAP: Evaluating 
Effectiveness and Outcomes in Nutrition Education. Full 
Committee. Serial No. 114-3, Part 4.
    In this hearing Members heard from representatives of 
organizations receiving SNAP-Ed funding about the various ways 
SNAP-Ed funding is used to educate SNAP recipients on how to 
prepare nutritious meals at home. The goal of SNAP-Ed is to 
improve the likelihood that persons eligible for SNAP will make 
healthy choices within a limited budget and choose active 
lifestyles consistent with the current Dietary Guidelines for 
Americans. Testimony was presented by grantees and 
administrators of SNAP-Ed funding from across the country who 
spoke specifically on what programs they have seen run 
successfully and the evaluation metrics utilized to measure 
success in individual programs.
    June 23, 2016: Big Data and Agriculture: Innovation in the 
Air. Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk 
Management. Serial No. 114-54.
    This hearing was the second in the series examining Big 
Data and Agriculture, and it focused on the innovation in 
agricultural imagery. Witnesses represented a variety of 
imagery technologies, including manned aircraft imagery, 
Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) or drone imagery, and satellite 
imagery. Members heard about the usefulness of each type of 
imagery to agriculture along with recent innovations made in 
gathering and distributing imagery information to the 
agricultural community. Members were specifically interested 
Part 107 of the UAS regulations regarding commercial operations 
of UAS, which was released two days prior to the hearing.
    July 6, 2016: Past, Present and Future of SNAP: Evaluating 
Error Rates and Anti-Fraud Measures to Enhance Program 
Integrity. Full Committee. Serial No. 114-3, Part 4.
    In this hearing Members learned what distinguishes an error 
rate from a fraud rate, what factors determine the reported 
rate, and how these measures impact program integrity. Error 
rates are mainly calculated as under- or over-payments to a 
recipient and are unintentional administrative errors. Fraud 
can happen at the retailer or individual level and is an 
intentional misuse of federal SNAP dollars. Witnesses discussed 
what the states' and Federal Government, respectively, are in 
charge of, what program integrity measures are currently in 
place to prevent fraud, and what is being done at the federal 
level to track and calculate state error reports.
    July 7, 2016: Agriculture and National Security: On-the-
Ground Experiences of Former Military Leaders. Full Committee. 
Serial No. 114-55.
    During this hearing, witnesses drew direct connections 
between agricultural policy and national security. Former 
military, including two retired major generals, leaders 
testified on the importance of U.S. investment in 
transportation and infrastructure, agricultural research and 
innovation, and risk management tools for farmers have all led 
to a vibrant and stable agricultural sector in the United 
States--which is inextricably linked to our national security. 
The witnesses spoke about specific examples where an 
insufficient focus on agriculture has had a detrimental impact 
on the security and stability of countries around the world and 
how Agribusiness Development Teams were deployed to help 
stabilize regions of importance to national security.
    July 13, 2016: Examining the CFTC's Proposed Rule: 
Regulation Automated Trading. Full Committee. Serial No. 114-
56.
    Through this hearing, the Committee sought to understand 
the potential impacts of Regulation Automated Trading. The 
Committee examined which market participants would be subject 
to the proposed rule; how the floor trader definition is 
utilized to further new registration system; the mechanics of 
the source code retention and access requirements; and the 
scope of new reporting mandates.
    September 13, 2016: Past, Present, and Future of SNAP: 
Improving Innovation and Success in Employment and Training 
Programs. Subcommittee on Nutrition. Serial No. 114-3, Part 4.
    In this hearing Members heard from representatives to 
discuss the initiatives by states to further improve their SNAP 
Employment and Training (SNAP E&T;) programs better assist 
recipients into the workforce or in attaining additional skills 
to increase earnings. The purpose of the program is to help 
recipients meet work requirements, and to gain the skills, 
training, or experience to increase their ability to obtain 
regular employment. Testimony was presented by state agencies 
on their efforts to improve the Employment and Training 
programs in their communities.
    September 14, 2016: American Agricultural Trade with Cuba. 
Full Committee. Serial No. 114-57
    Since Cuba's revolutionary government took power, the U.S. 
and Cuba have gone from major agricultural trading partners to 
having agricultural trade relations almost completely disappear 
once the Cuban embargo took full effect. Since then, Congress 
has passed legislation codifying the embargo. One piece of 
legislation, the Trade Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement 
Act (TSRA), authorized certain sales of food, medicines, and 
medical equipment to Cuba subject to various restrictions, 
including strict financing rules. Shortly after it was signed 
into law, TSRA quickly led to the reestablishment of U.S. 
agricultural exports to Cuba, but exports have been modest. 
This Congress, Rep. Crawford introduced the Cuba Agricultural 
Exports Act (H.R. 3687), which would ease some of the TSRA 
restrictions on U.S.-Cuba agricultural trade with the hopes of 
increasing market share for ag products in Cuba.
    This hearing examined the potential for expanding 
agricultural trade between the U.S. and Cuba, with much of the 
discussion centered around H.R. 3687. The witness panel 
comprised representatives from a producer organization, an 
export association, a lending institution, a human rights and 
democracy advocacy group, and a university professor. Members 
were specifically interested in what meaningful progress could 
be made in normalizing trade relations with Cuba, while also 
preventing human rights abuses.
    September 22, 2016: Rehabilitation of the Chesapeake Bay: 
Healing the Bay the Voluntary Way. Subcommittee on Conservation 
and Forestry. Serial No. 114-58
    In this hearing witnesses highlighted the effectiveness of 
the voluntary conservation model applied to the specific area 
of the Chesapeake Bay. Farmers, ranchers, and foresters have 
been adopting voluntary conservation measures to reduce runoff 
into the Bay, and results are being seen. NRCS announced that 
since 2009 their targeted voluntary approach to conservation in 
the Chesapeake Bay watershed has shown positive trends in water 
quality, habitat, and key aquatic species. This hearing 
emphasized the importance of the relationships NRCS builds with 
producers in the Chesapeake Bay, and around the nation, and how 
those relationships have yielded real conservation results.
    November 16, 2016: Past, Present, and Future of SNAP: 
Opportunities for Improving Access to Food. Full Committee. 
Serial No. 114-3, Part 4.
    In this hearing Members heard from representatives to 
discuss how innovative strategies are being used to improve 
access to food and to incentivize healthy food purchases. The 
discussion focused on the potential of online retailing, 
explored the challenges and opportunities in these strategies 
to increase access, and examined how technology plays a role in 
incentivizing healthier purchases. Testimony was presented by 
organizations that are working creatively to increase the 
capacity of their organizations to provide nutritious food to 
low income individuals in low access areas.
    December 7, 2015: 1890 Land-Grant Institutions: Recruitment 
Challenges and Scholarship Opportunities. Full Committee. 
Serial No. 114-59
    This hearing explored the recruitment challenges and 
scholarship opportunities at 1890 Land-Grant Universities 
(1890s). The Committee invited leaders of the 1890s to share 
the challenges they have faced in recruiting African American 
students to careers in agriculture as well as their suggestions 
for moving forward. The hearing built on the committee's July 
15, 2015, hearing that recognized the continuing contributions 
that those universities make to agriculture. The members also 
heard from three cosponsors of H.R. 6020: Funding for Student 
Scholarships for the 1890 Land-Grant African American Colleges 
and Universities Act. The bill would allocate scholarships to 
1890s for students interested in food and agricultural 
sciences.

2. Legislative Hearings

    March 25, 2015: Hearing To Examine the Implications of 
Potential Retaliatory Measures Taken Against the United States 
in Response to Meat Labeling Requirements. Subcommittee on 
Livestock and Foreign Agriculture. Hearing Serial No. 114-8.
    The purpose of this hearing was to give industry 
stakeholders a chance to share their views regarding the 
implications of potential retaliatory measures that were likely 
to be taken by Canada and Mexico absent legislative action to 
alter or repeal mandatory country-of-origin labeling (COOL) 
requirements for beef, pork, and chicken. Members and witnesses 
expressed concern that the U.S. would lose its last and final 
appeal in the World Trade Organization (WTO) case in which the 
WTO had previously ruled against the U.S., finding that the 
COOL rule violates WTO obligations by discriminating against 
imported livestock. Such a ruling would ultimately subject the 
U.S. to retaliatory sanctions which the witnesses expected to 
impact a variety of industries beyond agriculture. The 
witnesses explained how even the threat of such measures were 
already costing their respective industries. None of the 
witnesses offered specific suggestions for changes to the COOL 
rule that would bring the U.S. into compliance with its WTO 
obligations. Instead, the panel of witnesses nearly unanimously 
called for a repeal of country-of-origin labeling requirements 
in order to avoid retaliation.
    April 22, 2015: Hearing To Review Reauthorization of the 
U.S. Grain Standards Act. Subcommittee on General Farm 
Commodities and Risk Management. Hearing Serial No. 114-11.
    The purpose of this hearing was to review the state of the 
grain industry in preparation of drafting legislation to 
reauthorize the United States Grain Standards Act (USGSA). 
Authorization for several provisions within the USGSA expires 
on September 30, 2015. Members heard from three witnesses 
representing the grain industry and other stakeholders 
regarding the state of the industry as well as their insight to 
what changes the industry would like to see incorporated into 
the reauthorization bill. Members were especially concerned 
with the interruption in grain inspection and weighing services 
that happened in Washington State during the summer of 2014. 
Members and stakeholders affirmed that they want a safeguard 
mechanism in the reauthorization bill that would prevent this 
type of interruption from happening again.
    April 22, 2015: Hearing To Review Reauthorization of the 
Livestock Mandatory Reporting Act. Subcommittee on Livestock 
and Foreign Agriculture. Hearing Serial No. 114-12.
    The purpose of this hearing was to begin the legislative 
process of reauthorizing the Livestock Mandatory Reporting Act 
by hearing from representatives of the affected livestock 
organizations, as well as a representative of the packers' 
trade association, the North American Meat Institute. The 
witnesses shared their proposals and identified areas of 
concern as well as areas of consensus.

                         e. published hearings


 
 
