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114th Congress   }                                      {       Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session      }                                      {      114-904
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     


                        REPORT ON THE ACTIVITIES

                                 of the

                       COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AND

                             THE WORKFORCE

                                for the

                             114TH CONGRESS

                             together with

                             MINORITY VIEWS

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]


January 2, 2017.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed
              
                                  ______

                         U.S. GOVERNMENT PUBLISHING OFFICE 

23-198                         WASHINGTON : 2017              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
                COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AND THE WORKFORCE

                    JOHN KLINE, Minnesota, Chairman
Republicans                          Democrats
JOHN KLINE, Minnesota, Chairman      ROBERT C. ``BOBBY'' SCOTT, 
JOE WILSON, South Carolina               Virginia
VIRGINIA FOXX, North Carolina          Ranking Member
DUNCAN HUNTER, California            RUBEN HINOJOSA, Texas
DAVID ``PHIL'' ROE, Tennessee        SUSAN A. DAVIS, California
GLENN THOMPSON, Pennsylvania         RAUL M. GRIJALVA, Arizona
TIM WALBERG, Michigan                JOE COURTNEY, Connecticut
MATT SALMON, Arizona                 MARCIA L. FUDGE, Ohio
BRETT GUTHRIE, Kentucky              JARED POLIS, Colorado
TODD ROKITA, Indiana                 GREGORIO KILILI SABLAN, Northern 
LOU BARLETTA, Pennsylvania               Mariana Islands
JOSEPH J. HECK, Nevada               FREDERICA S. WILSON, Florida
LUKE MESSER, Indiana                 SUZANNE BONAMICI, Oregon
BRADLEY BYRNE, Alabama               MARK POCAN, Wisconsin
DAVID BRAT, Virginia                 MARK TAKANO, California
BUDDY CARTER, Georgia                HAKEEM S. JEFFRIES, New York
MIKE D. BISHOP, Michigan             KATHERINE M. CLARK, Massachusetts
GLENN GROTHMAN, Wisconsin            ALMA S. ADAMS, North Carolina
STEVE RUSSELL, Oklahoma              MARK DeSAULNIER, California
CARLOS CURBELO, Florida
ELISE STEFANIK, New York
RICK ALLEN, Georgia

----------
Under Rule X, clause (e) of the Rules of House, the jurisdiction of the 
Committee on Education and the Workforce is as follows: education and 
labor generally; food programs for children in schools; labor standards 
and statistics; mediation and arbitration of labor disputes; child 
labor; regulation or prevention of importation of foreign laborers 
under contract; workers' compensation; wages and hours of labor; 
welfare of miners; work incentive programs; convict labor and the entry 
of goods made by convicts into interstate commerce; vocational 
rehabilitation; Gallaudet University; and Howard University and 
Hospital.











  SUBCOMMITTEE ON EARLY CHILDHOOD, ELEMENTARY, AND SECONDARY EDUCATION

                     TODD ROKITA, Indiana, Chairman
DUNCAN HUNTER, California            MARCIA L. FUDGE, Ohio
GLENN THOMPSON, Pennsylvania           Ranking Member
DAVID BRAT, Virginia                 SUSAN A. DAVIS, California
BUDDY CARTER, Georgia                RAUL M. GRIJALVA, Arizona
BRADLEY BYRNE, Alabama               GREGORIO KILILI SABLAN, Northern 
MIKE D. BISHOP, Michigan                 Mariana Islands
GLENN GROTHMAN, Wisconsin            SUZANNE BONAMICI, Oregon
STEVE RUSSELL, Oklahoma              MARK TAKANO, California
CARLOS CURBELO, Florida              KATHERINE M. CLARK, Massachusetts

----------
The Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary 
Education has jurisdiction over education from early learning through 
the high school level, including but not limited to elementary and 
secondary education, special education, homeless education, and migrant 
education; overseas dependent schools; career and technical education; 
school safety and alcohol and drug abuse prevention; school lunch and 
child nutrition programs; educational research and improvement 
including the Institute of Education Sciences; environmental education; 
pre-service and in-service teacher professional development including 
Title II of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act and Title II of 
the Higher Education Act; early care and education programs, including 
the Head Start Act and the Child Care and Development Block Grant Act; 
adolescent development and training programs, including but not limited 
to those providing for the care and treatment of certain at-risk youth 
including the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act and the 
Runaway and Homeless Youth Act; and all matters dealing with child 
abuse and domestic violence, including the Child Abuse Prevention and 
Treatment Act and child adoption.
















        SUBCOMMITTEE ON HEALTH, EMPLOYMENT, LABOR, AND PENSIONS

                DAVID ``PHIL'' ROE, Tennessee, Chairman
JOE WILSON, South Carolina           JARED POLIS, Colorado
VIRGINIA FOXX, North Carolina          Ranking Member
TIM WALBERG, Michigan                JOE COURTNEY, Connecticut
MATT SALMON, Arizona                 MARK POCAN, Wisconsin
BRETT GUTHRIE, Kentucky              RUBEN HINOJOSA, Texas
LOU BARLETTA, Pennsylvania           GREGORIO KILILI SABLAN, Northern 
JOSEPH J. HECK, Nevada                   Mariana Islands
LUKE MESSER, Indiana                 FREDERICA S. WILSON, Florida
BRADLEY BYRNE, Alabama               SUZANNE BONAMICI, Oregon
BUDDY CARTER, Georgia                MARK TAKANO, California
GLENN GROTHMAN, Wisconsin            HAKEEM S. JEFFRIES, New York
RICK ALLEN, Georgia                  ROBERT C. ``BOBBY'' SCOTT, 
                                         Virginia

----------
The Subcommittee on Health, Employment, Labor, and Pensions has 
jurisdiction over all matters dealing with relationships between 
employers and employees including but not limited to the National Labor 
Relations Act, the Labor-Management Relations Act, and the Labor-
Management Reporting and Disclosure Act; the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics; and employment-related health and retirement security 
including pension, health, and other employee benefits and the Employee 
Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA).















        SUBCOMMITTEE ON HIGHER EDUCATION AND WORKFORCE TRAINING

               VIRGINIA FOXX, North Carolina, Chairwoman
DAVID ``PHIL'' ROE, Tennessee        RUBEN HINOJOSA, Texas
MATT SALMON, Arizona                 Ranking Member
BRETT GUTHRIE, Kentucky              HAKEEM S. JEFFRIES, New York
LOU BARLETTA, Pennsylvania           ALMA S. ADAMS, North Carolina
JOSEPH J. HECK, Nevada               MARK DeSAULNIER, California
LUKE MESSER, Indiana                 SUSAN A. DAVIS, California
BRADLEY BYRNE, Alabama               RAUL M. GRIJALVA, Arizona
CARLOS CURBELO, Florida              JOE COURTNEY, Connecticut
ELISE STEFANIK, New York             JARED POLIS, Colorado
RICK ALLEN, Georgia

----------
The Subcommittee on Higher Education and Workforce Training has 
jurisdiction over education and training beyond the high school level 
including but not limited to higher education generally, postsecondary 
student assistance and employment services, and the Higher Education 
Act; Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972; all domestic 
volunteer programs; all programs related to the arts and humanities, 
museum and library services, and arts and artifacts indemnity; 
postsecondary career and technical education, apprenticeship programs, 
and job training, including the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity 
Act, vocational rehabilitation, and training programs from immigration 
funding; science and technology programs; adult basic education (family 
literacy); all welfare reform programs, including work incentive 
programs and welfare-to-work requirements; poverty programs, including 
the Community Services Block Grant Act and the Low Income Home Energy 
Assistance Program (LIHEAP); the Native American Programs Act; the 
Institute of Peace; and all matters dealing with programs and services 
for the elderly, including nutrition programs and the Older Americans 
Act.









                 SUBCOMMITTEE ON WORKFORCE PROTECTIONS

                    TIM WALBERG, Michigan, Chairman
DUNCAN HUNTER, California            FREDERICA S. WILSON, Florida
GLENN THOMPSON, Pennsylvania         Ranking Member
TODD ROKITA, Indiana                 MARK POCAN, Wisconsin
DAVID BRAT, Virginia                 KATHERINE M. CLARK, Massachusetts
MICHAEL D. BISHOP, Michigan          ALMA S. ADAMS, North Carolina
STEVE RUSSELL, Oklahoma              MARK DeSAULNIER, California
ELISE STEFANIK, New York             MARCIA L. FUDGE, Ohio

----------
The Subcommittee on Workforce Protections has jurisdiction over wages 
and hours of workers, including but not limited to the Davis-Bacon Act, 
the Walsh-Healey Act, the Service Contract Act, and the Fair Labor 
Standards Act; workers' compensation, including the Federal Employees' 
Compensation Act, the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act, 
and the Black Lung Benefits Act; the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural 
Worker Protection Act; the Family and Medical Leave Act; the Worker 
Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act; the Employee Polygraph 
Protection Act of 1988; trade and immigration issues as they impact 
employers and workers; workers' safety and health, including but not 
limited to occupational safety and health, mine safety and health, and 
migrant and agricultural worker safety and health; and all matters 
related to equal employment opportunity and civil rights in employment.






                         LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

                              ----------                              

          Committee on Education and the Workforce,
                                  House of Representatives,
                                 Washington, DC, December 23, 2016.
Hon. Karen L. Haas,
Clerk of the House,
The Capitol, Washington, DC.
    Dear Ms. Haas: Purusant to Rule XI, clause 1, paragraph (d) 
of the Rules of the U.S. House of Representatives, I hereby 
transmit the Report on the Activities of the Committee on 
Education and the Workforce for the 114th Congress. This report 
summarizes the activities of the Committee during the 114th 
Congress with respect to its legislative and oversight 
responsibilities. I circulated this report to all members on 
December 16, 2016, and received minority views, which are 
included in this report.
            Sincerely,
                                                John Kline,
                                                          Chairman.
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                            C O N T E N T S

                                                                   Page
Letter of Transmittal............................................     V
Introduction.....................................................     1
Full Committee...................................................     4
    Hearings.....................................................     4
    Markups......................................................     8
Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary and Secondary 
  Education--Hearings............................................    11
Subcommittee on Health, Employment, Labor, and Pensions--Hearings    13
Subcommittee on Higher Education and Workforce Training--Hearings    17
Subcommittee on Workforce Protections--Hearings..................    18
Legislation Referred to Committee with House Passage.............    22
Legislation Referred to Committee Enacted into Law...............    24
Legislation within Committee Jurisdiction Enacted into Law.......    24
Oversight Plan Summary and Correspondence........................    24
Committee Activity Statistics....................................    31
Minority Views...................................................    33




















                                                Union Calendar No. 715
114th Congress   }                                      {       Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session      }                                      {      114-904

======================================================================



 
    REPORT ON THE ACTIVITIES OF THE COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AND THE 
                    WORKFORCE FOR THE 114TH CONGRESS

                                _______
                                

January 2, 2017.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

     Mr. Kline, from the Committee on Education and the Workforce, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                             MINORITY VIEWS

                              INTRODUCTION

    Under the leadership of Chairman John Kline in the 114th 
Congress, the House Committee on Education and the Workforce 
continued its efforts to improve the country's education 
system, support working families and retirees, and empower more 
Americans to pursue a lifetime of success and prosperity.
    Helping every child receive an excellent education was a 
leading priority this Congress. In 2015, the Committee 
successfully advanced the Student Success Act (H.R. 5). The 
legislation reflects three key principles to improve K-12 
education: reducing the federal role, restoring local control, 
and empowering parents. After months of bipartisan, bicameral 
work, House and Senate leaders reached agreement in November 
2015 on a proposal to end the Washington-knows-best approach to 
K-12 education. The resulting legislation, the Every Student 
Succeeds Act, was signed into law in December 2015, and the 
Committee has worked throughout 2016 to ensure the law is 
implemented according to its letter and intent.
    The Committee also advanced reforms to improve higher 
education and career and technical education. In 2015, the 
Committee moved the Higher Education Extension Act (H.R. 3594) 
to extend the Federal Perkins Loan Program and provide 
certainty to students and institutions while Congress continued 
working on more comprehensive higher education reform. The 
bipartisan bill--introduced by Reps. Mike Bishop and Mark 
Pocan--was signed into law in December 2015.
    Additionally, in 2016, the Committee ushered through the 
House, with strong bipartisan support, a number of bills to 
strengthen higher education for students, parents, and 
taxpayers: the Strengthening Transparency in Higher Education 
Act (H.R. 3178, sponsored by Rep. Virginia Foxx and Rep. 
Gregorio Sablan), the Empowering Students Through Enhanced 
Financial Counseling Act (H.R. 3179, sponsored by Rep. Brett 
Guthrie and Rep. Suzanne Bonamici), the Simplifying the 
Application for Student Aid Act (H.R. 5528, sponsored by Rep. 
Joe Heck and Rep. Jared Polis), the Accessing Higher Education 
Opportunities Act (H.R. 5529, sponsored by Rep. Joe Heck and 
Rep. Ruben Hinojosa), and the HBCU Capital Financing 
Improvement Act (H.R. 5530, sponsored by Rep. Alma Adams and 
Rep. Bradley Byrne). These bills include reforms to empower 
students and families to make informed decisions, simplify and 
improve the financial aid process, and enhance existing support 
and accountability for institutions serving minority students.
    Also in 2016, the Committee unanimously approved the 
Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st 
Century Act (H.R. 5587). Introduced by Reps. Glenn ``GT'' 
Thompson and Katherine Clark, the bipartisan legislation passed 
the House with overwhelming support in September 2016. The bill 
includes positive reforms to empower state and local leaders, 
improve alignment with in-demand jobs, increase transparency 
and accountability, and ensure a limited federal role in career 
and technical education. Because of these and other reforms, 
the bill will help more Americans obtain the skills and 
experience to compete for good-paying jobs in industries 
critical to the economy.
    The Committee also advanced a number of measures to protect 
and help some of the country's most vulnerable individuals. In 
May 2015, the House passed the Justice for Victims of 
Trafficking Act (S. 178), a bill to better target sex 
traffickers and support victims of sexual abuse. Signed into 
law later that month, the legislation includes a number of 
proposals championed by Committee members to strengthen 
protections for youth victims of sex trafficking.
    In the second session of the 114th Congress, the Committee 
approved the Infant Plan of Safe Care Improvement Act (H.R. 
4843), which was introduced by Reps. Lou Barletta and Katherine 
Clark. The legislation requires the administration to better 
ensure states are meeting current child welfare requirements, 
particularly protections for infants born with illegal 
substance exposure. The bill eventually became part of a 
broader effort to combat America's growing opioid crisis and 
was signed into law in July 2016.
    Members also worked to reform the juvenile justice system 
through the Supporting Youth Opportunity and Preventing 
Delinquency Act (H.R. 5963), a bill introduced by Rep. Carlos 
Curbelo and Ranking Member Robert C. ``Bobby'' Scott to help 
state and local leaders better serve at-risk youth and juvenile 
offenders and put them on the path to success. The legislation 
passed the House in September 2016 with overwhelming bipartisan 
support.
    In addition to passing reforms to help vulnerable youth, 
the Committee championed reforms for vulnerable seniors. The 
Committee advanced the Older Americans Act Reauthorization Act 
(S. 192), legislation enacted in April 2016 (P.L. 114-441) that 
strengthens support services for seniors and their caregivers, 
streamlines federal programs, and delivers state and local 
leaders greater flexibility to meet the needs of their seniors.
    Another bill, introduced by Early Childhood, Elementary, 
and Secondary Education Subcommittee Chairman Todd Rokita, 
would reform federal child nutrition programs to ensure states 
and schools have the flexibility they need to provide children 
with access to healthy meals without additional or prohibitive 
costs. That bill, the Improving Child Nutrition and Education 
Act (H.R. 5003), passed the Committee in May 2016.
    Throughout the 114th Congress, the Committee also worked to 
advance legislative solutions to protect the rights of workers 
and employers, strengthen the retirement security of working 
families, and preserve upward mobility and opportunity in 
America's workplaces.
    Building on efforts from the 113th Congress, the Committee 
put forward legislation in response to the National Labor 
Relations Board's (NLRB) partisan agenda. The Workforce 
Democracy and Fairness Act (H.R. 1768), introduced by Chairman 
Kline, and the Employee Privacy Protection Act (H.R. 1767) 
introduced by Subcommittee on Health, Employment, Labor, and 
Pensions Chairman David ``Phil'' Roe, seek to ensure fair union 
elections and protect the privacy of workers and their 
families.
    The Committee also advanced the Tribal Labor Sovereignty 
Act (H.R. 511) to prevent the NLRB from exerting jurisdiction 
over tribal businesses on tribal lands. The legislation was 
introduced by Chairman Rokita and passed the House in November 
2015. Additionally, Chairman Kline, along with Sen. Lamar 
Alexander, Chairman of the Senate Committee on Health, 
Education, Labor, and Pensions, introduced the Protecting Local 
Business Opportunity Act (H.R. 3459). Approved by the Committee 
in October 2015, the legislation would roll back the NLRB's 
``joint employer'' decision that is threatening small 
businesses and entrepreneurs across the country.
    Committee leaders also took steps to protect and strengthen 
retirement security for hardworking men and women. Working 
across the aisle, Chairman Roe led a bipartisan effort to 
ensure retirement advisors serve their clients' best interests 
and preserve access to high-quality, affordable retirement 
advice through two complementary legislative proposals. The 
Committee approved those proposals--the Affordable Retirement 
Advice Protection Act (H.R. 4293) and the Strengthening Access 
to Valuable Education and Retirement Support Act (H.R. 4294)--
in February 2016.
    The Committee also continued efforts to modernize the 
nation's multiemployer pension system. Following years of 
bipartisan work to address the serious challenges facing the 
system, Chairman Kline introduced a discussion draft in 
September 2016 of a proposal that would authorize an innovative 
multiemployer plan structure known as ``composite plans.'' The 
proposal includes reforms to provide more retirement choices 
for workers, more flexibility for employers, and greater 
protection for taxpayers.
    Additionally, the Committee played a key role in efforts to 
dismantle the 2010 health care law and protect Americans from 
its harmful effects. Through oversight and hearings, the 
Committee examined the negative impact the law has had on 
workers and employers, advanced legislation to roll back the 
fatally flawed law, and helped put forward a plan that would 
lead to market-based, patient-centered health care. As part of 
these efforts, the Committee approved within Reconciliation a 
proposal (H.R. 3112) sponsored by Rep. Elise Stefanik to repeal 
the auto-enrollment mandate in the President's health care law. 
The proposal was eventually included in a bipartisan budget 
agreement signed by the President in November 2015 (P.L. 114-
74, Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015).
    To preserve upward mobility and opportunity for American 
workers and employers, the Committee put forward two pieces of 
legislation to address the U.S. Department of Labor's extreme 
overtime rule. In March 2016, Republican leaders introduced the 
Protecting Workplace Advancement and Opportunity Act (H.R. 
4773) to prevent implementation of the rule and require an 
economic analysis of the rule's impact on workers, students, 
nonprofit organizations, and small businesses. Later that year, 
Workforce Protections Subcommittee Chairman Tim Walberg 
introduced the Regulatory Relief for Small Businesses, Schools, 
and Nonprofits Act (H.R. 6094). Passed by the House in 
September 2016, the legislation required a six-month delay in 
the effective date of the rule--a rule that was later blocked 
by a U.S. District Court judge.
    In addition to various legislation solutions, the Committee 
worked to hold the administration accountable and put a stop to 
harmful rules and regulations through the Congressional Review 
Act. Members introduced resolutions of disapproval to combat 
the NLRB's ambush election rule, which passed the House in 
March 2015; and the U.S. Department of Labor's fiduciary and 
overtime rules, which passed the House in April 2016 and 
September 2016, respectively. The Committee also approved a 
resolution to block the Department's partisan persuader rule, a 
regulation that threatened the rights of workers and employers 
during union elections.
    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will continue to 
advance solutions that benefit students, small business owners, 
teachers, and working families; hold the administration 
accountable to the American people; and work in a bipartisan 
manner to deliver commonsense reforms that benefit all 
Americans.