 
        114-01   Hearing To Review the State of the Rural Economy--Full
                  Committee--Wednesday, February 11, 2015.
        114-02   --Full Committee--Thursday, February 12, 2015.
 114-03, pt. 1   Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program--Past,
                  Present and Future of the Supplemental Nutrition
                  Assistance Program--Full Committee--Wednesday,
                  February 25, 2015.
 114-03, pt. 1   Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program--SNAP
                  Recipient Characteristics and Dynamics--Subcommittee
                  on Nutrition--Thursday, February 26, 2015
 114-03, pt. 1   Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program--The Past,
                  Present, and Future of SNAP: The World of Nutrition
                  and the Role of the Charitable Sector--Full Committee--
                  Wednesday, April 15, 2015.
 114-03, pt. 1   Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program--The Past,
                  Present, and Future of SNAP: The World of Nutrition,
                  Government Duplication and Unmet Needs--Subcommittee
                  on Nutrition--Wednesday, May 20, 2015.
 114-03, pt. 1   Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program--Past,
                  Present, and Future of SNAP: The Means to Climbing the
                  Economic Ladder--Full Committee--Wednesday, June 10,
                  2015.
   114-03, pt.   Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program--Past,
           2\2\   Present, and Future of SNAP: How Our Welfare System
                  Can Discourage Work--Subcommittee on Nutrition,
                  Committee on Agriculture and Subcommittee on Human
                  Resources, Committee on Ways and Means--Thursday, June
                  25, 2015.
\2\Note: this
 hearing is
 part 2 of the
 Supplemental
 Nutrition
 Assistance
 Program--Past,
 Present, and
 Future of SNAP
 series. The
 House
 Committee on
 Ways and Means
 took the lead
 and published,
 consequently
 the title is
 not reflective
 of the
 complete
 series. Also
 note: that
 there was an
 Errata sheet
 published to
 correct the
 misnamed
 Subcommittee
 on Nutrition
 of the House
 Agriculture
 Committee.
 114-03, pt. 3   Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program--The Past,
                  Present, and Future of SNAP: Developing and Using
                  Evidence-Based Solutions--Subcommittee on Nutrition--
                  Wednesday, July 15, 2015.
 114-03, pt. 3   Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program--Past,
                  Present, and Future of SNAP: Breaking the Cycle--
                  Subcommittee on Nutrition--Tuesday, October 27, 2015.
 114-03, pt. 3   Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program--Past,
                  Present, and Future of SNAP: The National Commission
                  on Hunger--Full Committee--Wednesday, November 18,
                  2015.
 114-03, pt. 4   Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program--Past,
                  Present, and Future of SNAP: Addressing Special
                  Populations--Subcommittee on Nutrition--Tuesday,
                  January 12, 2016.
 114-03, pt. 4   Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program--Past,
                  Present, and Future of SNAP: Examining State Options--
                  Full Committee--Wednesday, March 2, 2016.
 114-03, pt. 4   Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program--Past,
                  Present, and Future of SNAP: The Retailer Perspective--
                  Full Committee--Thursday, May 12, 2016.
 114-03, pt. 4   Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program--Past,
                  Present, and Future of SNAP: Evaluating Effectiveness
                  and Outcomes in Nutrition Education--Full Committee--
                  Wednesday, June 22, 2016.
 114-03, pt. 4   Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program--Past,
                  Present, and Future of SNAP: Evaluating Error Rates
                  and Anti-Fraud Measures to Enhance Program Integrity--
                  Full Committee--Wednesday, July 6, 2016.
 114-03, pt. 4   Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program--Past,
                  Present, and Future of SNAP: Improving Innovation and
                  Success in Employment and Training Programs--
                  Subcommittee on Nutrition--Tuesday, September 13,
                  2016.
 114-03, pt. 4   Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program--Past,
                  Present, and Future of SNAP: Opportunities for
                  Improving Access to Food--Full Committee--Wednesday,
                  November 16, 2016.
        114-04   Hearing To Review the Definition of Waters of the
                  United States Proposed Rule and Its Impact on Rural
                  America--Subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry--
                  Tuesday, March 17, 2015.
        114-05   The Importance of Trade to U.S. Agriculture--Full
                  Committee--Wednesday, March 18, 2015.
        114-06   Examination of the Costs and Impacts of Mandatory
                  Biotechnology Labeling Laws--Full Committee--Tuesday,
                  March 24, 2015.
        114-07   Reauthorizing the CFTC--End-User Views--Subcommittee on
                  Commodity Exchanges, Energy, and Credit--Tuesday,
                  March 24, 2015.
        114-07   Reauthorizing the CFTC--Market Participant Views--
                  Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy, and
                  Credit--Wednesday, March 25, 2015.
        114-07   Reauthorizing the CFTC--Commissioners' Perspectives--
                  Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy, and
                  Credit--Tuesday, April 14, 2015.
        114-08   Hearing To Examine the Implications of Potential
                  Retaliatory Measures Taken Against the United States
                  in Response to Meat Labeling Requirements--
                  Subcommittee on Livestock and Foreign Agriculture--
                  Wednesday, March 25, 2015
        114-09   --Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk
                  Management--Thursday, March 26, 2015.
        114-10   A Presentation by National 4-H Conference Participants
                  Concerning the Future of Agriculture in the United
                  States--Subcommittee on Biotechnology, Horticulture,
                  and Research--Tuesday, April 14, 2015.
        114-11   Hearing To Review Reauthorization of the U.S. Grain
                  Standards Act--Subcommittee on General Farm
                  Commodities and Risk Management--Wednesday, April 22,
                  2015
        114-12   Hearing To Review Reauthorization of the Livestock
                  Mandatory Reporting Act--Subcommittee on Livestock and
                  Foreign Agriculture--Wednesday, April 22, 2015.
        114-13   Hearing To Review the National Forest System and Active
                  Forest Management--Subcommittee on Conservation and
                  Forestry--Wednesday, April 29, 2015.
        114-14   Hearing To Review the Federal Coordination and Response
                  Regarding Pollinator Health--Subcommittee on
                  Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research--Wednesday,
                  May 13, 2015.
        114-15   Update on the Financial Health of Farm Country--
                  Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk
                  Management--Tuesday, June 2, 2015.
        114-16   Hearing To Review Agricultural Subsidies in Foreign
                  Countries--Full Committee--Wednesday, June 3, 2015.
        114-17   --Subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry--Thursday,
                  June 11, 2015.
        114-18   Hearing To Review U.S. International Food Aid Programs--
                  Full Committee--Wednesday, June 24, 2015.
        114-19   Hearing To Review USDA Marketing Programs--Subcommittee
                  on Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research--
                  Thursday, June 25, 2015.
        114-20   Energy and the Rural Economy: the Economic Impact of
                  Exporting Crude Oil--Full Committee--Wednesday, July
                  8, 2015.
        114-21   U.S. International Food Aid Programs: Oversight and
                  Accountability--Subcommittee on Livestock and Foreign
                  Agriculture--Thursday, July 9, 2015.
        114-22   --Full Committee--Wednesday, July 15, 2015.
        114-23   Oversight of the U.S. Department of Agriculture--Full
                  Committee--Wednesday, July 22, 2015.
        114-24   Dodd-Frank Turns Five: Assessing the Progress of Global
                  Derivatives Reforms--Full Committee--Wednesday, July
                  29, 2015.
        114-25   Examination of Federal and State Response to Avian
                  Influenza--Subcommittee on Livestock and Foreign
                  Agriculture--Thursday, July 30, 2015.
        114-26   Hearing To Review USDA Organization and Program
                  Administration--Part 1--Full Committee--Tuesday,
                  September 15, 2015.
        114-26   Hearing To Review USDA Organization and Program
                  Administration--Part 2--Full Committee--Wednesday,
                  September 16, 2015.
        114-27   Hearing To Highlight Research Innovations Achieved by
                  Our Nation's Agricultural Colleges and Universities--
                  Subcommittee on Biotechnology, Horticulture, and
                  Research--Tuesday, September 29, 2015.
        114-28   U.S. International Food Aid Programs: Stakeholder
                  Perspectives--Full Committee--Wednesday, September 30,
                  2015.
        114-29   2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans--Full Committee--
                  Wednesday, October 7, 2015.
        114-30   --Subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry--Thursday,
                  October 8, 2015.
        114-31   Foreign Subsidies: Jeopardizing Free Trade and Harming
                  American Farmers--Full Committee--Wednesday, October
                  21, 2015.
        114-32   Big Data and Agriculture: Innovation and Implications--
                  Full Committee--Wednesday, October 28, 2015.
        114-33   American Agriculture and Our National Security--Full
                  Committee--Wednesday, November 4, 2015.
        114-34   U.S. International Food Aid Programs: Transportation
                  Perspectives--Subcommittee on Livestock and Foreign
                  Agriculture, Committee on Agriculture; Coast Guard and
                  Maritime Transportation, Committee on Transportation
                  and Infrastructure--Tuesday, November 17, 2015.
        114-35   Hearing To Review the Farm Credit System--Full
                  Committee--Wednesday, December 2, 2015.
        114-36   Commodity in Focus: Stress in Cotton Country--
                  Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk
                  Management--Wednesday, December 9, 2015.
        114-37   Oversight of USDA's Use of Census of Agriculture
                  Authority To Acquire Farmers' Personal Financial--
                  Subcommittee on Biotechnology, Horticulture, and
                  Research--Wednesday, December 9, 2015.
        114-38   Opportunities and Challenges in Direct Marketing--A
                  View from the Field--Subcommittee on Biotechnology,
                  Horticulture, and Research--Tuesday, February 2, 2016
        114-39   Hearing To Review Incentive Programs Aimed At
                  Increasing Low-Income Families' Purchasing Power for
                  Fruits and Vegetables--Subcommittee on Nutrition--
                  Wednesday, February 3, 2016.
        114-40   --Full Committee--Wednesday, February 10, 2016.
        114-41   Hearing To Consider the Impacts of the Environmental
                  Protection Agency's Actions on the Rural Economy--Full
                  Committee--Thursday, February 11, 2016.
        114-42   Foot-and-Mouth Disease: Are We Prepared?--Subcommittee
                  on Livestock and Foreign Agriculture--Thursday,
                  February 11, 2016.
        114-43   Hearing To Review the State of the Rural Economy--Full
                  Committee--Wednesday, February 24, 2016.
        114-44   --Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy, and
                  Credit--Thursday, February 25, 2016.
        114-45   Voluntary Conservation: Utilizing Innovation and
                  Technology--Subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry--
                  Tuesday, March 1, 2016.
        114-46   Defending American Agriculture Against Foreign Pests
                  and Diseases--Subcommittees on Livestock and Foreign
                  Agriculture and Biotechnology, Horticulture, and
                  Research--Tuesday, March 15, 2016.
        114-47   Hearing To Examine USDA Organization and Program
                  Administration--Part 1--Full Committee--Thursday,
                  March 17, 2016.
        114-47   Hearing To Examine USDA Organization and Program
                  Administration--Part 2--Full Committee--Friday, March
                  18, 2016.
        114-48   Energy and the Rural Economy: The Impacts of Oil and
                  Gas Production--Full Committee--Wednesday, April 13,
                  2016.
        114-49   Focus on the Farm Economy: Growing Farm Financial
                  Pressure--Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and
                  Risk Management--Thursday, April 14, 2016.
        114-49   Focus on the Farm Economy: Tightening Credit
                  Conditions--Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges,
                  Energy, and Credit--Tuesday, April 19, 2016.
        114-49   Focus on the Farm Economy: Factors Impacting the Cost
                  of Production--Subcommittee on Biotechnology,
                  Horticulture, and Research--Wednesday, April 27, 2016.
        114-49   Focus on the Farm Economy: Food Prices and the
                  Consumer--Subcommittee on Nutrition--Thursday, April
                  28, 2016.
        114-49   Focus on the Farm Economy: Impacts of Environmental
                  Regulations and Voluntary Conservation Solutions--
                  Subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry--Tuesday,
                  May 17, 2016.
        114-49   Focus on the Farm Economy: A View from the Barnyard--
                  Subcommittee on Livestock and Foreign Agriculture--
                  Tuesday, May 24, 2016.
        114-50   Hearing To Review the Impact of Capital and Margin
                  Requirements on End-Users--Subcommittee on Commodity
                  Exchanges, Energy, and Credit--Thursday, April 28,
                  2016.
        114-51   Service in the Field: Veteran Contributions to National
                  Food Security--Full Committee--Wednesday, May 18,
                  2016.
        114-52   Food Waste from Field to Table--Full Committee--
                  Wednesday, May 25, 2016.
        114-53   --Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy, and
                  Credit--Tuesday, June 14, 2016.
        114-54   Big Data and Agriculture: Innovation in the Air--
                  Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk
                  Management--Thursday, June 23, 2016.
        114-55   Agriculture and National Security: On-the-Ground
                  Experiences of Former Military Leaders--Full
                  Committee--Thursday, July 7, 2016.
        114-56   Examining the CFTC's Proposed Rule: Regulation
                  Automated Trading--Full Committee--Wednesday, July 13,
                  2016.
        114-57   American Agricultural Trade with Cuba--Full Committee--
                  Wednesday, September 14, 2016.
        114-58   Rehabilitation of the Chesapeake Bay: Healing the Bay
                  the Voluntary Way--Subcommittee on Conservation and
                  Forestry--Thursday, September 22, 2016.
        114-59   --Full Committee--Wednesday, December 7, 2016.
 

                       f. meetings not published

    January 22, 2015--Full Committee open business meeting. 
Organizational meeting for the 114th Congress. Approval of the 
Committee Rules, Committee staff assignments, and the Oversight 
Plan for the 114th Congress by voice vote.
    February 12, 2015--Full Committee open business meeting. 
Approval of the Budget Views and Estimate Letter and en bloc 
amendment to revise the Committee Rules for the 114th Congress 
by voice vote.
    March 19, 2015--Full Committee open business meeting. 
Approval of H.R. 897, the Reducing Regulatory Burdens Act of 
2015, by voice vote.
    April 30, 2015--Full Committee open business meeting. 
Approval of H.R. 2051, the Mandatory Livestock Reporting Act of 
2015, and H.R. 2088, the United States Grain Standards Act 
Reauthorization Act of 2015, by voice vote.
    May 14, 2015--Full Committee open business meeting. 
Approval of H.R. 2289, Commodity End-User Relief Act, by voice 
vote.
    May 20, 2015--Full Committee open business meeting. 
Approval of H.R. 2394, The National Forest Foundation 
Reauthorization Act of 2015, by voice vote. Approval of H.R. 
2393, Country of Origin Labeling Amendments Act of 2015, by a 
recorded vote of 38 yeas to 6 nays.
    June 17, 2015--Full Committee open business meeting. 
Approval of H.R. 2647, The Resilient Federal Forests Act of 
2015, and H.R. 2620, legislation to amend the United States 
Cotton Futures Act, by voice vote.
    July 14, 2015--Full Committee open business meeting. 
Approval of H.R. 1599, Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act of 
2015, by voice vote.
    September 30, 2015--Full Committee open business meeting. 
Approval of H.R. 1317, legislation to amend the Commodity 
Exchange Act and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, by voice 
vote.
    February 2, 2016--Full Committee open business meeting. 
Approval by of the Budget View and Estimates Letter for FY 
2017, by voice vote.
    September 14, 2016--Full Committee open business meeting. 
Approval of H.R. 470, Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest Land 
Adjustment Act of 2015, H.R. 845, National Forest System Trails 
Stewardship Act, and H.R. 5883, Technical and Clarifying 
Amendments to the Packers and Stockyards Act of 2016, by voice 
vote.

                          g. committee prints

    Committee on Agriculture Rules. Adopted January 22, 2015; 
Revised February 12, 2015. Print No. 114-1.
    A Ceremony Unveiling the Portrait of the Honorable Frank D. 
Lucas. Tuesday, June 23, 2015. Print No. 114-2.

                             h. watersheds

    None.

                             III. Appendix


                      a. executive communications

    Note: In April 2013 the Parliamentarian's office altered 
its procedures concerning the referral of Executive 
Communications. In prior Congresses the Communications 
concerning pesticide tolerances submitted from the 
Environmental Protection Agency were referred to the Committee 
on Agriculture; however, beginning in August 2013 this type of 
Communication was referred to the Committee on Energy and 
Commerce. The Parliamentarian's office was notified of this 
discrepancy on November 24, 2014. The following is a list of 
the Executive Communication's numbers along with the date of 
publication in the Congressional Record ((entries marked with 
an asterisk (*) are for Communications concerning an exemption 
from the requirement of a tolerance (when in reference to a 
pesticide) which were also historically referred to the 
Committee on Agriculture):

 
 
 
January 28, 2015: 244, 245.          December 18, 2015: 3821, 3822,
                                      3823, 3824.
February 11, 2015: 415, 416.         January 25, 2016: *4072, *4074,
                                      4075.
February 20, 2015: 490.              February 3, 2016: 4208.
February 24, 2015: *521, 522, 523,   February 12, 2016: 4333.
 *526.
March 6, 2015: 684.                  February 23, 2016: 4380.
March 13, 2015: 742, 744.            February 24, 2016: 4429, 4430.
March 26, 2015: 874, 878.            February 26, 2016: 4487.
April 13, 2015: 941, 954.            March 3, 2016: 4557, 4559, 4561.
April 27, 2015: 1261, 1264.          March 10, 2016: 4605.
April 30, 2015: 1318.                April 11, 2016: 4806, 4818, 4824.
May 8, 2015: *1402, *1403, 1404.     April 15, 2016: 5045.
May 11, 2015: *1429.                 April 25, 2016: 5137.
May 18, 2015: *1496, 1497.           April 28, 2016: 5194.
May 29, 2015: 1628, 1629.            May 6, 2016: 5270, 5272, 5273,
June 25, 2015: 1950.                  5274, 5279, 5281.
June 16, 2015: 1849.                 June 3, 2016: 5555, 5556.
July 7, 2015: 2008.                  June 14, 2016: 5677, 5678.
July 8, 2015: 2078.                  July 6, 2016: *5905.
July 23, 2015: 2278.                 July 21, 2016: 6208, *6209.
July 31, 2015: 2333, 2335, 2336,     July 25, 2016: 6280.
 2338.
July 4, 2015: 2396.                  September 6, 2016: 6421, 6435,
September 15, 2015: 2733, 2735.       6436, 6451, 6456.
September 8, 2015: 2476, 2477,       September 12, 2016: 6780.
 2500, 2506.
September 18, 2015: 2850, 2851.      September 13, 2016: 6804.
September 24, 2015: 2928, 2929.      September 22, 2016: 6946.
October 20, 2015: 3180.              September 27, 2016: 6992, 16993.
October 29, 2015: 3328, 3330.        November 14, 2016: 7124, 7125,
November 16, 2015: 3432.              *7141, 7144, 7155, 7158, 7167,
                                      7168, 7171.
November 2, 2015: 3339, 3345.        November 17, 2016: 7488.
November 18, 2015: 3488.             November 18, 2016: 7514, 7517,
                                      7520.
November 30, 2015: 3540.             November 30, 2016: 7662, 7666.
December 7, 2015: 3668, 3669.        December 5, 2016: 7733, 7736, 7737,
                                      7738.
December 11, 2015: 3753, 3757,       December 16, 2016: 7882.
 *3758.
December 17, 2015: 3800, 3801.       December 23, 2016: 7981, 7990.
 

    E.C. 8--Jan. 9, 2015: A letter from the Administrator, 
Rural Business--Cooperative Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's Major final rule--Subpart B--
Rural Energy for America Program (RIN: 0570-AA76) received 
January 7, 2015.
    E.C. 120--Jan. 26, 2015: A letter from the FSA Regulatory 
Review Group, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Marketing Assistance Loans, Loan 
Deficiency Payments, and Sugar Loans (RIN: 0560-AI28) received 
January 15, 2015.
    E.C. 235--Jan. 28, 2015: A letter from the Assistant 
Secretary for Civil Rights, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Nondiscrimination on 
the Basis of Age in Programs or Activities Receiving Federal 
Financial Assistance From the U.S. Department of Agriculture 
(RIN: 0503-AA57) received January 14, 2015.
    E.C. 273--Feb. 2, 2015: A letter from the Director, Office 
of Legislative Affairs, Commodity Futures Trading Commission, 
transmitting the Commission's Agency Financial Report for FY 
2014.
    E.C. 274--Feb. 2, 2015: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
withdrawal of interim rule--Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia; 
Interstate Movement and Import Restrictions on Certain Live 
Fish [Doc. No.: APHIS-2007-0038] (RIN: 0579-AC74) received 
January 20, 2015.
    E.C. 275--Feb. 2, 2015: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Sulfoxaflor; 
Pesticide Tolerances for Emergency Exemptions [EPA-HQ-OPP-2014-
0643; FRL-9920-45] received January 23, 2015.
    E.C. 333--Feb. 5, 2015: A letter from the Director, 
National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--
Hispanic-Serving Agricultural Colleges and Universities (HSACU) 
(RIN: 0524-AA39) received January 28, 2015.
    E.C. 353--Feb. 9, 2015: A letter from the Acting 
Congressional Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health 
Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Animal Welfare; Retail Pet Stores and 
Licensing Exemptions; Technical Amendment [Doc. No.: APHIS-
2011-0003] (RIN: 0579-AD57) received January 27, 2015.
    E.C. 373--Feb. 10, 2015: A letter from the Management 
Analyst, Forest Service, ORMS, D and R, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--Forest 
Land Enhancement Program (FLEP) (RIN: 0596-AD21) received 
January 27, 2015.
    E.C. 374--Feb. 10, 2015: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, APHIS, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Commuted Traveltime; 
Correction [Doc. No.: APHIS-2004-0108] received February 3, 
2015.
    E.C. 375--Feb. 10, 2015: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, APHIS, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Brucellosis Class 
Free States and Certified Brucellosis-Free Herds; Revisions to 
Testing and Certification Requirements [Doc. No.: APHIS-2009-
0083] (RIN: 0579-AD22) received February 3, 2015.
    E.C. 376--Feb. 10, 2015: A letter from the Management and 
Program Analyst, Forest Service, ORMS, D and R, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--Use By 
Over-Snow Vehicles (Travel Management Rule) (RIN: 0596-AD17) 
received February 3, 2015.
    E.C. 400--Feb. 10, 2015: A letter from the Board Chair and 
Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Agency's fiscal year 2016 proposed budget and 
performance plan; jointly to the Committees on Agriculture and 
Oversight and Government Reform.
    E.C. 403--Feb. 11, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and 
Vegetable Programs, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's interim rule--Irish Potatoes Grown in Colorado; 
Relaxation of the Handling Regulation for Area No. 3 [Doc. No.: 
AMS-FV-14-0092; FV15-948-1 IR] received February 4, 2015.
    E.C. 404--Feb. 11, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and 
Vegetable Programs, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's interim rule--Marketing Order Regulating the 
Handling of Spearmint Oil Produced in the Far West; Revision of 
the Salable Quantity and Allotment Percentage for Class 3 
(Native) Spearmint Oil for the 2014-2015 Marketing Year [Doc. 
No.: AMS-FV-13-0087; FV14-985-1B IR] received February 4, 2015.
    E.C. 405--Feb. 11, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and 
Vegetable Programs, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Oranges and Grapefruit Grown in Lower 
Rio Grande Valley in Texas; Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. 
No.: AMS-FV-14-0054; FV14-906-3 FIR] received February 4, 2015.
    E.C. 406--Feb. 11, 2015: A letter from the Under Secretary, 
Rural Development, Rural Business--Cooperative Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Rural Development Regulations--Update to FmHA References 
and to Census References (RIN: 0570-AA30) received February 4, 
2015.
    E.C. 437--Feb. 12, 2015: A letter from the Management 
Analyst, Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards 
Administration, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Suspension of Flock Delivery and 
Stages of Poultry Production (RIN: 0580-AB23) received February 
6, 2015.
    E.C. 511--Feb. 20, 2015: A letter from the Director, Office 
of Congressional and Public Affairs, Farm Credit 
Administration, transmitting a corrected copy of the 
Administration's Fiscal Year 2016 proposed budget and 
performance plan; jointly to the Committees on Agriculture and 
Oversight and Government Reform.
    E.C. 537--Feb. 25, 2015: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Clothianidin; 
Pesticide Tolerances for Emergency Exemptions [EPA-HQ-OPP-2014-
0253; FRL-9919-59] received February 24, 2015.
    E.C. 670--Mar. 6, 2015: A letter from the Acting 
Congressional Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health 
Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Cattle Fever Tick; Importation 
Requirements for Ruminants From Mexico [Doc. No.: APHIS-2012-
0073] (RIN: 0579-AD91) received March 3, 2015.
    E.C. 671--Mar. 6, 2015: A letter from the Chairman and 
Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's proposed rule--Federal 
Agricultural Mortgage Corporation General Provisions; Federal 
Agricultural Mortgage Corporation Governance; Federal 
Agricultural Mortgage Corporation Risk Management; Federal 
Agricultural Mortgage Corporation Disclosure and Reporting; 
Farmer Mac Corporate Governance and Standards of Conduct (RIN: 
3052-AC89) received March 3, 2015
    E.C. 724--Mar. 13, 2015: A letter from the Administrator, 
Rural Business--Cooperative Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's direct final rule--Rural 
Development Loan Servicing (RIN: 0570-AA88) received March 6, 
2015.
    E.C. 725--Mar. 13, 2015: A letter from the Board Chair and 
CEO, Office of General Counsel, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's final rule--Disclosure to 
Shareholders; Pension Benefit Disclosures (RIN: 3052-AD02) 
received March 9, 2015.
    E.C. 785--Mar. 17, 2015: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
interim rule--Gypsy Moth Generally Infested Areas; Additions in 
Minnesota, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin [Doc. No.: 
APHIS-2014-0023] received March 16, 2015.
    E.C. 786--Mar. 17, 2015: A letter from the Administrator, 
FSA Regulatory Review Group, Commodity Credit Corporation, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Biomass Crop Assistance Program (RIN: 0560-AI27) received 
March 16, 2015.
    E.C. 825--Mar. 23, 2015: A letter from the Administrator, 
Rural Business--Cooperative Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's interim final rule--Rural 
Business Development Grant (RIN: 0570-AA92) received March 19, 
2015.
    E.C. 928--Apr. 13, 2015: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--Residual Interest Deadline for Futures 
Commission Merchants (RIN: 3038-AE22) received.\3\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \3\Date received not printed in the Congressional Record.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    E.C. 929--Apr. 13, 2015: A letter from the Chairman and 
Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's final rule--Organization and 
Functions; Field Office Locations (RIN: 3052-AD05) received 
April 2, 2015.
    E.C. 1117--Apr. 15, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and 
Vegetable Programs, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's interim rule--Marketing Order Regulating the 
Handling of Spearmint Oil Produced in the Far West; Revision of 
the Salable Quantity and Allotment Percentage for Class 3 
(Native) Spearmint Oil for the 2014-2015 Marketing Year [Doc. 
No.: AMS-FV-13-0087; FV14-985-1C IR] received April 13, 2015.
    E.C. 1118--Apr. 15, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and 
Vegetable Programs, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Marketing Order Regulating the 
Handling of Spearmint Oil Produced in the Far West; Revision of 
the Salable Quantity and Allotment Percentage for Class 1 
(Scotch) Spearmint Oil for the 2014-2015 Marketing Year [Doc. 
No.: AMS-FV-13-0087; FV14-985-1A FIR] received April 13, 2015.
    E.C. 1119--Apr. 15, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and 
Vegetable Programs, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's interim rule--Fruit, Vegetable, and Specialty 
Crops-Import Regulations; Changes to Reporting Requirements To 
Add Electronic Form Filing Option [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-14-0093; 
FV15-944/980/999-1 IR] received April 13, 2015.
    E.C. 1377--May 5, 2015: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Importation of Apples From China [Doc. No.: APHIS-2014-
0003] (RIN: 0579-AD89) received April 28, 2015.
    E.C. 1378--May 5, 2015: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Importation of Papayas From Peru [Doc. No.: APHIS-2012-
0014] (RIN: 0579-AD68) received April 28, 2015.
    E.C. 1379--May 5, 2015: A letter from the Administrator, 
Farm Service Agency, Regulatory Review Group, Office of the 
Secretary, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's interim rule--Conservation Compliance (RIN: 0560-
AI26) received May 4, 2015.
    E.C. 1394--May 8, 2015: A letter from the Management and 
Program Analyst, Forest Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Paleontological 
Resources Preservation (RIN: 0596-AC95) received May 1, 2015.
    E.C. 1419--May 12, 2015: A letter from the Administrator, 
Rural Business--Cooperative Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Subpart J--Value-
Added Producer Grant Program (RIN: 0570-AA79) received May 6, 
2015.
    E.C. 1455--May 13, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and 
Vegetable Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Irish Potatoes Grown in Colorado and 
Imported Irish Potatoes; Relaxation of the Handling Regulation 
for Area No. 2 and Import Regulations [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-13-
0073; FV13-948-3 FR] received May 12, 2015.
    E.C. 1456--May 13, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and 
Vegetable Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's affirmation of interim rule as final rule--
Avocados Grown in South Florida and Imported Avocados; Change 
in Maturity Requirements [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-14-0051; FV14-915-1 
FIR] received May 12, 2015.
    E.C. 1457--May 13, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agriculture Marketing Service, Fruit and 
Vegetable Programs, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's interim rule--Irish Potatoes Grown in Southeastern 
States; Suspension of Marketing Order Provisions [Doc. No.: 
AMS-FV-14-0011; FV14-953-1 IR] received May 12, 2015.
    E.C. 1458--May 13, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Fruit and Vegetable Program, Promotion and 
Economics Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, Department 
of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--Honey 
Packers and Importers Research, Promotion, Consumer Education 
and Information Order; Assessment Rate Increase [Doc. No.: AMS-
FV-14-0045] received May 12, 2015.
    E.C. 1471--May 15, 2015: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Viruses, Serums, Toxins, and Analogous Products; 
Exemptions from Preparation Pursuant to an Unsuspended and 
Unrevoked License [Doc. No.: APHIS-2011-0048] (RIN: 0579-AD66) 
received May 13, 2015.
    E.C. 1491--May 18, 2015: A letter from the Under Secretary, 
Rural Development, Rural Business--Cooperative Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
interim rule--Strategic Economic and Community Development 
(RIN: 0570-AA94) received May 15, 2015.
    E.C. 1736--Jun. 8, 2015: A letter from the Assistant 
Secretary for Legislation, Department of Health and Human 
Services, transmitting the ``Biennial Report to Congress on the 
Food Safety and Food Defense Research Plan'', pursuant to Sec. 
110(g) of the FDA Food Safety and Modernization Act, Pub. L. 
111-353; jointly to the Committees on Energy and Commerce and 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 1803--Jun. 11, 2015: A letter from the Board Chairman 
and Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's final rule--Organization; 
Institution Stockholder Voting Procedures (RIN: 3052-AC85) 
received June 10, 2015.
    E.C. 1804--Jun. 11, 2015: A letter from the Director, 
Issuances Staff, Office of Policy and Program Development, Food 
Safety and Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Descriptive 
Designation for Needle- or Blade-Tenderized (Mechanically 
Tenderized) Beef Products [Doc. No.: FSIS-2008-0017] (RIN: 
0583-AD45) received June 10, 2015.
    E.C. 1852--Jun. 17, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and 
Vegetable Programs, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's affirmation of interim rule as final rule--
Marketing Order Regulating the Handling of Spearmint Oil 
Produced in the Far West; Revision of the Salable Quantity and 
Allotment Percentage for Class 3 (Native) Spearmint Oil for the 
2014-2015 Marketing Year [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-13-0087; FV14-985-1B 
FIR] received June 15, 2015.
    E.C. 1853--Jun. 17, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and 
Vegetable Programs, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Tart Cherries Grown in the States of 
Michigan, et al.; Free and Restricted Percentages for the 2014-
15 Crop Year for Tart Cherries [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-14-0077; FV14-
930-2 FR] received June 15, 2015.
    E.C. 1854--Jun. 17, 2015: A letter from the Finance and 
Loan Analyst, Rural Development, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Reserve Account (RIN: 
0575-AC99) received June 15, 2015.
    E.C. 1855--Jun. 17, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and 
Vegetable Programs, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's affirmation of interim rule as final rule--Irish 
Potatoes Grown in Colorado; Relaxation of the Handling 
Regulation for Area No. 3 [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-14-0092; FV15-948-1 
FIR] received June 15, 2015.
    E.C. 1863--Jun. 18, 2015: A letter from the Secretary, 
Office of the Executive Director, Commodity Futures Trading 
Commission, transmitting the Commission's final rule--
Proceedings before the Commodity Futures Trading Commission; 
Rules Relating to Suspension or Disbarment from Appearance and 
Practice (RIN: 3038-AE21) received June 16, 2015.
    E.C. 1864--Jun. 18, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and 
Vegetable Programs, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Grapes Grown in a Designated Area of 
Southeastern California; Increased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: 
AMS-FV-14-0106; FV15-925-2 FR] received June 16, 2015.
    E.C. 1901--Jun. 24, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and 
Vegetable Programs, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Marketing Order Regulating the 
Handling of Spearmint Oil Produced in the Far West; Salable 
Quantities and Allotment Percentages for the 2015-2016 
Marketing Year [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-14-0096; FV15-985-1 FR] 
received June 22, 2015.
    E.C. 1902--Jun. 24, 2015: A letter from the Administrator, 
Rural Business--Cooperative Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's interim final rule--Biorefinery, 
Renewable Chemical, and Biobased Product Manufacturing 
Assistance Program (RIN: 0570-AA73) received June 22, 2015.
    E.C. 1981--Jul. 7, 2015: A letter from the Program Manager, 
BioPreferred Program, DM/OPPM/EMD, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Voluntary Labeling 
Program for Biobased Products (RIN: 0599-AA22) received June 
24, 2015.
    E.C. 2062--Jul. 8, 2015: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Importation of Beef From a Region in Argentina [Doc. No.: 
APHIS-2014-0032] (RIN: 0579-AD92) received July 7, 2015.
    E.C. 2063--Jul. 8, 2015: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Importation of Beef From a Region in Brazil [Doc. No.: 
APHIS-2009-0017] (RIN: 0579-AD41) received July 7, 2015.
    E.C. 2064--Jul. 8, 2015: A letter from the Program Manager, 
BioPreferred Program, Office of Procurement and Property 
Management, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Guidelines for Designating Biobased 
Products for Federal Procurement (RIN: 0599-AA23) received July 
1, 2015.
    E.C. 2165--Jul. 15, 2015: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Viruses, Serums, Toxins, and Analogous Products; Single 
Label Claim for Veterinary Biological Products [Doc. No.: 
APHIS-2011-0049] (RIN: 0579-AD64) received July 13, 2015.\4\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \4\Editor's note: the Parliamentarian's office altered its 
statutory referral listing from ``pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A)'' 
to include ``added by Public Law 104-121, Sec. 251''.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    E.C. 2186--Jul. 16, 2015: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Novaluron; 
Pesticide Tolerances [EPA-HQ-OPP-2014-0232; FRL-9929-57] 
received July 15, 2015.
    E.C. 2187--Jul. 16, 2015: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Thiabendazole; 
Pesticide Tolerances for Emergency Exemptions [EPA-HQ-OPP-2015-
0396; FRL-9929-95] received July 15, 2015.
    E.C. 2244--Jul. 21, 2015: A letter from the Chairman and 
Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's final rule--Organization and 
Functions; Field Office Locations (RIN: 3052-AD07) received 
July 20, 2015.
    E.C. 2262--Jul. 22, 2015: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
interim rule--Emerald Ash Borer; Quarantined Areas [Doc. No.: 