                             FULL COMMITTEE


                                HEARINGS

    In the 114th Congress, 18 Full Committee hearings were 
held.

February 4, 2015--``Expanding Opportunity in America's Schools and 
        Workplaces'' (Printed Hearing 114-1)

    The purpose of the hearing was to examine efforts made by 
state leaders to strengthen education, spur job creation, and 
expand opportunity for working families.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Mike Pence, Governor, State of 
Indiana, Indianapolis, Indiana; Dr. Michael Amiridis, Provost, 
University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina; Mr. 
Drew Greenblatt, President and CEO, Marlin Steel, Baltimore, 
Maryland (testifying on behalf of the National Association of 
Manufacturers); Dr. Lawrence Mishel, President, Economic Policy 
Institute, Washington, D.C.

March 18, 2015--``Reviewing the President's Fiscal Year 2016 Budget 
        Proposal for the Department of Labor'' (Printed Hearing 114-6)

    The purpose of the hearing was to examine the U.S. 
Department of Labor's budget request for Fiscal Year 2016 and 
the administration's new programs.
    Witness: The Honorable Thomas E. Perez, Secretary, U.S. 
Department of Labor, Washington, D.C.

April 15, 2015--``Serving Students and Families through Child Nutrition 
        Programs'' (Printed Hearing 114-9)

    The purpose of the hearing was to examine the importance of 
the federal government's child nutrition programs and to 
highlight how these programs are linked to better educational 
outcomes.
    Witnesses: Mr. Duke Storen, Senior Director, Research, 
Advocacy, and Partner Development, Share Our Strength, 
Washington, D.C.; Ms. Julia Bauscher, President, School 
Nutrition Association Director, School and Community Nutrition 
Services, Jefferson County Public School District, Louisville, 
Kentucky; Mrs. Dorothy S. McAuliffe, First Lady of Virginia, 
Office of the Governor, Commonwealth of Virginia, Richmond, 
Virginia; Dr. Kathy Krey, Director of Research and Assistant 
Research, Professor, Texas Hunger Initiative, Baylor 
University, Waco, Texas.

May 14, 2015--``Examining the Federal Government's Mismanagement of 
        Native American Schools'' (Printed Hearing 114-14)

    The purpose of this hearing was to discuss the Bureau of 
Indian Affairs' (BIA) and Bureau of Indian Education's (BIE) 
roles in Indian education and evaluate the impact of 
restructuring the BIA and BIE.
    Witnesses: Dr. Charles Roessel, Director, Bureau of Indian 
Education, U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington, D.C.; 
Mr. William Mendoza, Executive Director, White House Initiative 
on American Indian and Alaska Native Education, U.S. Department 
of Education, Washington, D.C.

June 3, 2015--``Compulsory Unionization through Grievance Fees: The 
        NLRB's Assault on Right-to-Work'' (Printed Hearing 114-17)

    The purpose of the hearing was to explore right-to-work 
laws and how suggested changes to the grievance process would 
affect workers.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Pete Ricketts, Governor, State of 
Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska; Mr. Walter Hewitt, Management 
Information Systems, Director, United Way of Southeastern 
Connecticut, Uncasville, Connecticut (testifying on own 
behalf); Robert Bruno, Ph.D., Professor, School of Labor and 
Employment Relations, University of Illinois Chicago, Illinois, 
(testifying on own behalf); Elise Gould, Ph.D., Senior 
Economist and Director of Health Policy Research, Economic 
Policy Institute, Washington, D.C. (testifying on own behalf); 
Mr. Mark Mix, President, National Right to Work Committee, 
Springfield, Virginia.

June 16, 2015--``Child Nutrition Assistance: Are Federal Rules and 
        Regulations Serving the Best Interests of Schools and 
        Families?'' (Printed Hearing 114-19)

    The purpose of the hearing was to discuss the U.S. 
Department of Agriculture's implementation of the Healthy, 
Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010 and the administration's 
priorities for the reauthorization of the law.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Tom Vilsack, Secretary, U.S. 
Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C.

July 28, 2015--``Reviewing the Policies and Priorities of the U.S. 
        Department of Health and Human Services'' (Printed Hearing 114-
        24)

    The purpose of the hearing was to examine the negative 
effects of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on 
employers, employees, and job growth.
    Witness: The Honorable Sylvia Mathews Burwell, Secretary, 
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, D.C.

October 7, 2015--``Strengthening Head Start for Current and Future 
        Generations'' (Printed Hearing 114-29)

    The purpose of this hearing is to examine the federal 
investment in the Head Start program, discuss its impact on our 
nation's most vulnerable populations, and reflect upon current 
proposals to alter the program or introduce new programs into 
the early care and education landscape.
    Witnesses: Timothy M. Nolan, Ph.D., Chief Executive Officer 
& Executive Director, National Centers for Learning Excellence, 
Inc., Waukesha, Wisconsin; Dr. Matthew Biel, MD, MSc, Division 
Chief, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Georgetown University, 
Washington, D.C.; Ms. Sara Mead, Partner, Bellwether Education 
Partners, Washington, D.C.; Ms. Yvette Sanchez Fuentes, 
President, National Alliance for Hispanic Families, 
Gaithersburg, Maryland.

October 8, 2015--``Reviewing the Juvenile Justice System and How It 
        Serves At-Risk Youth'' (Printed Hearing 114-31)

    The purpose of this hearing was to learn more about the 
Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act and the state 
of the juvenile justice system.
    Witnesses: Mr. Derek Cohen, Deputy Director, Center for 
Effective Justice, Texas Public Policy Foundation, Austin, 
Texas; Mr. Sloane Baxter, Youth Advocate, Washington, D.C.; The 
Honorable Steven Teske, Chief Judge, Clayton County Juvenile 
Court, Jonesboro, Georgia; Dr. Tim Goldsmith, Chief Clinical 
Officer, Youth Villages, Memphis, Tennessee.

February 3, 2016--``Expanding Educational Opportunity through School 
        Choice'' (Printed Hearing 114-37)

    The purpose of this hearing was to discuss the creation and 
expansion of state scholarship/private school voucher programs 
and education savings accounts and how federal policies can 
support these efforts.
    Witnesses: Mr. Gerard Robinson, Resident Fellow, American 
Enterprise Institute, Washington, D.C.; The Honorable Rob 
Bryan, North Carolina House of Representatives, Charlotte, 
North Carolina; Dr. Luis A. Huerta, Associate Professor of 
Education and Public Policy, Teachers College, Columbia 
University, New York, New York; Ms. Denisha Merriweather, 
Student, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida.

February 24, 2016--``Examining the Policies and Priorities of the U.S. 
        Department of Education'' (Printed Hearing 114-39)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the Department's 
budget request for Fiscal Year 2017 focusing on increasing 
equity and opportunity for all students, expanding support for 
teachers and school leaders, and improving access, 
affordability, and student outcomes in postsecondary education.
    Witness: Dr. John B. King, Acting Secretary, U.S. 
Department of Education, Washington, D.C.

February 25, 2016--``Next Steps for K-12 Education: Upholding the 
        Letter and Intent of the Every Student Succeeds Act'' (Printed 
        Hearing 114-40)

    The purpose of this hearing was to discuss reducing the 
federal role and restoring state and local control over K-12 
education.
    Witness: Dr. John B. King, Acting Secretary, U.S. 
Department of Education, Washington, D.C.

March 15, 2016--``Examining the Policies and Priorities of the U.S. 
        Department of Health and Human Services'' (Printed Hearing 114-
        41)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the Department's 
budget request for Fiscal Year 2017, including the President's 
health care law program, the Head Start program, and early 
childhood development program.
    Witness: The Honorable Sylvia Mathews Burwell, Secretary, 
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, D.C.

March 16, 2016--``Examining the Policies and Priorities of the U.S. 
        Department of Labor'' (Printed Hearing 114-42)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the U.S. 
Department of Labor's budget request for Fiscal Year 2017 and 
to highlight the administration's new programs, including the 
Paid Leave Partnership Initiative and the High-Growth Sector 
Training and Credentialing Grants.
    Witness: The Honorable Thomas E. Perez, Secretary, U.S. 
Department of Labor, Washington, D.C.

March 22, 2016--``Strengthening Education Research and Privacy 
        Protections to Better Serve Students'' (Printed Hearing 114-43)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the 
reauthorization of Education Sciences Reform Act and to update 
federal student privacy and education research laws.
    Witnesses: Ms. Rachael Stickland, Co-Founder, Co-Chair, 
Parent Coalition for Student Privacy, Littleton, Colorado; Mr. 
Neil Campbell, Director, Next Generation, Reforms Foundation 
for Excellence in Education, Washington, D.C.; Dr. Jane 
Hannaway, Professor, McCourt School, Georgetown University, 
Washington, D.C.; Mr. Robert Swiggum, Deputy Superintendent of 
Technology Services, Georgia Department of Education, Atlanta, 
Georgia.

May 17, 2016--``Helping Students Succeed by Strengthening the Carl D. 
        Perkins Career and Technical Education Act'' (Printed Hearing 
        114-48)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine how the 
reauthorization of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical 
Education Act will help Americans develop the skills they need 
to succeed in a 21st century workforce.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Tim Kaine, Senator, State of 
Virginia; Mr. Paul Tse, Project Manager, Shapiro & Duncan, 
Inc., Rockville, Maryland; Mr. Jason Bates, Manager, Toyota--
Bodine Aluminum, Inc., Jackson, Tennessee; Dr. Monty Sullivan, 
President, Louisiana Community and Technical College System, 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

June 9, 2016--``The Administration's Overtime Rule and Its Consequences 
        for Workers, Students, Nonprofits, and Small Businesses'' 
        (Printed Hearing 114-51)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine how the U.S. 
Department of Labor's overtime rule will impact employers and 
employees, including those at nonprofit organizations, 
students, and institutions of higher education.
    Witnesses: Dr. Jared Bernstein, Senior Fellow, Center on 
Budget and Policy Priorities, Washington, D.C.; Mr. Alexander 
J. Passantino, Partner, Seyfarth Shaw LLP, Washington, D.C.; 
Mr. Michael Rounds, Associate Vice Provost for Human Resource 
Management, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas; Ms. Tina 
Sharby, Chief Human Resources Officer, Easter Seals, New 
Hampshire, Inc., Manchester, New Hampshire (testifying on 
behalf of the Society for Human Resource Management).

June 23, 2016--``Next Steps in K-12 Education: Examining Recent Efforts 
        to Implement the Every Student Succeeds Act'' (Printed Hearing 
        114-52)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the U.S. 
Department of Education's regulatory proposals under the Every 
Student Succeeds Act, specifically the Department's proposed 
accountability regulations published in the Federal Register on 
June 1, 2016, and the Department's anticipated supplement, not 
supplant proposal.
    Witnesses: The Honorable John B. King, Jr., Secretary, U.S. 
Department of Education, Washington, D.C.; Dr. Stephen L. 
Pruitt, Commissioner, Kentucky Department of Education, 
Frankfort, Kentucky; Ms. Cassie Harrelson, Math Teacher, Aurora 
Public Schools, Aurora, Colorado; Ms. Daria Hall, Interim Vice 
President, Government Affairs and Communications, The Education 
Trust, Washington, D.C.; Dr. David R. Schuler, Superintendent, 
Township High School District 214, Arlington Heights, Illinois.

                                MARKUPS

    In the 114th Congress, the Full Committee held 18 markups 
and one business meeting. The Committee filed 15 legislative 
reports and one conference report. No subcommittee markups were 
held.

January 21, 2015--Full Committee Organizational Meeting to Adopt the 
        Committee Rules and Oversight Plan for the 114th Congress.

    Committee Rules and Oversight Plan were adopted by voice 
vote.

February 11, 2015--H.R. 5, Student Success Act

    (Sponsor: Rep. John Kline)
    H.R. 5 was ordered favorably reported to the House, as 
amended, by a vote of 21-16 on February 11, 2015. The committee 
report was filed on February 20, 2015 (House Report 114-5).

July 22, 2015--H.R. 511, Tribal Labor Sovereignty Act of 2015

    (Sponsor: Rep. Todd Rokita)
    H.R. 511 was ordered favorably reported to the House, as 
amended, by voice vote on July 22, 2015. The committee report 
was filed on September 10, 2015 (House Report 114-260).

September 30, 2015--Committee Print on Legislation Regarding the 
        Committee's Instructions Pursuant to Section 2002(a)(1) of S. 
        Con. Res. 11

    Motion to transmit the Committee Print, as amended, to the 
Committee on the Budget by a vote of 22-15 on September 30, 
2015.

October 28, 2015--H.R. 3459, Protecting Local Business Opportunity Act

    (Sponsor: Rep. John Kline)
    H.R. 3459 was ordered favorably reported to the House, as 
amended, by a vote of 21-15 on October 28, 2015. The committee 
report was filed on December 1, 2015 (House Report 114-293).

November 18, 2015, and November 19, 2015--Conference meeting of House 
        and Senate Conferees to S. 1177, Every Child Succeeds Act

    (Sponsor: Sen. Lamar Alexander)
    Conference Report was ordered reported. The conference 
report was filed on November 30, 2015 (H. Rept. 114-354).

February 2, 2016--H.R. 4294, Strengthening Access to Valuable Education 
        and Retirement Support Act of 2015

    (Sponsor: Rep. Peter J. Roskam)
    H.R. 4294 was ordered favorably reported to the House, as 
amended, by a vote of 22-14 on March 20, 2015. The committee 
report was filed on April 20, 2016 (House Report 114-512, Part 
2).

February 2, 2016--H.R. 4293, Affordable Retirement Advice Protection 
        Act

    (Sponsor: Rep. David ``Phil'' Roe)
    H.R. 4293 was ordered favorably reported to the House, as 
amended, by 22-14 on March 20, 2015. The committee report was 
filed on April 20, 2016 (House Report 114-511).

April 21, 2016--H.J. Res. 88, Disapproving the rule submitted by the 
        Department of Labor relating to the definition of the term 
        ``fiduciary''

    (Sponsor: Rep. David ``Phil'' Roe)
    H.J. Res. 88 was ordered favorably reported to the House by 
a vote of 22-14 on April 21, 2016. The committee report was 
filed on April 26, 2016 (House Report 114-527, Part 1).

April 28, 2016--H.R. 4843, Improving Safe Care for the Prevention of 
        Infant Abuse and Neglect Act

    (Sponsor: Rep. Lou Barletta)
    H.R. 4843 was ordered favorably reported to the House, as 
amended, by voice vote on April 28, 2016. The committee report 
was filed on May 10, 2016 (House Report 114-548).

May 18, 2016--H.J. Res. 87, Providing for congressional disapproval 
        under chapter 8 of title 5, United States Code, of the final 
        rule of the U.S. Department of Labor relating to 
        ``Interpretation of the `Advice' Exemption in Section 203(c) of 
        the Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act''

    (Sponsor: Rep. Bradley Byrne)
    H.J. Res. 87 was ordered favorably reported to the House by 
a vote of 22-13 on May 18, 2016. The committee report was filed 
on September 12, 2016 (House Report 114-739).

May 18, 2016--H.R. 5003, Improving Child Nutrition and Education Act of 
        2016

    (Sponsor: Rep. Todd Rokita)
    H.R. 5003 was ordered favorably reported to the House, as 
amended, by a vote of 22-14 on May 18, 2016. The committee 
report was filed on December 8, 2016 (House Report 114-852, 
Part I).

June 20, 2016--H.R. 3178, Strengthening Transparency in Higher 
        Education Act

    (Sponsor: Rep. Virginia Foxx)
    H.R. 3178 was ordered favorably reported to the House, as 
amended, by voice vote on June 20, 2016. The committee report 
was filed on July 11, 2016 (House Report 114-674).

June 20, 2016--H.R. 3179, Empowering Students through Enhanced 
        Financial Counseling Act

    (Sponsor: Rep. Brett Guthrie)
    H.R. 3179 was ordered favorably reported to the House, as 
amended, by voice vote on June 20, 2016. The committee report 
was filed on July 11, 2016 (House Report 114-675).

June 22, 2016--H.R. 5528, Simplifying the Application for Student Aid 
        Act

    (Sponsor: Rep. Joseph J. Heck)
    H.R. 5528 was ordered favorably reported to the House, as 
amended, by voice vote on June 22, 2016. The committee report 
was filed on July 11, 2016 (House Report 114-678).

June 22, 2016--H.R. 5529, Accessing Higher Education Opportunities Act

    (Sponsor: Rep. Joseph J. Heck)
    H.R. 5529 was ordered favorably reported to the House, as 
amended, by voice vote on June 22, 2016. The committee report 
was filed on July 11, 2016 (House Report 114-676).

June 22, 2016--H.R. 5530, HBCU Capital Financing Improvement Act

    (Sponsor: Rep. Alma S. Adams)
    H.R. 5530 was ordered favorably reported to the House, as 
amended, by voice vote on June 22, 2016. The committee report 
was filed on July 11, 2016 (House Report 114-677).

July 7, 2016--H.R. 5587, Strengthening Career and Technical Education 
        for the 21st Century Act

    (Sponsor: Rep. Glenn Thompson)
    H.R. 5587 was ordered favorably reported to the House, as 
amended, by a vote of 37-0 on July 7, 2016. The committee 
report was filed on September 8, 2016 (House Report 114-725).

September 14, 2016--H.R. 5963, Supporting Youth Opportunity and 
        Preventing Delinquency Act of 2016

    (Sponsor: Rep. Carlos Curbelo)
    H.R. 5587 was ordered favorably reported to the House, as 
amended, by a voice vote on September 14, 2016. The committee 
report was filed on September 20, 2016 (House Report 114-763).

  Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education


                                HEARINGS

    In the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, 
Elementary, and Secondary Education held seven hearings.

February 12, 2015--``How Emerging Technology Affects Student Privacy'' 
        (Printed Hearing 114-2)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the need to 
update the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) in 
order to help protect student privacy by limiting access to 
education records.
    Witnesses: Ms. Shannon Sevier, Vice President for Advocacy, 
National Parent Teacher Association, San Antonio, Texas; Ms. 
Allyson Knox, Director of Education Policy and Programs, 
Microsoft, Washington, D.C.; Dr. Sheryl R. Abshire, Chief 
Technology Officer, Calcasieu Parish Public Schools, Lake 
Charles, Louisiana; Mr. Joel R. Reidenberg, Stanley D. and 
Nikki Waxberg Chair and Professor of Law, Founding Academic 
Director, Center on Law and Information Policy, Fordham Law 
School, New York, New York.

April 22, 2015--``Examining the Challenges Facing Native American 
        Schools'' (Printed Hearing 114-10)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine, with the 
Committee's jurisdiction in mind, federal support and 
monitoring over the BIE school system.
    Witnesses: Ms. Jill Burcum, Editorial Writer, Minneapolis 
Star Tribune, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Mr. Brian Cladoosby, 
President, National Congress of American Indians, Embassy of 
Tribal Nations, Washington, D.C.; Ms. Melissa Emrey-Arras, 
Director, Education, Workforce and Income Security Issues, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office, Boston, Massachusetts; Mr. 
Quinton Roman Nose, Executive Director Tribal Education 
Departments National Assembly, Boulder, Colorado.

May 19, 2015--``Addressing Waste, Fraud, and Abuse in Federal Child 
        Nutrition Programs'' (Printed Hearing 114-15)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine potential waste, 
fraud, and abuse in federal nutrition programs and ways to 
prevent future fraud in the programs.
    Witnesses: Mr. Gil Harden, Assistant Inspector General, 
Office of Inspector General, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 
Washington, D.C.; Ms. Zoe Neuberger, Senior Policy Analyst, 
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Washington, D.C.; Ms. 
Kay E. Brown, Director Education, Workforce, and Income 
Security, U.S. Government Accountability Office, Washington, 
D.C.; Ms. Jessica Lucas-Judy, Acting Director, Forensic Audits 
and Investigative Service, U.S. Government Accountability 
Office, Washington, D.C.

June 24, 2015--``Child Nutrition Assistance: Looking at the Cost of 
        Compliance for States and Schools'' (Printed Hearing 114-22)

    The purpose of this hearing was to discuss the challenges 
states and schools have faced in implementing the requirements 
under the law and regulations for the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids 
Act of 2010.
    Witnesses: Dr. Melody Schopp, Secretary of Education, South 
Dakota Department of Education, Pierre, South Dakota; Mr. John 
Payne, President, Blackford County School Board of Trustees, 
Hartford City, Indiana; Ms. Donna Martin, Director, School 
Nutrition Program, Burke County, Public Schools, Waynesboro, 
Georgia; Dr. Lynn Harvey, Chief School Nutrition Services, Safe 
and Healthy Schools Support Division, North Carolina Department 
of Public Instruction, Raleigh, North Carolina.

October 27, 2015--``Improving Career and Technical Education to Help 
        Students Succeed in the Workforce'' (Printed Hearing 114-33)

    The purpose of this hearing was to focus on how to better 
align career and technical education with student and employer 
needs.
    Witnesses: Dr. Deneece G. Huftalin, President, Salt Lake 
Community College, Salt Lake City, Utah; Dr. Douglas Major, 
Superintendent/CEO, Meridian Technology Center, Stillwater, 
Oklahoma; Dr. Irelene Ricks, Director, Diversity in Life 
Science Programs, Keystone Symposia on Molecular and Cellular 
Biology, Silverthorne, Colorado; Mr. Tim Johnson, Director of 
Government Relations; National Center for Construction 
Education and Research, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

February 10, 2106--``Next Steps for K-12 Education: Implementing the 
        Promise to Restore State and Local Control'' (Printed Hearing 
        114-38)

    The purpose of this hearing was to receive feedback from 
state and local stakeholders and legal experts regarding the 
implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act.
    Witnesses: Ms. Joy Hofmeister, Superintendent of Public 
Instruction, Oklahoma State Department of Education, Oklahoma 
City, Oklahoma; Dr. Paul ``Vic'' Wilson, Superintendent, 
Hartselle City Schools, Hartselle, Alabama; Ms. Selene A. 
Almazan, Esq., Legal Director, Council of Parent Attorneys and 
Advocates, Inc., Towson, Maryland; Mr. Kent D. Talbert, 
Attorney at Law, Law Office of Kent D. Talbert, PLLC, 
Washington, D.C.

September 21, 2016--``Supplanting the Law and Local Education Authority 
        Through Regulatory Fiat'' (Printed Hearing 114-53)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine with the U.S. 
Department of Education's supplement, not supplant regulatory 
proposal.
    Witnesses: Dr. Steve Canavero, Superintendent of Public 
Instruction, Nevada Department of Education, Carson City, 
Nevada; Mr. Ryan Owens, Executive Director, Cooperative Council 
for Oklahoma School Administration; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; 
Mr. Scott Sargrad, Managing Director, K-12 Education Policy, 
Center for American Progress, Washington, D.C.; Dr. Nora E. 
Gordon, Associate Professor of Public Policy, McCourt School of 
Public Policy, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.

        Subcommittee on Health, Employment, Labor, and Pensions


                                HEARINGS

    In the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee on Health, 
Employment, Labor, and Pensions held 13 hearings, including two 
field hearings and one joint hearing.

February 26, 2015--``The Blacklisting Executive Order: Rewriting 
        Federal Labor Policies Through Executive Fiat'' (Printed 
        Hearing 114-3) (Joint hearing with the Subcommittee on 
        Workforce Protections)

    The purpose of this joint hearing was to examine the 
current federal procurement system, the impact of the 
Blacklisting Executive Order on that system, and concerns 
raised by the contracting community, including implementation 
issues, disregard of due process protections, the subjective 
role of Labor Compliance Advisors, and the unreasonable scope 
of the reporting requirements.
    Witnesses: Mr. Willis Goldsmith, Partner, Jones Day, New 
York, New York (testifying on behalf of the U.S. Chamber of 
Commerce); Mr. Stan Soloway, President and CEO, Professional 
Services Council, Arlington, Virginia; Ms. Angela Styles, 
Partner, Crowell & Moring LLP, Washington, D.C.; Ms. Karla 
Walter, Associate Director, American Worker Project, Center for 
American Progress, Washington, D.C.

March 4, 2015--H.J. Res. 29, ``Providing for congressional disapproval 
        under chapter 8 of title 5, United States Code, of the rule 
        submitted by the National Labor Relations Board relating to 
        representation case procedures'' (Printed Hearing 114-4)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the current 
National Labor Relations Board's representational election 
process, the changes made by the ambush election rule to that 
process, and the impact of the rule on employees, employers, 
and unions.
    Witnesses: Ms. Brenda Crawford, Registered Nurse, Murrieta, 
California; Mr. Roger King, Senior Labor and Employment 
Counsel, Washington, D.C. (testifying on behalf of the Retail 
Industry Leaders Association); Mr. Arnold E. Perl, Member, 
Glankler Brown, PLLC, Memphis, Tennessee; Mr. Glenn M. Taubman, 
Staff Attorney, National Right to Work Legal Defense and 
Education Foundation, Inc., Springfield, Virginia.

April 14, 2015--``Five Years of Broken Promises: How the President's 
        Health Care Law is Affecting America's Workplaces'' (Printed 
        Hearing 114-8)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the Patient 
Protection and Affordable Care Act's effect on businesses over 
the past five years and employers' plans for the future.
    Witnesses: Michael Brey, President, Brey Corp. t/a Hobby 
Works(R), WingTOTE Manufacturing, LLC, Laurel, Maryland; Mr. 
Rutland Paal, Jr., President, Rutland Beard Floral Group, 
Scotch Plains, New Jersey (testifying on behalf of the Society 
of American Florists); Ms. Sally Roberts, Human Resources 
Director, Morris Communications Company, LLC, Augusta, Georgia 
(testifying on behalf of the Society for Human Resource 
Management); The Honorable Tevi Troy, Ph.D., President, 
American Health Policy Institute, Washington, D.C.

April 29, 2015--``Examining Reforms to Modernize the Multiemployer 
        Pension System'' (Printed Hearing 114-12)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine proposals to 
modernize the plan design options available to employers and 
workers participating in the multiemployer pension system.
    Witnesses: Randy G. DeFrehn, Executive Director, National 
Coordinating Committee for Multiemployer Plans, Washington, 
D.C.; Mark McManus, General Secretary-Treasurer, United 
Association, Annapolis, Maryland; Steve Sandherr, Chief 
Executive Officer, Associated General Contractors of America, 
Arlington, Virginia; Andrew Scoggin, Executive Vice President, 
Human Resources, Labor Relations, Public Relations & Government 
Affairs, Albertsons LLC, Boise, Idaho.

June 16, 2015--H.R. 511, ``Tribal Labor Sovereignty Act of 2015'' 
        (Printed Hearing 114-20)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine legislation 
introduced by Rep. Todd Rokita that would prevent the National 
Labor Relations Board from exerting jurisdiction over Native 
American businesses operated on tribal lands.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Rodney Butler, Chairman, 
Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Council, Mashantucket, Connecticut; 
Mr. Richard Guest, Staff Attorney, Native American Rights Fund, 
Washington, D.C.; The Honorable Jefferson Keel, Lieutenant 
Governor, Chickasaw Nation, Ada, Oklahoma; Mr. Gary Navarro, 
Slot Machine Attendant and Bargaining Committee Member, UNITE 
HERE Local 2850, The Graton Casino and Resort, Rohnert Park, 
California.

June 17, 2015--``Restricting Access to Financial Advice: Evaluating the 
        Costs and Consequences for Working Families and Retirees'' 
        (Printed Hearing 114-21)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine a proposal by 
the U.S. Department of Labor to vastly expand the definition of 
``fiduciary'' and how the proposed rule will impact workers, 
small businesses, and retirees.
    Witness Panel 1: The Honorable Thomas E. Perez, Secretary, 
U.S. Department of Labor, Washington, D.C.
    Witnesses Panel 2: Mr. Jack Haley, Executive Vice 
President, Fidelity Investments, Boston, Massachusetts; Mr. 
Dean Harman, CFP, Managing Director, Harman Wealth Management, 
The Woodlands, Texas; Mr. Dennis Kelleher, President and CEO, 
Better Markets, Washington, D.C.; Mr. Kent Mason, Partner, 
Davis & Harman LLP, Washington, D.C.; Brian Reid, Ph.D., Chief 
Economist, Investment Company Institute, Washington, D.C.

August 25, 2015--``Redefining `Employer' and the Impact on Alabama's 
        Workers and Small Business Owners'' (Field Hearing in Mobile, 
        Alabama) (Printed Hearing 114-25)

    The purpose of this field hearing was to examine National 
Labor Relations Board efforts to rewrite how the Board 
determines joint employer status under the National Labor 
Relations Act and how that would dramatically alter the way 
franchise businesses operate.
    Witnesses: Mr. Marcel L. Debruge, Partner, Burr & Forman 
LLP, Birmingham, Alabama; Mr. Chris Holmes, President, CLH 
Development, Inc., Tallahassee, Florida; Col. Steve Carey, 
Owner and Operator, CertaPro Painters of Mobile & Baldwin 
Counties, Daphne, Alabama.

August 27, 2015--``Redefining `Employer' and the Impact on Georgia's 
        Workers and Small Business Owners'' (Field Hearing in Savannah, 
        Georgia) (Printed Hearing 114-26)

    The purpose of this field hearing was to examine National 
Labor Relations Board efforts to rewrite how the Board 
determines joint employer status under the National Labor 
Relations Act and how that would dramatically alter the way 
franchise businesses operate.
    Witnesses: Mr. Jeffrey Mintz, Shareholder, Littler 
Mendelson P.C., Atlanta, Georgia; Mr. Kalpesh ``Kal'' Patel, 
President & COO, Image Hotels, Inc., Pooler, Georgia; Mr. Alex 
Salgueiro, President and CEO, Savannah Restaurants Corp., 
Savannah, Georgia; Mr. Fred Weir, President, Meadowbrook 
Restaurant Company Inc., Cumming, Georgia.

September 29, 2015--H.R. 3459, ``Protecting Local Business Opportunity 
        Act'' (Printed Hearing 114-28)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the need for 
H.R. 3459, the Protecting Local Business Opportunity Act, which 
restores the long-held standard for determining ``joint 
employer'' status under the National Labor Relations Act.
    Witnesses: Mr. Ed Braddy, President, Winlee Foods, LLC, 
Timonium, Maryland; Mr. Kevin Cole, CEO, Ennis Electric 
Company, Inc., Manassas, Virginia; Mr. Charles Cohen, Senior 
Counsel, Morgan, Lewis & Bockius, LLP, Washington, D.C.; Ms. 
Mara Fortin, President & CEO, Nothing Bundt Cakes San Diego, 
San Diego, California; Mr. Michael Harper, Professor, Boston 
University School of Law, Boston, Massachusetts; Dr. Anne 
Lofaso, Professor, West Virginia University College of Law, 
Morgantown, West Virginia.

December 2, 2015--``Principles for Ensuring Retirement Advice Serves 
        the Best Interests of Working Families and Retirees'' (Printed 
        Hearing 114-35)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the recent U.S. 
Department of Labor notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) 
amending the regulatory definition of ``fiduciary'' under the 
Employee Retirement Income Security Act.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Bradford R. Campbell, Ph.D., MPH, 
Counsel, Drinker Biddle & Reath, LLP, Washington, D.C.; Ms. 
Rachel A. Doba, President, DB Engineering, LLC, Indianapolis, 
Indiana; Mr. Jules O. Gaudreau, Jr. ChFC, CIC, President, The 
Gaudreau Group, Inc., Wilbraham, Massachusetts; Ms. Marilyn 
Mohrman-Gillis, Esq., Managing Director, Public Policy & 
Communications, Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, 
Washington, D.C.

April 14, 2016--``Innovations in Health Care: Exploring Free-Market 
        Solutions for a Healthy Workforce'' (Printed Hearing 114-45)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine innovations in 
employer-sponsored health care insurance coverage, a system 
that insures over 150 million Americans.
    Witnesses: Ms. Sabrina Corlette, J.D., Senior Research 
Professor, Center on Health Insurance Reforms, Georgetown 
University's Health Policy Institute, Washington, D.C.; Ms. 
Tresia Franklin, Director, Total Rewards and Employee 
Relations, Hallmark Cards, Inc., Kansas City, Missouri; Ms. Amy 
McDonough, Vice President and General Manager of Corporate 
Wellness, Fitbit, San Francisco, California; Mr. John Zern, 
Executive Vice President and Global Health Leader, Aon, 
Chicago, Illinois.

April 27, 2016--``The Persuader Rule: The Administration's Latest 
        Attack on Employer Free Speech and Worker Free Choice'' 
        (Printed Hearing 114-47)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine a March 24, 
2016, U.S. Department of Labor final rule expanding reporting 
requirements under the Labor-Management Reporting and 
Disclosure Act for employers and labor consultants.
    Witnesses: Mr. Joseph Baumgarten, Partner, Proskauer Rose 
LLP, New York, New York; Mr. Jonathan D. Newman, Partner, 
Sherman, Dunn, Cohen, Leifer & Yellig, P.C., Washington, D.C.; 
Mr. Wm. T. ``Bill'' Robinson III, Member, Frost Brown Todd LLC, 
Florence, Kentucky; Ms. Sharon L. Sellers, President, SLS 
Consulting, LLC, Santee, South Carolina (testifying on behalf 
of the Society for Human Resource Management).

September 22, 2016--``Discussion Draft to Modernize Multiemployer 
        Pensions'' (Printed Hearing 114-54)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the discussion 
draft released by Chairman Kline on September 9, 2016, 
authorizing ``composite plans,'' a new plan design option that 
would be available to employers and workers participating in 
the multiemployer pension system.
    Witnesses: Mr. David Certner, Legislative Counsel and 
Legislative Policy Director, AARP Government Affairs, 
Washington, D.C.; Mr. Randy DeFrehn, Executive Director, 
National Coordinating Committee for Multiemployer Plans, 
Washington, D.C.; Mr. Jeff Green, Principal, Harris Davis Reber 
LLC, Bellevue, Nebraska; Mr. Rick Terven, Executive Vice 
President, United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of 
the Plumbing and Pipe Fitting Industry, Annapolis, Maryland.

        Subcommittee on Higher Education and Workforce Training


                                HEARINGS

    In the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee on Higher Education 
and Workforce Training held five hearings, including one joint 
hearing.

March 17, 2015--``Strengthening America's Higher Education System'' 
        (Printed Hearing 114-5)

    The purpose of this hearing was to explore policy proposals 
that align with the Committee's four pillars for 
reauthorization of the Higher Education Act: (1) empowering 
students and families to make informed decisions; (2) 
simplifying and improving student aid; (3) promoting 
innovation, access, and completion; and (4) ensuring strong 
accountability and a limited federal role.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Mitchell E. Daniels, Jr., 
President, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana; Dr. 
Christine M. Keller, Vice President, Research and Policy 
Analysis, Executive Director, Voluntary System of 
Accountability and Student Achievement Measure, Association of 
Public & Land-grant Universities, Washington, D.C.; Mr. David 
A. Bergeron, Vice President, Postsecondary Education, Center 
for American Progress, Washington, D.C.; Mr. Michael J. 
Bennett, Associate Vice President, Financial Aid Services, St. 
Petersburg College, St. Petersburg, Florida.

April 30, 2015--``Improving College Access and Completion for Low-
        Income and First-Generation Students'' (Printed Hearing 114-13)

    The purpose of this hearing was to explore policy proposals 
and best practices to strengthen programs to help disadvantaged 
students access and complete higher education.
    Witnesses: Dr. Laura Perna, James S. Riepe, Professor, 
Executive Director, Alliance for Higher Education and 
Democracy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania; Dr. Charles J. Alexander, Associate Vice Provost 
for Student Diversity, Director, Academic Advancement Program, 
Associate Adjunct Professor, University of California, Los 
Angeles, Los Angeles, California; Dr. Michelle Asha Cooper, 
President, Institute for Higher Education Policy, Washington, 
D.C.; Dr. Joe D. May, Chancellor, Dallas County Community 
College District, Dallas, Texas.

September 10, 2015--``Preventing and Responding to Sexual Assault on 
        College Campuses'' (Printed Hearing 114-27)

    The purpose of this hearing was to explore policy proposals 
and best practices to help higher education institutions 
address and respond to campus sexual assault and violence.
    Witnesses: Ms. Dana Scaduto, General Counsel, Dickinson 
College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania; Dr. Penny Rue, Vice President 
for Campus Life, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North 
Carolina; Ms. Lisa M. Maatz, M.A., Vice President for 
Government Relations, American Association of University Women, 
Washington, D.C.; Mr. Joseph Cohn, Legislative and Policy 
Director, Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

November 18, 2015--``Federal Student Aid: Performance-Based 
        Organization Review'' (Printed Hearing 114-34) (Joint hearing 
        with the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform's 
        Subcommittee on Government Operations)

    The purpose of this joint hearing was to review the Office 
of Federal Student Aid's responsibilities as a Performance-
Based Organization, evaluate their performance, and identify 
possible areas of reform.
    Witnesses: Mr. James Runcie, Chief Operating Officer, U.S. 
Department of Education; Ms. Melissa Emrey-Arras, Director 
Education, Workforce, and Income Security, U.S. Government 
Accountability Office, Washington, D.C.; The Honorable Kathleen 
Tighe, Inspector General, U.S. Department of Education, 
Washington, D.C.; Mr. Ben Miller, Senior Director, 
Postsecondary Education, Center for American Progress; Mr. 
Justin Draeger, President, National Association of Student 
Financial Aid Administrators.

May 24, 2016--``Demanding Accountability at the Corporation for 
        National and Community Service'' (Printed Hearing 114-49)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the protocols 
for monitoring the activities of grantees, subgrantees, and 
AmeriCorps members of the Corporation for National and 
Community Service.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Wendy Spencer, Chief Executive 
Officer, Corporation for National and Community Service, 
Washington, D.C.; The Honorable Deborah Jeffrey, Inspector 
General, Corporation for National and Community Service, 
Washington, D.C.

                 Subcommittee on Workforce Protections


                                HEARINGS

    In the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee on Workforce 
Protections held 12 hearings, including one field hearing.

February 26, 2015--``The Blacklisting Executive Order: Rewriting 
        Federal Labor Policies Through Executive Fiat'' (Printed 
        Hearing 114-3) (Joint hearing with the Subcommittee on Health, 
        Employment, Labor, and Pensions)

    The purpose of this joint hearing was to examine the 
current federal procurement system, the impact of Executive 
Order 13673, ``Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces,'' on that system, 
and concerns raised by the contracting community, including 
implementation issues, disregard of due process protections, 
the subjective role of Labor Compliance Advisors, and the 
unreasonable scope of the reporting requirements under the 
executive order.
    Witnesses: Mr. Willis Goldsmith, Partner, Jones Day, New 
York, New York (testifying on behalf of the U.S. Chamber of 
Commerce); Mr. Stan Soloway, President and CEO, Professional 
Services Council, Arlington, Virginia; Ms. Angela Styles, 
Partner, Crowell & Moring LLP, Washington, D.C.; Ms. Karla 
Walter, Associate Director, American Worker Project, Center for 
American Progress, Washington, D.C.

March 24, 2015--H.R. 548, ``Certainty in Enforcement Act of 2015''; 
        H.R. 549, ``Litigation Oversight Act of 2015''; H.R. 550, 
        ``EEOC Transparency and Accountability Act''; and H.R. 1189, 
        ``Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act'' (Printed Hearing 
        114-7)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the need for 
legislation in response to the Equal Employment Opportunity 
Commission's increasingly aggressive approach toward enforcing 
federal non-discrimination laws.
    Witnesses: Ms. Gail Heriot, Professor of Law, University of 
San Diego School of Law, San Diego, California; Ms. Tanya Clay 
House, Director of Public Policy, Lawyers' Committee for Civil 
Rights Under Law, Washington, D.C.; Mr. Paul Kehoe, Senior 
Counsel, Seyfarth Shaw LLP, Washington, D.C. (testifying on 
behalf of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce); Ms. Tamara Simon, 
Managing Director, Knowledge Resource Center, Buck Consultants, 
Washington, D.C. (testifying on behalf of the American Benefits 
Council).