APHIS-2015-0028] received July 21, 2015.
    E.C. 2263--Jul. 22, 2015: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Khapra Beetle; New Regulated Countries and Regulated 
Articles [Doc. No.: APHIS-2013-0079] received July 21, 2015.
    E.C. 2292--Jul. 27, 2015: A letter from the Farm Service 
Agency Regulatory Review Director, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's interim rule--Conservation 
Reserve Program (RIN: 0560-AI30) received July 23, 2015.
    E.C. 2423--Sep. 8, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and 
Vegetable Programs, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Clarification of United States 
Antitrust Laws, Immunity, and Liability Under Marketing Order 
Programs [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-14-0072; FV14-900-2 FR] received 
August 20, 2015.
    E.C. 2424--Sep. 8, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and 
Vegetable Programs, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Cranberries Grown in States of 
Massachusetts, et al.; Revising Determination of Sales History 
[Doc. No.: AMS-FV-14-0091; FV15-929-1 FR] received August 20, 
2015.
    E.C. 2425--Sep. 8, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and 
Vegetable Programs, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Fruit, Vegetable, and Specialty 
Crops--Import Regulations; Changes to Reporting Requirements To 
Add Electronic Form Filing Option [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-14-0093; 
FV15-944/980/999-1 FIR] received August 20, 2015.
    E.C. 2426--Sep. 8, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and 
Vegetable Programs, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Olives Grown in California; Increased 
Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-14-0105; FV15-932-1 FR] 
received August 20, 2015.
    E.C. 2427--Sep. 8, 2015: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
interim rule--Amendment of Asian Longhorned Beetle Quarantine 
Areas in Massachusetts and New York [Doc. No.: APHIS-2015-0016] 
received August 11, 2015.
    E.C. 2428--Sep. 8, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Cotton and Tobacco Program, Agricultural 
Marketing Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Cotton Research and Promotion Program: 
Procedures for Conduct of Sign-up Period [AMS-CN-12-0059] 
received August 20, 2015.
    E.C. 2429--Sep. 8, 2015: A letter from the Board Chairman 
and CEO, Farm Credit Administration, transmitting the 
Administration's Major final rule--Loans in Areas Having 
Special Flood Hazards (RIN: 3052-AC93) received August 13, 
2015.
    E.C. 2654--Sep. 10, 2015: A letter from the Chairman and 
Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's final rule--Organization; 
Mergers, Consolidations, and Charter Amendments of Banks or 
Associations (RIN: 3052-AC72) received August 28, 2015.
    E.C. 2692--Sep. 11, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--
Processed Raspberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order; 
Late Payment and Interest Charges on Past Due Assessments [Doc. 
No.: AMS-FV-14-0042] received August 28, 2015.
    E.C. 2722--Sep. 15, 2015: A letter from the Acting 
Congressional Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health 
Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's affirmation of interim rule as final rule--Gypsy 
Moth Generally Infested Areas; Additions in Minnesota, 
Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin [Doc. No.: APHIS-2014-
0023] received September 8, 2015.
    E.C. 2843--Sep. 18, 2015: A letter from the Director, 
Budget and Performance Management, Farm Service Agency, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
proposed rule--Changes to Fees and Payment Methods (RIN: 0518-
AA05) received September 15, 2015.
    E.C. 2880--Sep. 22, 2015: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--Membership in a Registered Futures 
Association (RIN: 3038-AE09) received September 21, 2015.
    E.C. 2921--Sep. 24, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--
Blueberry Promotion, Research and Information Order; Expanding 
the Membership of the U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council and Other 
Changes [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-14-0089] received September 24, 2015.
    E.C. 2922--Sep. 24, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's interim rule--Onions 
Grown in Certain Designated Counties in Idaho, and Malheur 
County, Oregon; Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-15-
0027; FV15-958-1 IR] received September 24, 2015.
    E.C. 2923--Sep. 24, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--Apricots 
Grown in Designated Counties in Washington; Decreased 
Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-15-0033; FV15-922-1 IR] 
received September 24, 2015.
    E.C. 2924--Sep. 24, 2015: A letter from the Director, 
Issuances Staff, Office of Policy and Program Development, Food 
Safety and Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Eligibility of 
Lithuania to Export Meat and Meat Products to the United States 
[Doc. No.: FSIS-2014-0040] (RIN: 0583-AD57) received September 
24, 2015.
    E.C. 2925--Sep. 24, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's affirmation of 
interim rule as final rule--Irish Potatoes Grown in 
Southeastern States; Suspension of Marketing Order Provisions 
[Doc. No.: AMS-FV-14-0011; FV14-953-1 FIR] received September 
24, 2015.
    E.C. 2949--Sep. 25, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's affirmation of 
interim rule as final rule--Marketing Order Regulating the 
Handling of Spearmint Oil Produced in the Far West; Revision of 
the Salable Quantity and Allotment Percentage for Class 3 
(Native) Spearmint Oil for the 2014-2015 Marketing Year [Doc. 
No.: AMS-FV-13-0087; FV14-985-1C FIR] received September 24, 
2015.
    E.C. 2961--Sep. 29, 2015: A letter from the Acting 
Congressional Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health 
Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Importation of Kiwi From Chile Into 
the United States [Doc. No.: APHIS-2014-0002] (RIN: 0579-AD98) 
received September 28, 2015.
    E.C. 2965--Sep. 29, 2015: A letter from the Assistant 
Secretary, Legislative Affairs, Department of State, 
transmitting the Department's 2014 annual report on activities 
under the Enterprise for the Americas Initiative and the 
Tropical Forest Conservation Act of 1998, in accordance with 
Sec. 614 of the Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance 
Act (7 U.S.C. 1738m); Sec. 710 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 
1961 (22 U.S.C. 2430i); and Sec. 813 of the Foreign Assistance 
Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2431k), as amended; jointly to the 
Committees on Foreign Affairs and Agriculture.
    E.C. 2966--Sep. 30, 2015: A letter from the Acting 
Director, Program Development and Regulatory Analysis, Rural 
Utilities Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's interim rule--Rural Broadband Access Loans and 
Loan Guarantees (RIN: 0572-AC34) received September 29, 2015.
    E.C. 3016--Oct. 2, 2015: A letter from the Acting Director, 
Program Development and Regulatory Analysis, Rural Utilities 
Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Section 306D Water Systems for Rural 
and Native Villages in Alaska (RIN: 0572-AC28) received October 
1, 2015.
    E.C. 3107--Oct. 8, 2015: A letter from the Acting 
Congressional Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health 
Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Fee Increases for Overtime Services 
[Doc. No.: APHIS-2009-0047] received October 5, 2015.
    E.C. 3108--Oct. 8, 2015: A letter from the Acting 
Congressional Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health 
Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's interim rule--Golden Nematode; Removal of 
Regulated Areas in Orleans, Nassau, and Suffolk Counties, New 
York [Doc. No.: APHIS-2015-0040] received October 5, 2015.
    E.C. 3109--Oct. 8, 2015: A letter from the Acting 
Congressional Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health 
Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Importation of Tomato Plantlets in 
Approved Growing Media From Mexico [Doc. No.: APHIS-2014-0099] 
(RIN: 0579-AE06) received October 5, 2015.
    E.C. 3149--Oct. 16, 2015: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Pesticides; 
Agricultural Worker Protection Standard Revisions [EPA-HQ-OPP-
2011-0184; FRL-9931-81] (RIN: 2070-AJ22) received October 9, 
2015.
    E.C. 3216--Oct. 21, 2015: A letter from the Director, 
National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--
Competitive and Noncompetitive Non-formula Federal Assistance 
Programs--Specific Administrative Provisions for the Food 
Insecurity Nutrition Incentive Grants Program (RIN: 0524-AA65) 
received October 19, 2015.
    E.C. 3231--Oct. 23, 2015: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--Repeal of the Exempt Commercial Market 
and Exempt Board of Trade Exemptions (RIN: 3038-AE10) received 
October 21, 2015.
    E.C. 3232--Oct. 23, 2015: A letter from the Chairman and 
Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's notification of its 2015 
compensation program adjustments, including the Agency's 
current salary range structure and the performance-based merit 
pay matrix, in accordance with Sec. 1206 of the Financial 
Institutions, Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act of 1989.
    E.C. 3288--Oct. 28, 2015: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Importation of Fresh Peppers From Ecuador Into the United 
States [Doc. No.: APHIS-2014-0086] (RIN: 0579-AE07) received 
October 26, 2015.
    E.C. 3332--Nov. 2, 2015: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Rimsulfuron; 
Pesticide Tolerances [EPA-HQ-OPP-2013-0035; FRL-9912-31] 
received October 29, 2015.
    E.C. 3333--Nov. 2, 2015: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Nicosulfuron; 
Pesticide Tolerances [EPA-HQ-OPP-2013-0034; FRL-9912-40] 
received October 29, 2015.
    E.C. 3380--Nov. 5, 2015: A letter from the Regulatory 
Review Group, Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Agriculture 
Priorities and Allocations System (RIN: 0560-AH68) received 
November 4, 2015.
    E.C. 3418--Nov. 16, 2015: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Importation of Two Hybrids of Unshu Orange From the 
Republic of Korea Into the Continental United States [Doc. No.: 
APHIS-2013-0085] (RIN: 0579-AD87) received November 9, 2015.
    E.C. 3553--Nov. 30, 2015: A letter from the Acting 
Legislative Director, Natural Resources Conservation Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--NRCS Procedures for Granting Equitable Relief (RIN: 0578-
AA57) received November 19, 2015.\5\
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    \5\Editor's note: the Parliamentarian's office altered its 
statutory referral listing from ``pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A); 
added by Public Law 104-121, Sec. 251'' to include ``(110 Stat. 868)''.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    E.C. 3590--Dec. 2, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and 
Vegetable Programs, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's interim rule--Oranges and Grapefruit Grown in 
Lower Rio Grande Valley in Texas; Decreased Assessment Rate 
[Doc. No.: AMS-FV-15-0035; FV15-906-1 IR] received December 1, 
2015.
    E.C. 3591--Dec. 2, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and 
Vegetable Programs, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's interim rule--Domestic Dates Produced or Packed in 
Riverside County, California; Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. 
No.: AMS-FV-15-0034; FV15-987-1 IFR] received December 1, 2015.
    E.C. 3592--Dec. 2, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and 
Vegetable Programs, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Walnuts Grown in California; Increased 
Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-15-0026; FV15-984-1 FR] 
received December 1, 2015.
    E.C. 3593--Dec. 2, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Livestock, 
Poultry, and Seed Program, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Soybean Promotion and 
Research: Amend the Order To Adjust Representation on the 
United Soybean Board [Doc. No.: AMS-LPS-15-0016] received 
December 1, 2015.
    E.C. 3594--Dec. 2, 2015: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's Major 
final rule--User Fees for Agricultural Quarantine and 
Inspection Services [Doc. No.: APHIS-2013-0021] (RIN: 0579-
AD77) received December 1, 2015.
    E.C. 3595--Dec. 2, 2015: A letter from the Associate 
Administrator, Specialty Crops Program, Promotion and Economics 
Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's termination of 
proceeding--Hardwood Lumber and Hardwood Plywood Promotion, 
Research and Information Order; Termination of Rulemaking 
Proceeding [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-11-0074; PR-A1, A2, B and B2] 
received December 1, 2015.
    E.C. 3732--Dec. 9, 2015: A letter from the Director, 
Issuance Staff, Office of Policy and Program Development, Food 
Safety and Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's Major final rule--Mandatory 
Inspection of Fish of the Order Siluriformes and Products 
Derived From Such Fish [Doc. No.: FSIS-2008-0031] (RIN: 0583-
AD36) received December 8, 2015.
    E.C. 3740--Dec. 10, 2015: A letter from the Director, 
Issuances Staff, Office of Policy and Program Development, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Mandatory Inspection of Fish of the Order Siluriformes 
and Products Derived From Such Fish [Doc. No.: FSIS-2008-0031] 
(RIN: 0583-AD36) received December 8, 2015.
    E.C. 3764--Dec. 15, 2015: A letter from the Administrator, 
Risk Management Agency, Department of Agriculture, transmitting 
the Department's final rule--Area Risk Protection Insurance 
(ARPI) Regulations; ARPI Basic Provisions and ARPI Forage Crop 
Insurance Provisions [Doc. No.: FCIC-15-0003] (RIN: 0563-AC49) 
received December 11, 2015.
    E.C. 4001--Jan. 12, 2016: A letter from the Regulatory 
Review Group, Commodity Credit Corporation, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--Payment 
Limitation and Payment Eligibility; Actively Engaged in Farming 
(RIN: 0560-AI31) received January 5, 2016.
    E.C. 4030--Jan. 13, 2016: A letter from the Co-Chairs, 
National Commission on Hunger, transmitting the Commission's 
report entitled ``Freedom from Hunger: An Achievable Goal for 
the United States of America'' for 2015, pursuant to Public Law 
113-76, div. A, title VII, Sec. 743(a)(3); (128 Stat. 40).
    E.C. 4031--Jan. 13, 2016: A letter from the Management and 
Program Analyst, Forest Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's notice of final directive--Ski 
Area Water Clause (RIN: 0596-AD14) received January 11, 2016.
    E.C. 4122--Jan. 28, 2016: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Exportation of Live Animals, Hatching Eggs, and Animal 
Germplasm From the United States [Doc. No.: APHIS-2012-0049] 
(RIN: 0579-AE00) received January 20, 2016.
    E.C. 4123--Jan. 28, 2016: A letter from the Administrator, 
Rural Housing Service, Rural Development, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--
Community Facilities Technical Assistance and Training Grants 
(RIN: 0575-AD02) received January 15, 2016.
    E.C. 4164--Feb. 2, 2016: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's direct 
final rule--Black Stem Rust; Additions of Rust-Resistant 
Species and Varieties [Doc. No.: APHIS-2015-0079] received 
January 28, 2016.
    E.C. 4165--Feb. 2, 2016: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
affirmation of interim final rule--Lacey Act Implementation 
Plan; Definitions for Exempt and Regulated Articles [Doc. No.: 
APHIS-2009-0018] (RIN: 0579-AD11) received January 28, 2016.
    E.C. 4166--Feb. 2, 2016: A letter from the Management and 
Program Analyst, ORMS, D&R;, Forest Service, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--
Stewardship End Result Contracting Projects (RIN: 0596-AD25) 
received January 28, 2016.
    E.C. 4203--Feb. 3, 2016: A letter from the Director, 
National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--
Hispanic-Serving Agricultural Colleges and Universities (HSACU) 
(RIN: 0524-AA39) received January 29, 2016.
    E.C. 4204--Feb. 3, 2016: A letter from the Director, 
National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--
Competitive and Noncompetitive Non-formula Federal Assistance 
Programs--General Award Administrative Provisions and Specific 
Administrative Provisions (RIN: 0524-AA58) received February 1, 
2016.
    E.C. 4205--Feb. 3, 2016: A letter from the Board Chairman 
and Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's proposed rule--Organization; 
Funding and Fiscal Affairs, Loan Policies and Operations, and 
Funding Operations; Farmer Mac Investment Eligibility (RIN: 
3052-AC86) received January 29, 2016.
    E.C. 4222--Feb. 4, 2016: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Review Group, Farm Service Agency, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--Highly 
Fractionated Indian Land (HFIL) Loan Program (RIN: 0560-AI32) 
received February 3, 2016.
    E.C. 4254--Feb. 8, 2016: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Importation of Orchids in Growing Media From Taiwan [Doc. 
No.: APHIS-2014-0041] (RIN: 0579-AE01) received February 5, 
2016.
    E.C. 4351--Feb. 23, 2016: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
interim rule--Conditions for Payment of Highly Pathogenic Avian 
Influenza Indemnity Claims [Doc. No.: APHIS-2015-0061] (RIN: 
0579-AE14) received February 10, 2016.
    E.C. 4352--Feb. 23, 2016: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Importation of Phalaenopsis Spp. Plants for Planting in 
Approved Growing Media From China to the Continental United 
States [Doc. No.: APHIS-2014-0106] (RIN: 0579-AE10) received 
February 16, 2016.
    E.C. 4353--Feb. 23, 2016: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Review Group, Farm Service Agency, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--Direct 
Farm Ownership Microloan (RIN: 0560-AI33) received February 12, 
2016.
    E.C. 4354--Feb. 23, 2016: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Review Group, Farm Service Agency, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--Direct 
Farm Ownership Microloan (RIN: 0560-AI33) received February 12, 
2016.
    E.C. 4421--Feb. 23, 2016: A letter from the Board Chairman 
and Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's proposed fiscal year 2017 