April 23, 2015--``Protecting America's Workers: An Enforcement Update 
        from the Mine Safety and Health Administration'' (Printed 
        Hearing 114-11)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the policies and 
procedures instituted by Mine Safety Health Administration in 
response to improved technology and regulatory changes required 
by the Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act.
    Witness: The Honorable Joseph A. Main, Assistant Secretary, 
Mine Safety and Health, U.S. Department of Labor, Arlington, 
Virginia.

May 20, 2015--``Reforming the Workers' Compensation Program for Federal 
        Employees'' (Printed Hearing 114-16)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine proposed reforms 
to the Federal Employees' Compensation Act and provide an 
overview of the Act, which is the exclusive remedy by which 
federal workers obtain disability, survivor, medical, and 
rehabilitation benefits for work-related injuries and 
illnesses.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Scott Dahl, Inspector General, 
U.S. Department of Labor, Washington, D.C.; Mr. Leonard Howie, 
III, Director, Office of Workers' Compensation Programs, U.S. 
Department of Labor, Washington, D.C.; Dr. Andrew Sherrill, 
Director of Education, Workforce, and Income Security, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office, Washington, D.C.; Mr. Ron 
Watson, Director of Retired Members, National Association of 
Letter Carriers, Washington, D.C.

June 10, 2015--``Reviewing the Rules and Regulations Implementing 
        Federal Wage and Hour Standards'' (Printed Hearing 114-18)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the Fair Labor 
Standards Act, focusing primarily on the FLSA's shortcomings 
and the disparity between the Act and today's twenty-first 
century workplace.
    Witnesses: Ms. Nicole Berberich, Human Resources Director, 
Cincinnati Animal Referral and Emergency (CARE) Center, 
Cincinnati, Ohio (testifying on behalf of the Society for Human 
Resource Management); Mr. Leonard Court, Senior Partner, Crowe 
& Dunlevy, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (testifying on behalf of the 
U.S. Chamber of Commerce); the Honorable Seth D. Harris, Former 
Acting U.S. Secretary of Labor and Deputy U.S. Secretary of 
Labor, Distinguished Scholar, Cornell University School of 
Industrial and Labor Relations, Ithaca, New York (testifying on 
own behalf); Mr. Jamie Richardson, Vice President, White Castle 
Systems, Inc., Columbus, Ohio (testifying on behalf of the 
National Council of Chain Restaurants).

July 23, 2015--``Examining the Costs and Consequences of the 
        Administration's Overtime Proposal'' (Printed Hearing 114-23)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the proposed 
overtime rule and its effect on employers and employees.
    Witnesses: Mr. Ross Eisenbrey, Vice President, Economic 
Policy Institute, Washington, D.C.; Ms. Elizabeth Hays, 
Director of Human Resources, MHY Family Services, Mars, 
Pennsylvania; The Honorable Tammy McCutchen, Principal, Littler 
Mendelson P.C., Washington, D.C.; Mr. Eric Williams, Chief 
Operating Officer, CKE Restaurant Holdings, Inc., Carpinteria, 
California.

October 7, 2015--``Protecting America's Workers: An Enforcement Update 
        from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration'' 
        (Printed Hearing 114-30)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the policies and 
priorities instituted by the Occupational Safety and Health 
Administration, its regulatory agenda, and its response to 
legal actions involving the agency.
    Witness: The Honorable David Michaels, Ph.D., MPH, 
Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and 
Health, U.S. Department of Labor, Washington, D.C.

October 21, 2015--``Protecting America's Workers: Reviewing Mine Safety 
        Policies with Stakeholders'' (Printed Hearing 114-32)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the impact of 
mine safety policies on the mining industry, as well as their 
impact on the health and safety of American mine workers.
    Witnesses: Mr. Ed Elliott, Director of Safety and Health, 
Rogers Group, Inc., Vincennes, Indiana; Dr. Jeffery L. Kohler, 
Professor and Chair of Mining Engineering, Pennsylvania State 
University, University Park, Pennsylvania; Mr. Steve Sanders, 
Esq., Director, Appalachian Citizens' Law Center, Whitesburg, 
Kentucky; Mr. Bruce Watzman, Senior Vice President, Regulatory 
Affairs, National Mining Association, Washington, D.C.; Mr. 
Mike Wright, Director of Health, Safety and Environment, United 
Steelworkers, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

December 9, 2015--``How the Administration's Regulatory Onslaught is 
        Affecting Workers and Job Creators'' (Printed Hearing 114-36)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the U.S. 
Department of Labor's regulations and their impact on business 
growth, hiring, productivity, and wages.
    Witnesses: Mr. Sam Batkins, Director of Regulatory Policy, 
American Action Forum, Washington, D.C.; Mr. Ralph Beebe, 
President, Highland Engineering, Howell, Michigan (testifying 
on behalf of the National Federation of Independent Business); 
Ms. Christine Owens, Executive Director, National Employment 
Law Project, Washington, D.C.; Mr. Bradford Hammock, 
Shareholder and Co-leader of the Workplace Safety and Health 
Practice Group, Jackson Lewis P.C., Reston, Virginia.

March 29, 2016--``The 21st Century Workforce: How Current Rules and 
        Regulations Affect Innovation and Flexibility in Michigan's 
        Workplaces'' (Field Hearing in Lansing, Michigan) (Printed 
        Hearing 114-44)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the Fair Labor 
Standards Act, focusing on its shortcomings and the disparity 
between its requirements and the 21st century workplace.
    Witnesses: Ms. Nancy McKeague, Senior Vice President, 
Michigan Health and Hospital Association, Okemos, Michigan 
(testifying on behalf of the Society for Human Resource 
Management); Mr. Jared Meyer, Fellow, Economics21 at the 
Manhattan Institute, Washington, D.C.; Dr. Dale Belman, 
Professor, School of Labor and Industrial Relations, Michigan 
State University, East Lansing, Michigan; Ms. Laurita Thomas, 
Associate Vice President for Human Resources, University of 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Mr. D. Mark Wilson, Vice 
President, Health and Employment Policy, HR Policy Association, 
Washington, D.C.

April 19, 2016--``Reviewing Recent Changes to OSHA's Silica Standards'' 
        (Printed Hearing 114-46)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine changes to the 
Occupational Safety and Health Administration's silica 
standards and the potential impact they will have on the 
nation's workplaces.
    Witnesses: Mr. Ed Brady, President, Brady Homes Illinois, 
Bloomington, Illinois (testifying on behalf of the National 
Association of Home Builders); Ms. Janis Herschkowitz, 
President, Regal Cast, Lebanon, Pennsylvania (testifying on 
behalf of the American Foundry Society); Dr. James Melius, 
M.D., Dr.P.H., Director of Research, Laborers' Health and 
Safety Fund of North America, Albany, New York; Mr. Henry 
Chajet, Of Counsel, Jackson Lewis P.C., Reston, Virginia 
(testifying on behalf of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce).

May 25, 2016--``Promoting Safe Workplaces Through Effective and 
        Responsible Recordkeeping Standards'' (Printed Hearing 114-50)

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine regulatory 
initiatives by the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational 
Safety and Health Administration to change injury and illness 
reporting requirements.
    Witnesses: Mr. David Sarvadi, Esq., Partner, Keller and 
Heckman LLP, Washington, D.C. (testifying on behalf of the 
Coalition for Workplace Safety); Ms. Lisa Sprick, President, 
Sprick Roofing Co., Inc., Corvallis, Oregon (testifying on 
behalf of the National Roofing Contractors Association); 
Rosemary Sokas, M.D., MOH, MSc., Professor and Chair, 
Department of Human Science, Georgetown University School of 
Nursing and Health Studies, Washington, D.C. (testifying on 
behalf of the American Public Health Association); Mr. Arthur 
G. Sapper, Esq., Partner, McDermott Will & Emery, Washington, 
D.C.

          Legislation Referred to Committee With House Passage

H.R. 5, Student Success Act (Sponsor: Rep. John Kline) July 8, 
        2015.
H.R. 8, North American Energy Security and Infrastructure Act 
        of 2015 (Sponsor: Rep. Fred Upton) December, 7, 2015.
H.R. 159, Stop Exploitation Through Trafficking Act of 2015 
        (Sponsor: Erik Paulsen) December 3, 2015.
H.R. 246, To improve the response to victims of child sex 
        trafficking (Sponsor: Rep. Joyce Beatty) January 27, 
        2015.
H.R. 329, Indian Employment, Training and Related Services 
        Consolidation Act of 2015 (Sponsor: Rep. Don Young) 
        December 7, 2016.
H.R. 468, Enhancing Services for Runaway and Homeless Victims 
        of Youth Trafficking Act of 2015 (Sponsor: Rep. Joseph 
        J. Heck) January 26, 2015.
H.R. 469, Strengthening Child Welfare Response to Trafficking 
        Act of 2015 (Sponsor: Rep. Karen Bass) January 27, 
        2015.
H.R. 511, Tribal Labor Sovereignty Act of 2015 (Sponsor: Rep. 
        Todd Rokita) November 17, 2015.
H.R. 596, To repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care 
        Act and health care-related provisions in the Health 
        Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, and for 
        other purposes (Sponsor: Rep. Bradley Byrne) February 
        3, 2015.
H.R. 1090, Retail Investor Protection Act (Sponsor: Rep. Ann 
        Wagner) October 27, 2015.
H.R. 1806, America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2015 
        (Sponsor: Rep. Lamar Smith) May 20, 2015.
H.R. 2617, An act to amend the Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2007 to 
        reduce a scheduled increase in the minimum wage 
        applicable to American Samoa (Sponsor: Rep. Aumua Amata 
        Coleman Radewagen) September 28, 2015.
H.R. 2646, Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act of 2016 
        (Sponsor: Rep. Tim Murphy) July 6, 2015.
H.R. 3038, Highway and Transportation Funding Act of 2015, Part 
        II (Sponsor: Rep. Paul D. Ryan) July 15, 2015.
H.R. 3178, Strengthening Transparency in Higher Education Act 
        (Sponsor: Rep. Virginia Foxx) July 11, 2016.
H.R. 3179, Empowering Students Through Enhanced Financial 
        Counseling Act (Sponsor: Rep. Brett Guthrie) July 11, 
        2016.
H.R. 3236, Surface Transportation and Veterans Health Care 
        Choice Improvement Act of 2015 (Sponsor: Rep. Bill 
        Shuster) July 29, 2016.
H.R. 3594, Federal Perkins Loan Program Extension Act of 2015 
        (Sponsor: Rep. Mike Bishop) September 28, 2015.
H.R. 4583, To promote a 21st century energy and manufacturing 
        workforce (Sponsor: Rep. Bobby L. Rush) February 29, 
        2016.
H.R. 4680, National Park Service Centennial Act (Sponsor: Rep. 
        Rob Bishop) December 7, 2016.
H.R. 4843, Infant Plan of Safe Care Improvement Act (Sponsor: 
        Rep. Lou Barletta) May 11, 2016.
H.R. 4919, Kevin and Avonte's Law of 2016 (Sponsor: Rep. 
        Christopher Smith) December 8, 2016.
H.R. 5278, PROMESA (Sponsor: Rep. Sean P. Duffy) June 9, 2016.
H.R. 5447, Small Business Health Care Relief Act of 2016 
        (Sponsor: Rep. Charles W. Boustany, Jr.) June 21, 2016.
H.R. 5528, Simplifying the Application for Student Aid Act 
        (Sponsor: Rep. Joseph J. Heck) July 11, 2016.
H.R. 5529, Accessing Higher Education Opportunities Act 
        (Sponsor: Rep. Joseph J. Heck) July 11, 2016.
H.R. 5530, HBCU Capital Financing Improvement Act (Sponsor: 
        Rep. Alma S. Adams) July 11, 2016.
H.R. 5587, Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 
        21st Century Act (Sponsor: Rep. Glenn Thompson) 
        September 13, 2016.
H.R. 5963, Supporting Youth Opportunity and Preventing 
        Delinquency Act of 2016 (Sponsor: Rep. Carlos Curbelo) 
        September 22, 2016.
H.R. 6094, Regulatory Relief for Small Businesses, Schools, and 
        Nonprofits Act (Sponsor: Rep. Tim Walberg) September 
        28, 2016.
H.J. Res. 88, Disapproving the rule submitted by the U.S 
        Department of Labor relating to the definition of the 
        term ``fiduciary'' (Sponsor: Rep. David ``Phil'' Roe) 
        April 28, 2016.
H. Con. Res. 138, Designating the George C. Marshall Museum and 
        George C. Marshall Research Library in Lexington, 
        Virginia, as the National George C. Marshall Museum and 
        Library (Sponsor: Rep. Bob Goodlatte) July 11, 2016.
S. 192, Older Americans Act Reauthorization Act of 2016 
        (Sponsor: Rep. Lamar Alexander) March 21, 2016.
S. 1124, WIOA Technical Amendments Act (Sponsor: Rep. Lamar 
        Alexander) May 12, 2015.

           Legislation Referred to Committee Enacted into Law

P.L. 114-18, S. 1124, WIOA Technical Amendments Act (Sponsor: 
        Sen. Lamar Alexander) May 22, 2015.
P.L. 114-41, H.R. 3236, Surface Transportation and Veterans 
        Health Care Choice Improvement Act of 2015 (Sponsor: 
        Bill Shuster) July 31, 2015.
P.L. 114-61, H.R. 2617, An act to amend the Fair Minimum Wage 
        Act of 2007 to reduce a scheduled increase in the 
        minimum wage applicable to American Samoa (Sponsor: 
        Rep. Aumua Amata Coleman Radewagen) October 7, 2015.
P.L. 114-105, H.R. 3594, Federal Perkins Loan Program Extension 
        Act of 2015 (Sponsor: Mike Bishop) December 18, 2015.
P.L. 114-144, S. 192, Older Americans Act Reauthorization Act 
        of 2016 (Sponsor: Sen. Lamar Alexander) April 19, 2016.

       Legislation within Committee Jurisdiction Enacted into Law

P.L. 114-22, S. 178, Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act of 
        2015 (Sponsor: Sen. John Cornyn) May 29, 2015.
P.L. 114-74, H.R. 3112, Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 (Sponsor: 
        Rep. Patrick Meehan) November 2, 2015. (Contains 
        provision from H.R. 3112)
P.L. 114-95, S. 1177, Every Student Succeeds Act (Sponsor: Sen. 
        Lamar Alexander) December 10, 2015.
P.L. 114-113, H.R. 2029, Military Construction and Veterans 
        Affairs and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2016 
        (Sponsor: Rep. Charles W. Dent) December 18, 2015.
P.L. 114-124, H.R. 3033, READ Act (Sponsor: Rep. Lamar Smith) 
        February 18, 2016.
P.L. 114-198, S. 524, Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act 
        of 2016 (Sponsor: Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse) July 22, 
        2016.
P.L.114-__, S. 2943, National Defense Authorization Act for 
        Fiscal Year 2017 (Sponsor: Sen. John McCain) December 
        23, 2016.

               Oversight Plan Summary and Correspondence

    On January 21, 2015, the Committee adopted an oversight 
plan for the 114th Congress. In fulfilling is obligation to 
ensure effective federal policies and programs, the Committee 
works to thoroughly monitor and investigate the various 
agencies, departments, and programs within its jurisdiction. 
The Committee's oversight plan ensures this work is well-
informed and Congress meets its responsibility for evaluating 
the effectiveness and administration of federal laws. Diligent 
oversight of federal programs helps ensure policies promote 
economic growth, support a stronger workforce, and improve 
education in America.
    Conducting oversight is an established responsibility of 
the Congress. The power to gather information and investigate 
is essential and inherent to the legislative process. It is 
Congress' obligation to monitor proposed federal rules to 
ensure laws are implemented as Congress intends. Likewise, 
Congress has the power to obtain information and conduct 
investigations to improve agency implementation of existing 
laws and inform the development of any needed legislation. 
Congress also exercises this power when examining situations 
involving waste, fraud, and abuse. In the end, taxpayers 
benefit from a robust examination of current policies, 
programs, and practices.
    The Committee identified the following areas in particular 
for oversight and investigation in the 114th Congress:
     Implementation of elementary and secondary 
education programs and policies, including the use of waiver 
authority and the impact of these policies on the ability of 
students to access to a quality education;
     Administration of elementary through postsecondary 
education programs to reduce duplicative, ineffective and 
burdensome regulations;
     Implementation of postsecondary education programs 
to ensure access to transparent information for students and 
families;
     Implementation of the nation's job training system 
under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act to help 
workers attain skills for 21st century jobs, provide greater 
accountability to taxpayers, and help put Americans back to 
work;
     Implementation of the Patient Protection and 
Affordable Care Act and how the law affects employers' ability 
to provide quality, affordable health care to employees;
     Administration of the National Labor Relations Act 
to ensure employee and employer rights are protected and 
applied consistently and without bias, giving particular 
scrutiny to the National Labor Relations Board's changes to 
union election rules and decisions affecting long-standing 
joint-employer standards;
     Administration of the U.S. Department of Labor's 
activities to ensure rules or regulations benefit the long-term 
financial security of working families and do not impede the 
ability of individuals to save for retirement;
     Implementation of the Multiemployer Pension Reform 
Act and additional needed pension reforms that will both 
protect taxpayers and encourage employer participation; and
     Administration of regulations to ensure laws 
operate as written by Congress in an open and transparent 
manner and do not overstep the authority of Congress.
    Along with gathering information through hearings, the 
Committee conducts oversight of federal programs under its 
jurisdiction through general information gathering. To evaluate 
the effectiveness and administration of federal laws, the 
Committee initiated the following oversight correspondence:

January 5, 2015--Letter to Secretary Thomas E. Perez, U.S. 
    Department of Labor, submitting comments on the Office of 
    Federal Contract Compliance Programs' Notice of Proposed 
    Rulemaking to require federal contractors to report summary 
    data on employee compensation broken down by sex, race, and 
    ethnicity under Executive Order 11236.
January 12, 2015--Letter to Chair Jenny R. Yang and 
    Commissioners Constance S. Barker, Chai R. Feldblum, and 
    Victoria A. Lipnic, U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity 
    Commission, requesting information concerning the 
    Commission's issuance of enforcement guidance entitled 
    ``Religious Garb and Grooming in the Workplace: Rights and 
    Responsibilities.''
January 14, 2015--Letter to Comptroller General Gene L. Dodaro, 
    U.S. Government Accountability Office, requesting a study 
    of the current federal and state programs serving children 
    under the age of five.
February 2, 2015--Letter to Chairman Mark Pearce, National 
    Labor Relations Board, requesting documents and 
    communications related to the timing of the Board's 
    publication of the ``ambush election'' rulemaking when it 
    failed to be reported as a short-term action in the 2014 
    Fall Unified Agenda.
February 6, 2015--Letter to Acting Chairman Patrick Nakamura, 
    Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission, 
    requesting information regarding the Commission's decision 
    to hold a closed meeting regarding citations against Broody 
    Mining, LLC, and subsequent decision to cancel the closed 
    meeting.
February 11, 2015--Letter to Assistant Secretary David 
    Michaels, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, 
    U.S. Department of Labor, encouraging the agency to 
    consider the recommendations of the Coalition for Crane 
    Operation Safety as it implements its revised standard for 
    cranes and derricks in construction.
February 13, 2015--Letter to Director Charles M. Roessel, 
    Bureau of Indian Education, U.S. Department of the 
    Interior, expressing concern over recent reports of the 
    deplorable conditions of schools maintained by the Bureau 
    of Indian Education.
February 20, 2015--Letter to Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell, 
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, thanking her 
    for her ongoing efforts to inform the Committee of the 
    Department's progress implementing the Child Care and 
    Development Block Grant Act of 2014, as well including a 
    list of provisions which affirms Congressional intent.
March 4, 2015--Letter to Secretary Thomas E. Perez, U.S. 
    Department of Labor, requesting information concerning 
    coordination between the Department and the Securities and 
    Exchange Commission regarding attempts to regulate for the 
    purpose of expanding fiduciary liability.
March 11, 2015--Letter to Assistant Secretary David Michaels, 
    Occupational Safety and Health Administration, requesting 
    the agency withdraw its guidance changing criteria for 
    businesses participating in the Safety and Health 
    Achievement Recognition Program.
March 16, 2015--Letter to Chairman Tom Price, Committee on the 
    Budget, and Ranking Member Chris Van Hollen, Committee on 
    the Budget, U.S. House of Representatives, asking them to 
    address the needs of special needs children, their 
    families, and their educators in the Fiscal Year 2016 
    Budget.
March 17, 2015--Letter to Secretary Thomas E. Perez, U.S. 
    Department of Labor, requesting the Department immediately 
    implement new Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act 
    requirements for contractor quality.
March 23, 2015--Letter to Chairman Hal Rogers, Committee on 
    Appropriations, Chairman Ken Calvert, Subcommittee on 
    Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies, Ranking Member 
    Nita M. Lowey, Committee on Appropriations, and Ranking 
    Member Betty McCollum, Subcommittee on Interior, 
    Environment, and Related Agencies, the U.S. House of 
    Representatives, urging the Committee to help address the 
    deplorable conditions of schools maintained by BIE.
March 24, 2015--Letter to Secretary Thomas E. Perez, U.S. 
    Department of Labor, continuing the Committee's request for 
    information concerning coordination between the Department 
    and the Securities and Exchange Commission to regulate for 
    the purposes of expanding fiduciary liability.
March 25, 2015--Letter to Chairman Hal Rogers, Committee on 
    Appropriations, Chairman Tom Cole, Subcommittee on Labor, 
    Health, and Human Services, Ranking Member Nita M. Lowey, 
    Committee on Appropriations, and Ranking Member Rosa 
    DeLauro, Subcommittee on Labor, Health, and Human Services, 
    U.S. House of Representatives, asking for support in 
    addressing the challenges facing special needs students, 
    their families, and their educators in the Fiscal Year 2016 
    appropriations.
April 10, 2015--Letter to Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell, 
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, expressing 
    concern about the health and safety of children enrolled in 
    the Head Start program.
April 28, 2015--Letter to Secretary Thomas E. Perez, U.S. 
    Department of Labor, requesting a briefing and an update on 
    the Office of Labor-Management Standards' approval process 
    for California transit grants following California's 
    passage of the Public Employee Pension Reform Act of 2012.
May 29, 2015--Letter to Secretary Thomas E. Perez, U.S. 
    Department of Labor, requesting the Department to extend 
    the period for public comment the Employee Benefits 
    Security Administration's Notice of Proposed Rulemaking 
    (RIN 1210-AB32) entitled ``Definition of the Term 
    `Fiduciary'; Conflict of Interest Rule-Retirement 
    Investment Advice.''
June 2, 2015--Letter to Secretary Thomas E. Perez, U.S. 
    Department of Labor, continuing the Committee's request for 
    information concerning coordination between the Department 
    and the Securities and Exchange Commission to regulate for 
    the purposes of expanding fiduciary liability.
June 15, 2015--Letter to Secretary Thomas E. Perez, U.S. 
    Department of Labor, raising concerns with the 
    implementation of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity 
    Act of 2014.
June 15, 2015--Letter to Secretary Arne Duncan, U.S. Department 
    of Education, stating concerns with the Department's 
    proposal to eliminate all uncompensated positions from the 
    definition of ``employment outcome'' for the purposes of 
    vocational rehabilitation in the recently enacted Workforce 
    Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014.
July 15, 2015--Letter to Secretary Thomas E. Perez, U.S. 
    Department of Labor, and Administrator Anne Rung, Office of 
    Federal Procurement Policy, Office of Management and 
    Budget, requesting the proposed implementing guidance and 
    rule, Executive Order 13673, be withdrawn.
June 19, 2015--Letter to Bernadette Wilson, Acting Executive 
    Officer, Executive Secretariat, Equal Employment 
    Opportunity Commission, submitting comments on the Notice 
    of Proposed Rulemaking (RIN 3046-AB01) amending regulations 
    implementing the Americans with Disabilities Act with 
    respect to employee wellness programs.
July 21, 2015--Letter to Secretary Thomas E. Perez, U.S. 
    Department of Labor, submitting comments on the Employee 
    Benefits Security Administration's Notice of Proposed 
    Rulemaking (RIN 1210-AB32) amending the definition of 
    ``fiduciary'' under the Employee Retirement Income Security 
    Act.
July 29, 2015--Letter to Secretary Arne Duncan, U.S. Department 
    of Education, expressing concerns with the proposed cash 
    management regulation published in the Federal Register on 
    May 18, 2015, which would impose costly and unnecessary 
    regulatory burdens on colleges and universities trying to 
    help students manage their federal financial aid.
August 7, 2015--Letter to Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell, 
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, requesting 
    information about sub-regulatory guidance issued on out-of-
    pocket maximums as applied to employer-sponsored health 
    coverage under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care 
    Act.
August 21, 2015--Letter to Secretary Thomas E. Perez, U.S. 
    Department of Labor, requesting an extension of the period 
    for public comment on the Wage and Hour Division's Notice 
    of Proposed Rulemaking (RIN 1235-AA11) to revise overtime 
    regulations under the Fair Labor Standards Act and to 
    request information regarding the rulemaking's ambiguity 
    concerning possible changes to the duties test.
August 26, 2015--Letter to Secretary Thomas E. Perez, U.S. 
    Department of Labor, and Administrator Anne Rung, Office of 
    Federal Procurement Policy, submitting comments on the 
    Department's proposed guidance and the Federal Acquisition 
    Regulatory Council's proposed rule to implement Executive 
    Order 13673.
September 17, 2015--Letter to Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell, 
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, expressing 
    concern with proposed changes to Head Start regulations.
September 21, 2015--Letter to Assistant Secretary Joseph A. 
    Main, Mine Safety and Health Administration, U.S. 
    Department of Labor, requesting information concerning how 
    the agency is working to ensure sampling technology used to 
    measure air quality in mines is capable of accurately 
    distinguishing between coal and rock dust. In addition, 
    this inquiry requested the agency provide the results of 
    any studies examining the interaction of rock dust and the 
    use of Continuous Personal Dust Monitors.
September 25, 2015--Letter to Administrator David Weil, Wage 
    and Hour Division, U.S. Department of Labor, requesting an 
    explanation why the Department had failed for the past five 
    years to implement the requirements of the McNamara-O'Hara 
    Service Contract Act by not determining local wage rates.
October 13, 2015--Letter to Secretary Thomas E. Perez, U.S. 
    Department of Labor, requesting documents and other 
    information regarding the Occupational Safety and Health 
    Administration's attempts to amend implementation of its 
    multiemployer citation policy.
October 20, 2015--Letter to Acting Administrator, Centers for 
    Medicare and Medicaid Services, U.S. Department of Health 
    and Human Services, requesting the agency consider adopting 
    lower reimbursement rates for plan years 2015 and 2016 and 
    to end the regulatory requirement that self-insured 
    companies and multi-employer health plans contribute to the 
    reinsurance program under the Patient Protection and 
    Affordable Care Act.
October 23, 2015--Letter to Director Richard Cordray, Consumer 
    Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), informing the CFPB that 
    its investigative demand to the Accrediting Council for 
    Independent Colleges and Schools is outside of its 
    jurisdiction.
November 3, 2015--Letter to Secretary Arne Duncan, U.S. 
    Department of Education, seeking clarification as to how 
    the Department calculates cohort default rates.
December 11, 2015--Letter to Secretary Thomas E. Perez, U.S. 
    Department of Labor, requesting the Occupational Safety and 
    Health Administration withdraw its guidance memoranda 
    related to the Process Safety Management regulation until 
    such time as the agency undertakes a formal rulemaking 
    process under the Administrative Procedure Act.
January 19, 2016--Letter to Secretary Thomas E. Perez, U.S. 
    Department of Labor, continuing the Committee's request for 
    documents and other information regarding the Occupational 
    Safety and Health Administration's attempts to amend 
    implementation of its multiemployer citation policy.
January 28, 2016--Letter to Bernadette Wilson, Acting Executive 
    Officer, Executive Secretariat, U.S. Equal Employment 
    Opportunity Commission, submitting comments on the NPRM 
    (RIN 3046-AB02) amending regulations implementing the 
    Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 with 
    respect to employee wellness programs.
February 12, 2016--Letter to Secretary Thomas E. Perez, U.S. 
    Department of Labor, requesting information relating to 
    meetings and communications with outside parties concerning 
    the Wage and Hour Division's proposal to revise overtime 
    regulations under the Fair Labor Standards Act.
February 22, 2016--Letter to Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell, 
    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, expressing 
    views regarding certain provisions of the NPRM published in 
    the Federal Register on December 24, 2015, in regards to 
    the Child Care and Development Block Grant Act of 2014.
March 16, 2016--Letter to Secretary Thomas E. Perez, U.S. 
    Department of Labor, requesting an extension of the period 
    for public comment on the Wage and Hour Division's NPRM 
    (RIN 1235-AA13) entitled ``Establishing Paid Sick Leave for 
    Federal Contractors, Executive Order 13706.''
March 18, 2016--Letter to President Justin Draeger, National 
    Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, 
    requesting additional input from institutions concerning 
    their experiences with the Office of Federal Student Aid 
    and whether the office is meeting its responsibilities.
March 29, 2016--Letter to Chair Jenny Yang, Equal Employment 
    Opportunity Commission, requesting an extension of the 
    period for public comment on proposed revisions of the 
    Employer Information Report (EEO-1) data collection 
    requirements to include pay data and also requesting 
    information relating to meetings and communications with 
    outside parties concerning the proposal.
April 8, 2016--Letter to Secretary John King, U.S. Department 
    of Education, requesting responses to questions regarding 
    the Student Aid Enforcement Unit.
May 17, 2016--Letter to Secretary John King, U.S. Department of 
    Education, asking questions about the recent negotiated 
    rulemaking session on provisions in the Every Student 
    Succeeds Act.
May 26, 2016--Letter to Secretary Jacob J. Lew, U.S. Department 
    of the Treasury, requesting information concerning the 
    Department's decision to reject the Central States Pension 
    Fund's proposed rescue plan.
May 27, 2016--Letter to Thomas E. Perez, U.S. Department of 
    Labor, citing concerns about Job Corps and its improvement 
    through the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.
June 10, 2016--Letter to Secretary John King, U.S. Department 
    of Education, inquiring about a common manual for servicing 
    federal student loans.
June 10, 2016--Letter to Secretary John King, U.S. Department 
    of Education, addressing concerns and seeking transparency 
    on the heightened cash monitoring process.
June 22, 2016--Letter to Comptroller General Gene L. Dodaro, 
    U.S. Government Accountability Office, requesting a study 
    be done on the Summer Food Service Program to determine 
    need and effectiveness.
June 24, 2016--Letter to Secretary John King, U.S. Department 
    of Education, requesting information concerning the 
    Department's recent handling of the negotiated rulemaking 
    process in regards to the borrower defenses to repayment 
    included within the Higher Education Act.
June 30, 2016--Letter to Chief Shaheena Simons, Educational 
    Opportunities Section, Civil Rights Division, U.S. 
    Department of Justice, and to United States Attorney Damon 
    Martinez, District of New Mexico, U.S. Department of 
    Justice, requesting information about the April 22, 2016 
    letter (the ``UNM findings letter'') the office sent to the 
    president of the University of New Mexico regarding the 
    Department of Justice's recently concluded investigation of 
    the university under Title IX of the Education Amendments 
    of 1972 (Title IX) and Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 
    1964 (Title IV).
June 30, 2016--Letter to Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights 
    Catherine E. Lhamon, U.S. Department of Education Office 
    for Civil Rights, requesting specific information in 
    regards to the Office for Civil Rights' position on the 
    definition of sexual harassment.
July 5, 2016--Letter to Bernadette B. Wilson, Acting Executive 
    Officer, Executive Secretariat, U.S. Equal Employment 
    Opportunity Commission, submitting comments regarding the 
    Commission's proposed enforcement guidance on national 
    origin discrimination.
July 6, 2016--Letter to Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights 
    Catherine E. Lhamon, U.S. Department of Education Office 
    for Civil Rights, requesting documents and communications 
    related to the process for entering into resolution 
    agreements with the Department's Office for Civil Rights.
August 1, 2016--Letter to Secretary John King, U.S. Department 
    of Education and Attorney General Loretta Lynch, U.S. 
    Department of Justice, requesting additional information 
    regarding the ``Dear Colleague Letter on Transgender 
    Students.''
August 8, 2016--Letter to Secretary John King, U.S. Department 
    of Education, expressing concerns with the Department's 
    proposal for a single servicer solution for federal student 
    loans and requesting a briefing from Department staff.
August 15, 2016--Letter to Joseph B. Nye, Policy Analyst, 
    Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of 
    Management and Budget (OMB), submitting comments regarding 
    the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's notice 
    of submission for OMB review of the Commission's proposed 
    revisions of the Employer Information Report (EEO-1) data 
    collection requirements to include pay data.
September 20, 2016--Letter to Secretary John King, U.S. 
    Department of Education, requesting information on the 
    Department's regulatory agenda for the remainder of the 
    114th Congress.
September 20, 2016--Letter to Secretary Thomas E. Perez, U.S. 
    Department of Labor, requesting information concerning the 
    Department's plans to issue rulemakings and non-regulatory 
    policy changes during the final months of the Obama 
    administration. In addition, this inquiry requested 
    information concerning attempts to hire political 
    appointees into the civil service.
October 4, 2016--Letter to Secretary John King, U.S. Department 
    of Education, requesting responses to specific questions 
    regarding the removal of federal recognition of the 
    Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools.
October 17, 2016--Letter to Comptroller General Gene L. Dodaro, 
    U.S. Government Accountability Office, citing concern the 
    U.S. Department of Education does not appropriately train 
    its staff responsible for monitoring compliance with the 
    Every Student Succeeds Act or help states appropriately 
    train state monitoring officials with their efforts to 
    implement the law.
October 26, 2016--Letter to Secretary Thomas E. Perez, U.S. 
    Department of Labor, continuing the Committee's request for 
    documents and other information regarding the Occupational 
    Safety and Health Administration's attempts to amend 
    implementation of its multiemployer citation policy.
October 28, 2016--Letter to Secretary Thomas E. Perez, U.S. 
    Department of Labor, requesting information concerning the 
    Office of Labor-Management Standards' implementation of 
    reporting requirements for worker centers under the Labor-
    Management Reporting and Disclosure Act.
November 4, 2016--Letter to Wendy Spencer, Chief Executive 
    Officer of the Corporation for National and Community 
    Service (CNCS), detailing CNCS's failures to properly 
    monitor and implement oversight of grantees and requests 
    documentation on oversight activity.
November 4, 2016--Letter to Secretary John King, U.S. 
    Department of Education, regarding concerns with the 
    Supplement, Not Supplant NPRM through the public comment 
    period.
December 5, 2016--Letter to Office of Regulations and 
    Interpretations, Employee Benefits Security Administration, 
    U.S. Department of Labor, submitting comments on the 
    agency's Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (RIN 1210-AB63) 
    revising annual reporting and disclosure requirements under 
    the Employee Retirement Income Security Act.

             Committee Activity Statistics--114th Congress

Total Number of Hearings--55
    Total Number of Full Committee Hearings--18
    Total Number of Subcommittee Hearings--37
    Total Number of Field Hearings--3
Total Number of Bills and Other Committee Materials Considered 
    in Markup Session--19
Total Number of Filed Legislative Reports--16
Total Number of House Bills Referred--840
Total Number of Bills Referred to the Committee with House 
    Passage--34
Total Number of Bills Referred to the Committee Enacted into 
    Law--5
Total Number of Bills within Committee Jurisdiction Enacted 
    into Law--7
Total Number of Initiated Oversight Correspondence--67