budget, pursuant to Public Law 92-181; jointly to the 
Committees on Agriculture and Oversight and Government Reform.
    E.C. 4478--Feb. 26, 2016: A letter from the Director, BPMS, 
Agricultural Research Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Changes to Fees and 
Payment Methods (RIN: 0518-AA05) received February 25, 2016.
    E.C. 4479--Feb. 26, 2016: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
affirmation of interim rule as final rule--Golden Nematode; 
Removal of Regulated Areas in Orleans, Nassau, and Suffolk 
Counties, New York [Doc. No.: APHIS-2015-0040] received 
February 25, 2016.
    E.C. 4507--Mar. 1, 2016: A letter from the Director, 
Transparency and Accountability Reporting Division, Office of 
the Chief Financial Officer, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Uniform 
Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit 
Requirements for Federal Awards (RIN: 0505-AA15) received 
February 26, 2016.
    E.C. 4508--Mar. 1, 2016: A letter from the Director, 
Engineering and Environmental Staff, Water and Environmental 
Programs, Rural Utilities Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Environmental 
Policies and Procedures (RIN: 0575-AC56) received February 26, 
2016.
    E.C. 4632--Mar. 14, 2016: A letter from the Acting 
Director, Legislative Affairs, Natural Resources Conservation 
Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's Major final rule--Conservation Stewardship Program 
[Doc. No.: NRCS-2014-0008] (RIN: 0578-AA63) received March 10, 
2016.
    E.C. 4714--Mar. 23, 2016: A letter from the Regulatory 
Review Group, Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's correcting amendments--Direct 
Farm Ownership Microloan; Correction (RIN: 0560-AI33) received 
March 21, 2016.
    E.C. 4758--Apr. 11, 2016: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--Trade Options (RIN: 3038-AE26) 
received March 29, 2016.
    E.C. 4759--Apr. 11, 2016: A letter from the Deputy 
Secretary, Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting 
the Commission's final rule--Alternative to Fingerprinting 
Requirement for Foreign Natural Persons (RIN: 3038-AE16) 
received April 7, 2016.
    E.C. 4760--Apr. 11, 2016: A letter from the PRAO Branch 
Chief, Food and Nutrition Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Supplemental 
Nutrition Assistance Program: Nutrition Education and Obesity 
Prevention Grant Program [FNS: 2011-0017] (RIN: 0584-AE07) 
received April 6, 2016.
    E.C. 5239--May 3, 2016: A letter from the PRAO Branch 
Chief, Food and Nutrition Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Requirements for the 
Distribution and Control of Donated Foods--The Emergency Food 
Assistance Program: Implementation of the Agricultural Act of 
2014 [FNS-2014-0040] (RIN: 0584-AE29) received April 29, 2016.
    E.C. 5334--May 13, 2016: A letter from the Deputy 
Secretary, Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting 
the Commission's final rule--Amendments to the Definitions of 
``Portfolio Reconciliation'' and ``Material Terms'' for 
Purposes of Swap Portfolio Reconciliation (RIN: 3038-AE17) 
received May 11, 2016.
    E.C. 5355--May 17, 2016: A letter from the Regulatory 
Review Group, Commodity Credit Corporation, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--Farm 
Storage Facility Loan (FSFL) Program; Portable Storage 
Facilities and Reduced Down Payment for FSFL Microloans (RIN: 
0560-AI35) received May 13, 2016.
    E.C. 5435--May 23, 2016: A letter from the Acting Director, 
Legislative Affairs, Natural Resources Conservation Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
interim rule adopted as final with changes--Environmental 
Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) [Doc. No.: NRCS-2014-0007] 
(RIN: 0578-AA62) received May 16, 2016.
    E.C. 5473--May 24, 2016: A letter from the Board Chairman 
and Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's final rule--Regulatory 
Capital Rules: Regulatory Capital, Implementation of Tier 1/
Tier 2 Framework (RIN: 3052-AC81) received May 19, 2016.
    E.C. 5493--May 25, 2016: A letter from the Director, Center 
for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--Federal 
Agency Final Regulations Implementing Executive Order 13559: 
Fundamental Principles and Policymaking Criteria for 
Partnerships With Faith-Based and Other Neighborhood 
Organizations (RIN: 0503-AA55) received May 19, 2016.
    E.C. 5502--May 26, 2016: A letter from the Director, 
Issuances Staff, Office of Policy and Program Development, Food 
Safety and Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Classes of Poultry 
[Doc. No.: FSIS-2015-0026] (RIN: 0583-AD60) received May 23, 
2016.
    E.C. 5503--May 26, 2016: A letter from the Administrator, 
Rural Business--Cooperative Service, Rural Development, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's Major 
final rule--Guaranteed Loanmaking and Servicing Regulations 
(RIN: 0570-AA85) received May 24, 2016.
    E.C. 5542--Jun. 3, 2016: A letter from the Acting 
Congressional Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health 
Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Mexican Hass Avocado Import Program 
[Doc. No.: APHIS-2014-0088] (RIN: 0579-AE05) received May 31, 
2016.
    E.C. 5543--Jun. 3, 2016: A letter from the Regulatory 
Review Group, FSA, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Margin Protection Program for Dairy 
(RIN: 0560-AI36) received May 23, 2016.
    E.C. 5658--Jun. 10, 2016: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's Major final rule--Margin Requirements for 
Uncleared Swaps for Swap Dealers and Major Swap Participants--
Cross-Border Application of the Margin Requirements (RIN: 3038-
AC97) received June 8, 2016.
    E.C. 5875--Jul. 5, 2016: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--Amendments to Swap Data record-keeping 
and Reporting Requirements for Cleared Swaps (RIN: 3038-AE12) 
received June 24, 2016.
    E.C. 5900--Jul. 6, 2016: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Use of Electronic Information Exchange Systems; 
Miscellaneous Amendments [Doc. No.: APHIS-2016-0016] received 
June 22, 2016.
    E.C. 5912--Jul. 7, 2016: A letter from the Under Secretary, 
Rural Development, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's interim rule--Community Facility Loans (RIN: 0575-
AD05) received July 5, 2016.
    E.C. 5913--Jul. 7, 2016: A letter from the Chairman, Farm 
Credit System Insurance Corporation, transmitting the annual 
report for CY 2015, in accordance with Sec. 5.64 of the Farm 
Credit Act of 1971, as amended.
    E.C. 5944--Jul. 8, 2016: A letter from the Board Chairman 
and Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the 2015 Annual Report on the Farm Credit System, 
added by Public Law 92-181, Sec. 5.17(a)(3) (as amended by 
Public Law 100-399, Sec. 901(m)); (102 Stat. 1003).
    E.C. 6189--Jul. 21, 2016: A letter from the Director, 
Issuance Staff, Food Safety and Inspection Service, Department 
of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--
Electronic Export Application and Certification Charge; 
Flexibility in the Requirements for Export Inspection Marks, 
Devices, and Certificates; Egg Products Export Certification 
[Doc. No.: FSIS-2009-0026] (RIN: 0583-AD41) received July 15, 
2016.
    E.C. 6340--Sep. 6, 2016: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
interim rule--Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State and Zone 
Designations; California [Doc. No.: APHIS-2016-0052] received 
August 8, 2016.
    E.C. 6341--Sep. 6, 2016: A letter from the Director, 
Issuances Staff, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Eligibility of Namibia To Export Meat 
Products to the United States [Doc. No.: FSIS-2012-0028] (RIN: 
0583-AD51) received July 28, 2016.
    E.C. 6342--Sep. 6, 2016: A letter from the Regulatory 
Review Group, Commodity Credit Corporation, Farm Service 
Agency, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Environmental Policies and Procedures; 
Compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act and 
Related Authorities (RIN: 0560-AH02) received August 4, 2016.
    E.C. 6343--Sep. 6, 2016: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--National Poultry Improvement Plan and Auxiliary 
Provisions [Doc. No.: APHIS-2014-0101] (RIN: 0579-AE16) 
received August 15, 2016.
    E.C. 6344--Sep. 6, 2016: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, National Organic Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--National Organic Program (NOP); Sunset 2016 Amendments to 
the National List [Doc. No.: AMS-NOP-15-0052; NOP-15-12] (RIN: 
0581-AD43) received August 16, 2016.
    E.C. 6345--Sep. 6, 2016: A letter from the Acting Deputy 
Director, Program Development and Regulatory Analysis, Rural 
Utilities Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's Major final rule--Rural Broadband Access Loans and 
Loan Guarantees (RIN: 0572-AC06) received August 16, 2016.
    E.C. 6346--Sep. 6, 2016: A letter from the Board Chairman 
and Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's final rule--Organization and 
Functions; Releasing Information; Privacy Act Regulations; 
Enforcement of Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap in 
Programs or Activities Conducted by the Farm Credit 
Administration (RIN: 3052-AD17) received July 26, 2016.
    E.C. 6347--Sep. 6, 2016: A letter from the Board Chairman 
and Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's Major final rule--Margin and 
Capital Requirements for Covered Swap Entities (RIN: 3052-AC69) 
received July 28, 2016.
    E.C. 6348--Sep. 6, 2016: A letter from the Chairman and 
Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's final rule--Federal 
Agricultural Mortgage Corporation Governance; Standards of 
Conduct; Risk Management; and Disclosure and Reporting (RIN: 
3052-AC89) received July 28, 2016.
    E.C. 6349--Sep. 6, 2016: A letter from the Director, 
Issuances Staff, Food Safety and Inspection Service, Department 
of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--
Requirements for the Disposition of Non-Ambulatory Disabled 
Veal Calves [Doc. No.: FSIS-2014-0020] (RIN: 0583-AD54) 
received August 2, 2016.
    E.C. 6350--Sep. 6, 2016: A letter from the Management 
Analyst, Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards 
Administration, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Reauthorization of the United States 
Grain Standards Act (RIN: 0580-AB24) received August 4, 2016.
    E.C. 6351--Sep. 6, 2016: A letter from the Associate 
Director for Operations, National Institute of Food and 
Agriculture, Office of Grants and Financial Management, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Competitive 
Federal Grants Program--General Administration Provisions (RIN: 
0524-AA67) received August 2, 2016.
    E.C. 6692--Sep. 8, 2016: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Viruses, Serums, Toxins, and Analogous Products; 
Packaging and Labeling [Doc. No.: APHIS-2008-0008] (RIN: 0579-
AD19) received August 30, 2016.
    E.C. 6693--Sep. 8, 2016: A letter from the Acting Director, 
PDRA Rural Utilities Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's interim rule--Rural Broadband 
Access Loans and Loan Guarantees (RIN: 0572-AC34) received 
September 1, 2016.
    E.C. 6968--Sep. 26, 2016: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--System Safeguards Testing Requirements 
for Derivatives Clearing Organizations (RIN: 3038-AE29) 
received September 21, 2016.
    E.C. 6969--Sep. 26, 2016: A letter from the Chairman and 
Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's notification of its 2016 
compensation program adjustments, including the Agency's 
current salary range structure and the performance-based merit 
pay matrix, pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1833b(a); added by Public Law 
101-73, Sec. 1206; (103 Stat. 523).
    E.C. 6981--Sep. 27, 2016: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--System Safeguards Testing Requirements 
(RIN: 3038-AE30) September 22, 2016.
    E.C. 7048--Nov. 14, 2016: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Tart Cherries Grown in the States of Michigan, et al.; 
Revision of Optimum Supply Requirements and Establishment of 
Inventory Release Procedures [Doc. No.: AMS-FV-15-0047; FV15-
930-2 FR] received October 3, 2016.
    E.C. 7049--Nov. 14, 2016: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
interim rule--Pistachios Grown in California, Arizona, and New 
Mexico; Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0076 
SC16-983-2 IR] received October 3, 2016.
    E.C. 7050--Nov. 14, 2016: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
affirmation of interim rule as final rule--Oranges and 
Grapefruit Grown in Lower Rio Grande Valley in Texas; 
Relaxation of Container and Pack Requirements [Doc. No.: AMS-
SC-16-0021; SC16-906-1 FIR] received October 25, 2016.
    E.C. 7051--Nov. 14, 2016: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service; Livestock, Poultry, and Seed 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Amendment to the Definition of 
``Condition'' and Prerequisite Requirement for Shell Eggs 
Eligible for Grading and Certification Stated in the 
Regulations Governing the Voluntary Grading of Shell Eggs [Doc. 
No.: AMS-LPS-15-0044] received October 3, 2016.
    E.C. 7052--Nov. 14, 2016: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's Major final rule--Clearing Requirement 
Determination under Section 2(h) of the Commodity Exchange Act 
for Interest Rate Swaps (RIN: 3038-AE20) received October 12, 
2016.
    E.C. 7053--Nov. 14, 2016: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
interim rule--Domestic Dates Produced or Packed in Riverside 
County, California; Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-
SC-16-0084; SC16-987-1 IR] received October 5, 2016.
    E.C. 7054--Nov. 14, 2016: A letter from the Chief, GAMB, 
Financial Management and Agreements Division, Agricultural 
Research Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--General Administrative Policy for Non-
Assistance Cooperative Agreements (RIN: 0518-AA06) received 
October 24, 2016.
    E.C. 7055--Nov. 14, 2016: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Review Group, Farm Service Agency, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--EZ 
Guarantee Program and Micro Lender Program (MLP) Status (RIN: 
0560-AI34) received October 27, 2016.
    E.C. 7056--Nov. 14, 2016: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Oranges and Grapefruit Grown in Lower Rio Grande Valley 
in Texas; Increased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0059; 
SC16-906-2 FR] received November 2, 2016.
    E.C. 7057--Nov. 14, 2016: A letter from the PRAO Branch 
Chief, Food and Nutrition Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Regulatory 
Implementation of Office of Management and Budget's Uniform 
Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit 
Requirements for Federal Awards (RIN: 0584-AE42) received 
October 6, 2016.
    E.C. 7058--Nov. 14, 2016: A letter from the Acting 
Legislative Affairs Director, Natural Resources Conservation 
Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Agricultural Conservation Easement 
Program [Doc. No.: NRCS-2014-0011] (RIN: 0578-AA61) received 
October 21, 2016.
    E.C. 7059--Nov. 14, 2016: A letter from the Administrator, 
Specialty Crops Program, Promotion and Economics Division, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's interim rule--Softwood Lumber 
Research, Promotion, Consumer Education and Industry 
Information Order; Revision of Time Frame for Continuance 
Referenda [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0054] received October 17, 2016.
    E.C. 7467--Nov. 16, 2016: A letter from the Acting 
Director, PDRA, Rural Utilities Service, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--New 
Equipment Contract, RUS Contract Form 395 for 
Telecommunications and Broadband Borrowers (RIN: 0572-AC29) 
received November 7, 2016.
    E.C. 7624--Nov. 29, 2016: A letter from the Deputy 
Secretary, Division of Swap Dealer and Intermediary Oversight, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--Chief Compliance Officer Annual Report 
Requirements for Futures Commission Merchants, Swap Dealers, 
and Major Swap Participants; Amendments to Filing Dates (RIN: 
3038-AE49) received November 17, 2016.
    E.C. 7724--Dec. 5, 2016: A letter from the Deputy 
Secretary, Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting 
the Commission's final rules--Commodity Pool Operator Financial 
Reports (RIN: 3038-AE47) received December 1, 2016.
    E.C. 7872--Dec. 16, 2016: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Raisins Produced From Grapes Grown in California and 
Imported Raisins; Removal of Language [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-
0065; SC16-989-2 FR] received December 9, 2016.
    E.C. 7873--Dec. 16, 2016: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Irish Potatoes Grown in Colorado; Modification of the 
Handling Regulation for Area No. 2 [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0042; 
SC16-948-1 FR] received December 9, 2016.
    E.C. 7874--Dec. 16, 2016: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
affirmation of interim rule as final rule--Olives Grown in 
California; Suspension and Revision of Incoming Size-Grade 
Requirements [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0031; SC16-932-1 FIR] 
received December 9, 2016.
    E.C. 7971--Dec. 23, 2016: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
interim rule--Changes to Reporting and Notification 
Requirements and Other Clarifying Changes for Imported Fruits, 
Vegetables, and Specialty Crops [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0083; 
SC16-944/980/999-1 IR] received December 20, 2016.
    E.C. 7972--Dec. 23, 2016: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Pesticides; 
Certification of Pesticide Applicators [EPA-HQ-OPP-2011-0183; 
FRL-9956-70] (RIN: 2070-AJ20) received December 14, 2016.
    E.C. 7973--Dec. 23, 2016: A letter from the PRAO Branch 
Chief, Food and Nutrition Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Supplemental 
Nutrition Assistance Program: Photo Electronic Benefit Transfer 
(EBT) Card Implementation Requirements [FNS-2016-0003] (RIN: 
0584-AE45) received December 20, 2016.
    E.C. 8036--Dec. 23, 2016: A letter from the Management and 
Program Analyst, Business Operations, Forest Service Department 
of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--
National Forest System Land Management Planning (RIN: 0596-
AD28) received December 20, 2016; jointly to the Committees on 
Natural Resources and Agriculture.