                             MINORITY VIEWS

    Early Childhood. Research is clear on both the short- and 
long-term positive outcomes of quality preschool programs, 
including reduction of achievement gaps in elementary and 
secondary education and significant returns on investment 
through reduced criminal activity, reliance on federal 
benefits, and other outcomes. Furthermore, state and local 
elected officials, business, school, law enforcement, military, 
and economic leaders have all expressed broad agreement that 
increasing such strategic investments in early childhood 
education are critical to our country's economic growth and 
military readiness. Committee Democrats are committed to 
improving access to high-quality early learning opportunities, 
as evidenced by the introduction of the Strong Start for 
America's Children Act of 2015, H.R. 2411, and leadership to 
prioritize early childhood education in reauthorization of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). H.R. 2411 would 
allow all children in families earning at or below 200% of the 
Federal Poverty Line the opportunity to attend a high-quality 
pre-K program.
    During the first session of the 114th Congress, Committee 
Democrats fought successfully to include the authorization of 
Preschool Development Grants into the Every Student Succeeds 
Act (ESSA), which was signed into law in December of 2015. 
Additionally, access to high quality early childhood education 
as a crucial component to improving student success was 
prioritized throughout ESSA, such as by including early 
childhood educators in professional development programs, 
allowing for the use of Title I funds for district early 
learning programs, and allowing charter schools to use federal 
funds for preschool classrooms.
    Large percentages of eligible children, however, continue 
to lack access to quality early learning programs. Many of 
these children live in under-resourced communities that are not 
able to help provide a nurturing environment. The disaster in 
Flint, Michigan is an example of how lack of investments and 
cuts in government funding lead to even more costly tragedies 
that disproportionately affect the most vulnerable communities. 
All children living in Flint and many in the surrounding 
communities suffered from lead poisoning due to a contaminated 
water supply. The effects of lead poisoning in children, 
especially children under age five, can lead to life-long 
impacts, including lower IQ, an inability to regulate 
behaviors, and chronic health effects. Early learning programs, 
such as Head Start and IDEA services for infants and toddlers, 
and child nutrition programs, such as WIC and the Child and 
Adult Care Food Program, are uniquely set up to help mitigate 
the effects of lead poisoning in children. Regrettably, 
repeated calls from Committee Democrats to hold a hearing on 
effectively using federal programs within the Committee's 
jurisdiction to mitigate the long-term negative impact of lead 
poisoning and increase federal investments for early learning 
resources in Flint went unanswered by the Republican Majority.
    Committee Democrats, during the second session, supported 
bipartisan efforts to include in appropriations bills, an 
increase in funding for Head Start and Child Care Development 
Block Grants, and continued funding for Early Head Start-Child 
Care Partnerships.
    K-12 Education. During the 1st session of the 114th 
Congress, Committee Democrats joined the Majority and Members 
of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and 
Pensions to successfully conference the House and Senate bills 
to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act 
(ESEA). Conference came following a highly partisan Committee 
and protracted floor process that accompanied The Student 
Success Act, H.R. 5, which resulted in only narrow passage of 
the measure (with 12 Republicans joining a unified House 
Democratic Conference to oppose passage). In the face of 
widespread opposition to both the House and Senate bills, 
Committee Democrats strategically employed their considerable 
leverage at the Conference table to demand key equity-focused 
improvements to the ESEA reauthorization vehicle, resulting in 
a Conference report (The Every Student Succeeds Act, S. 1177) 
endorsed by a broad array of constituencies, including 
teachers, parents, state, district, and school administrators, 
and civil rights advocates, among others. President Obama 
signed ESSA on December 10th, 2015. Committee Democrats are 
proud of the role they played to secure a comprehensive ESEA 
reauthorization that honors the civil rights legacy of the law 
and upholds the Democratic principle of equity of educational 
opportunity.
    Committee Democrats are particularly proud of the 
bipartisan consensus in support of key Democratic priorities, 
including provisions to require states to have challenging 
academic standards in reading and math; maintain annual, 
statewide assessments aligned to state standards to ensure that 
parents receive meaningful information about student and school 
performance; support responsible efforts to reduce over-testing 
in our nation's classrooms; ensure that all students count 
within the state's system of measuring and acting to support 
school improvement; repeal and replace adequate yearly progress 
with a strong state-developed accountability system that is 
focused on academic outcomes, but uses multiple measures of 
student learning and school success beyond tests; drives more 
equitable allocation of resources to support school 
improvement; and strengthens state and local responsibility for 
improving low-performing schools while requiring continuous 
improvement to support student learning, including a 
requirement to act when any individual subgroup of students is 
not learning.
    Most importantly, Committee Democrats successfully fought 
to preserve the full regulatory, oversight, and enforcement 
authority of the U.S. Department of Education. Although ESSA 
transfers much responsibility to states, the statute maintains 
the Department's robust authority to fully implement the law. 
The Secretary is prohibited from interfering in some state and 
local decisions regarding accountability and school improvement 
activities, including interference with state discretion to set 
standards aligned to college entrance, but he or she is charged 
by Congress with holding each state accountable for compliance 
with statutory and regulatory requirements to ensure that 
implementation fulfills Congressional intent to hold all states 
accountable for meeting the needs of all students.
    Committee Democrats worked with Committee Republicans to 
oversee the Department's implementation activity throughout the 
2nd session and are pleased with the Departments urgency to 
provide states and school districts with clarity and guidance 
to ensure faithful implementation of the statute. Committee 
Democrats look forward to working with Committee Republicans 
and the incoming Administration to ensure implementation of 
ESSA adheres to the longstanding and bipartisan intent of 
Congress to protect and promote educational equity and civil 
rights for all students.
    In addition to the Committee's legislative agenda, 
Committee Democrats worked with the Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) to investigate the status of socioeconomic and 
racial diversity in our nation's public schools. Released in 
May of 2016, the report shows an alarming trend of re-
segregation in public education, leaving the promise of Brown 
v. Board unfulfilled. In response to the report's findings 
Committee Democrats introduced the Equity and Inclusion 
Enforcement Act, H.R. 5260 and the Stronger Together School 
Diversity Act of 2015, H.R. 5738. Committee Democrats also held 
a forum on the issue of school diversity after request for 
official committee action on the issue went ignored by the 
Chairman. Committee Democrats are committed to elevating this 
issue in the 115th Congress.
    To support states and school districts in tackling the 
teacher shortage, Committee Democrats introduced the 
Innovations to Recruit and Retain Excellent Teachers Act, H.R. 
6236, in November of 2016. Because issues of teacher 
recruitment and retention impact students' current and future 
socioeconomic outcomes, H.R. 6236 seeks to empower states and 
school districts to develop innovative, tailored strategies to 
ensure that students (especially those from low-income 
families) are taught by a well-supported and diverse workforce 
of excellent teachers. The bill would build on the recruitment 
and retention initiatives funded through ESEA Title II, as 
updated by ESSA. Committee Democrats are committed to robust 
support for public school teachers to deliver world-class 
instruction in every U.S. classroom.
    Students with Disabilities. Committee Democrats are 
committed to meeting the developmental and educational needs of 
children with disabilities to empower each individual to pursue 
opportunities for independent living and full integration into 
society. To that end, Committee Democrats fought to 
successfully secure key protections for students with 
disabilities in ESSA, such as access to college- and career-
ready standards; the one percent cap on alternate assessments 
based on alternate achievement standards for students with the 
most significant cognitive disabilities; school-level 
accountability for subgroup performance that requires action 
when any individual subgroup of students is not performing 
academically; and codification of both the four year adjusted 
and extended year graduation rates in a manner that affords 
states the appropriate credit for graduating students with 
significant cognitive disabilities who earn a diploma that is 
aligned to standards and requirements for a regular high school 
diploma.
    Committee Democrats understand that these and other 
protections in ESSA, along with equity protections in the 
Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA) and Title IV of the 
Workforce Investment and Opportunity Act (WIOA) will be 
rendered meaningless without appropriate regulatory clarity and 
subsequent oversight and enforcement from the U.S. Department 
of Education. Committee Democrats look forward to working with 
Committee Republicans and the incoming Administration during 
the 115th Congress to ensure faithful implementation of federal 
law to protect and promote educational equity and civil rights 
for all students, including students with disabilities.
    In the 115th Congress, Committee Democrats will fight to 
ensure that any reauthorization of the Individuals with 
Disabilities Education Act strengthens due process protections 
for students and families, provides schools with resources and 
supports so students with disabilities are held to high 
academic and achievement standards, and continues to improve 
access to general education curriculum for students with 
disabilities.
    Child Nutrition. The Committee plays a critical role in the 
fight against hunger and the childhood obesity epidemic. In the 
111th Congress, Committee Democrats led efforts to address 
these issues through enacting the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act 
(HHFKA) which introduced stronger nutrition standards for foods 
served in schools, both during and outside the traditional meal 
service. These robust standards ensure that children are 
exposed to healthy foods and can begin forming healthy eating 
habits in order to grow into healthy adults. According to 
recent research, since the healthier standards have been put in 
place, the overall nutritional quality of the foods chosen by 
students has increased by 29 percent.\1\ Through the hard work 
of many actors at the local, state, and federal levels, the 
improved nutrition standards are in place at over 98 percent of 
schools participating in the National School Lunch Program.\2\ 
Unfortunately, these standards have been criticized by 
Republicans.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\Donna Johnson, Mary Podrabsky, Anita Rocha, JJ. Otten, ``Effect 
of the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act on the Nutritional Quality of Meals 
Selected by Students and School Lunch Participation Rates,'' JAMA 
Pediatrics (January 4, 2016) available at: http://jamanetwork.com/
journals/jamapediatrics/article-abstract/2478057.
    \2\USDA. School Meal Certification Data, (October 19, 2016) 
available at: http://www.fns.usda.gov/sites/default/files/cn/
SFAcert_FY16Q3.pdf.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Over the four Committee hearings held in the 114th 
Congress, Committee Democrats made clear that any 
reauthorization of child nutrition programs must build on what 
is already working and continue to improve services for those 
the programs are intended to serve. Rather than moving the 
country forward in a bipartisan fashion, the Committee 
considered and passed a highly partisan child nutrition 
reauthorization bill that would do the opposite. H.R. 5003, the 
Improving Child Nutrition and Education Act of 2016, would roll 
back access to and availability of nutritious meals, putting at 
risk the current and future health of millions of 
schoolchildren. The Republican reauthorization bill included an 
increased burden on schools and families who participate in 
school meals programs, a pilot program to block grant school 
meals programs, and weakened nutrition standards for the foods 
that fuel our nation's children and students. Not a single 
Democrat voted in favor of the misguided legislation.
    Further, H.R. 5003 proposed drastic changes to a successful 
provision in the 2010 reauthorization that provides access to 
free, nutritious meals to millions of students from low-income 
families. The Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) allowed 
more than 18,000 schools across the country to serve free, 
universal, healthy school meals to 8.5 million children in 
school year 2015-2016 without the stigma or burden of 
paperwork.\3\ CEP has proven to be a powerful tool that allows 
school districts to provide easier access to nutritious meals 
for children in high-poverty schools and high-poverty areas by 
simplifying program eligibility and eliminating unnecessary and 
redundant school meal applications. Despite its demonstrated 
efficacy and popularity, H.R. 5003 would make it harder for 
schools and children to qualify for CEP, again, rolling back 
the progress of the 2010 reauthorization.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \3\Food Research Action Council & Center on Budget and Policy 
Priorities. Community Eligibility Adoption Rises for the 2015-2016 
School Year, Increasing Access to School Meals, (May 13, 2016) 
available at: http://frac.org/pdf/take-up-of-cep-report.pdf.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Committee Democrats offered over two dozen amendments to 
H.R. 5003 with the goal of improving access to nutritious meals 
both inside and outside of school. Committee Democrats urged: 
preserving CEP and strong nutrition standards in child 
nutrition programs, improving summer and afterschool feeding 
programs so that those programs can reach more children 
(mirroring bipartisan legislation introduced by Rep. Davis and 
Rep. Bonamici, respectively), meaningful improvements to an 
expansion of WIC services, and ensuring that safe drinking 
water is available to all students. The amendments, along with 
the other amendments offered, represent the priorities of 
Committee Democrats that will continue to drive their efforts 
in improving federal child nutrition programs.
    Child Safety. The safety of all children must be the 
highest priority for this Committee. In 2016, Committee 
Republicans and Committee Democrats collaborated on a 
bipartisan child welfare bill that unanimously passed the House 
to support children who are born dependent on opioids, known as 
Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, due to the parent's addiction to 
illegal or prescription drugs. The Infant Plan of Safe Care 
Improvement Act, H.R. 4843, amended the Child Abuse Prevention 
and Treatment Act (CAPTA) to strengthen requirements for the 
state to ensure the safety of the infant and well-being of the 
caregiver following the child's release from a healthcare 
provider. The bill became law on July 22, 2016 as part of a 
larger legislative package to address opioid abuse called the 
Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA). CARA takes a 
broad approach to help Americans addicted to opioids, from 
reforming the drug approval process to providing better care 
for individuals suffering from addiction. While Committee 
Democrats welcome H.R. 4843 as a bipartisan achievement during 
the 114th Congress, Committee Democrats look forward to more 
robust Committee discussion on issues of child safety and well-
being, including achieving a bipartisan comprehensive CAPTA 
reauthorization.
    Committee Democrats were disappointed that Committee 
Republicans held no hearings on policy issues central to 
improving child safety, such as abusive seclusion and restraint 
practices in schools, child abuse in residential programs for 
teens, and the health risks for student athletes posed by 
concussions. Such hearings are essential for a thorough 
examination of legislative options that could lead to stronger 
protections for vulnerable children.
    Additionally, Committee Democrats reintroduced legislation 
this Congress to protect student athletes from concussions. 
Sports-related youth concussions are a growing concern, with 
recent research estimating 1.6-3.8 million injuries occurring 
each year. Sponsored by Rep. DeSaulnier, the Protecting Student 
Athletes from Concussions Act of 2015, H.R. 2062, would, for 
the first time, set minimum safety standards for concussion 
management in public schools across the country with plans that 
educate students, parents, and school personnel about how to 
recognize and respond to concussions.
    Student Data Privacy. Protecting student privacy is a 
priority that transcends party lines. In July of 2015 Committee 
Democrats and Committee Republicans worked to introduce the 
bipartisan Student Privacy Protection Act, H.R. 3157, a bill to 
modernize the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) 
of 1974. Recognizing advances in the delivery of educational 
programs and services since the law's enactment, including use 
of modern technology, the legislation would update federal 
student data privacy protections to align with the evolving use 
of 21st century technology in kindergarten through 
postsecondary education. Committee Democrats believe that any 
efforts to improve FERPA must be bipartisan and not only 
modernize student protections, but also strengthen parental 
involvement, hold bad actors accountable, and allow for 
appropriate uses of technology and research for improving 
student outcomes. Despite multiple hearings on the issue of 
student data privacy throughout the 114th Congress, there was 
no further Committee action on H.R. 3157.
    Juvenile Justice. In the 114th Congress, Committee 
Democrats sought to emphasize the importance of federal 
investment in research-based and effective juvenile justice and 
delinquency prevention programs. Ranking Member Scott and 
Committee Democrats strongly believe that federal supports for 
state juvenile justice systems need to be maintained and 
strengthened. Committee Democrats know that investments in 
evidence-based practices designed to both prevent children from 
committing juvenile offenses, and intervene in the lives of 
children having committed such offenses are cost-effective 
investments that result in fiscal savings and better outcomes 
for young people.
    In too many communities in America, an ineffective 
educational system converges with an unresponsive juvenile 
justice system to create a ``Cradle to Prison Pipeline.'' 
According to estimates from the Children's Defense Fund, 1 in 3 
African-American Boys born in the year 2000 will spend a 
portion of their lives incarcerated. To bring Congressional 
attention to this problem and in an effort to dismantle the 
cradle to prison pipeline, and replace it with a Cradle to 
College or the Workforce Pipeline, Ranking Member Scott 
introduced H.R. 2197, the Youth Prison Reduction through 
Mentoring, Intervention, Support, and Education (Youth PROMISE) 
Act in May of 2015. This bipartisan legislation would fund the 
planning and implementation of locally tailored, holistic 
continuums of evidence-based programs designed to put young 
people on the right track and keep them there.
    Committee Democrats remain committed to reauthorizing the 
Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 
(JJDPA). JJDPA provides federal money to states for the 
administration of state juvenile justice systems while also 
establishing core protections for juveniles in state systems. 
The law also authorizes prevention programs to keep young 
people from entering the juvenile justice system and 
intervention programs to prevent juvenile offenders from 
further interaction with the juvenile and criminal justice 
systems. Last updated in 2002, JJDPA has been out of 
authorization since 2007. Since fiscal year 2002, federal 
investment in these vital programs and services has decreased 
by more than 50 percent.
    In June of 2015, Ranking Member Scott introduced H.R. 2728, 
the Youth Justice Act of 2015, a comprehensive reauthorization 
of the JJDPA. The bill raised authorization levels for juvenile 
justice programs considerably and strengthened all of the core 
protections for juveniles in the system. Committee Democrats' 
persistence on the issue was pivotal in the Committee convening 
a hearing in October of 2015 on juvenile justice. In June of 
2016, the Committee held an informal roundtable with juvenile 
justice officials and service providers from around the 
country. Additionally, Committee members and staff attended 
site visits to juvenile justice facilities in the District of 
Columbia to better understand local implementation of federal 
juvenile justice programs.
    As a result of this bipartisan work, on September 8, 2016, 
Rep. Curbelo and Ranking Member Scott introduced H.R. 5963, the 
Supporting Youth Opportunity and Preventing Delinquency Act of 
2016. This comprehensive reauthorization of JJDPA sought to 
strengthen each of the federal core protections for youth in 
state systems, emphasize the use of evidence-based and trauma-
informed practices in the administration of such systems, and 
restructure grant programs for delinquency prevention to a 
model based on the Youth PROMISE Act. The bill was reported out 
of Committee unanimously and passed the U.S. House of 
Representatives 382-29 on September 22, 2016, the first time a 
JJDPA reauthorization vehicle received a vote on the floor of 
either chamber of Congress since the 2002 reauthorization. 
While efforts to pass H.R. 5963 through the Senate were 
ultimately unsuccessful, Committee Democrats look forward to 
building upon this foundation to enact a bipartisan 
comprehensive JJDPA reauthorization in the next Congress.
    Career and Technical Education. The Carl D. Perkins Career 
and Technical Education (CTE) Act provides federal support to 
state and local secondary and postsecondary education CTE 
programs that provide students the knowledge, skills, and 
experience necessary to succeed in today's competitive 
marketplace. Long overdue for reauthorization, Committee 
Republicans and Committee Democrats introduced a bipartisan 
bill, the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 
21st Century Act, H.R. 5587, which overwhelmingly passed the 
House 405-5 on September 13, 2016. Despite overwhelming 
bipartisan and constituent support for the bill, the Senate 
failed to consider and pass H.R. 5587.
    H.R. 5587 embodied Committee Democrats' commitments to 
reauthorize the law to increase alignment between CTE programs 
and careers; ensure opportunity for participation in CTE for 
underserved students; improve collaboration between secondary 
and postsecondary programs, industry, employers, and community 
partners; promote innovation in CTE programs; improve outcomes 
for students, employers, and communities; and strengthen the 
federal commitment to support delivery of high-quality CTE 
programs. Committee Democrats stand ready to resume work on a 
bipartisan reauthorization that honors these commitments in the 
next Congress.
    Higher Education. Throughout the 114th Congress, Committee 
Democrats have prioritized equity in higher education by 
fighting to improve college access, affordability, and 
completion to ensure that all students--not just those who have 
been traditionally served by higher education--receive an equal 
chance at success.
    While there are marked policy differences between Committee 
Democrats and Republicans on higher education, there were some 
areas of common ground. In July of 2015, Republican and 
Democratic members of the Committee came together to introduce 
bills to make discrete improvements in the areas of: data 
transparency (H.R. 3178, the Strengthening Transparency in 
Higher Education Act), financial aid counseling (H.R. 3179, 
Empowering Students Through Enhanced Financial Counseling Act), 
and simplification of the Free Application for Federal Student 
Aid (FAFSA) (H.R. 3177, the Simplifying the Application for 
Student Aid Act (later refiled as H.R. 5528)). In June of 2016, 
bipartisan legislation was introduced to enhance federal 
supports for institutions serving minority students, 
specifically at Hispanic-serving Institutions (H.R. 5529, the 
Accessing Higher Education Opportunities Act) and Historically 
Black Colleges and Universities (H.R. 5530, the HBCU Capital 
Financing Improvement Act). All of these bills were reported 
out of Committee and passed the U.S. House of Representatives 
unanimously, yet none have been acted on by the Senate.
    While Committee Democrats are proud of this bipartisan 
collaboration, these bills are not a substitute for a 
comprehensive rewriting of the Higher Education Act. We remain 
focused on evidence-based, results driven higher education 
policies to improve access, affordability, and completion for 
all.
    All members of the U.S. House of Representatives spoke with 
one voice when the chamber unanimously passed, in September of 
2015, H.R. 3594, the Federal Perkins Loan Program Extension Act 
of 2015, bipartisan legislation to extend the Perkins Loan 