                        b. statutory and reports

    USDA: Committee Charter for the Grain Inspection Advisory 
Committee as required by the Federal Advisory Committee Act. 
January 7, 2015.
    FCA: Farm Credit Administration Fiscal Year 2016 Proposed 
Budget and Performance Plan. February 5, 2015.
    USDA: National Advisory Committee on Microbiological 
Criteria for Foods as required by the Federal Advisory 
Committee Act. February 5, 2015.
    USDA: Plant Variety Protection Board as required by the 
Federal Advisory Committee Act. February 5, 2015.
    USDA: Advisory Committee on Beginning Farmers and Rancher 
as required by the Federal Advisory Committee Act. February 6, 
2015.
    FCA: Final Rule adopted by the Farm Credit Administration 
Board under the provisions of the Farm Credit Act of 1971 to 
amend Title 12, Chapter VI of the Code of Federal Regulations. 
February 20, 2015.
    USDA: Letter regarding the U.S. Department of Agriculture's 
Forest Service's restructuring efforts to reorganize the Forest 
Service Job Crops National Office and the 28 Job Corps Civilian 
Conservation Centers. March 2, 2015.
    USDA: Forest Inventory and Analysis Strategic Plan as 
required by the Agricultural Act of 2014. March 2, 2015.
    USDA: Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and 21st Century 
Agriculture as required by the Federal Advisory Committee Act. 
March 13, 2015.
    FCSIC: 2014 Annual Report as required under the 
Notification and Federal Employee Antidiscrimination and 
Retaliation Act of 2002. March 18, 2015.
    FCA: 2014 Annual Report as required by the Notification and 
Federal Employee Antidiscrimination and Retaliation Act of 
2002. March 18, 2015.
    DOI: Stewardship Contracting Fiscal Year 2014 Report as 
required by the Agricultural Act of 2014. March 18, 2015.
    USDA: Letter informing Committee of FOIA request from 
growers of grapes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, onion and 
garlic in California. March 25, 2105.
    USDA: Peanut Revenue Crop Insurance Program as required by 
the Agricultural Act of 2014. March 25, 2015.
    U.S. Dept. of State: Report to Congress on efforts by 
Mexico to meet its treaty deliveries of water to the Rio Grande 
in accordance with the treaty between U.S. and Mexico. March 
26, 2015.
    OMB: Report to Congress on Implementation of the Resource 
Conservation and Recovery Act; Farm Security and Rural 
Investment Act of 2002; and the Food, Conservation, and Energy 
Act of 2008. April 16, 2015.
    USDA: Task Force on Agricultural Air Quality Research as 
required by the Federal Advisory Committee Act. April 16, 2015.
    USDA: Report regarding approved purchase of land in 
Ontonagon County, Michigan as required by the Weeks Act at 
U.S.C. 521(b). April 20, 2015
    AMS: Letter providing releases of names for the Pistachio 
Marketing Order as required under Section 1663 of the Food 
Security Act of 1985.
    USDA: Letter providing a copy of the Pesticide Data Program 
Summary of 2013 Data. April 2015.
    EPA: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Fiscal Year 
2014 annual report prepared in accordance with Section 203 of 
the Notification and Federal Employee Antidiscrimination and 
Retaliation Act of 2002, Public Law 107-174. April 24, 2015.
    USDA: Federal Grain Inspection Service Annual Report as 
required under Section 87 of the U.S. Grain Standards Act. May 
1, 2015.
    USDA: Study of Food Safety Report as required under Section 
522c of the Federal Crop Insurance Act as Amended by the 
Agricultural Act of 2014. May 6, 2015.
    USDA: Letter to outline the Department of Agriculture's 
Forest Service estimate of anticipated wildland fire 
suppression costs for fiscal year (FY) 2015, as required in the 
FY 2010 Appropriation, Public Law 111-88, Title V--FLAME Act. 
May 11, 2015.
    USDA: Committee Charter for the Advisory Committee on 
Beginning Farmers and Ranchers in compliance with P.L. 92-463. 
May 15, 2015.
    U.S. Office of Special Counsel: Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 
1213(e)(3) reports based on disclosures made by whistleblowers 
at USDA Office for the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights. 
May 18, 2015.
    U.S. Office of Special Counsel: USDA report based on 
disclosures of wrongdoing at the Office of the Assistant 
Secretary for Civil Rights. May 18, 2015.
    FCA: Semiannual report prepared by the Inspector General of 
the Farm Credit Administration for the period of October 1, 
2014-March 31, 2015, pursuant to section 5 of the Inspector 
General Act of 1978, as amended. May 21, 2015.
    USDA: Semiannual Report to Congress published by OIG at 
USDA to highlight accomplishments from October 1, 2014-March 
31, 2015. May 26, 2015.
    USDA: Report on programs that address the issue of produce 
represented as grown in the United States when it is fact not 
grown in the United States as required by Section 12309 of the 
Agricultural Act of 2014.
    FCA: Final rule adopted by FCA Board to amend Title 12, 
Chapter VI of the Code of Federal Regulations pursuant to 5 
U.S.C. 801(a)(1). May 22, 2015.
    USDA: Eastern Washington Cascades Provincial Advisory 
Committee and Deschutes Provincial Advisory Committee as 
required un the Federal Advisory Committee Act. May 27, 2015.
    USDA: Letter to advise of the acquisition of privately 
owned lands in Minnesota per the Weeks Act at 16 U.S.C. 521(b). 
May 28, 2015.
    USDA: Report as required by Section 508(c)(6)(D) of the 
Federal Crop Insurance Act as Amended by Section 11023 of the 
Agricultural Act of 2014. May 29, 2015.
    USDA: Eastern Region Recreation Resource Advisory 
Committee; Southern Region Recreation Advisory Committee; 
Pacific Northwest Region Recreation Advisory Committee; Pacific 
Southwest Region Recreation Resource Advisory Committee; and 
Colorado Recreation Resource Advisory Committee as required by 
the Federal Advisory Committee Act. June 3, 2015.
    GAO: Report on a rule promulgated by USDA, Rural Business--
Cooperative Service, Rural Housing Service, Rural Utilities 
Service, Farm Service Agency entitled ``Strategic Economic and 
Community Development''. June 4, 2015.
    USDA: In compliance with P.L. 92-463, the Federal Advisory 
Committee act are approved Trade Committee charters for the 
Agricultural Policy Advisory Committee, the Agricultural 
Technical Advisory Committee for Trade in Animals and Animal 
Products, the Agricultural Technical Advisory Committee for 
Trade in Fruits and Vegetables, the Agricultural Technical 
Advisory Committee for Trade in Grains, Feed, Oilseed and 
Planting Seeds, the Agricultural Technical Advisory Committee 
for Trade in Processed Foods, the Agricultural Technical 
Advisor Committee for Trade in Sweeteners and Sweetener 
Products, the Agricultural Technical advisory Committee for 
Trade in Tobacco, Cotton and Peanuts. June 8, 2015.
    USDA: Update on the progress of the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service in addressing 
the provisions on fish in the order of Siluriformes as required 
by Section 12106(b)(2) of the Agricultural Act of 2014. June 5, 
2015.
    USDA: Study to assess the economic impact of the biobased 
products industry as required by Section 9002(a)(3)(B) of the 
Agricultural Act of 2014. June 15, 2015.
    USDA: Letter to inform the Committee that AMS intends to 
release copies of the lists of growers of cranberries as 
required under FOIA. June 17, 2015.
    USDA: Report on implementation of concluded appeals to the 
NAD from RMA as required under Section 14009(b) of the Food, 
Energy, and Conservation Act of 2008. June 19, 2015
    USDA: Specialty Crop Report, as required by instructions 
contained in section 508(a)(6)(B) of the Federal Crop Insurance 
Act. June 19, 2015.
    USDA: USDA Annual Report for FY2014 as required by Public 
Law 107-174. June 11, 2015.
    USDA: Report of proposed land acquisition on the Hiawatha 
National Forest in the State of Michigan as required by the 
Weeks Act of 16 U.S.C. 521b. June 25, 2015.
    USDA: Data Gathering Report as required by the instructions 
contained in section 522(c)(23) of the Federal Crop Insurance 
Act, as amended by the Agricultural Act of 2014. July 2, 2015.
    GAO: Report on a major rule promulgated by USDA, Rural 
Business--Cooperative Service, Rural Utilities Service 
entitled, Biorefinery, Renewable Chemical, and Biobased 
Product, Manufacturing Assistance Program (RIN: 0570-AA73) 
pursuant to Section 801(a)(2)(A). July 8, 2015.
    USDA: Report regarding the use of the categorical 
exclusions (CE) under the Healthy Forest Restoration Act 
(HRFA), as amended by section 8204 of the Agricultural Act of 
2014. June 25, 2015.
    USDA: Table showing modification and one addition to the 
conveyance list as required under Section 503 of Public Law 
106-54. July 7, 2015.
    USDA: Report concerning acquiring a tract of land owned by 
Double A Firewood, Inc located within the De Soto National 
Forest in the State of Mississippi. July 14, 2015.
    USDA: Forest Resource Coordinating Committee in compliance 
with P.L. 92-463, the Federal Advisory Committee Act. July 16, 
2015.
    GAO: Report on a major rule promulgated by the Department 
of Agriculture, Animal, and Plant Health Inspection Service: 
Importation of Beef from a Region in Brazil. July 20, 2015.
    GAO: Report on a major rule promulgated by the Department 
of Agriculture, Animal, and Plant Health Inspection Service: 
Importation of Beef from a Region in Brazil. July 20, 2015.
    USDA: Report of purchase of privately owned land known as 
the Little Long Mountain Tract located within the boundary of 
the Uwharrie National Forest in the State of North Carolina. 
July 27, 2015.
    USDA: Report of the acquisition of land owned by the State 
of Minnesota located within Boundary Waters Canoe Area 
Wilderness. July 27, 2015.
    USDA: Committee Charter and addendum for the Secure Rural 
Schools Resource Advisory Committees as required by the Federal 
Advisory Committee Act. July 27, 2015.
    FCA: Final rule that amends title 12, chapter VI of the 
Code of Federal Regulations. July 31, 2015.
    USDA: Letter outlining the Forest Service estimate of 
anticipated wildland fire suppression costs for FY2015, as 
required in the Department of the Interior, Environment, and 
Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010 (Public Law 111-88), 
as part of the Title V--FLAME Act of 2009. August 4, 2015.
    USDA: Annual report of civil rights complaints, 
resolutions, and actions for FY14 as required by Section 14010 
of the 2008 Farm Bill. August 7, 2015.
    USDA: Letter to inform that the Forest Service is within 30 
days of depleting available ``Wildland Fire Management'' and 
``FLAME'' funds as required by Public Law 113-235. August 13, 
2015.
    USAID: Response to GAO report entitled ``EGYPT: U.S. 
Government Should Examine Options for Using Unobligated Funds 
and Evaluating Security Assistance Programs'' (GAO-15-259). 
August 11, 2015.
    USDA: Letter to inform that Forest Service has approved the 
purchase of Pinhook Swamp Purchase Unit, Osceola National 
Forest, Florida as required by the Weeks Act at 16 U.S.C. 521b. 
August 19, 2015.
    FCA: Final rule adopted by the FCA Board under the 
provisions of the Farm Credit Act of 1971, as amended. The rule 
amends Title 12, Chapter VI of the Code of Federal Regulations. 
August 19, 2015.
    U.S. Dept. of State: Letter on Status Update on Water 
Deliveries from Mexico to the Rio Grande under Exiting Treaty 
Obligations as required by Section 12310 of the Agricultural 
Act of 2014. (P.L. 113-79). August 19, 2015.
    FCA: Final rule adopted by FCA Board under the provisions 
of the Farm Credit Act of 1971, as amended. The rule amends 
Title 12, Chapter VI of the Code of Federal Regulations. August 
19, 2015.
    USDA: Copy of Committee Charter for the Forestry Research 
Advisory Council as required by P.L. 92-463, the Federal 
Advisory Committee Act. September 1, 2015.
    USDA: Report entitled, Foreign Holdings of U.S. 
Agricultural Land Through December 31, 2013 compiled by FSA. 
September 18, 2015.
    USDA: Proposed land purchase within the proclamation 
boundary of the Green Mountain National Forest in Bennington 
County, Vermont. September 18, 2015.
    USDA: Letter regarding the approval of purchase of 
privately owned lands within the proclamation boundary of the 
Green Mountain National Forest, in the State of Vermont. 
September 29, 2015.
    USDA: Letter to approve the exchange of federal lands for 
non-federal lands on the Hiawatha National Forest. October 1, 
2015.
    HHS: Letter submitting the Fourteenth Report to Congress on 
Welfare Indicators and Risk Factors. October 9, 2015.
    DOC: Report to Congress on the export licensing actions 
taken by the Department of Commerce's Bureau of Industry and 
Security relating to exports and reexports of agricultural 
commodities to Cuba from July 1 through September 30, 2015. 
October 19, 2015.
    FCSIC: Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 2016 through 2021 as 
required by the Government Performance and Results Act. 
November 4, 2015.
    USDA: Semiannual Report to Congress published by the Office 
of Inspector General at USDA. November 16, 2015.
    USDA: Letter to approve the purchase of non-federal lands 
within the boundary of the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest 
in the State of Wisconsin. November 18, 2015.
    GAO: Report on a rule promulgated by FSIS entitled 
``Mandatory Inspection of Fish of the Order Siluriformes and 
Products Derived From Such Fish'' (RIN 0583-AD36). December 21, 
2015.
    DOI: Final Feasibility Report and Final EIS for the SLRWRI 
for review for the Shast Dam and Shasta Reservoir located in 
California. November 24, 2015.
    USDA: Report of all cases returned to the agency pursuant 
to a final determination of the National Appeals Division and 
the status of implementation of each final determination. 
December 21, 2015.
    National Commission on Hunger: Report in response to 
Section 743 of the FY2014 Consolidated Appropriations Act (P.L. 
113-76). December 2015.
    USDA: RMA report on Study on Swine Catastrophic Disease as 
required by Section 11022 of the Agricultural Act of 2014. 
December 21, 2015.
    USDA: Forest Service letter to advise the purchase of 300 
acres of land in Ripley County, Missouri. December 28, 2015.
    USDA: Letter to update on the progress of the USDA Food 
Safety and Inspection Service in addressing the provisions of 
fish in the order of Siluriformes as required by Section 
12106(b)(2) of the Agricultural Act of 2014. January 4, 2016.
    USDA: Watershed Protection and Flood Prevention Program 
Plan as directed by House Report 113-468. January 7, 2016.
    USDA: Report that describes the cropland acreage in each 
applicable county and State and the changes in cropland acreage 
from 2014-2015 as required by section 11014(c) of the 
Agriculture Act of 2014. January 20, 2016.
    FCA: Proposed amendments to title 12, chapter VI of the 
Code of Federal Regulations as promulgated by the Farm Credit 
Administration. January 21, 2016.
    FCA: Agency's proposed FY17 budget. February 8, 2016.
    DOC: Report on the export licensing actions taken by the 
Department of Commerce's BIS relating to exports and reexports 
of agricultural commodities to Cuba from October 1 through 
December 31, 2015. February 17, 2016.
    USDA: 2015 Conference Transparency Report, detailing all 
conferences with costs of $10,000 or more, during the period of 
July 1, 2014, through June 30, 2015, as required by the Food, 
Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008. February 12, 2016.
    USDA: Report on Program Enrollments and Assistance, as 
required by Section 1241(i) of the Food Security Act of 1985, 
as amended. February 22, 2016.
    USDA: Report presenting the extent to which the requests 
for highly erodible land conservation and wetland compliance 
determinations are being addressed in a timely manner as 
required by section 1241(c) of the Food Security Act of 1985. 
February 22, 2016.
    USDA: Report to Congress on the disruption in federal 
inspection of grain exports at the Port of Vancouver in the 
summer of 2014 as required by Title III of the United States 
Grain Standards Act Reauthorization, Section 301. February 29, 
2016.
    FCA: FCA Board adopted both a joint final rule and interim 
final rule that add a new part 624 to chapter VI of title XII 
of the Code of Federal Regulations.
    USDA: Forest Service estimate of anticipated wildland fire 
suppression costs for FY16 as required by the Department of 
Interior Appropriations Act (P.L. 111-88) as a part of the 
Title V--FLAME Act of 2009. January 5, 2016.
    U.S. Dept. of State: Report to Congress on Water Deliveries 
from Mexico to the Rio Grande under Existing Treaty 
Obligations. February 16, 2016.
    EPA: Copy of the EPA Fiscal Year 2015 annual report 
prepared in accordance with Section 203 of the Notification and 
Federal Employee Antidiscrimination and Retaliation Act of 
2002, Public Law 107-174. March 2, 2016.
    USDA: Forest Service letter to advise of approval of the 
purchase of 468 acres of land in Ripley County, Missouri. March 
8, 2016.
    USDA: Progress report on implementation of the provisions 
on certain types of fish in the Agricultural Act of 2014. March 
10, 2016.
    USDA: Section 1613 of the Farm Security and Rural 
Investment Act of 2002 requires the Secretary of Agriculture 
submit an Equitable Relief Report. March 10, 2016.
    GAO: Pursuant to section 801 (a)(2)(A) of title 5, United 
States Code, report on a major rule promulgated by the 
Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Marketing Service 
entitled, Removal of Mandatory Country of Origin Labeling 
Requirements for Beef and Pork Muscle Cuts, Ground Beef, and 
Ground Pork. March 21, 2016.
    GAO: Pursuant to section 801 (a)(2)(A) of title 5, United 
States Code, report on a major rule promulgated by the 
Department of Agriculture, Commodity Credit Corporation and the 
Natural Resources Conservation Service entitled ``Conservation 
Stewardship Program''. March 24, 2016.
    FCA: 2015 Annual Report required under the Notification and 
Federal Employee Antidiscrimination and Retaliation Act of 
2002. March 31, 2016.
    FCSIC: 2015 Annual report required under the Notification 
and Federal Employee Antidiscrimination and Retaliation Act of 
2002. March 31, 2016.
    USDA: Request under FOIA for the names and contact 
information of all handlers that report quarterly under the 
Federal marketing order for cranberries. March, 2016.
    USDA: U.S. Forest Service to acquire 185.4 acres of land in 
Ripley County, Missouri. April 18, 2016.
    USDA: U.S. Forest Service to acquire 29.33 acres of land in 
Cook County, Minnesota. April 18, 2016.
    USDA: Request under FOIA for a list of pistachio growers 
covered by a Federal Marketing Order. April 25, 2016.
    DOC: Report to Congress the export licensing actions taken 
by the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) relating to 
exports and reexports of agricultural commodities to Cuba from 
January 1 through March 31, 2016. April 18, 2016.
    USDA: Annual report of civil rights complaints, 
resolutions, and actions for FY 2015 as required by the Food, 
Conservation and Energy Act of 2008, Section 14010. May 6, 
2016.
    USDA: Annual report to Congress that summarizes USDA's data 
collection efforts and describes how data collection agencies 
are coordinating with data-user agencies to meet their needs 
for useful data as required by Section 10004(a) of the 
Agricultural Act of 2014. May 6, 2016.
    USDA: Committee Charter for the National Organic Standards 
Board in compliance with P.L. 92-463. May 6, 2016.
    USDA: Report on the pilot program to test prevention of 
duplicate participation in SNAP as required by Section 4032(c) 
of the Agricultural Act of 2014. May 10, 2016.
    FCA: Final rule adopted by FCA under the provisions of the 
Farm Credit Act of 1971, as amended. The rule amends Title 12, 
Chapter VI of the Code of Federal Regulations. May 11, 2016.
    USDA: Annual report to Congress detailing official grain 
inspection and weighing program activities as well as new 
initiatives for the coming year. May 12, 2016.
    USAID: Report, U.S. International Food Assistance Report 
FY2014, as required by Section 407 of the Food for Peace Act, 
as amended by Section 3010 of the 2014 Farm Bill. May 16, 2016.
    FCA: Final rule adopted by the FCA Board under the 
provisions of the Farm Credit Act of 1971, as amended. May 16, 
2016.
    CFTC: Charter for the CFTC's Market Risk Advisory 
Committee. May 20, 2016.
    USDA: Letter to inform of acquisition of 185.5 acres within 
the Uwharrie National Forest, North Carolina from the Land 
Trust for Central North Carolina. May 24, 2016.
    USDA: Letter to inform of acquisition of 73 acres within 
Pisgah National Forest in North Carolina. May 24, 2016.
    USAID: Semiannual report to the Congress for the period 
ending March 31, 2016. May 25, 2016.
    USDA: Report on implementation of the provisions on certain 
types of fish in the Agricultural Act of 2014 (P.L. 113-79). 
May 25, 2016.
    USDA: Semiannual Report to Congress summarizing the most 
significant accomplishments of the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture's OIG. May 27, 2016.
    USDA: Letter to recommend land exchange located on the Mr. 
Hood National Forest within Clackamas and Multnomah Counties, 
Oregon. June 2, 2016.
    USDA: Letter to inform of acquisition of 17.86 acres of 
land in Cass County, Minnesota. May 26, 2016.
    USDA: Annual Report for FY 2015 as required by the 
Notification and Federal Employee Antidiscrimination and 
Retaliation Act of 2002 (P.L. 107-174). June 1, 2016.
    U.S. Office of Special Counsel: Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 
Section 1213(e)(3) report from USDA based on a disclosure of 
wrongdoing at the U.S. Forest Service, Douglas Ranger District, 
Coronado National Forest, Douglas, Arizona. June 3, 2016.
    USDA: Section 4022 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 requires 
annual report to the Committee on the SNAP E&T; pilot projects. 
June 6, 2016.
    DOT: Quarterly report for the period October 1-December 31, 
2014, submitted under Section 906(b) of the Trade Sanctions 
Reform and Export Enhancement Act of 2000. June 13, 2016.
    FCA: Annual Report on the Farm Credit System in accordance 
with section 5.17(a)(3) of the Farm Credit Act of 1971, as 
amended (P.L. 92-181). July 6, 2016.
    FCA: FCA Strategic Plan, 2016-2021, which was approved by 
the FCA Board on April 6, 2016. July 6, 2016.
    USDA: Report to Congress on the global effort to reduce 
child hunger and increase school attendance as directed by 
section 3107 of the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 
2002, and reauthorized in the Agricultural Act of 2014. June 
28, 2016.
    GAO: Pursuant to section 801(a)(2)(A) of title 5, U.S.C., 
report on a major rule promulgated by USDA, Rural Business--
Cooperative Service, Rural Utilities Service entitled 
``Guaranteed Loanmaking and Servicing Regulations''. June 17, 
2016.
    DOI: Estimate of anticipated wildfire suppression costs for 
each fiscal year during March, May, and July as required by the 
Federal Land Assistance Management and Enhancement Act of 2009 
(Title V of Division A of P.L. 111-88). June 20, 2016.
    USDA: Committee Charter for the Secure Rural Schools 
Resource Advisory Committees in compliance with P.L. 92-463. 
June 21, 2016.
    USDA: Feasibility of Tribal Administration of Federal 
Nutrition Assistance Programs report as required under section 
4004 Agricultural Act of 2014 (P.L. 113-79; the Act). July 1, 
2016.
    USDA: Letter to notify the purchase of 3.042 acres within 
the Pinhook Swamp Purchase Unit of Osceola National Forest in 
Florida. July 7, 2016.
    USDA: Letter to notify the purchase of 866.0 acres of land 
from The Nature Conservancy located in Charleston County, South 
Carolina. July 11, 2016.
    USDA: Committee Charter for The Council of Native American 
Farming and Ranching as required by P.L. 92-463, the Federal 
Advisory Committee Act. July 11, 2016.
    FCA: Final rule adopted by the FCA Board under the 
provisions of the Farm Credit Act of 1971, as amended. July 13, 
2016.
    USDA: Letter to notify the purchase of 40.4 acres of land, 
containing over 2,000 of lake frontage within the proclamation 
boundary of the Chippewa National Forest, Michigan. July 13, 
2016.
    USDA: Letter to notify the purchase of 958.4 acres of land 
from Hughes Draft, Inc. located adjacent to Lake Moomaw, the 
second largest impoundment in western Virginia and of one of 
the George Washington and Jefferson National Forests most 
important recreational areas. July 13, 2016.
    USDA: Committee Charter for the Collaborative Forest 
Restoration Program Technical Advisory Panel as required by 
P.L. 92-463, the Federal Advisory Committee Act. July 14, 2016.
    USDA: Committee Charter for the National Wildlife Services 
Advisory Committee as required by P.L. 92-463, the Federal 
Advisory Committee Act. July 14, 2016.
    USDA: Committee Charter for the National Urban and 
Community Forestry Advisory Council as required by P.L. 92-463, 
the Federal Advisory Committee Act. July 14, 2016.
    USAID: ``Food for Peace Act, Section 202(e) Funding 
Report''. July 15, 2016.
    USDA: Report of the cases in which the National Appeals 
Division has issued a final determination involving RMA as 
required by Section 14009(b) of the Food, Energy, and 
Conservation Act of 2008. July 18, 2016.
    GAO: General Administrative Regulations; Catastrophic Risk 
Protection Endorsement; Area Risk Protection Insurance 
Regulations; and the Common Crop Insurance Regulations, Basic 
Provisions (RIN: 0563-AC43). July 18, 2016.
    USDA: Committee Charter for the Black Hills National Forest 
Advisory Board as required by P.L. 92-463, the Federal Advisory 
Committee Act. July 20, 2016.
    USDA: Notification of the Secretary of Agriculture to 
convey administrative sites and used the proceeds from the 
conveyances for certain purposes as required by FSFREA (16 
U.S.C. 580d note). July 26, 2016.
    USDA: 2015 Conference Transparency Report for the period of 
July 1, 2014, through June 30, 2015. July 26, 2016.
    USDA: Report, as required by Section 4205 of the 
Agricultural Act of 2014 (P.L. 113-79) establishing a Multi-
Agency Task Force to provide coordination and direction for 
commodity programs administered by the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture's Food and Nutrition Service. July 27, 2016.
    DOI: Estimate of anticipated wildfire suppression costs for 
each fiscal year during March, May, and July as required by the 
Federal Land Assistance Management and Enhancement Act of 2009. 
August 2, 2016.
    DOC: Export licensing actions taken by the Department of 
Commerce's Bureau of Industry and Security relating to exports 
and reexports of agricultural commodities to Cuba from April 1 
through June 30, 2016. August 2, 2016.
    FCA: Report containing information regarding its agency's 
policies, practices, and controls related to logical access, 
multi-factor authentication, privileged users, software 
inventory and license management, and exfiltration. August 10, 
2016.
    FCA: Peer Review Report on the FCA OIG's audit function 
that was issued on August 2, 2016 by the Inspector General of 
the Federal Labor Relations Authority. August 15, 2016.
    USDA: Report on the demonstrative projects to end childhood 
hunger and the related evaluation authorized and funded by 
Section 141 of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. 
August 16, 2016.
    DHHS: Fifteenth Report to Congress on Welfare Indicators 
and Risk Factors. August 16, 2016.
    USDA: Report on implementation of the provisions on certain 
types of fish in the Agricultural Act of 2014 (P.L. 113-79). 
August 18, 2016.
    USDA: Foreign Holdings of U.S. Agricultural Land Through 
December 31, 2014 report. August 18, 2016.
    GAO: Report on ``National School Lunch Program and School 
Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods Sold in 
School as Required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 
2010.'' (RIN: 0584-AE09). August 18, 2016.
    USDA: Letter to notify of the purchase of 144.81 acres of 
land within the boundary of the Chequamegon-Nicolet National 
Forest in Taylor County, Wisconsin. August 18, 2016.
    USDA: Voluntary Public Access and habitat Incentive Program 
report as directed by Section 2503 of the Agricultural Act of 
2014. August 23, 2016.
    USDA: Letter to notify of the purchase of 177.3 acres of 
land in the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest in Wisconsin. 
August 26, 2016.
    USDA: Letter to notify of the purchase of 320 acres within 
the Ouachita National forest in Arkansas. August 26, 2016.
    USDA: Committee Charter for the Secretary's Advisory 
Committee on Animal Health as required by P.L. 92-463, the 
Federal Advisory Committee Act. September 2, 2016.
    USDA: Committee Charter for the Advisory Committee on 
Agriculture Statistics as required by P.L. 92-463, the Federal 
Advisory Committee Act. September 6, 2016.
    USDA: Report on simplifying funding application processes 
for Rural Development Programs. September 7, 2016.
    FCA: Rule amending its regulations to reflect changes to 
the Freedom of Information Act. September 13, 2016.
    USDA: Report containing a description of the agricultural 
research, extension, and education activities carried out by 
the Federal Government during the fiscal year immediately 
precedes the year for which the report is submitted. September 
16, 2016.
    CFTC: Charter for the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading 
Commission's Agricultural Advisory Committee. September 16, 
2016.
    USDA: Report that describes the annual disbursements and 
expenditures for each State and the number of organic 
operations served by the National Organic Certification Cost 
Share Program. September 19, 2016.
    USDA: Letter to notify of the purchase of 463.04 acres of 
land within the boundary of the Chequaemgon-Nicolet National 
Forest in Bayfield County, Wisconsin. September 19, 2016.
    CFTC: Charter for the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading 
Commission's Global Markets Advisory Committee. September 23, 
2016.
    DOT: Biennial report for the period October 1, 2012-
September 30, 2014 submitted under Section 906(c) of the Trade 
Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement Act of 2000. September 
26, 2016.
    USAID: Food for Peace Act, Development Funding Report. 
September 30, 2016.
    USAID: U.S. Government Global Food Security Strategy. 
September 30, 2016.
    USDA: AMS request under FOIA for a list of cherry growers 
covered by a Federal Marketing Order. October 4, 2016.
    FCA: Proposed rule that would amend title 12, caper VI of 
the Code of Federal Regulations as issued by the Farm Credit 
Administration. October 21, 2016.
    USDA: 2016 Conference Transparency Report, detailing all 
conferences with costs of $10,000 or more; sponsored or held by 
USDA; or attended by USDA employees during the period of July 
1, 2015, through June 30, 2016. October 21, 2016.
    USDA: Committee Charter for the Grain Inspection Advisory 
Committee as required by P.L. 92-463. October 25, 2016.
    USDA: Committee Charter for the National Advisory Council 
on Maternal, Infant, and Fetal Nutrition as required by P.L. 
92-463. October 25, 2016.
    DOI: ``Stewardship Contracting for Fiscal Year 2015'' 
report in compliance with Section 8205 of the Agricultural Act 
of 2014. October 25, 2016.
    DOC: Report on the export licensing actions taken by the 
Department of Commerce's Bureau of Industry and Security 
relating to exports and reexports of agricultural commodities 
to Cuba as required by Section 906(b) of the Trade Sanctions 
Reform and Export Enhancement Act of 2000. October 28, 2016.
    DOC: Report on the export licensing actions taken by the 
Department of Commerce's Bureau of Industry and Security 
relating to exports of agricultural commodities to Cuba during 
the preceding two year period of October 1, 2014 through 
September 30, 2016, as required by Section 906(c) of the Trade 
Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement Act of 2000. October 
28, 2016.
    FCA: Semiannual report prepared by the Inspector General of 
the Farm Credit Administration for the period of April 2, 2016 
through September 30, 2016, pursuant to Section 5 of the 
Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. November 1, 2016.
    USDA: Report, as required by Section 4022 of the 
Agricultural Act of 2014, for USDA to conduct a periodic 
evaluation to review existing practices and research to 
identify employment and training program components and 
practices that assist members of households participating in 
SNAP to obtain regular employment and are best integrated with 
State workforce development systems. November 3, 2016.
    USAID: Semiannual Office of Inspector General report for 
the period ending September 30, 2016. November 21, 2016.
    USDA: Annual report on term limits regarding the Farm 
Service Agency's direct operating loans. November 21, 2016.
    USDA: Semiannual report which covers the 6 month reporting 
period from April 2, 2016 to September 30, 2016. The report 
summarizes the most significant accomplishments of the USDA 
Office of Inspector General. November 30, 2016.
    USDA: Annual report on the effectiveness of Restaurant 
Meals Program, operated by States as an option under the 
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, as required by 
Section 4014 of the Agricultural Act of 2014. October 26, 2016.
    USDA: Report required by section 4301 of the Food, 
Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 to assess the 
effectiveness of State and local efforts to directly certify 
children for free school meals under the National School Lunch 
Program for school year 2014-2015.
    USDA: Report presenting the extent to which the requests 
for highly erodible land conservation and wetland compliance 
determinations are being addressed in a timely manner as 
required by Section 1241(c) of the Food Security Act of 1985. 
December 1, 2016.
    USDA: Report on the action plans developed by the Animal 
and Plant Health Inspection Service for high consequence plant 
pests and diseases, to assist in preventing the introduction 
and widespread dissemination of new threats in the United 
States. December 2, 2016.
    USDA: Committee Charter for the Arizona National Scenic 
Trail Advisory Council in compliance with P.L. 92-463. December 
5, 2016.