Program. Committee Democrats believe the Perkins program is an 
important tool that gives college financial aid offices 
flexibility to tailor awards to students. Unfortunately, Senate 
amendments to H.R. 3594 made the undergraduate Perkins program 
less generous and eliminated new borrowers to the graduate 
program. In order to keep the Perkins program alive, House 
Democratic and Republican members agreed to the Senate 
amendments.
    Evidence shows that many low-income students and parents 
are deterred from even applying to college due to exorbitant 
college costs and general unawareness of federal financial aid 
that can make college more affordable. Because a college degree 
remains the greatest driver of socioeconomic mobility in 
America, Ranking Member Scott introduced H.R. 2962, the 
America's College Promise Act of 2015 to make two years of 
community college free and provide an affordable pathway to a 
four-year college degree for low-income students. Committee 
Democrats believe advancing comprehensive policy solutions to 
improve college affordability for socioeconomically 
disadvantaged students should be a nonpartisan issue, yet no 
Republican Member of Congress has signed on to this bill, which 
now has more than 110 House Democrats as cosponsors.
    Committee Democrats support Congressional action to reduce 
student loan debt by lowering interest rates or by giving 
borrowers the option to refinance their debt when lower rates 
are available. In March of 2015 Rep. Courtney introduced H.R. 
1434, the Bank on Students Emergency Loan Refinancing Act to do 
just that. The Congressional Budget Office has estimated that 
enacting this legislation would provide $50 billion in debt 
relief for student borrowers, putting money back in the pockets 
of millions of young Americans who are straining to get a 
decent start in life. The House Democratic Conference strongly 
supports the measure and believes that the federal student loan 
program should not be a source of profit for the federal 
government, with 181 House Democrats cosponsoring the 
legislation, and 173 petitioning House leadership to discharge 
the Committee on Education and the Workforce from considering 
the bill and move it directly to the House floor. Again, no 
Republican Member of Congress has signed on to either the bill 
or the discharge petition. Committee Democrats remain committed 
to advancing this policy goal through any action on 
comprehensive reauthorization of the Higher Education Act.
    Led by Committee Democrats, Democratic Members of Congress 
fought throughout the 114th Congress to protect the Pell Grant 
Program, the cornerstone of federal financial aid. Pell Grants 
provide millions of low-income students' access to higher 
education. Due to lower-than-expected program costs throughout 
the last several years, this Congress the Pell Grant program 
held a balance of $7.8 billion in funds more than necessary to 
meet current need. This excess funding became an attractive 
vehicle to fund Congressional priorities outside of the Pell 
Grant program during the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 House and Senate 
Appropriations Committee processes and subsequent omnibus 
negotiations. Committee Democrats believe that redirecting 
funds away from the Pell Grant Program would not only make 
college less affordable for millions of Americans in the short-
term, but also jeopardizes the future of the entire program. 
Committee Democrats urged Members of the Appropriations 
Committee to utilize the FY 2017 appropriations process to 
reduce the burden of college costs for students in need by 
using some of the surplus to restore year-round Pell, increase 
the maximum discretionary award, and keep any remaining funds 
in the account for the sole use of the Pell Grant program. 
Committee Democrats will remain vigilant in efforts to both 
protect Pell grant funding in the 115th Congress, and are 
hopeful Committee Republicans will join them in that effort.
    While protecting Pell Grant program funding is a worthy 
starting point, House Democrats believe Congress must improve 
the program to better meet the needs of students. Committee 
Democrats put forth several such proposals during the 114th 
Congress. Ranking Member of the Higher Education and Workforce 
Training Subcommittee, Rep. Ruben Hinojosa, introduced three 
measures to safeguard and significantly improve the program by 
removing Pell grant funding from the yearly appropriations 
process (H.R. 1956, the Pell Grant Protection Act); raising the 
grant award to cover the cost of in-state tuition and indexing 
the award to inflation (H.R. 1957, the Pell Grant Cost of 
Tuition Adjustment Act), and restoring funding for year-round 
Pell Grants (H.R. 1958, the Year-Round Pell Grant Restoration 
Act).
    Improved access to higher education provided by a robust 
investment in the Pell Grant program is meaningless if 
government and institutions fail to adequately support low-
income and first generation students to complete their degree 
programs. Research shows that one of every 10 Pell Grant 
recipients fails to refile his or her FAFSA when returning for 
their second year. A recent report found that Pell-eligible 
students were more than twice as likely as non-Pell-eligible 
students to experience difficulty obtaining their parents 
financial information. Additionally, due to the filing of both 
student and parent financial information, dependent students 
take twice as long to refile the FAFSA than independent 
students, who must provide only their own financial data. 
Financial information is useful for calculating aid eligibility 
the first time a FAFSA is filed, but because data demonstrates 
consistency in Pell award amounts for dependent students upon 
refiling, there is no need to collect this information year 
after year. To simplify the FAFSA for dependent low-income 
students, Ranking Member Scott introduced H.R. 5784, the File 
Once FAFSA Act of 2016. The legislation would allow dependent 
Pell Grant recipients to file just once before going to college 
and forgo burdensome refiling in subsequent years. This 
legislation would make it easier for nearly 3.5 million low-
income students to obtain critical Pell Grant aid.
    State disinvestment in higher education is a chief cause of 
rising college costs. Low-income students are increasingly 
forced to rely on loan rather than grant aid. This is why 
Committee Democrats have fought to ensure that all students 
have access to affordable loan repayment plans. More than 8 
million student borrowers are in default on their student 
loans, many of whom would have qualified for a lower payment in 
an existing income-driven repayment plan. In September of 2016, 
Rep. Bonamici introduced H.R. 5962, the Streamlining Income-
driven, Manageable Payments on Loans for Education (SIMPLE) 
Act, a bipartisan bill to help struggling student loan 
borrowers enroll in the most affordable repayment plans 
available to them. The legislation would also automate the 
annual process of updating borrowers' income information while 
enrolled in income-driven repayment plans, which would help 
keep payments affordable. Committee Democrats have also urged 
the U.S. Department of Education to improve the quality of 
servicing provided by federal student loan servicers and debt 
collectors.
    In many cases, borrowers who default are actually those who 
are having a difficult time finding a job that allows them to 
repay their loans. According to a national survey administered 
through the U.S. Department of Education, the overwhelming 
majority--more than 60 percent--of borrowers who default are 
students who left school with no degree. This is why in 
addition to issues of access and affordability, Committee 
Democrats have fought to improve student supports and increase 
completion rates, especially for low-income students.
    Committee Democrats recognize that meaningful 
accountability for institutional and program quality in higher 
education is needed. To hold institutions and programs 
accountable, we need better data that accounts for all 
students. Although the majority of college students are no 
longer first-time, full-time students, the data available 
through Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System 
(IPEDS)--the federal government's most comprehensive higher 
education dataset--mostly reports data only for this subset of 
students. Recognizing this shortcoming, House Democrats have 
urged the Department of Education to develop metrics that 
account for all students. In response to the Department's 
Notice of Public Rulemaking (NPRM) on revisions to the 
Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS), Ranking 
Member Scott supported proposals to collect graduation rates 
disaggregated by Pell Grant recipients and Subsidized Stafford 
Loan borrowers who did not receive a Pell Grant. Committee 
Democrats also urged the Department to gather more detailed 
data on how borrowers at risk of re-default are performing in 
repayment. Committee Democrats urge the Department to continue 
more comprehensive data collection on student outcomes, 
especially for students who have been traditionally underserved 
by higher education. Committee Democrats believe that these 
data requests are not a substitution for the collection of 
student unit level data by the Department of Education, which 
would provide Congress, states, and institutions with holistic 
information that could transform how we hold students, schools, 
loan servicers, and debt collectors accountable in higher 
education to improve quality.
    Lastly, Committee Democrats remain committed to safe and 
supportive learning environments for all postsecondary 
students. In a September 2015 Committee hearing entitled, 
``Preventing and Responding to Sexual Assault on College 
Campuses,'' Committee Democrats put forth a unified message 
that Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Clery 
Act (which includes the Campus SaVE Act when the Violence 
Against Women Act was reauthorized in 2013) and FERPA are 
fundamental tools for the Department of Education to assist 
universities, students, advocates, and others to educate, 
prevent, protect, and support students regarding campus sexual 
assault. Democrats made clear throughout the hearing that 
institutions of higher education must have processes that 
ensure the paramount principle of fundamental fairness in 
handling allegations of campus sexual assaults, and must be 
held accountable, through robust federal enforcement, for Title 
IX, Clery, and FERPA compliance. Committee Democrats will 
remain vigilant on the issue of campus sexual assault in the 
115th Congress.
    Committee Democrats have shown through their legislative 
efforts that they are ready to take on the challenges of higher 
education, whether it's making sure hardworking students are 
not penalized by their parents immigration choices (H.R. 1507, 
the IN STATE Act of 2015 introduced by Ranking Member Polis as 
well as H.R. 1959, the College Options for DREAMers Act 
introduced by Ranking Member Hinojosa); partnering with states 
to ensure continued robust investment in higher education (H.R. 
5756, the Degrees Not Debt Act introduced by Rep. Pocan), 
clearly delineating consumer protections and rights for all 
education borrowers (H.R. 1352, the Student Loan Borrowers' 
Bill of Rights Act of 2015 introduced by Ranking Member Wilson 
and H.R. 4661, the Parent PLUS Loan Improvement Act of 2016 
introduced by Ranking Member Fudge); and combating sexual 
assault on college campuses (H.R. 1490, the Survivor Outreach 
and Support ``SOS'' Campus Act introduced by Rep. Davis).
    Throughout the 114th Congress, Committee Democrats have 
spent time visiting with and learning from students, parents, 
higher education thought leaders, and colleges and 
universities. The focus of these visits were to understand how 
to help students earn college degrees in a faster timeframe by 
providing cohesive student supports. We stand ready to apply 
that learning to achieving a comprehensive reauthorization of 
the Higher Education Act that supports all students in 
accessing and completing a meaningful postsecondary degree.
    Economic Security. Even with the longest stretch of private 
sector job growth on record, during which the private sector 
added 15.6 million jobs, many American families continue to 
struggle to make ends meet. During the 114th Congress, 
Committee Democrats advocated for key legislation to improve 
the lives of working families. Many of these bills were 
packaged in a resolution, H. Res. 506. This resolution called 
for hearings and votes on H.R. 2150, Raise the Wage Act; H.R. 
3514, Workplace Action for a Growing Economy (WAGE) Act; H.R. 
3427, the Payroll Fraud Prevention Act of 2015; H.R. 3071, 
Schedules that Work Act; H.R. 932, Healthy Families Act; H.R. 
1439, Family and Medical Insurance Leave (FAMILY) Act; H.R. 
2411, Strong Start for America's Children Act of 2015; H.R. 
2654, Pregnant Workers Fairness Act; H.R. 1619, Paycheck 
Fairness Act; and H.R. 3185, Equality Act. A total of 118 
Democrats cosponsored this resolution. Yet, the Committee 
Majority refused to hold a single hearing on this legislation.
    Committee Democrats also introduced new legislation to curb 
wage theft, which is a widespread problem in America. In 2012, 
victims of wage theft recovered $933 million in stolen wages 
through complaints filed with federal, state, and local 
agencies or through private litigation.\4\ This staggering 
figure represents only a fraction of the total amount of stolen 
wages every year, which is estimated to be as much as $50 
billion nationally. Given the prevalence of this problem, it is 
critical that workers have the tools they need to fight back 
against wage theft. But employers' routine failure to provide 
pay stubs makes it extremely difficult to identify and 
prosecute wage violations. H.R. 4376, The Pay Stub Disclosure 
Act will help workers prevent and remedy wage theft by: 
providing a uniform federal pay stub requirement; requiring 
employers to provide non-exempt employees with paychecks that 
explain how their wages are calculated; providing a private 
right of action and financial remedy to employees whose rights 
to a pay stub or records inspection are violated; and codifying 
the legal presumption that if an employer fails to keep records 
of an employee's pay, the employee's own credible evidence and 
testimony about his or her pay is presumed to be true.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \4\Brady Meixell and Ross Eisenbrey. ``An Epidemic of Wage Theft is 
Costing Workers Hundreds of Millions of Dollars a Year,'' Economic 
Policy Institute, (September 11, 2014) available at: http://
www.epi.org/publication/epidemic-wage-theft-costing-workers-hundreds/.
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    In May of 2016, the Department of Labor issued a final rule 
Defining and Delimiting the Exemptions for Executive, 
Administrative, Professional, Outside Sales, and Computer 
Employees (the ``overtime rule''). The update to the overtime 
regulations restore the effectiveness of the overtime 
protections in the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) by ensuring 
that when employees work extra, they get paid extra. It does so 
by providing a much-needed update to the salary level test. 
Most salaried workers who earn under the salary threshold are 
automatically eligible for overtime pay when they work more 
than 40 hours in a week. The overtime salary threshold is 
currently $455 per week ($23,660 per year), which is below the 
poverty level for a family of four in 2014 ($24,008). It covers 
less than ten percent of the salaried workforce. In contrast, 
in 1975, over 60 percent of the workforce earned below the 
salary threshold and was thus overtime-eligible.\5\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \5\Ross Eisenbrey and Will Kimball. ``An Updated Analysis of Who 
Would Benefit from an Increased Overtime Salary Threshold,'' Economic 
Policy Institute, (June 26, 2015) available at: http://www.epi.org/
blog/an-updated-analysis-of-who-would-benefit-from-an-increased-
overtime-salary-threshold/.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The final rule raises the salary threshold to the 40th 
percentile of full-time weekly salaried earnings in the lowest 
wage Census region (the South)--$913 per week ($47,476 per 
year)--and creates a mechanism for the threshold to increase 
every three years. This update makes 4.2 million more workers 
newly eligible for overtime pay, strengthens the overtime 
rights of an additional 8.9 million workers, and raises the 
share of the salaried workforce that is eligible for overtime 
to nearly 33 percent.
    Despite the evidence that millions of working people will 
now be guaranteed access to overtime pay, the Committee 
Republicans held hearings, as well as introduced and called 
votes on legislation that would undermine the overtime rule. On 
June 9, 2016, Committee Democrats successfully defended the 
overtime rule from partisan attacks during a hearing called by 
the Majority entitled, ``The Administration's Overtime Rule and 
Its Consequences for Workers, Students, Nonprofits, and Small 
Businesses.'' Committee Republicans introduced H.R. 4773, the 
Protecting Workplace Advancement and Opportunity Act and H.J. 
Res. 95, a Congressional Review Act resolution expressing 
Congressional disapproval of the overtime rule. In addition, 
the Committee Republicans bypassed committee consideration of 
H.R. 6094, the Regulatory Relief for Small Businesses, Schools 
and Nonprofits Act and brought the bill to the floor as an 
emergency measure. This piece of legislation sought to delay 
the implementation of the overtime rule for six months and 
passed on the House Floor on a near party-line vote.
    H.R. 2150, the Raise the Wage Act, is a key priority for 
Committee Democrats. This legislation raises the minimum wage 
to $12 by 2020, phases out the tipped minimum wage, and indexes 
the minimum wage to the median wage. One hundred and seventy-
five Democrats support this legislation. At the state and local 
level, there is broad support for raising wages, but not a 
single Republican in Congress has signed onto this legislation. 
Twenty-nine states and 30 localities have raised their minimum 
wages beyond the federal minimum wage. During the 114th 
Congress there has been significant movement in cities and 
states across the country to raise wages, with increasing 
momentum behind a $15 minimum wage at the state and local 
level. In 2015, policymakers in 14 cities, counties and states 
approved $15 minimum wage laws. In 2016, California, New York 
and D.C. passed legislation to raise their minimum wages to 
$15. On Election Day 2016, voters in four states and one city 
backed ballot measures to increase the minimum wage. These 
states were Arizona, Colorado, Maine and Washington. Arizona, 
Colorado and Maine will raise their minimum wages to $12 by 
2020. Washington will raise its minimum wage to $13.50 by 2020. 
Flagstaff, Arizona will raise its minimum wage to $15 by 2021. 
The Department of Labor estimates that these increases will 
raise wages for 2.2 million workers. Despite this progress, 
workers in 21 states are still subject to the federal minimum 
wage.
    Workforce Development. In the 113th Congress, Committee 
Democrats were proud to work on the bipartisan reauthorization 
of federal workforce programs through the Workforce Innovation 
and Opportunity Act (WIOA). With WIOA implementation fully 
underway in the 114th Congress, Committee Democrats are even 
more committed to ensuring that our nation's workforce 
development system is working. Committee Democrats understand 
that now more than ever, effective education and workforce 
development opportunities are critical to building a stronger 
middle class.
    Committee Democrats continued their commitment to improving 
employment opportunities for young Americans, introducing and 
supporting H.R. 6117, the Opening Doors for Youth Act of 2016. 
An estimated 5.25 million young people between the ages of 16 
and 24 are disconnected from both school and work. These 
disconnected youth are three times more likely than other youth 
to have a disability; twice as likely to live below the federal 
poverty threshold; and significantly more likely to live in 
racially segregated neighborhoods. Disconnected young women and 
girls are three times more likely to have a child and young 
people involved in the juvenile justice system or aging out of 
the foster care system are at high risk of disconnection. 
Disconnection during this critical period can leave young 
people without the entry-level work experience and 
postsecondary credentials they need to succeed in the 
workforce. Disconnection also imposes significant costs on 
affected young people, their communities and the overall 
economy. Disconnected young people are also commonly referred 
to as ``opportunity youth'' because of the tremendous potential 
they possess. Young people from high-poverty, low-opportunity 
communities may need a range of supports to overcome barriers 
to reengaging in school or training and stay on the path to a 
good job. The Opening Doors for Youth Act of 2016 expands 
opportunities for our nation's at-risk and opportunity youth by 
putting more than one million young people to work and 
supporting community efforts to keep youth connected to school 
and training.
    Committee Democrats led the effort to expand and promote 
registered apprenticeships--a proven approach to successful on 
the job training--and pre-apprenticeship programs by 
introducing H.R. 5635, the Leveraging Effective Apprenticeships 
to Rebuild National Skills (LEARNS) Act. By 2020, the U.S. will 
experience a shortage of three million skilled workers with 
postsecondary credentials and an aging workforce of highly-
skilled workers.\6\ In addition, it is predicted that almost 65 
percent of jobs will require postsecondary education by 2020. 
Registered apprenticeships, a training model in which workers 
are paid to receive on-the-job training, provide a much-needed 
solution.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \6\Ben Olinsky and Sarah Ayers. ``Training for Success: A Policy to 
Expand Apprenticeships in the United States,'' The Center for American 
Progress, (December 2013) available at: https://
cdn.americanprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/
apprenticeship_report.pdf.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The LEARNS Act will support a closer alignment between 
registered apprenticeship programs, employers and other program 
sponsors offering good jobs, increase the attainment of 
recognized postsecondary credentials by program participants, 
create national standards for registered apprenticeship 
programs, and establish a permanent advisory council at the 
Department of Labor to oversee the actions and implementation 
of registered apprenticeship programs.
    Workers' Rights. Since the Majority took control in the 
112th Congress, the Majority has held 24 hearings and markups 
criticizing the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) and 
assailing labor unions. During this session, Committee 
Republicans moved four pieces of anti-labor legislation, which 
include: (1) passing by a vote of 249-177 the Tribal Labor 
Sovereignty Act, H.R. 511, which strips workers employed at 
tribal enterprises on tribal lands of their rights under the 
National Labor Relations Act (NLRA); (2) reporting the 
Protecting Local Business Opportunity Act, H.R. 3549, which 
overturns a recent NLRB decision that reinstates the common law 
of agency in defining who is a ``joint employer'' under the 
NLRA, and adopts in its place a far narrower definition that 
allows putative employers to remain hidden and avoid bargaining 
with employees even though they control the terms of 
employment; (3) passed by a vote of 232-186 a Congressional 
Review Act (CRA) Resolution of Disapproval, S.J. Res 8, 
regarding the NLRB's revised election procedures which 
streamlined the process for conducting union representation 
elections; and (4) reported a Resolution of Disapproval, H.J. 
Res 87, regarding the Department of Labor's Persuader Rule, 
which requires union-avoidance consultants and employers to 
disclose their arrangements covering ``indirect'' as well as 
``direct'' persuader activity. The President vetoed the 
Resolution of Disapproval regarding the NLRB's election 
procedures and issued a Statement of Administration Policy 
opposing the enactment of the Tribal Labor Sovereignty Act 
because it undermined collective bargaining rights.
    Taken together, these bills undermine workers' rights while 
doing nothing to improve workers' lives, give them a voice at 
work, or increase their economic security. Moreover, these 
bills and resolutions represent a frontal assault on the key 
purposes of the NLRA, which include:
           Encouraging the practice and procedures of 
        collective bargaining, and
           Protecting the exercise by workers of full 
        freedom of association, self-organization and 
        designation of representatives of their own choosing, 
        for the purposes of negotiating the terms and 
        conditions of their employment or other mutual aid or 
        protection.
    As an alternative, Committee Democrats proposed the WAGE 
Act, H.R. 3514, a bill to strengthen workers' right to organize 
unions by establishing meaningful deterrents for violations of 
labor law. It does so by establishing civil monetary penalties 
for violations, authorizing treble damages for lost wages, and 
providing a private right of action for workers who face 
workplace discrimination for exercising their rights under 
NLRA. Committee Democrats also proposed the Workplace Democracy 
Act, H.R. 3690, which allows workers to unionize through either 
an election or a majority card-check and, requires binding 
arbitration for a first contract, if an agreement cannot be 
reached in a reasonable time period.
    Democrats have supported the NLRB's Columbia University 
decision which designates teaching and research assistants at 
private universities and colleges as employees under the NLRA, 
and thus makes them eligible to form a union and bargain over 
wages, benefits and working conditions.
    Mine Safety and Health. In light of the lessons learned 
from the April 2010 Upper Big Branch (UBB) mine disaster, 
Committee Democrats have called for a bipartisan effort to 
update the 40-year old Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 
1977. That explosion was the worst coal mining accident in the 
U.S. in the past 40 years. The Assistant Secretary of Labor for 
Mine Safety has repeatedly asked Congress to enact reforms that 
would give the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) 
additional tools to protect miners, including subpoena 
authority, stronger criminal sanctions, and the means to 
collect overdue fines from scofflaws who refuse to pay their 
fines. In response, Democrats introduced the Robert C. Byrd 
Mine Safety Protection Act of 2015, H.R. 1926, which, amongst 
its provisions, strengthens criminal sanctions in the Mine Act 
by making it a felony to knowingly violate mine safety 
standards and recklessly expose miners to risk of injury, 
illness, or death.
    By contrast, Committee Republicans have stalled for the 
past 6 years, stating that they wanted to wait for all of the 
UBB accident investigation reports to be completed before 
taking action. Six investigation reports have long been 
finalized; the last report was released nearly five years ago 
in February 2012. A Committee hearing was held in the 112th 
Congress to review these reports. No mine safety hearings were 
held in the 113th Congress. During an oversight hearing in the 
114th Congress, the Assistant Secretary reiterated his support 
for legislative reforms, but to no avail.
    Rather than work to protect miner safety, Committee 
Republicans have challenged the feasibility of MSHA's long-
overdue respirable dust rule, which is aimed at ending the 
scourge of black lung disease. In the two years since it was 
issued, this rule has reduced average coal dust levels and 
improved compliance by requiring real time exposure monitoring 
through new technology. Committee Democrats have supported 
MSHA's efforts to end black lung disease--a workplace illness 
which has already taken the lives of 70,000 coal miners.
    Occupational Safety and Health. According to the Bureau of 
Labor Statistics (BLS), 4,836 workers were killed on the job in 
2015--an average of 13 workers a day. For some groups of 
workers the problem is getting worse. Deaths among Latino and 
immigrant workers increased significantly, as did deaths in 
dangerous industries like construction and trucking. In 2015 at 
least 3.65 million workers incurred occupational injuries or 
illnesses, according to BLS. Disabling injuries cost the 
economy between $159 and $318 billion in both direct and 
indirect costs. To reduce health and safety risks to workers, 
Committee Democrats:
           Supported a rule issued by the Occupational 
        Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to protect 2.3 
        million workers--mostly in construction-- who are at 
        risk of contracting silicosis, lung cancer and renal 
        disease caused by excess inhalation of crystalline 
        silica;
           Called upon OSHA to develop a comprehensive 
        workplace violence prevention standard to protect 
        workers in America's health care and social service 
        workplaces, following the release of a Government 
        Accountability Office (GAO) report which documented 
        that workplace violence is a serious concern for 15 
        million health care workers, and that violence 
        prevention programs are effective;\7\ and
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \7\Government Accountability Office. Workplace Safety and Health: 
Additional Efforts Needed to Help Protect Health Care Workers from 
Workplace Violence (GAO 16-11), (March 17, 2016) available at: http://
www.gao.gov/products/GAO-16-11.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
           Supported an OSHA recordkeeping rule which, 
        in addition making workplace injury statistics 
        transparent to the public, protects workers from 
        retaliation for reporting workplace injuries and 
        illness. The need for this rule was underscored by a 
        GAO report, which found that workers in meat and 
        poultry plants continue to face unsafe working 
        conditions, and confirms that many injuries and 
        illnesses go underreported as workers may fear for 
        their jobs if they report an injury.\8\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \8\Government Accountability Office. Workplace Safety and Health: 
Additional Data Needed to Address Continued Hazards in the Meat and 
Poultry Industry (GAO 16-337), (April 25, 2016) available at: http://
www.gao.gov/products/GAO-16-337.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Democrats believe our nation's job safety laws must be 
strengthened. The Protecting America's Workers Act (H.R. 2090) 
would bring the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 into 
the 21st century by requiring employers to promptly abate 
safety violations, expand OSHA coverage for millions of state 
and local government workers, and modernize whistleblower 
protections. The Offshore Oil and Gas Worker Whistleblower 
Protection Act of 2015 (H.R. 2824) would implement a key 
recommendation from the National Commission on the Deepwater 
Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling to provide these 
workers with protections from retaliation if they blow the 
whistle on unsafe work practices. In the 114th Congress, 
however, the Majority has taken no legislative action to 
improve workplace safety and health.
    Rather than enacting pro-worker safety laws, Committee 
Republicans used its hearings to object to OSHA's new standard 
to prevent silicosis, challenged OSHA's guidance to prevent 
chemical accidents, and opposed a rule that requires certain 
employers in higher hazard workplaces to electronically 
transmit their injury logs or summaries to OSHA.
    Workers' Compensation Programs. The Committee has held no 
hearings on the Black Lung Benefits Act since 1991, despite the 
revelations over the past several years of unfair tactics being 
used by coal operators and their law firms to defeat black lung 
claims by miners and their survivors. A Pulitzer Prize winning 
investigation revealed how coal operators have defeated black 
lung claims by hiring doctors at prestigious medical centers 
who systematically misread lung x-rays that clearly showed the 
most advanced stages of black lung disease. This investigation 
showed that defense law firms also withheld medical evidence 
from miners, surviving spouses, and judges that would have 
proven the claimants' eligibility for benefits. One medical 
center shut down its x-ray reading program, but has yet to 
release its internal investigation report.
    Hearings are also needed to assess the future solvency of 
the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund in light of decreasing 
excise tax revenues due to reduced coal production, a 
forthcoming 55% cut in the coal excise tax rate in December of 
2018, and an increase in claims being shifted from the 
responsible operators to the Trust Fund due to coal operator 
bankruptcies. Congress also needs to assess the backlog of 
black lung and other claims in the DOL's Office of 
Administrative Law Judges (ALJ). There is 35-month backlog for 
contested black lung claims.
    To gather information, Committee Democrats have hosted two 
roundtables with coal miners and black lung experts who 
examined how the claims process has been tilted against 
claimants by a disparity in medical and legal resources between 
coal miners and well-financed coal companies. Miners also 
expressed concern about delay in the claims adjudication 
process. To help level the playing field, Committee Democrats, 
in conjunction with Representative Matt Cartwright, introduced 
the Black Lung Benefits Improvement Act of 2015, H.R. 3625 to 
reform the program, so that claimants who have meritorious 
claims will actually gain the benefits that they are entitled 
to under the law. Committee Democrats, in conjunction with the 
Ways and Means Committee, asked the GAO to assess the future 
solvency of the Trust Fund. Committee Democrats have worked to 
eliminate delays in claims adjudication by securing funding for 
additional ALJs as part of appropriations bills.
    Federal Employees' Compensation Act. Committee Democrats 
have conducted oversight of the rapidly growing costs of 
compounded prescription drugs under the Federal Employees' 
Compensation Act (FECA), and recommended that the DOL adopt 
administrative tools that have been used successfully by other 
agencies to control provider fraud. Committee Democrats also 
evaluated the Administration's legislative proposals to cut 
workers' compensation benefits under the FECA. Testimony 
provided by GAO and the National Association of Letter Carriers 
at a May 15, 2015 hearing before the Subcommittee on Workforce 
Protections revealed that the Administration's stated rationale 
for proposing deep benefit cuts to injured workers at 
retirement age lacked merit, and that proposed changes raised 
fairness questions. Committee Democrats have worked to ensure 
that federal and postal workers who are injured in the line of 
duty will not be economically worse off than if they had not 
been injured in the first place, while also protecting 
taxpayers' interests through necessary program integrity 
measures.
    Health Care. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) is providing 
greater health care security for millions of American workers 
and their families. Because of the ACA, 20 million previously 
uninsured Americans now have health coverage.\9\ For the first 
time ever, less than 9 percent of Americans are uninsured--with 
the uninsured rate currently at 8.6 percent.\10\ Coverage for 
the 150 million Americans with insurance through their employer 
now comes with important consumer protections. Due to the ACA, 
all health plans now have limits on out-of-pocket costs, 
benefiting 22 million people with employer coverage who lacked 
this protection prior to the ACA.\11\ Since the enactment of 
the ACA, for most Americans, the growth in premiums has slowed 
considerably. For the 155 million Americans with employer 
coverage, the average family premium for employer coverage rose 
only 3.4 percent in 2016--compared to an average annual rate of 
7.9 percent from 2000 to 2010.\12\ Women can no longer be 
charged more than men, people with preexisting conditions 
cannot be denied coverage or charged exorbitant prices, and 
children up to 26 years of age can stay on a parent's insurance 
policy. Preventive services--like contraception and recommended 
cancer screenings and vaccines--must now be covered with no 
out-of-pocket costs. The ACA also provided one of the largest 
expansions of mental health and substance use disorder coverage 
in a generation, by requiring mental health and substance use 
disorder benefits to be comparable to physical health benefits.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \9\Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation: 
ASPE. Health Insurance Coverage and the Affordable Care Act, (September 
22, 2015) available at: https://aspe.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/pdf/
111826/ACA%20health%20insurance%20coverage%20brief%2009212015.pdf.
    \10\Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Health Insurance 
Coverage: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview 
Survey, (September 2016) available at: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/
nhis/earlyrelease/insur201609.pdf.
    \11\Council of Economic Advisors. New Data Show that Premium Growth 
in Employer Coverage Remained Low in 2016, (September 14, 2016) 
available at: https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2016/09/14/new-data-show-
premium-growth-employer-coverage-remained-low-2016.
    \12\Id.
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    Despite these gains, since the ACA was signed into law, it 
has come under constant attack by the Majority, which has held 
dozens of hearings to criticize the law and have brought more 
than 60 votes to repeal it to the House Floor. Instead of 
trying to work with Democrats to make improvements to the law 
where necessary, the Majority has been singularly focused on 
destroying the ACA and taking away millions of Americans' 
opportunity to access health care for the first time.
    Most egregiously, in the 114th Congress, the Republican 
Budget Resolution called on Committees--including the Education 
and the Workforce Committee--to repeal the Affordable Care Act 
using reconciliation. This was just one of the many Republican 
efforts to repeal or undo the ACA. Their repeal efforts are a 
bridge to nowhere for millions of families and their children. 
In these uncertain times, working people in America value the 
safety and security of health coverage more than ever. The 30 
million Americans who would lose their health coverage if the 
Affordable Care Act is repealed need care, not chaos. Repealing 
the ACA without a plan to replace it is not a risk our families 
can afford to take. Committee Democrats remain committed to 
protecting access to health coverage as a right, not a 
privilege.
    Civil Rights. Committee Democrats believe that everyone 
deserves a shot at success and that everyone should enjoy equal 
access and opportunity in our country. Committee Democrats 
support the Fair Chance to Compete for Jobs Act of 2015, H.R. 
3470, legislation that prohibits federal agencies and 
contractors from inquiring about the criminal history 
information of a candidate until he or she is given a 
conditional offer of employment. This bill reinforces the basic 
concepts of a fair chance and individual assessments by calling 
for the federal government to join 24 states, 150 localities, 
and numerous private businesses in providing fair consideration 
to applicants with a criminal history, rather than dismissing 
them from consideration outright, as happens all too often.
    Committee Democrats also joined 178 bipartisan cosponsors 
to support the Equality Act, H.R. 3185. The bill would amend 
the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and other key laws to make clear 
that LBGT is a statutorily protected class regarding workplace 
discrimination in hiring, promotions, termination, or 
harassment. Committee Democrats were among the 23 Senators and 
105 House Members that joined an amicus curiae brief in the 
case of Christiansen v. Omnicom Group to urge the Second 
Circuit to rule that sexual orientation-based discrimination is 
prohibited by the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The case and brief 
build on the EEOC's reliance on Supreme Court precedents that 
discrimination based on sex stereotypes is a violation of Title 
VII of the Civil Rights Act.
    Committee Democrats fought off Republican efforts to weaken 
EEOC's enforcement powers at a legislative hearing that 
promoted bills to mandate posting requirements for the EEOC 
(H.R. 550); limit the Commission's disparate impact analysis 
(H.R. 548); restrict the General Counsel's authority to select 
cases (H.R. 549); and exempt employers who offer wellness plans 
through health care providers from liability claims arising 
from the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Genetic 
Information Non-Discrimination Act (H.R. 1189). Fortunately, 
none of the bills were advanced out of the Committee.
    Committee Democrats joined other Congressional colleagues 
in submitting an amicus curiae brief in the Zubik v. Burwell 
case before the U.S. Supreme Court. In that case, petitioners 
challenged the accommodations provided by the Department of 
Health and Human Services to permit employers to exclude 
contraceptive coverage from their health insurance plans in 
certain circumstances where employers had a religious objection 
to providing coverage. Committee Democrats objected to the 
petitioners' argument which was built largely on a prior case, 
Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, which allows certain, small companies 
to circumvent the contraceptive coverage requirement under the 
ACA, if the owners have a religious objection. Committee 
Democrats are committed to ensuring that employers' religious 
beliefs are not used as a discriminatory tool against 
employees. To that end, Committee Democrats also introduced the 
Do No Harm Act, H.R, 5272, to limit the Religion Freedom 
Restoration Act's use as a sword to nullify laws that protect 
equal opportunity, workplace safety, and health care.
    Committee Democrats commented in support of the proposed 
rules issued by the EEOC in support of the Commission's 
proposal (81 Federal Register 5113) to collect aggregate pay 
and hour data through its Employer Information Report (EEO-1) 
form.
    Committee Democrats wrote a letter to the EEOC regarding 
proposed rules pertaining to wellness programs allowed under 
the ACA. The letter states that these wellness programs must 
coexist with robust civil rights protections that do not 
undermine the privacy protections afforded under the Americans 
with Disabilities Act and Genetic Information Non-
Discrimination Act. Committee Democrats also requested that the 
EEOC provide education, training, and technical assistance, to 
address the unique vulnerability of isolated workers to sexual 
violence in the janitorial services and agricultural 
industries.
    To ensure equal representation in growing and in-demand 
fields, Committee Democrats have taken various steps to examine 
and address the lack of diversity in the technology sector. In 
December of 2015, Committee Democrats requested that the EEOC 
examine this issue and in May of 2016, the EEOC released its 
Diversity in Tech report. The report served as the basis for a 
September 27, 2016 roundtable hosted by Committee Democrats 
which included representatives from the government and private 
sectors, as well as economists and educators. Committee 
Democrats and the roundtable participants explored: the role of 
the federal government in promoting equal opportunity in the 
technology sector, the economic issues and impact of the lack 
of diversity in the tech sector, concrete steps the sector can 
take or is taking to address the issue of diversity, the extent 
to which H1-B visas exacerbate the diversity problem, and how 
academic institutions and industry engagement can address the 
pipeline and diversity issues.
    Additionally, Committee Democrats continue to conduct 
oversight on the Office of Federal Contract Compliance 
Programs' enforcement of Executive Order 11246 as it applies to 
high-tech companies that have received federal contract and 
subcontracts. At the request of Committee Democrats, the U.S. 
Commission on Civil Rights voted on December 2, 2016 to examine 
the lack of diversity in the tech sector and the federal 
government's enforcement of Executive Order 11246. Finally, 
Committee Democrats joined Judiciary and Oversight and 
Government Reform Committee Democrats to ask the GAO to conduct 
an investigation of the federal government's effectiveness in 
improving diversity in the STEM fields and to assess the trends 
in racial, ethnic, and gender diversity in the workforce at 
leading U.S. technology companies, including those that 
contract with the federal government.
    Pensions and Retirement Security. The retirement savings 
and planning landscape has changed significantly over the past 
several decades. 401(k) plans and IRAs largely replaced 
traditional defined-benefit pension plans, which shifted the 
decision-making and investment risks from employers to 
individual workers and retirees. As a result, many Americans 
rely on professional investment advice to invest their 
retirement nest egg and ensure they do not outlive what they 
have saved. Over the course of several years, the Department of 
Labor (DOL) worked to close loopholes in existing law allowing 
unscrupulous financial advisors to provide ``conflicted 
advice'' and put their financial interests ahead of their 
retirement clients'. According to the White House Council on 
Economic Advisors, conflicted advice costs retirement plan 
participants $17 billion in losses every year and could result 
in a loss of almost a quarter of an individual's savings over a 
35-year period.\13\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \13\Council of Economic Advisors. The Effects of Conflicted 
Investment Advice on Retirement Savings, (February 2015) available at: 
https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/docs/
cea_coi_report_final.pdf.
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    During the 114th Congress, Committee Republicans repeatedly 
sought to criticize, undermine and nullify the DOL's 
responsible conflict of interest (COI) rulemaking effort.
    In June and December of 2015, the HELP Subcommittee held 
hearings on the DOL's then-draft COI rule. In February of 2016, 
the Education and the Workforce Committee considered H.R. 4293, 
Affordable Retirement Advice Protection Act, and H.R. 4294, 
SAVERS Act of 2015. These bills perpetuated the unacceptable 
status-quo and included an unnecessary, constitutionally-
suspect procedural mechanism that prohibited the DOL's final 
conflict of interest rule from taking effect unless it was 
approved by Congress within 60 days. Ranking Member Scott and 
Committee Democrats opposed both H.R. 4293 and H.R. 4294.
    In April of 2016, the DOL issued its final COI rule. Less 
than two weeks after the rule was finalized and published in 
the Federal Register, Committee Republicans hastily advanced a 
Congressional Review Act (CRA) joint resolution of disapproval 
of the DOL's final COI rule (H.J. Res. 88). Ranking Member 
Scott and Committee Democrats opposed H.J. Res. 88 and argued 
that the DOL's final COI rule helps protect workers' hard-
earned savings and ensures financial advisors act in the best 
interests of their retirement clients. Additionally, Ranking 
Member Scott and Committee Democrats pointed out that the DOL's 
final COI rule resulted from a thoughtful, thorough, and 
transparent multi-year process.
    Ranking Member Scott and Committee Democrats strongly 
believe that, after a lifetime of hard work, Americans deserve 
a secure and dignified retirement. To that end, throughout the 
114th Congress, Ranking Member Scott and Committee Democrats 
have supported responsible efforts to strengthen and expand 
access to workplace retirement savings opportunities.
    Older Americans. In addition to retirement security, there 
are a variety of challenges facing the aging population and 
their family members serving as caregivers. For example, 
Committees Democrats continue to urge Committee action to 
prevent age discrimination. In the 114th Congress, the 
Committee came together to pass a bipartisan reauthorization of 
the Older Americans Act (OAA), originally passed in 1965. The 
Older Americans Act Reauthorization Act of 2016, S. 192, makes 
necessary improvements to the programs that serve our nation's 
seniors and their families. It is imperative that the Committee 
continues to ensure that these programs are effectively 
implemented and are provided with the funding necessary in 
order to reach the growing number of elderly Americans who need 
OAA services. Unfortunately, a stagnant funding trend and 
Congress's reliance on a continuing resolution for the 
beginning of FY 2017 places these needed authorized funding 
increases at risk. Committee Democrats will continue to work 
toward enhancing and protecting programs and services that 
assist older Americans.
    Responsible Contracting. Committee Democrats defended the 
integrity of Executive Order 13673 on Fair Pay and Safe 
Workplaces at a joint hearing before the Workforce Protections 
and Health, Employment, Labor, and Pensions Subcommittees on 
February 26, 2015. Committee Democrats rejected Committee 
Republicans' mischaracterization of the executive order by 
making clear that its aim is to improve the federal contracting 
process by ensuring that prospective contractors' history of 
violations with regard to employment, labor, anti-
discrimination, and safety laws are disclosed and evaluated by 
contracting officers when selecting a contractor. The Executive 
Order seeks to ensure that taxpayer dollars are not used to 
award contracts to unscrupulous companies that have a pervasive 
practice of engaging in wage theft, cheating workers out of 
overtime, or putting workers' safety in jeopardy. Specifically, 
the Department of Labor offered an extensive comment and review 
period to ensure that responsible contractors are not unfairly 
undercut by contractors who cut corners and treat violations of 
labor laws as the cost of doing business.
    Committee Democrats and House Armed Services Committee 
Democrats worked to secure the removal of Section 1095 of the 
House version of FY 2017 National Defense Authorization Act 
(and Senate Section 829) which would have eliminated or 
diminished the application of the Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces 
Executive Order to defense contractors. Committee Democrats 
worked closely with the House Armed Services Committee 
Democrats to remove Section 1094 of the House version of FY 
2017 National Defense Authorization Act, which was misleadingly 
labeled, ``Protections Relating to Civil Rights and 
Disabilities.'' With a total of 89 House Members, Committee 
Democrats called for the removal of this section which would 
have allowed contractors that are religious organizations to 
circumvent workplace non-discrimination provisions under the 
Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Americans with Disabilities 
Act, allowing private religious employers to discriminate in 
hiring using federal funds.
                                   Robert C. ``Bobby'' Scott,
                                           Ranking Member.
                                   Susan A. Davis.
                                   Joe Courtney.
                                   Jared Polis.
                                   Frederica S. Wilson.
                                   Mark Pocan.
                                   Hakeem S. Jeffries.
                                   Alma S. Adams.
                                   Ruben Hinojosa.
                                   Raul M. Grijalva.
                                   Marcia L. Fudge.
                                   Gregorio Kilili Camacho Sablan.
                                   Suzanne Bonamici.
                                   Mark Takano.
                                   Katherine M. Clark.
                                   Mark DeSaulnier.

                                  [all]