                              c. memorials

    Memorial No. 24. Also, a memorial of the Legislature of the 
State of Idaho, relative to House Joint Memorial No. 6, urging 
the Congress of the United States to enact bipartisan 
legislation that reaffirms the FDA as the primary authority in 
uniform food labeling related to genetic engineering, based on 
scientific standards regarding health, safety, and nutrition; 
jointly to the Committees on Energy and Commerce and 
Agriculture. Submitted April 27, 2015.
    Memorial No. 66. Also, a memorial of the Senate of the 
State of Louisiana, relative to Senate Resolution No. 141, 
urging the United States Congress to take such actions as are 
necessary to designate Grambling State University as a United 
States Department of Agriculture 1890 land-grant institution; 
jointly to the Committees on Agriculture and Education and the 
Workforce. Submitted June 18, 2015.
    Memorial No. 75. Also, a memorial of the House of 
Representatives of the State of Louisiana, relative to House 
Resolution No. 102, urging the United States Congress to take 
such actions as are necessary to designate Grambling State 
University as an 1890 land-grant institution; jointly to the 
Committees on Agriculture and Education and the Workforce. 
Submitted July 9, 2015.
    Memorial No. 92. Also, a memorial of the Legislature of the 
State of Utah, relative to House Concurrent Resolution 8, 
urging the President of the United States to direct federal 
agencies that implement management practices that increase soil 
carbon sequestration to develop comprehensive plans that 
achieve the maximum amount of carbon sequestration possible and 
increase the economic and environmental productivity of 
rangelands and urges similar action within each state; jointly 
to the Committees on Energy and Commerce and Agriculture. 
Submitted July 15, 2015.
    Memorial No. 130. Also, a memorial of the Legislature of 
the State of California, relative to Assembly Joint Resolution 
No. 18, urging the Congress of the United States to support 
H.R. 167, the federal Wildfire Disaster Funding Act; jointly to 
the Committees on the Budget, Agriculture, and Natural 
Resources. Submitted September 16, 2015.
    Memorial No. 132. Also, a memorial of the Legislature of 
the State of California, relative to Assembly Joint Resolution 
No. 18, urging the Congress of the United States to support 
H.R. 167, the federal Wildlife Disaster Funding Act; jointly to 
the Committees on the Budget, Agriculture, and Natural 
Resources. Submitted September 18, 2015.
    Memorial No. 133. The Speaker presented a memorial of the 
House of Representatives of the State of Texas, relative to 
House Resolution No. 1508, expressing support for the use of 
sound science to study and regulate such modern agricultural 
technologies as crop protection chemistries, genetically 
engineered or enhanced traits, and nutrients; to the Committee 
on Agriculture. Submitted September 22, 2015.
    Memorial No. 196. The Speaker presented a memorial of the 
House of Representatives of the State of Kansas, relative to 
House Resolution No. 6045, urging the Federal Government to 
require the use of sound science in evaluating crop protection 
chemistries and nutrients. Submitted April 13, 2016.
    Memorial No. 234. Also, a memorial of the Legislature of 
the State of Arizona, relative to Senate Concurrent Memorial 
1011, urging the Congress of United States to enact the 
Resilient Federal Forests Act; jointly to the Committees on 
Agriculture and Natural Resources. Submitted April 24, 2016.
    Memorial No. 237. Also, a memorial of the Legislature of 
the State of Arizona, relative to Senate Concurrent Memorial 
1015, urging the United States Congress to enact the Stopping 
EPA Overreach Act; jointly to the Committees on Energy and 
Commerce, Natural Resources, Transportation and Infrastructure, 
and Agriculture. Submitted April 24, 2016.
    Memorial No. 263. Also, a memorial of the Senate of the 
State of Hawaii, relative to Senate Resolution No. 32, 
requesting the revision of federal regulations so that housing 
subsidies through the Section 8 rental assistance and 
homeownership program paid directly to an applicant of the 
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program are excluded from the 
calculation of household income to determine eligibility for 
the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program; jointly to the 
Committees on Financial Services and Agriculture. Submitted 
June 15, 2016.
    Memorial No. 276. Also, a memorial of the Legislature of 
the State of Arizona, relative to Senate Concurrent Memorial 
1011, urging the Congress of the United States to enact the 
Resilient Federal Forests Act; which was referred jointly to 
the Committees on Agriculture and Natural Resources. Submitted 
July 1, 2016.
    Memorial No. 280. Also, a memorial of the Legislature of 
the State of Arizona, relative to Senate Concurrent Memorial 
1015, urging the United States Congress to enact the Stopping 
EPA Overreach Act; which was referred jointly to the Committees 
on Energy and Commerce, Natural Resources, Transportation and 
Infrastructure, and Agriculture. Submitted July 1, 2016.
    Memorial No. 302. The Speaker presented a memorial of the 
Senate of the State of Texas, relative to Senate Resolution No. 
642, expressing support for the study and regulation of modern 
agricultural technologies and expressing opposition to 
regulatory action that results in unnecessary restrictions on 
the use of modern agricultural technologies. Submitted November 
14, 2016.

                              d. petitions

    Petition No. 46. The Speaker presented a petition of the 
Board of County Commissioners of Miami-Dade County, Florida, 
relative to Resolution No. R-70-16, urging the U.S. Congress 
and U.S. Department of Agriculture, as well as the Florida 
Legislature and the Florida Department of Agriculture and 
Consumer Services, to provide financial relief to farmers 
impacted by historic rainfalls in South Florida during December 
2015. Submitted March 1, 2016.

                                  [all]